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Sample records for intestinal epithelial barrier

  1. Enteric glial cells and their role in the intestinal epithelial barrier

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Yan-Bo; Li, Yan-Qing

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium constitutes a physical and functional barrier between the external environment and the host organism. It is formed by a continuous monolayer of intestinal epithelial cells maintained together by intercellular junctional complex, limiting access of pathogens, toxins and xenobiotics to host tissues. Once this barrier integrity is disrupted, inflammatory disorders and tissue injury are initiated and perpetuated. Beneath the intestinal epithelial cells lies a population ...

  2. Enteric glial cells and their role in the intestinal epithelial barrier.

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    Yu, Yan-Bo; Li, Yan-Qing

    2014-08-28

    The intestinal epithelium constitutes a physical and functional barrier between the external environment and the host organism. It is formed by a continuous monolayer of intestinal epithelial cells maintained together by intercellular junctional complex, limiting access of pathogens, toxins and xenobiotics to host tissues. Once this barrier integrity is disrupted, inflammatory disorders and tissue injury are initiated and perpetuated. Beneath the intestinal epithelial cells lies a population of astrocyte-like cells that are known as enteric glia. The morphological characteristics and expression markers of these enteric glia cells were identical to the astrocytes of the central nervous system. In the past few years, enteric glia have been demonstrated to have a trophic and supporting relationship with intestinal epithelial cells. Enteric glia lesions and/or functional defects can be involved in the barrier dysfunction. Besides, factors secreted by enteric glia are important for the regulation of gut barrier function. Moreover, enteric glia have an important impact on epithelial cell transcriptome and induce a shift in epithelial cell phenotype towards increased cell adhesion and cell differentiation. Enteric glia can also preserve epithelial barrier against intestinal bacteria insult. In this review, we will describe the current body of evidence supporting functional roles of enteric glia on intestinal barrier.

  3. Intestinal epithelial barrier function and tight junction proteins with heat and exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dokladny, Karol; Zuhl, Micah N; Moseley, Pope L

    2016-01-01

    (passive hyperthermia) heat stress on tight junction barrier function in in vitro and in vivo (animals and humans) models. Our secondary focus is to review changes in tight junction proteins in response to exercise or hyperthermic conditions. Finally, we discuss some pharmacological or nutritional...... interventions that may affect the cellular mechanisms involved in maintaining homeostasis of the intestinal epithelial tight junction barrier during heat stress or exercise....... permeation of luminal antigens, endotoxins, and bacteria into the blood stream. Various substances and conditions have been shown to affect the maintenance of the intestinal epithelial tight junction barrier. The primary focus of the present review is to analyze the effects of exertional or nonexertional...

  4. Bovine dairy complex lipids improve in vitro measures of small intestinal epithelial barrier integrity.

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    Anderson, Rachel C; MacGibbon, Alastair K H; Haggarty, Neill; Armstrong, Kelly M; Roy, Nicole C

    2018-01-01

    Appropriate intestinal barrier maturation is essential for absorbing nutrients and preventing pathogens and toxins from entering the body. Compared to breast-fed infants, formula-fed infants are more susceptible to barrier dysfunction-associated illnesses. In infant formula dairy lipids are usually replaced with plant lipids. We hypothesised that dairy complex lipids improve in vitro intestinal epithelial barrier integrity. We tested milkfat high in conjugated linoleic acid, beta serum (SureStart™Lipid100), beta serum concentrate (BSC) and a ganglioside-rich fraction (G600). Using Caco-2 cells as a model of the human small intestinal epithelium, we analysed the effects of the ingredients on trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER), mannitol flux, and tight junction protein co-localisation. BSC induced a dose-dependent improvement in TEER across unchallenged cell layers, maintained the co-localisation of tight junction proteins in TNFα-challenged cells with increased permeability, and mitigated the TEER-reducing effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). G600 also increased TEER across healthy and LPS-challenged cells, but it did not alter the co-location of tight junction proteins in TNFα-challenged cells. SureStart™Lipid100 had similar TEER-increasing effects to BSC when added at twice the concentration (similar lipid concentration). Ultimately, this research aims to contribute to the development of infant formulas supplemented with dairy complex lipids that support infant intestinal barrier maturation.

  5. Oral activated charcoal adsorbent (AST-120) ameliorates chronic kidney disease-induced intestinal epithelial barrier disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaziri, Nosratola D; Yuan, Jun; Khazaeli, Mahyar; Masuda, Yuichi; Ichii, Hirohito; Liu, Shuman

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) impairs intestinal barrier function which by allowing influx of noxious products causes systemic inflammation. We have recently shown that intestinal barrier dysfunction in CKD is due to degradation of epithelial tight junction (TJ) which is, in part, mediated by influx of urea and its conversion to ammonia by microbial urease. We hypothesized that by adsorbing urea and urea-derived ammonia, oral activated charcoal (AST-120) may ameliorate CKD-induced intestinal epithelial barrier disruption and systemic inflammation. Rats were randomized to the CKD or control groups. The CKD group was fed a chow containing 0.7% adenine for 2 weeks. They were then randomized to receive a chow with or without AST-120 (4 g/kg/day) for 2 weeks. Rats consuming regular diet served as controls. Animals were then euthanized, colons were removed and processed for Western blot and immunohistology, and plasma was used to measure endotoxin and oxidative and inflammatory markers. Compared with the controls, the untreated CKD rats showed elevated plasma endotoxin, IL-6, TNF-α, MCP-1, CINC-3, L-selectin, ICAM-1, and malondialdehyde, and depletions of colonic epithelial TJ proteins, claudin-1, occludin, and ZO1. Administration of AST-120 resulted in partial restoration of the epithelial TJ proteins and reduction in plasma endotoxin and markers of oxidative stress and inflammation. CKD animals exhibited depletion of the key protein constituents of the colonic epithelial TJ which was associated with systemic inflammation, oxidative stress and endotoxemia. Administration of AST-120 attenuated uremia-induced disruption of colonic epithelial TJ and the associated endotoxemia, oxidative stress and inflammation. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Hypoxia Inducible Factor (HIF Hydroxylases as Regulators of Intestinal Epithelial Barrier FunctionSummary

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    Mario C. Manresa

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Human health is dependent on the ability of the body to extract nutrients, fluids, and oxygen from the external environment while at the same time maintaining a state of internal sterility. Therefore, the cell layers that cover the surface areas of the body such as the lung, skin, and gastrointestinal mucosa provide vital semipermeable barriers that allow the transport of essential nutrients, fluid, and waste products, while at the same time keeping the internal compartments free of microbial organisms. These epithelial surfaces are highly specialized and differ in their anatomic structure depending on their location to provide appropriate and effective site-specific barrier function. Given this important role, it is not surprising that significant disease often is associated with alterations in epithelial barrier function. Examples of such diseases include inflammatory bowel disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and atopic dermatitis. These chronic inflammatory disorders often are characterized by diminished tissue oxygen levels (hypoxia. Hypoxia triggers an adaptive transcriptional response governed by hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs, which are repressed by a family of oxygen-sensing HIF hydroxylases. Here, we review recent evidence suggesting that pharmacologic hydroxylase inhibition may be of therapeutic benefit in inflammatory bowel disease through the promotion of intestinal epithelial barrier function through both HIF-dependent and HIF-independent mechanisms. Keywords: Epithelial Barrier, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Hypoxia, Hypoxia-Inducible Factor (HIF Hydroxylases

  7. Low uptake of silica nanoparticles in Caco-2 intestinal epithelial barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Dong; Bramini, Mattia; Hristov, Delyan R; Wan, Sha; Salvati, Anna; Åberg, Christoffer; Dawson, Kenneth A

    2017-01-01

    Cellular barriers, such as the skin, the lung epithelium or the intestinal epithelium, constitute one of the first obstacles facing nanomedicines or other nanoparticles entering organisms. It is thus important to assess the capacity of nanoparticles to enter and transport across such barriers. In this work, Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells were used as a well-established model for the intestinal barrier, and the uptake, trafficking and translocation of model silica nanoparticles of different sizes were investigated using a combination of imaging, flow cytometry and transport studies. Compared to typical observations in standard cell lines commonly used for in vitro studies, silica nanoparticle uptake into well-developed Caco-2 cellular barriers was found to be very low. Instead, nanoparticle association to the apical outer membrane was substantial and these particles could easily be misinterpreted as internalised in the absence of imaging. Passage of nanoparticles through the barrier was very limited, suggesting that the low amount of internalised nanoparticles was due to reduced uptake into cells, rather than a considerable transport through them.

  8. Time course study of intestinal epithelial barrier disruption in acute mesenteric venous thrombosis.

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    Yang, Shuofei; Chen, Jiaquan; Ni, Qihong; Qi, Haozhe; Guo, Xiangjiang; Zhang, Lan; Xue, Guanhua

    2018-04-01

    Acute superior mesenteric venous thrombosis (ASMVT) is an abdominal vascular condition. Early recanalization is essential to successful treatment. The aim of the study was to establish rabbit models of ASMVT and assess the time course of intestinal epithelial barrier disruption. After surgical exposure of superior mesenteric vein (Sham group), large-vessel (L-group) and small-vessel (S-group) models were established by endothelium damage, stenosis creation, and thrombin injection. At baseline, 6, 9, and 12 h, hemodynamic and serum parameters were tested. Serum from ASMVT patients diagnosed at 24, 36, 48, and 60 h from symptom onset was collected. Intestinal barrier disruption was assessed by tight junction (TJ) protein expression, morphology changes, and bacterial translocation. Mesenteric arteriospasm was measured by flow velocity and intestinal wet/dry weight ratio. The serum level of intestinal fatty acid-binding protein and endotoxin in patients was also measured as an indicator for intestinal barrier function. Severe acidosis and lacticemia were observed in both the groups. The L-group experienced greater hemodynamic alteration than the S-group. Intestinal barrier disruption was detected by significantly decreased TJ protein expression, histology and ultrastructure injury of TJ, increased permeability, and bacterial translocation, at 9 h in the S-group and 12 h in the L-group. Secondary mesenteric arteriospasm occurred at the same time of complete intestinal barrier disruption and could be a significant cause of bowel necrosis. Significant increased level of intestinal fatty acid-binding protein and endotoxin was found in patients at 48 h in the S-group type and 60 h in the L-group type. The ASMVT animal models of both the types were first established. The loss of intestinal barrier function occurred at 6 h in the S-group model and 9 h in the L-group model. For clinical patients, the time window extended to 36 h in the S-group type and 48 h in the L

  9. EICOSAPENTAENOIC ACID ENHANCES HEATSTROKE-IMPAIRED INTESTINAL EPITHELIAL BARRIER FUNCTION IN RATS.

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    Xiao, Guizhen; Yuan, Fangfang; Geng, Yan; Qiu, Xiaowen; Liu, Zhifeng; Lu, Jiefu; Tang, Liqun; Zhang, Yali; Su, Lei

    2015-10-01

    indicate that EPA pretreatment is more effective than DHA pretreatment in attenuating heat-induced intestinal dysfunction and preventing TJ damage. Enhanced expression of TJ proteins that support the epithelial barrier integrity may be important for maintaining a functional intestinal barrier during heatstroke.

  10. Imbalance of gut microbiome and intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction in patients with high blood pressure.

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    Kim, Seungbum; Goel, Ruby; Kumar, Ashok; Qi, Yanfei; Lobaton, Gil; Hosaka, Koji; Mohammed, Mohammed; Handberg, Eileen M; Richards, Elaine M; Pepine, Carl J; Raizada, Mohan K

    2018-03-30

    Recent evidence indicates a link between gut pathology and microbiome with hypertension (HTN) in animal models. However, whether this association exists in humans is unknown. Thus, our objectives in the present study were to test the hypotheses that high blood pressure (BP) patients have distinct gut microbiomes and that gut-epithelial barrier function markers and microbiome composition could predict systolic BP (SBP). Fecal samples, analyzed by shotgun metagenomics, displayed taxonomic and functional changes, including altered butyrate production between patients with high BP and reference subjects. Significant increases in plasma of intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and augmented gut-targetting proinflammatory T helper 17 (Th17) cells in high BP patients demonstrated increased intestinal inflammation and permeability. Zonulin, a gut epithelial tight junction protein regulator, was markedly elevated, further supporting gut barrier dysfunction in high BP. Zonulin strongly correlated with SBP (R 2 = 0.5301, P <0.0001). Two models predicting SBP were built using stepwise linear regression analysis of microbiome data and circulating markers of gut health, and validated in a separate cohort by prediction of SBP from zonulin in plasma (R 2 = 0.4608, P <0.0001). The mouse model of HTN, chronic angiotensin II (Ang II) infusion, was used to confirm the effects of butyrate and gut barrier function on the cardiovascular system and BP. These results support our conclusion that intestinal barrier dysfunction and microbiome function are linked to HTN in humans. They suggest that manipulation of gut microbiome and its barrier functions could be the new therapeutic and diagnostic avenues for HTN. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  11. Lactobacillus protects the integrity of intestinal epithelial barrier damaged by pathogenic bacteria

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    Qinghua eYu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Pathogens invade intestinal mucosal barrier through phagocytosis of antigen presenting cells (dendritic cell, microfold cells, or through the invasion into the intestinal epithelial directly. Some pathogens could damage the cell junction between epithelial cells and use the paracellular pathway as an entrance to invade. Moreover, some Lactobacillus could inhibit the adhesion of the pathogens and protect the integrity of the cell junction and mucosal barrier. This research focused on the potential therapeutic effect of Lactobacillus fructosus (L. fructosus C2 to attenuate ETEC K88 or S. typhimurium SL1344 induced changes to mucosal barrier. The results demonstrated that treatment of polarized Caco-2 cells with L. fructosus C2 reduced the permeation of dextran, and expression of IL-8, p-ERK and p-JNK when cells were infected with pathogenic bacteria. The findings indicated that L. fructosus C2 exerted a protective effect against the damage to the integrity of Caco-2 cells by ETEC or S. typhimurium infection.

  12. Boswellia serrata Preserves Intestinal Epithelial Barrier from Oxidative and Inflammatory Damage.

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    Daniela Catanzaro

    Full Text Available Aminosalicylates, corticosteroids and immunosuppressants are currently the therapeutic choices in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD, however, with limited remission and often serious side effects. Meanwhile complementary and alternative medicine (CAM use is increasing, particularly herbal medicine. Boswellia serrata is a traditional Ayurvedic remedy with anti-inflammatory properties, of interest for its usefulness in IBDs. The mechanism of this pharmacological potential of Boswellia serrata was investigated in colonic epithelial cell monolayers exposed to H2O2 or INF-γ+TNF-α, chosen as in vitro experimental model of intestinal inflammation. The barrier function was evaluated by the transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER and paracellular permeability assay, and by the tight junction proteins (zonula occludens-1, ZO-1 and occludin immunofluorescence. The expression of phosphorylated NF-κB and reactive oxygen species (ROS generation were determined by immunoblot and cytofluorimetric assay, respectively. Boswellia serrata oleo-gum extract (BSE and its pure derivative acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic acid (AKBA, were tested at 0.1-10 μg/ml and 0.027 μg/ml, respectively. BSE and AKBA safety was demonstrated by no alteration of intestinal cell viability and barrier function and integrity biomarkers. H2O2 or INF-γ+TNF-α treatment of Caco-2 cell monolayers significantly reduced TEER, increased paracellular permeability and caused the disassembly of tight junction proteins occludin and ZO-1. BSE and AKBA pretreatment significantly prevented functional and morphological alterations and also the NF-κB phosphorylation induced by the inflammatory stimuli. At the same concentrations BSE and AKBA counteracted the increase of ROS caused by H2O2 exposure. Data showed the positive correlation of the antioxidant activity with the mechanism involved in the physiologic maintenance of the integrity and function of the intestinal epithelium. This study

  13. A fish intestinal epithelial barrier model established from the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) cell line, RTgutGC

    OpenAIRE

    Minghetti, Matteo; Drieschner, Carolin; Bramaz, Nadine; Schug, Hannah; Schirmer, Kristin

    2017-01-01

    The intestine of fish is a multifunctional organ: lined by only a single layer of specialized epithelial cells, it has various physiological roles including nutrient absorption and ion regulation. It moreover comprises an important barrier for environmental toxicants, including metals. Thus far, knowledge of the fish intestine is limited largely to in vivo or ex vivo investigations. Recently, however, the first fish intestinal cell line, RTgutGC, was established, originating from a rainbow tr...

  14. Inhalation of methane preserves the epithelial barrier during ischemia and reperfusion in the rat small intestine.

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    Mészáros, András T; Büki, Tamás; Fazekas, Borbála; Tuboly, Eszter; Horváth, Kitti; Poles, Marietta Z; Szűcs, Szilárd; Varga, Gabriella; Kaszaki, József; Boros, Mihály

    2017-06-01

    Methane is part of the gaseous environment of the intestinal lumen. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the bioactivity of exogenous methane on the intestinal barrier function in an antigen-independent model of acute inflammation. Anesthetized rats underwent sham operation or 45-min occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery. A normoxic methane (2.2%)-air mixture was inhaled for 15 min at the end of ischemia and at the beginning of a 60-min or 180-min reperfusion. The integrity of the epithelial barrier of the ileum was assessed by determining the lumen-to-blood clearance of fluorescent dextran, while microvascular permeability changes were detected by the Evans blue technique. Tissue levels of superoxide, nitrotyrosine, myeloperoxidase, and endothelin-1 were measured, the superficial mucosal damage was visualized and quantified, and the serosal microcirculation and mesenteric flow was recorded. Erythrocyte deformability and aggregation were tested in vitro. Reperfusion significantly increased epithelial permeability, worsened macro- and microcirculation, increased the production of proinflammatory mediators, and resulted in a rapid loss of the epithelium. Exogenous normoxic methane inhalation maintained the superficial mucosal structure, decreased epithelial permeability, and improved local microcirculation, with a decrease in reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generation. Both the deformability and aggregation of erythrocytes improved with incubation of methane. Normoxic methane decreases the signs of oxidative and nitrosative stress, improves tissue microcirculation, and thus appears to modulate the ischemia-reperfusion-induced epithelial permeability changes. These findings suggest that the administration of exogenous methane may be a useful strategy for maintaining the integrity of the mucosa sustaining an oxido-reductive attack. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Identification of multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates that are highly disruptive to the intestinal epithelial barrier

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    Shevchenko Olga

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa nosocomial infections are increasingly recognized worldwide. In this study, we focused on the virulence of multi-drug resistant clinical strains P. aeruginosa against the intestinal epithelial barrier, since P. aeruginosa can cause lethal sepsis from within the intestinal tract of critically ill and immuno-compromised patients via mechanisms involving disruption of epithelial barrier function. Methods We screened consecutively isolated multi-drug resistant P. aeruginosa clinical strains for their ability to disrupt the integrity of human cultured intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2 and correlated these finding to related virulence phenotypes such as adhesiveness, motility, biofilm formation, and cytotoxicity. Results Results demonstrated that the majority of the multi-drug resistant P. aeruginosa clinical strains were attenuated in their ability to disrupt the barrier function of cultured intestinal epithelial cells. Three distinct genotypes were found that displayed an extreme epithelial barrier-disrupting phenotype. These strains were characterized and found to harbor the exoU gene and to display high swimming motility and adhesiveness. Conclusion These data suggest that detailed phenotypic analysis of the behavior of multi-drug resistant P. aeruginosa against the intestinal epithelium has the potential to identify strains most likely to place patients at risk for lethal gut-derived sepsis. Surveillance of colonizing strains of P. aeruginosa in critically ill patients beyond antibiotic sensitivity is warranted.

  16. Mucosal pathobiology and molecular signature of epithelial barrier dysfunction in the small intestine in irritable bowel syndrome.

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    González-Castro, Ana M; Martínez, Cristina; Salvo-Romero, Eloísa; Fortea, Marina; Pardo-Camacho, Cristina; Pérez-Berezo, Teresa; Alonso-Cotoner, Carmen; Santos, Javier; Vicario, María

    2017-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most prevalent gastrointestinal disorders in developed countries. Its etiology remains unknown; however, a common finding, regardless of IBS subtype, is the presence of altered intestinal barrier. In fact, signaling and location of cell-to-cell adhesion proteins, in connection with increased immune activity, seem abnormal in the intestinal epithelium of IBS patients. Despite that most research is performed on distal segments of the intestine, altered permeability has been reported in both, the small and the large bowel of all IBS subtypes. The small intestine carries out digestion and nutrient absorption and is also the site where the majority of immune responses to luminal antigens takes place. In fact, the upper intestine is more exposed to environmental antigens than the colon and is also a site of symptom generation. Recent studies have revealed small intestinal structural alterations of the epithelial barrier and mucosal immune activation in association with intestinal dysfunction, suggesting the commitment of the intestine as a whole in the pathogenesis of IBS. This review summarizes the most recent findings on mucosal barrier alterations and its relationship to symptoms arising from the small intestine in IBS, including epithelial structural abnormalities, mucosal immune activation, and microbial dysbiosis, further supporting the hypothesis of an organic origin of IBS. © 2016 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  17. Cathelicidin-WA Improves Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Function and Enhances Host Defense against Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 Infection.

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    Yi, Hongbo; Hu, Wangyang; Chen, Shan; Lu, Zeqing; Wang, Yizhen

    2017-02-15

    Impaired epithelial barrier function disrupts immune homeostasis and increases inflammation in intestines, leading to many intestinal diseases. Cathelicidin peptides suppress intestinal inflammation and improve intestinal epithelial barrier function independently of their antimicrobial activity. In this study, we investigated the effects of Cathelicidin-WA (CWA) on intestinal epithelial barrier function, as well as the underlying mechanism, by using enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC)-infected mice and intestinal epithelial cells. The results showed that CWA attenuated EHEC-induced clinical symptoms and intestinal colitis, as did enrofloxacin (Enro). CWA decreased IL-6 production in the serum, jejunum, and colon of EHEC-infected mice. Additionally, CWA alleviated the EHEC-induced disruption of mucin-2 and goblet cells in the intestine. Interestingly, CWA increased the mucus layer thickness, which was associated with increasing expression of trefoil factor 3, in the jejunum of EHEC-infected mice. CWA increased the expression of tight junction proteins in the jejunum of EHEC-infected mice. Using intestinal epithelial cells and a Rac1 inhibitor in vitro, we demonstrated that the CWA-mediated increases in the tight junction proteins might depend on the Rac1 pathway. Furthermore, CWA improved the microbiota and short-chain fatty acid concentrations in the cecum of EHEC-infected mice. Although Enro and CWA had similar effects on intestinal inflammation, CWA was superior to Enro with regard to improving intestinal epithelial barrier and microbiota in the intestine. In conclusion, CWA attenuated EHEC-induced inflammation, intestinal epithelial barrier damage, and microbiota disruption in the intestine of mice, suggesting that CWA may be an effective therapy for many intestinal diseases. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  18. Activation of the Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition Factor Snail Mediated Acetaldehyde-Induced Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Disruption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elamin, E.; Masclee, A.; Troost, F.; Dekker, J.; Jonkers, D.

    2014-01-01

    Background : Acetaldehyde (AcH) is mutagenic and can reach high concentrations in colonic lumen after ethanol consumption and is associated with intestinal barrier dysfunction and an increased risk of progressive cancers, including colorectal carcinoma. Snail, the transcription factor of

  19. Small intestine epithelial barrier function is compromised in pigs with low feed intake at weaning.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spreeuwenberg, M.A.; Verdonk, J.M.; Gaskins, H.R.; Verstegen, M.W.A.

    2001-01-01

    Compromising alterations in gastrointestinal architecture are common during the weaning transition of pigs. The relation between villous atrophy and epithelial barrier function at weaning is not well understood. This study evaluated in vitro transepithelial transport by Ussing metabolic chambers,

  20. Excreted/secreted Trichuris suis products reduce barrier function and suppress inflammatory cytokine production of intestinal epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hiemstra, I. H.; Klaver, E. J.; Vrijland, K.

    2014-01-01

    . The intestinal epithelium forms an efficient barrier between the intestinal lumen containing the microbial flora and helminths, and dendritic cells (DCs) present in the lamina propria that determine the TH response. Here, we investigated how excreted/secreted (E/S) products of T. suis affect the barrier function...... of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) in order to reach the DCs and modulate the immune response. We show that T. suis E/S products reduce the barrier function and the expression of the tight junction proteins EMP-1 and claudin-4 in IEC CMT93/69 monolayers in a glycan-dependent manner. This resulted...... in an increased passage of soluble compounds to the basolateral side that affected DC function. In addition, T. suis E/S suppressed LPS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production by CMT93/69 cells, whereas the production of the TH2 response-inducing cytokine thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) was induced. Our...

  1. Low uptake of silica nanoparticles in Caco-2 intestinal epithelial barriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ye, Dong; Bramini, Mattia; Hristov, Delyan R.; Wan, Sha; Salvati, Anna; Åberg, Christoffer; Dawson, Kenneth A.

    2017-01-01

    Cellular barriers, such as the skin, the lung epithelium or the intestinal epithelium, constitute one of the first obstacles facing nanomedicines or other nanoparticles entering organisms. It is thus important to assess the capacity of nanoparticles to enter and transport across such barriers. In

  2. Real-time monitoring of trans-epithelial electrical resistance in cultured intestinal epithelial cells: the barrier protection of water-soluble dietary fiber.

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    Majima, Atsushi; Handa, Osamu; Naito, Yuji; Suyama, Yosuke; Onozawa, Yuriko; Higashimura, Yasuki; Mizushima, Katsura; Morita, Mayuko; Uehara, Yukiko; Horie, Hideki; Iida, Takaya; Fukui, Akifumu; Dohi, Osamu; Okayama, Tetsuya; Yoshida, Naohisa; Kamada, Kazuhiro; Katada, Kazuhiro; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Takagi, Tomohisa; Konishi, Hideyuki; Yasukawa, Zenta; Tokunaga, Makoto; Okubo, Tsutomu; Itoh, Yoshito

    2017-03-01

    In this study we aimed to verify a real-time trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER) monitoring system in a Caco-2 monolayer and to investigate the therapeutic effect of partially hydrolyzed guar gum (PHGG), a dietary fiber, against interferon (IFN)-γ-induced intestinal barrier dysfunction using this monitoring system. We measured TEER using a real-time monitoring system and evaluated epithelial paracellular permeability using fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated dextran (4 kDa; FD4) in Caco-2 monolayers treated with IFN-γ for 48 h. The expression and distribution of tight junction (TJ)-associated proteins, ZO-1 and occludin, were analyzed by Western blot and immunocytochemistry, respectively. In some experiments PHGG was added prior to IFN-γ treatment in order to investigate its protective effect on barrier function. IFN-γ treatment significantly decreased TEER and increased FD4 flux across Caco-2 monolayers, indicating a great influence of IFN-γ on the intestinal epithelial paracellular permeability. In contrast, the pretreatment of PHGG significantly reduced the IFN-γ-induced increment of FD4 flux without affecting TEER. Neither IFN-γ nor PHGG treatment affected the expressions of TJ-associated proteins, while immunocytochemistry showed that IFN-γ-induced redistribution of occludin was clearly restored by PHGG. Real-time TEER monitoring enabled us to evaluate the dynamic changes of intestinal epithelial barrier function. PHGG may have a protective effect against IFN-γ-induced barrier dysfunction by attenuating the paracellular hyperpermeability; thus, its promotion as a functional food is anticipated. © 2017 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  3. A fish intestinal epithelial barrier model established from the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) cell line, RTgutGC.

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    Minghetti, Matteo; Drieschner, Carolin; Bramaz, Nadine; Schug, Hannah; Schirmer, Kristin

    2017-12-01

    The intestine of fish is a multifunctional organ: lined by only a single layer of specialized epithelial cells, it has various physiological roles including nutrient absorption and ion regulation. It moreover comprises an important barrier for environmental toxicants, including metals. Thus far, knowledge of the fish intestine is limited largely to in vivo or ex vivo investigations. Recently, however, the first fish intestinal cell line, RTgutGC, was established, originating from a rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). In order to exploit the opportunities arising from RTgutGC cells for exploring fish intestinal physiology and toxicology, we present here the establishment of cells on commercially available permeable membrane supports and evaluate its suitability as a model of polarized intestinal epithelia. Within 3 weeks of culture, RTgutGC cells show epithelial features by forming tight junctions and desmosomes between adjacent cells. Cells develop a transepithelial electrical resistance comparable to in vivo measured values, reflecting the leaky nature of the fish intestine. Immunocytochemistry reveals evidence of polarization, such as basolateral localization of Na + /K + -ATPase (NKA) and apical localization of the tight junction protein ZO-1. NKA mRNA abundance was induced as physiological response toward a saltwater buffer, mimicking the migration of rainbow trout from fresh to seawater. Permeation of fluorescent molecules proved the barrier function of the cells, with permeation coefficients being comparable to those reported in fish. Finally, we demonstrate that cells on permeable supports are more resistant to the toxicity elicited by silver ions than cells grown the conventional way, likely due to improved cellular silver excretion.

  4. Alpha-Melanocyte Stimulating Hormone Protects against Cytokine-Induced Barrier Damage in Caco-2 Intestinal Epithelial Monolayers.

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    Judit Váradi

    Full Text Available Alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH is a potent anti-inflammatory peptide with cytoprotective effect in various tissues. The present investigation demonstrates the ability of α-MSH to interact with intestinal epithelial cell monolayers and mitigate inflammatory processes of the epithelial barrier. The protective effect of α-MSH was studied on Caco-2 human intestinal epithelial monolayers, which were disrupted by exposure to tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β. The barrier integrity was assessed by measuring transepithelial electric resistance (TEER and permeability for marker molecules. Caco-2 monolayers were evaluated by immunohistochemistry for expression of melanocortin-1 receptor and tight junction proteins ZO-1 and claudin-4. The activation of nuclear factor kappa beta (NF-κB was detected by fluorescence microscopy and inflammatory cytokine expression was assessed by flow cytometric bead array cytokine assay. Exposure of Caco-2 monolayers to proinflammatory cytokines lowered TEER and increased permeability for fluorescein and albumin, which was accompanied by changes in ZO-1 and claudin-4 immunostaining. α-MSH was able to prevent inflammation-associated decrease of TEER in a dose-dependent manner and reduce the increased permeability for paracellular marker fluorescein. Further immunohistochemistry analysis revealed proinflammatory cytokine induced translocation of the NF-κB p65 subunit into Caco-2 cell nuclei, which was inhibited by α-MSH. As a result the IL-6 and IL-8 production of Caco-2 monolayers were also decreased with different patterns by the addition of α-MSH to the culture medium. In conclusion, Caco-2 cells showed a positive immunostaining for melanocortin-1 receptor and α-MSH protected Caco-2 cells against inflammatory barrier dysfunction and inflammatory activation induced by tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β cytokines.

  5. Alpha-Melanocyte Stimulating Hormone Protects against Cytokine-Induced Barrier Damage in Caco-2 Intestinal Epithelial Monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Váradi, Judit; Harazin, András; Fenyvesi, Ferenc; Réti-Nagy, Katalin; Gogolák, Péter; Vámosi, György; Bácskay, Ildikó; Fehér, Pálma; Ujhelyi, Zoltán; Vasvári, Gábor; Róka, Eszter; Haines, David; Deli, Mária A.; Vecsernyés, Miklós

    2017-01-01

    Alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) is a potent anti-inflammatory peptide with cytoprotective effect in various tissues. The present investigation demonstrates the ability of α-MSH to interact with intestinal epithelial cell monolayers and mitigate inflammatory processes of the epithelial barrier. The protective effect of α-MSH was studied on Caco-2 human intestinal epithelial monolayers, which were disrupted by exposure to tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β. The barrier integrity was assessed by measuring transepithelial electric resistance (TEER) and permeability for marker molecules. Caco-2 monolayers were evaluated by immunohistochemistry for expression of melanocortin-1 receptor and tight junction proteins ZO-1 and claudin-4. The activation of nuclear factor kappa beta (NF-κB) was detected by fluorescence microscopy and inflammatory cytokine expression was assessed by flow cytometric bead array cytokine assay. Exposure of Caco-2 monolayers to proinflammatory cytokines lowered TEER and increased permeability for fluorescein and albumin, which was accompanied by changes in ZO-1 and claudin-4 immunostaining. α-MSH was able to prevent inflammation-associated decrease of TEER in a dose-dependent manner and reduce the increased permeability for paracellular marker fluorescein. Further immunohistochemistry analysis revealed proinflammatory cytokine induced translocation of the NF-κB p65 subunit into Caco-2 cell nuclei, which was inhibited by α-MSH. As a result the IL-6 and IL-8 production of Caco-2 monolayers were also decreased with different patterns by the addition of α-MSH to the culture medium. In conclusion, Caco-2 cells showed a positive immunostaining for melanocortin-1 receptor and α-MSH protected Caco-2 cells against inflammatory barrier dysfunction and inflammatory activation induced by tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β cytokines. PMID:28103316

  6. Effects of Lactobacillus johnsonii and Lactobacillus reuteri on gut barrier function and heat shock proteins in intestinal porcine epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao-Yu; Roos, Stefan; Jonsson, Hans; Ahl, David; Dicksved, Johan; Lindberg, Jan Erik; Lundh, Torbjörn

    2015-04-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are a set of highly conserved proteins that can serve as intestinal gate keepers in gut homeostasis. Here, effects of a probiotic, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG), and two novel porcine isolates, Lactobacillus johnsonii strain P47-HY and Lactobacillus reuteri strain P43-HUV, on cytoprotective HSP expression and gut barrier function, were investigated in a porcine IPEC-J2 intestinal epithelial cell line model. The IPEC-J2 cells polarized on a permeable filter exhibited villus-like cell phenotype with development of apical microvilli. Western blot analysis detected HSP expression in IPEC-J2 and revealed that L. johnsonii and L. reuteri strains were able to significantly induce HSP27, despite high basal expression in IPEC-J2, whereas LGG did not. For HSP72, only the supernatant of L. reuteri induced the expression, which was comparable to the heat shock treatment, which indicated that HSP72 expression was more stimulus specific. The protective effect of lactobacilli was further studied in IPEC-J2 under an enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) challenge. ETEC caused intestinal barrier destruction, as reflected by loss of cell-cell contact, reduced IPEC-J2 cell viability and transepithelial electrical resistance, and disruption of tight junction protein zonula occludens-1. In contrast, the L. reuteri treatment substantially counteracted these detrimental effects and preserved the barrier function. L. johnsonii and LGG also achieved barrier protection, partly by directly inhibiting ETEC attachment. Together, the results indicate that specific strains of Lactobacillus can enhance gut barrier function through cytoprotective HSP induction and fortify the cell protection against ETEC challenge through tight junction protein modulation and direct interaction with pathogens. © 2015 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  7. Inhibition of Epithelial TNF-α Receptors by Purified Fruit Bromelain Ameliorates Intestinal Inflammation and Barrier Dysfunction in Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zijuan; Wang, Liang; Feng, Panpan; Yin, Lianhong; Wang, Chen; Zhi, Shengxu; Dong, Jianyi; Wang, Jingyu; Lin, Yuan; Chen, Dapeng; Xiong, Yongjian; Peng, Jinyong

    2017-01-01

    Activation of the TNF-α receptor (TNFR) leads to an inflammatory response, and anti-TNF therapy has been administered to reduce inflammation symptoms and heal mucosal ulcers in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Bromelain, a complex natural mixture of proteolytic enzymes, has been shown to exert anti-inflammatory effects. This study aimed to investigate the effect of purified fruit bromelain (PFB)-induced inhibition of epithelial TNFR in a rat colitis model. Colitis was established by intracolonic administration of 2, 4, 6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid. Expression of TNFR1 and TNFR2 was measured by quantitative RT-PCR and western blotting. The effect of PFB on colitis was evaluated by examining the inflammatory response and intestinal epithelial barrier function. Our results showed that both TNFR1 and TNFR2 expression were significantly increased in a colitis model, and the increase was significantly reversed by PFB. Colitis symptoms, including infiltration of inflammatory cells, cytokine profiles, epithelial cell apoptosis, and epithelial tight junction barrier dysfunction were significantly ameliorated by PFB. Compared with fruit bromelain and stem bromelain complex, the inhibition of TNFR2 induced by PFB was stronger than that exhibited on TNFR1. These results indicate that PFB showed a stronger selective inhibitory effect on TNFR2 than TNFR1. In other words, purification of fruit bromelain increases its selectivity on TNFR2 inhibition. High expression of epithelial TNFRs in colitis was significantly counteracted by PFB, and PFB-induced TNFR inhibition ameliorated colitis symptoms. These results supply novel insights into potential IBD treatment by PFB.

  8. Effects of phenol on barrier function of a human intestinal epithelial cell line correlate with altered tight junction protein localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Ingrid C; Betanzos, Abigail; Weber, Dominique A; Nava, Porfirio; Miller, Gary W; Parkos, Charles A

    2009-11-15

    Phenol contamination of soil and water has raised concerns among people living near phenol-producing factories and hazardous waste sites containing the chemical. Phenol, particularly in high concentrations, is an irritating and corrosive substance, making mucosal membranes targets of toxicity in humans. However, few data on the effects of phenol after oral exposure exist. We used an in vitro model employing human intestinal epithelial cells (SK-CO15) cultured on permeable supports to examine effects of phenol on epithelial barrier function. We hypothesized that phenol disrupts epithelial barrier by altering tight junction (TJ) protein expression. The dose-response effect of phenol on epithelial barrier function was determined using transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and FITC-dextran permeability measurements. We studied phenol-induced changes in cell morphology and expression of several tight junction proteins by immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis. Effects on cell viability were assessed by MTT, Trypan blue, propidium iodide and TUNEL staining. Exposure to phenol resulted in decreased TER and increased paracellular flux of FITC-dextran in a dose-dependent manner. Delocalization of claudin-1 and ZO-1 from TJs to cytosol correlated with the observed increase in permeability after phenol treatment. Additionally, the decrease in TER correlated with changes in the distribution of a membrane raft marker, suggesting phenol-mediated effects on membrane fluidity. Such observations were independent of effects of phenol on cell viability as enhanced permeability occurred at doses of phenol that did not cause cell death. Overall, these findings suggest that phenol may affect transiently the lipid bilayer of the cell membrane, thus destabilizing TJ-containing microdomains.

  9. Acrolein Disrupts Tight Junction Proteins and Causes Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Mediated Epithelial Cell Death Leading to Intestinal Barrier Dysfunction and Permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Yang; Wang, Min; Zhang, Jingwen; Barve, Shirish S; McClain, Craig J; Joshi-Barve, Swati

    2017-12-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that environmental and dietary factors can affect intestinal epithelial integrity leading to gut permeability and bacterial translocation. Intestinal barrier dysfunction is a pathogenic process associated with many chronic disorders. Acrolein is an environmental and dietary pollutant and a lipid-derived endogenous metabolite. The impact of acrolein on the intestine has not been investigated before and is evaluated in this study, both in vitro and in vivo. Our data demonstrate that oral acrolein exposure in mice caused damage to the intestinal epithelial barrier, resulting in increased permeability and subsequently translocation of bacterial endotoxin-lipopolysaccharide into the blood. Similar results were seen in vitro using established Caco-2 cell monolayers wherein acrolein decreased barrier function and increased permeability. Acrolein also caused the down-regulation and/or redistribution of three representative tight junction proteins (ie, zonula occludens-1, Occludin, Claudin-1) that critically regulate epithelial paracellular permeability. In addition, acrolein induced endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated death of epithelial cells, which is an important mechanism contributing to intestinal barrier damage/dysfunction, and gut permeability. Overall, we demonstrate that exposure to acrolein affects the intestinal epithelium by decrease/redistribution of tight junction proteins and endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated epithelial cell death, thereby resulting in loss of barrier integrity and function. Our findings highlight the adverse consequences of environmental and dietary pollutants on intestinal barrier integrity/function with relevance to gut permeability and the development of disease. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Defects in small intestinal epithelial barrier function and morphology associated with peri-weaning failure to thrive syndrome (PFTS) in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeser, Adam J; Borst, Luke B; Overman, Beth L; Pittman, Jeremy S

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate intestinal function and morphology associated with peri-weaning failure to thrive syndrome (PFTS) in swine. Jejunum and distal ileum from control and pigs exhibiting PFTS was harvested at weaning, 4 and 11 days post-weaning (PW) for intestinal barrier function studies and histological analyses (n=6 pigs per group). Marked disturbances in intestinal barrier function was observed in PFTS pigs, compared with controls, indicated by lower (p<0.05) TER and increased (p<0.01) permeability to FITC dextran (4 kDa). Intestines from weaned pigs, subjected to a 4-day fast, exhibited minor disturbances in intestinal barrier function. Villus atrophy and crypt hyperplasia were observed in the PFTS intestine compared with control and fasted pigs. These data demonstrate that PFTS is associated with profound disturbances in intestinal epithelial barrier function and alterations in mucosal and epithelial morphology in which anorexia is not the sole factor. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Toll-Like Receptor 2 Activation by beta 2 -> 1-Fructans Protects Barrier Function of T84 Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells in a Chain Length-Dependent Manner

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogt, Leonie M.; Meyer, Diederick; Pullens, Gerdie; Faas, Marijke M.; Venema, Koen; Ramasamy, Uttara; Schols, Henk A.; de Vos, Paul

    Dietary fiber intake is associated with lower incidence and mortality from disease, but the underlying mechanisms of these protective effects are unclear. We hypothesized that beta 2 -> 1-fructan dietary fibers confer protection on intestinal epithelial cell barrier function via Toll-like receptor 2

  12. Protective effects of ψ taraxasterol 3-O-myristate and arnidiol 3-O-myristate isolated from Calendula officinalis on epithelial intestinal barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Acqua, Stefano; Catanzaro, Daniela; Cocetta, Veronica; Igl, Nadine; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Giron, Maria Cecilia; Cecconello, Laura; Montopoli, Monica

    2016-03-01

    The triterpene esters ᴪ taraxasterol-3-O-myristate (1) and arnidiol-3-O-myristate (2) were tested for their ability to protect epithelial intestinal barrier in an in vitro model. Their effects on ROS production and on trans-epithelial resistance were investigated on CaCo-2 cell monolayers both in basal and stress-induced conditions. Both compounds were able to modulate the stress damage induced by H2O2 and INFγ+TNFα, showing a potential use as model compounds for the study of new therapeutic agents for intestinal inflammations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of Hops Derived Prenylated Phenols on TNF-α Induced Barrier Dysfunction in Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luescher, Sandro; Urmann, Corinna; Butterweck, Veronika

    2017-04-28

    For the prenylated hops phenols 6- and 8-prenylnaringenin (1 and 2), xanthohumol (3), and isoxanthohumol (4), a variety of biological activities has been described. In the current study, a transwell based in vitro model using the human intestinal epithelial cell line Caco-2 was developed to assess potential beneficial effects of compounds 1-4 on TNF-α-induced impairment of tight junction (TJ) permeability. Transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) was measured using the latest cellZScope online monitoring device. TNF-α treatment (25 ng/mL) induced a significant decrease in TEER values (204.71 ± 4.57 at 72 h) compared to that in control values (245.94 ± 1.68 at 72 h). To determine preventive effects on TNF-α-induced impairment of TJ permeability, 1-4 were added to the apical compartment of Caco-2 monolayers 1 h before TNF-α treatment; afterward, TNF-α was added to the basolateral compartment to induce TJ dysfunction and incubated for a further 72 h. Using this setting, only 1 and 2 prevented epithelial disruption induced by TNF-α. To evaluate restorative effects of 1-4, TNF-α was added to the basolateral compartment of Caco-2 cell monolayers. After 48 h of incubation, 1-4 were added to the apical side, and TEER values were monitored online for a further 72 h. Under these experimental conditions, only 2 restored TNF-α induced barrier dysfunction.

  14. Live Faecalibacterium prausnitzii in an apical anaerobic model of the intestinal epithelial barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ulluwishewa, D.; Anderson, R.C.; Young, W.; McNabb, W.C.; Baarlen, van P.; Moughan, P.J.; Wells, J.M.; Roy, N.C.

    2015-01-01

    Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, an abundant member of the human commensal microbiota, has been proposed to have a protective role in the intestine. However, it is an obligate anaerobe, difficult to co-culture in viable form with oxygen-requiring intestinal cells. To overcome this limitation, a unique

  15. Type 3 innate lymphoid cells maintain intestinal epithelial stem cells after tissue damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Aparicio-Domingo (Patricia); M. Romera-Hernandez (Monica); J.J. Karrich (Julien J.); F.H.J. Cornelissen (Ferry); N. Papazian (Natalie); D.J. Lindenbergh-Kortleve (Dicky); J.A. Butler (James A.); L. Boon (Louis); M. Coles (Mark); J.N. Samsom (Janneke); T. Cupedo (Tom)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractDisruption of the intestinal epithelial barrier allows bacterial translocation and predisposes to destructive inflammation. To ensure proper barrier composition, crypt-residing stem cells continuously proliferate and replenish all intestinal epithelial cells within days. As a consequence

  16. Protein kinase C δ signaling is required for dietary prebiotic-induced strengthening of intestinal epithelial barrier function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Richard Y.; Abdullah, Majd; Määttänen, Pekka; Pilar, Ana Victoria C.; Scruten, Erin; Johnson-Henry, Kathene C.; Napper, Scott; O’Brien, Catherine; Jones, Nicola L.; Sherman, Philip M.

    2017-01-01

    Prebiotics are non-digestible oligosaccharides that promote the growth of beneficial gut microbes, but it is unclear whether they also have direct effects on the intestinal mucosal barrier. Here we demonstrate two commercial prebiotics, inulin and short-chain fructo-oligosaccharide (scFOS), when applied onto intestinal epithelia in the absence of microbes, directly promote barrier integrity to prevent pathogen-induced barrier disruptions. We further show that these effects involve the induction of select tight junction (TJ) proteins through a protein kinase C (PKC) δ-dependent mechanism. These results suggest that in the absence of microbiota, prebiotics can directly exert barrier protective effects by activating host cell signaling in the intestinal epithelium, which represents a novel alternative mechanism of action of prebiotics. PMID:28098206

  17. Protein kinase C δ signaling is required for dietary prebiotic-induced strengthening of intestinal epithelial barrier function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Richard Y; Abdullah, Majd; Määttänen, Pekka; Pilar, Ana Victoria C; Scruten, Erin; Johnson-Henry, Kathene C; Napper, Scott; O'Brien, Catherine; Jones, Nicola L; Sherman, Philip M

    2017-01-18

    Prebiotics are non-digestible oligosaccharides that promote the growth of beneficial gut microbes, but it is unclear whether they also have direct effects on the intestinal mucosal barrier. Here we demonstrate two commercial prebiotics, inulin and short-chain fructo-oligosaccharide (scFOS), when applied onto intestinal epithelia in the absence of microbes, directly promote barrier integrity to prevent pathogen-induced barrier disruptions. We further show that these effects involve the induction of select tight junction (TJ) proteins through a protein kinase C (PKC) δ-dependent mechanism. These results suggest that in the absence of microbiota, prebiotics can directly exert barrier protective effects by activating host cell signaling in the intestinal epithelium, which represents a novel alternative mechanism of action of prebiotics.

  18. Intestinal Barrier and Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julio-Pieper, M; Bravo, J A

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal barrier function contributes to gut homeostasis by modulating absorption of water, electrolytes, and nutrients from the lumen into the circulation while restricting the passage of noxious luminal substances and microorganisms. Chronic conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and celiac disease are associated to intestinal barrier dysfunction. Here, the hypothesis is that a leaky intestinal wall allowing for indiscriminate passage of intraluminal compounds to the vascular compartment could in turn lead to systemic inflammation. An increasing number of studies are now investigating the association between gut permeability and CNS disorders, under the premise that translocation of intestinal luminal contents could affect CNS function, either directly or indirectly. Still, it is unknown whether disruption of intestinal barrier is a causative agent or a consequence in these situations. Here, we discuss the latest evidence pointing to an association between increased gut permeability and disrupted behavioral responses. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Modulation of cytochrome P450 metabolism and transport across intestinal epithelial barrier by ginger biophenolics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao Mukkavilli

    Full Text Available Natural and complementary therapies in conjunction with mainstream cancer care are steadily gaining popularity. Ginger extract (GE confers significant health-promoting benefits owing to complex additive and/or synergistic interactions between its bioactive constituents. Recently, we showed that preservation of natural "milieu" confers superior anticancer activity on GE over its constituent phytochemicals, 6-gingerol (6G, 8-gingerol (8 G, 10-gingerol (10 G and 6-shogaol (6S, through enterohepatic recirculation. Here we further evaluate and compare the effects of GE and its major bioactive constituents on cytochrome P450 (CYP enzyme activity in human liver microsomes by monitoring metabolites of CYP-specific substrates using LC/MS/MS detection methods. Our data demonstrate that individual gingerols are potent inhibitors of CYP isozymes, whereas GE exhibits a much higher half-maximal inhibition value, indicating no possible herb-drug interactions. However, GE's inhibition of CYP1A2 and CYP2C8 reflects additive interactions among the constituents. In addition, studies performed to evaluate transporter-mediated intestinal efflux using Caco-2 cells revealed that GE and its phenolics are not substrates of P-glycoprotein (Pgp. Intriguingly, however, 10 G and 6S were not detected in the receiver compartment, indicating possible biotransformation across the Caco-2 monolayer. These data strengthen the notion that an interplay of complex interactions among ginger phytochemicals when fed as whole extract dictates its bioactivity highlighting the importance of consuming whole foods over single agents. Our study substantiates the need for an in-depth analysis of hepatic biotransformation events and distribution profiles of GE and its active phenolics for the design of safe regimens.

  20. Non-animal models of epithelial barriers (skin, intestine and lung) in research, industrial applications and regulatory toxicology.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gordon, S.; Daneshian, M.; Bouwstra, J.A.; Caloni, F.; Constant, S.; Davies, D.E.; Dandekar, G.; Guzman, C.A.; Fabian, E.; Haltner, E.; Hartung, T.; Hasiwa, N.; Hayden, P.; Kandarova, H.; Khare, S.; Krug, H.F.; Kneuer, C.; Leist, M.; Lian, G.; Marx, U.; Metzger, M.; Ott, K.; Prieto, P.; Roberts, M.S.; Roggen, E.L.; Tralau, T.; Braak, van den C.; Walles, H.; Lehr, C.M.

    2015-01-01

    Models of the outer epithelia of the human body - namely the skin, the intestine and the lung - have found valid applications in both research and industrial settings as attractive alternatives to animal testing. A variety of approaches to model these barriers are currently employed in such fields,

  1. A defect in epithelial barrier integrity is not required for a systemic response to bacterial antigens or intestinal injury in T cell receptor-alpha gene-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydora, Beate C; Tavernini, Michele M; Doyle, Jason; Fedorak, Richard N

    2006-08-01

    Genetically induced disruption of the intestinal epithelial barrier leads to development of intestinal inflammation. In the interleukin-10 gene-deficient inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) mouse model, for instance, a primary defect in intestinal epithelial integrity occurs before the development of enterocolitis. In humans, a causal role for epithelial barrier disruption is still controversial. Although studies with first-degree relatives of IBD patients suggests an underlying role of impaired barrier function, a primary epithelial barrier defect in IBD patients has not been confirmed. The purpose of this article is to examine whether a primary epithelial barrier disruption is a prerequisite for the development of intestinal inflammation or whether intestinal inflammation can develop in the absence of epithelial disruption. We examined the intestinal epithelial integrity of the T cell receptor (TCR)-alpha gene-deficient mouse model of IBD. In vivo colonic permeability, determined by mannitol transmural flux, was assessed in 6-week-, 12-week-, and 25-week-old TCR-alpha gene-deficient and wild-type control mice using a single-pass perfusion technique. Mice were scored for intestinal histological injury and intestinal cytokine levels measured in organ cultures. Systemic responses to bacterial antigens were determined through 48-h spleen cell cultures stimulated with sonicate derived from endogenous bacterial strains. In contrast with previous findings in the interleukin-10 gene-deficient IBD model, TCR-alpha gene-deficient mice did not demonstrate evidence of primary intestinal epithelial barrier disruption at any age, despite developing a moderate to severe colitis within 12 weeks. A rise in intestinal interferon (IFN)-gamma levels preceded the onset of mucosal inflammation and then correlated closely with the degree of intestinal inflammation and injury. Spleen cells from TCR-alpha gene-deficient mice released IFN-gamma in response to stimulation with endogenous

  2. Probiotic-derived polyphosphate enhances the epithelial barrier function and maintains intestinal homeostasis through integrin-p38 MAPK pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuichi Segawa

    Full Text Available Probiotics exhibit beneficial effects on human health, particularly in the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis in a complex manner notwithstanding the diversity of an intestinal flora between individuals. Thus, it is highly probable that some common molecules secreted by probiotic and/or commensal bacteria contribute to the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis and protect the intestinal epithelium from injurious stimuli. To address this question, we aimed to isolate the cytoprotective compound from a lactobacillus strain, Lactobacillus brevis SBC8803 which possess the ability to induce cytoprotective heat shock proteins in mouse small intestine. L. brevis was incubated in MRS broth and the supernatant was passed through with a 0.2-µm filter. Caco2/bbe cells were treated with the culture supernatant, and HSP27 expression was evaluated by Western blotting. HSP27-inducible components were separated by ammonium sulfate precipitation, DEAE anion exchange chromatography, gel filtration, and HPLC. Finally, we identified that the HSP27-inducible fraction was polyphosphate (poly P, a simple repeated structure of phosphates, which is a common product of lactobacilli and other bacteria associated with intestinal microflora without any definitive physiological functions. Then, poly P was synthesized by poly P-synthesizing enzyme polyphosphate kinase. The synthesized poly P significantly induced HSP27 from Caco2/BBE cells. In addition, Poly P suppressed the oxidant-induced intestinal permeability in the mouse small intestine and pharmacological inhibitors of p38 MAPK and integrins counteract its protective effect. Daily intrarectal administration of poly P (10 µg improved the inflammation grade and survival rate in 4% sodium dextran sulfate-administered mice. This study, for the first time, demonstrated that poly P is the molecule responsible for maintaining intestinal barrier actions which are mediated through the intestinal integrin β1-p38 MAPK.

  3. Glycoprotein A33 deficiency: a new mouse model of impaired intestinal epithelial barrier function and inflammatory disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin B. Williams

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The cells of the intestinal epithelium provide a selectively permeable barrier between the external environment and internal tissues. The integrity of this barrier is maintained by tight junctions, specialised cell-cell contacts that permit the absorption of water and nutrients while excluding microbes, toxins and dietary antigens. Impairment of intestinal barrier function contributes to multiple gastrointestinal disorders, including food hypersensitivity, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD and colitis-associated cancer (CAC. Glycoprotein A33 (GPA33 is an intestinal epithelium-specific cell surface marker and member of the CTX group of transmembrane proteins. Roles in cell-cell adhesion have been demonstrated for multiple CTX family members, suggesting a similar function for GPA33 within the gastrointestinal tract. To test a potential requirement for GPA33 in intestinal barrier function, we generated Gpa33−/− mice and subjected them to experimental regimens designed to produce food hypersensitivity, colitis and CAC. Gpa33−/− mice exhibited impaired intestinal barrier function. This was shown by elevated steady-state immunosurveillance in the colonic mucosa and leakiness to oral TRITC-labelled dextran after short-term exposure to dextran sodium sulphate (DSS to injure the intestinal epithelium. Gpa33−/− mice also exhibited rapid onset and reduced resolution of DSS-induced colitis, and a striking increase in the number of colitis-associated tumours produced by treatment with the colon-specific mutagen azoxymethane (AOM followed by two cycles of DSS. In contrast, Gpa33−/− mice treated with AOM alone showed no increase in sporadic tumour formation, indicating that their increased tumour susceptibility is dependent on inflammatory stimuli. Finally, Gpa33−/− mice displayed hypersensitivity to food allergens, a common co-morbidity in humans with IBD. We propose that Gpa33−/− mice provide a valuable model to study the mechanisms

  4. Remodeling of Tight Junctions and Enhancement of Barrier Integrity of the CACO-2 Intestinal Epithelial Cell Layer by Micronutrients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzano, Mary Carmen; DiGuilio, Katherine; Mercado, Joanna; Teter, Mimi; To, Julie; Ferraro, Brendan; Mixson, Brittany; Manley, Isabel; Baker, Valerissa; Moore, Beverley A.; Wertheimer, Joshua; Mullin, James M.

    2015-01-01

    The micronutrients zinc, quercetin, butyrate, indole and berberine were evaluated for their ability to induce remodeling of epithelial tight junctions (TJs) and enhance barrier integrity in the CACO-2 gastrointestinal epithelial cell culture model. All five of these chemically very diverse micronutrients increased transepithelial electrical resistance (Rt) significantly, but only berberine also improved barrier integrity to the non-electrolyte D-mannitol. Increases of Rt as much as 200% of untreated controls were observed. Each of the five micronutrients also induced unique, signature-like changes in TJ protein composition, suggesting multiple pathways (and TJ arrangements) by which TJ barrier function can be enhanced. Decreases in abundance by as much as 90% were observed for claudin-2, and increases of over 300% could be seen for claudins -5 and -7. The exact effects of the micronutrients on barrier integrity and TJ protein composition were found to be highly dependent on the degree of differentiation of the cell layer at the time it was exposed to the micronutrient. The substratum to which the epithelial layer adheres was also found to regulate the response of the cell layer to the micronutrient. The implications of these findings for therapeutically decreasing morbidity in Inflammatory Bowel Disease are discussed. PMID:26226276

  5. Can probiotics modulate human disease by impacting intestinal barrier function?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bron, Peter A.; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Brummer, Robert Jan; Cani, Patrice D.; Mercenier, Annick; MacDonald, Thomas T.; Garcia-Ródenas, Clara L.; Wells, Jerry M.

    2017-01-01

    Intestinal barrier integrity is a prerequisite for homeostasis of mucosal function, which is balanced to maximise absorptive capacity, while maintaining efficient defensive reactions against chemical and microbial challenges. Evidence is mounting that disruption of epithelial barrier integrity is

  6. Optimization of micro-fabricated porous membranes for intestinal epithelial cell culture and in vitro modeling of the human intestinal barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair Gourikutty Sajay, Bhuvanendran; Yin, Chiam Su; Ramadan, Qasem

    2017-12-01

    In vitro modeling of organs could provide a controlled platform for studying physiological events and has great potential in the field of pharmaceutical development. Here, we describe the characterization of in vitro modeling of the human intestinal barrier mimicked using silicon porous membranes as a substrate. To mimic an intestinal in vivo setup as closely as possible, a porous substrate is required in a dynamic environment for the cells to grow rather than a static setup with an impermeable surface such as a petri dish. In this study, we focus on the detailed characterization of Caco-2 cells cultured on a silicon membrane with different pore sizes as well as the effect of dynamic fluid flow on the model. The porous silicon membrane together with continuous perfusion of liquid applying shear stress on the cells enhances the differentiation of polarized cells by providing access to the both their basal and apical surfaces. Membranes with pore sizes of 0.5-3 µm were used and a shear stress of ~0.03 dyne cm-2 was created by applying a low flow rate of 20 nl s-1. By providing these optimized conditions, cells were able to differentiate with columnar morphology, which developed microvilli structures on their apical side and tight junctions between adjacent cells like those in a healthy human intestinal barrier. In this setup, it is possible to study the important cellular functions of the intestine such as transport, absorption and secretion, and thus this model has great potential in drug screening.

  7. Oral and fecal Campylobacter concisus strains perturb barrier function by apoptosis induction in HT-29/B6 intestinal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Linde Nielsen

    Full Text Available Campylobacter concisus infections of the gastrointestinal tract can be accompanied by diarrhea and inflammation, whereas colonization of the human oral cavity might have a commensal nature. We focus on the pathophysiology of C. concisus and the effects of different clinical oral and fecal C. concisus strains on human HT-29/B6 colon cells. Six oral and eight fecal strains of C. concisus were isolated. Mucus-producing HT-29/B6 epithelial monolayers were infected with the C. concisus strains. Transepithelial electrical resistance (R(t and tracer fluxes of different molecule size were measured in Ussing chambers. Tight junction (TJ protein expression was determined by Western blotting, and subcellular TJ distribution was analyzed by confocal laser-scanning microscopy. Apoptosis induction was examined by TUNEL-staining and Western blot of caspase-3 activation. All strains invaded confluent HT-29/B6 cells and impaired epithelial barrier function, characterized by a time- and dose-dependent decrease in R(t either after infection from the apical side but even more from the basolateral compartment. TJ protein expression changes were sparse, only in apoptotic areas of infected monolayers TJ proteins were redistributed. Solely the barrier-forming TJ protein claudin-5 showed a reduced expression level to 66±8% (P<0.05, by expression regulation from the gene. Concomitantly, Lactate dehydrogenase release was elevated to 3.1±0.3% versus 0.7±0.1% in control (P<0.001, suggesting cytotoxic effects. Furthermore, oral and fecal C. concisus strains elevated apoptotic events to 5-fold. C. concisus-infected monolayers revealed an increased permeability for 332 Da fluorescein (1.74±0.13 vs. 0.56±0.17 10(-6 cm/s in control, P<0.05 but showed no difference in permeability for 4 kDa FITC-dextran (FD-4. The same was true in camptothecin-exposed monolayers, where camptothecin was used for apoptosis induction.In conclusion, epithelial barrier dysfunction by oral and

  8. Inhibition of Epithelial TNF-α Receptors by Purified Fruit Bromelain Ameliorates Intestinal Inflammation and Barrier Dysfunction in Colitis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Zijuan; Wang, Liang; Feng, Panpan; Yin, Lianhong; Wang, Chen; Zhi, Shengxu; Dong, Jianyi; Wang, Jingyu; Lin, Yuan; Chen, Dapeng; Xiong, Yongjian; Peng, Jinyong

    2017-01-01

    Activation of the TNF-α receptor (TNFR) leads to an inflammatory response, and anti-TNF therapy has been administered to reduce inflammation symptoms and heal mucosal ulcers in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Bromelain, a complex natural mixture of proteolytic enzymes, has been shown to exert anti-inflammatory effects. This study aimed to investigate the effect of purified fruit bromelain (PFB)-induced inhibition of epithelial TNFR in a rat colitis model. Colitis was established by intracol...

  9. Intestinal barrier integrity and inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmberg, Fredrik Eric Olof; Pedersen, Jannie; Jørgensen, Peter

    2017-01-01

    of antimicrobial peptides. Inflammatory bowel disease is associated with life-long morbidity for affected patients, and both the incidence and prevalence is increasing globally, resulting in substantial economic strain for society. Mucosal healing and re-establishment of barrier integrity is associated......, novel treatment strategies to accomplish mucosal healing and to re-establish normal barrier integrity in inflammatory bowel disease are warranted, and luminal stem cell-based approaches might have an intriguing potential. Transplantation of in vitro expanded intestinal epithelial stem cells derived...

  10. The intestinal barrier function and its involvement in digestive disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvo Romero, Eloísa; Alonso Cotoner, Carmen; Pardo Camacho, Cristina; Casado Bedmar, Maite; Vicario, María

    2015-11-01

    The gastrointestinal mucosal surface is lined with epithelial cells representing an effective barrier made up with intercellular junctions that separate the inner and the outer environments, and block the passage of potentially harmful substances. However, epithelial cells are also responsible for the absorption of nutrients and electrolytes, hence a semipermeable barrier is required that selectively allows a number of substances in while keeping others out. To this end, the intestine developed the "intestinal barrier function", a defensive system involving various elements, both intra- and extracellular, that work in a coordinated way to impede the passage of antigens, toxins, and microbial byproducts, and simultaneously preserves the correct development of the epithelial barrier, the immune system, and the acquisition of tolerance against dietary antigens and the intestinal microbiota. Disturbances in the mechanisms of the barrier function favor the development of exaggerated immune responses; while exact implications remain unknown, changes in intestinal barrier function have been associated with the development of inflammatory conditions in the gastrointestinal tract. This review details de various elements of the intestinal barrier function, and the key molecular and cellular changes described for gastrointestinal diseases associated with dysfunction in this defensive mechanism.

  11. Impact of copper oxide nanomaterials on differentiated and undifferentiated Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells; assessment of cytotoxicity, barrier integrity, cytokine production and nanomaterial penetration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ude, Victor C; Brown, David M; Viale, Luca; Kanase, Nilesh; Stone, Vicki; Johnston, Helinor J

    2017-08-23

    Copper oxide nanomaterials (CuO NMs) are exploited in a diverse array of products including antimicrobials, inks, cosmetics, textiles and food contact materials. There is therefore a need to assess the toxicity of CuO NMs to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract since exposure could occur via direct oral ingestion, mucocillary clearance (following inhalation) or hand to mouth contact. Undifferentiated Caco-2 intestinal cells were exposed to CuO NMs (10 nm) at concentrations ranging from 0.37 to 78.13 μg/cm 2 Cu (equivalent to 1.95 to 250 μg/ml) and cell viability assessed 24 h post exposure using the alamar blue assay. The benchmark dose (BMD 20), determined using PROAST software, was identified as 4.44 μg/cm 2 for CuO NMs, and 4.25 μg/cm 2 for copper sulphate (CuSO 4 ), which informed the selection of concentrations for further studies. The differentiation status of cells and the impact of CuO NMs and CuSO 4 on the integrity of the differentiated Caco-2 cell monolayer were assessed by measurement of trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER), staining for Zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and imaging of cell morphology using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The impact of CuO NMs and CuSO 4 on the viability of differentiated cells was performed via assessment of cell number (DAPI staining), and visualisation of cell morphology (light microscopy). Interleukin-8 (IL-8) production by undifferentiated and differentiated Caco-2 cells following exposure to CuO NMs and CuSO 4 was determined using an ELISA. The copper concentration in the cell lysate, apical and basolateral compartments were measured with Inductive Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) and used to calculate the apparent permeability coefficient (P app ); a measure of barrier permeability to CuO NMs. For all experiments, CuSO 4 was used as an ionic control. CuO NMs and CuSO 4 caused a concentration dependent decrease in cell viability in undifferentiated cells. CuO NMs and CuSO 4

  12. A Novel Role for Interleukin-27 (IL-27) as Mediator of Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Protection Mediated via Differential Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT) Protein Signaling and Induction of Antibacterial and Anti-inflammatory Proteins*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diegelmann, Julia; Olszak, Torsten; Göke, Burkhard; Blumberg, Richard S.; Brand, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    The role of the Th17 cell inhibiting cytokine IL-27 in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease is contradictory. Its effects on the intestinal barrier have so far not been investigated, which was the aim of this study. We show that intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) express both IL-27 receptor subunits IL-27RA and gp130. The IL-27 receptor expression is up-regulated in intestinal inflammation and during bacterial infection. IL-27 activates ERK and p38 MAPKs as well as Akt, STAT1, STAT3, and STAT6 in IEC. IL-27 significantly enhances cell proliferation and IEC restitution. These functions of IL-27 are dependent on the activation of STAT3 and STAT6 signaling pathways. As analyzed by microarray, IL-27 modulates the expression of 428 target genes in IEC (316 up and 112 down; p < 0.05). IL-27 as well as its main target genes are up-regulated in colonic tissue and IEC isolated from mice with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. The IL-27-induced expression of the anti-bacterial gene deleted in malignant brain tumor 1 (DMBT1) is mediated by p38 and STAT3 signaling, whereas the activation of the anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial gene indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO1) is dependent on STAT1 signal transduction. IL-27-induced indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase enzymatic activity leads to growth inhibition of intestinal bacteria by causing local tryptophan depletion. For the first time, we characterize IL-27 as a mediator of intestinal epithelial barrier protection mediated via transcriptional activation of anti-inflammatory and antibacterial target genes. PMID:22069308

  13. Fish oil enhances recovery of intestinal microbiota and epithelial integrity in chronic rejection of intestinal transplant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiurong Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The intestinal chronic rejection (CR is the major limitation to long-term survival of transplanted organs. This study aimed to investigate the interaction between intestinal microbiota and epithelial integrity in chronic rejection of intestinal transplantation, and to find out whether fish oil enhances recovery of intestinal microbiota and epithelial integrity. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The luminal and mucosal microbiota composition of CR rats were characterized by DGGE analysis at 190 days after intestinal transplant. The specific bacterial species were determined by sequence analysis. Furthermore, changes in the localization of intestinal TJ proteins were examined by immunofluorescent staining. PCR-DGGE analysis revealed that gut microbiota in CR rats had a shift towards Escherichia coli, Bacteroides spp and Clostridium spp and a decrease in the abundance of Lactobacillales bacteria in the intestines. Fish oil supplementation could enhance the recovery of gut microbiota, showing a significant decrease of gut bacterial proportions of E. coli and Bacteroides spp and an increase of Lactobacillales spp. In addition, CR rats showed pronounced alteration of tight junction, depicted by marked changes in epithelial cell ultrastructure and redistribution of occuldin and claudins as well as disruption in TJ barrier function. Fish oil administration ameliorated disruption of epithelial integrity in CR, which was associated with an improvement of the mucosal structure leading to improved tight junctions. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study have presented novel evidence that fish oil is involved in the maintenance of epithelial TJ integrity and recovery of gut microbiota, which may have therapeutic potential against CR in intestinal transplantation.

  14. Epithelial Cell Inflammasomes in Intestinal Immunity and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea C. Lei-Leston

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Pattern recognition receptors (PRR, such as NOD-like receptors (NLRs, sense conserved microbial signatures, and host danger signals leading to the coordination of appropriate immune responses. Upon activation, a subset of NLR initiate the assembly of a multimeric protein complex known as the inflammasome, which processes pro-inflammatory cytokines and mediates a specialized form of cell death known as pyroptosis. The identification of inflammasome-associated genes as inflammatory bowel disease susceptibility genes implicates a role for the inflammasome in intestinal inflammation. Despite the fact that the functional importance of inflammasomes within immune cells has been well established, the contribution of inflammasome expression in non-hematopoietic cells remains comparatively understudied. Given that intestinal epithelial cells (IEC act as a barrier between the host and the intestinal microbiota, inflammasome expression by these cells is likely important for intestinal immune homeostasis. Accumulating evidence suggests that the inflammasome plays a key role in shaping epithelial responses at the host–lumen interface with many inflammasome components highly expressed by IEC. Recent studies have exposed functional roles of IEC inflammasomes in mucosal immune defense, inflammation, and tumorigenesis. In this review, we present the main features of the predominant inflammasomes and their effector mechanisms contributing to intestinal homeostasis and inflammation. We also discuss existing controversies in the field and open questions related to their implications in disease. A comprehensive understanding of the molecular basis of intestinal inflammasome signaling could hold therapeutic potential for clinical translation.

  15. Celiac Disease: Role of the Epithelial BarrierSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Schumann

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In celiac disease (CD a T-cell–mediated response to gluten is mounted in genetically predisposed individuals, resulting in a malabsorptive enteropathy histologically highlighted by villous atrophy and crypt hyperplasia. Recent data point to the epithelial layer as an under-rated hot spot in celiac pathophysiology to date. This overview summarizes current functional and genetic evidence on the role of the epithelial barrier in CD, consisting of the cell membranes and the apical junctional complex comprising sealing as well as ion and water channel-forming tight junction proteins and the adherens junction. Moreover, the underlying mechanisms are discussed, including apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells, biology of intestinal stem cells, alterations in the apical junctional complex, transcytotic uptake of gluten peptides, and possible implications of a defective epithelial polarity. Current research is directed toward new treatment options for CD that are alternatives or complementary therapeutics to a gluten-free diet. Thus, strategies to target an altered epithelial barrier therapeutically also are discussed. Keywords: Celiac Sprue, Gluten-Sensitive Enteropathy, Tight Junction, Epithelial Polarity, Partitioning-Defective Proteins, α-Gliadin 33mer

  16. Glycomacropeptide Reduces Intestinal Epithelial Cell Barrier Dysfunction and Adhesion of Entero-Hemorrhagic and Entero-Pathogenic Escherichia coli in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane Feeney

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the potential of glycosylated food components to positively influence health has received considerable attention. Milk is a rich source of biologically active glycoconjugates which are associated with antimicrobial, immunomodulatory, anti-adhesion, anti-inflammatory and prebiotic properties. Glycomacropeptide (GMP is the C-terminal portion of kappa-casein that is released from whey during cheese-making by the action of chymosin. Many of the biological properties associated with GMP, such as anti-adhesion, have been linked with the carbohydrate portion of the protein. In this study, we investigated the ability of GMP to inhibit the adhesion of a variety of pathogenic Escherichia coli strains to HT-29 and Caco-2 intestinal cell lines, given the importance of E. coli in causing bacterial gastroenteritis. GMP significantly reduced pathogen adhesion, albeit with a high degree of species specificity toward enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC strains O125:H32 and O111:H2 and enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC strain 12900 O157:H7. The anti-adhesive effect resulted from the interaction of GMP with the E. coli cells and was also dependent on GMP concentration. Pre-incubation of intestinal Caco-2 cells with GMP reduced pathogen translocation as represented by a decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER. Thus, GMP is an effective in-vitro inhibitor of adhesion and epithelial injury caused by E. coli and may have potential as a biofunctional ingredient in foods to improve gastrointestinal health.

  17. Zinc enhances intestinal epithelial barrier function through the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway in Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yuxin; Wolf, Patricia G; Guo, Shuangshuang; Guo, Yuming; Gaskins, H Rex; Zhang, Bingkun

    2017-05-01

    Zinc plays an important role in maintaining intestinal barrier function as well as modulating cellular signaling recognition and protein kinase activities. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) cascade has been demonstrated to affect intercellular integrity and tight junction (TJ) proteins. The current study investigated the hypothesis that zinc regulates intestinal intercellular junction integrity through the PI3K/protein kinase B (AKT)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. A transwell model of Caco-2 cell was incubated with 0, 50 and 100 μM of zinc at various time points. Transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER), paracellular permeability, TJ proteins, cell proliferation, differentiation and cell damage were measured. Compared with controls, 50 and 100 μM of zinc increased cell growth at 6, 12 and 24 h and the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen at 24 h. Zinc (100 μM) significantly elevated TEER at 6-24 h and reduced TJ permeability at 24 h, accompanied by the up-regulation of alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity and zonula occludens (ZO)-1 expression. In addition, zinc (100 μM) affected the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway by stimulating phosphorylation of AKT and the downstream target mTOR. Inhibition of PI3K signaling by LY294002 counteracted zinc promotion, as shown by a decrease in AP activity, TEER, the abundance of ZO-1 and phosphorylation of AKT and mTOR. Additionally, TJ permeability and the expression of caspase-3 and LC3II (markers of cell damage) were increased by addition of PI3K inhibitor. In conclusion, the activation of PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling by zinc is involved in improving intestinal barrier function by enhancing cell differentiation and expression of TJ protein ZO-1. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Rho-A prenylation and signaling link epithelial homeostasis to intestinal inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López-Posadas, Rocío; Becker, Christoph; Günther, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Although defects in intestinal barrier function are a key pathogenic factor in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), the molecular pathways driving disease-specific alterations of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) are largely unknown. Here, we addressed this issue by characterizing t...

  19. Activation of intestinal epithelial Stat3 orchestrates tissue defense during gastrointestinal infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Wittkopf

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal infections with EHEC and EPEC are responsible for outbreaks of diarrheal diseases and represent a global health problem. Innate first-line-defense mechanisms such as production of mucus and antimicrobial peptides by intestinal epithelial cells are of utmost importance for host control of gastrointestinal infections. For the first time, we directly demonstrate a critical role for Stat3 activation in intestinal epithelial cells upon infection of mice with Citrobacter rodentium - a murine pathogen that mimics human infections with attaching and effacing Escherichia coli. C. rodentium induced transcription of IL-6 and IL-22 in gut samples of mice and was associated with activation of the transcription factor Stat3 in intestinal epithelial cells. C. rodentium infection induced expression of several antimicrobial peptides such as RegIIIγ and Pla2g2a in the intestine which was critically dependent on Stat3 activation. Consequently, mice with specific deletion of Stat3 in intestinal epithelial cells showed increased susceptibility to C. rodentium infection as indicated by high bacterial load, severe gut inflammation, pronounced intestinal epithelial cell death and dissemination of bacteria to distant organs. Together, our data implicate an essential role for Stat3 activation in intestinal epithelial cells during C. rodentium infection. Stat3 concerts the host response to bacterial infection by controlling bacterial growth and suppression of apoptosis to maintain intestinal epithelial barrier function.

  20. Ex vivo culture of intestinal crypt organoids as a model system for assessing cell death induction in intestinal epithelial cells and enteropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grabinger, T.; Luks, L.; Kostadinova, F.; Zimberlin, C.; Medema, J. P.; Leist, M.; Brunner, T.

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) not only have a critical function in the absorption of nutrients, but also act as a physical barrier between our body and the outside world. Damage and death of the epithelial cells lead to the breakdown of this barrier function and inflammation due to access of

  1. Epidermal Growth Factor and Intestinal Barrier Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaopeng Tang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidermal growth factor (EGF is a 53-amino acid peptide that plays an important role in regulating cell growth, survival, migration, apoptosis, proliferation, and differentiation. In addition, EGF has been established to be an effective intestinal regulator helping to protect intestinal barrier integrity, which was essential for the absorption of nutrients and health in humans and animals. Several researches have demonstrated that EGF via binding to the EGF receptor and subsequent activation of Ras/MAPK, PI3K/AKT, PLC-γ/PKC, and STATS signal pathways regulates intestinal barrier function. In this review, the relationship between epidermal growth factor and intestinal development and intestinal barrier is described, to provide a better understanding of the effects of EGF on intestine development and health.

  2. [THE INTESTINAL BARRIER, THE MICROBIOTA, MICROBIOME].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mar'yanovich, A T

    2016-01-01

    The review examined modern condition of development directions physiology of digestion, like structure and function of the intestinal barrier, the microbiota of the digestive tract in its relations with the microorganism.

  3. Epithelial adhesion molecules and the regulation of intestinal homeostasis during neutrophil transepithelial migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumagin, Ronen; Parkos, Charles A

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial adhesion molecules play essential roles in regulating cellular function and maintaining mucosal tissue homeostasis. Some form epithelial junctional complexes to provide structural support for epithelial monolayers and act as a selectively permeable barrier separating luminal contents from the surrounding tissue. Others serve as docking structures for invading viruses and bacteria, while also regulating the immune response. They can either obstruct or serve as footholds for the immune cells recruited to mucosal surfaces. Currently, it is well appreciated that adhesion molecules collectively serve as environmental cue sensors and trigger signaling events to regulate epithelial function through their association with the cell cytoskeleton and various intracellular adapter proteins. Immune cells, particularly neutrophils (PMN) during transepithelial migration (TEM), can modulate adhesion molecule expression, conformation, and distribution, significantly impacting epithelial function and tissue homeostasis. This review discusses the roles of key intestinal epithelial adhesion molecules in regulating PMN trafficking and outlines the potential consequences on epithelial function. PMID:25838976

  4. Mast Cell Tryptase Reduces Junctional Adhesion Molecule-A (JAM-A) Expression in Intestinal Epithelial Cells: Implications for the Mechanisms of Barrier Dysfunction in Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wilcz-Villega, Ewa M

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate how mast cell tryptase may influence intestinal permeability and tight junction (TJ) proteins in vitro and explore translation to irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

  5. Bacterial Signaling at the Intestinal Epithelial Interface in Inflammation and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia I. Coleman

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The gastrointestinal (GI tract provides a compartmentalized interface with an enormous repertoire of immune and metabolic activities, where the multicellular structure of the mucosa has acquired mechanisms to sense luminal factors, such as nutrients, microbes, and a variety of host-derived and microbial metabolites. The GI tract is colonized by a complex ecosystem of microorganisms, which have developed a highly coevolved relationship with the host’s cellular and immune system. Intestinal epithelial pattern recognition receptors (PRRs substantially contribute to tissue homeostasis and immune surveillance. The role of bacteria-derived signals in intestinal epithelial homeostasis and repair has been addressed in mouse models deficient in PRRs and signaling adaptors. While critical for host physiology and the fortification of barrier function, the intestinal microbiota poses a considerable health challenge. Accumulating evidence indicates that dysbiosis is associated with the pathogenesis of numerous GI tract diseases, including inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD and colorectal cancer (CRC. Aberrant signal integration at the epithelial cell level contributes to such diseases. An increased understanding of bacterial-specific structure recognition and signaling mechanisms at the intestinal epithelial interface is of great importance in the translation to future treatment strategies. In this review, we summarize the growing understanding of the regulation and function of the intestinal epithelial barrier, and discuss microbial signaling in the dynamic host–microbe mutualism in both health and disease.

  6. Molecular and cellular studies on the absorption, function, and safety of food components in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satsu, Hideo

    2017-03-01

    The intestinal tract comes into direct contact with the external environment despite being inside the body. Intestinal epithelial cells, which line the inner face of the intestinal tract, have various important functions, including absorption of food substances, immune functions such as cytokine secretion, and barrier function against xenobiotics by means of detoxification enzymes. It is likely that the functions of intestinal epithelial cells are regulated or modulated by these components because they are frequently exposed to food components at high concentrations. This review summarizes our research on the interaction between intestinal epithelial cells and food components at cellular and molecular levels. The influence of xenobiotic contamination in foods on the cellular function of intestinal epithelial cells is also described in this review.

  7. Microbial products induce claudin-2 to compromise gut epithelial barrier function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyu Liu

    Full Text Available The epithelial barrier dysfunction is an important pathogenic feature in a number of diseases. The underlying mechanism is to be further investigated. The present study aims to investigate the role of tight junction protein claudin-2 (Cldn2 in the compromising epithelial barrier function. In this study, the expression of Cldn2 in the epithelial layer of mice and patients with food allergy was observed by immunohistochemistry. The induction of Cldn2 was carried out with a cell culture model. The Cldn2-facilitated antigen internalization was observed by confocal microscopy. The epithelial barrier function in the gut epithelial monolayer was assessed by recording the transepithelial resistance and assessing the permeability to a macromolecular tracer. The results showed that the positive immune staining of Cldn2 was observed in the epithelial layer of the small intestine that was weakly stained in naïve control mice, and strongly stained in sensitized mice as well as patients with food allergy. Exposure to cholera toxin or Staphylococcal enterotoxin B induced the expression of Cldn2 in HT-29 or T84 cells. Cldn2 could bind protein antigen to form complexes to facilitate the antigen transport across the epithelial barrier. Blocking Cldn2 prevented the allergen-related hypersensitivity the intestine. We conclude that the tight junction protein Cldn2 is involved in the epithelial barrier dysfunction.

  8. Characterizing microbiota-independent effects of oligosaccharides on intestinal epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akbari, Peyman; Fink-Gremmels, Johanna; Willems, Rianne H.A.M.; Difilippo, Elisabetta; Schols, Henk A.; Schoterman, Margriet H.C.; Garssen, Johan; Braber, Saskia

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The direct effects of galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS), including Vivinal® GOS syrup (VGOS) and purified Vivinal® GOS (PGOS), on the epithelial integrity and corresponding interleukin-8 (IL-8/CXCL8) release were examined in a Caco-2 cell model for intestinal barrier dysfunction. To

  9. The effect of direct-fed microbial supplementation, as an alternative to antibiotics, on growth performance, intestinal immune status and epithelial barrier protein expression in broiler chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of Bacillus subtilis-based probiotic supplementation in broiler chicken diets on growth performance, feed efficiency, intestinal cytokine and tight junction (TJ) protein mRNA expression. Day-old broiler chicks (n = 140) were randomly assigne...

  10. The effects of direct-fed microbial supplementation, as alternative to antibiotics, on growth performance, intestinal immune status and epithelial barrier protein expression in broiler chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of Bacillus subtilis supplementation in broiler chicken diets on growth performance, feed efficiency, intestinal cytokine and tight junction (TJ) protein mRNA expression. Day-old broiler chicks (n = 140) were assigned five dietary treatments: basal...

  11. Streptococcus pyogenes translocates across an epithelial barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumitomo, Tomoko

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a β-hemolytic organism responsible for a wide variety of human diseases that commonly occur as self-limiting purulent diseases of the pharynx and skin. Although the occurrence of invasive infections by S. pyogenes is rare, mortality rates remain high even with progressive medical therapy. As a prerequisite for causing the severe invasive disease, S. pyogenes must invade underlying sterile tissues by translocating across the epithelial barrier. In this study, streptolysin S and SpeB were identified as the novel factors that facilitate bacterial translocation via degradation of intercellular junctions. Furthermore, we found that S. pyogenes exploits host plasminogen for acceleration of bacterial invasion into deeper tissues via tricellular tight junctions. Here, I would like to show our study on bacterial translocation across the epithelial barrier through paracellular route.

  12. The role of nitric oxide in intestinal epithelial injury and restitution in neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokshi, Nikunj K; Guner, Yigit S; Hunter, Catherine J; Upperman, Jeffrey S; Grishin, Anatoly; Ford, Henri R

    2008-04-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is the most common life-threatening gastrointestinal disease encountered in the premature infant. Although the inciting events leading to NEC remain elusive, various risk factors, including prematurity, hypoxemia, formula feeding, and intestinal ischemia, have been implicated in the pathogenesis of NEC. Data from our laboratory and others suggest that NEC evolves from disruption of the intestinal epithelial barrier, as a result of a combination of local and systemic insults. We postulate that nitric oxide (NO), an important second messenger and inflammatory mediator, plays a key role in intestinal barrier failure seen in NEC. Nitric oxide and its reactive nitrogen derivative, peroxynitrite, may affect gut barrier permeability by inducing enterocyte apoptosis (programmed cell death) and necrosis, or by altering tight junctions or gap junctions that normally play a key role in maintaining epithelial monolayer integrity. Intrinsic mechanisms that serve to restore monolayer integrity following epithelial injury include enterocyte proliferation, epithelial restitution via enterocyte migration, and re-establishment of cell contacts. This review focuses on the biology of NO and the mechanisms by which it promotes epithelial injury while concurrently disrupting the intrinsic repair mechanisms.

  13. NOD-Like Receptors in Intestinal Homeostasis and Epithelial Tissue Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlato, Marianna; Yeretssian, Garabet

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium constitutes a dynamic physical barrier segregating the luminal content from the underlying mucosal tissue. Following injury, the epithelial integrity is restored by rapid migration of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) across the denuded area in a process known as wound healing. Hence, through a sequence of events involving restitution, proliferation and differentiation of IECs the gap is resealed and homeostasis reestablished. Relapsing damage followed by healing of the inflamed mucosa is a hallmark of several intestinal disorders including inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). While several regulatory peptides, growth factors and cytokines stimulate restitution of the epithelial layer after injury, recent evidence in the field underscores the contribution of innate immunity in controlling this process. In particular, nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain-like receptors (NLRs) play critical roles in sensing the commensal microbiota, maintaining homeostasis, and regulating intestinal inflammation. Here, we review the process of intestinal epithelial tissue repair and we specifically focus on the impact of NLR-mediated signaling mechanisms involved in governing epithelial wound healing during disease. PMID:24886810

  14. Reversible effect of dextran sodium sulfate on mucus secreting intestinal epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ditte Søvsø Gundelund; Fredborg, Marlene; Andersen, V

    2016-01-01

    investigated effects of increasing doses of DSS on viability and integrity of these intestinal epithelial cells. For cell viability studies, cells were treated with DSS solutions for 24 or 48 h and viability was measured fluorometrically by PicoGreen double-stranded DNA quantitation. HT29-MTX-E12 cells were...... provide valuable insight into a possible mechanism for dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)–induced colitis of importance for the design of subsequent in vivo studies. To develop a new in vitro IBD model with DSS-induced inflammation in human mucus-secreting intestinal epithelial cells (HT29-MTX-E12), we first...... affects the viability and disrupts the intestinal barrier function of HT29-MTX-E12 monolayers, a main feature observed in IBD. Furthermore, the harmful effect of DSS is reversible, suggesting that recovery of intestinal integrity after DSS treatment by potential therapeutic drugs can be studied in vitro....

  15. Protects Porcine Intestinal Barrier from Deoxynivalenol via Improved Zonula Occludens-1 Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Jeong Gu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs forming the barrier for the first-line of protection are interconnected by tight junction (TJ proteins. TJ alteration results in impaired barrier function, which causes potentially excessive inflammation leading to intestinal disorders. It has been suggested that toll-like receptor (TLR 2 ligands and some bacteria enhance epithelial barrier function in humans and mice. However, no such study has yet to be claimed in swine. The aim of the present study was to examine whether Bacillus subtilis could improve barrier integrity and protection against deoxynivalenol (DON-induced barrier disruption in porcine intestinal epithelial cell line (IPEC-J2. We found that B. subtilis decreased permeability of TJ and improved the expression of zonula occludens (ZO-1 and occludin during the process of forming TJ. In addition, ZO-1 expression of IPEC-J2 cells treated with B. subtilis was up-regulated against DON-induced damage. In conclusion, B. subtilis may have potential to enhance epithelial barrier function and to prevent the cells from DON-induced barrier dysfunction.

  16. γδ T cells in homeostasis and host defence of epithelial barrier tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Morten M; Witherden, Deborah A; Havran, Wendy L

    2017-12-01

    Epithelial surfaces line the body and provide a crucial interface between the body and the external environment. Tissue-resident epithelial γδ T cells represent a major T cell population in the epithelial tissues and are ideally positioned to carry out barrier surveillance and aid in tissue homeostasis and repair. In this Review, we focus on the intraepithelial γδ T cell compartment of the two largest epithelial tissues in the body - namely, the epidermis and the intestine - and provide a comprehensive overview of the crucial contributions of intraepithelial γδ T cells to tissue integrity and repair, host homeostasis and protection in the context of the symbiotic relationship with the microbiome and during pathogen clearance. Finally, we describe epithelium-specific butyrophilin-like molecules and briefly review their emerging role in selectively shaping and regulating epidermal and intestinal γδ T cell repertoires.

  17. Myosin light chain kinase mediates intestinal barrier disruption following burn injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanli Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Severe burn injury results in the loss of intestinal barrier function, however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Myosin light chain (MLC phosphorylation mediated by MLC kinase (MLCK is critical to the pathophysiological regulation of intestinal barrier function. We hypothesized that the MLCK-dependent MLC phosphorylation mediates the regulation of intestinal barrier function following burn injury, and that MLCK inhibition attenuates the burn-induced intestinal barrier disfunction. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Male balb/c mice were assigned randomly to either sham burn (control or 30% total body surface area (TBSA full thickness burn without or with intraperitoneal injection of ML-9 (2 mg/kg, an MLCK inhibitor. In vivo intestinal permeability to fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC-dextran was measured. Intestinal mucosa injury was assessed histologically. Tight junction proteins ZO-1, occludin and claudin-1 was analyzed by immunofluorescent assay. Expression of MLCK and phosphorylated MLC in ileal mucosa was assessed by Western blot. Intestinal permeability was increased significantly after burn injury, which was accompanied by mucosa injury, tight junction protein alterations, and increase of both MLCK and MLC phosphorylation. Treatment with ML-9 attenuated the burn-caused increase of intestinal permeability, mucosa injury, tight junction protein alterations, and decreased MLC phosphorylation, but not MLCK expression. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The MLCK-dependent MLC phosphorylation mediates intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction after severe burn injury. It is suggested that MLCK-dependent MLC phosphorylation may be a critical target for the therapeutic treatment of intestinal epithelial barrier disruption after severe burn injury.

  18. Intestinal Epithelial Sirtuin 1 Regulates Intestinal Inflammation During Aging in Mice by Altering the Intestinal Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellman, Alicia S; Metukuri, Mallikarjuna R; Kazgan, Nevzat; Xu, Xiaojiang; Xu, Qing; Ren, Natalie S X; Czopik, Agnieszka; Shanahan, Michael T; Kang, Ashley; Chen, Willa; Azcarate-Peril, M Andrea; Gulati, Ajay S; Fargo, David C; Guarente, Leonard; Li, Xiaoling

    2017-09-01

    Intestinal epithelial homeostasis is maintained by complex interactions among epithelial cells, commensal gut microorganisms, and immune cells. Disruption of this homeostasis is associated with disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but the mechanisms of this process are not clear. We investigated how Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), a conserved mammalian NAD + -dependent protein deacetylase, senses environmental stress to alter intestinal integrity. We performed studies of mice with disruption of Sirt1 specifically in the intestinal epithelium (SIRT1 iKO, villin-Cre+, Sirt1 flox/flox mice) and control mice (villin-Cre-, Sirt1 flox/flox ) on a C57BL/6 background. Acute colitis was induced in some mice by addition of 2.5% dextran sodium sulfate to drinking water for 5-9 consecutive days. Some mice were given antibiotics via their drinking water for 4 weeks to deplete their microbiota. Some mice were fed with a cholestyramine-containing diet for 7 days to sequester their bile acids. Feces were collected and proportions of microbiota were analyzed by 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing and quantitative PCR. Intestines were collected from mice and gene expression profiles were compared by microarray and quantitative PCR analyses. We compared levels of specific mRNAs between colon tissues from age-matched patients with ulcerative colitis (n=10) vs without IBD (n=8, controls). Mice with intestinal deletion of SIRT1 (SIRT1 iKO) had abnormal activation of Paneth cells starting at the age of 5-8 months, with increased activation of NF-κB, stress pathways, and spontaneous inflammation at 22-24 months of age, compared with control mice. SIRT1 iKO mice also had altered fecal microbiota starting at 4-6 months of age compared with control mice, in part because of altered bile acid metabolism. Moreover, SIRT1 iKO mice with defective gut microbiota developed more severe colitis than control mice. Intestinal tissues from patients with ulcerative colitis expressed significantly lower

  19. Attachment of Giardia lamblia to rat intestinal epithelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Inge, P M; Edson, C M; Farthing, M J

    1988-01-01

    The human enteric protozoan, Giardia lamblia, has surface membrane lectin activity which mediates parasite adherence to erythrocytes. To determine whether an intestinal binding site exists for this lectin we have studied the interaction in vitro between axenically cultured Giardia trophozoites and isolated rat intestinal epithelial cells. Scanning electron microscopy showed that Giardia attached to the apical microvillus membrane and basolateral membrane of rat enterocytes. Any location on th...

  20. Drug permeation across intestinal epithelial cells using porous silicon nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bimbo, Luis M; Mäkilä, Ermei; Laaksonen, Timo; Lehto, Vesa-Pekka; Salonen, Jarno; Hirvonen, Jouni; Santos, Hélder A

    2011-04-01

    Mesoporous silicon particles hold great potential in improving the solubility of otherwise poorly soluble drugs. To effectively translate this feature into the clinic, especially via oral or parenteral administration, a thorough understanding of the interactions of the micro- and nanosized material with the physiological environment during the delivery process is required. In the present study, the behaviour of thermally oxidized porous silicon particles of different sizes interacting with Caco-2 cells (both non-differentiated and polarized monolayers) was investigated in order to establish their fate in a model of intestinal epithelial cell barrier. Particle interactions and TNF-α were measured in RAW 264.7 macrophages, while cell viabilities, reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide levels, together with transmission electron microscope images of the polarized monolayers, were assessed with both the Caco-2 cells and RAW 264.7 macrophages. The results showed a concentration and size dependent influence on cell viability and ROS-, NO- and TNF-α levels. There was no evidence of the porous nanoparticles crossing the Caco-2 cell monolayers, yet increased permeation of the loaded poorly soluble drug, griseofulvin, was shown. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Mechanisms of Intestinal Barrier Dysfunction in Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoseph, Benyam P; Klingensmith, Nathan J; Liang, Zhe; Breed, Elise R; Burd, Eileen M; Mittal, Rohit; Dominguez, Jessica A; Petrie, Benjamin; Ford, Mandy L; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2016-07-01

    Intestinal barrier dysfunction is thought to contribute to the development of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome in sepsis. Although there are similarities in clinical course following sepsis, there are significant differences in the host response depending on the initiating organism and time course of the disease, and pathways of gut injury vary widely in different preclinical models of sepsis. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the timecourse and mechanisms of intestinal barrier dysfunction are similar in disparate mouse models of sepsis with similar mortalities. FVB/N mice were randomized to receive cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) or sham laparotomy, and permeability was measured to fluoresceinisothiocyanate conjugated-dextran (FD-4) six to 48 h later. Intestinal permeability was elevated following CLP at all timepoints measured, peaking at 6 to 12 h. Tight junction proteins claudin 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 13, and 15, Junctional Adhesion Molecule-A (JAM-A), occludin, and ZO-1 were than assayed by Western blot, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry 12 h after CLP to determine potential mechanisms underlying increases in intestinal permeability. Claudin 2 and JAM-A were increased by sepsis, whereas claudin-5 and occludin were decreased by sepsis. All other tight junction proteins were unchanged. A further timecourse experiment demonstrated that alterations in claudin-2 and occludin were detectable as early as 1 h after the onset of sepsis. Similar experiments were then performed in a different group of mice subjected to Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia. Mice with pneumonia had an increase in intestinal permeability similar in timecourse and magnitude to that seen in CLP. Similar changes in tight junction proteins were seen in both models of sepsis although mice subjected to pneumonia also had a marked decrease in ZO-1 not seen in CLP. These results indicate that two disparate, clinically relevant models of sepsis

  2. A coculture model mimicking the intestinal mucosa reveals a regulatory role for myofibroblasts in immune-mediated barrier disruption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemsen, L. E. M.; Schreurs, C. C. H. M.; Kroes, H.; Spillenaar Bilgen, E. J.; van Deventer, S. J. H.; van Tol, E. A. F.

    2002-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Crohn's disease involves a mucosal inflammatory response affecting the barrier function of the gut. Myofibroblasts directly underlining the intestinal epithelium may have a regulatory role in immune-mediated barrier disruption. A coculture system of T84 epithelial and CCD-18Co

  3. Regulators of Intestinal Epithelial Migration in Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Mei; Klingensmith, Nathan J; Liang, Zhe; Lyons, John D; Fay, Katherine T; Chen, Ching-Wen; Ford, Mandy L; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2018-02-08

    The gut is a continuously renewing organ, with cell proliferation, migration and death occurring rapidly under basal conditions. Since the impact of critical illness on cell movement from crypt base to villus tip is poorly understood, the purpose of this study was to determine how sepsis alters enterocyte migration. Wild type, transgenic and knockout mice were injected with 5-bromo-2'deoxyuridine (BrdU) to label cells in S phase before and after the onset of cecal ligation and puncture and were sacrificed at pre-determined endpoints to determine distance proliferating cells migrated up the crypt-villus unit. Enterocyte migration rate was decreased from 24-96 hours following sepsis. BrdU was not detectable on villi 6 days after sham laparotomy, meaning all cells had migrated the length of the gut and been exfoliated into its lumen. However, BrdU positive cells were detectable on villi 10 days after sepsis. Multiple components of gut integrity altered enterocyte migration. Sepsis decreased crypt proliferation, which further slowed enterocyte transit as mice injected with BrdU after the onset of sepsis (decreased proliferation) had slower migration than mice injected with BrdU prior to the onset of sepsis (normal proliferation). Decreasing intestinal apoptosis via gut-specific overexpression of Bcl-2 prevented sepsis-induced slowing of enterocyte migration. In contrast, worsened intestinal hyperpermeability by genetic deletion of JAM-A increased enterocyte migration. Sepsis therefore significantly slows enterocyte migration, and intestinal proliferation, apoptosis and permeability all affect migration time, which can potentially be targeted both genetically and pharmacologically.

  4. The food contaminant deoxynivalenol, decreases intestinal barrier permeability and reduces claudin expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinton, Philippe; Nougayrede, Jean-Philippe; Del Rio, Juan-Carlos; Moreno, Carolina; Marin, Daniela E.; Ferrier, Laurent; Bracarense, Ana-Paula; Kolf-Clauw, Martine; Oswald, Isabelle P.

    2009-01-01

    'The gastrointestinal tract represents the first barrier against food contaminants as well as the first target for these toxicants. Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a mycotoxin that commonly contaminates cereals and causes various toxicological effects. Through consumption of contaminated cereals and cereal products, human and pigs are exposed to this mycotoxin. Using in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo approaches, we investigated the effects of DON on the intestinal epithelium. We demonstrated that, in intestinal epithelial cell lines from porcine (IPEC-1) or human (Caco-2) origin, DON decreases trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and increases in a time and dose-dependent manner the paracellular permeability to 4 kDa dextran and to pathogenic Escherichia coli across intestinal cell monolayers. In pig explants treated with DON, we also observed an increased permeability of intestinal tissue. These alterations of barrier function were associated with a specific reduction in the expression of claudins, which was also seen in vivo in the jejunum of piglets exposed to DON-contaminated feed. In conclusion, DON alters claudin expression and decreases the barrier function of the intestinal epithelium. Considering that high levels of DON may be present in food or feed, consumption of DON-contaminated food/feed may induce intestinal damage and has consequences for human and animal health.

  5. Intestinal Epithelial Cell Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Inflammatory Bowel Disease Pathogenesis: An Update Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoshi Ma

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal epithelial cells serve essential roles in maintaining intestinal homeostasis, which relies on appropriate endoplasmic reticulum (ER function for proper protein folding, modification, and secretion. Exogenous or endogenous risk factors with an ability to disturb the ER function can impair the intestinal barrier function and activate inflammatory responses in the host. The last decade has witnessed considerable progress in the understanding of the functional role of ER stress and unfolded protein response (UPR in the gut homeostasis and its significant contribution to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Herein, we review recent evidence supporting the viewpoint that deregulation of ER stress and UPR signaling in the intestinal epithelium, including the absorptive cells, Paneth cells, goblet cells, and enteroendocrine cells, mediates the action of genetic or environmental factors driving colitis in experimental animals and IBD patients. In addition, we highlight pharmacologic application of chaperones or small molecules that enhance protein folding and modification capacity or improve the function of the ER. These molecules represent potential therapeutic strategies in the prevention or treatment of IBD through restoring ER homeostasis in intestinal epithelial cells.

  6. Intestinal Epithelial Cells Synthesize Glucocorticoids and Regulate T Cell Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cima, Igor; Corazza, Nadia; Dick, Bernhard; Fuhrer, Andrea; Herren, Simon; Jakob, Sabine; Ayuni, Erick; Mueller, Christoph; Brunner, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are important steroid hormones with widespread activities in metabolism, development, and immune regulation. The adrenal glands are the major source of GCs and release these hormones in response to psychological and immunological stress. However, there is increasing evidence that GCs may also be synthesized by nonadrenal tissues. Here, we report that the intestinal mucosa expresses steroidogenic enzymes and releases the GC corticosterone in response to T cell activation. T cell activation causes an increase in the intestinal expression of the steroidogenic enzymes required for GC synthesis. In situ hybridization analysis revealed that these enzymes are confined to the crypt region of the intestinal epithelial layer. Surprisingly, in situ–produced GCs exhibit both an inhibitory and a costimulatory role on intestinal T cell activation. In the absence of intestinal GCs in vivo, activation by anti-CD3 injection resulted in reduced CD69 expression and interferon-γ production by intestinal T cells, whereas activation by viral infection led to increased T cell activation. We conclude that the intestinal mucosa is a potent source of immunoregulatory GCs. PMID:15596520

  7. A lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-derived soluble protein, p40, stimulates ligand release from intestinal epithelial cells to transactivate epidermal growth factor receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protein p40, a Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG)-derived soluble protein, ameliorates intestinal injury and colitis, reduces apoptosis and preserves barrier function by activation of EGF receptor (EGFR) in intestinal epithelial cells. The aim of this study was to determine the mechanisms by which p40...

  8. Regulation of DMBT1 via NOD2 and TLR4 in intestinal epithelial cells modulates bacterial recognition and invasion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenstiel, Philip; Sina, Christian; End, Caroline

    2007-01-01

    Mucosal epithelial cell layers are constantly exposed to a complex resident microflora. Deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 (DMBT1) belongs to the group of secreted scavenger receptor cysteine-rich proteins and is considered to be involved in host defense by pathogen binding. This report describes...... the regulation and function of DMBT1 in intestinal epithelial cells, which form the primary immunological barrier for invading pathogens. We report that intestinal epithelial cells up-regulate DMBT1 upon proinflammatory stimuli (e.g., TNF-alpha, LPS). We demonstrate that DMBT1 is a target gene...... for the intracellular pathogen receptor NOD2 via NF-kappaB activation. DMBT1 is strongly up-regulated in the inflamed intestinal mucosa of Crohn's disease patients with wild-type, but not with mutant NOD2. We show that DMBT1 inhibits cytoinvasion of Salmonella enterica and LPS- and muramyl dipeptide-induced NF...

  9. Regulation of DMBT1 via NOD2 and TLR4 in intestinal epithelial cells modulates bacterial recognition and invasion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenstiel, Philip; Sina, Christian; End, Caroline

    2007-01-01

    Mucosal epithelial cell layers are constantly exposed to a complex resident microflora. Deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 (DMBT1) belongs to the group of secreted scavenger receptor cysteine-rich proteins and is considered to be involved in host defense by pathogen binding. This report describes...... for the intracellular pathogen receptor NOD2 via NF-kappaB activation. DMBT1 is strongly up-regulated in the inflamed intestinal mucosa of Crohn's disease patients with wild-type, but not with mutant NOD2. We show that DMBT1 inhibits cytoinvasion of Salmonella enterica and LPS- and muramyl dipeptide-induced NF...... the regulation and function of DMBT1 in intestinal epithelial cells, which form the primary immunological barrier for invading pathogens. We report that intestinal epithelial cells up-regulate DMBT1 upon proinflammatory stimuli (e.g., TNF-alpha, LPS). We demonstrate that DMBT1 is a target gene...

  10. Early effects of gliadin on enterocyte intracellular signalling involved in intestinal barrier function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente, M G; De Virgiliis, S; Kang, J S; Macatagney, R; Musu, M P; Di Pierro, M R; Drago, S; Congia, M; Fasano, A

    2003-02-01

    Despite the progress made in understanding the immunological aspects of the pathogenesis of coeliac disease (CD), the early steps that allow gliadin to cross the intestinal barrier are still largely unknown. The aim of this study was to establish whether gliadin activates a zonulin dependent enterocyte intracellular signalling pathway(s) leading to increased intestinal permeability. The effect of gliadin on the enterocyte actin cytoskeleton was studied on rat intestinal epithelial (IEC-6) cell cultures by fluorescence microscopy and spectrofluorimetry. Zonulin concentration was measured on cell culture supernatants by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Transepithelial intestinal resistance (Rt) was measured on ex vivo intestinal tissues mounted in Ussing chambers. Incubation of cells with gliadin led to a reversible protein kinase C (PKC) mediated actin polymerisation temporarily coincident with zonulin release. A significant reduction in Rt was observed after gliadin addition on rabbit intestinal mucosa mounted in Ussing chambers. Pretreatment with the zonulin inhibitor FZI/0 abolished the gliadin induced actin polymerisation and Rt reduction but not zonulin release. Gliadin induces zonulin release in intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. Activation of the zonulin pathway by PKC mediated cytoskeleton reorganisation and tight junction opening leads to a rapid increase in intestinal permeability.

  11. MicroRNA-122a Regulates Zonulin by Targeting EGFR in Intestinal Epithelial Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Zhang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: This study aimed to investigate the role of microRNA (miR-122a in regulating zonulin during the modulation of intestinal barrier. Methods: Zonulin proteins and their target gene expression were analyzed in miR-122a-overexpressing cell lines and in the target gene of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR. An mmu-miR-122a intestinal epithelial conditional transgenic (miR-122a-TG mouse model was established to investigate EGFR and zonulin expression. MiR-122a was also detected in the clinical specimens of inflammatory bowel disease. Results: EGFR was identified as a target gene of miR-122a. The expression level of miR-122a was positively correlated with that of zonulin. The expression level of zonulin was significantly increased, whereas the expression level of EGFR was significantly decreased in the miR-122a-TG mice and in the corresponding primary epithelial culture (P < 0.05. These results were consistent with the data of the clinical specimens. Conclusions: miR-122a could be a positive factor of zonulin by targeting EGFR, which increased the intestinal epithelial permeability in vivo and in vitro.

  12. MicroRNA-122a Regulates Zonulin by Targeting EGFR in Intestinal Epithelial Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin; Tian, Yinghai; Jiang, Ping; Jiang, Yanqiong; Li, Chao; Liu, Ting; Zhou, Rujian; Yang, Ning; Zhou, Xinke; Liu, Zhihua

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the role of microRNA (miR)-122a in regulating zonulin during the modulation of intestinal barrier. Zonulin proteins and their target gene expression were analyzed in miR-122a-overexpressing cell lines and in the target gene of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). An mmu-miR-122a intestinal epithelial conditional transgenic (miR-122a-TG) mouse model was established to investigate EGFR and zonulin expression. MiR-122a was also detected in the clinical specimens of inflammatory bowel disease. EGFR was identified as a target gene of miR-122a. The expression level of miR-122a was positively correlated with that of zonulin. The expression level of zonulin was significantly increased, whereas the expression level of EGFR was significantly decreased in the miR-122a-TG mice and in the corresponding primary epithelial culture (P zonulin by targeting EGFR, which increased the intestinal epithelial permeability in vivo and in vitro. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Methods to Study Epithelial Transport Protein Function and Expression in Native Intestine and Caco-2 Cells Grown in 3D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anabazhagan, Arivarasu N; Chatterjee, Ishita; Priyamvada, Shubha; Kumar, Anoop; Tyagi, Sangeeta; Saksena, Seema; Alrefai, Waddah A; Dudeja, Pradeep K; Gill, Ravinder K

    2017-03-16

    The intestinal epithelium has important transport and barrier functions that play key roles in normal physiological functions of the body while providing a barrier to foreign particles. Impaired epithelial transport (ion, nutrient, or drugs) has been associated with many diseases and can have consequences that extend beyond the normal physiological functions of the transporters, such as by influencing epithelial integrity and the gut microbiome. Understanding the function and regulation of transport proteins is critical for the development of improved therapeutic interventions. The biggest challenge in the study of epithelial transport is developing a suitable model system that recapitulates important features of the native intestinal epithelial cells. Several in vitro cell culture models, such as Caco-2, T-84, and HT-29-Cl.19A cells are typically used in epithelial transport research. These cell lines represent a reductionist approach to modeling the epithelium and have been used in many mechanistic studies, including their examination of epithelial-microbial interactions. However, cell monolayers do not accurately reflect cell-cell interactions and the in vivo microenvironment. Cells grown in 3D have shown to be promising models for drug permeability studies. We show that Caco-2 cells in 3D can be used to study epithelial transporters. It is also important that studies in Caco-2 cells are complemented with other models to rule out cell specific effects and to take into account the complexity of the native intestine. Several methods have been previously used to assess the functionality of transporters, such as everted sac and uptake in isolated epithelial cells or in isolated plasma membrane vesicles. Taking into consideration the challenges in the field with respect to models and the measurement of transport function, we demonstrate here a protocol to grow Caco-2 cells in 3D and describe the use of an Ussing chamber as an effective approach to measure serotonin

  14. Exogenous HIV-1 Nef upsets the IFN-γ-induced impairment of human intestinal epithelial integrity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Giovanna Quaranta

    Full Text Available The mucosal tissues play a central role in the transmission of HIV-1 infection as well as in the pathogenesis of AIDS. Despite several clinical studies reported intestinal dysfunction during HIV infection, the mechanisms underlying HIV-induced impairments of mucosal epithelial barrier are still unclear. It has been postulated that HIV-1 alters enterocytic function and HIV-1 proteins have been detected in several cell types of the intestinal mucosa. In the present study, we analyzed the effect of the accessory HIV-1 Nef protein on human epithelial cell line.We used unstimulated or IFN-γ-stimulated Caco-2 cells, as a model for homeostatic and inflamed gastrointestinal tracts, respectively. We investigated the effect of exogenous recombinant Nef on monolayer integrity analyzing its uptake, transepithelial electrical resistance, permeability to FITC-dextran and the expression of tight junction proteins. Moreover, we measured the induction of proinflammatory mediators. Exogenous Nef was taken up by Caco-2 cells, increased intestinal epithelial permeability and upset the IFN-γ-induced reduction of transepithelial resistance, interfering with tight junction protein expression. Moreover, Nef inhibited IFN-γ-induced apoptosis and up-regulated TNF-α, IL-6 and MIP-3α production by Caco-2 cells while down-regulated IL-10 production. The simultaneous exposure of Caco-2 cells to Nef and IFN-γ did not affect cytokine secretion respect to untreated cells. Finally, we found that Nef counteracted the IFN-γ induced arachidonic acid cascade.Our findings suggest that exogenous Nef, perturbing the IFN-γ-induced impairment of intestinal epithelial cells, could prolong cell survival, thus allowing for accumulation of viral particles. Our results may improve the understanding of AIDS pathogenesis, supporting the discovery of new therapeutic interventions.

  15. Arctigenin from Fructus Arctii (Seed of Burdock Reinforces Intestinal Barrier Function in Caco-2 Cell Monolayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee Soon Shin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fructus Arctii is used as a traditional herbal medicine to treat inflammatory diseases in oriental countries. This study aimed to investigate effect of F. Arctii extract on intestinal barrier function in human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells and to reveal the active component of F. Arctii. We measured transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER value (as an index of barrier function and ovalbumin (OVA permeation (as an index of permeability to observe the changes of intestinal barrier function. The treatment of F. Arctii increased TEER value and decreased OVA influx on Caco-2 cell monolayers. Furthermore, we found that arctigenin as an active component of F. Arctii increased TEER value and reduced permeability of OVA from apical to the basolateral side but not arctiin. In the present study, we revealed that F. Arctii could enhance intestinal barrier function, and its active component was an arctigenin on the functionality. We expect that the arctigenin from F. Arctii could contribute to prevention of inflammatory, allergic, and infectious diseases by reinforcing intestinal barrier function.

  16. Arctigenin from Fructus Arctii (Seed of Burdock) Reinforces Intestinal Barrier Function in Caco-2 Cell Monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hee Soon; Jung, Sun Young; Back, Su Yeon; Do, Jeong-Ryong; Shon, Dong-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Fructus Arctii is used as a traditional herbal medicine to treat inflammatory diseases in oriental countries. This study aimed to investigate effect of F. Arctii extract on intestinal barrier function in human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells and to reveal the active component of F. Arctii. We measured transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) value (as an index of barrier function) and ovalbumin (OVA) permeation (as an index of permeability) to observe the changes of intestinal barrier function. The treatment of F. Arctii increased TEER value and decreased OVA influx on Caco-2 cell monolayers. Furthermore, we found that arctigenin as an active component of F. Arctii increased TEER value and reduced permeability of OVA from apical to the basolateral side but not arctiin. In the present study, we revealed that F. Arctii could enhance intestinal barrier function, and its active component was an arctigenin on the functionality. We expect that the arctigenin from F. Arctii could contribute to prevention of inflammatory, allergic, and infectious diseases by reinforcing intestinal barrier function. PMID:26550018

  17. "Targeted disruption of the epithelial-barrier by Helicobacter pylori"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wroblewski Lydia E

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Helicobacter pylori colonizes the human gastric epithelium and induces chronic gastritis, which can lead to gastric cancer. Through cell-cell contacts the gastric epithelium forms a barrier to protect underlying tissue from pathogenic bacteria; however, H. pylori have evolved numerous strategies to perturb the integrity of the gastric barrier. In this review, we summarize recent research into the mechanisms through which H. pylori disrupts intercellular junctions and disrupts the gastric epithelial barrier.

  18. Mechanisms of Cell Polarity-Controlled Epithelial Homeostasis and Immunity in the Intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klunder, Leon J.; Faber, Klaas Nico; Dijkstra, Gerard; van IJzendoorn, Sven C. D.

    Intestinal epithelial cell polarity is instrumental to maintain epithelial homeostasis and balance communications between the gut lumen and bodily tissue, thereby controlling the defense against gastrointestinal pathogens and maintenance of immune tolerance to commensal bacteria. In this review, we

  19. Inhibition of EV71 by curcumin in intestinal epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chio, Chi-Chong; Lin, Jhao-Yin

    2018-01-01

    EV71 is a positive-sense single-stranded RNA virus that belongs to the Picornaviridae family. EV71 infection may cause various symptoms ranging from hand-foot-and-mouth disease to neurological pathological conditions such as aseptic meningitis, ataxia, and acute transverse myelitis. There is currently no effective treatment or vaccine available. Various compounds have been examined for their ability to restrict EV71 replication. However, most experiments have been performed in rhabdomyosarcoma or Vero cells. Since the gastrointestinal tract is the entry site for this pathogen, we anticipated that orally ingested agents may exert beneficial effects by decreasing virus replication in intestinal epithelial cells. In this study, curcumin (diferuloylmethane, C21H20O6), an active ingredient of turmeric (Curcuma longa Linn) with anti-cancer properties, was investigated for its anti-enterovirus activity. We demonstrate that curcumin treatment inhibits viral translation and increases host cell viability. Curcumin does not exert its anti-EV71 effects by modulating virus attachment or virus internal ribosome entry site (IRES) activity. Furthermore, curcumin-mediated regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways is not involved. We found that protein kinase C delta (PKCδ) plays a role in virus translation in EV71-infected intestinal epithelial cells and that curcumin treatment decreases the phosphorylation of this enzyme. In addition, we show evidence that curcumin also limits viral translation in differentiated human intestinal epithelial cells. In summary, our data demonstrate the anti-EV71 properties of curcumin, suggesting that ingestion of this phytochemical may protect against enteroviral infections. PMID:29370243

  20. Interaction of Botulinum Toxin with the Epithelial Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukako Fujinaga

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT is a protein toxin (~150 kDa, which possesses a metalloprotease activity. Food-borne botulism is manifested when BoNT is absorbed from the digestive tract to the blood stream and enters the peripheral nerves, where the toxin cleaves core proteins of the neuroexocytosis apparatus and elicits the inhibition of neurotransmitter release. The initial obstacle to orally ingested BoNT entering the body is the epithelial barrier of the digestive tract. Recent cell biology and molecular biology studies are beginning to elucidate the mechanism by which this large protein toxin crosses the epithelial barrier. In this review, we provide an overview of the structural features of botulinum toxins (BoNT and BoNT complex and the interaction of these toxins with the epithelial barrier.

  1. Protective effects of nonionic tri-block copolymers on bile acid-mediated epithelial barrier disruption.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelstein, A.; Fink, D.; Musch, M.; Valuckaite, V.; Zabornia, O.; Grubjesic, S.; Firestone, M. A.; Matthews, J. B.; Alverdy, J. C. (Materials Science Division); (Univ. of Chicago)

    2011-11-01

    Translocation of bacteria and other luminal factors from the intestine following surgical injury can be a major driver of critical illness. Bile acids have been shown to play a key role in the loss of intestinal epithelial barrier function during states of host stress. Experiments to study the ability of nonionic block copolymers to abrogate barrier failure in response to bile acid exposure are described. In vitro experiments were performed with the bile salt sodium deoxycholate on Caco-2 enterocyte monolayers using transepithelial electrical resistance to assay barrier function. A bisphenol A coupled triblock polyethylene glycol (PEG), PEG 15-20, was shown to prevent sodium deoxycholate-induced barrier failure. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, lactate dehydrogenase, and caspase 3-based cell death detection assays demonstrated that bile acid-induced apoptosis and necrosis were prevented with PEG 15-20. Immunofluorescence microscopic visualization of the tight junctional protein zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1) demonstrated that PEG 15-20 prevented significant changes in tight junction organization induced by bile acid exposure. Preliminary transepithelial electrical resistance-based studies examining structure-function correlates of polymer protection against bile acid damage were performed with a small library of PEG-based copolymers. Polymer properties associated with optimal protection against bile acid-induced barrier disruption were PEG-based compounds with a molecular weight greater than 10 kd and amphiphilicity. The data demonstrate that PEG-based copolymer architecture is an important determinant that confers protection against bile acid injury of intestinal epithelia.

  2. Microbial-Derived Butyrate Promotes Epithelial Barrier Function through IL-10 Receptor-Dependent Repression of Claudin-2.

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    Zheng, Leon; Kelly, Caleb J; Battista, Kayla D; Schaefer, Rachel; Lanis, Jordi M; Alexeev, Erica E; Wang, Ruth X; Onyiah, Joseph C; Kominsky, Douglas J; Colgan, Sean P

    2017-10-15

    Commensal interactions between the enteric microbiota and distal intestine play important roles in regulating human health. Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), such as butyrate, produced through anaerobic microbial metabolism represent a major energy source for the host colonic epithelium and enhance epithelial barrier function through unclear mechanisms. Separate studies revealed that the epithelial anti-inflammatory IL-10 receptor α subunit (IL-10RA) is also important for barrier formation. Based on these findings, we examined if SCFAs promote epithelial barrier through IL-10RA-dependent mechanisms. Using human intestinal epithelial cells (IECs), we discovered that SCFAs, particularly butyrate, enhanced IEC barrier formation, induced IL-10RA mRNA, IL-10RA protein, and transactivation through activated Stat3 and HDAC inhibition. Loss and gain of IL-10RA expression directly correlates with IEC barrier formation and butyrate represses permeability-promoting claudin-2 tight-junction protein expression through an IL-10RA-dependent mechanism. Our findings provide a novel mechanism by which microbial-derived butyrate promotes barrier through IL-10RA-dependent repression of claudin-2. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  3. Loss of guanylyl cyclase C (GCC signaling leads to dysfunctional intestinal barrier.

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    Xiaonan Han

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Guanylyl Cyclase C (GCC signaling via uroguanylin (UGN and guanylin activation is a critical mediator of intestinal fluid homeostasis, intestinal cell proliferation/apoptosis, and tumorigenesis. As a mechanism for some of these effects, we hypothesized that GCC signaling mediates regulation of intestinal barrier function.Paracellular permeability of intestinal segments was assessed in wild type (WT and GCC deficient (GCC-/- mice with and without lipopolysaccharide (LPS challenge, as well as in UGN deficient (UGN-/- mice. IFNγ and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK levels were determined by real time PCR. Expression of tight junction proteins (TJPs, phosphorylation of myosin II regulatory light chain (MLC, and STAT1 activation were examined in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs and intestinal mucosa. The permeability of Caco-2 and HT-29 IEC monolayers, grown on Transwell filters was determined in the absence and presence of GCC RNA interference (RNAi. We found that intestinal permeability was increased in GCC-/- and UGN-/- mice compared to WT, accompanied by increased IFNγ levels, MLCK and STAT1 activation in IECs. LPS challenge promotes greater IFNγ and STAT1 activation in IECs of GCC-/- mice compared to WT mice. Claudin-2 and JAM-A expression were reduced in GCC deficient intestine; the level of phosphorylated MLC in IECs was significantly increased in GCC-/- and UGN-/- mice compared to WT. GCC knockdown induced MLC phosphorylation, increased permeability in IEC monolayers under basal conditions, and enhanced TNFα and IFNγ-induced monolayer hyperpermeability.GCC signaling plays a protective role in the integrity of the intestinal mucosal barrier by regulating MLCK activation and TJ disassembly. GCC signaling activation may therefore represent a novel mechanism in maintaining the small bowel barrier in response to injury.

  4. Intestinal subepithelial myofibroblasts support the growth of intestinal epithelial stem cells.

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    Nan Ye Lei

    Full Text Available Intestinal epithelial stem cells (ISCs are the focus of recent intense study. Current in vitro models rely on supplementation with the Wnt agonist R-spondin1 to support robust growth, ISC self-renewal, and differentiation. Intestinal subepithelial myofibroblasts (ISEMFs are important supportive cells within the ISC niche. We hypothesized that co-culture with ISEMF enhances the growth of ISCs in vitro and allows for their successful in vivo implantation and engraftment. ISC-containing small intestinal crypts, FACS-sorted single ISCs, and ISEMFs were procured from C57BL/6 mice. Crypts and single ISCs were grown in vitro into enteroids, in the presence or absence of ISEMFs. ISEMFs enhanced the growth of intestinal epithelium in vitro in a proximity-dependent fashion, with co-cultures giving rise to larger enteroids than monocultures. Co-culture of ISCs with supportive ISEMFs relinquished the requirement of exogenous R-spondin1 to sustain long-term growth and differentiation of ISCs. Mono- and co-cultures were implanted subcutaneously in syngeneic mice. Co-culture with ISEMFs proved necessary for successful in vivo engraftment and proliferation of enteroids; implants without ISEMFs did not survive. ISEMF whole transcriptome sequencing and qPCR demonstrated high expression of specific R-spondins, well-described Wnt agonists that supports ISC growth. Specific non-supportive ISEMF populations had reduced expression of R-spondins. The addition of ISEMFs in intestinal epithelial culture therefore recapitulates a critical element of the intestinal stem cell niche and allows for its experimental interrogation and biodesign-driven manipulation.

  5. Intestinal subepithelial myofibroblasts support the growth of intestinal epithelial stem cells.

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    Lei, Nan Ye; Jabaji, Ziyad; Wang, Jiafang; Joshi, Vaidehi S; Brinkley, Garrett J; Khalil, Hassan; Wang, Fengchao; Jaroszewicz, Artur; Pellegrini, Matteo; Li, Linheng; Lewis, Michael; Stelzner, Matthias; Dunn, James C Y; Martín, Martín G

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial stem cells (ISCs) are the focus of recent intense study. Current in vitro models rely on supplementation with the Wnt agonist R-spondin1 to support robust growth, ISC self-renewal, and differentiation. Intestinal subepithelial myofibroblasts (ISEMFs) are important supportive cells within the ISC niche. We hypothesized that co-culture with ISEMF enhances the growth of ISCs in vitro and allows for their successful in vivo implantation and engraftment. ISC-containing small intestinal crypts, FACS-sorted single ISCs, and ISEMFs were procured from C57BL/6 mice. Crypts and single ISCs were grown in vitro into enteroids, in the presence or absence of ISEMFs. ISEMFs enhanced the growth of intestinal epithelium in vitro in a proximity-dependent fashion, with co-cultures giving rise to larger enteroids than monocultures. Co-culture of ISCs with supportive ISEMFs relinquished the requirement of exogenous R-spondin1 to sustain long-term growth and differentiation of ISCs. Mono- and co-cultures were implanted subcutaneously in syngeneic mice. Co-culture with ISEMFs proved necessary for successful in vivo engraftment and proliferation of enteroids; implants without ISEMFs did not survive. ISEMF whole transcriptome sequencing and qPCR demonstrated high expression of specific R-spondins, well-described Wnt agonists that supports ISC growth. Specific non-supportive ISEMF populations had reduced expression of R-spondins. The addition of ISEMFs in intestinal epithelial culture therefore recapitulates a critical element of the intestinal stem cell niche and allows for its experimental interrogation and biodesign-driven manipulation.

  6. Serratia marcescens is injurious to intestinal epithelial cells.

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    Ochieng, John B; Boisen, Nadia; Lindsay, Brianna; Santiago, Araceli; Ouma, Collins; Ombok, Maurice; Fields, Barry; Stine, O Colin; Nataro, James P

    2014-01-01

    Diarrhea causes substantial morbidity and mortality in children in low-income countries. Although numerous pathogens cause diarrhea, the etiology of many episodes remains unknown. Serratia marcescens is incriminated in hospital-associated infections, and HIV/AIDS associated diarrhea. We have recently found that Serratia spp. may be found more commonly in the stools of patients with diarrhea than in asymptomatic control children. We therefore investigated the possible enteric pathogenicity of S. marcescens in vitro employing a polarized human colonic epithelial cell (T84) monolayer. Infected monolayers were assayed for bacterial invasion, transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER), cytotoxicity, interleukin-8 (IL-8) release and morphological changes by scanning electron microscopy. We observed significantly greater epithelial cell invasion by S. marcescens compared to Escherichia coli strain HS (p = 0.0038 respectively). Cell invasion was accompanied by reduction in TEER and secretion of IL-8. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) extracellular concentration rapidly increased within a few hours of exposure of the monolayer to S. marcescens. Scanning electron microscopy of S. marcescens-infected monolayers demonstrated destruction of microvilli and vacuolization. Our results suggest that S. marcescens interacts with intestinal epithelial cells in culture and induces dramatic alterations similar to those produced by known enteric pathogens.

  7. Immunochemical, biomolecular and biochemical characterization of bovine epithelial intestinal primocultures

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    Mainil Jacques

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cultures of enterocytes and colonocytes represent valuable tools to study growth and differentiation of epithelial cells. In vitro models may be used to evaluate passage or toxicity of drugs, interactions of enteropathogenes bacteria strains with intestinal epithelium and other physiologic or pathologic phenomenon involving the digestive tract. Results Cultures of bovine colonocytes and jejunocytes were obtained from organoid-enriched preparations, using a combination of enzymatic and mechanical disruption of the intestine epithelium, followed by an isopicnic centrifugation discarding most single cells. Confluent cell monolayers arising from plated organoids exhibited epithelium typical features, such as the pavement-like structure, the presence of apical microvilli and tight junctions. Accordingly, cells expressed several markers of enterocyte brush border (i.e. maltase, alkaline phosphatase and fatty acid binding protein as well as an epithelial cytoskeleton component (cytokeratin 18. However, enterocyte primocultures were also positive for the vimentin immunostaining (mesenchyme marker. Vimentin expression studies showed that this gene is constitutively expressed in bovine enterocytes. Comparison of the vimentin expression profile with the pattern of brush border enzymes activities, suggested that the decrease of cell differentiation level observed during the enterocyte isolation procedure and early passages of the primoculture could result from a post-transcriptional de-repression of vimentin synthesis. The low differentiation level of bovine enterocytes in vitro could partly be counteracted adding butyrate (1–2 mM or using a glucose-deprived culture medium. Conclusion The present study describes several complementary approaches to characterize bovine primary cultures of intestinal cells. Cultured cells kept their morphologic and functional characteristics during several generations.

  8. Culture of human intestinal epithelial cell using the dissociating enzyme thermolysin and endothelin-3

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    Z. Liu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Epithelium, a highly dynamic system, plays a key role in the homeostasis of the intestine. However, thus far a human intestinal epithelial cell line has not been established in many countries. Fetal tissue was selected to generate viable cell cultures for its sterile condition, effective generation, and differentiated character. The purpose of the present study was to culture human intestinal epithelial cells by a relatively simple method. Thermolysin was added to improve the yield of epithelial cells, while endothelin-3 was added to stimulate their growth. By adding endothelin-3, the achievement ratio (viable cell cultures/total cultures was enhanced to 60% of a total of 10 cultures (initiated from 8 distinct fetal small intestines, allowing the generation of viable epithelial cell cultures. Western blot, real-time PCR and immunofluorescent staining showed that cytokeratins 8, 18 and mouse intestinal mucosa-1/39 had high expression levels in human intestinal epithelial cells. Differentiated markers such as sucrase-isomaltase, aminopeptidase N and dipeptidylpeptidase IV also showed high expression levels in human intestinal epithelial cells. Differentiated human intestinal epithelial cells, with the expression of surface markers (cytokeratins 8, 18 and mouse intestinal mucosa-1/39 and secretion of cytokines (sucrase-isomaltase, aminopeptidase N and dipeptidylpeptidase IV, may be cultured by the thermolysin and endothelin-3 method and maintained for at least 20 passages. This is relatively simple, requiring no sophisticated techniques or instruments, and may have a number of varied applications.

  9. Commensal bacteria-dependent indole production enhances epithelial barrier function in the colon.

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    Yosuke Shimada

    Full Text Available Microbiota have been shown to have a great influence on functions of intestinal epithelial cells (ECs. The role of indole as a quorum-sensing (QS molecule mediating intercellular signals in bacteria has been well appreciated. However, it remains unknown whether indole has beneficial effects on maintaining intestinal barriers in vivo. In this study, we analyzed the effect of indole on ECs using a germ free (GF mouse model. GF mice showed decreased expression of junctional complex molecules in colonic ECs. The feces of specific pathogen-free (SPF mice contained a high amount of indole; however the amount was significantly decreased in the feces of GF mice by 27-fold. Oral administration of indole-containing capsules resulted in increased expression of both tight junction (TJ- and adherens junction (AJ-associated molecules in colonic ECs in GF mice. In accordance with the increased expression of these junctional complex molecules, GF mice given indole-containing capsules showed higher resistance to dextran sodium sulfate (DSS-induced colitis. A similar protective effect of indole on DSS-induced epithelial damage was also observed in mice bred in SPF conditions. These findings highlight the beneficial role of indole in establishing an epithelial barrier in vivo.

  10. Simulated Reflux Decreases Vocal Fold Epithelial Barrier Resistance

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    Erickson, Elizabeth; Sivasankar, Mahalakshmi

    2010-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis The vocal fold epithelium provides a barrier to the entry of inhaled and systemic challenges. However, the location of the epithelium makes it vulnerable to damage. Past research suggests, but does not directly demonstrate, that exposure to gastric reflux adversely affects the function of the epithelial barrier. Understanding the nature of reflux-induced epithelial barrier dysfunction is necessary to better recognize the mechanisms for vocal fold susceptibility to this disease. Therefore, we examined the effects of physiologically relevant reflux challenges on vocal fold transepithelial resistance and gross epithelial and subepithelial appearance. Study Design Ex vivo, mixed design with between-group and repeated-measures analyses. Methods Healthy, native porcine vocal folds (N = 52) were exposed to physiologically relevant acidic pepsin, acid-only, or pepsin-only challenges and examined with electrophysiology and light microscopy. For all challenges, vocal folds exposed to a neutral pH served as control. Results Acidic pepsin and acid-only challenges, but not pepsin-only or control challenges significantly reduced transepithelial resistance within 30 minutes. Reductions in transepithelial resistance were irreversible. Challenge exposure produced minimal gross changes in vocal fold epithelial or subepithelial appearance as evidenced by light microscopy. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that acidic environments characteristic of gastric reflux compromise epithelial barrier function without gross structural changes. In healthy, native vocal folds, reductions in transepithelial resistance could reflect reflux-related epithelial disruption. These results might guide the development of pharmacologic and therapeutic recommendations for patients with reflux, such as continued acid-suppression therapy and patient antireflux behavioral education. PMID:20564752

  11. Anthrax lethal toxin disrupts intestinal barrier function and causes systemic infections with enteric bacteria.

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    Chen Sun

    Full Text Available A variety of intestinal pathogens have virulence factors that target mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathways, including Bacillus anthracis. Anthrax lethal toxin (LT has specific proteolytic activity against the upstream regulators of MAPKs, the MAPK kinases (MKKs. Using a murine model of intoxication, we show that LT causes the dose-dependent disruption of intestinal epithelial integrity, characterized by mucosal erosion, ulceration, and bleeding. This pathology correlates with an LT-dependent blockade of intestinal crypt cell proliferation, accompanied by marked apoptosis in the villus tips. C57BL/6J mice treated with intravenous LT nearly uniformly develop systemic infections with commensal enteric organisms within 72 hours of administration. LT-dependent intestinal pathology depends upon its proteolytic activity and is partially attenuated by co-administration of broad spectrum antibiotics, indicating that it is both a cause and an effect of infection. These findings indicate that targeting of MAPK signaling pathways by anthrax LT compromises the structural integrity of the mucosal layer, serving to undermine the effectiveness of the intestinal barrier. Combined with the well-described immunosuppressive effects of LT, this disruption of the intestinal barrier provides a potential mechanism for host invasion via the enteric route, a common portal of entry during the natural infection cycle of Bacillus anthracis.

  12. Mechanisms of Cell Polarity-Controlled Epithelial Homeostasis and Immunity in the Intestine.

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    Klunder, Leon J; Faber, Klaas Nico; Dijkstra, Gerard; van IJzendoorn, Sven C D

    2017-07-05

    Intestinal epithelial cell polarity is instrumental to maintain epithelial homeostasis and balance communications between the gut lumen and bodily tissue, thereby controlling the defense against gastrointestinal pathogens and maintenance of immune tolerance to commensal bacteria. In this review, we highlight recent advances with regard to the molecular mechanisms of cell polarity-controlled epithelial homeostasis and immunity in the human intestine. Copyright © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  13. TREM-1 Promotes Pancreatitis-Associated Intestinal Barrier Dysfunction

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    Shengchun Dang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP can cause intestinal barrier dysfunction (IBD, which significantly increases the disease severity and risk of mortality. We hypothesized that the innate immunity- and inflammatory-related protein-triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (TREM-1 contributes to this complication of SAP. Thus, we investigated the effect of TREM-1 pathway modulation on a rat model of pancreatitis-associated IBD. In this study we sought to clarify the role of TREM-1 in the pathophysiology of intestinal barrier dysfunction in SAP. Specifically, we evaluated levels of serum TREM-1 and membrane-bound TREM-1 in the intestine and pancreas from an animal model of experimentally induced SAP. TREM-1 pathway blockade by LP17 treatment may suppress pancreatitis-associated IBD and ameliorate the damage to the intestinal mucosa barrier.

  14. Claudins, dietary milk proteins, and intestinal barrier regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotler, Belinda M; Kerstetter, Jane E; Insogna, Karl L

    2013-01-01

    The family of claudin proteins plays an important role in regulating the intestinal barrier by modulating the permeability of tight junctions. The impact of dietary protein on claudin biology has not been studied extensively. Whey proteins have been reported to improve intestinal barrier function, but their mechanism of action is not clear. Recent studies, however, have demonstrated increased intestinal claudin expression in response to milk protein components. Reviewed here are new findings suggesting that whey-protein-derived transforming growth factor β transcriptionally upregulates claudin-4 expression via a Smad-4-dependent pathway. These and other data, including limited clinical studies, are summarized below and, in the aggregate, suggest a therapeutic role for whey protein in diseases of intestinal barrier dysfunction, perhaps, in part, by regulating claudin expression. © 2013 International Life Sciences Institute.

  15. Genomic dissection of conserved transcriptional regulation in intestinal epithelial cells.

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    Colin R Lickwar

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal epithelium serves critical physiologic functions that are shared among all vertebrates. However, it is unknown how the transcriptional regulatory mechanisms underlying these functions have changed over the course of vertebrate evolution. We generated genome-wide mRNA and accessible chromatin data from adult intestinal epithelial cells (IECs in zebrafish, stickleback, mouse, and human species to determine if conserved IEC functions are achieved through common transcriptional regulation. We found evidence for substantial common regulation and conservation of gene expression regionally along the length of the intestine from fish to mammals and identified a core set of genes comprising a vertebrate IEC signature. We also identified transcriptional start sites and other putative regulatory regions that are differentially accessible in IECs in all 4 species. Although these sites rarely showed sequence conservation from fish to mammals, surprisingly, they drove highly conserved IEC expression in a zebrafish reporter assay. Common putative transcription factor binding sites (TFBS found at these sites in multiple species indicate that sequence conservation alone is insufficient to identify much of the functionally conserved IEC regulatory information. Among the rare, highly sequence-conserved, IEC-specific regulatory regions, we discovered an ancient enhancer upstream from her6/HES1 that is active in a distinct population of Notch-positive cells in the intestinal epithelium. Together, these results show how combining accessible chromatin and mRNA datasets with TFBS prediction and in vivo reporter assays can reveal tissue-specific regulatory information conserved across 420 million years of vertebrate evolution. We define an IEC transcriptional regulatory network that is shared between fish and mammals and establish an experimental platform for studying how evolutionarily distilled regulatory information commonly controls IEC development

  16. Culture of human intestinal epithelial cell using the dissociating enzyme thermolysin and endothelin-3

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Z.; Zhang, P.; Zhou, Y.; Qin, H.; Shen, T.

    2010-01-01

    Epithelium, a highly dynamic system, plays a key role in the homeostasis of the intestine. However, thus far a human intestinal epithelial cell line has not been established in many countries. Fetal tissue was selected to generate viable cell cultures for its sterile condition, effective generation, and differentiated character. The purpose of the present study was to culture human intestinal epithelial cells by a relatively simple method. Thermolysin was added to improve the yield of epithel...

  17. Arginine consumption by the intestinal parasite Giardia intestinalis reduces proliferation of intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadelmann, Britta; Merino, María C; Persson, Lo; Svärd, Staffan G

    2012-01-01

    In the field of infectious diseases the multifaceted amino acid arginine has reached special attention as substrate for the hosts production of the antimicrobial agent nitric oxide (NO). A variety of infectious organisms interfere with this part of the host immune response by reducing the availability of arginine. This prompted us to further investigate additional roles of arginine during pathogen infections. As a model we used the intestinal parasite Giardia intestinalis that actively consumes arginine as main energy source and secretes an arginine-consuming enzyme, arginine deiminase (ADI). Reduced intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) proliferation is a common theme during bacterial and viral intestinal infections, but it has never been connected to arginine-consumption. Our specific question was thereby, whether the arginine-consumption by Giardia leads to reduced IEC proliferation, in addition to NO reduction. In vitro cultivation of human IEC lines in arginine-free or arginine/citrulline-complemented medium, as well as in interaction with different G. intestinalis isolates, were used to study effects on host cell replication by MTT assay. IEC proliferation was further analyzed by DNA content analysis, polyamine measurements and expressional analysis of cell cycle regulatory genes. IEC proliferation was reduced upon arginine-withdrawal and also in an arginine-dependent manner upon interaction with G. intestinalis or addition of Giardia ADI. We show that arginine-withdrawal by intestinal pathogens leads to a halt in the cell cycle in IECs through reduced polyamine levels and upregulated cell cycle inhibitory genes. This is of importance with regards to intestinal tissue homeostasis that is affected through reduced cell proliferation. Thus, the slower epithelial cell turnover helps the pathogen to maintain a more stable niche for colonization. This study also shows why supplementation therapy of diarrhea patients with arginine/citrulline is helpful and that

  18. Rhubarb Supplementation Promotes Intestinal Mucosal Innate Immune Homeostasis through Modulating Intestinal Epithelial Microbiota in Goat Kids.

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    Jiao, Jinzhen; Wu, Jian; Wang, Min; Zhou, Chuanshe; Zhong, Rongzhen; Tan, Zhiliang

    2018-01-31

    The abuse and misuse of antibiotics in livestock production pose a potential health risk globally. Rhubarb can serve as a potential alternative to antibiotics, and several studies have looked into its anticancer, antitumor, and anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of this study was to test the effects of rhubarb supplementation to the diet of young ruminants on innate immune function and epithelial microbiota in the small intestine. Goat kids were fed with a control diet supplemented with or without rhubarb (1.25% DM) and were slaughtered at days 50 and 60 of age. Results showed that the supplementation of rhubarb increased ileal villus height (P = 0.036), increased jejujal and ileal anti-inflammatory IL-10 production (P immune function were accompanied by shifts in ileal epithelial bacterial ecosystem in favor of Blautia, Clostridium, Lactobacillus, and Pseudomonas, and with a decline in the relative abundance of Staphylococcus (P immune homeostasis by modulating intestinal epithelial microbiota during the early stages of animal development.

  19. HDAC1 and HDAC2 restrain the intestinal inflammatory response by regulating intestinal epithelial cell differentiation.

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    Naomie Turgeon

    Full Text Available Acetylation and deacetylation of histones and other proteins depends on histone acetyltransferases and histone deacetylases (HDACs activities, leading to either positive or negative gene expression. HDAC inhibitors have uncovered a role for HDACs in proliferation, apoptosis and inflammation. However, little is known of the roles of specific HDACs in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC. We investigated the consequences of ablating both HDAC1 and HDAC2 in murine IECs. Floxed Hdac1 and Hdac2 homozygous mice were crossed with villin-Cre mice. Mice deficient in both IEC HDAC1 and HDAC2 weighed less and survived more than a year. Colon and small intestinal sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, or with Alcian blue and Periodic Acid Schiff for goblet cell identification. Tissue sections from mice injected with BrdU for 2 h, 14 h and 48 h were stained with anti-BrdU. To determine intestinal permeability, 4-kDa FITC-labeled dextran was given by gavage for 3 h. Microarray analysis was performed on total colon RNAs. Inflammatory and IEC-specific gene expression was assessed by Western blot or semi-quantitative RT-PCR and qPCR with respectively total colon protein and total colon RNAs. HDAC1 and HDAC2-deficient mice displayed: 1 increased migration and proliferation, with elevated cyclin D1 expression and phosphorylated S6 ribosomal protein, a downstream mTOR target; 2 tissue architecture defects with cell differentiation alterations, correlating with reduction of secretory Paneth and goblet cells in jejunum and goblet cells in colon, increased expression of enterocytic markers such as sucrase-isomaltase in the colon, increased expression of cleaved Notch1 and augmented intestinal permeability; 3 loss of tissue homeostasis, as evidenced by modifications of claudin 3 expression, caspase-3 cleavage and Stat3 phosphorylation; 4 chronic inflammation, as determined by inflammatory molecular expression signatures and altered inflammatory gene expression

  20. Role of airway epithelial barrier dysfunction in pathogenesis of asthma.

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    Gon, Yasuhiro; Hashimoto, Shu

    2018-01-01

    Bronchial asthma is characterized by persistent cough, increased sputum, and repeated wheezing. The pathophysiology underlying these symptoms is the hyper-responsiveness of the airway along with chronic airway inflammation. Repeated injury, repair, and regeneration of the airway epithelium following exposure to environmental factors and inflammation results in histological changes and functional abnormalities in the airway mucosal epithelium; such changes are believed to have a significant association with the pathophysiology of asthma. Damage to the barrier functions of the airway epithelium enhances mucosal permeability of foreign substances in the airway epithelium of patients with asthma. Thus, epithelial barrier fragility is closely involved in releasing epithelial cytokines (e.g., TSLP, IL-25, and IL-33) because of the activation of airway epithelial cells, dendritic cells, and innate group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2). Functional abnormalities of the airway epithelial cells along with the activation of dendritic cells, Th2 cells, and ILC2 form a single immunopathological unit that is considered to cause allergic airway inflammation. Here we use the latest published literature to discuss the potential pathological mechanisms regarding the onset and progressive severity of asthma with regard to the disruption of the airway epithelial function. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Allergology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Control the Epithelial Barrier: A Pivotal First Line of Defense

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    Catherine M McKay

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Lumen-derived material gains access to the mucosa by permeating between adjacent epithelial cells (ie, paracellular pathway, by transcytosis across the apical and basolateral cell membranes (ie, transcellular pathway or by exploiting breaks or erosions in the epithelium that may, for example, result from inflammation. Increased epithelial permeability (or decreased barrier function has repeatedly been demonstrated in a variety of gut disturbances; notably, in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. There has been an exponential increase in our knowledge of the structural elements that comprise the epithelial barrier, and of the intrinsic factors (eg, cytokines and external stimuli (eg, bacterial toxins that can either perturb or enhance epithelial permeability. Canadian researchers have been very active in the study of epithelial permeability and have been responsible for major advances in the field, documenting increased permeability in patients with ulcer disease and IBD and some of their first degree relatives (as well as before onset of overt inflammation, and elucidating mechanisms of stress-induced and cytokine-induced increases in permeability (1-8. A recent study from Scott et al (9 continues this impressive tradition.

  2. Glucose stimulates intestinal epithelial crypt proliferation by modulating cellular energy metabolism.

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    Zhou, Weinan; Ramachandran, Deepti; Mansouri, Abdelhak; Dailey, Megan J

    2018-04-01

    The intestinal epithelium plays an essential role in nutrient absorption, hormone release, and barrier function. Maintenance of the epithelium is driven by continuous cell renewal by stem cells located in the intestinal crypts. The amount and type of diet influence this process and result in changes in the size and cellular make-up of the tissue. The mechanism underlying the nutrient-driven changes in proliferation is not known, but may involve a shift in intracellular metabolism that allows for more nutrients to be used to manufacture new cells. We hypothesized that nutrient availability drives changes in cellular energy metabolism of small intestinal epithelial crypts that could contribute to increases in crypt proliferation. We utilized primary small intestinal epithelial crypts from C57BL/6J mice to study (1) the effect of glucose on crypt proliferation and (2) the effect of glucose on crypt metabolism using an extracellular flux analyzer for real-time metabolic measurements. We found that glucose increased both crypt proliferation and glycolysis, and the glycolytic pathway inhibitor 2-deoxy-d-glucose (2-DG) attenuated glucose-induced crypt proliferation. Glucose did not enhance glucose oxidation, but did increase the maximum mitochondrial respiratory capacity, which may contribute to glucose-induced increases in proliferation. Glucose activated Akt/HIF-1α signaling pathway, which might be at least in part responsible for glucose-induced glycolysis and cell proliferation. These results suggest that high glucose availability induces an increase in crypt proliferation by inducing an increase in glycolysis with no change in glucose oxidation. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Neutrophils Compromise Retinal Pigment Epithelial Barrier Integrity

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    Jiehao Zhou

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesized that neutrophils and their secreted factors mediate breakdown of the integrity of the outer blood-retina-barrier by degrading the apical tight junctions of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE. The effect of activated neutrophils or neutrophil cell lysate on apparent permeability of bovine RPE-Choroid explants was evaluated by measuring [H] mannitol flux in a modified Ussing chamber. The expression of matrix metalloproteinase- (MMP- 9 in murine peritoneal neutrophils, and the effects of neutrophils on RPE tight-junction protein expression were assessed by confocal microscopy and western blot. Our results revealed that basolateral incubation of explants with neutrophils decreased occludin and ZO-1 expression at 1 and 3 hours and increased the permeability of bovine RPE-Choroid explants by >3-fold (P<.05. Similarly, basolateral incubation of explants with neutrophil lysate decreased ZO-1 expression at 1 and 3 hours (P<.05 and increased permeability of explants by 75%. Further, we found that neutrophils prominently express MMP-9 and that incubation of explants with neutrophils in the presence of anti-MMP-9 antibody inhibited the increase in permeability. These data suggest that neutrophil-derived MMP-9 may play an important role in disrupting the integrity of the outer blood-retina barrier.

  4. Epithelial barrier disruption allows nondisease-causing bacteria to initiate and sustain IBD in the IL-10 gene-deficient mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydora, Beate C; Macfarlane, Sarah M; Walker, John W; Dmytrash, Andrea L; Churchill, Thomas A; Doyle, Jason; Fedorak, Richard N

    2007-08-01

    In the IL-10 gene-deficient mouse model, development of intestinal inflammation is associated with a defect in epithelial barrier integrity that is thought to allow sufficient passage of bacteria or bacterial antigens to initiate a mucosal immune response. Microbial monoassociation experiments into axenic animals have shown that some, but not all, endogenous bacteria will initiate an intestinal inflammatory response. For instance, Bacteroides vulgatus does not initiate intestinal inflammation in axenic IL-10 gene-deficient mice. We investigated whether B. vulgatus requires concomitant disruption of the intestinal epithelial barrier integrity in order to initiate an inflammatory response. We first identified a dose of the indomethacin that would cause a primary disruption of the epithelial barrier without causing intestinal inflammation. IL-10 axenic mice were then administered this dose of indomethacin in their drinking water for 7 days and concomitantly monoassociated, by oral gavage, with B. vulgatus. Indomethacin treatment (2 microg/g/d) for 7 days resulted in disruption of epithelial barrier integrity, but it caused neither a systemic inflammatory response nor a mucosal inflammatory response in the colon or cecum. Monoassociation with B. vulgatus alone did not lead to a mucosal inflammatory response, despite a measurable systemic response. In contrast, administration of indomethacin plus B. vulgatus-monoassociation resulted in a marked intestinal inflammatory response in colon and cecum. Our data show that, in a genetically predisposed animal model, the nondisease-causing endogenous bacteria, B. vulgatus, is able to cause an intestinal inflammatory response provided that disruption of the intestinal epithelial barrier has occurred.

  5. Action of cholera toxin in the intestinal epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyun, C.S.

    1982-01-01

    The primary event in the action of cholera toxin on the isolated chick intestinal epithelial cell is its interaction with a large number of high affinity binding sites in the cell membrane. Binding of 125 I-labeled toxin is rapid, temperature-dependent, reversible, and saturable over a wide range of concentrations and includes only a small contribution from nonspecific sites. A characteristic lag phase of 10 min occurs following the complete binding of toxin before any increase in cellular cAMP levels can be detected. The response (elevation of cellular cAMP) is linear with time for 40 to 50 min and causes a six- to eight-fold increase over control levels (10 to 15 picomole cAMP/mg cellular protein) at steady state. cAMP and agents that increase cAMP production inhibit Cl - -independent Na + influx into the isolated enterocytes whereas chlorpromazine (CPZ) which completely abolishes toxin-induced elevation of cAMP both reverses and prevents the cAMP-mediated inhibition of Na + entry. Correlation between cellular cAMP levels and the magnitude of Na + influx provides evidence for a cAMP-mediated control of intestinal Na + uptake, which may represent the mechanistic basis for the antiabsorptive effect of CT on Na + during induction of intestinal secretion. The effect of cAMP on Na + but not Cl - influx preparations can be partially explained in terms of a cAMP-regulated Na + /H + neutral exchange system. Data on the coupling relationship between Na + transport and the intra- and extracellular pH in the enterocytes show that an amiloride-sensitive electroneutral Na + /H + exchange process occurs. This coupling between Na + and H + is partially inhibited by CT and dbcAMP, suggesting that the Na + /H + exchange may be a cAMP-regulated process. 31 references, 32 figures, 5 tables

  6. Action of cholera toxin in the intestinal epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyun, C.S.

    1982-01-01

    The primary event in the action of cholera toxin on the isolated chick intestinal epithelial cell is its interaction with the cell membrane. This involves a large number (17 million per cell) of high affinity binding sites which belong to a single class. Binding of biologically active 125 I-labeled toxin is rapid, temperature-dependent, reversible, and saturable over a wide range of concentrations and includes only a small contribution from nonspecific sites. A characteristic lag phase of 10 min occurs following the complete binding of toxin before any increase in cellular cAMP levels can be detected in the isolated cells. The response (elevation of cellular cAMP) of the enterocytes to cholera toxin is linear with time for 40-50 min and causes a six- to eight-fold increase over control levels at steady stae. cAMP and agents that increase cAMP production inhibit Cl - -independent Na + influx into the isolated enterocytes whereas chlorporomazine (CPZ) which completely abolishes toxin-induced elevation of cAMP both reverses and prevents the cAMP-mediated inhibition of Na + entry. Correlation between cellular cAMP levels and the magnitude of Na + influx into the enterocytes provides evidence for a cAMP-mediated control of intestinal Na + uptake, which may represent the mechanistic basis for the antiabsorptive effect of CT and Na + during induction of intestinal secretion. The effect of cAMP on Na + but no Cl - influx in our villus cell preparation can be partially explained in terms of a cAMP-regulated Na + /H + neutral exchange system

  7. Action of cholera toxin in the intestinal epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyun, C.S.

    1982-01-01

    The primary event in the action of cholera toxin on the isolated chick intestinal epithelial cell is its interaction with the cell membrane. This involves a large number (17 million per cell) of high affinity binding sites which belong to a single class. Binding of biologically active /sup 125/I-labeled toxin is rapid, temperature-dependent, reversible, and saturable over a wide range of concentrations and includes only a small contribution from nonspecific sites. A characteristic lag phase of 10 min occurs following the complete binding of toxin before any increase in cellular cAMP levels can be detected in the isolated cells. The response (elevation of cellular cAMP) of the enterocytes to cholera toxin is linear with time for 40-50 min and causes a six- to eight-fold increase over control levels at steady stae. cAMP and agents that increase cAMP production inhibit Cl/sup -/-independent Na/sup +/ influx into the isolated enterocytes whereas chlorporomazine (CPZ) which completely abolishes toxin-induced elevation of cAMP both reverses and prevents the cAMP-mediated inhibition of Na/sup +/ entry. Correlation between cellular cAMP levels and the magnitude of Na/sup +/ influx into the enterocytes provides evidence for a cAMP-mediated control of intestinal Na/sup +/ uptake, which may represent the mechanistic basis for the antiabsorptive effect of CT and Na/sup +/ during induction of intestinal secretion. The effect of cAMP on Na/sup +/ but no Cl/sup -/ influx in our villus cell preparation can be partially explained in terms of a cAMP-regulated Na/sup +//H/sup +/ neutral exchange system.

  8. Influence of the intrinsic gut microbiota on transcriptional regulation of genes involved in the early life development of intestinal epithelial integrity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergström, Anders; Kristensen, Matilde Bylov; Frøkjær, Hanne

    2010-01-01

    The interplay between the gut microbiota and the integrity of the intestinal mucus layer is important both in the maintenance of the epithelial barrier as part of the innate immune defense, and in the conservation of gut homeostasis. Interesting parameters are the mucins, which protect the mucosal...

  9. Protective Effects of Bifidobacterium on Intestinal Barrier Function in LPS-Induced Enterocyte Barrier Injury of Caco-2 Monolayers and in a Rat NEC Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Xiang; Linglong, Peng; Weixia, Du; Hong, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Zonulin protein is a newly discovered modulator which modulates the permeability of the intestinal epithelial barrier by disassembling intercellular tight junctions (TJ). Disruption of TJ is associated with neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). It has been shown bifidobacterium could protect the intestinal barrier function and prophylactical administration of bifidobacterium has beneficial effects in NEC patients and animals. However, it is still unknown whether the zonulin is involved in the gut barrier dysfunction of NEC, and the protective mechanisms of bifidobacterium on intestinal barrier function are also not well understood. The present study aims to investigate the effects of bifidobacterium on intestinal barrier function, zonulin regulation, and TJ integrity both in LPS-induced enterocyte barrier injury of Caco-2 monolayers and in a rat NEC model. Our results showed bifidobacterium markedly attenuated the decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance and the increase in paracellular permeability in the Caco-2 monolayers treated with LPS (P zonulin release (P zonulin (P zonulin protein release and improvement of intestinal TJ integrity.

  10. Subacute stress and chronic stress interact to decrease intestinal barrier function in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauffer, Adriana; Vanuytsel, Tim; Vanormelingen, Christophe; Vanheel, Hanne; Salim Rasoel, Shadea; Tóth, Joran; Tack, Jan; Fornari, Fernando; Farré, Ricard

    2016-01-01

    Psychological stress increases intestinal permeability, potentially leading to low-grade inflammation and symptoms in functional gastrointestinal disorders. We assessed the effect of subacute, chronic and combined stress on intestinal barrier function and mast cell density. Male Wistar rats were allocated to four experimental groups (n = 8/group): 1/sham; 2/subacute stress (isolation and limited movement for 24 h); 3/chronic crowding stress for 14 days and 4/combined subacute and chronic stress. Jejunum and colon were collected to measure: transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER; a measure of epithelial barrier function); gene expression of tight junction molecules; mast cell density. Plasma corticosterone concentration was increased in all three stress conditions versus sham, with highest concentrations in the combined stress condition. TEER in the jejunum was decreased in all stress conditions, but was significantly lower in the combined stress condition than in the other groups. TEER in the jejunum correlated negatively with corticosterone concentration. Increased expression of claudin 1, 5 and 8, occludin and zonula occludens 1 mRNAs was detected after subacute stress in the jejunum. In contrast, colonic TEER was decreased only after combined stress, and the expression of tight junction molecules was unaltered. Increased mast cell density was observed in the chronic and combined stress condition in the colon only. In conclusion, our data show that chronic stress sensitizes the gastrointestinal tract to the effects of subacute stress on intestinal barrier function; different underlying cellular and molecular alterations are indicated in the small intestine versus the colon.

  11. Zonulin and its regulation of intestinal barrier function: the biological door to inflammation, autoimmunity, and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasano, Alessio

    2011-01-01

    The primary functions of the gastrointestinal tract have traditionally been perceived to be limited to the digestion and absorption of nutrients and to electrolytes and water homeostasis. A more attentive analysis of the anatomic and functional arrangement of the gastrointestinal tract, however, suggests that another extremely important function of this organ is its ability to regulate the trafficking of macromolecules between the environment and the host through a barrier mechanism. Together with the gut-associated lymphoid tissue and the neuroendocrine network, the intestinal epithelial barrier, with its intercellular tight junctions, controls the equilibrium between tolerance and immunity to non-self antigens. Zonulin is the only physiological modulator of intercellular tight junctions described so far that is involved in trafficking of macromolecules and, therefore, in tolerance/immune response balance. When the finely tuned zonulin pathway is deregulated in genetically susceptible individuals, both intestinal and extraintestinal autoimmune, inflammatory, and neoplastic disorders can occur. This new paradigm subverts traditional theories underlying the development of these diseases and suggests that these processes can be arrested if the interplay between genes and environmental triggers is prevented by reestablishing the zonulin-dependent intestinal barrier function. This review is timely given the increased interest in the role of a "leaky gut" in the pathogenesis of several pathological conditions targeting both the intestine and extraintestinal organs.

  12. Intestinal barrier: A gentlemen's agreement between microbiota and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caricilli, Andrea Moro; Castoldi, Angela; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva

    2014-02-15

    Our body is colonized by more than a hundred trillion commensals, represented by viruses, bacteria and fungi. This complex interaction has shown that the microbiome system contributes to the host's adaptation to its environment, providing genes and functionality that give flexibility of diet and modulate the immune system in order not to reject these symbionts. In the intestine, specifically, the microbiota helps developing organ structures, participates of the metabolism of nutrients and induces immunity. Certain components of the microbiota have been shown to trigger inflammatory responses, whereas others, anti-inflammatory responses. The diversity and the composition of the microbiota, thus, play a key role in the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis and explain partially the link between intestinal microbiota changes and gut-related disorders in humans. Tight junction proteins are key molecules for determination of the paracellular permeability. In the context of intestinal inflammatory diseases, the intestinal barrier is compromised, and decreased expression and differential distribution of tight junction proteins is observed. It is still unclear what is the nature of the luminal or mucosal factors that affect the tight junction proteins function, but the modulation of the immune cells found in the intestinal lamina propria is hypothesized as having a role in this modulation. In this review, we provide an overview of the current understanding of the interaction of the gut microbiota with the immune system in the development and maintenance of the intestinal barrier.

  13. Krüppel-like factor 4 regulates intestinal epithelial cell morphology and polarity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianxin Yu

    Full Text Available Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4 is a zinc finger transcription factor that plays a vital role in regulating cell lineage differentiation during development and maintaining epithelial homeostasis in the intestine. In normal intestine, KLF4 is predominantly expressed in the differentiated epithelial cells. It has been identified as a tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer. KLF4 knockout mice demonstrated a decrease in number of goblet cells in the colon, and conditional ablation of KLF4 from the intestinal epithelium led to altered epithelial homeostasis. However, the role of KLF4 in differentiated intestinal cells and colon cancer cells, as well as the mechanism by which it regulates homeostasis and represses tumorigenesis in the intestine is not well understood. In our study, KLF4 was partially depleted in the differentiated intestinal epithelial cells by a tamoxifen-inducible Cre recombinase. We found a significant increase in the number of goblet cells in the KLF4-deleted small intestine, suggesting that KLF4 is not only required for goblet cell differentiation, but also required for maintaining goblet cell numbers through its function in inhibiting cell proliferation. The number and position of Paneth cells also changed. This is consistent with the KLF4 knockout study using villin-Cre [1]. Through immunohistochemistry (IHC staining and statistical analysis, we found that a stem cell and/or tuft cell marker, DCAMKL1, and a proliferation marker, Ki67, are affected by KLF4 depletion, while an enteroendocrine cell marker, neurotensin (NT, was not affected. In addition, we found KLF4 depletion altered the morphology and polarity of the intestinal epithelial cells. Using a three-dimensional (3D intestinal epithelial cyst formation assay, we found that KLF4 is essential for cell polarity and crypt-cyst formation in human colon cancer cells. These findings suggest that, as a tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer, KLF4 affects intestinal epithelial cell

  14. Metallic oxide nanoparticle translocation across the human bronchial epithelial barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Isabelle; Naudin, Grégoire; Boland, Sonja; Mornet, Stéphane; Contremoulins, Vincent; Beugnon, Karine; Martinon, Laurent; Lambert, Olivier; Baeza-Squiban, Armelle

    2015-03-14

    Inhalation is the most frequent route of unintentional exposure to nanoparticles (NPs). Our aim was to quantify the translocation of different metallic NPs across human bronchial epithelial cells and to determine the factors influencing this translocation. Calu-3 cells forming a tight epithelial barrier when grown on a porous membrane in a two compartment chamber were exposed to fluorescently labelled NPs to quantify the NP translocation. NP translocation and uptake by cells were also studied by confocal and transmission electron microscopy. Translocation was characterized according to NP size (16, 50, or 100 nm), surface charge (negative or positive SiO2), composition (SiO2 or TiO2), presence of proteins or phospholipids and in an inflammatory context. Our results showed that NPs can translocate through the Calu-3 monolayer whatever their composition (SiO2 or TiO2), but this translocation was increased for the smallest and negatively charged NPs. Translocation was not associated with an alteration of the integrity of the epithelial monolayer, suggesting a transcytosis of the internalized NPs. By modifying the NP corona, the ability of NPs to cross the epithelial barrier differed depending on their intrinsic properties, making positively charged NPs more prone to translocate. NP translocation can be amplified by using agents known to open tight junctions and to allow paracellular passage. NP translocation was also modulated when mimicking an inflammatory context frequently found in the lungs, altering the epithelial integrity and inducing transient tight junction opening. This in vitro evaluation of NP translocation could be extended to other inhaled NPs to predict their biodistribution.

  15. Development and Characterization of a Human and Mouse Intestinal Epithelial Cell Monolayer Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Kozuka

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: We describe the development and characterization of a mouse and human epithelial cell monolayer platform of the small and large intestines, with a broad range of potential applications including the discovery and development of minimally systemic drug candidates. Culture conditions for each intestinal segment were optimized by correlating monolayer global gene expression with the corresponding tissue segment. The monolayers polarized, formed tight junctions, and contained a diversity of intestinal epithelial cell lineages. Ion transport phenotypes of monolayers from the proximal and distal colon and small intestine matched the known and unique physiology of these intestinal segments. The cultures secreted serotonin, GLP-1, and FGF19 and upregulated the epithelial sodium channel in response to known biologically active agents, suggesting intact secretory and absorptive functions. A screen of over 2,000 pharmacologically active compounds for inhibition of potassium ion transport in the mouse distal colon cultures led to the identification of a tool compound. : Siegel and colleagues describe their development of a human and mouse intestinal epithelial cell monolayer platform that maintains the cellular, molecular, and functional characteristics of tissue for each intestinal segment. They demonstrate the platform's application to drug discovery by screening a library of over 2,000 compounds to identify an inhibitor of potassium ion transport in the mouse distal colon. Keywords: intestinal epithelium, organoids, monolayer, colon, small intestine, phenotype screening assays, enteroid, colonoid

  16. Fusion of intestinal epithelial cells with bone marrow derived cells is dispensable for tissue homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    de Jong, Joan H.; Rodermond, Hans M.; Zimberlin, Cheryl D.; Lascano, Valeria; De Sousa E Melo, Felipe; Richel, Dick J.; Medema, Jan Paul; Vermeulen, Louis

    2012-01-01

    The epithelial lining of the intestine is characterized by an immense cellular turn-over ascertaining an extensive regenerative capacity. Multiple reports suggest that besides the local intestinal stem cell pool, circulating cells of bone marrow origin (BMDCs) contribute to this process by fusing with the epithelial lineage. However, the functional relevance of these observations is unknown. In the present study we employ a model system in which we cannot only detect cell fusion but also exam...

  17. Action of cholera toxin in the intestinal epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyun, C.S.

    1982-01-01

    The primary event in the action of cholera toxin on the isolated chick intestinal epithelial cell is its interaction with a large number of high affinity binding sites in the cell membrane. Binding of /sup 125/I-labeled toxin is rapid, temperature-dependent, reversible, and saturable over a wide range of concentrations and includes only a small contribution from nonspecific sites. A characteristic lag phase of 10 min occurs following the complete binding of toxin before any increase in cellular cAMP levels can be detected. The response (elevation of cellular cAMP) is linear with time for 40 to 50 min and causes a six- to eight-fold increase over control levels (10 to 15 picomole cAMP/mg cellular protein) at steady state. cAMP and agents that increase cAMP production inhibit Cl/sup -/-independent Na/sup +/ influx into the isolated enterocytes whereas chlorpromazine (CPZ) which completely abolishes toxin-induced elevation of cAMP both reverses and prevents the cAMP-mediated inhibition of Na/sup +/ entry. Correlation between cellular cAMP levels and the magnitude of Na/sup +/ influx provides evidence for a cAMP-mediated control of intestinal Na/sup +/ uptake, which may represent the mechanistic basis for the antiabsorptive effect of CT on Na/sup +/ during induction of intestinal secretion. The effect of cAMP on Na/sup +/ but not Cl/sup -/ influx preparations can be partially explained in terms of a cAMP-regulated Na/sup +//H/sup +/ neutral exchange system. Data on the coupling relationship between Na/sup +/ transport and the intra- and extracellular pH in the enterocytes show that an amiloride-sensitive electroneutral Na/sup +//H/sup +/ exchange process occurs. This coupling between Na/sup +/ and H/sup +/ is partially inhibited by CT and dbcAMP, suggesting that the Na/sup +//H/sup +/ exchange may be a cAMP-regulated process. 31 references, 32 figures, 5 tables.

  18. Knockout of MIMP protein in lactobacillus plantarum lost its regulation of intestinal permeability on NCM460 epithelial cells through the zonulin pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhihua; Kang, Liang; Li, Chao; Tong, Chao; Huang, Meijin; Zhang, Xingwei; Huang, Nanqi; Moyer, Mary Pat; Qin, Huanlong; Wang, Jianping

    2014-10-03

    Previous studies indicated that the micro integral membrane protein located within the media place of the integral membrane protein of Lactobacillus plantarum CGMCC 1258 had protective effects against the intestinal epithelial injury. In our study, we mean to establish micro integral membrane protein -knockout Lactobacillus plantarum (LPKM) to investigate the change of its protective effects and verify the role of micro integral membrane protein on protection of normal intestinal barrier function. Binding assay and intestinal permeability were performed to verify the protective effects of micro integral membrane protein on intestinal permeability in vitro and in vivo. Molecular mechanism was also determined as the zonulin pathway. Clinical data were also collected for further verification of relationship between zonulin level and postoperative septicemia. LPKM got decreased inhibition of EPEC adhesion to NCM460 cells. LPKM had lower ability to alleviate the decrease of intestinal permeability induced by enteropathogenic-e.coli, and prevent enteropathogenic-e.coli -induced increase of zonulin expression. Overexpression of zonulin lowered the intestinal permeability regulated by Lactobacillus plantarum. There was a positive correlation between zonulin level and postoperative septicemia. Therefore, micro integral membrane protein could be necessary for the protective effects of Lactobacillus plantarum on intestinal barrier. MIMP might be a positive factor for Lactobacillus plantarum to protect the intestinal epithelial cells from injury, which could be related to the zonulin pathway.

  19. Binding of cholera toxin B subunit to intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navolotskaya, Elena V; Sadovnikov, Vladimir B; Lipkin, Valery M; Zav'yalov, Vladimir P

    2018-03-01

    We have prepared 125 I-labeled cholera toxin B subunit ( 125 I-labeled CT-B, a specific activity of 98Ci/mmol) and found that it binds to rat IEC-6 and human Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells with high affinity (K d 3.6 and 3.7nM, respectively). The binding of labeled protein was completely inhibited by unlabeled thymosin-α 1 (TM-α 1 ), interferon-α 2 (IFN-α 2 ), and the synthetic peptide LKEKK that corresponds to residues 16-20 in TM-α 1 and 131-135 in IFN-α 2 , but was not inhibited by the synthetic peptide KKEKL with inverted amino acid sequence (K i >10μM). Thus, TM-α 1 , IFN-α 2 , and the peptide: LKEKK bind with high affinity and specificity to the cholera toxin receptor on IEC-6 and Caco-2 cells. It was found that CT-B and the peptide: LKEKK at concentrations of 10-1000nM increased in a dose-dependent manner the nitric oxide production and the soluble guanylate cyclase activity in IEC-6 and Caco-2 cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of synbiotics on intestinal mucosal barrier in rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Xue

    2017-06-01

    Conclusions: Probiotics can improve the concentration of colonic probiotics, while synbiotics can improve probiotics concentration and mucosa thickness in colon, decrease L/M ratio and bacterial translocation. Synbiotics shows more protective effects on intestinal mucosal barrier in rats after cecectomy and gastrostomy and the intervention of specific antibiotics.

  1. Intestinal epithelial cell-specific RARα depletion results in aberrant epithelial cell homeostasis and underdeveloped immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jijon, H B; Suarez-Lopez, L; Diaz, O E; Das, S; De Calisto, J; Yaffe, M B; Pittet, M J; Mora, J R; Belkaid, Y; Xavier, R J; Villablanca, E J

    2017-11-15

    Retinoic acid (RA), a dietary vitamin A metabolite, is crucial in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. RA acts on intestinal leukocytes to modulate their lineage commitment and function. Although the role of RA has been characterized in immune cells, whether intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) rely on RA signaling to exert their immune-regulatory function has not been examined. Here we demonstrate that lack of RA receptor α (RARα) signaling in IECs results in deregulated epithelial lineage specification, leading to increased numbers of goblet cells and Paneth cells. Mechanistically, lack of RARα resulted in increased KLF4 + goblet cell precursors in the distal bowel, whereas RA treatment inhibited klf4 expression and goblet cell differentiation in zebrafish. These changes in secretory cells are associated with increased Reg3g, reduced luminal bacterial detection, and an underdeveloped intestinal immune system, as evidenced by an almost complete absence of lymphoid follicles and gut resident mononuclear phagocytes. This underdeveloped intestinal immune system shows a decreased ability to clear infection with Citrobacter rodentium. Collectively, our findings indicate that epithelial cell-intrinsic RARα signaling is critical to the global development of the intestinal immune system.Mucosal Immunology advance online publication, 15 November 2017; doi:10.1038/mi.2017.91.

  2. Polyphenol-Rich Propolis Extracts Strengthen Intestinal Barrier Function by Activating AMPK and ERK Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Jin, Xiaolu; Chen, Yifan; Song, Zehe; Jiang, Xiasen; Hu, Fuliang; Conlon, Michael A.; Topping, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Propolis has abundant polyphenolic constituents and is used widely as a health/functional food. Here, we investigated the effects of polyphenol-rich propolis extracts (PPE) on intestinal barrier function in human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells, as well as in rats. In Caco-2 cells, PPE increased transepithelial electrical resistance and decreased lucifer yellow flux. PPE-treated cells showed increased expression of the tight junction (TJ) loci occludin and zona occludens (ZO)-1. Confocal microscopy showed organized expressions in proteins related to TJ assembly, i.e., occludin and ZO-1, in response to PPE. Furthermore, PPE led to the activation of AMPK, ERK1/2, p38, and Akt. Using selective inhibitors, we found that the positive effects of PPE on barrier function were abolished in cells in which AMPK and ERK1/2 signaling were inhibited. Moreover, rats fed a diet supplemented with PPE (0.3% in the diet) exhibited increased colonic epithelium ZO-1 expression. Overall, these data suggest that PPE strengthens intestinal barrier function by activating AMPK and ERK signaling and provide novel insights into the potential application of propolis for human gut health. PMID:27164138

  3. Fermented soya bean (tempe) extracts reduce adhesion of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli to intestinal epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roubos-van den Hil, P.J.; Nout, M.J.R.; Beumer, R.R.; Meulen, van der J.; Zwietering, M.H.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: This study aimed to investigate the effect of processed soya bean, during the successive stages of tempe fermentation and different fermentation times, on adhesion of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) K88 to intestinal brush border cells as well as Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells; and

  4. Fusion of intestinal epithelial cells with bone marrow derived cells is dispensable for tissue homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Joan H.; Rodermond, Hans M.; Zimberlin, Cheryl D.; Lascano, Valeria; de Sousa E Melo, Felipe; Richel, Dick J.; Medema, Jan Paul; Vermeulen, Louis

    2012-01-01

    The epithelial lining of the intestine is characterized by an immense cellular turn-over ascertaining an extensive regenerative capacity. Multiple reports suggest that besides the local intestinal stem cell pool, circulating cells of bone marrow origin (BMDCs) contribute to this process by fusing

  5. Does small intestinal atresia affect epithelial protein expression in human newborns?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaart, Maaike W.; Yamanouchi, Takeshi; van Nispen, Danielle J. P. M.; Raatgeep, Rolien H. C.; van Goudoever, Johannes B.; de Krijger, Ronald R.; Tibboel, Dick; Einerhand, Alexandra W. C.; Renes, Ingrid B.

    2006-01-01

    Bowel segments distal to a congenital intestinal obstruction have been suggested to be immature. In other words, luminal components such as amniotic fluid (before birth) and/or enteral nutrition (after birth) may be required to activate intestinal epithelial protein expression, thereby influencing

  6. Propofol Does Not Reduce Pyroptosis of Enterocytes and Intestinal Epithelial Injury After Lipopolysaccharide Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu-Yu; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Hu-Fei; Guan, Su; Wen, Shi-Hong; Huang, Wen-Qi; Liu, Zi-Meng

    2018-01-01

    To date, mechanisms of sepsis-induced intestinal epithelial injury are not well known. P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) regulates pyroptosis of lymphocytes, and propofol is usually used for sedation in septic patients. We aimed to determine the occurrence of enterocyte pyroptosis mediated by P2X7R and to explore the effects of propofol on pyroptosis and intestinal epithelial injury after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. A novel regimen of LPS challenge was applied in vitro and in vivo. Inhibitors of P2X7R (A438079) and NLRP3 inflammasome (MCC950), and different doses of propofol were administered. The caspase-1 expression, caspase-3 expression, caspase-11 expression, P2X7R expression and NLRP3 expression, extracellular ATP concentration and YO-PRO-1 uptake, and cytotoxicity and HMGB1 concentration were detected to evaluate enterocyte pyroptosis in cultured cells and intestinal epithelial tissues. Chiu's score, diamine oxidase and villus length were used to evaluate intestinal epithelial injury. Moreover, survival analysis was performed. LPS challenge activated caspase-11 expression and P2X7R expression, enhanced ATP concentration and YO-PRO-1 uptake, and led to increased cytotoxicity and HMGB1 concentration. Subsequently, LPS resulted in intestinal epithelial damage, as evidenced by increased levels of Chiu's score and diamine oxidase, and shorter villus length and high mortality of animals. A438079, but not MCC950, significantly relieved LPS-induced enterocyte pyroptosis and intestinal epithelial injury. Importantly, propofol did not confer the protective effects on enterocyte pyroptosis and intestinal epithelia although it markedly decreased P2X7R expression. LPS attack leads to activation of caspase-11/P2X7R and pyroptosis of enterocytes. Propofol does not reduce LPS-induced pyroptosis and intestinal epithelial injury, although it inhibits P2X7R upregulation.

  7. Mechanism of leukotriene D4 inhibition of Na-alanine cotransport in intestinal epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Talukder, Jamilur R.; Kekuda, Ramesh; Saha, Prosenjit; Sundaram, Uma

    2008-01-01

    In a rabbit model of chronic intestinal inflammation, we previously demonstrated inhibition of neutral Na-amino acid cotransport. The mechanism of the inhibition was secondary to a decrease in the affinity for amino acid rather than the number of cotransporters. Since leukotriene (LT)D4 is known to be elevated in enterocytes during chronic intestinal inflammation, we used rat intestinal epithelial cell (IEC-18) monolayers to determine the mechanism of regulation of Na-alanine cotransport (ala...

  8. Stress-induced breakdown of intestinal barrier function in the rat: reversal by wood creosote.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuge, Tomoo; Greenwood-Van Meerveld, Beverley; Sokabe, Masahiro

    2006-07-24

    Our previous studies demonstrated that wood creosote (Seirogan) inhibits intestinal secretion and normalizes the transport of electrolytes and water in rats subjected to restraint stress. The goal of the present study was to examine whether wood creosote has a protective effect against stress-induced breakdown of intestinal barrier function. F-344 rats were subjected to 90-min water avoidance stress (WAS) with wood creosote (30 mg/kg) or vehicle administered intragastrically 30 min prior to WAS. Sham stressed rats received wood creosote or vehicle treatment but did not experience the WAS. All rats were euthanized at the end of the WAS or sham-stress and the jejunum and colon were isolated. Epithelial transport was studied in modified Ussing chambers. Spontaneous secretion was assessed by electrophysiological measurement of the short circuit current (I(sc)) while electrical conductance (G) was calculated from the potential difference (PD) and I(sc) using Ohm's law. Intestinal permeability was defined by the mucosal-to-serosal flux of horseradish peroxidase (HRP). WAS significantly elevated basal I(sc) and G and increased epithelial permeability to HRP in the jejunum but not in the colon. Wood creosote resulted in a significant reduction of the stress-induced increase in I(sc), G and the mucosal-to-serosal flux of HRP compared to the vehicle-treated group. Wood creosote caused no significant effects in sham-stressed rats. The results suggest that oral administration of wood creosote may prevent stress-induced diarrhea by preventing aversive effects on small intestinal secretion and barrier function.

  9. Intestinal barrier function and the brain-gut axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Carmen; Vicario, María; Pigrau, Marc; Lobo, Beatriz; Santos, Javier

    2014-01-01

    The luminal-mucosal interface of the intestinal tract is the first relevant location where microorganism-derived antigens and all other potentially immunogenic particles face the scrutiny of the powerful mammalian immune system. Upon regular functioning conditions, the intestinal barrier is able to effectively prevent most environmental and external antigens to interact openly with the numerous and versatile elements that compose the mucosal-associated immune system. This evolutionary super system is capable of processing an astonishing amount of antigens and non-immunogenic particles, approximately 100 tons in one individual lifetime, only considering food-derived components. Most important, to develop oral tolerance and proper active immune responses needed to prevent disease and inflammation, this giant immunogenic load has to be managed in a way that physiological inflammatory balance is constantly preserved. Adequate functioning of the intestinal barrier involves local and distant regulatory networks integrating the so-called brain-gut axis. Along this complex axis both brain and gut structures participate in the processing and execution of response signals to external and internal changes coming from the digestive tract, using multidirectional pathways to communicate. Dysfunction of brain-gut axis facilitates malfunctioning of the intestinal barrier, and vice versa, increasing the risk of uncontrolled immunological reactions that may trigger mucosal and brain low-grade inflammation, a putative first step to the initiation of more permanent gut disorders. In this chapter, we describe the structure, function and interactions of intestinal barrier, microbiota and brain-gut axis in both healthy and pathological conditions.

  10. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG supernatant upregulates serotonin transporter expression in intestinal epithelial cells and mice intestinal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y M; Ge, X Z; Wang, W Q; Wang, T; Cao, H L; Wang, B L; Wang, B M

    2015-09-01

    The role that probiotics play in relieving irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) has been demonstrated; however, the mechanism by which IBS is affected remains unclear. In this study, serotonin transporter (SERT) mRNA and serotonin transporter protein (SERT-P) levels in HT-29, Caco-2 cells, and mice intestinal tissues were examined after treatment with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG supernatant (LGG-s). HT-29 and Caco-2 cells were treated with different concentrations of LGG-s for 12 and 24 h and C57BL/6 mice received supplements of different concentrations for 4 weeks. SERT mRNA and SERT-P levels were detected by real-time PCR and Western blotting. SERT mRNA and SERT-P levels in HT-29 and Caco-2 cells were higher than those in the control 24 h after treatment. Undiluted LGG-s upregulated SERT mRNA levels by 9.4-fold in the first week, which dropped in the second week. The double-diluted LGG-s upregulated SERT mRNA by 2.07-fold in the first week; levels dropped to 1.75-fold within the second week and under base expression levels by the third week, while they again climbed to 1.56-fold in the fourth week. The triple-diluted LGG-s could not upregulate SERT mRNA expression until the end of the fourth week. The SERT-P levels in the double-diluted LGG-s group were higher than that in the control but fluctuated with time. SERT-P levels in the triple-diluted LGG-s were higher than that in the control in the last 2 weeks and increased with time. LGG-s can upregulate SERT mRNA and SERT-P levels in intestinal epithelial cells and mice intestinal tissues. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Toxicological interactions between the mycotoxins deoxynivalenol, nivalenol and their acetylated derivatives in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alassane-Kpembi, Imourana; Puel, Olivier; Oswald, Isabelle P

    2015-08-01

    In case of mycotoxin contaminations, food and feedstuff are usually contaminated by more than one toxin. However toxicological data concerning the effects of mycotoxin combinations are sparse. The intestinal epithelium is the first barrier against food contaminants and this constantly renewing organ is particularly sensitive to mycotoxins. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of deoxynivalenol (DON) and four other type B trichothecenes (TCTB), 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol (3-ADON), 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol (15-ADON), nivalenol (NIV) and fusarenon-X (FX) alone or in combination on intestinal epithelial cells. Proliferating, non-transformed IPEC-1 cells were exposed to increasing doses of TCTB, alone or in binary mixtures and mycotoxin-induced cytotoxicity was measured with MTT test. The toxicological interactions were assessed using the isobologram-Combination index method. The five tested mycotoxins and their mixtures had a dose-dependent effect on the proliferating enterocytes. DON-NIV, DON-15-ADON and 15-ADON-3-ADON combinations were synergistic, with magnitude of synergy for 10 % cytotoxicity ranging from 2 to 7. The association between DON and 3-ADON also demonstrated a synergy but only at high doses, at lower doses antagonism was noted. Additivity was observed between NIV and FX, and antagonism between DON and FX. These results indicate that the simultaneous presence of mycotoxins in food commodities and diet may be more toxic than predicted from the mycotoxins alone. This synergy should be taken into account considering the frequent co-occurrence of TCTB in the diet.

  12. Cyclin-dependent kinases regulate apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Sujoy; Ray, Ramesh M.; Johnson, Leonard R.

    2014-01-01

    Homeostasis of the gastrointestinal epithelium is dependent upon a balance between cell proliferation and apoptosis. Cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) are well known for their role in cell proliferation. Previous studies from our group have shown that polyamine-depletion of intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6) decreases cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2) activity, increases p53 and p21Cip1 protein levels, induces G1 arrest, and protects cells from camptothecin (CPT)-induced apoptosis. Although emerging evidence suggests that members of the Cdk family are involved in the regulation of apoptosis, their roles directing apoptosis of IEC-6 cells are not known. In this study, we report that inhibition of Cdk1, 2, and 9 (with the broad range Cdk inhibitor, AZD5438) in proliferating IEC-6 cells triggered DNA damage, activated p53 signaling, inhibited proliferation, and induced apoptosis. By contrast, inhibition of Cdk2 (with NU6140) increased p53 protein and activity, inhibited proliferation, but had no effect on apoptosis. Notably, AZD5438 sensitized, whereas, NU6140 rescued proliferating IEC-6 cells from CPT-induced apoptosis. However, in colon carcinoma (Caco2) cells with mutant p53, treatment with either AZD5438 or NU6140 blocked proliferation, albeit more robustly with AZD5438. Both Cdk inhibitors induced apoptosis in Caco2 cells in a p53-independent manner. In serum starved quiescent IEC-6 cells, both AZD5438 and NU6140 decreased TNF- /CPT-induced activation of p53 and, consequently, rescued cells from apoptosis, indicating that sustained Cdk activity is required for apoptosis of quiescent cells. Furthermore, AZD5438 partially reversed the protective effect of polyamine depletion whereas NU6140 had no effect. Together, these results demonstrate that Cdks possess opposing roles in the control of apoptosis in quiescent and proliferating cells. In addition, Cdk inhibitors uncouple proliferation from apoptosis in a p53-dependent manner. PMID:24242917

  13. Pseudomonas fluorescens alters epithelial permeability and translocates across Caco-2/TC7 intestinal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madi Amar

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas fluorescens has long been considered as a psychrotrophic microorganism. Recently, we have shown that clinical strains of P. fluorescens (biovar 1 are able to adapt at a growth temperature of 37°C or above and induce a specific inflammatory response. Interestingly, a highly specific antigen of P. fluorescens, I2, is detected in the serum of patients with Crohn's disease but the possible role of this bacterium in the disease has not yet been explored. In the present study, we examined the ability of a psychrotrophic and a clinical strain of P. fluorescens to modulate the permeability of a Caco-2/TC7 intestinal epithelial model, reorganize the actin cytoskeleton, invade the target cells and translocate across the epithelium. The behaviour of these two strains was compared to that of the well known opportunistic pathogen P. aeruginosa PAO1. Results Both strains of P. fluorescens were found to decrease the transepithelial resistance (TER of Caco-2/TC7 differentiated monolayers. This was associated with an increase in paracellular permeability and F-actin microfilaments rearrangements. Moreover, the invasion and translocation tests demonstrated that the two strains used in this study can invade and translocate across the differentiated Caco-2/TC7 cell monolayers. Conclusions The present work shows for the first time, that P. fluorescens is able to alter the intestinal epithelial barrier function by disorganizing the F-actin microfilament network. Moreover, we reveal that independently of their origins, the two P. fluorescens strains can translocate across differentiated Caco-2/TC7 cell monolayers by using the transcellular pathway. These findings could, at least in part, explain the presence of the P. fluorescens specific I2 antigen in the serum of patients with Crohn's disease.

  14. The effect of fucoidan on intestinal flora and intestinal barrier function in rats with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Meilan; Ji, Xinqiang; Liang, Hui; Liu, Ying; Wang, Bing; Sun, Lingling; Li, Weiwei

    2018-02-21

    Recent research studies have shown that the intestinal flora are related to the occurrence and progress of breast cancer. This study investigates the effect of fucoidan on intestinal flora and intestinal barrier function in rats with 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced breast cancers. Sixty female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to the control group, the model group, and the F1 and F2 groups, which were fed fucoidan at concentrations of 200 and 400 mg per kg bw (body weight), respectively. Intestinal histopathological analysis was performed and 16S rDNA high-throughput sequencing was used to provide an overview of the intestinal flora composition. The contents of d-lactic acid (d-LA), diamine oxidase (DAO) and endotoxin in plasma were detected by ELISA. Expression levels of the tight junction (TJ) proteins, phosphorylated p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 were measured using western blotting. Our results suggested that the intestinal wall of the model group was damaged. However, after fucoidan intervention, the villi were gradually restored. ELISA showed that the levels of plasma endotoxin, d-LA and DAO decreased in the F1 and F2 groups compared to those in the model group. Fucoidan treatment also increased the expressions of ZO-1, occludin, claudin-1 and claudin-8. Furthermore, the expression levels of phosphorylated p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 were upregulated in fucoidan treatment groups. The results of 16S rDNA high-throughput sequencing indicated that fucoidan increased the diversity of the intestinal microbiota and induced changes in microbial composition, with the increased Bacteroidetes/Firmicutes phylum ratio. In conclusion, the supplement of fucoidan could improve the fecal microbiota composition and repair the intestinal barrier function. The study suggested the use of fucoidan as an intestinal flora modulator for potential prevention of breast cancer.

  15. Butyrate Enhances the Intestinal Barrier by Facilitating Tight Junction Assembly via Activation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase in Caco-2 Cell Monolayers12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Luying; Li, Zhong-Rong; Green, Robert S.; Holzman, Ian R.; Lin, Jing

    2009-01-01

    Butyrate, one of the SCFA, promotes the development of the intestinal barrier. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the butyrate regulation of the intestinal barrier are unknown. To test the hypothesis that the effect of butyrate on the intestinal barrier is mediated by the regulation of the assembly of tight junctions involving the activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), we determined the effect of butyrate on the intestinal barrier by measuring the transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and inulin permeability in a Caco-2 cell monolayer model. We further used a calcium switch assay to study the assembly of epithelial tight junctions and determined the effect of butyrate on the assembly of epithelial tight junctions and AMPK activity. We demonstrated that the butyrate treatment increased AMPK activity and accelerated the assembly of tight junctions as shown by the reorganization of tight junction proteins, as well as the development of TER. AMPK activity was also upregulated by butyrate during calcium switch-induced tight junction assembly. Compound C, a specific AMPK inhibitor, inhibited the butyrate-induced activation of AMPK. The facilitating effect of butyrate on the increases in TER in standard culture media, as well as after calcium switch, was abolished by compound C. We conclude that butyrate enhances the intestinal barrier by regulating the assembly of tight junctions. This dynamic process is mediated by the activation of AMPK. These results suggest an intriguing link between SCFA and the intracellular energy sensor for the development of the intestinal barrier. PMID:19625695

  16. Commensal Bacteria and Epithelial Cross Talk in the Developing Intestine

    OpenAIRE

    Rautava, Samuli; Walker, W. Allan

    2007-01-01

    Indigenous intestinal microbes have co-evolved with the intestinal immune system to form a symbiotic ecosystem. In the postnatal period, intestinal microbes provide the developing gut with stimuli that are necessary for healthy maturation of the intestinal immune system. Cross talk between the host and commensal microbes is an essential component of gut homeostasis mechanisms also in later life. During recent years, innovative research has shed light on the molecular mechanisms of these inter...

  17. Neutrophil Interactions with Epithelial Expressed ICAM-1 Enhances Intestinal Mucosal Wound Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumagin, R; Brazil, JC; Nava, P; Nishio, H; Alam, A; Luissint, AC; Weber, DA; Neish, AS; Nusrat, A; Parkos, CA

    2015-01-01

    A characteristic feature of gastrointestinal tract inflammatory disorders, such as inflammatory bowel disease, is polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) transepithelial migration (TEM) and accumulation in the gut lumen. PMN accumulation within the intestinal mucosa contributes to tissue injury. While epithelial infiltration by large numbers of PMNs results in mucosal injury, we found that PMN interactions with luminal epithelial membrane receptors may also play a role in wound healing. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is a PMN ligand that is upregulated on apical surfaces of intestinal epithelial cells under inflammatory conditions. In our study, increased expression of ICAM-1 resulted in enhanced PMN binding to the apical epithelium, which was associated with reduced PMN apoptosis. Following TEM, PMN adhesion to ICAM-1 resulted in activation of Akt and β-catenin signaling, increased epithelial-cell proliferation, and wound healing. Such responses were ICAM-1 dependent as engagement of epithelial ICAM-1 by antibody-mediated cross-linking yielded similar results. Furthermore, using an in-vivo biopsy-based, colonic-mucosal-injury model, we demonstrated epithelial ICAM-1 plays an important role in activation of epithelial Akt and β-catenin signaling and wound healing. These findings suggest that post-migrated PMNs within the intestinal lumen can regulate epithelial homeostasis, thereby identifying ICAM-1 as a potential therapeutic target for promoting mucosal wound healing. PMID:26732677

  18. Neutrophil interactions with epithelial-expressed ICAM-1 enhances intestinal mucosal wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumagin, R; Brazil, J C; Nava, P; Nishio, H; Alam, A; Luissint, A C; Weber, D A; Neish, A S; Nusrat, A; Parkos, C A

    2016-09-01

    A characteristic feature of gastrointestinal tract inflammatory disorders, such as inflammatory bowel disease, is polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) transepithelial migration (TEM) and accumulation in the gut lumen. PMN accumulation within the intestinal mucosa contributes to tissue injury. Although epithelial infiltration by large numbers of PMNs results in mucosal injury, we found that PMN interactions with luminal epithelial membrane receptors may also play a role in wound healing. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is a PMN ligand that is upregulated on apical surfaces of intestinal epithelial cells under inflammatory conditions. In our study, increased expression of ICAM-1 resulted in enhanced PMN binding to the apical epithelium, which was associated with reduced PMN apoptosis. Following TEM, PMN adhesion to ICAM-1 resulted in activation of Akt and β-catenin signaling, increased epithelial-cell proliferation, and wound healing. Such responses were ICAM-1 dependent as engagement of epithelial ICAM-1 by antibody-mediated cross-linking yielded similar results. Furthermore, using an in-vivo biopsy-based, colonic-mucosal-injury model, we demonstrated epithelial ICAM-1 has an important role in activation of epithelial Akt and β-catenin signaling and wound healing. These findings suggest that post-migrated PMNs within the intestinal lumen can regulate epithelial homeostasis, thereby identifying ICAM-1 as a potential therapeutic target for promoting mucosal wound healing.

  19. Lactobacillus GG restoration of the gliadin induced epithelial barrier disruption: the role of cellular polyamines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Celiac disease is characterized by enhanced intestinal paracellular permeability due to alterations of function and expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins including ZO-1, Claudin-1 and Occludin. Polyamines are pivotal in the control of intestinal barrier function and are also involved in the regulation of intercellular junction proteins. Different probiotic strains may inhibit gliadin-induced toxic effects and the Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (L.GG) is effective in the prevention and treatment of gastrointestinal diseases. Aims of the study were to establish in epithelial Caco-2 cells whether i) gliadin affects paracellular permeability and polyamine profile; ii) co-administration of viable L.GG, heat-killed L.GG (L.GG-HK) or its conditioned medium (L.GG-CM) preserves the intestinal epithelial barrier integrity. Additionally, the effects of L.GG on TJ protein expression were tested in presence or absence of polyamines. Results Administration of gliadin (1 mg/ml) to Caco-2 cells for 6 h caused a significant alteration of paracellular permeability as demonstrated by the rapid decrease in transepithelial resistance with a concomitant zonulin release. These events were followed by a significant increase in lactulose paracellular transport and a slight lowering in ZO-1 and Occludin expression without affecting Claudin-1. Besides, the single and total polyamine content increased significantly. The co-administration of viable L.GG (108 CFU/ml), L.GG-HK and L.GG-CM with gliadin significantly restored barrier function as demonstrated by transepithelial resistance, lactulose flux and zonulin release. Viable L.GG and L.GG-HK, but not L.GG-CM, led to a significant reduction in the single and total polyamine levels. Additionally, only the co-administration of viable L.GG with gliadin significantly increased ZO-1, Claudin-1 and Occludin gene expression compared to control cells. When Caco-2 cells treated with viable L.GG and gliadin were deprived in the polyamine

  20. Lactobacillus GG restoration of the gliadin induced epithelial barrier disruption: the role of cellular polyamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, Antonella; Linsalata, Michele; Notarnicola, Maria; Tutino, Valeria; Russo, Francesco

    2014-01-31

    Celiac disease is characterized by enhanced intestinal paracellular permeability due to alterations of function and expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins including ZO-1, Claudin-1 and Occludin. Polyamines are pivotal in the control of intestinal barrier function and are also involved in the regulation of intercellular junction proteins. Different probiotic strains may inhibit gliadin-induced toxic effects and the Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (L.GG) is effective in the prevention and treatment of gastrointestinal diseases. Aims of the study were to establish in epithelial Caco-2 cells whether i) gliadin affects paracellular permeability and polyamine profile; ii) co-administration of viable L.GG, heat-killed L.GG (L.GG-HK) or its conditioned medium (L.GG-CM) preserves the intestinal epithelial barrier integrity. Additionally, the effects of L.GG on TJ protein expression were tested in presence or absence of polyamines. Administration of gliadin (1 mg/ml) to Caco-2 cells for 6 h caused a significant alteration of paracellular permeability as demonstrated by the rapid decrease in transepithelial resistance with a concomitant zonulin release. These events were followed by a significant increase in lactulose paracellular transport and a slight lowering in ZO-1 and Occludin expression without affecting Claudin-1. Besides, the single and total polyamine content increased significantly. The co-administration of viable L.GG (10(8) CFU/ml), L.GG-HK and L.GG-CM with gliadin significantly restored barrier function as demonstrated by transepithelial resistance, lactulose flux and zonulin release. Viable L.GG and L.GG-HK, but not L.GG-CM, led to a significant reduction in the single and total polyamine levels. Additionally, only the co-administration of viable L.GG with gliadin significantly increased ZO-1, Claudin-1 and Occludin gene expression compared to control cells. When Caco-2 cells treated with viable L.GG and gliadin were deprived in the polyamine content by

  1. Glucagon-like peptide-2 protects impaired intestinal mucosal barriers in obstructive jaundice rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Dong, Jia-Tian; Li, Xiao-Jing; Gu, Ye; Cheng, Zhi-Jian; Cai, Yuan-Kun

    2015-01-14

    To observe the protective effect of glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) on the intestinal barrier of rats with obstructive jaundice and determine the possible mechanisms of action involved in the protective effect. Thirty-six Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into a sham operation group, an obstructive jaundice group, and a GLP-2 group; each group consisted of 12 rats. The GLP-2 group was treated with GLP-2 after the day of surgery, whereas the other two groups were treated with the same concentration of normal saline. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT), total bilirubin, and endotoxin levels were recorded at 1, 3, 7, 10 and 14 d. Furthermore, on the 14(th) day, body weight, the wet weight of the small intestine, pathological changes of the small intestine and the immunoglobulin A (IgA) expressed by plasma cells located in the small intestinal lamina propria were recorded for each group. In the rat model, jaundice was obvious, and the rats' activity decreased 4-6 d post bile duct ligation. Compared with the sham operation group, the obstructive jaundice group displayed increased yellow staining of abdominal visceral serosa, decreased small intestine wet weight, thinning of the intestinal muscle layer and villi, villous atrophy, uneven height, fusion, partial villous epithelial cell shedding, substantial inflammatory cell infiltration and significantly reduced IgA expression. However, no significant gross changes were noted between the GLP-2 and sham groups. With time, the levels of ALT, endotoxin and bilirubin in the GLP-2 group were significantly increased compared with the sham group (P jaundice group than in the GLP-2 group (P jaundice rats, which might be attributed to increased intestinal IgA and reduced bilirubin and endotoxin.

  2. Damaged intestinal epithelial integrity linked to microbial translocation in pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob D Estes

    Full Text Available The chronic phase of HIV infection is marked by pathological activation of the immune system, the extent of which better predicts disease progression than either plasma viral load or CD4(+ T cell count. Recently, translocation of microbial products from the gastrointestinal tract has been proposed as an underlying cause of this immune activation, based on indirect evidence including the detection of microbial products and specific immune responses in the plasma of chronically HIV-infected humans or SIV-infected Asian macaques. We analyzed tissues from SIV-infected rhesus macaques (RMs to provide direct in situ evidence for translocation of microbial constituents from the lumen of the intestine into the lamina propria and to draining and peripheral lymph nodes and liver, accompanied by local immune responses in affected tissues. In chronically SIV-infected RMs this translocation is associated with breakdown of the integrity of the epithelial barrier of the gastrointestinal (GI tract and apparent inability of lamina propria macrophages to effectively phagocytose translocated microbial constituents. By contrast, in the chronic phase of SIV infection in sooty mangabeys, we found no evidence of epithelial barrier breakdown, no increased microbial translocation and no pathological immune activation. Because immune activation is characteristic of the chronic phase of progressive HIV/SIV infections, these findings suggest that increased microbial translocation from the GI tract, in excess of capacity to clear the translocated microbial constituents, helps drive pathological immune activation. Novel therapeutic approaches to inhibit microbial translocation and/or attenuate chronic immune activation in HIV-infected individuals may complement treatments aimed at direct suppression of viral replication.

  3. Visualization of probiotic-mediated Ca2+ signaling in intestinal epithelial cells in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Adachi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics, such as lactic acid bacteria (LAB and Bacillus subtilis var. natto, have been shown to modulate immune responses. It is important to understand how probiotic bacteria impact intestinal epithelial cells (IECs, because IECs are the first line of defense at the mucosal surface barrier and their activities substantially affect the gut microenvironment and immunity. However, to date, their precise mechanism remains unknown due to a lack of analytical systems available for live animal models. Recently, we generated a conditional Ca2+ biosensor Yellow Cameleon (YC3.60 transgenic mouse line and established 5D (x, y, z, time, and Ca2+ intravital imaging systems of lymphoid tissues including those in Peyer’s patches and bone marrow. In the present study, we further advance our intravital imaging system for intestinal tracts to visualize IEC responses against orally administrated food compounds in real time. Using this system, heat-killed Bacillus subtilis natto, a probiotic TTCC012 strain, is shown to directly induce Ca2+ signaling in IECs in mice housed under specific pathogen-free conditions. In contrast, this activation is not observed in the Lactococcus lactis strain C60; however, when we generate germ-free YC3.60 mice and observe the LAB stimulation of IECs in the absence of gut microbiota, C60 is capable of inducing Ca2+ signaling. This is the first study to successfully visualize the direct effect of probiotics on IECs in live animals. These data strongly suggest that probiotic strains stimulate IECs under physiological conditions, and that their activity is affected by the microenvironment of the small intestine, such as commensal bacteria.

  4. Effects of propofol on damage of rat intestinal epithelial cells induced by heat stress and lipopolysaccharides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, J.; Jiang, Y. [Southern Medical University, Nanfang Hospital, Department of Anesthesia, Guangzhou, China, Department of Anesthesia, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Tang, Y.; Chen, B. [Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command, Department of Intensive Care Unit, Guangzhou, China, Department of Intensive Care Unit, Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command, Guangzhou (China); Sun, X. [Laboratory of Traditional Chinese Medicine Syndrome, School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Su, L.; Liu, Z. [Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command, Department of Intensive Care Unit, Guangzhou, China, Department of Intensive Care Unit, Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command, Guangzhou (China)

    2013-06-25

    Gut-derived endotoxin and pathogenic bacteria have been proposed as important causative factors of morbidity and death during heat stroke. However, it is still unclear what kind of damage is induced by heat stress. In this study, the rat intestinal epithelial cell line (IEC-6) was treated with heat stress or a combination of heat stress and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In addition, propofol, which plays an important role in anti-inflammation and organ protection, was applied to study its effects on cellular viability and apoptosis. Heat stress, LPS, or heat stress combined with LPS stimulation can all cause intestinal epithelial cell damage, including early apoptosis and subsequent necrosis. However, propofol can alleviate injuries caused by heat stress, LPS, or the combination of heat stress and LPS. Interestingly, propofol can only mitigate LPS-induced intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis, and has no protective role in heat-stress-induced apoptosis. This study developed a model that can mimic the intestinal heat stress environment. It demonstrates the effects on intestinal epithelial cell damage, and indicated that propofol could be used as a therapeutic drug for the treatment of heat-stress-induced intestinal injuries.

  5. Effects of propofol on damage of rat intestinal epithelial cells induced by heat stress and lipopolysaccharides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, J.; Jiang, Y.; Tang, Y.; Chen, B.; Sun, X.; Su, L.; Liu, Z.

    2013-01-01

    Gut-derived endotoxin and pathogenic bacteria have been proposed as important causative factors of morbidity and death during heat stroke. However, it is still unclear what kind of damage is induced by heat stress. In this study, the rat intestinal epithelial cell line (IEC-6) was treated with heat stress or a combination of heat stress and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In addition, propofol, which plays an important role in anti-inflammation and organ protection, was applied to study its effects on cellular viability and apoptosis. Heat stress, LPS, or heat stress combined with LPS stimulation can all cause intestinal epithelial cell damage, including early apoptosis and subsequent necrosis. However, propofol can alleviate injuries caused by heat stress, LPS, or the combination of heat stress and LPS. Interestingly, propofol can only mitigate LPS-induced intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis, and has no protective role in heat-stress-induced apoptosis. This study developed a model that can mimic the intestinal heat stress environment. It demonstrates the effects on intestinal epithelial cell damage, and indicated that propofol could be used as a therapeutic drug for the treatment of heat-stress-induced intestinal injuries

  6. Multivalent adhesion molecule 7 clusters act as signaling platform for host cellular GTPase activation and facilitate epithelial barrier dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenson Lim

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio parahaemolyticus is an emerging bacterial pathogen which colonizes the gastrointestinal tract and can cause severe enteritis and bacteraemia. During infection, V. parahaemolyticus primarily attaches to the small intestine, where it causes extensive tissue damage and compromises epithelial barrier integrity. We have previously described that Multivalent Adhesion Molecule (MAM 7 contributes to initial attachment of V. parahaemolyticus to epithelial cells. Here we show that the bacterial adhesin, through multivalent interactions between surface-induced adhesin clusters and phosphatidic acid lipids in the host cell membrane, induces activation of the small GTPase RhoA and actin rearrangements in host cells. In infection studies with V. parahaemolyticus we further demonstrate that adhesin-triggered activation of the ROCK/LIMK signaling axis is sufficient to redistribute tight junction proteins, leading to a loss of epithelial barrier function. Taken together, these findings show an unprecedented mechanism by which an adhesin acts as assembly platform for a host cellular signaling pathway, which ultimately facilitates breaching of the epithelial barrier by a bacterial pathogen.

  7. γδ T cells in homeostasis and host defence of epithelial barrier tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten M.; Witherden, Deborah A.; Havran, Wendy L.

    2017-01-01

    Epithelial surfaces line the body and provide a crucial interface between the body and the external environment. Tissue-resident epithelial γδ T cells represent a major T cell population in the epithelial tissues and are ideally positioned to carry out barrier surveillance and aid in tissue...

  8. Enteric Pathogens and Their Toxin-Induced Disruption of the Intestinal Barrier through Alteration of Tight Junctions in Chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Wageha A; Hess, Claudia; Hess, Michael

    2017-02-10

    Maintaining a healthy gut environment is a prerequisite for sustainable animal production. The gut plays a key role in the digestion and absorption of nutrients and constitutes an initial organ exposed to external factors influencing bird's health. The intestinal epithelial barrier serves as the first line of defense between the host and the luminal environment. It consists of a continuous monolayer of intestinal epithelial cells connected by intercellular junctional complexes which shrink the space between adjacent cells. Consequently, free passing of solutes and water via the paracellular pathway is prevented. Tight junctions (TJs) are multi-protein complexes which are crucial for the integrity and function of the epithelial barrier as they not only link cells but also form channels allowing permeation between cells, resulting in epithelial surfaces of different tightness. Tight junction's molecular composition, ultrastructure, and function are regulated differently with regard to physiological and pathological stimuli. Both in vivo and in vitro studies suggest that reduced tight junction integrity greatly results in a condition commonly known as "leaky gut". A loss of barrier integrity allows the translocation of luminal antigens (microbes, toxins) via the mucosa to access the whole body which are normally excluded and subsequently destroys the gut mucosal homeostasis, coinciding with an increased susceptibility to systemic infection, chronic inflammation and malabsorption. There is considerable evidence that the intestinal barrier dysfunction is an important factor contributing to the pathogenicity of some enteric bacteria. It has been shown that some enteric pathogens can induce permeability defects in gut epithelia by altering tight junction proteins, mediated by their toxins. Resolving the strategies that microorganisms use to hijack the functions of tight junctions is important for our understanding of microbial pathogenesis, because some pathogens can

  9. Airway Epithelial Barrier Dysfunction in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease : Role of Cigarette Smoke Exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aghapour, Mahyar; Raee, Pourya; Moghaddam, Seyed Javad; Hiemstra, Pieter S.; Heijink, Irene H.

    The epithelial lining of the airway forms the first barrier against environmental insults, such as inhaled cigarette smoke, which is the primary risk factor for the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The barrier is formed by airway epithelial junctions, which are

  10. Circadian regulation of epithelial functions in the intestine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pácha, Jiří; Sumová, Alena

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 208, č. 1 (2013), s. 11-24 ISSN 1748-1708 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/10/0969; GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/11/0668 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : circadian rhythms * intestine * colon * proliferation * digestion * intestinal transport Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.251, year: 2013

  11. Cdx2 modulates proliferation in normal human intestinal epithelial crypt cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escaffit, Fabrice; Pare, Frederic; Gauthier, Remy; Rivard, Nathalie; Boudreau, Francois; Beaulieu, Jean-Francois

    2006-01-01

    The homeobox gene Cdx2 is involved in the regulation of the expression of intestine specific markers such as sucrase-isomaltase and lactase-phlorizin hydrolase. Previous studies performed with immortalized or transformed intestinal cell lines have provided evidence that Cdx2 can promote morphological and functional differentiation in these experimental models. However, no data exist concerning the implication of this factor in normal human intestinal cell physiology. In the present work, we have investigated the role of Cdx2 in normal human intestinal epithelial crypt (HIEC) cells that lack this transcription factor. The establishment of HIEC cells expressing Cdx2 in an inducible manner shows that forced expression of Cdx2 significantly alters the proliferation of intestinal crypt cells and stimulates dipeptidylpeptidase IV expression but is not sufficient to trigger intestinal terminal differentiation. These observations suggest that Cdx2 requires additional factors to activate the enterocyte differentiation program in normal undifferentiated cells

  12. Interleukin-4 and interleukin-13 cause barrier dysfunction in human airway epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Saatian, Bahman; Rezaee, Fariba; Desando, Samantha; Emo, Jason; Chapman, Tim; Knowlden, Sara; Georas, Steve N.

    2013-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that airway epithelial barrier function is compromised in asthma, a disease characterized by Th2-skewed immune response against inhaled allergens, but the mechanisms involved are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of Th2-type cytokines on airway epithelial barrier function. 16HBE14o- human bronchial epithelial cells monolayers were grown on collagen coated Transwell inserts. The basolateral or apical surfaces of airway epi...

  13. Protective effect of intestinal trefoil factor on injury of intestinal epithelial tight junction induced by platelet activating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ling-fen; Teng, Xu; Guo, Jing; Sun, Mei

    2012-02-01

    Intestinal barrier dysfunction plays an important role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). To evaluate the effect of intestinal trefoil factor (ITF) on increased intestinal permeability and its association with tight junction proteins, an in vitro intestinal epithelia barrier model was established with Caco-2 cells and treated with platelet-activating factor (PAF). We found that exposing cells to 0.3 M ITF (30 min before or 30 min after PAF treatment) attenuated the PAF-induced changes in transepithelial electrical resistance and Lucifer yellow flux. A quantitative RT-PCR and western blot analysis revealed that ITF suppressed PAF-induced downregulation of tight junction proteins claudin-1 and ZO-1 expression; furthermore, an abnormal localization and distribution of these proteins was inhibited, as assessed by immunofluorescence staining. These results suggest that ITF decreases mucosal permeability and shows potential as a therapy for treating IBD.

  14. Mapping of HNF4alpha target genes in intestinal epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyd, Mette; Bressendorff, Simon; Moller, Jette

    2009-01-01

    not previously been described as being regulated by HNF4alpha. The 1,541 genes contributed significantly to gene ontology (GO) pathways categorized by lipid and amino acid transport and metabolism. An analysis of the homeodomain transcription factor Cdx-2 (CDX2), the disaccharidase trehalase (TREH......ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The role of HNF4alpha has been extensively studied in hepatocytes and pancreatic beta-cells, and HNF4alpha is also regarded as key regulator of intestinal epithelial cell differentiation as well. The aim of the present work is to identify novel HNF4alpha target genes...... in the human intestinal epithelial cells in order to elucidate the role of HNF4alpha in the intestinal differentiation progress. METHODS: We have performed a ChIP-chip analysis of the human intestinal cell line Caco-2 in order to make a genome-wide identification of HNF4alpha binding to promoter regions...

  15. Does dietary fibre stimulate intestinal epithelial cell proliferation in germ free rats?

    OpenAIRE

    Goodlad, R A; Ratcliffe, B; Fordham, J P; Wright, N A

    1989-01-01

    The aim of the present experiment was to investigate the role of hind gut fermentation in the proliferative response of the intestinal epithelium to dietary fibre. We have previously shown that refeeding starved rats with an elemental diet supplemented with fermentable dietary fibre (but not inert bulk) is capable of stimulating intestinal epithelial cell proliferation throughout the gastrointestinal tract. Three groups of 10 germ free (GF) rats and three groups of 10 conventional (CV) rats, ...

  16. A method for high purity intestinal epithelial cell culture from adult human and murine tissues for the investigation of innate immune function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Christina L; Harden, Scott W; LaPato, Melissa; Nelson, Michael; Amador, Byron; Sorenson, Heather; Frazier, Charles J; Wallet, Shannon M

    2014-12-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) serve as an important physiologic barrier between environmental antigens and the host intestinal immune system. Thus, IECs serve as a first line of defense and may act as sentinel cells during inflammatory insults. Despite recent renewed interest in IEC contributions to host immune function, the study of primary IEC has been hindered by lack of a robust culture technique, particularly for small intestinal and adult tissues. Here, a novel adaptation for culture of primary IEC is described for human duodenal organ donor tissue as well as duodenum and colon of adult mice. These epithelial cell cultures display characteristic phenotypes and are of high purity. In addition, the innate immune function of human primary IEC, specifically with regard to Toll-like receptor (TLR) expression and microbial ligand responsiveness, is contrasted with a commonly used intestinal epithelial cell line (HT-29). Specifically, TLR expression at the mRNA level and production of cytokine (IFNγ and TNFα) in response to TLR agonist stimulation is assessed. Differential expression of TLRs as well as innate immune responses to ligand stimulation is observed in human-derived cultures compared to that of HT-29. Thus, use of this adapted method to culture primary epithelial cells from adult human donors and from adult mice will allow for more appropriate studies of IECs as innate immune effectors. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Nlrp9b inflammasome restricts rotavirus infection in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shu; Ding, Siyuan; Wang, Penghua; Wei, Zheng; Pan, Wen; Palm, Noah W; Yang, Yi; Yu, Hua; Li, Hua-Bing; Wang, Geng; Lei, Xuqiu; de Zoete, Marcel R; Zhao, Jun; Zheng, Yunjiang; Chen, Haiwei; Zhao, Yujiao; Jurado, Kellie A; Feng, Ningguo; Shan, Liang; Kluger, Yuval; Lu, Jun; Abraham, Clara; Fikrig, Erol; Greenberg, Harry B; Flavell, Richard A

    2017-06-29

    Rotavirus, a leading cause of severe gastroenteritis and diarrhoea in young children, accounts for around 215,000 deaths annually worldwide. Rotavirus specifically infects the intestinal epithelial cells in the host small intestine and has evolved strategies to antagonize interferon and NF-κB signalling, raising the question as to whether other host factors participate in antiviral responses in intestinal mucosa. The mechanism by which enteric viruses are sensed and restricted in vivo, especially by NOD-like receptor (NLR) inflammasomes, is largely unknown. Here we uncover and mechanistically characterize the NLR Nlrp9b that is specifically expressed in intestinal epithelial cells and restricts rotavirus infection. Our data show that, via RNA helicase Dhx9, Nlrp9b recognizes short double-stranded RNA stretches and forms inflammasome complexes with the adaptor proteins Asc and caspase-1 to promote the maturation of interleukin (Il)-18 and gasdermin D (Gsdmd)-induced pyroptosis. Conditional depletion of Nlrp9b or other inflammasome components in the intestine in vivo resulted in enhanced susceptibility of mice to rotavirus replication. Our study highlights an important innate immune signalling pathway that functions in intestinal epithelial cells and may present useful targets in the modulation of host defences against viral pathogens.

  18. TTC7A mutations disrupt intestinal epithelial apicobasal polarity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bigorgne, Amélie E; Farin, Henner F; Lemoine, Roxane; Mahlaoui, Nizar; Lambert, Nathalie; Gil, Marine; Schulz, Ansgar; Philippet, Pierre; Schlesser, Patrick; Abrahamsen, Tore G; Oymar, Knut; Davies, E Graham; Ellingsen, Christian Lycke; Leteurtre, Emmanuelle; Moreau-Massart, Brigitte; Berrebi, Dominique; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Nischke, Patrick; Brousse, Nicole; Fischer, Alain; Clevers, Hans; de Saint Basile, Geneviève

    Multiple intestinal atresia (MIA) is a rare cause of bowel obstruction that is sometimes associated with a combined immunodeficiency (CID), leading to increased susceptibility to infections. The factors underlying this rare disease are poorly understood. We characterized the immunological and

  19. Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 (GSK-3) influences epithelial barrier function by regulating Occludin, Claudin-1 and E-cadherin expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severson, Eric A.; Kwon, Mike; Hilgarth, Roland S.; Parkos, Charles A.; Nusrat, Asma

    2010-01-01

    The Apical Junctional Complex (AJC) encompassing the tight junction (TJ) and adherens junction (AJ) plays a pivotal role in regulating epithelial barrier function and epithelial cell proliferative processes through signaling events that remain poorly characterized. A potential regulator of AJC protein expression is Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 (GSK-3). GSK-3 is a constitutively active kinase that is repressed during epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). In the present study, we report that GSK-3 activity regulates the structure and function of the AJC in polarized model intestinal (SK-CO15) and kidney (Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK)) epithelial cells. Reduction of GSK-3 activity, either by small molecule inhibitors or siRNA targeting GSK-3 alpha and beta mRNA, resulted in increased permeability to both ions and bulk solutes. Immunofluorescence labeling and immunoblot analyses revealed that the barrier defects correlated with decreased protein expression of AJC transmembrane proteins Occludin, Claudin-1 and E-cadherin without influencing other TJ proteins, Zonula Occludens-1 (ZO-1) and Junctional Adhesion Molecule A (JAM-A). The decrease in Occludin and E-cadherin protein expression correlated with downregulation of the corresponding mRNA levels for these respective proteins following GSK-3 inhibition. These observations implicate an important role of GSK-3 in the regulation of the structure and function of the AJC that is mediated by differential modulation of mRNA transcription of key AJC proteins, Occludin, Claudin-1 and E-cadherin.

  20. Oncostatin M promotes mucosal epithelial barrier dysfunction and is elevated in eosinophilic mucosal disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothoven, Kathryn L.; Norton, James E.; Hulse, Kathryn E.; Suh, Lydia A.; Carter, Roderick G.; Rocci, Erin; Harris, Kathleen E.; Shintani-Smith, Stephanie; Conley, David B.; Chandra, Rakesh K.; Liu, Mark C.; Kato, Atsushi; Gonsalves, Nirmala; Grammer, Leslie C.; Peters, Anju T.; Kern, Robert C.; Bryce, Paul J.; Tan, Bruce K.; Schleimer, Robert P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Epithelial barrier dysfunction is thought to play a role in many mucosal diseases including asthma, chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS), and eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the role of OSM in epithelial barrier dysfunction in human mucosal disease. Methods OSM expression was measured in tissue extracts, nasal secretions, and BAL. Effects of OSM stimulation on barrier function of normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells and nasal epithelial cells (NEC) cultured at air liquid interface (ALI) were assessed using transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and FITC dextran flux. Dual color immunofluorescence was used to evaluate integrity of tight junction structures in cultured epithelial cells. Results Analysis of CRS samples showed that OSM mRNA and protein were highly increased in nasal polyps compared to control uncinate tissue (p<0.05). OSM was also elevated in BAL of allergic asthmatics following segmental allergen challenge and in esophageal biopsies from EoE patients. OSM stimulation of ALI cultures resulted in reduced barrier function measured by decreased TEER and increased FITC dextran flux (p<0.05). Alterations in barrier function by OSM were reversible, and the viability of epithelial cells was unaffected. OSM levels in lysates of nasal polyps and UT positively correlated with α2-macroglobulin, a marker of epithelial leak, in localized nasal secretions (r=0.4855, p<0.05). Conclusions These results suggest that OSM may play a role in epithelial barrier dysfunction in CRS and other mucosal diseases. PMID:25840724

  1. Gut microbial colonization orchestrates TLR2 expression, signaling and epithelial proliferation in the small intestinal mucosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nives Hörmann

    Full Text Available The gut microbiota is an environmental factor that determines renewal of the intestinal epithelium and remodeling of the intestinal mucosa. At present, it is not resolved if components of the gut microbiota can augment innate immune sensing in the intestinal epithelium via the up-regulation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs. Here, we report that colonization of germ-free (GF Swiss Webster mice with a complex gut microbiota augments expression of TLR2. The microbiota-dependent up-regulation of components of the TLR2 signaling complex could be reversed by a 7 day broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment. TLR2 downstream signaling via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK1/2 and protein-kinase B (AKT induced by bacterial TLR2 agonists resulted in increased proliferation of the small intestinal epithelial cell line MODE-K. Mice that were colonized from birth with a normal gut microbiota (conventionally-raised; CONV-R showed signs of increased small intestinal renewal and apoptosis compared with GF controls as indicated by elevated mRNA levels of the proliferation markers Ki67 and Cyclin D1, elevated transcripts of the apoptosis marker Caspase-3 and increased numbers of TUNEL-positive cells per intestinal villus structure. In accordance, TLR2-deficient mice showed reduced proliferation and reduced apoptosis. Our findings suggest that a tuned proliferation response of epithelial cells following microbial colonization could aid to protect the host from its microbial colonizers and increase intestinal surface area.

  2. Intestinal permeability and carrier-mediated monosaccharide absorption in preterm neonates during the early postnatal period

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rouwet, Ellen V.; Heineman, Erik; Buurman, Wim A.; ter Riet, Gerben; Ramsay, Graham; Blanco, Carlos E.

    2002-01-01

    Immaturity of intestinal epithelial barrier function and absorptive capacity may play a role in the pathophysiology of intestinal complications in preterm neonates during the early postnatal period. We determined the intestinal permeability and carrier-mediated absorption of monosaccharides in

  3. Inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase attenuates butyrate-induced intestinal barrier impairment in a Caco-2 cell monolayer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiao-Zhong; Li, Zhong-Rong; Zhu, Li-Bin; Huang, Hui-Ya; Hou, Long-Long; Lin, Jing

    2014-08-01

    Butyrate is well known to induce apoptosis in differentiating intestinal epithelial cells. The present study was designed to examine the role of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in butyrate-induced intestinal barrier impairment. The intestinal barrier was determined by measuring the transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) in a Caco-2 cell monolayer model. The permeability was determined by measuring transepithelial passage of fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated inulin (inulin-FITC). The morphology of the monolayers was examined with scanning electron microscopy. The apoptosis status was determined by annexin V-FITC labeling and flow cytometry. The activity of p38 MAPK was determined by the phosphorylation status of p38 with Western blotting. Butyrate at 5 mM increases the apoptosis rate of Caco-2 cells and induces impairment of intestinal barrier functions as determined by decreased TER and increased inulin-FITC permeability. Butyrate treatment activates p38 MAPK in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. SB203580, a specific p38 inhibitor, inhibits butyrate-induced Caco-2 cell apoptosis. Treatment of SB203580 significantly attenuates the butyrate-induced impairment of barrier functions in the Caco-2 cell monolayer model. p38 MAPK can be activated by butyrate and is involved in the butyrate-induced apoptosis and impairment of intestinal barrier function. Inhibition of p38 MAPK can significantly attenuate butyrate-induced intestinal barrier dysfunction.

  4. Bioavailability of genistein, daidzein, and their glycosides in intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steensma, A.; Noteborn, H.P.J.M.; Jagt, van der R.C.M.; Polman, Th.H.G.; Mengelers, M.J.B.; Kuiper, H.A.

    1999-01-01

    In this study information was obtained on bioavailability of genistein, daidzein and their glycosides in human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells grown on semi-permeable filters. The integrity of Caco-2 monolayers was confirmed by transepithelial electrical resistance measurements and by

  5. Campylobacter jejuni translocation across intestinal epithelial cells is facilitated by ganglioside-like lipooligosaccharide structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.P.L. Louwen (Rogier); E.E.S. Nieuwenhuis (Edward); L. van Marrewijk (Leonie); D. Horst-Kreft (Deborah); L.F. de Ruiter (Lilian); A.P. Heikema (Astrid); W.J.B. van Wamel (Willem); J.A. Wagenaar (Jaap); H.P. Endtz (Hubert); J.N. Samsom (Janneke); P. van Baarlen (Peter); A.S. Akhmanova (Anna); A.F. van Belkum (Alex)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractTranslocation across intestinal epithelial cells is an established pathogenic feature of the zoonotic bacterial species Campylobacter jejuni. The number of C. jejuni virulence factors known to be involved in translocation is limited. In the present study, we investigated whether

  6. Intestinal epithelial organoids fuse to form self-organizing tubes in floating collagen gels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sachs, Norman; Tsukamoto, Yoshiyuki; Kujala, Pekka; Peters, Peter J.; Clevers, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Multiple recent examples highlight how stem cells can self-organize in vitro to establish organoids that closely resemble their in vivo counterparts. Single Lgr5+ mouse intestinal stem cells can be cultured under defined conditions forming ever-expanding epithelial organoids that retain cell

  7. Molecular properties of adult mouse gastric and intestinal epithelial progenitors in their niches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giannakis, Marios; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S; Mills, Jason C

    2006-01-01

    We have sequenced 36,641 expressed sequence tags from laser capture microdissected adult mouse gastric and small intestinal epithelial progenitors, obtaining 4031 and 3324 unique transcripts, respectively. Using Gene Ontology (GO) terms, each data set was compared with cDNA libraries from intact ...

  8. Protective Effects of Bifidobacterium on Intestinal Barrier Function in LPS-Induced Enterocyte Barrier Injury of Caco-2 Monolayers and in a Rat NEC Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Ling

    Full Text Available Zonulin protein is a newly discovered modulator which modulates the permeability of the intestinal epithelial barrier by disassembling intercellular tight junctions (TJ. Disruption of TJ is associated with neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC. It has been shown bifidobacterium could protect the intestinal barrier function and prophylactical administration of bifidobacterium has beneficial effects in NEC patients and animals. However, it is still unknown whether the zonulin is involved in the gut barrier dysfunction of NEC, and the protective mechanisms of bifidobacterium on intestinal barrier function are also not well understood. The present study aims to investigate the effects of bifidobacterium on intestinal barrier function, zonulin regulation, and TJ integrity both in LPS-induced enterocyte barrier injury of Caco-2 monolayers and in a rat NEC model. Our results showed bifidobacterium markedly attenuated the decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance and the increase in paracellular permeability in the Caco-2 monolayers treated with LPS (P < 0.01. Compared with the LPS group, bifidobacterium significantly decreased the production of IL-6 and TNF-α (P < 0.01 and suppressed zonulin release (P < 0.05. In addition, bifidobacterium pretreatment up-regulated occludin, claudin-3 and ZO-1 expression (P < 0.01 and also preserved these proteins localization at TJ compared with the LPS group. In the in vivo study, bifidobacterium decreased the incidence of NEC from 88 to 47% (P < 0.05 and reduced the severity in the NEC model. Increased levels of IL-6 and TNF-α in the ileum of NEC rats were normalized in bifidobacterium treated rats (P < 0.05. Moreover, administration of bifidobacterium attenuated the increase in intestinal permeability (P < 0.01, decreased the levels of serum zonulin (P < 0.05, normalized the expression and localization of TJ proteins in the ileum compared with animals with NEC. We concluded that bifidobacterium may

  9. Fermented soya bean (tempe) extracts reduce adhesion of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli to intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roubos-van den Hil, P J; Nout, M J R; Beumer, R R; van der Meulen, J; Zwietering, M H

    2009-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of processed soya bean, during the successive stages of tempe fermentation and different fermentation times, on adhesion of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) K88 to intestinal brush border cells as well as Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells; and to clarify the mechanism of action. Tempe was prepared at controlled laboratory scale using Rhizopus microsporus var. microsporus as the inoculum. Extracts of raw, soaked and cooked soya beans reduced ETEC adhesion to brush border cells by 40%. Tempe extracts reduced adhesion by 80% or more. ETEC adhesion to Caco-2 cells reduced by 50% in the presence of tempe extracts. ETEC K88 bacteria were found to interact with soya bean extracts, and this may contribute to the observed decrease of ETEC adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells. Fermented soya beans (tempe) reduce the adhesion of ETEC to intestinal epithelial cells of pig and human origin. This reduced adhesion is caused by an interaction between ETEC K88 bacteria and soya bean compounds. The results strengthen previous observations on the anti-diarrhoeal effect of tempe. This effect indicates that soya-derived compounds may reduce adhesion of ETEC to intestinal cells in pigs as well as in humans and prevent against diarrhoeal diseases.

  10. Long-term Renewable Human Intestinal Epithelial Stem Cells as Monolayers: A Potential for Clinical Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Andrew; Rouch, Joshua D; Jabaji, Ziyad; Khalil, Hassan A; Solorzano, Sergio; Lewis, Michael; Martín, Martín G.; Stelzner, Matthias G.; Dunn, James C.Y.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Current culture schema for human intestinal stem cells (hISCs) frequently rely on a 3D culture system using Matrigel™, a laminin-rich matrix derived from murine sarcoma that is not suitable for clinical use. We have developed a novel 2D culture system for the in vitro expansion of hISCs as an intestinal epithelial monolayer without the use of Matrigel. Methods Cadaveric duodenal samples were processed to isolate intestinal crypts from the mucosa. Crypts were cultured on a thin coat of type I collagen or laminin. Intestinal epithelial monolayers were supported with growth factors to promote self-renewal or differentiation of the hISCs. Proliferating monolayers were sub-cultured every 4–5 days. Results Intestinal epithelial monolayers were capable of long-term cell renewal. Less differentiated monolayers expressed high levels of gene marker LGR5, while more differentiated monolayers had higher expressions of CDX2, MUC2, LYZ, DEF5, and CHGA. Furthermore, monolayers were capable of passaging into a 3D culture system to generate spheroids and enteroids. Conclusion This 2D system is an important step to expand hISCs for further experimental studies and for clinical cell transplantation. PMID:26995514

  11. A20 restricts wnt signaling in intestinal epithelial cells and suppresses colon carcinogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Shao

    Full Text Available Colon carcinogenesis consists of a multistep process during which a series of genetic and epigenetic adaptations occur that lead to malignant transformation. Here, we have studied the role of A20 (also known as TNFAIP3, a ubiquitin-editing enzyme that restricts NFκB and cell death signaling, in intestinal homeostasis and tumorigenesis. We have found that A20 expression is consistently reduced in human colonic adenomas than in normal colonic tissues. To further investigate A20's potential roles in regulating colon carcinogenesis, we have generated mice lacking A20 specifically in intestinal epithelial cells and interbred these with mice harboring a mutation in the adenomatous polyposis coli gene (APC(min. While A20(FL/FL villin-Cre mice exhibit uninflamed intestines without polyps, A20(FL/FL villin-Cre APC(min/+ mice contain far greater numbers and larger colonic polyps than control APC(min mice. We find that A20 binds to the β-catenin destruction complex and restricts canonical wnt signaling by supporting ubiquitination and degradation of β-catenin in intestinal epithelial cells. Moreover, acute deletion of A20 from intestinal epithelial cells in vivo leads to enhanced expression of the β-catenin dependent genes cyclinD1 and c-myc, known promoters of colon cancer. Taken together, these findings demonstrate new roles for A20 in restricting β-catenin signaling and preventing colon tumorigenesis.

  12. Epithelial structure and function in the hen lower intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laverty, G.; Elbrønd, Vibeke Sødring; Árnason, Sigvatur S.

    2006-01-01

    In birds, transport processes in the lower intestine mediate absorption of ions, water and a variety of organic substrates, including significant amounts of glucose, amino acids derived from protein associated with urate spheres, and short-chain fatty acids derived from fermentation processes....... These transport pathways contribute to both osmoregulation and energy homeostasis. Although birds lack a urinary bladder, evidence has shown that ureteral urine, entering the distal lower intestine, is forced into the colon, caecae and even distal portions of the small intestine. Further, substrates also enter......, by resalination of low-salt hens, or by aldosterone administration to high-salt-acclimated birds. In the coprodeum, the changes in transport are paralleled by extensive remodelling of the mucosal surface, with low-salt acclimation increasing cell numbers, microvillus density and length and the proportion...

  13. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor preserves intestinal mucosal barrier function and alters gut microbiota in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Li

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal mucosal barrier (IMB enables the intestine to provide adequate containment of luminal microorganisms and molecules while preserving the ability to absorb nutrients. In this study, we explored the effect of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF on IMB function and gut microbiota in mice. BDNF gene knock-out mice (the BDNF+/− group and wild-type mice (the BDNF+/+ group were selected. The gut microbiota of these mice was analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE assay. The ultrastructure of the ileum and the colonic epithelium obtained from decapitated mice were observed by transmission electron microscopy. The protein expression of epithelial tight junction proteins, zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1 and occludin was detected by immunohistochemistry staining. The protein expression of claudin-1 and claudin-2 was determined by Western blotting. The DGGE band patterns of gut microbiota in the BDNF+/− group were significantly different from that in the BDNF+/+ group, which indicated that the BDNF expression alters the gut microbiota in mice. Compared with the BDNF+/+ group, the BDNF+/− group presented no significant difference in the ultrastructure of ileal epithelium; however, a significant difference was observed in the colonic epithelial barrier, manifested by decreased microvilli, widening intercellular space and bacterial invasion. Compared with the BDNF+/+ group, the expression of ZO-1 and occludin in the BDNF+/− group was significantly decreased. The expression of claudin-1 in the BDNF+/− group was significantly reduced, while the expression of claudin-2 was elevated. These findings indicate that BDNF preserves IMB function and modulates gut microbiota in mice.

  14. Cyanidin-3-O-Glucoside Modulates the In Vitro Inflammatory Crosstalk between Intestinal Epithelial and Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Ferrari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal epithelium represents a protective physical barrier and actively contributes to the mucosal immune system. Polarized basolateral intestinal secretion of inflammatory mediators, followed by activation of NF-κB signaling and inflammatory pathways in endothelial cells, efficiently triggers extravasation of neutrophils from the vasculature, therefore contributing to the development and maintenance of intestinal inflammation. Proper regulation of NF-κB activation at the epithelial interface is crucial for the maintenance of physiological tissue homeostasis. Many papers reported that anthocyanins, a group of compounds belonging to flavonoids, possess anti-inflammatory effects and modulate NF-κB activity. In this study, by using a coculture in vitro system, we aimed to evaluate the effects of TNF-α-stimulated intestinal cells on endothelial cells activation, as well as the protective effects of cyanidin-3-glucoside (C3G. In this model, TNF-α induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB and TNF-α and IL-8 gene expression in Caco-2 cells, whereas C3G pretreatment dose-dependently reduced these effects. Furthermore, TNF-α-stimulated Caco-2 cells induced endothelial cells activation with increased E-selectin and VCAM-1 mRNA, leukocyte adhesion, and NF-κB levels in HUVECs, which were inhibited by C3G. We demonstrated that selective inhibition of the NF-κB pathway in epithelial cells represents the main mechanism by which C3G exerts these protective effects. Thus, anthocyanins could contribute to the management of chronic gut inflammatory diseases.

  15. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli infection stimulates Shiga toxin 1 macropinocytosis and transcytosis across intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukyanenko, Valeriy; Malyukova, Irina; Hubbard, Ann; Delannoy, Michael; Boedeker, Edgar; Zhu, Chengru; Cebotaru, Liudmila; Kovbasnjuk, Olga

    2011-11-01

    Gastrointestinal infection with Shiga toxins producing enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli causes the spectrum of gastrointestinal and systemic complications, including hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome, which is fatal in ∼10% of patients. However, the molecular mechanisms of Stx endocytosis by enterocytes and the toxins cross the intestinal epithelium are largely uncharacterized. We have studied Shiga toxin 1 entry into enterohemorrhagic E. coli-infected intestinal epithelial cells and found that bacteria stimulate Shiga toxin 1 macropinocytosis through actin remodeling. This enterohemorrhagic E. coli-caused macropinocytosis occurs through a nonmuscle myosin II and cell division control 42 (Cdc42)-dependent mechanism. Macropinocytosis of Shiga toxin 1 is followed by its transcytosis to the basolateral environment, a step that is necessary for its systemic spread. Inhibition of Shiga toxin 1 macropinocytosis significantly decreases toxin uptake by intestinal epithelial cells and in this way provides an attractive, antibiotic-independent strategy for prevention of the harmful consequences of enterohemorrhagic E. coli infection.

  16. Ethanol metabolism and its effects on the intestinal epithelial barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elamin, E.E.; Masclee, A.A.; Dekker, J.; Jonkers, D.M.

    2013-01-01

    Ethanol is widely consumed and is associated with an increasing global health burden. Several reviews have addressed the effects of ethanol and its oxidative metabolite, acetaldehyde, on the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, focusing on carcinogenic effects or alcoholic liver disease. However, both the

  17. Protelytic Regulation of the Intestinal Epithelial Barrier: Mechanisms and Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Inflammatory bowel diseases are characterized by chronic, progressive and destructive inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract...by chronic, progressive and destructive inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. The two main forms of IBD, Crohn’s disease and Ulcerative...retrieval in citrate buffer pH 6, and immunostaining with primary and fluorescently labeled secondary antibodies. Sections are co- stained with the

  18. Phosphate-dependent luminal ATP metabolism regulates transcellular calcium transport in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uekawa, Atsushi; Yamanaka, Hitoki; Lieben, Liesbet; Kimira, Yoshifumi; Uehara, Mariko; Yamamoto, Yoko; Kato, Shigeaki; Ito, Kosei; Carmeliet, Geert; Masuyama, Ritsuko

    2018-01-05

    Extracellular low phosphate strongly enhances intestinal calcium absorption independently of active vitamin D [1,25(OH) 2 D 3 ] signaling, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly characterized. To elucidate the phosphate-dependent regulation of calcium transport, we investigated part of the enteral environment that is involved in 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 -independent calcium absorption, which responds to dietary phosphate levels in mice that lack intestinal vitamin D receptor ( Vdr) activity. Impaired calcium absorption in intestinal Vdr-null mice was improved by dietary phosphate restriction. Accordingly, calcium transport in cultured intestinal epithelial cells was increased when the apical side was exposed to low phosphate levels (0.5 mM) compared with normal or high phosphate levels (1.0 or 5.0 mM, respectively). Mechanistically, low phosphate increased ATP in the apical side medium and allowed calcium entry into epithelial cells via the P2X7 purinoreceptor, which results in increased calcium transport. We found that luminal ATP was regulated by the release and degradation of ATP at the epithelium, and phosphate restriction increased ATP release from epithelial cells via connexin-43 hemichannels. Furthermore, ATP degradation by ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase-1 was reduced, which was caused by the reduction of the MAPK cascade. These findings indicate that luminal ATP metabolism regulates transcellular calcium transport in the intestine by an 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 -independent mechanism in response to dietary phosphate levels.-Uekawa, A., Yamanaka, H., Lieben, L., Kimira, Y., Uehara, M., Yamamoto, Y., Kato, S., Ito, K., Carmeliet, G., Masuyama, R. Phosphate-dependent luminal ATP metabolism regulates transcellular calcium transport in intestinal epithelial cells.

  19. Plasticity of intestinal epithelial cells in regeneration and cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tetteh, Paul W.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular plasticity refers to the ability of a cell to change its fate or identity in response to external or intrinsic factors. Regeneration of the intestinal epithelium after injury is driven mainly by plasticity of crypt stem cells that can rapidly divide to replace all the lost cells. Stem cell

  20. Epithelial structure and function in the hen lower intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laverty, G.; Elbrønd, Vibeke Sødring; Árnason, Sigvatur S.

    2006-01-01

    In birds, transport processes in the lower intestine mediate absorption of ions, water and a variety of organic substrates, including significant amounts of glucose, amino acids derived from protein associated with urate spheres, and short-chain fatty acids derived from fermentation processes. Th...

  1. Effects of ethanol and acetaldehyde on tight junction integrity: in vitro study in a three dimensional intestinal epithelial cell culture model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elhaseen Elamin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intestinal barrier dysfunction and translocation of endotoxins are involved in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. Exposure to ethanol and its metabolite, acetaldehyde at relatively high concentrations have been shown to disrupt intestinal epithelial tight junctions in the conventional two dimensional cell culture models. The present study investigated quantitatively and qualitatively the effects of ethanol at concentrations detected in the blood after moderate ethanol consumption, of its metabolite acetaldehyde and of the combination of both compounds on intestinal barrier function in a three-dimensional cell culture model. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Caco-2 cells were grown in a basement membrane matrix (Matrigel™ to induce spheroid formation and were then exposed to the compounds at the basolateral side. Morphological differentiation of the spheroids was assessed by immunocytochemistry and transmission electron microscopy. The barrier function was assessed by the flux of FITC-labeled dextran from the basal side into the spheroids' luminal compartment using confocal microscopy. Caco-2 cells grown on Matrigel assembled into fully differentiated and polarized spheroids with a central lumen, closely resembling enterocytes in vivo and provide an excellent model to study epithelial barrier functionality. Exposure to ethanol (10-40 mM or acetaldehyde (25-200 µM for 3 h, dose-dependently and additively increased the paracellular permeability and induced redistribution of ZO-1 and occludin without affecting cell viability or tight junction-encoding gene expression. Furthermore, ethanol and acetaldehyde induced lysine residue and microtubules hyperacetylation. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that ethanol at concentrations found in the blood after moderate drinking and acetaldehyde, alone and in combination, can increase the intestinal epithelial permeability. The data also point to the involvement of protein hyperacetylation in

  2. Characterization of human, mouse, and rat cultures of enteric glial cells and their effect on intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soret, R; Coquenlorge, S; Cossais, F; Meurette, G; Rolli-Derkinderen, M; Neunlist, M

    2013-11-01

    Enteric glial cells (EGC) are major regulators of neuronal and intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) functions. Simple isolation methods of EGC, especially human tissues, remain scarce and limit their study. We present herein a method to isolate EGC and we characterize EGC phenotype and their functional impact on IEC. Longitudinal muscle and myenteric plexus preparations of rat, mouse, or human intestine were obtained by microdissection. After mechanical and enzymatic dissociation, individual ganglionic or interganglionic structures were seeded into plates, maintained in culture several weeks and passaged up to 4 times. Purity of cultures was assessed by immunocytochemistry using antibodies against glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), S100β and Sox10 or smooth muscle actin. Effects of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) on intracellular Ca²⁺ signaling in EGC were studied. Co-cultures of EGC with IEC line, Caco-2, were performed for 2-6 days to analyze their impact on monolayer resistance, cell proliferation, and cell spreading. More than 80% of DAPI-positive cells were GFAP, S100β, and Sox10-immunoreactive. EGC expressed these glial markers over 4 consecutive passages, and the majority of them responded to ATP by an increase in intracellular Ca²⁺ concentration. In addition, rat, mouse, and human EGC increased intestinal barrier resistance, IEC size, and reduced IEC number. We have developed a simple method to isolate and culture human, rat, or mouse EGC. EGC exhibit similar functional properties on the intestinal barrier independently of the species. This study sets the basis for exploring glial biology and functions in human health and diseases. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Fluorescent labelling of intestinal epithelial cells reveals independent long-lived intestinal stem cells in a crypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horita, Nobukatsu; Tsuchiya, Kiichiro; Hayashi, Ryohei; Fukushima, Keita; Hibiya, Shuji; Fukuda, Masayoshi; Kano, Yoshihito; Mizutani, Tomohiro; Nemoto, Yasuhiro; Yui, Shiro; Okamoto, Ryuichi; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Lentivirus mixed with Matrigel enables direct infection of intestinal organoids. • Our original approach allows the marking of a single stem cell in a crypt. • Time-lapse imaging shows the dynamics of a single stem cell. • Our lentivirus transgene system demonstrates plural long-lived stem cells in a crypt. - Abstract: Background and aims: The dynamics of intestinal stem cells are crucial for regulation of intestinal function and maintenance. Although crypt stem cells have been identified in the intestine by genetic marking methods, identification of plural crypt stem cells has not yet been achieved as they are visualised in the same colour. Methods: Intestinal organoids were transferred into Matrigel® mixed with lentivirus encoding mCherry. The dynamics of mCherry-positive cells was analysed using time-lapse imaging, and the localisation of mCherry-positive cells was analysed using 3D immunofluorescence. Results: We established an original method for the introduction of a transgene into an organoid generated from mouse small intestine that resulted in continuous fluorescence of the mCherry protein in a portion of organoid cells. Three-dimensional analysis using confocal microscopy showed a single mCherry-positive cell in an organoid crypt that had been cultured for >1 year, which suggested the presence of long-lived mCherry-positive and -negative stem cells in the same crypt. Moreover, a single mCherry-positive stem cell in a crypt gave rise to both crypt base columnar cells and transit amplifying cells. Each mCherry-positive and -negative cell contributed to the generation of organoids. Conclusions: The use of our original lentiviral transgene system to mark individual organoid crypt stem cells showed that long-lived plural crypt stem cells might independently serve as intestinal epithelial cells, resulting in the formation of a completely functional villus

  4. Fluorescent labelling of intestinal epithelial cells reveals independent long-lived intestinal stem cells in a crypt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horita, Nobukatsu [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan); Tsuchiya, Kiichiro, E-mail: kii.gast@tmd.ac.jp [Department of Advanced Therapeutics for Gastrointestinal Diseases, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan); Hayashi, Ryohei [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan); Department of Gastroenterology and Metabolism, Hiroshima University (Japan); Fukushima, Keita; Hibiya, Shuji; Fukuda, Masayoshi; Kano, Yoshihito; Mizutani, Tomohiro; Nemoto, Yasuhiro; Yui, Shiro [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan); Okamoto, Ryuichi; Nakamura, Tetsuya [Department of Advanced Therapeutics for Gastrointestinal Diseases, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan); Watanabe, Mamoru [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Japan)

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: • Lentivirus mixed with Matrigel enables direct infection of intestinal organoids. • Our original approach allows the marking of a single stem cell in a crypt. • Time-lapse imaging shows the dynamics of a single stem cell. • Our lentivirus transgene system demonstrates plural long-lived stem cells in a crypt. - Abstract: Background and aims: The dynamics of intestinal stem cells are crucial for regulation of intestinal function and maintenance. Although crypt stem cells have been identified in the intestine by genetic marking methods, identification of plural crypt stem cells has not yet been achieved as they are visualised in the same colour. Methods: Intestinal organoids were transferred into Matrigel® mixed with lentivirus encoding mCherry. The dynamics of mCherry-positive cells was analysed using time-lapse imaging, and the localisation of mCherry-positive cells was analysed using 3D immunofluorescence. Results: We established an original method for the introduction of a transgene into an organoid generated from mouse small intestine that resulted in continuous fluorescence of the mCherry protein in a portion of organoid cells. Three-dimensional analysis using confocal microscopy showed a single mCherry-positive cell in an organoid crypt that had been cultured for >1 year, which suggested the presence of long-lived mCherry-positive and -negative stem cells in the same crypt. Moreover, a single mCherry-positive stem cell in a crypt gave rise to both crypt base columnar cells and transit amplifying cells. Each mCherry-positive and -negative cell contributed to the generation of organoids. Conclusions: The use of our original lentiviral transgene system to mark individual organoid crypt stem cells showed that long-lived plural crypt stem cells might independently serve as intestinal epithelial cells, resulting in the formation of a completely functional villus.

  5. Antigen presentation by small intestinal epithelial cells uniquely enhances IFN-γ secretion from CD4{sup +} intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatano, Ryo; Yamada, Kiyoshi; Iwamoto, Taku; Maeda, Nana; Emoto, Tetsuro; Shimizu, Makoto; Totsuka, Mamoru, E-mail: atotuka@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •Small intestinal epithelial cells (sIECs). •sIECs are able to induce antigen specific proliferation of CD4{sup +} IELs. •sIECs induce markedly enhanced IFN-γ secretion by CD4{sup +} IELs. •Induction of enhanced IFN-γ secretion by sIECs is uniquely observed in CD4{sup +} IELs. -- Abstract: Small intestinal epithelial cells (sIECs) express major histocompatibility complex class II molecules even in a normal condition, and are known to function as antigen presenting cells (APCs) at least in vitro. These findings raised the possibility that sIECs play an important role in inducing immune responses against luminal antigens, especially those of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) and lamina propria lymphocytes (LPLs). We herein showed that antigenic stimulation with sIECs induced markedly greater secretion of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) by CD4{sup +} IELs, but not interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10 and IL-17 although the proliferative response was prominently lower than that with T cell-depleted splenic APCs. In contrast, no enhanced IFN-γ secretion by CD4{sup +} LPLs and primed splenic CD4{sup +} T cells was observed when stimulated with sIECs. Taken together, these results suggest that sIECs uniquely activate CD4{sup +} IELs and induce remarkable IFN-γ secretion upon antigenic stimulation in vivo.

  6. Fluorescently labeled methyl-beta-cyclodextrin enters intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells by fluid-phase endocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferenc Fenyvesi

    Full Text Available Cyclodextrins are widely used excipients for increasing the bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs. Their effect on drug absorption in the gastrointestinal tract is explained by their solubility- and permeability-enhancement. The aims of this study were to investigate penetration properties of fluorescently labeled randomly methylated-beta-cyclodextrin (FITC-RAMEB on Caco-2 cell layer and examine the cellular entry of cyclodextrins on intestinal cells. The permeability of FITC-RAMEB through Caco-2 monolayers was very limited. Using this compound in 0.05 mM concentration the permeability coefficient was 3.35±1.29×10(-8 cm/s and its permeability did not change in the presence of 5 mM randomly methylated-beta-cyclodextrin. Despite of the low permeability, cellular accumulation of FITC-RAMEB in cytoplasmic vesicles was significant and showed strong time and concentration dependence, similar to the characteristics of the macropinocytosis marker Lucifer Yellow. The internalization process was fully inhibited at 0°C and it was drastically reduced at 37°C applying rottlerin, an inhibitor of macropinocytosis. Notably, FITC-RAMEB colocalized with the early endosome organizer Rab5a. These results have revealed that FITC-RAMEB is able to enter intestinal epithelial cells by fluid-phase endocytosis from the apical side. This mechanism can be an additional process which helps to overcome the intestinal barrier and contributes to the bioavailability enhancement of cyclodextrins.

  7. The role of the intestinal microvasculature in inflammatory bowel disease: studies with a modified Caco-2 model including endothelial cells resembling the intestinal barrier in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Jennifer Y; Hermanns, Maria Iris; Cavelius, Christian; Kraegeloh, Annette; Jung, Thomas; Danzebrink, Rolf; Unger, Ronald E; Kirkpatrick, Charles James

    2016-01-01

    The microvascular endothelium of the gut barrier plays a crucial role during inflammation in inflammatory bowel disease. We have modified a commonly used intestinal cell model based on the Caco-2 cells by adding microvascular endothelial cells (ISO-HAS-1). Transwell filters were used with intestinal barrier-forming Caco-2 cells on top and the ISO-HAS-1 on the bottom of the filter. The goal was to determine whether this coculture mimics the in vivo situation more closely, and whether the model is suitable to evaluate interactions of, for example, prospective nanosized drug vehicles or contrast agents with this coculture in a physiological and inflamed state as it would occur in inflammatory bowel disease. We monitored the inflammatory responsiveness of the cells (release of IL-8, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1, and soluble E-selectin) after exposure to inflammatory stimuli (lipopolysaccharide, TNF-α, INF-γ, IL1-β) and a nanoparticle (Ba/Gd: coprecipitated BaSO4 and Gd(OH)3), generally used as contrast agents. The barrier integrity of the coculture was evaluated via the determination of transepithelial electrical resistance and the apparent permeability coefficient (Papp) of NaFITC. The behavior of the coculture Caco-1/ISO-HAS-1 was compared to the respective monocultures Caco-2 and ISO-HAS-1. Based on transepithelial electrical resistance, the epithelial barrier integrity of the coculture remained stable during incubation with all stimuli, whereas the Papp decreased after exposure to the cytokine mixture (TNF-α, INF-γ, IL1-β, and Ba/Gd). Both the endothelial and epithelial monocultures showed a high inflammatory response in both the upper and lower transwell-compartments. However, in the coculture, inflammatory mediators were only detected on the epithelial side and not on the endothelial side. Thus in the coculture, based on the Papp, the epithelial barrier appears to prevent a potential inflammatory overreaction in the underlying endothelial cells

  8. The inhibition of COPII trafficking is important for intestinal epithelial tight junction disruption during enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and Citrobacter rodentium infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanabalasuriar, Ajitha; Kim, Jinoh; Gruenheid, Samantha

    2013-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) and enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) are bacterial pathogens that cause severe illnesses in humans. Citrobacter rodentium is a related mouse pathogen that serves as a small animal model for EPEC and EHEC infections. EPEC, EHEC and C. rodentium translocate bacterial virulence proteins directly into host intestinal cells via a type III secretion system (T3SS). Non-LEE-encoded effector A (NleA) is a T3SS effector that is common to EPEC, EHEC and C. rodentium. NleA interacts with and inhibits the mammalian COPII complex, impairing cellular secretion; this interaction is required for bacterial virulence. Although diarrhea is a hallmark of EPEC, EHEC and C. rodentium infections, the underlying mechanisms are not well characterized. One of the essential functions of the intestine is to maintain a barrier between the lumen and submucosa. Tight junctions seal the space between adjacent epithelial cells creating this barrier. Consequently, it is thought that the disruption of intestinal epithelial tight junctions by EPEC, EHEC, and C. rodentium could result in a loss of barrier function. In this study, we demonstrate that NleA mediated COPII inhibition is required for EPEC- and C. rodentium-mediated disruption of tight junction proteins and increases in fecal water content. Copyright © 2013 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of Psychoneural Factors on Intestinal Epithelial Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Cecilia Berin

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress has been associated with abnormal gastrointestinal function, including diarrhea and abdominal pain, and stress-associated gastric ulceration has frequently been documented. Stress can also exacerbate ongoing pathophysiology and often precedes relapses in patients with inflammatory bowel disease or irritable bowel syndrome. The relatively new field of psychoneuroimmunology is involved with the elucidation of mechanisms that explain the link between the central nervous system and immune-mediated pathophysiology. Recent progress examining the interaction among the nervous system, the immune system and the epithelium of the intestine is discussed, and the evidence for central nervous sysytem control of this interaction is examined.

  10. Establishment of primary bovine intestinal epithelial cell culture and clone method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Kang; Lin, Miao; Liu, Ming-Mei; Sui, Yang-Nan; Zhao, Guo-Qi

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish bovine intestinal epithelial cell (BIEC) line and provide a novel clone cell method. Although various strategies of bovine cell culture and clone techniques have been reported, these methods remain not established. Here, we culture successfully primary BIECs and establish a novel clone cell method. Our result showed that BIECs could be successfully cultured and passaged about generation 5. These cellular aggregates and clusters were adherent loosely at day 2 of culture. Cell aggregates and clusters start to proliferate after approximately 4 d. The BIECs showed positive reaction against cytokeratin 18, E-cadherin, and characteristics of epithelial-like morphology. In addition, the fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs), villin, and intestinal peptidase (IP) band were positive in BIECs. Our results suggest that the establishment of culturing and clone BIEC methods will apply to isolate and clone other primary cells. These BIECs could therefore contribute to the study of bovine intestinal nutrient absorption and regulation, immune regulation, and the pathogenesis of the bovine intestinal disease, which will provide intestinal cell model in vitro.

  11. Epithelial Cell Damage Activates Bactericidal/Permeability Increasing-Protein (BPI Expression in Intestinal Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjun Balakrishnan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available As the first line of defense against invading pathogen, intestinal epithelium produces various antimicrobial proteins (AMP that help in clearance of pathogen. Bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI is a 55 kDa AMP that is expressed in intestinal epithelium. Dysregulation of BPI in intestinal epithelium is associated with various inflammatory diseases like Crohn’s Disease, Ulcerative colitis, and Infectious enteritis’s. In this paper, we report a direct correlation between intestinal damage and BPI expression. In Caco-2 cells, we see a significant increase in BPI levels upon membrane damage mediated by S. aureus infection and pore-forming toxins (Streptolysin and Listeriolysin. Cells detect changes in potassium level as a Danger-associated molecular pattern associated with cell damage and induce BPI expression in a p38 dependent manner. These results are further supported by in vivo findings that the BPI expression in murine intestinal epithelium is induced upon infection with bacteria which cause intestinal damage (Salmonella Typhimurium and Shigella flexneri whereas mutants that do not cause intestinal damage (STM ΔfliC and STM ΔinvC did not induce BPI expression. Our results suggest that epithelial damage associated with infection act as a signal to induce BPI expression.

  12. Distinct Roles for Intestinal Epithelial Cell-Specific Hdac1 and Hdac2 in the Regulation of Murine Intestinal Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonneaud, Alexis; Turgeon, Naomie; Boudreau, François; Perreault, Nathalie; Rivard, Nathalie; Asselin, Claude

    2016-02-01

    The intestinal epithelium responds to and transmits signals from the microbiota and the mucosal immune system to insure intestinal homeostasis. These interactions are in part conveyed by epigenetic modifications, which respond to environmental changes. Protein acetylation is an epigenetic signal regulated by histone deacetylases, including Hdac1 and Hdac2. We have previously shown that villin-Cre-inducible intestinal epithelial cell (IEC)-specific Hdac1 and Hdac2 deletions disturb intestinal homeostasis. To determine the role of Hdac1 and Hdac2 in the regulation of IEC function and the establishment of the dual knockout phenotype, we have generated villin-Cre murine models expressing one Hdac1 allele without Hdac2, or one Hdac2 allele without Hdac1. We have also investigated the effect of short-term deletion of both genes in naphtoflavone-inducible Ah-Cre and tamoxifen-inducible villin-Cre(ER) mice. Mice with one Hdac1 allele displayed normal tissue architecture, but increased sensitivity to DSS-induced colitis. In contrast, mice with one Hdac2 allele displayed intestinal architecture defects, increased proliferation, decreased goblet cell numbers as opposed to Paneth cells, increased immune cell infiltration associated with fibrosis, and increased sensitivity to DSS-induced colitis. In comparison to dual knockout mice, intermediary activation of Notch, mTOR, and Stat3 signaling pathways was observed. While villin-Cre(ER) Hdac1 and Hdac2 deletions led to an impaired epithelium and differentiation defects, Ah-Cre-mediated deletion resulted in blunted proliferation associated with the induction of a DNA damage response. Our results suggest that IEC determination and intestinal homeostasis are highly dependent on Hdac1 and Hdac2 activity levels, and that changes in the IEC acetylome may alter the mucosal environment. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Dysbiosis and zonulin upregulation alter gut epithelial and vascular barriers in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccia, Francesco; Guggino, Giuliana; Rizzo, Aroldo; Alessandro, Riccardo; Luchetti, Michele Maria; Milling, Simon; Saieva, Laura; Cypers, Heleen; Stampone, Tommaso; Di Benedetto, Paola; Gabrielli, Armando; Fasano, Alessio; Elewaut, Dirk; Triolo, Giovanni

    2017-06-01

    Dysbiosis has been recently demonstrated in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) but its implications in the modulation of intestinal immune responses have never been studied. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of ileal bacteria in modulating local and systemic immune responses in AS. Ileal biopsies were obtained from 50 HLA-B27 + patients with AS and 20 normal subjects. Silver stain was used to visualise bacteria. Ileal expression of tight and adherens junction proteins was investigated by TaqMan real-time (RT)-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Serum levels of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), LPS-binding protein (LPS-BP), intestinal fatty acid-BP (iFABP) and zonulin were assayed by ELISA. Monocyte immunological functions were studied in in vitro experiments. In addition the effects of antibiotics on tight junctions in human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B27 transgenic (TG) rats were assessed. Adherent and invasive bacteria were observed in the gut of patients with AS with the bacterial scores significantly correlated with gut inflammation. Impairment of the gut vascular barrier (GVB) was also present in AS, accompanied by significant upregulation of zonulin, and associated with high serum levels of LPS, LPS-BP, iFABP and zonulin. In in vitro studies zonulin altered endothelial tight junctions while its epithelial release was modulated by isolated AS ileal bacteria. AS circulating monocytes displayed an anergic phenotype partially restored by ex vivo stimulation with LPS+sCD14 and their stimulation with recombinant zonulin induced a clear M2 phenotype. Antibiotics restored tight junction function in HLA-B27 TG rats. Bacterial ileitis, increased zonulin expression and damaged intestinal mucosal barrier and GVB, characterises the gut of patients with AS and are associated with increased blood levels of zonulin, and bacterial products. Bacterial products and zonulin influence monocyte behaviour. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use

  14. Effect of neuronal PC12 cells on the functional properties of intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satsu, Hideo; Yokoyama, Tatsuya; Ogawa, Nobumasa; Fujiwara-Hatano, Yoko; Shimizu, Makoto

    2003-06-01

    The effect of neuronal cells on the functional properties of intestinal epithelial cells was examined by using an in vitro coculture system. Two cell lines, Caco-2 and PC12, were respectively used as intestinal epithelial and enteric neuronal cell models. Coculture of differentiated Caco-2 cells with PC12 caused a significant decrease in the transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) value of the Caco-2 monolayer. The permeability to lucifer yellow (LY) was also significantly increased, suggesting that the tight junction (TJ) of the Caco-2 monolayers was modulated by coculturing with PC12. To identify the TJ-modulating factor presumably secreted from PC12, the effects of the major neurotransmitters on the TER value and LY transport were examined, but no influence was apparent. The TJ-modulating effect of PC12 was prevented by exposing PC12 to cycloheximide, suggesting that new protein synthesis in PC12 was necessary for this regulation.

  15. Bile acid receptor TGR5 overexpression is associated with decreased intestinal mucosal injury and epithelial cell proliferation in obstructive jaundice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Chen-Guang; Xie, Xiao-Li; Yin, Jie; Qi, Wei; Chen, Lei; Bai, Yun; Wang, Na; Zhao, Dong-Qiang; Jiang, Xiao-Yu; Jiang, Hui-Qing

    2017-04-01

    Bile acids stimulate intestinal epithelial proliferation in vitro. We sought to investigate the role of the bile acid receptor TGR5 in the protection of intestinal epithelial proliferation in obstructive jaundice. Intestinal tissues and serum samples were obtained from patients with malignant obstructive jaundice and from bile duct ligation (BDL) rats. Intestinal permeability and morphological changes in the intestinal mucosa were observed. The functions of TGR5 in cell proliferation in intestinal epithelial injury were determined by overexpression or knockdown studies in Caco-2 and FHs 74 Int cells pretreated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Internal biliary drainage was superior to external biliary drainage in recovering intestinal permeability and mucosal histology in patients with obstructive jaundice. In BDL rats, feeding of chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) decreased intestinal mucosa injury. The levels of PCNA, a marker of proliferation, increased in response to CDCA feeding and were paralleled by elevated TGR5 expression. CDCA upregulated TGR5 expression and promoted proliferation in Caco-2 and FHs 74 Int cells pretreated with LPS. Overexpression of TGR5 resulted in increased PCNA, cell viability, EdU incorporation, and the proportion of cells in S phase, whereas knockdown of TGR5 had the opposite effect. Our data indicate that bile acids promote intestinal epithelial cell proliferation and decrease mucosal injury by upregulating TGR5 expression in obstructive jaundice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A mouse model of pathological small intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis and shedding induced by systemic administration of lipopolysaccharide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan M. Williams

    2013-11-01

    The gut barrier, composed of a single layer of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs held together by tight junctions, prevents the entrance of harmful microorganisms, antigens and toxins from the gut lumen into the blood. Small intestinal homeostasis is normally maintained by the rate of shedding of senescent enterocytes from the villus tip exactly matching the rate of generation of new cells in the crypt. However, in various localized and systemic inflammatory conditions, intestinal homeostasis can be disturbed as a result of increased IEC shedding. Such pathological IEC shedding can cause transient gaps to develop in the epithelial barrier and result in increased intestinal permeability. Although pathological IEC shedding has been implicated in the pathogenesis of conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, our understanding of the underlying mechanisms remains limited. We have therefore developed a murine model to study this phenomenon, because IEC shedding in this species is morphologically analogous to humans. IEC shedding was induced by systemic lipopolysaccharide (LPS administration in wild-type C57BL/6 mice, and in mice deficient in TNF-receptor 1 (Tnfr1−/−, Tnfr2 (Tnfr2−/−, nuclear factor kappa B1 (Nfκb1−/− or Nfĸb2 (Nfĸb2−/−. Apoptosis and cell shedding was quantified using immunohistochemistry for active caspase-3, and gut-to-circulation permeability was assessed by measuring plasma fluorescence following fluorescein-isothiocyanate–dextran gavage. LPS, at doses ≥0.125 mg/kg body weight, induced rapid villus IEC apoptosis, with peak cell shedding occurring at 1.5 hours after treatment. This coincided with significant villus shortening, fluid exudation into the gut lumen and diarrhea. A significant increase in gut-to-circulation permeability was observed at 5 hours. TNFR1 was essential for LPS-induced IEC apoptosis and shedding, and the fate of the IECs was also dependent on NFκB, with signaling via NFκB1 favoring cell survival and

  17. Intestinal epithelial cell caveolin 1 regulates fatty acid and lipoprotein cholesterol plasma levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otis, Jessica P; Shen, Meng-Chieh; Quinlivan, Vanessa; Anderson, Jennifer L; Farber, Steven A

    2017-03-01

    Caveolae and their structural protein caveolin 1 (CAV1) have roles in cellular lipid processing and systemic lipid metabolism. Global deletion of CAV1 in mice results in insulin resistance and increases in atherogenic plasma lipids and cholesterol, but protects from diet-induced obesity and atherosclerosis. Despite the fundamental role of the intestinal epithelia in the regulation of dietary lipid processing and metabolism, the contributions of CAV1 to lipid metabolism in this tissue have never been directly investigated. In this study the cellular dynamics of intestinal Cav1 were visualized in zebrafish and the metabolic contributions of CAV1 were determined with mice lacking CAV1 in intestinal epithelial cells (CAV1 IEC-KO ). Live imaging of Cav1-GFP and fluorescently labeled caveolae cargos shows localization to the basolateral and lateral enterocyte plasma membrane (PM), suggesting Cav1 mediates transport between enterocytes and the submucosa. CAV1 IEC-KO mice are protected from the elevation in circulating fasted low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol associated with a high-fat diet (HFD), but have increased postprandial LDL cholesterol, total free fatty acids (FFAs), palmitoleic acid, and palmitic acid. The increase in circulating FAs in HFD CAV1 IEC-KO mice is mirrored by decreased hepatic FAs, suggesting a non-cell-autonomous role for intestinal epithelial cell CAV1 in promoting hepatic FA storage. In conclusion, CAV1 regulates circulating LDL cholesterol and several FA species via the basolateral PM of enterocytes. These results point to intestinal epithelial cell CAV1 as a potential therapeutic target to lower circulating FFAs and LDL cholesterol, as high levels are associated with development of type II diabetes and cardiovascular disease. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. Intestinal epithelial apoptosis initiates gross bowel necrosis in an experimental rat model of neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jilling, Tamas; Lu, Jing; Jackson, Michele; Caplan, Michael S

    2004-04-01

    The histopathology of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is characterized by destruction of the mucosal layer in initial stages and by transmural necrosis of the intestinal wall in advanced stages of the disease. To test the hypothesis that enhanced epithelial apoptosis is an initial event underlying the gross histologic changes, we analyzed epithelial apoptosis and tissue morphology in an animal model of NEC and evaluated the effect of caspase inhibition on the incidence of experimental NEC in this model. Apoptosis was analyzed with terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-FITC nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining in intestinal sections and by measuring caspase 3 activity from intestinal lysates of neonatal rats subjected to formula feeding and cold/asphyxia stress (FFCAS) and from mother-fed (MF) controls. Morphologic evaluation was based on hematoxylin and eosin staining of intestinal sections. FFCAS resulted in histologic changes consistent with NEC, which were absent from MF animals. FFCAS was also associated with a significantly increased rate of nuclear DNA fragmentation in the small intestinal epithelium compared with MF. Elevated tissue caspase 3 activity confirmed the presence of apoptosis in samples with increased DNA fragmentation. Analysis of the coincidence of morphologic damage and apoptosis in corresponding tissue sections indicated that apoptosis precedes gross morphologic changes in this model. Furthermore, supplementation of formula with 8 boc-aspartyl(OMe)-fluoromethylketone, a pan-caspase inhibitor, significantly reduced the incidences of apoptosis and experimental NEC. These findings indicate that in neonatal rats FFCAS induces epithelial apoptosis that serves as an underlying cause for subsequent gross tissue necrosis.

  19. Giardia duodenalis Surface Cysteine Proteases Induce Cleavage of the Intestinal Epithelial Cytoskeletal Protein Villin via Myosin Light Chain Kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amol Bhargava

    Full Text Available Giardia duodenalis infections are among the most common causes of waterborne diarrhoeal disease worldwide. At the height of infection, G. duodenalis trophozoites induce multiple pathophysiological processes within intestinal epithelial cells that contribute to the development of diarrhoeal disease. To date, our understanding of pathophysiological processes in giardiasis remains incompletely understood. The present study reveals a previously unappreciated role for G. duodenalis cathepsin cysteine proteases in intestinal epithelial pathophysiological processes that occur during giardiasis. Experiments first established that Giardia trophozoites indeed produce cathepsin B and L in strain-dependent fashion. Co-incubation of G. duodenalis with human enterocytes enhanced cathepsin production by Assemblage A (NF and S2 isolates trophozoites, but not when epithelial cells were exposed to Assemblage B (GSM isolate trophozoites. Direct contact between G. duodenalis parasites and human intestinal epithelial monolayers resulted in the degradation and redistribution of the intestinal epithelial cytoskeletal protein villin; these effects were abolished when parasite cathepsin cysteine proteases were inhibited. Interestingly, inhibition of parasite proteases did not prevent degradation of the intestinal tight junction-associated protein zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1, suggesting that G. duodenalis induces multiple pathophysiological processes within intestinal epithelial cells. Finally, this study demonstrates that G. duodenalis-mediated disruption of villin is, at least, in part dependent on activation of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK. Taken together, this study indicates a novel role for parasite cathepsin cysteine proteases in the pathophysiology of G. duodenalis infections.

  20. Giardia duodenalis Surface Cysteine Proteases Induce Cleavage of the Intestinal Epithelial Cytoskeletal Protein Villin via Myosin Light Chain Kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Amol; Cotton, James A; Dixon, Brent R; Gedamu, Lashitew; Yates, Robin M; Buret, Andre G

    2015-01-01

    Giardia duodenalis infections are among the most common causes of waterborne diarrhoeal disease worldwide. At the height of infection, G. duodenalis trophozoites induce multiple pathophysiological processes within intestinal epithelial cells that contribute to the development of diarrhoeal disease. To date, our understanding of pathophysiological processes in giardiasis remains incompletely understood. The present study reveals a previously unappreciated role for G. duodenalis cathepsin cysteine proteases in intestinal epithelial pathophysiological processes that occur during giardiasis. Experiments first established that Giardia trophozoites indeed produce cathepsin B and L in strain-dependent fashion. Co-incubation of G. duodenalis with human enterocytes enhanced cathepsin production by Assemblage A (NF and S2 isolates) trophozoites, but not when epithelial cells were exposed to Assemblage B (GSM isolate) trophozoites. Direct contact between G. duodenalis parasites and human intestinal epithelial monolayers resulted in the degradation and redistribution of the intestinal epithelial cytoskeletal protein villin; these effects were abolished when parasite cathepsin cysteine proteases were inhibited. Interestingly, inhibition of parasite proteases did not prevent degradation of the intestinal tight junction-associated protein zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1), suggesting that G. duodenalis induces multiple pathophysiological processes within intestinal epithelial cells. Finally, this study demonstrates that G. duodenalis-mediated disruption of villin is, at least, in part dependent on activation of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK). Taken together, this study indicates a novel role for parasite cathepsin cysteine proteases in the pathophysiology of G. duodenalis infections.

  1. Lentiviral-Mediated Transgene Expression Can Potentiate Intestinal Mesenchymal-Epithelial Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dismuke Adria D

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mesenchymal-epithelial signaling is essential for the development of many organs and is often disrupted in disease. In this study, we demonstrate the use of lentiviral-mediated transgene delivery as an effective approach for ectopic transgene expression and an alternative to generation of transgenic animals. One benefit to this approach is that it can be used independently or in conjunction with established transgenic or knockout animals for studying modulation of mesenchymal-epithelial interactions. To display the power of this approach, we explored ectopic expression of a Wnt ligand in the mouse intestinal mesenchyme and demonstrate its functional influence on the adjacent epithelium. Our findings highlight the efficient use of lentiviral-mediated transgene expression for modulating mesenchymal-epithelial interactions in vivo.

  2. Lentiviral-Mediated Transgene Expression Can Potentiate Intestinal Mesenchymal-Epithelial Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohn Aimee

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mesenchymal-epithelial signaling is essential for the development of many organs and is often disrupted in disease. In this study, we demonstrate the use of lentiviral-mediated transgene delivery as an effective approach for ectopic transgene expression and an alternative to generation of transgenic animals. One benefit to this approach is that it can be used independently or in conjunction with established transgenic or knockout animals for studying modulation of mesenchymal-epithelial interactions. To display the power of this approach, we explored ectopic expression of a Wnt ligand in the mouse intestinal mesenchyme and demonstrate its functional influence on the adjacent epithelium. Our findings highlight the efficient use of lentiviral-mediated transgene expression for modulating mesenchymal-epithelial interactions in vivo.

  3. Epithelial WNT Ligands Are Essential Drivers of Intestinal Stem Cell Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winnie Y. Zou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal stem cells (ISCs maintain and repair the intestinal epithelium. While regeneration after ISC-targeted damage is increasingly understood, injury-repair mechanisms that direct regeneration following injuries to differentiated cells remain uncharacterized. The enteric pathogen, rotavirus, infects and damages differentiated cells while sparing all ISC populations, thus allowing the unique examination of the response of intact ISC compartments during injury-repair. Upon rotavirus infection in mice, ISC compartments robustly expand and proliferating cells rapidly migrate. Infection results specifically in stimulation of the active crypt-based columnar ISCs, but not alternative reserve ISC populations, as is observed after ISC-targeted damage. Conditional ablation of epithelial WNT secretion diminishes crypt expansion and ISC activation, demonstrating a previously unknown function of epithelial-secreted WNT during injury-repair. These findings indicate a hierarchical preference of crypt-based columnar cells (CBCs over other potential ISC populations during epithelial restitution and the importance of epithelial-derived signals in regulating ISC behavior.

  4. Protein Malnutrition Modifies Innate Immunity and Gene Expression by Intestinal Epithelial Cells and Human Rotavirus Infection in Neonatal Gnotobiotic Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasova, Anastasia N; Paim, Francine C; Kandasamy, Sukumar; Alhamo, Moyasar A; Fischer, David D; Langel, Stephanie N; Deblais, Loic; Kumar, Anand; Chepngeno, Juliet; Shao, Lulu; Huang, Huang-Chi; Candelero-Rueda, Rosario A; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Saif, Linda J

    2017-01-01

    Malnutrition affects millions of children in developing countries, compromising immunity and contributing to increased rates of death from infectious diseases. Rotavirus is a major etiological agent of childhood diarrhea in developing countries, where malnutrition is prevalent. However, the interactions between the two and their combined effects on immune and intestinal functions are poorly understood. In this study, we used neonatal gnotobiotic (Gn) pigs transplanted with the fecal microbiota of a healthy 2-month-old infant (HIFM) and fed protein-deficient or -sufficient bovine milk diets. Protein deficiency induced hypoproteinemia, hypoalbuminemia, hypoglycemia, stunting, and generalized edema in Gn pigs, as observed in protein-malnourished children. Irrespective of the diet, human rotavirus (HRV) infection early, at HIFM posttransplantation day 3 (PTD3), resulted in adverse health effects and higher mortality rates (45 to 75%) than later HRV infection (PTD10). Protein malnutrition exacerbated HRV infection and affected the morphology and function of the small intestinal epithelial barrier. In pigs infected with HRV at PTD10, there was a uniform decrease in the function and/or frequencies of natural killer cells, plasmacytoid dendritic cells, and CD103 + and apoptotic mononuclear cells and altered gene expression profiles of intestinal epithelial cells (chromogranin A, mucin 2, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, SRY-Box 9, and villin). Thus, we have established the first HIFM-transplanted neonatal pig model that recapitulates major aspects of protein malnutrition in children and can be used to evaluate physiologically relevant interventions. Our findings provide an explanation of why nutrient-rich diets alone may lack efficacy in malnourished children. IMPORTANCE Malnutrition and rotavirus infection, prevalent in developing countries, individually and in combination, affect the health of millions of children, compromising their immunity and increasing the rates

  5. It takes more than a coating to get nanoparticles through the intestinal barrier in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenstein, Dajana; Ebmeyer, Johanna; Meyer, Thomas; Behr, Anne-Cathrin; Kästner, Claudia; Böhmert, Linda; Juling, Sabine; Niemann, Birgit; Fahrenson, Christoph; Selve, Sören; Thünemann, Andreas F; Meijer, Jan; Estrela-Lopis, Irina; Braeuning, Albert; Lampen, Alfonso

    2017-09-01

    Size and shape are crucial parameters which have impact on the potential of nanoparticles to penetrate cell membranes and epithelial barriers. Current research in nanotoxicology additionally focuses on particle coating. To distinguish between core- and coating-related effects in nanoparticle uptake and translocation, two nanoparticles equal in size, coating and charge but different in core material were investigated. Silver and iron oxide nanoparticles coated with poly (acrylic acid) were chosen and extensively characterized by small-angle x-ray scattering, nanoparticle tracing analysis and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Uptake and transport were studied in the intestinal Caco-2 model in a Transwell system with subsequent elemental analysis. TEM and ion beam microscopy were conducted for particle visualization. Although equal in size, charge and coating, the behavior of the two particles in Caco-2 cells was different: while the internalized amount was comparable, only iron oxide nanoparticles additionally passed the epithelium. Our findings suggest that the coating material influenced only the uptake of the nanoparticles whereas the translocation was determined by the core material. Knowledge about the different roles of the particle coating and core materials in crossing biological barriers will facilitate toxicological risk assessment of nanoparticles and contribute to the optimization of pharmacokinetic properties of nano-scaled pharmaceuticals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Soluble Dietary Fiber Ameliorates Radiation-Induced Intestinal Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition and Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianbo; Ding, Chao; Dai, Xujie; Lv, Tengfei; Xie, Tingbing; Zhang, Tenghui; Gao, Wen; Gong, Jianfeng; Zhu, Weiming; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2017-11-01

    Intestinal fibrosis is a late complication of pelvic radiotherapy. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays an important role in tissue fibrosis. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of soluble dietary fiber on radiation-induced intestinal EMT and fibrosis in a mouse model. Apple pectin (4% wt/wt in drinking water) was administered to wild-type and pVillin-Cre-EGFP transgenic mice with intestinal fibrosis induced by a single dose of abdominal irradiation of 10 Gy. The effects of pectin on intestinal EMT and fibrosis, gut microbiota, and short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentration were evaluated. Intestinal fibrosis in late radiation enteropathy showed increased submucosal thickness and subepithelial collagen deposition. Enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) + /vimentin + and EGFP + /α-smooth muscle actin (SMA) + coexpressing cells were most clearly observed at 2 weeks after irradiation and gradually decreased at 4 and 12 weeks. Pectin significantly attenuated the thickness of submucosa and collagen deposition at 12 weeks (24.3 vs 27.6 µm in the pectin + radiation-treated group compared with radiation-alone group, respectively, P soluble dietary fiber pectin protected the terminal ileum against radiation-induced fibrosis. This effect might be mediated by altered SCFA concentration in the intestinal lumen and reduced EMT in the ileal epithelium.

  7. Cellular cross talk in the small intestinal mucosa: postnatal lymphocytic immigration elicits a specific epithelial transcriptional response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjoldager, Katrine Ter-Borch Gram; Maltesen, Henrik R; Balmer, Sophie

    2008-01-01

    During the early postnatal period lymphocytes migrate into the mouse small intestine. Migrating infiltrative lymphocytes have the potential to affect the epithelial cells via secreted cytokines. Such cross talk can result in the elicitation of an epithelial transcriptional response. Knowledge about...

  8. Isolation and gene expression profiling of intestinal epithelial cells: crypt isolation by calcium chelation from in vivo samples.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Balfe, Aine

    2018-01-01

    The epithelial layer within the colon represents a physical barrier between the luminal contents and its underlying mucosa. It plays a pivotal role in mucosal homeostasis, and both tolerance and anti-pathogenic immune responses. Identifying signals of inflammation initiation and responses to stimuli from within the epithelial layer is critical to understanding the molecular pathways underlying disease pathology. This study validated a method to isolate and analyze epithelial populations, enabling investigations of epithelial function and response in a variety of disease setting.

  9. Mammalian intestinal epithelial cells in primary culture: a mini-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeffer, Bertrand

    2002-03-01

    Epithelial cells lining the digestive tract represent a highly organized system built up by multipotent stem cells. A process of asymmetric mitosis produces a population of proliferative cells that are rapidly renewed and migrate along the crypt-villus axis, differentiating into functional mature cells before dying and exfoliating into the intestinal lumen. Isolated crypts or epithelial cells retaining high viability can be prepared within a few h after tissue sampling. After cells are cultured in serum-free media, short-term studies (16-48 h) can be conducted for endocrinology, energy metabolism, or programmed cell death. However, long-term primary culture of intestinal cells (up to 10 d) is still difficult despite progress in isolation methodologies and manipulation of the cell microenvironment. The main problem in developing primary culture is the lack of structural markers specific to the stem cell compartment. The design of a microscopic multidimensional analytic system to record the expression profiles of biomarkers all along the living intestinal crypt should improve basic knowledge of the survival and growth of adult crypt stem cells, and the selection of totipotent embryonic stem cells capable of differentiating into intestinal tissues should facilitate studies of the genomic basis of endodermal tissue differentiation.

  10. Curcumin Anti-Apoptotic Action in a Model of Intestinal Epithelial Inflammatory Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loganes, Claudia; Lega, Sara; Bramuzzo, Matteo; Vecchi Brumatti, Liza; Piscianz, Elisa; Valencic, Erica; Tommasini, Alberto; Marcuzzi, Annalisa

    2017-06-06

    The purpose of this study is to determine if a preventive treatment with curcumin can protect intestinal epithelial cells from inflammatory damage induced by IFNγ. To achieve this goal we have used a human intestinal epithelial cell line (HT29) treated with IFNγ to undergo apoptotic changes that can reproduce the damage of intestinal epithelia exposed to inflammatory cytokines. In this model, we measured the effect of curcumin (curcuminoid from Curcuma Longa ) added as a pre-treatment at different time intervals before stimulation with IFNγ. Curcumin administration to HT29 culture before the inflammatory stimulus IFNγ reduced the cell apoptosis rate. This effect gradually declined with the reduction of the curcumin pre-incubation time. This anti-apoptotic action by curcumin pre-treatment was paralleled by a reduction of secreted IL7 in the HT29 culture media, while there was no relevant change in the other cytokine levels. Even though curcumin pre-administration did not impact the activation of the NF-κB pathway, a slight effect on the phosphorylation of proteins in this inflammatory signaling pathway was observed. In conclusion, curcumin pre-treatment can protect intestinal cells from inflammatory damage. These results can be the basis for studying the preventive role of curcumin in inflammatory bowel diseases.

  11. ER Stress Causes Rapid Loss of Intestinal Epithelial Stemness through Activation of the Unfolded Protein Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarom Heijmans

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells generate rapidly dividing transit-amplifying cells that have lost the capacity for self-renewal but cycle for a number of times until they exit the cell cycle and undergo terminal differentiation. We know very little of the type of signals that trigger the earliest steps of stem cell differentiation and mediate a stem cell to transit-amplifying cell transition. We show that in normal intestinal epithelium, endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress and activity of the unfolded protein response (UPR are induced at the transition from stem cell to transit-amplifying cell. Induction of ER stress causes loss of stemness in a Perk-eIF2α-dependent manner. Inhibition of Perk-eIF2α signaling results in stem cell accumulation in organoid culture of primary intestinal epithelium. Our findings show that the UPR plays an important role in the regulation of intestinal epithelial stem cell differentiation.

  12. Human Oral Isolate Lactobacillus fermentum AGR1487 Reduces Intestinal Barrier Integrity by Increasing the Turnover of Microtubules in Caco-2 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Rachel C.; Young, Wayne; Clerens, Stefan; Cookson, Adrian L.; McCann, Mark J.; Armstrong, Kelly M.; Roy, Nicole C.

    2013-01-01

    Lactobacillus fermentum is found in fermented foods and thought to be harmless. In vivo and clinical studies indicate that some L. fermentum strains have beneficial properties, particularly for gastrointestinal health. However, L. fermentum AGR1487 decreases trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER), a measure of intestinal barrier integrity. The hypothesis was that L. fermentum AGR1487 decreases the expression of intestinal cell tight junction genes and proteins, thereby reducing barrier integrity. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of Caco-2 cells (model of human intestinal epithelial cells) treated with L. fermentum AGR1487 were used to obtain a global view of the effect of the bacterium on intestinal epithelial cells. Specific functional characteristics by which L. fermentum AGR1487 reduces intestinal barrier integrity were examined using confocal microscopy, cell cycle progression and adherence bioassays. The effects of TEER-enhancing L. fermentum AGR1485 were investigated for comparison. L. fermentum AGR1487 did not alter the expression of Caco-2 cell tight junction genes (compared to L. fermentum AGR1485) and tight junction proteins were not able to be detected. However, L. fermentum AGR1487 increased the expression levels of seven tubulin genes and the abundance of three microtubule-associated proteins, which have been linked to tight junction disassembly. Additionally, Caco-2 cells treated with L. fermentum AGR1487 did not have defined and uniform borders of zona occludens 2 around each cell, unlike control or AGR1485 treated cells. L. fermentum AGR1487 cells were required for the negative effect on barrier integrity (bacterial supernatant did not cause a decrease in TEER), suggesting that a physical interaction may be necessary. Increased adherence of L. fermentum AGR1487 to Caco-2 cells (compared to L. fermentum AGR1485) was likely to facilitate this cell-to-cell interaction. These findings illustrate that bacterial strains of the same species can

  13. A Novel Role of OS-9 in the Maintenance of Intestinal Barrier Function from Hypoxia-induced Injury via p38-dependent Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lihua; Xu, Chao; Chen, Guoqing; Yu, Min; Yang, Songwei; Qiu, Yuan; Peng, Ke; Wang, Wensheng; Xiao, Weidong; Yang, Hua

    2015-01-01

    OS-9 is a lectin required for efficient ubquitination of glycosylated substrates of endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD). OS-9 has previously been implicated in ER-to-Golgi transport and transcription factor turnover. However, we know very little about other functions of OS-9 under endoplasmic reticulum stress. Here, we used gene knockdown and overexpression approaches to study the protective effect of OS-9 on intestinal barrier function of intestinal epithelial cell Caco-2 monolayer. We found that OS-9 attenuated intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction under hypoxia through up-regulating occludin and claudin-1 protein expression. Furthermore, we showed that the up-regulation of occludin and claudin-1 induced by OS-9 was mediated by p38 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation and did not involve HIF-1α. In summary, our results demonstrate that OS-9 up-regulates occludin and claudin-1 by activating the MAP kinase (MAPK) pathway, and thus protects the epithelial barrier function of Caco-2 monolayer under hypoxia condition.

  14. Fecal microbiota transplantation and bacterial consortium transplantation have comparable effects on the re-establishment of mucosal barrier function in mice with intestinal dysbiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming eLi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT is a promising therapy, despite some reports of adverse side effects. Bacterial consortia transplantation (BCT for targeted restoration of the intestinal ecosystem is considered a relatively safe and simple procedure. However, no systematic research has assessed the effects of FMT and BCT on immune responses of intestinal mucosal barrier in patients. We conducted complementary studies in animal models on the effects of FMT and BCT, and provide recommendations for improving the clinical outcomes of these treatments. To establish the dysbiosis model, male BALB/c mice were treated with ceftriaxone intra-gastrically for 7 days. After that, FMT and BCT were performed on ceftriaxone-treated mice for 3 consecutive days to rebuild the intestinal ecosystem. Post-FMT and post-BCT changes of the intestinal microbial community and mucosal barrier functions were investigated and compared. Disruption of intestinal microbial homeostasis impacted the integrity of mucosal epithelial layer, resulting in increased intestinal permeability. These outcomes were accompanied by overexpression of Muc2, significant decrease of SIgA secretion, and overproduction of defensins and inflammatory cytokines. After FMT and BCT, the intestinal microbiota recovered quickly, this was associated with better reconstruction of mucosal barriers and re-establishment of immune networks compared with spontaneous recovery (SR. Although based on a short-term study, our results suggest that FMT and BCT promote the re-establishment of intestinal microbial communities in mice with antibiotic-induced dysbiosis, and contribute to the temporal and spatial interactions between microbiota and mucosal barriers. The effects of BCT are comparable to that of FMT, especially in normalizing the intestinal levels of Muc2, SIgA, and defensins.

  15. Effect of Utipro(®) (containing gelatin-xyloglucan) against Escherichia coli invasion of intestinal epithelial cells: results of an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Servi, Barbara; Ranzini, Francesco; Piqué, Nuria

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate whether Utipro(®), a natural product approved to prevent urinary tract infections, protects intestinal epithelial cells from Escherichia coli adherence/intracellular invasion in vitro. Caco-2 and CacoGoblet(TM) cells were treated with Utipro (1.5 to 10 mg/ml) or untreated (controls). E. coli adherence/intracellular invasion was evaluated by Trans-Epithelial Electrical Resistance, Lucifer Yellow assay and microbial counts. Utipro was noncytotoxic. Utipro 5 and 10 mg/ml protected cell tight junctions (mean ± SD Trans-Epithelial Electrical Resistance [Ω × cm(2)] 66.83 ± 0.29 and 71.33 ± 0.29, respectively), and protected cells from E. coli intracellular invasion (mean ± SD reductions in total bacteria counts [Log10] 0.9 ± 0.06 and 2.1 ± 0.56, respectively). Results indicate that Utipro creates a protective physical barrier on intestinal epithelial cells in vitro which reduces the settling of E. coli reservoirs. These results constitute the first step in the demonstration of the efficacy of Utipro to prevent urinary tract infections. Further research is needed in in vivo models and clinical trials.

  16. Pathogen induced chemo-attractant hepoxilin A3 drives neutrophils, but not eosinophils across epithelial barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubala, S A; Patil, S U; Shreffler, W G; Hurley, B P

    2014-01-01

    Pathogen induced migration of neutrophils across mucosal epithelial barriers requires epithelial production of the chemotactic lipid mediator, hepoxilin A3 (HXA3). HXA3 is an eicosanoid derived from arachidonic acid. Although eosinophils are also capable of penetrating mucosal surfaces, eosinophilic infiltration occurs mainly during allergic processes whereas neutrophils dominate mucosal infection. Both neutrophils and eosinophils can respond to chemotactic gradients of certain eicosanoids, however, it is not known whether eosinophils respond to pathogen induced lipid mediators such as HXA3. In this study, neutrophils and eosinophils were isolated from human blood and placed on the basolateral side of polarized epithelial monolayers grown on permeable Transwell filters and challenged by various chemotactic gradients of distinct lipid mediators. We observed that both cell populations migrated across epithelial monolayers in response to a leukotriene B4 (LTB4) gradient, whereas only eosinophils migrated toward a prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) gradient. Interestingly, while pathogen induced neutrophil trans-epithelial migration was substantial, pathogen induced eosinophil trans-epithelial migration was not observed. Further, gradients of chemotactic lipids derived from pathogen infected epithelial cells known to be enriched for HXA3 as well as purified HXA3 drove significant numbers of neutrophils across epithelial barriers, whereas eosinophils failed to respond to these gradients. These data suggest that although the eicosanoid HXA3 serves as an important neutrophil chemo-attractant at mucosal surfaces during pathogenic infection, HXA3 does not appear to exhibit chemotactic activity toward eosinophils. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Modulation of Intestinal Epithelial Cell Proliferation, Migration, and Differentiation In Vitro by Astragalus Polysaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chun Li; Ren, Hui Jun; Liu, Meng Meng; Li, Xiao Gai; Sun, De Li; Li, Nan; Ming, Liang

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that Astragalus polysaccharides (APS) can be used to treat general gastrointestinal disturbances including intestinal mucosal injury. However, the mechanism by which APS mediate this effect is unclear. In the present study, the effects of APS on proliferation, migration, and differentiation of intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6) were assessed using an in vitro wounding model and colorimetric thiazolyl blue (MTT) assays. The effect of APS on IEC-6 cell differentiation was observed using a light microscope and scanning electron microscope, and the expression of differentiation-specific markers of IEC-6 cells, such as cytokeratin 18 (CK18), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), tight junction protein ZO-2, and sucrase-isomaltase (SI), was determined by immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and real-time PCR. In addition, APS-induced signaling pathways in IEC-6 cells were characterized. Our results indicated that APS significantly enhance migration and proliferation of IEC-6 cells in vitro. APS-treated IEC-6 cells have numerous microvilli on their apical surface and also highly express CK18, ALP, ZO-2, and SI. Moreover, APS-treated IEC-6 cells, in which the activity and expression level of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) were significantly elevated, also exhibited an increase in cellular putrescine, whereas no significant increase in TGF-β levels was observed. These findings suggest that APS may enhance intestinal epithelial cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation in vitro by stimulating ODC gene expression and activity and putrescine production, independent of TGF-β. Exogenous administration of APS may provide a new approach for modulating intestinal epithelial wound restitution in vivo. PMID:25157577

  18. Increased epithelial gaps in the small intestines of patients with inflammatory bowel disease: density matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Julia J; Wong, Karen; Thiesen, Aducio L; Mah, Stephanie J; Dieleman, Levinus A; Claggett, Brian; Saltzman, John R; Fedorak, Richard N

    2011-06-01

    Epithelial gaps created by shedding of epithelial cells in the small intestine can be visualized by using confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE). The density of epithelial gaps in the small bowels of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and controls without IBD is unknown. To determine whether the epithelial gap density in patients with IBD is different from that in controls. Prospective, controlled, cohort study. A tertiary-care referral center. This study involved patients with IBD and control patients without IBD undergoing colonoscopy. Probe-based CLE (pCLE) was used to image the terminal ileum. The primary outcome of the study was gap density, defined as the total number of gaps per 1000 cells counted in adequately imaged villi by using pCLE. The pCLE images were blindly reviewed, and the number of epithelial gaps and cells were manually counted. The secondary outcomes were correlation of gap density with disease activity, location, and severity of clinical disease. There were 30 controls and 28 patients with IBD. Of the patients with IBD, 16 had Crohn's disease, and 12 had ulcerative colitis. The median epithelial gap densities for controls and patients with IBD were 18 and 61 gaps/1000 cells, respectively (P < .001). Gap density did not correlate with disease activity. Patients with ulcerative pan-colitis tended toward gap densities lower than those of patients with limited colitis (32 versus 97 gaps/1000 cells, P = .06). Patients with IBD with severe clinical disease also had lower median gap densities (37 vs 90 gaps/1000 cells, P = .04). A single-center study. The epithelial gap density was significantly increased in patients with IBD compared with controls. ( NCT00988273.). Copyright © 2011. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  19. Heat shock protein 90β inhibits apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells induced by hypoxia through stabilizing phosphorylated Akt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal epithelial cell (IEC apoptosis induced by hypoxiacompromise intestinal epithelium barrier function. Both Akt andHsp90 have cytoprotective function. However, the specific roleof Akt and Hsp90β in IEC apoptosis induced by hypoxia has notbeen explored. We confirmed that hypoxia-induced apoptosiswas reduced by Hsp90β overexpression but enhanced bydecreasing Hsp90β expression. Hsp90β overexpressionenhanced BAD phosphorylation and thus reduced mitochondrialrelease of cytochrome C. Reducing Hsp90β expression hadopposite effects. The protective effect of Hsp90β againstapoptosis was negated by LY294002, an Akt inhibitor. Furtherstudy showed that Akt phosphorylation was enhanced byHsp90β, which was not due to the activation of upstream PI3Kand PDK1 but because of stabilization of pAkt via directinteraction between Hsp90β and pAkt. These results demonstratethat Hsp90β may play a significant role in protecting IECs fromhypoxia-induced apoptosis via stabilizing pAkt to phosphorylateBAD and reduce cytochrome C release. [BMB Reports 2013;46(1: 47-52

  20. Enterococcus faecium NCIMB 10415 Modulates Epithelial Integrity, Heat Shock Protein, and Proinflammatory Cytokine Response in Intestinal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanti Klingspor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics have shown positive effects on gastrointestinal diseases; they have barrier-modulating effects and change the inflammatory response towards pathogens in studies in vitro. The aim of this investigation has been to examine the response of intestinal epithelial cells to Enterococcus faecium NCIMB 10415 (E. faecium, a probiotic positively affecting diarrhea incidence in piglets, and two pathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli strains, with specific focus on the probiotic modulation of the response to the pathogenic challenge. Porcine (IPEC-J2 and human (Caco-2 intestinal cells were incubated without bacteria (control, with E. faecium, with enteropathogenic (EPEC or enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC each alone or in combination with E. faecium. The ETEC strain decreased transepithelial resistance (TER and increased IL-8 mRNA and protein expression in both cell lines compared with control cells, an effect that could be prevented by pre- and coincubation with E. faecium. Similar effects were observed for the increased expression of heat shock protein 70 in Caco-2 cells. When the cells were challenged by the EPEC strain, no such pattern of changes could be observed. The reduced decrease in TER and the reduction of the proinflammatory and stress response of enterocytes following pathogenic challenge indicate the protective effect of the probiotic.

  1. Non-Saccharomyces yeasts protect against epithelial cell barrier disruption induced by Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, I M; Baker, A; Arneborg, N; Jespersen, L

    2015-11-01

    The human gastrointestinal epithelium makes up the largest barrier separating the body from the external environment. Whereas invasive pathogens cause epithelial barrier disruption, probiotic micro-organisms modulate tight junction regulation and improve epithelial barrier function. In addition, probiotic strains may be able to reduce epithelial barrier disruption caused by pathogenic species. The aim of this study was to explore non-Saccharomyces yeast modulation of epithelial cell barrier function in vitro. Benchmarking against established probiotic strains, we evaluated the ability of four nonpathogenic yeast species to modulate transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) across a monolayer of differentiated human colonocytes (Caco-2 cells). Further, we assessed yeast modulation of a Salmonella Typhimurium-induced epithelial cell barrier function insult. Our findings demonstrate distinct patterns of non-Saccharomyces yeast modulation of epithelial cell barrier function. While the established probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii increased TER across a Caco-2 monolayer by 30%, Kluyveromyces marxianus exhibited significantly stronger properties of TER enhancement (50% TER increase). In addition, our data demonstrate significant yeast-mediated modulation of Salmonella-induced epithelial cell barrier disruption and identify K. marxianus and Metschnikowia gruessii as two non-Saccharomyces yeasts capable of protecting human epithelial cells from pathogen invasion. This study demonstrates distinct patterns of non-Saccharomyces yeast modulation of epithelial cell barrier function in vitro. Further, our data demonstrate significant yeast-mediated modulation of Salmonella Typhimurium-induced epithelial cell barrier disruption and identify Kluyveromyces marxianus and Metschnikowia gruessii as two non-Saccharomyces yeasts capable of protecting human epithelial cells from pathogen invasion. This study is the first to demonstrate significant non-Saccharomyces yeast

  2. Heat shock protein 70-dependent protective effect of polaprezinc on acetylsalicylic acid-induced apoptosis of rat intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Ying; Naito, Yuji; Handa, Osamu; Hayashi, Natsuko; Kuki, Aiko; Mizushima, Katsura; Omatsu, Tatsushi; Tanimura, Yuko; Morita, Mayuko; Adachi, Satoko; Fukui, Akifumi; Hirata, Ikuhiro; Kishimoto, Etsuko; Nishikawa, Taichiro; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Takagi, Tomohisa; Yagi, Nobuaki; Kokura, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2011-11-01

    Protection of the small intestine from mucosal injury induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs including acetylsalicylic acid is a critical issue in the field of gastroenterology. Polaprezinc an anti-ulcer drug, consisting of zinc and L-carnosine, provides gastric mucosal protection against various irritants. In this study, we investigated the protective effect of polaprezinc on acetylsalicylic acid-induced apoptosis of the RIE1 rat intestinal epithelial cell line. Confluent rat intestinal epithelial cells were incubated with 70 µM polaprezinc for 24 h, and then stimulated with or without 15 mM acetylsalicylic acid for a further 15 h. Subsequent cellular viability was quantified by fluorometric assay based on cell lysis and staining. Acetylsalicylic acid-induced cell death was also qualified by fluorescent microscopy of Hoechst33342 and propidium iodide. Heat shock proteins 70 protein expression after adding polaprezinc or acetylsalicylic acid was assessed by western blotting. To investigate the role of Heat shock protein 70, Heat shock protein 70-specific small interfering RNA was applied. Cell viability was quantified by fluorometric assay based on cell lysis and staining and apoptosis was analyzed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. We found that acetylsalicylic acid significantly induced apoptosis of rat intestinal epithelial cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Polaprezinc significantly suppressed acetylsalicylic acid-induced apoptosis of rat intestinal epithelial cells at its late phase. At the same time, polaprezinc increased Heat shock protein 70 expressions of rat intestinal epithelial cells in a time-dependent manner. However, in Heat shock protein 70-silenced rat intestinal epithelial cells, polaprezinc could not suppress acetylsalicylic acid -induced apoptosis at its late phase. We conclude that polaprezinc-increased Heat shock protein 70 expression might be an important mechanism by which polaprezinc suppresses acetylsalicylic

  3. Lactobacillus reuteri glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase functions in adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen-Ming; Wang, Hai-Feng; Gao, Kan; Wang, Cong; Liu, Li; Liu, Jian-Xin

    2015-05-01

    This study was aimed to identify key surface proteins mediating the adhesion of lactobacilli to intestinal epithelial cells. By using Caco-2 and IPEC-J2 cells labeled with sulfo-NHS-biotin in the western blotting, a protein band of an approximately 37 kDa was detected on the surface layer of Lactobacillus reuteri strains ZJ616, ZJ617, ZJ621, and ZJ623 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. Mass spectrometry analysis using the adhesion-related protein from L. reuteri ZJ617 showed that it was 100% homologous to the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) of L. reuteri JCM 1112 (GenBank: YP_001841377). The ability of L. reuteri ZJ617 to adhere to epithelial cells decreased significantly by treatment with LiCl or by blocking with an anti-GAPDH antibody, in comparison with the untreated strain (p reuteri ZJ617. The results indicated that the GAPDH protein of L. reuteri ZJ617 acts as an adhesion component that plays an important role in binding to the intestinal epithelial cells.

  4. Mechanisms of decreased intestinal epithelial proliferation and increased apoptosis in murine acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Kareem D; Stromberg, Paul E; Woolsey, Cheryl A; Turnbull, Isaiah R; Dunne, W Michael; Javadi, Pardis; Buchman, Timothy G; Karl, Irene E; Hotchkiss, Richard S; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2005-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of acute lung injury on the gut epithelium and examine mechanisms underlying changes in crypt proliferation and apoptosis. The relationship between severity and timing of lung injury to intestinal pathology was also examined. Randomized, controlled study. University research laboratory. Genetically inbred mice. Following induction of acute lung injury, gut epithelial proliferation and apoptosis were assessed in a) C3H/HeN wild-type and C3H/HeJ mice, which lack functional Toll-like receptor 4 (n = 17); b) C57Bl/6 mice that received monoclonal anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha or control antibody (n = 22); and c) C57Bl/6 wild-type and transgenic mice that overexpress Bcl-2 in their gut epithelium (n = 21). Intestinal epithelial proliferation and death were also examined in animals with differing degrees of lung inflammation (n = 24) as well as in a time course analysis following a fixed injury (n = 18). Acute lung injury caused decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis in crypt epithelial cells in all animals studied. C3H/HeJ mice had higher levels of proliferation than C3H/HeN animals without additional changes in apoptosis. Anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha antibody had no effect on gut epithelial proliferation or death. Overexpression of Bcl-2 did not change proliferation despite decreasing gut apoptosis. Proliferation and apoptosis were not correlated to severity of lung injury, as gut alterations were lost in mice with more severe acute lung injury. Changes in both gut epithelial proliferation and death were apparent within 12 hrs, but proliferation was decreased 36 hrs following acute lung injury while apoptosis returned to normal. Acute lung injury causes disparate effects on crypt proliferation and apoptosis, which occur, at least in part, through differing mechanisms involving Toll-like receptor 4 and Bcl-2. Severity of lung injury does not correlate with perturbations in proliferation or death in the

  5. HIV-1 transgene expression in rats causes oxidant stress and alveolar epithelial barrier dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Barbara A

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-infected individuals are at increased risk for acute and chronic airway disease even though there is no evidence that the virus can infect the lung epithelium. Although HIV-related proteins including gp120 and Tat can directly cause oxidant stress and cellular dysfunction, their effects in the lung are unknown. The goal of this study was to determine the effects of HIV-1 transgene expression in rats on alveolar epithelial barrier function. Alveolar epithelial barrier function was assessed by determining lung liquid clearance in vivo and alveolar epithelial monolayer permeability in vitro. Oxidant stress in the alveolar space was determined by measuring the glutathione redox couple by high performance liquid chromatography, and the expression and membrane localization of key tight junction proteins were assessed. Finally, the direct effects of the HIV-related proteins gp120 and Tat on alveolar epithelial barrier formation and tight junction protein expression were determined. Results HIV-1 transgene expression caused oxidant stress within the alveolar space and impaired epithelial barrier function even though there was no evidence of overt inflammation within the airways. The expression and membrane localization of the tight junction proteins zonula occludens-1 and occludin were decreased in alveolar epithelial cells from HIV-1 transgenic rats. Further, treating alveolar epithelial monolayers from wild type rats in vitro with recombinant gp120 or Tat for 24 hours reproduced many of the effects on zonula occludens-1 and occludin expression and membrane localization. Conclusion Taken together, these data indicate that HIV-related proteins cause oxidant stress and alter the expression of critical tight junction proteins in the alveolar epithelium, resulting in barrier dysfunction.

  6. Mechanisms of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia-induced intestinal epithelial apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, Erin E; Jung, Enjae; Breed, Elise; Dominguez, Jessica A; Liang, Zhe; Clark, Andrew T; Dunne, W Michael; Burd, Eileen M; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2012-07-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) pneumonia-induced sepsis is a common cause of morbidity in the intensive care unit. Although pneumonia is initiated in the lungs, extrapulmonary manifestations occur commonly. In light of the key role the intestine plays in the pathophysiology of sepsis, we sought to determine whether MRSA pneumonia induces intestinal injury. FVB/N mice were subjected to MRSA or sham pneumonia and killed 24 h later. Septic animals had a marked increase in intestinal epithelial apoptosis by both hematoxylin-eosin and active caspase 3 staining. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus-induced intestinal apoptosis was associated with an increase in the expression of the proapoptotic proteins Bid and Bax and the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-xL in the mitochondrial pathway. In the receptor-mediated pathway, MRSA pneumonia induced an increase in Fas ligand but decreased protein levels of Fas, FADD, pFADD, TNF-R1, and TRADD. To assess the functional significance of these changes, MRSA pneumonia was induced in mice with genetic manipulations in proteins in either the mitochondrial or receptor-mediated pathways. Both Bid-/- mice and animals with intestine-specific overexpression of Bcl-2 had decreased intestinal apoptosis compared with wild-type animals. In contrast, Fas ligand-/- mice had no alterations in apoptosis. To determine if these findings were organism-specific, similar experiments were performed in mice subjected to Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia. Pseudomonas aeruginosa induced gut apoptosis, but unlike MRSA, this was associated with increased Bcl-2 and TNF-R1 and decreased Fas. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus pneumonia thus induces organism-specific changes in intestinal apoptosis via changes in both the mitochondrial and receptor-mediated pathways, although the former may be more functionally significant.

  7. Inhibition of Matriptase Activity Results in Decreased Intestinal Epithelial Monolayer Integrity In Vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Pászti-Gere

    Full Text Available Barrier dysfunction in inflammatory bowel diseases implies enhanced paracellular flux and lowered transepithelial electrical resistance (TER causing effective invasion of enteropathogens or altered intestinal absorption of toxins and drug compounds. To elucidate the role of matriptase-driven cell surface proteolysis in the maintenance of intestinal barrier function, the 3-amidinophenylalanine-derived matriptase inhibitor, MI-432 was used on porcine IPEC-J2 cell monolayer. Studies with two fluorescent probes revealed that short (2 h treatment with MI-432 caused an altered distribution of oxidative species between intracellular and extracellular spaces in IPEC-J2 cells. This perturbation was partially compensated when administration of inhibitor continued for up to 48 h. Significant decrease in TER between apical and basolateral compartments of MI-432-treated IPEC-J2 cell monolayers proved that matriptase is one of the key effectors in the maintenance of barrier integrity. Changes in staining pattern of matriptase and in localization of the junctional protein occludin were observed suggesting that inhibition of matriptase by MI-432 can also exert an effect on paracellular gate opening via modulation of tight junctional protein assembly. This study confirms that non-tumorigenic IPEC-J2 cells can be used as an appropriate small intestinal model for the in vitro characterization of matriptase-related effects on intestinal epithelium. These findings demonstrate indirectly that matriptase plays a pivotal role in the development of barrier integrity; thus matriptase dysfunction can facilitate the occurence of leaky gut syndrome observed in intestinal inflammatory diseases.

  8. Erythropoietin protects the retinal pigment epithelial barrier against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    O2-induced hyperpermeability. H Zhang, Y Gong, X Wu, Y Shi, L Yin, Y Qiu. Abstract. Erythropoietin (EPO) is not limited to hematopoiesis; it may act as a protective cytokine. In this study, the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell viability, cell ...

  9. Determination of Autophagy in the Caco-2 Spontaneously Differentiating Model of Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunçer, Sinem; Banerjee, Sreeparna

    2017-08-27

    The Caco-2 colorectal cancer cell line is widely used as a model for intestinal differentiation and barrier function. These cells, upon reaching confluency, spontaneously differentiate into enterocyte-like cells, synthesize intestinal enzymes, and form domes. Caco-2 cells also undergo autophagy in the course of differentiation. The criteria to establish the induction of autophagy in cells are already well established. Here, we describe the protocol for the spontaneous differentiation of Caco-2 cells and the detection of autophagy using Western blot, flow cytometry, and immunofluorescence.

  10. Interleukin-4 and interleukin-13 cause barrier dysfunction in human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saatian, Bahman; Rezaee, Fariba; Desando, Samantha; Emo, Jason; Chapman, Tim; Knowlden, Sara; Georas, Steve N

    2013-04-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that airway epithelial barrier function is compromised in asthma, a disease characterized by Th2-skewed immune response against inhaled allergens, but the mechanisms involved are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of Th2-type cytokines on airway epithelial barrier function. 16HBE14o- human bronchial epithelial cells monolayers were grown on collagen coated Transwell inserts. The basolateral or apical surfaces of airway epithelia were exposed to human interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-13, IL-25, IL-33, thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) alone or in combination at various concentrations and time points. We analyzed epithelial apical junctional complex (AJC) function by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and permeability to FITC-conjugated dextran over time. We analyzed AJC structure using immunofluorescence with antibodies directed against key junctional components including occludin, ZO-1, β-catenin and E-cadherin. Transepithelial resistance was significantly decreased after both basolateral and apical exposure to IL-4. Permeability to 3 kDa dextran was also increased in IL-4-exposed cells. Similar results were obtained with IL-13, but none of the innate type 2 cytokines examined (TSLP, IL-25 or IL-33) significantly affected barrier function. IL-4 and IL-13-induced barrier dysfunction was accompanied by reduced expression of membrane AJC components but not by induction of claudin- 2. Enhanced permeability caused by IL-4 was not affected by wortmannin, an inhibitor of PI3 kinase signaling, but was attenuated by a broad spectrum inhibitor of janus associated kinases. Our study indicates that IL-4 and IL-13 have disruptive effect on airway epithelial barrier function. Th2-cytokine induced epithelial barrier dysfunction may contribute to airway inflammation in allergic asthma.

  11. Leukotriene B4 receptor 2 regulates the proliferation, migration, and barrier integrity of bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min; Shen, Juan; Yuan, Huimin; Chen, Fengling; Song, Huaidong; Qin, Hui; Li, Yanqin; Xu, Jiabo; Ye, Qing; Li, Shenxian; Saeki, Kazuko; Yokomizo, Takehiko

    2018-01-11

    The airway epithelium plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of asthma. The functions of leukotriene B4 receptor 2 (BLT2) on the airway epithelial cells remains unknown. In our study, BLT2 expression in 16HBE bronchial epithelial cells were manipulated by transfection with BLT2 overexpression plasmid or BLT2 small interference RNA. 16HBE cells were then exposed to BLT2 antagonist (LY255283) or BLT2 agonist (12(S)-hydroxyheptadeca-5Z,8E,10E-trienoic acid [12-HHT] or CAY10583). The results showed that BLT2 overexpression, 12-HHT stimulation, or CAY10583 treatment resulted in the enhanced proliferation and migration of 16HBE cells. In addition, BLT2 showed an inhibitory effect on epithelial permeability as illustrated by the measurement of transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and epithelial permeability, and a promoting effect on the levels of tight junction proteins (occludin and claudin-4) and phosphorylated p38 as demonstrated by real-time PCR and Western blotting analyses. These results suggest BLT2 as a key determinant of airway epithelial barrier integrity. On the contrary, RNAi-mediated knockdown or LY255283 treatment had reversed effects on the proliferation, migration, and epithelial barrier integrity. Together, our findings suggest the critical roles of BLT2 on the functions of bronchial epithelial cells and that BLT2 agonists are potential therapeutic agents for asthma treatment. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Clinical implications of the sugar absorption test: intestinal permeability test to assess mucosal barrier function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uil, J. J.; van Elburg, R. M.; van Overbeek, F. M.; Mulder, C. J.; vanBerge-Henegouwen, G. P.; Heymans, H. S.

    1997-01-01

    Functional integrity as an aspect of the mucosal barrier function of the small bowel can be estimated by the intestinal permeability for macromolecules. In the first part of this paper, an overview of intestinal permeability and its measurement is given. In the second part of the paper our own

  13. Zonulin, a regulator of epithelial and endothelial barrier functions, and its involvement in chronic inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturgeon, Craig; Fasano, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    Beside digesting nutrients and absorbing solutes and electrolytes, the intestinal epithelium with its barrier function is in charge of a tightly controlled antigen trafficking from the intestinal lumen to the submucosa. This trafficking dictates the delicate balance between tolerance and immune response causing inflammation. Loss of barrier function secondary to upregulation of zonulin, the only known physiological modulator of intercellular tight junctions, leads to uncontrolled influx of dietary and microbial antigens. Additional insights on zonulin mechanism of action and the recent appreciation of the role that altered intestinal permeability can play in the development and progression of chronic inflammatory disorders has increased interest of both basic scientists and clinicians on the potential role of zonulin in the pathogenesis of these diseases. This review focuses on the recent research implicating zonulin as a master regulator of intestinal permeability linked to the development of several chronic inflammatory disorders.

  14. The effect of wellsolve, a novel solubilizing agent, on the intestinal barrier function and intestinal absorption of griseofulvin in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, Khuriah Abdul; Lin, Yulian; Gao, Yang; Katsumi, Hidemasa; Sakane, Toshiyasu; Yamamoto, Akira

    2009-11-01

    The effect of Wellsolve, a new solubilizing agent, on the function of intestinal membrane barrier and transporters including P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and peptide transporter (PEPT1) was examined by an in vitro diffusion chamber and an in situ closed loop method. The model drugs used in this study were 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein (CF), rhodamine123 (a P-glycoprotein substrate), cephalexin (a typical substrate for PEPT1) and griseofulvin (a BCS Class II drug). Intestinal absorption of CF was not affected by the addition of 1-10% (v/v) Wellsolve, while 20% (v/v) Wellsolve significantly enhanced its intestinal absorption by the in situ absorption study. Therefore, this finding suggested that high concentration of Wellsolve might alter the intestinal barrier function. The mucosal to serosal (absorptive) and serosal to mucosal (secretory) transport of rhodamine123 was significantly inhibited in the presence of 5.0-20% (v/v) of Wellsolve, suggesting that Wellsolve might not affect the function of P-gp in the intestine. The intestinal transport of cephalexin was not affected in the presence of Wellsolve, suggesting that this solubilizing agent might not change the function of PEPT1 in the intestine. In the toxicity studies, we found that 1-10% (v/v) Wellsolve did not change the release of lactate hydrogenase (LDH) and protein from the intestinal membranes. Furthermore, intestinal absorption of griseofulvin in the presence of 10% (v/v) Wellsolve significantly increased as compared with the control. In summary, Wellsolve at lower concentrations might be a potent and safe solubilizing agent for improving the solubility and absorption of poorly water-soluble drugs including griseofulvin.

  15. Barrier-protective effects of activated protein C in human alveolar epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferranda Puig

    Full Text Available Acute lung injury (ALI is a clinical manifestation of respiratory failure, caused by lung inflammation and the disruption of the alveolar-capillary barrier. Preservation of the physical integrity of the alveolar epithelial monolayer is of critical importance to prevent alveolar edema. Barrier integrity depends largely on the balance between physical forces on cell-cell and cell-matrix contacts, and this balance might be affected by alterations in the coagulation cascade in patients with ALI. We aimed to study the effects of activated protein C (APC on mechanical tension and barrier integrity in human alveolar epithelial cells (A549 exposed to thrombin. Cells were pretreated for 3 h with APC (50 µg/ml or vehicle (control. Subsequently, thrombin (50 nM or medium was added to the cell culture. APC significantly reduced thrombin-induced cell monolayer permeability, cell stiffening, and cell contraction, measured by electrical impedance, optical magnetic twisting cytometry, and traction microscopy, respectively, suggesting a barrier-protective response. The dynamics of the barrier integrity was also assessed by western blotting and immunofluorescence analysis of the tight junction ZO-1. Thrombin resulted in more elongated ZO-1 aggregates at cell-cell interface areas and induced an increase in ZO-1 membrane protein content. APC attenuated the length of these ZO-1 aggregates and reduced the ZO-1 membrane protein levels induced by thrombin. In conclusion, pretreatment with APC reduced the disruption of barrier integrity induced by thrombin, thus contributing to alveolar epithelial barrier protection.

  16. Intestinal epithelium in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coskun, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    homeostasis. Therefore, dysregulation within the epithelial layer can increase intestinal permeability, lead to abnormalities in interactions between IECs and immune cells in underlying lamina propria, and disturb the intestinal immune homeostasis, all of which are linked to the clinical disease course......The intestinal epithelium has a strategic position as a protective physical barrier to luminal microbiota and actively contributes to the mucosal immune system. This barrier is mainly formed by a monolayer of specialized intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) that are crucial in maintaining intestinal...

  17. FOXA2 regulates a network of genes involved in critical functions of human intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosalia, Nehal; Yang, Rui; Kerschner, Jenny L; Harris, Ann

    2015-07-01

    The forkhead box A (FOXA) family of pioneer transcription factors is critical for the development of many endoderm-derived tissues. Their importance in regulating biological processes in the lung and liver is extensively characterized, though much less is known about their role in intestine. Here we investigate the contribution of FOXA2 to coordinating intestinal epithelial cell function using postconfluent Caco2 cells, differentiated into an enterocyte-like model. FOXA2 binding sites genome-wide were determined by ChIP-seq and direct targets of the factor were validated by ChIP-qPCR and siRNA-mediated depletion of FOXA1/2 followed by RT-qPCR. Peaks of FOXA2 occupancy were frequent at loci contributing to gene ontology pathways of regulation of cell migration, cell motion, and plasma membrane function. Depletion of both FOXA1 and FOXA2 led to a significant reduction in the expression of multiple transmembrane proteins including ion channels and transporters, which form a network that is essential for maintaining normal ion and solute transport. One of the targets was the adenosine A2B receptor, and reduced receptor mRNA levels were associated with a functional decrease in intracellular cyclic AMP. We also observed that 30% of FOXA2 binding sites contained a GATA motif and that FOXA1/A2 depletion reduced GATA-4, but not GATA-6 protein levels. These data show that FOXA2 plays a pivotal role in regulating intestinal epithelial cell function. Moreover, that the FOXA and GATA families of transcription factors may work cooperatively to regulate gene expression genome-wide in the intestinal epithelium. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Commensal Streptococcus salivarius Modulates PPARγ Transcriptional Activity in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Couvigny

    Full Text Available The impact of commensal bacteria in eukaryotic transcriptional regulation has increasingly been demonstrated over the last decades. A multitude of studies have shown direct effects of commensal bacteria from local transcriptional activity to systemic impact. The commensal bacterium Streptococcus salivarius is one of the early bacteria colonizing the oral and gut mucosal surfaces. It has been shown to down-regulate nuclear transcription factor (NF-кB in human intestinal cells, a central regulator of the host mucosal immune system response to the microbiota. In order to evaluate its impact on a further important transcription factor shown to link metabolism and inflammation in the intestine, namely PPARγ (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor, we used human intestinal epithelial cell-lines engineered to monitor PPARγ transcriptional activity in response to a wide range of S. salivarius strains. We demonstrated that different strains from this bacterial group share the property to inhibit PPARγ activation independently of the ligand used. First attempts to identify the nature of the active compounds showed that it is a low-molecular-weight, DNase-, proteases- and heat-resistant metabolite secreted by S. salivarius strains. Among PPARγ-targeted metabolic genes, I-FABP and Angptl4 expression levels were dramatically reduced in intestinal epithelial cells exposed to S. salivarius supernatant. Both gene products modulate lipid accumulation in cells and down-regulating their expression might consequently affect host health. Our study shows that species belonging to the salivarius group of streptococci impact both host inflammatory and metabolic regulation suggesting a possible role in the host homeostasis and health.

  19. Total intermittent Pringle maneuver during liver resection can induce intestinal epithelial cell damage and endotoxemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon A W G Dello

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The intermittent Pringle maneuver (IPM is frequently applied to minimize blood loss during liver transection. Clamping the hepatoduodenal ligament blocks the hepatic inflow, which leads to a non circulating (hepatosplanchnic outflow. Also, IPM blocks the mesenteric venous drainage (as well as the splenic drainage with raising pressure in the microvascular network of the intestinal structures. It is unknown whether the IPM is harmful to the gut. The aim was to investigate intestinal epithelial cell damage reflected by circulating intestinal fatty acid binding protein levels (I-FABP in patients undergoing liver resection with IPM. METHODS: Patients who underwent liver surgery received total IPM (total-IPM or selective IPM (sel-IPM. A selective IPM was performed by selectively clamping the right portal pedicle. Patients without IPM served as controls (no-IPM. Arterial blood samples were taken immediately after incision, ischemia and reperfusion of the liver, transection, 8 hours after start of surgery and on the first post-operative day. RESULTS: 24 patients (13 males were included. 7 patients received cycles of 15 minutes and 5 patients received cycles of 30 minutes of hepatic inflow occlusion. 6 patients received cycles of 15 minutes selective hepatic occlusion and 6 patients underwent surgery without inflow occlusion. Application of total-IPM resulted in a significant increase in I-FABP 8 hours after start of surgery compared to baseline (p<0.005. In the no-IPM group and sel-IPM group no significant increase in I-FABP at any time point compared to baseline was observed. CONCLUSION: Total-IPM in patients undergoing liver resection is associated with a substantial increase in arterial I-FABP, pointing to intestinal epithelial injury during liver surgery. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01099475.

  20. Mechanism of leukotriene D4 inhibition of Na-alanine cotransport in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukder, Jamilur R; Kekuda, Ramesh; Saha, Prosenjit; Sundaram, Uma

    2008-07-01

    In a rabbit model of chronic intestinal inflammation, we previously demonstrated inhibition of neutral Na-amino acid cotransport. The mechanism of the inhibition was secondary to a decrease in the affinity for amino acid rather than the number of cotransporters. Since leukotriene (LT)D4 is known to be elevated in enterocytes during chronic intestinal inflammation, we used rat intestinal epithelial cell (IEC-18) monolayers to determine the mechanism of regulation of Na-alanine cotransport (alanine, serine, cysteine transporter 1: ASCT1) by LTD4. Na-alanine cotransport was inhibited by LTD4 in IEC-18 cells. The mechanism of inhibition of ASCT1 (solute carrier, SLC1A4) by LTD4 is secondary to a decrease in the affinity of the cotransporter for alanine without a significant change in cotransporter numbers and is not secondary to an alteration in the Na+ extruding capacity of the cells. Real-time quantitative PCR and Western blot analysis results indicate that ASCT1 message and protein levels are also unchanged in LTD4-treated IEC-18 cells. These results indicate that LTD4 inhibits Na-dependent neutral amino acid cotransport in IEC. The mechanism of inhibition is secondary to a decrease in the affinity for alanine, which is identical to that seen in villus cells from the chronically inflamed rabbit small intestine, where LTD4 levels are significantly increased.

  1. Th17 Cell Induction by Adhesion of Microbes to Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atarashi, Koji; Tanoue, Takeshi; Ando, Minoru; Kamada, Nobuhiko; Nagano, Yuji; Narushima, Seiko; Suda, Wataru; Imaoka, Akemi; Setoyama, Hiromi; Nagamori, Takashi; Ishikawa, Eiji; Shima, Tatsuichiro; Hara, Taeko; Kado, Shoichi; Jinnohara, Toshi; Ohno, Hiroshi; Kondo, Takashi; Toyooka, Kiminori; Watanabe, Eiichiro; Yokoyama, Shin-Ichiro; Tokoro, Shunji; Mori, Hiroshi; Noguchi, Yurika; Morita, Hidetoshi; Ivanov, Ivaylo I; Sugiyama, Tsuyoshi; Nuñez, Gabriel; Camp, J Gray; Hattori, Masahira; Umesaki, Yoshinori; Honda, Kenya

    2015-10-08

    Intestinal Th17 cells are induced and accumulate in response to colonization with a subgroup of intestinal microbes such as segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB) and certain extracellular pathogens. Here, we show that adhesion of microbes to intestinal epithelial cells (ECs) is a critical cue for Th17 induction. Upon monocolonization of germ-free mice or rats with SFB indigenous to mice (M-SFB) or rats (R-SFB), M-SFB and R-SFB showed host-specific adhesion to small intestinal ECs, accompanied by host-specific induction of Th17 cells. Citrobacter rodentium and Escherichia coli O157 triggered similar Th17 responses, whereas adhesion-defective mutants of these microbes failed to do so. Moreover, a mixture of 20 bacterial strains, which were selected and isolated from fecal samples of a patient with ulcerative colitis on the basis of their ability to cause a robust induction of Th17 cells in the mouse colon, also exhibited EC-adhesive characteristics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Autophagy protects intestinal epithelial cells against deoxynivalenol toxicity by alleviating oxidative stress via IKK signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yulong; Li, Jianjun; Li, Fengna; Hu, Chien-An A; Liao, Peng; Tan, Kunrong; Tan, Bie; Xiong, Xia; Liu, Gang; Li, Tiejun; Yin, Yulong

    2015-12-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular process of homeostatic degradation that promotes cell survival under various stressors. Deoxynivalenol (DON), a fungal toxin, often causes diarrhea and disturbs the homeostasis of the intestinal system. To investigate the function of intestinal autophagy in response to DON and associated mechanisms, we firstly knocked out ATG5 (autophagy-related gene 5) in porcine intestinal epithelial cells (IPEC-J2) using CRISPR-Cas9 technology. When treated with DON, autophagy was induced in IPEC-J2 cells but not in IPEC-J2.Atg5ko cells. The deficiency in autophagy increased DON-induced apoptosis in IPEC-J2.atg5ko cells, in part, through the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The cellular stress response can be restored in IPEC-J2.atg5ko cells by overexpressing proteins involved in protein folding. Interestingly, we found that autophagy deficiency downregulated the expression of endoplasmic reticulum folding proteins BiP and PDI when IPEC-J2.atg5ko cells were treated with DON. In addition, we investigated the molecular mechanism of autophagy involved in the IKK, AMPK, and mTOR signaling pathway and found that Bay-117082 and Compound C, specific inhibitors for IKK and AMPK, respectively, inhibited the induction of autophagy. Taken together, our results suggest that autophagy is pivotal for protection against DON in pig intestinal cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Gut epithelial barrier markers in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barceló, Antonia; Esquinas, Cristina; Robles, Juan; Piérola, Javier; De la Peña, Mónica; Aguilar, Irene; Morell-Garcia, Daniel; Alonso, Alberto; Toledo, Nuria; Sánchez-de la Torre, Manuel; Barbé, Ferran

    2016-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is now being recognized as an additional contributing factor to the pathogenesis of obesity-related comorbidities. At the same time, there is now increasing evidence to suggest that intestinal wall permeability plays a role in the development of metabolic syndrome. In the present study, circulating zonulin and fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP) were measured in association with metabolic, hepatic, and inflammatory parameters. Compared with controls, plasma I-FABP levels were significantly higher in patients with OSA (571 pg/mL [IQR 290-950] vs 396 pg/mL [IQR 234-559], p = 0.04). Zonulin levels were similar between groups. Significant relationships were observed between zonulin levels and waist circumference (p zonulin levels correlated negatively with the mean nocturnal oxygenation saturation (p zonulin and ALT, AST, and hs-CRP were attenuated, but not eliminated, after adjustment for other variables. The results of this study suggest that OSA is a risk factor for intestinal damage, regardless of metabolic profile, and that intestinal permeability might be a possible contributor to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in patients with OSA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Development of microfluidic cell culture devices towards an in vitro human intestinal barrier model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Hsih-Yin

    Existing in vitro models of the human intestine such as the established epithelial cell line, Caco-2, cultured on porous membranes have been extensively used for assessing and predicting permeability and absorption of oral drugs in the pharmaceutical industries. However, such in vitro human intes...

  5. Binding of Candida albicans to Human CEACAM1 and CEACAM6 Modulates the Inflammatory Response of Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaile, Esther; Müller, Mario M; Schäfer, Miriam R; Clauder, Ann-Katrin; Feer, Sabina; Heyl, Kerstin A; Stock, Magdalena; Klassert, Tilman E; Zipfel, Peter F; Singer, Bernhard B; Slevogt, Hortense

    2017-03-14

    Candida albicans colonizes human mucosa, including the gastrointestinal tract, as a commensal. In immunocompromised patients, C. albicans can breach the intestinal epithelial barrier and cause fatal invasive infections. Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1; CD66a), CEACAM5 (CEA), and CEACAM6 (CD66c) are immunomodulatory receptors expressed on human mucosa and are recruited by bacterial and viral pathogens. Here we show for the first time that a fungal pathogen (i.e., C. albicans ) also binds directly to the extracellular domain of human CEACAM1, CEACAM3, CEACAM5, and CEACAM6. Binding was specific for human CEACAMs and mediated by the N-terminal IgV-like domain. In enterocytic C2BBe1 cells, C. albicans caused a transient tyrosine phosphorylation of CEACAM1 and induced higher expression of membrane-bound CEACAM1 and soluble CEACAM6. Lack of the CEACAM1 receptor after short hairpin RNA (shRNA) knockdown abolished CXCL8 (interleukin-8) secretion by C2BBe1 cells in response to C. albicans In CEACAM1-competent cells, the addition of recombinant soluble CEACAM6 reduced the C. albicans -induced CXCL8 secretion. IMPORTANCE The present study demonstrates for the first time that fungal pathogens can be recognized by at least four members of the immunomodulatory CEACAM receptor family: CEACAM1, -3, -5, and -6. Three of the four receptors (i.e., CEACAM1, -5, and -6) are expressed in mucosal cells of the intestinal tract, where they are implicated in immunomodulation and control of tissue homeostasis. Importantly, the interaction of the major fungal pathogen in humans Candida albicans with CEACAM1 and CEACAM6 resulted in an altered epithelial immune response. With respect to the broad impact of CEACAM receptors on various aspects of the innate and the adaptive immune responses, in particular epithelial, neutrophil, and T cell behavior, understanding the role of CEACAMs in the host response to fungal pathogens might help to improve management of

  6. Acute Acrolein Exposure Induces Impairment of Vocal Fold Epithelial Barrier Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinxin; Zheng, Wei; Sivasankar, M Preeti

    2016-01-01

    Acrolein is a ubiquitous pollutant abundant in cigarette smoke, mobile exhaust, and industrial waste. There is limited literature on the effects of acrolein on vocal fold tissue, although there are clinical reports of voice changes after pollutant exposures. Vocal folds are responsible for voice production. The overall objective of this study was to investigate the effects of acrolein exposure on viable, excised vocal fold epithelial tissue and to characterize the mechanism underlying acrolein toxicity. Vocal fold epithelia were studied because they form the outermost layer of the vocal folds and are a primary recipient of inhaled pollutants. Porcine vocal fold epithelia were exposed to 0, 50, 100, 500, 900 or 1300 μM of acrolein for 3 hours; the metabolic activity, epithelial resistance, epithelial permeability, tight junction protein (occludin and claudin 3) expression, cell membrane integrity and lipid peroxidation were investigated. The data demonstrated that acrolein exposure at 500 μM significantly reduced vocal fold epithelial metabolic activity by 27.2% (p≤0.001). Incubation with 100 μM acrolein caused a marked increase in epithelial permeability by 130.5% (pacrolein-treated samples, the cell membrane integrity was significantly damaged with a 45.6% increase of lipid peroxidation as compared to controls (pacrolein exposure impairs vocal fold epithelial barrier integrity. Lipid peroxidation-induced cell membrane damage may play an important role in reducing the barrier function of the epithelium.

  7. Uptake of Gold Nanoparticles by Intestinal Epithelial Cells: Impact of Particle Size on Their Absorption, Accumulation, and Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Mingfei; He, Lili; McClements, David Julian; Xiao, Hang

    2015-09-16

    Inorganic nanomaterials have been increasingly utilized in many consumer products, which has led to concerns about their potential toxicity. At present, there is limited knowledge about the gastrointestinal fate and cytotoxicity of ingested inorganic nanoparticles. This study determined the influence of particle size and concentration of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on their absorption, accumulation, and cytotoxicity in model intestinal epithelial cells. As the mean particle diameter of the AuNPs decreased (from 100 to 50 to 15 nm), their rate of absorption by the intestinal epithelium cells increased, but their cellular accumulation in the epithelial cells decreased. Moreover, accumulation of AuNPs caused cytotoxicity in the intestinal epithelial cells, which was evidenced by depolarization of mitochondria membranes. These results provide important insights into the relationship between the dimensions of AuNPs and their gastrointestinal uptake and potential cytotoxicity.

  8. Angiotensin II induces apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells through the AT2 receptor, GATA-6 and the Bax pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Lihua; Wang, Wensheng; Xiao, Weidong; Liang, Hongyin; Yang, Yang [Department of General Surgery, Xingqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400037 (China); Yang, Hua, E-mail: hwbyang@126.com [Department of General Surgery, Xingqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400037 (China)

    2012-08-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ang II-induced apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cell through AT2 receptor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The apoptosis process involves in the Bax/Bcl-2 intrinsic pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GATA-6 short hairpin RNA reduced Bax expression, but not Bcl-2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GATA-6 may play a critical role in apoptosis in response to the Ang II challenge. -- Abstract: Angiotensin II (Ang II) has been shown to play an important role in cell apoptosis. However, the mechanisms of Ang-II-induced apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells are not fully understood. GATA-6 is a zinc finger transcription factor expressed in the colorectal epithelium, which directs cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. In the present study we investigated the underlying mechanism of which GATA-6 affects Ang-II induced apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells. The in vitro intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis model was established by co-culturing Caco-2 cells with Ang II. Pretreatment with Angiotensin type 2 (AT2) receptor antagonist, PD123319, significantly reduced the expression of Bax and prevented the Caco-2 cells apoptosis induced by Ang II. In addition, Ang II up-regulated the expression of GATA-6. Interestingly, GATA-6 short hairpin RNA prevented Ang II-induced intestinal epithelial cells apoptosis and reduced the expression of Bax, but not Bcl-2. Taken together, the present study suggests that Angiotensin II promotes apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells through GATA-6 and the Bax pathway in an AT2 receptor-dependent manner.

  9. Angiotensin II induces apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells through the AT2 receptor, GATA-6 and the Bax pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Lihua; Wang, Wensheng; Xiao, Weidong; Liang, Hongyin; Yang, Yang; Yang, Hua

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Ang II-induced apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cell through AT2 receptor. ► The apoptosis process involves in the Bax/Bcl-2 intrinsic pathway. ► GATA-6 short hairpin RNA reduced Bax expression, but not Bcl-2. ► GATA-6 may play a critical role in apoptosis in response to the Ang II challenge. -- Abstract: Angiotensin II (Ang II) has been shown to play an important role in cell apoptosis. However, the mechanisms of Ang-II-induced apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells are not fully understood. GATA-6 is a zinc finger transcription factor expressed in the colorectal epithelium, which directs cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. In the present study we investigated the underlying mechanism of which GATA-6 affects Ang-II induced apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells. The in vitro intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis model was established by co-culturing Caco-2 cells with Ang II. Pretreatment with Angiotensin type 2 (AT2) receptor antagonist, PD123319, significantly reduced the expression of Bax and prevented the Caco-2 cells apoptosis induced by Ang II. In addition, Ang II up-regulated the expression of GATA-6. Interestingly, GATA-6 short hairpin RNA prevented Ang II-induced intestinal epithelial cells apoptosis and reduced the expression of Bax, but not Bcl-2. Taken together, the present study suggests that Angiotensin II promotes apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells through GATA-6 and the Bax pathway in an AT2 receptor-dependent manner.

  10. Target of rapamycin (TOR) signaling controls epithelial morphogenesis in the vertebrate intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makky, Khadijah; Tekiela, Jackie; Mayer, Alan N

    2007-03-15

    The target of rapamycin (TOR) signaling pathway regulates cell growth and proliferation, however the extent to which TOR signaling mediates particular organogenesis programs remains to be determined. Here we report an examination of TOR signaling during zebrafish development, using a combination of small molecule treatment and morpholino-mediated gene knockdown. First, we amplified and sequenced the full-length cDNA for the zebrafish TOR ortholog (ztor). By in situ hybridization, we found that ztor is expressed ubiquitously in the early embryo, but displays a dynamic pattern in the gut between 48 and 72 h post-fertilization (hpf). Treatment of zebrafish embryos with rapamycin induced only a mild general developmental delay up to 72 hpf, but digestive tract development became arrested at the primitive gut tube stage. Rapamycin inhibited intestinal epithelial growth, morphogenesis and differentiation. Using morpholino-mediated gene knockdown of TOR pathway components, we show that this effect is mediated specifically by the rapamycin-sensitive TOR complex 1 (TORC1). Thus, in addition to regulating cell growth and proliferation, TOR signaling controls the developmental program guiding epithelial morphogenesis in the vertebrate intestine.

  11. Nivalenol induces oxidative stress and increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidant effect in intestinal epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Regno, Marisanta; Adesso, Simona; Popolo, Ada [Department of Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, 132–84084 Fisciano, Salerno (Italy); Quaroni, Andrea [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Cornell University, Veterinary Research Tower, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853–6401 (United States); Autore, Giuseppina [Department of Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, 132–84084 Fisciano, Salerno (Italy); Severino, Lorella [Department of Pathology and Animal Health, Division of Toxicology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Naples “Federico II”, Via Delpino 1, 80137 Naples (Italy); Marzocco, Stefania, E-mail: smarzocco@unisa.it [Department of Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, 132–84084 Fisciano, Salerno (Italy)

    2015-06-01

    Mycotoxins are secondary fungal metabolites often found as contaminants in almost all agricultural commodities worldwide, and the consumption of food or feed contaminated by mycotoxins represents a major risk for human and animal health. Reactive oxygen species are normal products of cellular metabolism. However, disproportionate generation of reactive oxygen species poses a serious problem to bodily homeostasis and causes oxidative tissue damage. In this study we analyzed the effect of two trichothecenes mycotoxins: nivalenol and deoxynivalenol, alone and in combination, on oxidative stress in the non-tumorigenic intestinal epithelial cell line IEC-6. Our results indicate the pro-oxidant nivalenol effect in IEC-6, the stronger pro-oxidant effect of nivalenol when compared to deoxynivalenol and, interestingly, that nivalenol increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidative effects. Mechanistic studies indicate that the observed effects were mediated by NADPH oxidase, calcium homeostasis alteration, NF-kB and Nrf2 pathways activation and by iNOS and nitrotyrosine formation. The toxicological interaction by nivalenol and deoxynivalenol reported in this study in IEC-6, points out the importance of the toxic effect of these mycotoxins, mostly in combination, further highlighting the risk assessment process of these toxins that are of growing concern. - Highlights: • Nivalenol induces oxidative stress in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). • Nivalenol increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidant effects in IECs. • Nivalenol and deoxynivalenol trigger antioxidant response IECs. • These results indicate the importance of mycotoxins co-contamination.

  12. Erythropoietin protects the retinal pigment epithelial barrier against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    zhanghongmei

    2011-05-09

    May 9, 2011 ... by EPO pre-treatment. EPO treatment also induced lower MDA levels and higher SOD activity in H2O2 treated RPE cells. So, it is concluded that, non-lethal concentrations of H2O2 could damage RPE barrier and destroy its integrity. EPO showed the protective effects on H2O2-induced hyperpermeability by.

  13. Preterm infant gut microbiota affects intestinal epithelial development in a humanized microbiome gnotobiotic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yueyue; Lu, Lei; Sun, Jun; Petrof, Elaine O; Claud, Erika C

    2016-09-01

    Development of the infant small intestine is influenced by bacterial colonization. To promote establishment of optimal microbial communities in preterm infants, knowledge of the beneficial functions of the early gut microbiota on intestinal development is needed. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of early preterm infant microbiota on host gut development using a gnotobiotic mouse model. Histological assessment of intestinal development was performed. The differentiation of four epithelial cell lineages (enterocytes, goblet cells, Paneth cells, enteroendocrine cells) and tight junction (TJ) formation was examined. Using weight gain as a surrogate marker for health, we found that early microbiota from a preterm infant with normal weight gain (MPI-H) induced increased villus height and crypt depth, increased cell proliferation, increased numbers of goblet cells and Paneth cells, and enhanced TJs compared with the changes induced by early microbiota from a poor weight gain preterm infant (MPI-L). Laser capture microdissection (LCM) plus qRT-PCR further revealed, in MPI-H mice, a higher expression of stem cell marker Lgr5 and Paneth cell markers Lyz1 and Cryptdin5 in crypt populations, along with higher expression of the goblet cell and mature enterocyte marker Muc3 in villus populations. In contrast, MPI-L microbiota failed to induce the aforementioned changes and presented intestinal characteristics comparable to a germ-free host. Our data demonstrate that microbial communities have differential effects on intestinal development. Future studies to identify pioneer settlers in neonatal microbial communities necessary to induce maturation may provide new insights for preterm infant microbial ecosystem therapeutics. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Bacterial antigens alone can influence intestinal barrier integrity, but live bacteria are required for initiation of intestinal inflammation and injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydora, Beate C; Martin, Sarah M; Lupicki, Maryla; Dieleman, Levinus A; Doyle, Jason; Walker, John W; Fedorak, Richard N

    2006-06-01

    Intestinal flora plays a critical role in the initiation and perpetuation of inflammatory bowel disease. This study examined whether live fecal bacteria were necessary for the initiation of this inflammatory response or whether sterile fecal material would provoke a similar response. Three preparations of fecal material were prepared: (1) a slurry of live fecal bacteria, (2) a sterile lysate of bacterial antigens, and (3) a sterile filtrate of fecal water. Each preparation was introduced via gastric gavage into the intestines of axenic interleukin-10 gene-deficient mice genetically predisposed to develop inflammatory bowel disease. Intestinal barrier integrity and degrees of mucosal and systemic inflammations were determined for each preparation group. Intestinal barrier integrity, as determined by mannitol transmural flux, was altered by both live fecal bacterial and sterile lysates of bacterial antigens, although it was not altered by sterile filtrates of fecal water. However, only live fecal bacteria initiated mucosal inflammation and injury and a systemic immune response. Fecal bacterial antigens in the presence of live bacteria and sterile fecal bacterial antigens have different effects on the initiation and perpetuation of intestinal inflammation.

  15. E. coli O124 K72 alters the intestinal barrier and the tight junctions proteins of guinea pig intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiaomeng; Zhu, Yanyan; Gamallat, Yaser; Ma, Shenhao; Chiwala, Gift; Meyiah, Abdo; Xin, Yi

    2017-10-01

    Our research group previously isolated and identified a strain of pathogenic Escherichia coli from clinical samples called E. coli O124 K72. The present study was aimed at determining the potential effects of E. coli O124 K72 on intestinal barrier functions and structural proteins integrity in guinea pig. Guinea pigs were grouped into three groups; control (CG); E. coli O124 K72 (E. coli); and probiotics Lactobacillus rhamnosus (LGG). Initially, we create intestinal dysbiosis by giving all animals Levofloxacin for 10days, but the control group (CG) received the same volume of saline. Then, the animals received either E. coli O124 K72 (E. coli) or Lactobacillus rhamnosus (LGG) according to their assigned group. E. coli O124 K72 treatment significantly affected colon morphology and distorted intestinal barrier function by up-regulating Claudin2 and down-regulating Occludin. In addition, E. coli upregulated the mRNA expression of MUC1, MUC2, MUC13 and MUC15. Furthermore, suspected tumor was found in the E. coli treated animals. Our results suggested that E. coli O124 K72 strain has adverse effects on intestinal barrier functions and is capable of altering integrity of structural proteins in guinea pig model while at same time it may have a role in colon carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Toxoplasma gondii Infection Promotes Epithelial Barrier Dysfunction of Caco-2 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briceño, Marisol Pallete; Nascimento, Layane Alencar Costa; Nogueira, Nathalia Pires; Barenco, Paulo Victor Czarnewski; Ferro, Eloisa Amália Vieira; Rezende-Oliveira, Karine; Goulart, Luiz Ricardo; Alves, Patrícia Terra; Barbosa, Bellisa de Freitas; Lima, Wânia Rezende; Silva, Neide Maria

    2016-01-01

    After oral infection, Toxoplasma gondii invades intestinal cells, induces breakdown of intestinal physiology and barrier functions, and causes intestinal pathology in some animal species. Although parasites’ invasion into host cells is a known phenomenon, the effects of T. gondii infection in the intestinal barrier are still not well established. To evaluate morphological and physiological modifications on the colorectal adenocarcinoma-derived Caco-2 cell line during T. gondii infection, microvilli, tight junction integrity, and transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) were investigated under infection. It was observed that the dextran uptake (endocytosis) and distribution were smaller in infected than in noninfected Caco-2 cells. The infection leads to the partial loss of microvilli at the cell surface. Claudin-1, zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), and occludin expressions were colocalized by immunofluorescence and presented discontinuous net patterns in infected cells. Immunoblotting analysis at 24 hr postinfection revealed decreasing expression of occludin and ZO-1 proteins, whereas claudin-1 presented similar expression level compared with noninfected cells. T. gondii decreased TEER in Caco-2 cells 24 hr after infection. Our results suggest that T. gondii infection may lead to the loss of integrity of intestinal mucosa, resulting in impaired barrier function. PMID:27370796

  17. A gene expression programme induced by bovine colostrum whey promotes growth and wound-healing processes in intestinal epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Blais, M.; Pouliot, Y.; Gauthier, S.; Boutin, Y.; Lessard, M.

    2014-01-01

    Bovine colostrum is well known for its beneficial properties on health and development. It contains a wide variety of bioactive ingredients that are known to promote a number of cellular processes. Therefore the use of colostrum whey as a feed additive to promote intestinal health has been proposed, yet little is known about mechanisms implicated in its beneficial properties on intestinal epithelial cells. In the present paper, casein were removed from bovine colostrum and the remaining liqui...

  18. Progressive Depletion of Rough Endoplasmic Reticulum in Epithelial Cells of the Small Intestine in Monosodium Glutamate Mice Model of Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiko Nakadate

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obesity is a known risk factor for metabolic syndrome. However, little is known about pathological changes in the small intestine associated with chronic obesity. This study investigated cellular and subcellular level changes in the small intestine of obese mice. In this study, a mouse model of obesity was established by early postnatal administration of monosodium glutamate. Changes in body weight were monitored, and pathological changes in the small intestine were evaluated using hematoxylin-eosin and Nissl staining and light and electron microscopy. Consequently, obese mice were significantly heavier compared with controls from 9 weeks of age. Villi in the small intestine of obese mice were elongated and thinned. There was reduced hematoxylin staining in the epithelium of the small intestine of obese mice. Electron microscopy revealed a significant decrease in and shortening of rough endoplasmic reticulum in epithelial cells of the small intestine of obese mice compared with normal mice. The decrease in rough endoplasmic reticulum in the small intestine epithelial cells of obese mice indicates that obesity starting in childhood influences various functions of the small intestine, such as protein synthesis, and could impair both the defense mechanism against invasion of pathogenic microbes and nutritional absorption.

  19. The pH-sensing receptor OGR1 improves barrier function of epithelial cells and inhibits migration in an acidic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vallière, Cheryl; Vidal, Solange; Clay, Ieuan; Jurisic, Giorgia; Tcymbarevich, Irina; Lang, Silvia; Ludwig, Marie-Gabrielle; Okoniewski, Michal; Eloranta, Jyrki J; Kullak-Ublick, Gerd A; Wagner, Carsten A; Rogler, Gerhard; Seuwen, Klaus

    2015-09-15

    The pH-sensing receptor ovarian cancer G protein-coupled receptor 1 (OGR1; GPR68) is expressed in the gut. Inflammatory bowel disease is typically associated with a decrease in local pH, which may lead to altered epithelial barrier function and subsequent gastrointestinal repair involving epithelial cell adhesion and migration. As the mechanisms underlying the response to pH changes are not well understood, we have investigated OGR1-mediated, pH-dependent signaling pathways in intestinal epithelial cells. Caco-2 cells stably overexpressing OGR1 were created and validated as tools to study OGR1 signaling. Barrier function, migration, and proliferation were measured using electric cell-substrate impedance-sensing technology. Localization of the tight junction proteins zonula occludens protein 1 and occludin and the rearrangement of cytoskeletal actin were examined by confocal microscopy. Paracellular permeability and protein and gene expression analysis using DNA microarrays were performed on filter-grown Caco-2 monolayers. We report that an acidic pH shift from pH 7.8 to 6.6 improved barrier function and stimulated reorganization of filamentous actin with prominent basal stress fiber formation. Cell migration and proliferation during in vitro wound healing were inhibited. Gene expression analysis revealed significant upregulation of genes related to cytoskeleton remodeling, cell adhesion, and growth factor signaling. We conclude that acidic extracellular pH can have a signaling function and impact the physiology of intestinal epithelial cells. The deconstruction of OGR1-dependent signaling may aid our understanding of mucosal inflammation mechanisms. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Epithelial apoptosis in mechanistically distinct methods of injury in the murine small intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Dinesh; Robertson, Charles M; Stromberg, Paul E; Martin, James R.; Dunne, W. Michael; Houchen, Courtney W; Barrett, Terrence A; Ayala, Alfred; Perl, Mario; Buchman, Timothy G; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2007-01-01

    Gut epithelial apoptosis is involved in the pathophysiology of multiple diseases. This study characterized intestinal apoptosis in three mechanistically distinct injuries with different kinetics of cell death. FVB/N mice were subjected to gamma radiation, Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia or injection of monoclonal anti-CD3 antibody and sacrificed 4, 12, or 24 hours post-injury (n=10/time point). Apoptosis was quantified in the jejunum by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E), active caspase-3, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP-mediated nick end labeling (TUNEL), in situ oligoligation reaction (ISOL,) cytokeratin 18, and annexin V staining. Reproducible results were obtained only for H&E, active caspase-3, TUNEL and ISOL, which were quantified and compared against each other for each injury at each time point. Kinetics of injury were different with early apoptosis highest following radiation, late apoptosis highest following anti CD3, and more consistent levels following pneumonia. ISOL was the most consistent stain and was always statistically indistinguishable from at least 2 stains. In contrast, active caspase-3 demonstrated lower levels of apoptosis, while the TUNEL assay had higher levels of apoptosis in the most severely injured intestine regardless of mechanism of injury. H&E was a statistical outlier more commonly than any other stain. This suggests that regardless of mechanism or kinetics of injury, ISOL correlates to other quantification methods of detecting gut epithelial apoptosis more than any other method studied and compares favorably to other commonly accepted techniques of quantifying apoptosis in a large intestinal cross sectional by balancing sensitivity and specificity across a range of times and levels of death. PMID:17357092

  1. Effects of the ionising radiations on the structure and the function of the intestinal epithelial cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haton, C.

    2005-06-01

    The intestinal mucosa is a particularly radio-sensitive tissue and damage may occur following either accidental or therapeutic exposure. the deleterious actions of ionizing radiation are linked to the formation of sometimes overwhelming quantities of reactive oxygen species (R.O.S.). Production of R.O.S. is both direct and indirect from the secondary effects of irradiation. A better comprehension of the underlying mechanisms of injury will lead to more adapted therapeutic approaches to limit the harmful effects of irradiation. The homeostasis of the intestinal epithelium is regulated by three factors: proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation. these three factors were studied using the cell model, HT29, in order to analyze modulations of this balance after irradiation. our results, in agreement with other data, showed the establishment of mitotic delay. This arrest of proliferation was followed by apoptosis to be the major mechanism leading to cell death in this model. thus, for the first time, we have shown that irradiated intestinal epithelial cells preserve their capacity to differentiate. This indicates, although indirectly, that intestinal cells have and preserve an intrinsic capacity restore a functional epithelium. R.O.S. are considered as intermediates between the physical nature of radiations and biological responses. It seems essential to understand anti-oxidant mechanisms used by the cell for defence against the deleterious effects of R.O.S post exposure. This study of several anti-oxidant defence mechanisms of intestinal mucosa, was carried out in vivo in the mouse at different times following abdominal irradiation. We observed an early mitochondrial response in the hours following irradiation revealing this organelle as a particular target. We demonstrated a strong alteration of anti-oxidant capacity as revealed by a decrease in S.O.D.s, catalase and an increase of the G.P.X.s and M.T.s. A part of these modifications appeared to depend on an

  2. Characterizing microbiota-independent effects of oligosaccharides on intestinal epithelial cells: insight into the role of structure and size : Structure-activity relationships of non-digestible oligosaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Peyman; Fink-Gremmels, Johanna; Willems, Rianne H A M; Difilippo, Elisabetta; Schols, Henk A; Schoterman, Margriet H C; Garssen, Johan; Braber, Saskia

    2017-08-01

    The direct effects of galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS), including Vivinal ® GOS syrup (VGOS) and purified Vivinal ® GOS (PGOS), on the epithelial integrity and corresponding interleukin-8 (IL-8/CXCL8) release were examined in a Caco-2 cell model for intestinal barrier dysfunction. To investigate structure-activity relationships, the effects of individual DP fractions of VGOS were evaluated. Moreover, the obtained results with GOS were compared with Caco-2 monolayers incubated with fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) and inulin. Caco-2 monolayers were pretreated (24 h) with or without specific oligosaccharides or DP fractions of VGOS (DP2 to DP6) before being exposed for 12 or 24 h to the fungal toxin deoxynivalenol (DON). Transepithelial electrical resistance and lucifer yellow permeability were measured to investigate barrier integrity. A calcium switch assay was used to study the reassembly of tight junction proteins. Release of CXCL8, a typical marker for inflammation, was quantified by ELISA. In comparison with PGOS, FOS and inulin, VGOS showed the most pronounced protective effect on the DON-induced impairment of the monolayer integrity, acceleration of the tight junction reassembly and the subsequent CXCL8 release. DP2 and DP3 in concentrations occurring in VGOS prevented the DON-induced epithelial barrier disruption, which could be related to their high prevalence in VGOS. However, no effects of the separate DP GOS fractions were observed on CXCL8 release. This comparative study demonstrates the direct, microbiota-independent effects of oligosaccharides on the intestinal barrier function and shows the differences between individual galacto- and fructo-oligosaccharides. This microbiota-independent effect of oligosaccharides depends on the oligosaccharide structure, DP length and concentration.

  3. Arsenic compromises conducting airway epithelial barrier properties in primary mouse and immortalized human cell cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cara L Sherwood

    Full Text Available Arsenic is a lung toxicant that can lead to respiratory illness through inhalation and ingestion, although the most common exposure is through contaminated drinking water. Lung effects reported from arsenic exposure include lung cancer and obstructive lung disease, as well as reductions in lung function and immune response. As part of their role in innate immune function, airway epithelial cells provide a barrier that protects underlying tissue from inhaled particulates, pathogens, and toxicants frequently found in inspired air. We evaluated the effects of a five-day exposure to environmentally relevant levels of arsenic {<4μM [~300 μg/L (ppb] as NaAsO2} on airway epithelial barrier function and structure. In a primary mouse tracheal epithelial (MTE cell model we found that both micromolar (3.9 μM and submicromolar (0.8 μM arsenic concentrations reduced transepithelial resistance, a measure of barrier function. Immunofluorescent staining of arsenic-treated MTE cells showed altered patterns of localization of the transmembrane tight junction proteins claudin (Cl Cl-1, Cl-4, Cl-7 and occludin at cell-cell contacts when compared with untreated controls. To better quantify arsenic-induced changes in tight junction transmembrane proteins we conducted arsenic exposure experiments with an immortalized human bronchial epithelial cell line (16HBE14o-. We found that arsenic exposure significantly increased the protein expression of Cl-4 and occludin as well as the mRNA levels of Cl-4 and Cl-7 in these cells. Additionally, arsenic exposure resulted in altered phosphorylation of occludin. In summary, exposure to environmentally relevant levels of arsenic can alter both the function and structure of airway epithelial barrier constituents. These changes likely contribute to the observed arsenic-induced loss in basic innate immune defense and increased infection in the airway.

  4. Deficiency of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Non-Receptor Type 2 in Intestinal Epithelial Cells Has No Appreciable Impact on Dextran Sulphate Sodium Colitis Severity But Promotes Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Stephanie H; Spalinger, Marianne R; Leonardi, Irina; Gerstgrasser, Alexandra; Raselli, Tina; Gottier, Claudia; Atrott, Kirstin; Frey-Wagner, Isabelle; Fischbeck-Terhalle, Anne; Rogler, Gerhard; Scharl, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 2 (PTPN2) is known to mediate susceptibility to inflammatory bowel diseases. Cell culture experiments suggest that PTPN2 influences barrier function, autophagy and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. PTPN2 knockout mice die a few weeks after birth due to systemic inflammation, emphasizing the importance of this phosphatase in inflammatory processes. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of PTPN2 in colon epithelial cells by performing dextran sulphate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis in PTPN2xVilCre mice. Acute colitis was induced by administering 2.5 or 2% DSS for 7 days and chronic colitis by 4 cycles of treatment using 1% DSS. Body weight of mice was measured regularly and colonoscopy was done at the end of the experiments. Mice were sacrificed afterwards and colon specimens were obtained for H&E staining. For analysis of wound healing, mechanical wounds were introduced during endoscopy and wound closure assessed by daily colonoscopy. Although colonoscopy and weight development suggested changes in colitis severity, the lack of any influence of PTPN2 deficiency on histological scoring for inflammation severity after acute or chronic DSS colitis indicates that colitis severity is not influenced by epithelial-specific loss of PTPN2. Chronic colitis induced the development of aberrant crypt foci more frequently in PTPN2xVilCre mice compared to their wild type littermates. On the other hand, loss of PTPN2-induced enhanced epithelial cell proliferation and promoted wound closure. Loss of PTPN2 in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) has no significant influence on inflammation in DSS colitis. Obviously, loss of PTPN2 in IECs can be compensated in vivo, thereby suppressing a phenotype. This lack of a colitis-phenotype might be due to enhanced epithelial cell proliferation and subsequent increased wound-healing capacity of the epithelial layer. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Three-Dimensional Organotypic Co-Culture Model of Intestinal Epithelial Cells and Macrophages to Study "Salmonella Enterica" Colonization Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Mark; Yang, J; Barilla, J.; Crabbe, A.; Sarker, S. F.; Liu, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional/3-D organotypic models of human intestinal epithelium mimic the differentiated form and function of parental tissues often not exhibited by 2-D monolayers and respond to Salmonella in ways that reflect in vivo infections. To further enhance the physiological relevance of 3-D models to more closely approximate in vivo intestinal microenvironments during infection, we developed and validated a novel 3-D intestinal co-culture model containing multiple epithelial cell types and phagocytic macrophages, and applied to study enteric infection by different Salmonella pathovars.

  6. Na+/H+ Exchanger Regulates Amino Acid-Mediated Autophagy in Intestinal Epithelial Cells

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    Huiying Shi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Dysfunctional autophagy has been reported to be associated with aberrant intestinal metabolism. Amino acids can regulate autophagic activity in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs. Na+/H+-exchanger 3 (NHE3 has been found to participate in the absorption of amino acids in the intestine, but whether NHE3 is involved in the regulation of autophagy in IECs is unclear. Methods: In the present study, an amino acid starvation-induced autophagic model was established. Then, the effects of alanine and proline with or without the NHE inhibitor 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl amiloride (EIPA were evaluated. Autophagy was examined based on the microtubule-associated light chain 3 (LC3 levels, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, tandem GFP-mCherry-LC3 construct, sequestosome-1 (SQSTM1, P62 mRNA and protein levels, and autophagy-related gene (ATG 5, 7, and 12 expression levels. The autophagic flux was evaluated as the ratio of yellow (autophagosomes to red (autolysosomes LC3 puncta. Results: Following amino acid starvation, we found the LC3-II and ATG expression levels were enhanced in the IEC-18 cells. An increase in the number of autophagic vacuoles was concomitantly observed by TEM and confocal microscopy. Based on the results, supplementation with either alanine or proline depressed autophagy in the IEC-18 cells. Consistent with the elevated LC3-II levels, ATG expression increased upon NHE3 inhibition. Moreover, the mCherry-GFP-LC3 autophagic puncta representing both autophagosomes and autolysosomes per cell increased after EIPA treatment. Conclusions: These results demonstrate that NHE (most likely NHE3 may participate in the amino acid regulation of autophagy in IECs, which would aid in the design of better treatments for intestinal inflammation.

  7. Coating with luminal gut-constituents alters adherence of nanoparticles to intestinal epithelial cells

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    Heike Sinnecker

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anthropogenic nanoparticles (NPs have found their way into many goods of everyday life. Inhalation, ingestion and skin contact are potential routes for NPs to enter the body. In particular the digestive tract with its huge absorptive surface area provides a prime gateway for NP uptake. Considering that NPs are covered by luminal gut-constituents en route through the gastrointestinal tract, we wanted to know if such modifications have an influence on the interaction between NPs and enterocytes.Results: We investigated the consequences of a treatment with various luminal gut-constituents on the adherence of nanoparticles to intestinal epithelial cells. Carboxylated polystyrene particles 20, 100 and 200 nm in size represented our anthropogenic NPs, and differentiated Caco-2 cells served as model for mature enterocytes of the small intestine. Pretreatment with the proteins BSA and casein consistently reduced the adherence of all NPs to the cultured enterocytes, while incubation of NPs with meat extract had no obvious effect on particle adherence. In contrast, contact with intestinal fluid appeared to increase the particle-cell interaction of 20 and 100 nm NPs.Conclusion: Luminal gut-constituents may both attenuate and augment the adherence of NPs to cell surfaces. These effects appear to be dependent on the particle size as well as on the type of interacting protein. While some proteins will rather passivate particles towards cell attachment, possibly by increasing colloid stability or camouflaging attachment sites, certain components of intestinal fluid are capable to modify particle surfaces in such a way that interactions with cellular surface structures result in an increased binding.

  8. Effects of polysaccharide from mycelia of Ganoderma lucidum on intestinal barrier functions of rats.

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    Jin, Mingliang; Zhu, Yimin; Shao, Dongyan; Zhao, Ke; Xu, Chunlan; Li, Qi; Yang, Hui; Huang, Qingsheng; Shi, Junling

    2017-01-01

    The intestinal mucosal barriers play essential roles not only in the digestion and absorption of nutrients, but also the innate defense against most intestinal pathogens. In the present study, polysaccharide from the mycelia of Ganoderma lucidum was given via oral administration to rats (100mg/kg body weight, 21days) to investigate its effects on intestinal barrier functions, including the mechanical barrier, immunological barrier and biological barrier function. It was found that the polysaccharide administration could significantly up-regulate the expression of occludin, nuclear factor-κB p65 (NF-κB p65) and secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA) in ileum, markedly improve the levels of interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-2 (IL-2), and IL-4, and decrease the level of diamine oxidase (DAO) in serum. Meanwhile, rats from the polysaccharide group showed significant higher microbiota richness in cecum as reflected by the Chao 1 index compared with the control group. Moreover, the polysaccharide decreased the Firmicutes-to-Bacteroidetes ratio. Our results indicated that the polysaccharide from the mycelia of G. lucidum might be used as functional agent to regulate the intestinal barrier functions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Disruption of the F-actin cytoskeleton and monolayer barrier integrity induced by PAF and the protective effect of ITF on intestinal epithelium.

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    Xu, Ling-fen; Xu, Cheng; Mao, Zhi-Qin; Teng, Xu; Ma, Li; Sun, Mei

    2011-02-01

    To explore whether platelet-activating factor (PAF) can disrupt the intestinal epithelial barrier directly and is associated with structural alterations of the F-actin-based cytoskeleton, and to observe the protective effect of intestinal trefoil factor (ITF), we establish an intestinal epithelia barrier model using Caco-2 cells in vitro. Transepithelial electrical resistance and unidirectional flux of lucifer yellow were measured to evaluate barrier permeability; immunofluorescent staining and flow cytometry were applied to observe morphological alterations and to quantify proteins of the F-actin cytoskeleton: the tight junction marker ZO-1 and Claudin-1 were observed using immunofluorescent staining. PAF significantly increased paracellular permeability, at the same time, F-actin and tight junction proteins were disrupted. It was thought that ITF could reverse the high permeability by restoring normal F-actin, ZO-1 and Claudin-1 structures. These results collectively demonstrated that PAF plays an important role in the regulation of mucosal permeability and the effects of PAF are correlated with structural alterations of the F-actin-based cytoskeleton and of tight junctions. ITF can protect intestinal epithelium against PAF-induced disruption by restricting the rearrangement of the F-actin cytoskeleton and of tight junctions.

  10. Regulation of the epithelial Ca2+ channels in small intestine as studied by quantitative mRNA detection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abel, M. van; Hoenderop, J.G.J.; Kemp, J.W.C.M. van der; Leeuwen, J.P.P.M. van; Bindels, R.J.M.

    2003-01-01

    The epithelial Ca2+ channels TRPV5 and TRPV6 are localized to the brush border membrane of intestinal cells and constitute the postulated rate-limiting entry step of active Ca2+ absorption. The aim of the present study was to investigate the hormonal regulation of these channels. To this end, the

  11. Zinc Supplementation, via GPR39, Upregulates PKCζ to Protect Intestinal Barrier Integrity in Caco-2 Cells Challenged by Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium.

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    Shao, Yu-Xin; Lei, Zhao; Wolf, Patricia G; Gao, Yan; Guo, Yu-Ming; Zhang, Bing-Kun

    2017-07-01

    Background: Zinc has been shown to improve intestinal barrier function against Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium ( S. typhimurium ) infection, but the mechanisms involved in this process remain undefined. Objective: We aimed to explore the roles of G protein-coupled receptor (GPR)39 and protein kinase Cζ (PKCζ) in the regulation by zinc of intestinal barrier function. Methods: A Transwell Caco-2 monolayer was pretreated with 0, 50, or 100 μM Zn and then incubated with S. typhimurium for 0-6 h. Afterward, cells silenced by the small interfering RNA for GPR39 or PKCζ were pretreated with 100 μM Zn and incubated with S. typhimurium for 3 h. Finally, transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER), permeability, tight junction (TJ) proteins, and signaling molecules GPR39 and PKCζ were measured. Results: Compared with controls, S. typhimurium decreased TEER by 62.3-96.2% at 4-6 h ( P 0.1). Silencing GPR39 decreased ( P zinc-activated PKCζ and blocked ( P zinc on epithelial integrity. Furthermore, silencing PKCζ counteracted the protective effect of zinc on epithelial integrity but did not inhibit GPR39 ( P = 0.138). Conclusion: We demonstrated that zinc upregulates PKCζ by activating GPR39 to enhance the abundance of ZO-1, thereby improving epithelial integrity in S. typhimurium- infected Caco-2 cells. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  12. Intestinal Dysbiosis, Barrier Dysfunction, and Bacterial Translocation Account for CKD-Related Systemic Inflammation.

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    Andersen, Kirstin; Kesper, Marie Sophie; Marschner, Julian A; Konrad, Lukas; Ryu, Mi; Kumar Vr, Santhosh; Kulkarni, Onkar P; Mulay, Shrikant R; Romoli, Simone; Demleitner, Jana; Schiller, Patrick; Dietrich, Alexander; Müller, Susanna; Gross, Oliver; Ruscheweyh, Hans-Joachim; Huson, Daniel H; Stecher, Bärbel; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2017-01-01

    CKD associates with systemic inflammation, but the underlying cause is unknown. Here, we investigated the involvement of intestinal microbiota. We report that collagen type 4 α3-deficient mice with Alport syndrome-related progressive CKD displayed systemic inflammation, including increased plasma levels of pentraxin-2 and activated antigen-presenting cells, CD4 and CD8 T cells, and Th17- or IFNγ-producing T cells in the spleen as well as regulatory T cell suppression. CKD-related systemic inflammation in these mice associated with intestinal dysbiosis of proteobacterial blooms, translocation of living bacteria across the intestinal barrier into the liver, and increased serum levels of bacterial endotoxin. Uremia did not affect secretory IgA release into the ileum lumen or mucosal leukocyte subsets. To test for causation between dysbiosis and systemic inflammation in CKD, we eradicated facultative anaerobic microbiota with antibiotics. This eradication prevented bacterial translocation, significantly reduced serum endotoxin levels, and fully reversed all markers of systemic inflammation to the level of nonuremic controls. Therefore, we conclude that uremia associates with intestinal dysbiosis, intestinal barrier dysfunction, and bacterial translocation, which trigger the state of persistent systemic inflammation in CKD. Uremic dysbiosis and intestinal barrier dysfunction may be novel therapeutic targets for intervention to suppress CKD-related systemic inflammation and its consequences. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  13. Krüppel-like factor 5 is essential for proliferation and survival of mouse intestinal epithelial stem cells

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    Mandayam O. Nandan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Krüppel-like factor 5 (KLF5 is a pro-proliferative transcription factor that is expressed in dividing epithelial cells of the intestinal crypt. Leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein coupled receptor 5 (Lgr5 has been identified as a stem cell marker in both small intestinal and colonic epithelial cells. To determine whether KLF5 regulates proliferation of intestinal stem cells, we investigated the effects of Klf5 deletion specifically from the intestinal stem cells in adult mice. Mice with inducible intestinal stem cell-specific deletion of Klf5 (Lgr5-Klf5fl/fl were injected with tamoxifen for 5 consecutive days to induce Lgr5-driven Cre expression. Intestinal and colonic tissues were examined by immunohistochemistry at various time points up to 112 days following start of tamoxifen treatment. Klf5 is co-localized in the crypt-based columnar (CBC cells that express Lgr5. By 11 days following the start of tamoxifen treatment, Lgr5-positive crypts from which Klf5 was deleted exhibited a loss of proliferation that was accompanied by an increase in apoptosis. Beginning at 14 days following the start of tamoxifen treatment, both Klf5 expression and proliferation were re-established in the transit-amplifying epithelial cells but not in the Lgr5-positive CBC cells. By 112 days post-treatment, up to 90% of the Lgr5-positive cells from which Klf5 was deleted were lost from the intestinal crypts. These results indicate a critical role for KLF5 in the survival and maintenance of intestinal stem cells.

  14. Interactions of Giardia sp. with the intestinal barrier: Epithelium, mucus, and microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allain, Thibault; Amat, Christina B; Motta, Jean-Paul; Manko, Anna; Buret, André G

    2017-01-02

    Understanding how intestinal enteropathogens cause acute and chronic alterations has direct animal and human health perspectives. Significant advances have been made on this field by studies focusing on the dynamic crosstalk between the intestinal protozoan parasite model Giardia duodenalis and the host intestinal mucosa. The concept of intestinal barrier function is of the highest importance in the context of many gastrointestinal diseases such as infectious enteritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and post-infectious gastrointestinal disorders. This crucial function relies on 3 biotic and abiotic components, first the commensal microbiota organized as a biofilm, then an overlaying mucus layer, and finally the tightly structured intestinal epithelium. Herein we review multiple strategies used by Giardia parasite to circumvent these 3 components. We will summarize what is known and discuss preliminary observations suggesting how such enteropathogen directly and/ or indirectly impairs commensal microbiota biofilm architecture, disrupts mucus layer and damages host epithelium physiology and survival.

  15. A gene expression programme induced by bovine colostrum whey promotes growth and wound-healing processes in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blais, M; Pouliot, Y; Gauthier, S; Boutin, Y; Lessard, M

    2014-01-01

    Bovine colostrum is well known for its beneficial properties on health and development. It contains a wide variety of bioactive ingredients that are known to promote a number of cellular processes. Therefore the use of colostrum whey as a feed additive to promote intestinal health has been proposed, yet little is known about mechanisms implicated in its beneficial properties on intestinal epithelial cells. In the present paper, casein were removed from bovine colostrum and the remaining liquid, rich in bioactive compounds, was evaluated for its capacity to modulate cellular processes in porcine intestinal epithelial cell line IPEC-J2 and human colon adenocarcinoma cell line Caco-2/15. First, we verified the effect of colostrum whey and cheese whey on processes involved in intestinal wound healing, including cell proliferation, attachment, morphology and migration. Our results showed that colostrum whey promoted proliferation and migration, and decreased specifically the attachment of Caco-2/15 cells on the culture dish. On the other hand, cheese whey induced proliferation and morphological changes in IPEC-J2 cells, but failed to induce migration. The gene expression profile of IPEC-J2 cells following colostrum whey treatment was evaluated by microarray analysis. Results revealed that the expression of a significant number of genes involved in cell migration, adhesion and proliferation was indeed affected in colostrum whey-treated cells. In conclusion, colostrum specific bioactive content could be beneficial for intestinal epithelial cell homoeostasis by controlling biological processes implicated in wound healing through a precise gene expression programme.

  16. Primary culture of intestinal epithelial cells as a potential model for Toxoplasma gondii enteric cycle studies

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    Marcos de Assis Moura

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The primary culture of intestinal epithelial cells from domestic cats is an efficient cellular model to study the enteric cycle of Toxoplasma gondii in a definitive host. The parasite-host cell ratio can be pointed out as a decisive factor that determines the intracellular fate of bradyzoites forms. The development of the syncytial-like forms of T. gondii was observed using the 1:20 bradyzoite-host cell ratio, resulting in similar forms described in in vivo systems. This alternative study potentially opens up the field for investigation into the molecular aspects of this interaction. This can contribute to the development of new strategies for intervention of a main route by which toxoplasmosis spreads.

  17. Loss of Survivin in Intestinal Epithelial Progenitor Cells Leads to Mitotic Catastrophe and Breakdown of Gut Immune Homeostasis

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    Eva Martini

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A tightly regulated balance of proliferation and cell death of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs is essential for maintenance of gut homeostasis. Survivin is highly expressed during embryogenesis and in several cancer types, but little is known about its role in adult gut tissue. Here, we show that Survivin is specifically expressed in transit-amplifying cells and Lgr5+ stem cells. Genetic loss of Survivin in IECs resulted in destruction of intestinal integrity, mucosal inflammation, and death of the animals. Survivin deletion was associated with decreased epithelial proliferation due to defective chromosomal segregation. Moreover, Survivin-deficient animals showed induced phosphorylation of p53 and H2AX and increased levels of cell-intrinsic apoptosis in IECs. Consequently, induced deletion of Survivin in Lgr5+ stem cells led to cell death. In summary, Survivin is a key regulator of gut tissue integrity by regulating epithelial homeostasis in the stem cell niche.

  18. Fusion between Intestinal epithelial cells and macrophages in a cancer context results in nuclear reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Anne E; Anderson, Eric C; Davies, Paige S; Silk, Alain D; Pelz, Carl; Impey, Soren; Wong, Melissa H

    2011-02-15

    The most deadly phase in cancer progression is attributed to the inappropriate acquisition of molecular machinery leading to metastatic transformation and spread of disease to distant organs. Although it is appreciated that metastasis involves epithelial-mesenchymal interplay, the underlying mechanism defining this process is poorly understood. Specifically, how cancer cells evade immune surveillance and gain the ability to navigate the circulatory system remains a focus. One possible mechanism underlying metastatic conversion is fusion between blood-derived immune cells and cancer cells. While this notion is a century old, in vivo evidence that cell fusion occurs within tumors and imparts genetic or physiologic changes remains controversial. We have previously demonstrated in vivo cell fusion between blood cells and intestinal epithelial cells in an injury setting. Here, we hypothesize that immune cells, such as macrophages, fuse with tumor cells imparting metastatic capabilities by transferring their cellular identity. We used parabiosis to introduce fluorescent-labeled bone marrow-derived cells to mice with intestinal tumors, finding that fusion between circulating blood-derived cells and tumor epithelium occurs during the natural course of tumorigenesis. Moreover, we identify the macrophage as a key cellular partner for this process. Interestingly, cell fusion hybrids retain a transcriptome identity characteristic of both parental derivatives, while also expressing a unique subset of transcripts. Our data supports the novel possibility that tumorigenic cell fusion may impart physical behavior attributed to migratory macrophages, including navigation of circulation and immune evasion. As such, cell fusion may represent a promising novel mechanism underlying the metastatic conversion of cancer cells. ©2011 AACR.

  19. Induction of P-glycoprotein expression and function in human intestinal epithelial cells (T84).

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    Haslam, I S; Jones, K; Coleman, T; Simmons, N L

    2008-10-01

    Intestinal induction of Pgp is known to limit the oral availability of certain drug compounds and give rise to detrimental drug-drug interactions. We have investigated the induction of P-glycoprotein (Pgp; MDR1) activity in a human intestinal epithelial cell line (T84) following pre-exposure to a panel of drug compounds, reported to be Pgp substrates, inhibitors or inducers. Human MDR1-transfected MDCKII epithelial monolayers were used to assess Pgp substrate interactions and inhibition of digoxin secretion by the selected drug compounds. The T84 cell line was used to assess induction of Pgp-mediated digoxin secretion following pre-exposure to the same compounds. Changes in gene expression (MDR1, MRP2, PXR and CAR) were determined by quantitative RT-PCR. Net transepithelial digoxin secretion was increased (1.3 fold, n=6, Pfollowing pre-exposure to the PXR activator hyperforin (100nM, 72h), as was MDR1 mRNA expression (3.0 fold, n=4, P<0.05). A number of Pgp substrates (quinidine, amprenavir, irinotecan, topotecan, atorvastatin and erythromycin) induced net digoxin secretion, as did the non-Pgp substrate artemisinin. Various non-Pgp substrates demonstrated inhibition of digoxin secretion (verapamil, mifepristone, clotrimazole, mevastatin, diltiazem and isradipine) but did not induce Pgp-mediated digoxin secretion. Of the compounds that increased Pgp secretion, quinidine, topotecan, atorvastatin and amprenavir pre-exposure also elevated MDR1 mRNA levels, whereas erythromycin, irinotecan and artemisinin displayed no change in transcript levels. This indicates possible post-translational regulation of digoxin secretion. Finally, a strong correlation between drug modulation of MRP2 and PXR mRNA expression levels was evident.

  20. Contribution of intestinal barrier damage, microbial translocation and HIV-1 infection status to an inflammaging signature.

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    Amanda K Steele

    Full Text Available Systemic inflammation is a characteristic of both HIV-1 infection and aging ("inflammaging". Intestinal epithelial barrier damage (IEBD and microbial translocation (MT contribute to HIV-associated inflammation, but their impact on inflammaging remains unclear.Plasma biomarkers for IEBD (iFABP, MT (LPS, sCD14, T-cell activation (sCD27, and inflammation (hsCRP, IL-6 were measured in 88 HIV-1 uninfected (HIV(neg and 83 treated, HIV-1-infected (HIV(pos adults from 20-100 years old.Age positively correlated with iFABP (r = 0.284, p = 0.008, sCD14 (r = 0.646, p = <0.0001 and LPS (r = 0.421, p = 0.0002 levels in HIV(neg but not HIV(pos subjects. Age also correlated with sCD27, hsCRP, and IL-6 levels regardless of HIV status. Middle-aged HIV(pos subjects had elevated plasma biomarker levels similar to or greater than those of elderly HIV(neg subjects with the exception of sCD14. Clustering analysis described an inflammaging phenotype (IP based on iFABP, sCD14, sCD27, and hsCRP levels in HIV(neg subjects over 60 years of age. The IP in HIV(neg subjects was used to develop a classification model that was applied to HIV(pos subjects to determine whether HIV(pos subjects under 60 years of age were IP+. HIV(pos IP+ subjects were similar in age to IP- subjects but had a greater risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD based on Framingham risk score (p =  0.01.We describe a novel IP that incorporates biomarkers of IEBD, MT, immune activation as well as inflammation. Application of this novel IP in HIV-infected subjects identified a group at higher risk of CVD.

  1. Contribution of intestinal barrier damage, microbial translocation and HIV-1 infection status to an inflammaging signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Amanda K; Lee, Eric J; Vestal, Brian; Hecht, Daniel; Dong, Zachary; Rapaport, Eric; Koeppe, John; Campbell, Thomas B; Wilson, Cara C

    2014-01-01

    Systemic inflammation is a characteristic of both HIV-1 infection and aging ("inflammaging"). Intestinal epithelial barrier damage (IEBD) and microbial translocation (MT) contribute to HIV-associated inflammation, but their impact on inflammaging remains unclear. Plasma biomarkers for IEBD (iFABP), MT (LPS, sCD14), T-cell activation (sCD27), and inflammation (hsCRP, IL-6) were measured in 88 HIV-1 uninfected (HIV(neg)) and 83 treated, HIV-1-infected (HIV(pos)) adults from 20-100 years old. Age positively correlated with iFABP (r = 0.284, p = 0.008), sCD14 (r = 0.646, p = LPS (r = 0.421, p = 0.0002) levels in HIV(neg) but not HIV(pos) subjects. Age also correlated with sCD27, hsCRP, and IL-6 levels regardless of HIV status. Middle-aged HIV(pos) subjects had elevated plasma biomarker levels similar to or greater than those of elderly HIV(neg) subjects with the exception of sCD14. Clustering analysis described an inflammaging phenotype (IP) based on iFABP, sCD14, sCD27, and hsCRP levels in HIV(neg) subjects over 60 years of age. The IP in HIV(neg) subjects was used to develop a classification model that was applied to HIV(pos) subjects to determine whether HIV(pos) subjects under 60 years of age were IP+. HIV(pos) IP+ subjects were similar in age to IP- subjects but had a greater risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) based on Framingham risk score (p =  0.01). We describe a novel IP that incorporates biomarkers of IEBD, MT, immune activation as well as inflammation. Application of this novel IP in HIV-infected subjects identified a group at higher risk of CVD.

  2. Fasting protects mice from lethal DNA damage by promoting small intestinal epithelial stem cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinkum, Kelsey L; Stemler, Kristina M; White, Lynn S; Loza, Andrew J; Jeter-Jones, Sabrina; Michalski, Basia M; Kuzmicki, Catherine; Pless, Robert; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S; Piwnica-Worms, David; Piwnica-Worms, Helen

    2015-12-22

    Short-term fasting protects mice from lethal doses of chemotherapy through undetermined mechanisms. Herein, we demonstrate that fasting preserves small intestinal (SI) architecture by maintaining SI stem cell viability and SI barrier function following exposure to high-dose etoposide. Nearly all SI stem cells were lost in fed mice, whereas fasting promoted sufficient SI stem cell survival to preserve SI integrity after etoposide treatment. Lineage tracing demonstrated that multiple SI stem cell populations, marked by Lgr5, Bmi1, or HopX expression, contributed to fasting-induced survival. DNA repair and DNA damage response genes were elevated in SI stem/progenitor cells of fasted etoposide-treated mice, which importantly correlated with faster resolution of DNA double-strand breaks and less apoptosis. Thus, fasting preserved SI stem cell viability as well as SI architecture and barrier function suggesting that fasting may reduce host toxicity in patients undergoing dose intensive chemotherapy.

  3. Acute Acrolein Exposure Induces Impairment of Vocal Fold Epithelial Barrier Function.

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    Xinxin Liu

    Full Text Available Acrolein is a ubiquitous pollutant abundant in cigarette smoke, mobile exhaust, and industrial waste. There is limited literature on the effects of acrolein on vocal fold tissue, although there are clinical reports of voice changes after pollutant exposures. Vocal folds are responsible for voice production. The overall objective of this study was to investigate the effects of acrolein exposure on viable, excised vocal fold epithelial tissue and to characterize the mechanism underlying acrolein toxicity. Vocal fold epithelia were studied because they form the outermost layer of the vocal folds and are a primary recipient of inhaled pollutants. Porcine vocal fold epithelia were exposed to 0, 50, 100, 500, 900 or 1300 μM of acrolein for 3 hours; the metabolic activity, epithelial resistance, epithelial permeability, tight junction protein (occludin and claudin 3 expression, cell membrane integrity and lipid peroxidation were investigated. The data demonstrated that acrolein exposure at 500 μM significantly reduced vocal fold epithelial metabolic activity by 27.2% (p≤0.001. Incubation with 100 μM acrolein caused a marked increase in epithelial permeability by 130.5% (p<0.05 and a reduction in transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER by 180.0% (p<0.001. While the expression of tight junctional protein did not change in acrolein-treated samples, the cell membrane integrity was significantly damaged with a 45.6% increase of lipid peroxidation as compared to controls (p<0.05. Taken together, these data provide evidence that acute acrolein exposure impairs vocal fold epithelial barrier integrity. Lipid peroxidation-induced cell membrane damage may play an important role in reducing the barrier function of the epithelium.

  4. The atopic march: current insights into skin barrier dysfunction and epithelial cell-derived cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hongwei; Roan, Florence; Ziegler, Steven F

    2017-07-01

    Atopic dermatitis often precedes the development of other atopic diseases. The atopic march describes this temporal relationship in the natural history of atopic diseases. Although the pathophysiological mechanisms that underlie this relationship are poorly understood, epidemiological and genetic data have suggested that the skin might be an important route of sensitization to allergens. Animal models have begun to elucidate how skin barrier defects can lead to systemic allergen sensitization. Emerging data now suggest that epithelial cell-derived cytokines such as thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), IL-33, and IL-25 may drive the progression from atopic dermatitis to asthma and food allergy. This review focuses on current concepts of the role of skin barrier defects and epithelial cell-derived cytokines in the initiation and maintenance of allergic inflammation and the atopic march. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. E. coli Nissle 1917 Affects Salmonella adhesion to porcine intestinal epithelial cells.

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    Peter Schierack

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 (EcN has been shown to interfere in a human in vitro model with the invasion of several bacterial pathogens into epithelial cells, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are not known. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of EcN on Salmonella Typhimurium invasion of porcine intestinal epithelial cells, focusing on EcN effects on the various stages of Salmonella infection including intracellular and extracellular Salmonella growth rates, virulence gene regulation, and adhesion. We show that EcN affects the initial Salmonella invasion steps by modulating Salmonella virulence gene regulation and Salmonella SiiE-mediated adhesion, but not extra- and intracellular Salmonella growth. However, the inhibitory activity of EcN against Salmonella invasion always correlated with EcN adhesion capacities. EcN mutants defective in the expression of F1C fimbriae and flagellae were less adherent and less inhibitory toward Salmonella invasion. Another E. coli strain expressing F1C fimbriae was also adherent to IPEC-J2 cells, and was similarly inhibitory against Salmonella invasion like EcN. CONCLUSIONS: We propose that EcN affects Salmonella adhesion through secretory components. This mechanism appears to be common to many E. coli strains, with strong adherence being a prerequisite for an effective reduction of SiiE-mediated Salmonella adhesion.

  6. Characterization of V. cholerae T3SS-dependent cytotoxicity in cultured intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kelly A; Chaand, Mudit; Gregoire, Stacy; Yoshida, Takeshi; Beck, Lisa A; Ivanov, Andrei I; Dziejman, Michelle

    2016-12-01

    AM-19226 is a pathogenic, non-O1/non-O139 serogroup strain of Vibrio cholerae that uses a Type 3 Secretion System (T3SS) mediated mechanism to colonize host tissues and disrupt homeostasis, causing cholera. Co-culturing the Caco2-BBE human intestinal epithelial cell line with AM-19226 in the presence of bile results in rapid mammalian cell death that requires a functional T3SS. We examined the role of bile, sought to identify the mechanism, and evaluated the contributions of T3SS translocated effectors in in vitro cell death. Our results suggest that Caco2-BBE cytotoxicity does not proceed by apoptotic or necrotic mechanisms, but rather displays characteristics consistent with osmotic lysis. Cell death was preceded by disassembly of epithelial junctions and reorganization of the cortical membrane skeleton, although neither cell death nor cell-cell disruption required VopM or VopF, two effectors known to alter actin dynamics. Using deletion strains, we identified a subset of AM-19226 Vops that are required for host cell death, which were previously assigned roles in protein translocation and colonization, suggesting that they function other than to promote cytotoxicity. The collective results therefore suggest that cooperative Vop activities are required to achieve cytotoxicity in vitro, or alternatively, that translocon pores destabilize the membrane in a bile dependent manner. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Characterization of V. cholerae T3SS-dependent cytotoxicity in cultured intestinal epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kelly A.; Chaand, Mudit; Gregoire, Stacy; Yoshida, Takeshi; Beck, Lisa; Ivanov, Andrei I.; Dziejman, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Summary AM-19226 is a pathogenic, non-O1/non-O139 serogroup strain of Vibrio cholerae that uses a Type 3 Secretion System (T3SS) mediated mechanism to colonize host tissues and disrupt homeostasis, causing cholera. Co-culturing the Caco2-BBE human intestinal epithelial cell line with AM-19226 in the presence of bile results in rapid mammalian cell death that requires a functional T3SS. We examined the role of bile, sought to identify the mechanism, and evaluated the contributions of T3SS translocated effectors in in vitro cell death. Our results suggest that Caco2-BBE cytotoxicity does not proceed by apoptotic or necrotic mechanisms, but rather displays characteristics consistent with osmotic lysis. Cell death was preceded by disassembly of epithelial junctions and reorganization of the cortical membrane skeleton, although neither cell death nor cell-cell disruption required VopM or VopF, two effectors known to alter actin dynamics. Using deletion strains, we identified a subset of AM-19226 Vops that are required for host cell death, which were previously assigned roles in protein translocation and colonization, suggesting that they function other than to promote cytotoxicity. The collective results therefore suggest that cooperative Vop activities are required to achieve cytotoxicity in vitro, or alternatively, that translocon pores destabilize the membrane in a bile dependent manner. PMID:27302486

  8. Xenobiotic Receptor-Mediated Regulation of Intestinal Barrier Function and Innate Immunity

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    Harmit S. Ranhotra

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The molecular basis for the regulation of the intestinal barrier is a very fertile research area. A growing body of knowledge supports the targeting of various components of intestinal barrier function as means to treat a variety of diseases, including the inflammatory bowel diseases. Herein, we will summarize the current state of knowledge of key xenobiotic receptor regulators of barrier function, highlighting recent advances, such that the field and its future are succinctly reviewed. We posit that these receptors confer an additional dimension of host-microbe interaction in the gut, by sensing and responding to metabolites released from the symbiotic microbiota, in innate immunity and also in host drug metabolism. The scientific evidence for involvement of the receptors and its molecular basis for the control of barrier function and innate immunity regulation would serve as a rationale towards development of non-toxic probes and ligands as drugs.

  9. Processing of whey modulates proliferative and immune functions in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Duc Ninh; Sangild, Per T; Li, Yanqi; Bering, Stine B; Chatterton, Dereck E W

    2016-02-01

    Whey protein concentrate (WPC) is often subjected to heat treatment during industrial processing, resulting in protein denaturation and loss of protein bioactivity. We hypothesized that WPC samples subjected to different degrees of thermal processing are associated with different levels of bioactive proteins and effects on proliferation and immune response in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC). The results showed that low-heat-treated WPC had elevated levels of lactoferrin and transforming growth factor-β2 compared with that of standard WPC. The level of aggregates depended on the source of whey, with the lowest level being found in WPC derived from acid whey. Following acid activation, WPC from acid whey enhanced IEC proliferation compared with WPC from sweet whey or nonactivated WPC. Low-heat-treated WPC from acid whey induced greater secretion of IL-8 in IEC than either standard WPC from acid whey or low-heat-treated WPC from sweet whey. Following acid activation (to activate growth factors), low-heat-treated WPC from sweet whey induced higher IL-8 levels in IEC compared with standard WPC from sweet whey. In conclusion, higher levels of bioactive proteins in low-heat-treated WPC, especially from acid whey, may enhance proliferation and cytokine responses of IEC. These considerations could be important to maintain optimal bioactivity of infant formulas, including their maturational and immunological effects on the developing intestine. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Transepithelial transport of putrescine across monolayers of the human intestinal epithelial cell line, Caco-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milovic, Vladan; Turchanowa, Lyudmila; Stein, Jürgen; Caspary, Wolfgang F.

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To study the transepithelial transport characteristics of the polyamine putrescine in human intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers to elucidate the mechanisms of the putrescine intestinal absorption. METHODS: The transepithelial transport and the cellular accumulation of putrescine was measured using Caco-2 cell monolayers grown on permeable filters. RESULTS: Transepithelial transport of putrescine in physiological concentrations ( > 0.5 mM) from the apical to basolateral side was linear. Intracellular accumulation of putrescine was higher in confluent than in fully differentiated Caco-2 cells, but still negligible (less than 0.5%) of the overall transport across the monolayers in apical to basolateral direction.EGF enhanced putrescine accumulation in Caco-2 cells by four fold, as well as putrescine conversion to spermidine and spermine by enhancing the activity of S adenosylmethionine decarboxylase. However, EGF did not have any significant influence on putrescine flux across the Caco- 2 cell monolayers. Excretion of putrescine from Caco-2 cells into the basolateral medium did not exceed 50 picomoles, while putrescine passive flux from the apical to the basolateral chamber, contributed hundreds of micromoles polyamines to the basolateral chamber. CONCLUSION: Transepithelial transport of putrescine across Caco-2 cell monolayers occurs in passive diffusion, and is not influenced when epithelial cells are stimulated to proliferate by a potent mitogen such as EGF. PMID:11819759

  11. MDR1 is Related to Intestinal Epithelial Injury Induced by Acetylsalicylic Acid

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    Munehiro Kugai

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Although the cytotoxicity of aspirin against the intestinal epithelium is a major clinical problem, little is known about its pathogenesis. We assessed the involvement of Multi Drug Resistance (MDR 1 in intestinal epithelial cell injury caused by aspirin using MDR1 gene-transfected Caco2 cells. Methods: Caco2 cells were treated with various concentrations of aspirin for 24 h. After treatment of Caco2 cells with verapamil, a specific inhibitor of MDR1, we assessed the extent of cell injury using a WST-8 assay at 24 h after aspirin-stimulation. We performed the same procedure in MDR1 gene-transfected Caco2 cells. To determine the function of MDR1 in the metabolism of aspirin, flux study was performed using 14C-labeled aspirin. Results: The level of aspirin-induced cell injury was higher in verapamil-treated Caco2 cells than in control cells and was less serious in MDR1-transfected Caco2 cells than in control vector-transfected cells. The efflux of 14C-labeled aspirin was higher in verapamil-treated Caco2 cells than in control cells. Conclusion: These data suggest that aspirin effux occurs through the MDR1 transporter and that the MDR1 transporter is involved in the pathogenesis of aspirin-induced cell injury.

  12. Celiac anti-type 2 transglutaminase antibodies induce phosphoproteome modification in intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells.

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    Gaetana Paolella

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Celiac disease is an inflammatory condition of the small intestine that affects genetically predisposed individuals after dietary wheat gliadin ingestion. Type 2-transglutaminase (TG2 activity seems to be responsible for a strong autoimmune response in celiac disease, TG2 being the main autoantigen. Several studies support the concept that celiac anti-TG2 antibodies may contribute to disease pathogenesis. Our recent findings on the ability of anti-TG2 antibodies to induce a rapid intracellular mobilization of calcium ions, as well as extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation, suggest that they potentially act as signaling molecules. In line with this concept, we have investigated whether anti-TG2 antibodies can induce phosphoproteome modification in an intestinal epithelial cell line. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied phosphoproteome modification in Caco-2 cells treated with recombinant celiac anti-TG2 antibodies. We performed a two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by specific staining of phosphoproteins and mass spectrometry analysis of differentially phosphorylated proteins. Of 14 identified proteins (excluding two uncharacterized proteins, three were hypophosphorylated and nine were hyperphosphorylated. Bioinformatics analyses confirmed the presence of phosphorylation sites in all the identified proteins and highlighted their involvement in several fundamental biological processes, such as cell cycle progression, cell stress response, cytoskeletal organization and apoptosis. CONCLUSIONS: Identification of differentially phosphorylated proteins downstream of TG2-antibody stimulation suggests that in Caco-2 cells these antibodies perturb cell homeostasis by behaving as signaling molecules. We hypothesize that anti-TG2 autoantibodies may destabilize the integrity of the intestinal mucosa in celiac individuals, thus contributing to celiac disease establishment and progression. Since several proteins here

  13. Exogenous lysozyme influences Clostridium perfringens colonization and intestinal barrier function in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dan; Guo, Yuming; Wang, Zhong; Yuan, Jianmin

    2010-02-01

    Necrotic enteritis is a worldwide poultry disease caused by the overgrowth of Clostridium perfringens in the small intestine. An experiment with a 2x2 factorial design (supplementation with or without 40 mg lysozyme/kg diet for chickens challenged with or without C. perfringens) was conducted to investigate the inhibitory efficacy of exogenous lysozyme against intestinal colonization by C. perfringens in chickens subject to oral inoculation of C. perfringens type A on days 17 to 20. The C. perfringens challenge resulted in significant increase of C. perfringens, Escherichia coli and Lactobacillus populations in the ileum, bacteria translocation to the spleen, the intestinal lesion scores , There was significantly lower intestinal lysozyme activity in the duodenum and jejunum and weight gain during days 14 to 28 of the experiment. The addition of exogenous lysozyme significantly reduced the concentration of C. perfringens in the ileum and the intestinal lesion scores, inhibited the overgrowth of E. coli and Lactobacillus in the ileum and intestinal bacteria translocation to the spleen, and improved intestinal lysozyme activity in the duodenum and the feed conversion ratio of chickens. These findings suggest that exogenous lysozyme could decrease C. perfringens colonization and improve intestinal barrier function and growth performance of chickens.

  14. Protective Effects of Let-7b on the Expression of Occludin by Targeting P38 MAPK in Preventing Intestinal Barrier Dysfunction

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    Zhihua Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Let-7b was dramatically reduced after a dicer knockout of mice with intestinal barrier function injuries. This paper aims to investigate the molecular mechanism of let-7b by targeting p38 MAPK in preventing intestinal barrier dysfunction. Methods: A total of 186 patients were enrolled, with 93 in the control group and 93 in the PRO group. Only 158 patients completed the entire study, whereas the others either did not meet the inclusion criteria or refused to participate. To further verify the role of let-7b, intestinal epithelial conditional knockout (IKO mice of mmu-let-7b model were established. Serum let-7b, zonulin, IL-6, and TNF-α concentrations were measured by ELISA or quantitative RT-PCR. Permeability assay was done by ussing chamber. The apoptotic cells were identified using an In Situ Cell Death Detection Kit. Protein was detected by western blot. Results: Probiotics can lower infection-related complications, as well as increase the serum and tissue let-7b levels. P38 MAPK was identified as the target of let-7b, as verified by NCM460 cells. P38 MAPK expression was increased, whereas tight-junction (TJ proteins were significantly decreased in let-7b IKO mice (both P<0.05. Negative regulation of p38 MAPK molecular signaling pathways was involved in the protective effects of let-7b on intestinal barrier function. Conclusion: Let-7b was identified as a novel diagnosis biomarker or a potential treatment target for preventing intestinal barrier dysfunction.

  15. Protective Effects of Let-7b on the Expression of Occludin by Targeting P38 MAPK in Preventing Intestinal Barrier Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhihua; Tian, Yinghai; Jiang, Yanqiong; Chen, Shihua; Liu, Ting; Moyer, Mary Pat; Qin, Huanlong; Zhou, Xinke

    2018-01-01

    Let-7b was dramatically reduced after a dicer knockout of mice with intestinal barrier function injuries. This paper aims to investigate the molecular mechanism of let-7b by targeting p38 MAPK in preventing intestinal barrier dysfunction. A total of 186 patients were enrolled, with 93 in the control group and 93 in the PRO group. Only 158 patients completed the entire study, whereas the others either did not meet the inclusion criteria or refused to participate. To further verify the role of let-7b, intestinal epithelial conditional knockout (IKO) mice of mmu-let-7b model were established. Serum let-7b, zonulin, IL-6, and TNF-α concentrations were measured by ELISA or quantitative RT-PCR. Permeability assay was done by ussing chamber. The apoptotic cells were identified using an In Situ Cell Death Detection Kit. Protein was detected by western blot. Probiotics can lower infection-related complications, as well as increase the serum and tissue let-7b levels. P38 MAPK was identified as the target of let-7b, as verified by NCM460 cells. P38 MAPK expression was increased, whereas tight-junction (TJ) proteins were significantly decreased in let-7b IKO mice (both P<0.05). Negative regulation of p38 MAPK molecular signaling pathways was involved in the protective effects of let-7b on intestinal barrier function. Let-7b was identified as a novel diagnosis biomarker or a potential treatment target for preventing intestinal barrier dysfunction. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Protective effect of perioperative recombinant human growth hormone application on intestinal mucosal barrier function in patients with intestinal obstruction and the assessment of immune inflammatory response

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    Jun-Yi Jia

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the protective effect of perioperative recombinant human growth hormone (r-hGH application on intestinal mucosal barrier function in patients with intestinal obstruction and the influence on the immune inflammatory response. Methods: 60 patients with intestinal obstruction who underwent surgical treatment in our hospital between February 2013 and July 2016 were selected as the research subjects and divided into the control group (n=34 who received conventional surgical treatment and the observation group (n=26 who received surgery combined with perioperative r-hGH treatment. The serum levels of intestinal mucosal barrier indexes, immunoglobulin and inflammatory response indicators were compared between two groups of patients before and after treatment. Results: Before treatment, differences in serum levels of intestinal mucosal barrier indexes, immunoglobulin and inflammatory response indicators were not statistically significant between the two groups of patients. After treatment, serum intestinal mucosal barrier indexes Endotoxin, D-Lactate and DAO levels in observation group were lower than those in control group, immunoglobulin IgA, IgM and IgG levels were higher than those in control group, and inflammatory response indicators IL-1, IL-6, PCT and TNF-α levels were lower than those in control group patients. Conclusion: Perioperative r-hGH application in patients with intestinal obstruction can protect the intestinal mucosal barrier, also optimize the humoral immunity and suppress the systemic inflammatory response.

  17. Effect of a Semi-Purified Oligosaccharide-Enriched Fraction from Caprine Milk on Barrier Integrity and Mucin Production of Co-Culture Models of the Small and Large Intestinal Epithelium

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    Alicia M. Barnett

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Caprine milk contains the highest amount of oligosaccharides among domestic animals, which are structurally similar to human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs. This suggests caprine milk oligosaccharides may offer similar protective and developmental effects to that of HMOs. However, to date, studies using oligosaccharides from caprine milk have been limited. Thus, this study aimed to examine the impact of a caprine milk oligosaccharide-enriched fraction (CMOF on barrier function of epithelial cell co-cultures of absorptive enterocytes (Caco-2 cells and mucus-secreting goblet cells (HT29-MTX cells, that more closely simulate the cell proportions found in the small (90:10 and large intestine (75:25. Treatment of epithelial co-cultures with 0.4, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 mg/mL of CMOF was shown to have no effect on metabolic activity but did enhance cell epithelial barrier integrity as measured by trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER, in a dose-dependent manner. The CMOF at the maximum concentration tested (4.0 mg/mL enhanced TEER, mucin gene expression and mucin protein abundance of epithelial co-cultures, all of which are essential components of intestinal barrier function.

  18. Steric and interactive barrier properties of intestinal mucus elucidated by particle diffusion and peptide permeation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgh, Marie; García-Díaz, María; Müllertz, Anette

    2015-01-01

    The mucus lining of the gastrointestinal tract epithelium is recognized as a barrier to efficient oral drug delivery. Recently, a new in vitro model for assessment of drug permeation across intestinal mucosa was established by applying a biosimilar mucus matrix to the surface of Caco-2 cell...

  19. Yogurt inhibits intestinal barrier dysfunction in Caco-2 cells by increasing tight junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putt, Kelley K; Pei, Ruisong; White, Heather M; Bolling, Bradley W

    2017-01-25

    Chronic inflammation disrupts intestinal barrier function and may contribute to the pathology of obesity and other diseases. The goal of this study was to determine the mechanism by which yogurt improves intestinal barrier function. Caco-2 cells were differentiated on Transwell inserts and used as a model of intestinal barrier permeability. Transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and flux of 4 kDa fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran (FD) and lucifer yellow (LY) were used as indicators of monolayer integrity and paracellular permeability. Immunofluorescence microscopy and real time quantitative polymerase chain were used to assess the localization and expression of tight junction proteins known to regulate intestinal permeability. Differentiated cells were treated with a vehicle control (C), inflammatory stimulus (I) (interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, interferon-γ, and lipopolysaccharide), or I and 0.03 g mL -1 yogurt (IY). After 48 h, I reduced Caco-2 TEER by 46%, while IY reduced TEER by only 27% (P effect on barrier function was reduced at latter stages of digestion.

  20. Physiological, Pathological, and Therapeutic Implications of Zonulin-Mediated Intestinal Barrier Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasano, Alessio

    2008-01-01

    The anatomical and functional arrangement of the gastrointestinal tract suggests that this organ, beside its digestive and absorptive functions, regulates the trafficking of macromolecules between the environment and the host through a barrier mechanism. Under physiological circumstances, this trafficking is safeguarded by the competency of intercellular tight junctions, structures whose physiological modulation is mediated by, among others, the recently described protein zonulin. To prevent harm and minimize inflammation, the same paracellular pathway, in concert with the gut-associated lymphoid tissue and the neuroendocrine network, controls the equilibrium between tolerance and immunity to nonself antigens. The zonulin pathway has been exploited to deliver drugs, macromolecules, or vaccines that normally would not be absorbed through the gastrointestinal mucosal barrier. However, if the tightly regulated trafficking of macromolecules is jeopardized secondary to prolonged zonulin up-regulation, the excessive flow of nonself antigens in the intestinal submucosa can cause both intestinal and extraintestinal autoimmune disorders in genetically susceptible individuals. This new paradigm subverts traditional theories underlying the development of autoimmunity, which are based on molecular mimicry and/or the bystander effect, and suggests that the autoimmune process can be arrested if the interplay between genes and environmental triggers is prevented by re-establishing intestinal barrier competency. Understanding the role of zonulin-dependent intestinal barrier dysfunction in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases is an area of translational research that encompasses many fields. PMID:18832585

  1. The intestinal barrier in irritable bowel syndrome: subtype-specific effects of the systemic compartment in an in vitro model.

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    Samefko Ludidi

    Full Text Available Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is a disorder with multifactorial pathophysiology. Intestinal barrier may be altered, especially in diarrhea-predominant IBS (IBS-D. Several mediators may contribute to increased intestinal permeability in IBS.We aimed to assess effects of tryptase and LPS on in vitro permeability using a 3-dimensional cell model after basolateral cell exposure. Furthermore, we assessed the extent to which these mediators in IBS plasma play a role in intestinal barrier function.Caco-2 cells were grown in extracellular matrix to develop into polarized spheroids and were exposed to tryptase (10 - 50 mU, LPS (1 - 50 ng/mL and two-fold diluted plasma samples of 7 patients with IBS-D, 7 with constipation-predominant IBS (IBS-C and 7 healthy controls (HC. Barrier function was assessed by the flux of FITC-dextran (FD4 using live cell imaging. Furthermore, plasma tryptase and LPS were determined.Tryptase (20 and 50 mU and LPS (6.25 - 50 ng/mL significantly increased Caco-2 permeability versus control (all P< 0.05. Plasma of IBS-D only showed significantly elevated median tryptase concentrations (7.1 [3.9 - 11.0] vs. 4.2 [2.2 - 7.0] vs. 4.2 [2.5 - 5.9] μg/mL; P<0.05 and LPS concentrations (3.65 [3.00 - 6.10] vs. 3.10 [2.60-3.80] vs. 2.65 [2.40 - 3.40] EU/ml; P< 0.05 vs. IBS-C and HC. Also, plasma of IBS-D increased Caco-2 permeability versus HC (0.14450 ± 0.00472 vs. 0.00021 ± 0.00003; P < 0.001, which was attenuated by selective inhibition of tryptase and LPS (P< 0.05.Basolateral exposure of spheroids to plasma of IBS-D patients resulted in a significantly increased FD4 permeation, which was partially abolished by selective inhibition of tryptase and LPS. These findings point to a role of systemic tryptase and LPS in the epithelial barrier alterations observed in patients with IBS-D.

  2. Effects of the Probiotic Enterococcus faecium and Pathogenic Escherichia coli Strains in a Pig and Human Epithelial Intestinal Cell Model

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    Ulrike Lodemann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study has been to elucidate the effect of the probiotic Enterococcus faecium NCIMB 10415 on epithelial integrity in intestinal epithelial cells and whether pre- and coincubation with this strain can reproducibly prevent damage induced by enterotoxigenic (ETEC and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC. Porcine (IPEC-J2 and human (Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells were incubated with bacterial strains and epithelial integrity was assessed by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER and mannitol flux rates. E. faecium alone increased TEER of Caco-2 cells without affecting mannitol fluxes whereas the E. coli strains decreased TEER and concomitantly increased mannitol flux rates in both cell lines. Preincubation with E. faecium had no effect on the TEER decrease induced by E. coli in preliminary experiments. However, in a second set of experiments using a slightly different protocol, E. faecium ameliorated the TEER decrease induced by ETEC at 4 h in IPEC-J2 and at 2, 4, and 6 h in Caco-2 cells. We conclude that E. faecium positively affected epithelial integrity in monoinfected Caco-2 cells and could ameliorate the damage on TEER induced by an ETEC strain. Reproducibility of the results is, however, limited when experiments are performed with living bacteria over longer periods.

  3. Effect of Polysaccharides from on Intestinal Mucosal Barrier of Lipopolysaccharide Challenged Mice

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    Jie Han

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the role of polysaccharide from Acanthopanax senticosus (ASPS in preventing lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced intestinal injury, 18 mice (at 5 wk of age were assigned to three groups with 6 replicates of one mouse each. Mice were administrated by oral gavage with or without ASPS (300 mg/kg body weight for 14 days and were injected with saline or LPS at 15 days. Intestinal samples were collected at 4 h post-challenge. The results showed that ASPS ameliorated LPS-induced deterioration of digestive ability of LPS-challenged mice, indicated by an increase in intestinal lactase activity (45%, p<0.05, and the intestinal morphology, as proved by improved villus height (20.84%, p<0.05 and villus height:crypt depth ratio (42%, p<0.05, and lower crypt depth in jejunum (15.55%, p<0.05, as well as enhanced intestinal tight junction proteins expression involving occludin-1 (71.43%, p<0.05. ASPS also prevented intestinal inflammation response, supported by decrease in intestinal inflammatory mediators including tumor necrosis factor α (22.28%, p<0.05 and heat shock protein (HSP70 (77.42%, p<0.05. In addition, intestinal mucus layers were also improved by ASPS, as indicated by the increase in number of goblet cells (24.89%, p<0.05 and intestinal trefoil peptide (17.75%, p<0.05. Finally, ASPS facilitated mRNA expression of epidermal growth factor (100%, p<0.05 and its receptor (200%, p<0.05 gene. These results indicate that ASPS can prevent intestinal mucosal barrier injury under inflammatory conditions, which may be associated with up-regulating gene mRNA expression of epidermal growth factor and its receptor.

  4. Intestinal barrier loss as a critical pathogenic link between inflammatory bowel disease and graft-versus-host disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalle, S C; Turner, J R

    2015-07-01

    Compromised intestinal barrier function is a prominent feature of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, links between intestinal barrier loss and disease extend much further, including documented associations with celiac disease, type I diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and multiple sclerosis. Intestinal barrier loss has also been proposed to have a critical role in the pathogenesis of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), a serious, potentially fatal consequence of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Experimental evidence has begun to support this view, as barrier loss and its role in initiating and establishing a pathogenic inflammatory cycle in GVHD is emerging. Here we discuss similarities between IBD and GVHD, mechanisms of intestinal barrier loss in these diseases, and the crosstalk between barrier loss and the immune system, with a special focus on natural killer (NK) cells. Unanswered questions and future research directions on the topic are discussed along with implications for treatment.

  5. Impairment of intestinal barrier and secretory function as well as egg excretion during intestinal schistosomiasis occur independently of mouse mast cell protease-1.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rychter, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304810584; van Nassauw, L.; Brown, J.K.; van Marck, E.; Knight, P.A.; Miller, H.R.P.; Kroese, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/068352247; Timmermans, J.P.

    2010-01-01

    Deposition of Schistosoma mansoni eggs in the intestinal mucosa is associated with recruitment of mucosal mast cells (MMC) expressing mouse mast cell protease-1 (mMCP-1). We investigated the involvement of mMCP-1 in intestinal barrier disruption and egg excretion by examining BALB/c mice lacking

  6. Transporter mRNA expression in a conditionally immortalized rat small intestine epithelial cell line (TR-SIE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoya, Ken-ichi; Tomi, Masatoshi; Takayama, Megumi; Komokata, Yuko; Nakai, Daisuke; Tokui, Taro; Nishimura, Kenji; Ueda, Masatsugu; Obinata, Masuo; Hori, Satoko; Ohtsuki, Sumio; Amidon, Gordon L; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2004-08-01

    Small intestine epithelial cell lines (TR-SIE), which are established from the small intestine of transgenic rats harboring temperature-sensitive simian virus 40 large T-antigen gene (tsA58 Tg rat), were used to characterize the mRNA expression of small intestine transporters. TR-SIE cells had a polygonal morphology and expressed cytokeratin protein and villin mRNA. Although the large T-antigen was strongly expressed at 33 degrees C, this was reduced at 37 and 39 degrees C. Concomitantly, the cell growth was arrested at 37 and 39 degrees C compared with that at 33 degrees C, suggesting that TR-SIE cells are conditionally immortalized cell lines. RT-PCR analysis revealed that TR-SIE cells expressed ABCB1 (mdr1a and mdr1b), ABCB4 (mdr2), ABCC2 (mrp2), ABCC6 (mrp6), ABCG1, ABCG2 (bcrp/mxr), Slc21a7 (Oatp3), Slc15a1 (PepT1), and Slc16a1 (Mct1). Conditionally immortalized rat small intestine epithelial cell lines were established from tsA58 Tg rats and expressed the mRNA of intestinal transporters.

  7. Flavonoid-mediated inhibition of intestinal ABC transporters may affect the oral bioavailability of drugs, food-borne toxic compounds and bioactive ingredients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, W.; Schutte, M.E.; Williamson, G.; Zanden, J.J. van; Cnubben, N.H.P.; Groten, J.P.; Bladeren, P.J. van; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2006-01-01

    The transcellular transport of ingested food ingredients across the intestinal epithelial barrier is an important factor determining bioavailability upon oral intake. This transcellular transport of many chemicals, food ingredients, drugs or toxic compounds over the intestinal epithelium can be

  8. Oral Administration of Probiotics Inhibits Absorption of the Heavy Metal Cadmium by Protecting the Intestinal Barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Qixiao; Tian, Fengwei; Zhao, Jianxin; Zhang, Hao; Narbad, Arjan; Chen, Wei

    2016-07-15

    The heavy metal cadmium (Cd) is an environmental pollutant that causes adverse health effects in humans and animals. Our previous work demonstrated that oral administration of probiotics can significantly inhibit Cd absorption in the intestines of mice, but further evidence is needed to gain insights into the related protection mode. The goal of this study was to evaluate whether probiotics can inhibit Cd absorption through routes other than the Cd binding, with a focus on gut barrier protection. In the in vitro assay, both the intervention and therapy treatments of Lactobacillus plantarum CCFM8610 alleviated Cd-induced cytotoxicity in the human intestinal cell line HT-29 and protected the disruption of tight junctions in the cell monolayers. In a mouse model, probiotics with either good Cd-binding or antioxidative ability increased fecal Cd levels and decreased Cd accumulation in the tissue of Cd-exposed mice. Compared with the Cd-only group, cotreatment with probiotics also reversed the disruption of tight junctions, alleviated inflammation, and decreased the intestinal permeability of mice. L. plantarum CCFM8610, a strain with both good Cd binding and antioxidative abilities, exhibited significantly better protection than the other two strains. These results suggest that along with initial intestinal Cd sequestration, probiotics can inhibit Cd absorption by protecting the intestinal barrier, and the protection is related to the alleviation of Cd-induced oxidative stress. A probiotic with both good Cd-binding and antioxidative capacities can be used as a daily supplement for the prevention of oral Cd exposure. The heavy metal cadmium (Cd) is an environmental pollutant that causes adverse health effects in humans and animals. For the general population, food and drinking water are the main sources of Cd exposure due to the biomagnification of Cd within the food chain; therefore, the intestinal tract is the first organ that is susceptible to Cd contamination

  9. Persistent Transmissible Gastroenteritis Virus Infection Enhances Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli K88 Adhesion by Promoting Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Lu; Dai, Lei; Yu, Qinghua; Yang, Qian

    2017-11-01

    Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) is a coronavirus characterized by diarrhea and high morbidity rates, and the mortality rate is 100% in piglets less than 2 weeks old. Pigs infected with TGEV often suffer secondary infection by other pathogens, which aggravates the severity of diarrhea, but the mechanisms remain unknown. Here, we hypothesized that persistent TGEV infection stimulates the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and thus enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) can more easily adhere to generating cells. Intestinal epithelial cells are the primary targets of TGEV and ETEC infections. We found that TGEV can persistently infect porcine intestinal columnar epithelial cells (IPEC-J2) and cause EMT, consistent with multiple changes in key cell characteristics. Infected cells display fibroblast-like shapes; exhibit increases in levels of mesenchymal markers with a corresponding loss of epithelial markers; have enhanced expression levels of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-8, transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) mRNAs; and demonstrate increases in migratory and invasive behaviors. Additional experiments showed that the activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways via TGF-β is critical for the TGEV-mediated EMT process. Cellular uptake is also modified in cells that have undergone EMT. TGEV-infected cells have higher levels of integrin α5 and fibronectin and exhibit enhanced ETEC K88 adhesion. Reversal of EMT reduces ETEC K88 adhesion and inhibits the expression of integrin α5 and fibronectin. Overall, these results suggest that TGEV infection induces EMT in IPEC-J2 cells, increasing the adhesion of ETEC K88 in the intestine and facilitating dual infection. IMPORTANCE Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) causes pig diarrhea and is often followed by secondary infection by other pathogens. In this study, we showed

  10. Malaria-Associated l-Arginine Deficiency Induces Mast Cell-Associated Disruption to Intestinal Barrier Defenses against Nontyphoidal Salmonella Bacteremia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Jennifer Y.; Tiffany, Caitlin M.; Nimishakavi, Shilpa; Lawrence, Jessica A.; Pakpour, Nazzy; Mooney, Jason P.; Lokken, Kristen L.; Caughey, George H.; Tsolis, Renee M.

    2013-01-01

    Coinfection with malaria and nontyphoidal Salmonella serotypes (NTS) can cause life-threatening bacteremia in humans. Coinfection with malaria is a recognized risk factor for invasive NTS, suggesting that malaria impairs intestinal barrier function. Here, we investigated mechanisms and strategies for prevention of coinfection pathology in a mouse model. Our findings reveal that malarial-parasite-infected mice, like humans, develop l-arginine deficiency, which is associated with intestinal mastocytosis, elevated levels of histamine, and enhanced intestinal permeability. Prevention or reversal of l-arginine deficiency blunts mastocytosis in ileal villi as well as bacterial translocation, measured as numbers of mesenteric lymph node CFU of noninvasive Escherichia coli Nissle and Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium, the latter of which is naturally invasive in mice. Dietary supplementation of malarial-parasite-infected mice with l-arginine or l-citrulline reduced levels of ileal transcripts encoding interleukin-4 (IL-4), a key mediator of intestinal mastocytosis and macromolecular permeability. Supplementation with l-citrulline also enhanced epithelial adherens and tight junctions in the ilea of coinfected mice. These data suggest that increasing l-arginine bioavailability via oral supplementation can ameliorate malaria-induced intestinal pathology, providing a basis for testing nutritional interventions to reduce malaria-associated mortality in humans. PMID:23690397

  11. The Nucleotide Synthesis Enzyme CAD Inhibits NOD2 Antibacterial Function in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Amy L.; Kabi, Amrita; Homer, Craig R.; García, Noemí Marina; Nickerson, Kourtney P.; NesvizhskiI, Alexey I.; Sreekumar, Arun; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Nuñez, Gabriel; McDonald, Christine

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Polymorphisms that reduce the function of nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)2, a bacterial sensor, have been associated with Crohn’s disease (CD). No proteins that regulate NOD2 activity have been identified as selective pharmacologic targets. We sought to discover regulators of NOD2 that might be pharmacologic targets for CD therapies. METHODS Carbamoyl phosphate synthetase/ aspartate transcarbamylase/dihydroorotase (CAD) is an enzyme required for de novo pyrimidine nucleotide synthesis; it was identified as a NOD2-interacting protein by immunoprecipitation-coupled mass spectrometry. CAD expression was assessed in colon tissues from individuals with and without inflammatory bowel disease by immunohistochemistry. The interaction between CAD and NOD2 was assessed in human HCT116 intestinal epithelial cells by immunoprecipitation, immunoblot, reporter gene, and gentamicin protection assays. We also analyzed human cell lines that express variants of NOD2 and the effects of RNA interference, overexpression and CAD inhibitors. RESULTS CAD was identified as a NOD2-interacting protein expressed at increased levels in the intestinal epithelium of patients with CD compared with controls. Overexpression of CAD inhibited NOD2-dependent activation of nuclear factor κB and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, as well as intracellular killing of Salmonella. Reduction of CAD expression or administration of CAD inhibitors increased NOD2-dependent signaling and antibacterial functions of NOD2 variants that are and are not associated with CD. CONCLUSIONS The nucleotide synthesis enzyme CAD is a negative regulator of NOD2. The antibacterial function of NOD2 variants that have been associated with CD increased in response to pharmacologic inhibition of CAD. CAD is a potential therapeutic target for CD. PMID:22387394

  12. Radioprotection and Cell Cycle Arrest of Intestinal Epithelial Cells by Darinaparsin, a Tumor Radiosensitizer

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    Tian, Junqiang; Doi, Hiroshi [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Saar, Matthias; Santos, Jennifer [Department of Urology, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Li, Xuejun; Peehl, Donna M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Knox, Susan J., E-mail: sknox@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: It was recently reported that the organic arsenic compound darinaparsin (DPS) is a cytotoxin and radiosensitizer of tumor cells in vitro and in subcutaneous xenograft tumors. Surprisingly, it was also found that DPS protects normal intestinal crypt epithelial cells (CECs) from clonogenic death after ionizing radiation (IR). Here we tested the DPS radiosensitizing effect in a clinically relevant model of prostate cancer and explored the radioprotective effect and mechanism of DPS on CECs. Methods and Materials: The radiation modification effect of DPS was tested in a mouse model of orthotopic xenograft prostate cancer and of IR-induced acute gastrointestinal syndrome. The effect of DPS on CEC DNA damage and DNA damage responses was determined by immunohistochemistry. Results: In the mouse model of IR-induced gastrointestinal syndrome, DPS treatment before IR accelerated recovery from body weight loss and increased animal survival. DPS decreased post-IR DNA damage and cell death, suggesting that the radioprotective effect was mediated by enhanced DNA damage repair. Shortly after DPS injection, significant cell cycle arrest was observed in CECs at both G1/S and G2/M checkpoints, which was accompanied by the activation of cell cycle inhibitors p21 and growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible protein 45 alpha (GADD45A). Further investigation revealed that DPS activated ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), an important inducer of DNA damage repair and cell cycle arrest. Conclusions: DPS selectively radioprotected normal intestinal CECs and sensitized prostate cancer cells in a clinically relevant model. This effect may be, at least in part, mediated by DNA damage response activation and has the potential to significantly increase the therapeutic index of radiation therapy.

  13. Radioprotection and Cell Cycle Arrest of Intestinal Epithelial Cells by Darinaparsin, a Tumor Radiosensitizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Junqiang; Doi, Hiroshi; Saar, Matthias; Santos, Jennifer; Li, Xuejun; Peehl, Donna M.; Knox, Susan J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: It was recently reported that the organic arsenic compound darinaparsin (DPS) is a cytotoxin and radiosensitizer of tumor cells in vitro and in subcutaneous xenograft tumors. Surprisingly, it was also found that DPS protects normal intestinal crypt epithelial cells (CECs) from clonogenic death after ionizing radiation (IR). Here we tested the DPS radiosensitizing effect in a clinically relevant model of prostate cancer and explored the radioprotective effect and mechanism of DPS on CECs. Methods and Materials: The radiation modification effect of DPS was tested in a mouse model of orthotopic xenograft prostate cancer and of IR-induced acute gastrointestinal syndrome. The effect of DPS on CEC DNA damage and DNA damage responses was determined by immunohistochemistry. Results: In the mouse model of IR-induced gastrointestinal syndrome, DPS treatment before IR accelerated recovery from body weight loss and increased animal survival. DPS decreased post-IR DNA damage and cell death, suggesting that the radioprotective effect was mediated by enhanced DNA damage repair. Shortly after DPS injection, significant cell cycle arrest was observed in CECs at both G1/S and G2/M checkpoints, which was accompanied by the activation of cell cycle inhibitors p21 and growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible protein 45 alpha (GADD45A). Further investigation revealed that DPS activated ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), an important inducer of DNA damage repair and cell cycle arrest. Conclusions: DPS selectively radioprotected normal intestinal CECs and sensitized prostate cancer cells in a clinically relevant model. This effect may be, at least in part, mediated by DNA damage response activation and has the potential to significantly increase the therapeutic index of radiation therapy

  14. The Bile Acid Receptor GPBAR-1 (TGR5) Modulates Integrity of Intestinal Barrier and Immune Response to Experimental Colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipriani, Sabrina; Mencarelli, Andrea; Chini, Maria Giovanna; Distrutti, Eleonora; Renga, Barbara; Bifulco, Giuseppe; Baldelli, Franco; Donini, Annibale; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    Background GP-BAR1, a member G protein coupled receptor superfamily, is a cell surface bile acid-activated receptor highly expressed in the ileum and colon. In monocytes, ligation of GP-BAR1 by secondary bile acids results in a cAMP-dependent attenuation of cytokine generation. Aims To investigate the role GP-BAR1 in regulating intestinal homeostasis and inflammation-driven immune dysfunction in rodent models of colitis. Methods Colitis was induced in wild type and GP-BAR1−/− mice by DSS and TNBS administration. Potential GP-BAR1 agonists were identified by in silico screening and computational docking studies. Results GP-BAR1−/− mice develop an abnormal morphology of colonic mucous cells and an altered molecular architecture of epithelial tight junctions with increased expression and abnormal subcellular distribution of zonulin 1 resulting in increased intestinal permeability and susceptibility to develop severe colitis in response to DSS at early stage of life. By in silico screening and docking studies we identified ciprofloxacin as a GP-BAR1 ligand. In monocytes, ciprofloxacin increases cAMP concentrations and attenuates TNFα release induced by TLR4 ligation in a GP-BAR1 dependent manner. Treating mice rendered colitic by TNBS with ciprofloxacin and oleanolic acid, a well characterized GP-BAR1 ligand, abrogates signs and symptoms of colitis. Colonic expression of GP-BAR1 mRNA increases in rodent models of colitis and tissues from Crohn's disease patients. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrates that ≈90% of CD14+ cells isolated from the lamina propria of TNBS-treated mice stained positively for GP-BAR1. Conclusions GP-BAR1 regulates intestinal barrier structure. Its expression increases in rodent models of colitis and Crohn's disease. Ciprofloxacin is a GP-BAR1 ligand. PMID:22046243

  15. The bile acid receptor GPBAR-1 (TGR5 modulates integrity of intestinal barrier and immune response to experimental colitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Cipriani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: GP-BAR1, a member G protein coupled receptor superfamily, is a cell surface bile acid-activated receptor highly expressed in the ileum and colon. In monocytes, ligation of GP-BAR1 by secondary bile acids results in a cAMP-dependent attenuation of cytokine generation. AIMS: To investigate the role GP-BAR1 in regulating intestinal homeostasis and inflammation-driven immune dysfunction in rodent models of colitis. METHODS: Colitis was induced in wild type and GP-BAR1(-/- mice by DSS and TNBS administration. Potential GP-BAR1 agonists were identified by in silico screening and computational docking studies. RESULTS: GP-BAR1(-/- mice develop an abnormal morphology of colonic mucous cells and an altered molecular architecture of epithelial tight junctions with increased expression and abnormal subcellular distribution of zonulin 1 resulting in increased intestinal permeability and susceptibility to develop severe colitis in response to DSS at early stage of life. By in silico screening and docking studies we identified ciprofloxacin as a GP-BAR1 ligand. In monocytes, ciprofloxacin increases cAMP concentrations and attenuates TNFα release induced by TLR4 ligation in a GP-BAR1 dependent manner. Treating mice rendered colitic by TNBS with ciprofloxacin and oleanolic acid, a well characterized GP-BAR1 ligand, abrogates signs and symptoms of colitis. Colonic expression of GP-BAR1 mRNA increases in rodent models of colitis and tissues from Crohn's disease patients. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrates that ≈90% of CD14+ cells isolated from the lamina propria of TNBS-treated mice stained positively for GP-BAR1. CONCLUSIONS: GP-BAR1 regulates intestinal barrier structure. Its expression increases in rodent models of colitis and Crohn's disease. Ciprofloxacin is a GP-BAR1 ligand.

  16. Breaking down the barriers: the gut microbiome, intestinal permeability and stress-related psychiatric disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, John R.; Kennedy, Paul J.; Cryan, John F.; Dinan, Timothy G.; Clarke, Gerard; Hyland, Niall P.

    2015-01-01

    The emerging links between our gut microbiome and the central nervous system (CNS) are regarded as a paradigm shift in neuroscience with possible implications for not only understanding the pathophysiology of stress-related psychiatric disorders, but also their treatment. Thus the gut microbiome and its influence on host barrier function is positioned to be a critical node within the brain-gut axis. Mounting preclinical evidence broadly suggests that the gut microbiota can modulate brain development, function and behavior by immune, endocrine and neural pathways of the brain-gut-microbiota axis. Detailed mechanistic insights explaining these specific interactions are currently underdeveloped. However, the concept that a “leaky gut” may facilitate communication between the microbiota and these key signaling pathways has gained traction. Deficits in intestinal permeability may underpin the chronic low-grade inflammation observed in disorders such as depression and the gut microbiome plays a critical role in regulating intestinal permeability. In this review we will discuss the possible role played by the gut microbiota in maintaining intestinal barrier function and the CNS consequences when it becomes disrupted. We will draw on both clinical and preclinical evidence to support this concept as well as the key features of the gut microbiota which are necessary for normal intestinal barrier function. PMID:26528128

  17. the intestinal expulsion of the roundworm Ascaris suum is associated with eosinophils, intra-epithelial T cells and decreased intestinal transit time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masure, Dries; Wang, Tao; Vlaminck, Johnny; Claerhoudt, Sarah; Chiers, Koen; Van den Broeck, Wim; Saunders, Jimmy; Vercruysse, Jozef; Geldhof, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Ascaris lumbricoides remains the most common endoparasite in humans, yet there is still very little information available about the immunological principles of protection, especially those directed against larval stages. Due to the natural host-parasite relationship, pigs infected with A. suum make an excellent model to study the mechanisms of protection against this nematode. In pigs, a self-cure reaction eliminates most larvae from the small intestine between 14 and 21 days post infection. In this study, we investigated the mucosal immune response leading to the expulsion of A. suum and the contribution of the hepato-tracheal migration. Self-cure was independent of previous passage through the liver or lungs, as infection with lung stage larvae did not impair self-cure. When animals were infected with 14-day-old intestinal larvae, the larvae were being driven distally in the small intestine around 7 days post infection but by 18 days post infection they re-inhabited the proximal part of the small intestine, indicating that more developed larvae can counter the expulsion mechanism. Self-cure was consistently associated with eosinophilia and intra-epithelial T cells in the jejunum. Furthermore, we identified increased gut movement as a possible mechanism of self-cure as the small intestinal transit time was markedly decreased at the time of expulsion of the worms. Taken together, these results shed new light on the mechanisms of self-cure that occur during A. suum infections.

  18. the intestinal expulsion of the roundworm Ascaris suum is associated with eosinophils, intra-epithelial T cells and decreased intestinal transit time.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dries Masure

    Full Text Available Ascaris lumbricoides remains the most common endoparasite in humans, yet there is still very little information available about the immunological principles of protection, especially those directed against larval stages. Due to the natural host-parasite relationship, pigs infected with A. suum make an excellent model to study the mechanisms of protection against this nematode. In pigs, a self-cure reaction eliminates most larvae from the small intestine between 14 and 21 days post infection. In this study, we investigated the mucosal immune response leading to the expulsion of A. suum and the contribution of the hepato-tracheal migration. Self-cure was independent of previous passage through the liver or lungs, as infection with lung stage larvae did not impair self-cure. When animals were infected with 14-day-old intestinal larvae, the larvae were being driven distally in the small intestine around 7 days post infection but by 18 days post infection they re-inhabited the proximal part of the small intestine, indicating that more developed larvae can counter the expulsion mechanism. Self-cure was consistently associated with eosinophilia and intra-epithelial T cells in the jejunum. Furthermore, we identified increased gut movement as a possible mechanism of self-cure as the small intestinal transit time was markedly decreased at the time of expulsion of the worms. Taken together, these results shed new light on the mechanisms of self-cure that occur during A. suum infections.

  19. Acetonic Extract from the Feijoa sellowiana Berg. Fruit Exerts Antioxidant Properties and Modulates Disaccharidases Activities in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turco, Fabio; Palumbo, Ilaria; Andreozzi, Paolo; Sarnelli, Giovanni; De Ruberto, Francesca; Esposito, Giuseppe; Basile, Adriana; Cuomo, Rosario

    2016-08-01

    Feijoa sellowiana fruit has been shown to possess various biological activities, such as anti-bacterial and anti-cancer properties, in a variety of cellular models, but its activity on human intestinal epithelial cells has never been tested. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the acetonic extract of F. sellowiana fruits on the viability, membrane peroxidation, disaccharidases activities and proliferation of in vitro models of human intestinal epithelial cells. To obtain this goal, Caco-2 and HT-29 cells were exposed to the acetonic extract for 24 h. Cell proliferation, viability, lactase and sucrase-isomaltase activity and H2 O2 -induced membrane lipid peroxidation were tested. We found that, compared to control conditions, the acetonic extract significantly increased lactase and sucrase-isomaltase activity in Caco-2, but not HT-29, cells, decreased proliferation, had no effects on viability and restored lipid peroxidation in both cell models. This study suggests that the acetonic extract improves lactase and sucrase-isomaltase activity, inhibits cell proliferation, have no cytotoxic effects and prevent lipid peroxidation of intestinal epithelial cells. These effects may be exploited in case of disaccharidases deficit and also as an adjuvant treatment of diseases related to oxidative stress. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Morphogenesis and proliferative rule of porcine transmissible gastroenteritis virus in porcine intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhenhui; Dai, Xianjin; Ye, Cuifang; Li, Yuntian; Wang, Li; Hu, Yang

    2016-12-01

    To gain a better understanding of the replication, proliferation and infection characteristics of porcine transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) in porcine intestinal epithelial cells (IECs), this study established a cell model of IECs infected with the Chongqing (CQ) strain of TGEV. The morphogenesis and proliferative rule of TGEV in porcine IECs were investigated using transmission electron microscopy, indirect immunofluorescence assays and real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR. Observations under the TEM indicated that the enveloped viral particles were roughly spherical, with diameters of between 80 and 120nm. The virions entered porcine IECs by membrane fusion and the mature viruses in the vacuoles were transported to the cell membrane before release. The results also showed that from 0 to 12h after TGEV infection of porcine IECs, the intracellular viral RNA content did not change significantly. Logarithmic growth occurred from 12 to 36h, after which it gradually decreased. Moreover, the extracellular RNA content began to rise at 24h after inoculation and then reduced gradually at approximately 48h. This study provided a theoretical foundation for further study on the infection characteristics of TGEV in target cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Nivalenol induces oxidative stress and increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidant effect in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Regno, Marisanta; Adesso, Simona; Popolo, Ada; Quaroni, Andrea; Autore, Giuseppina; Severino, Lorella; Marzocco, Stefania

    2015-06-01

    Mycotoxins are secondary fungal metabolites often found as contaminants in almost all agricultural commodities worldwide, and the consumption of food or feed contaminated by mycotoxins represents a major risk for human and animal health. Reactive oxygen species are normal products of cellular metabolism. However, disproportionate generation of reactive oxygen species poses a serious problem to bodily homeostasis and causes oxidative tissue damage. In this study we analyzed the effect of two trichothecenes mycotoxins: nivalenol and deoxynivalenol, alone and in combination, on oxidative stress in the non-tumorigenic intestinal epithelial cell line IEC-6. Our results indicate the pro-oxidant nivalenol effect in IEC-6, the stronger pro-oxidant effect of nivalenol when compared to deoxynivalenol and, interestingly, that nivalenol increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidative effects. Mechanistic studies indicate that the observed effects were mediated by NADPH oxidase, calcium homeostasis alteration, NF-kB and Nrf2 pathways activation and by iNOS and nitrotyrosine formation. The toxicological interaction by nivalenol and deoxynivalenol reported in this study in IEC-6, points out the importance of the toxic effect of these mycotoxins, mostly in combination, further highlighting the risk assessment process of these toxins that are of growing concern. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Polyamine regulation of ornithine decarboxylase and its antizyme in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Q; Ray, R M; Viar, M J; Johnson, L R

    2001-01-01

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) is feedback regulated by polyamines. ODC antizyme mediates this process by forming a complex with ODC and enhancing its degradation. It has been reported that polyamines induce ODC antizyme and inhibit ODC activity. Since exogenous polyamines can be converted to each other after they are taken up into cells, we used an inhibitor of S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase, diethylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) (DEGBG), to block the synthesis of spermidine and spermine from putrescine and investigated the specific roles of individual polyamines in the regulation of ODC in intestinal epithelial crypt (IEC-6) cells. We found that putrescine, spermidine, and spermine inhibited ODC activity stimulated by serum to 85, 46, and 0% of control, respectively, in the presence of DEGBG. ODC activity increased in DEGBG-treated cells, despite high intracellular putrescine levels. Although exogenous spermidine and spermine reduced ODC activity of DEGBG-treated cells close to control levels, spermine was more effective than spermidine. Exogenous putrescine was much less effective in inducing antizyme than spermidine or spermine. High putrescine levels in DEGBG-treated cells did not induce ODC antizyme when intracellular spermidine and spermine levels were low. The decay of ODC activity and reduction of ODC protein levels were not accompanied by induction of antizyme in the presence of DEGBG. Our results indicate that spermine is the most, and putrescine the least, effective polyamine in regulating ODC activity, and upregulation of antizyme is not required for the degradation of ODC protein.

  3. Polyamines inhibit the assembly of stress granules in normal intestinal epithelial cells regulating apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Tongtong; Rao, Jaladanki N; Liu, Lan; Xiao, Lan; Cui, Yu-Hong; Jiang, Zhengran; Ouyang, Miao; Donahue, James M; Wang, Jian-Ying

    2012-07-01

    Polyamines regulate multiple signaling pathways and are implicated in many aspects of cellular functions, but the exact molecular processes governed by polyamines remain largely unknown. In response to environmental stress, repression of translation is associated with the assembly of stress granules (SGs) that contain a fraction of arrested mRNAs and are thought to function as mRNA storage. Here we show that polyamines modulate the assembly of SGs in normal intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and that induced SGs following polyamine depletion are implicated in the protection of IECs against apoptosis. Increasing the levels of cellular polyamines by ectopic overexpression of the ornithine decarboxylase gene decreased cytoplasmic levels of SG-signature constituent proteins eukaryotic initiation factor 3b and T-cell intracellular antigen-1 (TIA-1)-related protein and repressed the assembly of SGs induced by exposure to arsenite-induced oxidative stress. In contrast, depletion of cellular polyamines by inhibiting ornithine decarboxylase with α-difluoromethylornithine increased cytoplasmic eukaryotic initiation factor 3b and TIA-1 related protein abundance and enhanced arsenite-induced SG assembly. Polyamine-deficient cells also exhibited an increase in resistance to tumor necrosis factor-α/cycloheximide-induced apoptosis, which was prevented by inhibiting SG formation with silencing SG resident proteins Sort1 and TIA-1. These results indicate that the elevation of cellular polyamines represses the assembly of SGs in normal IECs and that increased SGs in polyamine-deficient cells are crucial for increased resistance to apoptosis.

  4. Splenectomy attenuates severe thermal trauma-induced intestinal barrier breakdown in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiang-dong; Chen, Zhen-yong; Yang, Peng; Huang, Wen-guang; Jiang, Chun-fang

    2015-12-01

    The severe local thermal trauma activates a number of systemic inflammatory mediators, such as TNF-α, NF-κB, resulting in a disruption of gut barrier. The gastrointestinal tight junction (TJ) is highly regulated by membrane-associated proteins including zonula occludens protein-1 (ZO-1) and occludin, which can be modulated by inflammatory cytokines. As splenectomy has been shown to reduce secretion of cytokines, we hypothesized that (1) severe scald injury up-regulates TNF-α and NF-κB, meanwhile down-regulates expression of ZO-1 and occludin, leading to the increased intestinal permeability, and (2) splenectomy can prevent the burn-induced decrease in ZO-1 and occludin expression, resulting in improved intestinal barrier. Wistar rats undergoing a 30% total body surface area (TBSA) thermal trauma were randomized to receive an accessorial splenectomy meanwhile or not. Intestinal injury was assessed by histological morphological analysis, and serum endotoxin levels, TNF-α, NF-κB, ZO-1 and occludin levels were detected by Western blotting in the terminal ileum mucosal tissue. 30% TBSA burn caused a significant increase in serum endotoxin levels, but NF-κB, and TNF-α, and the average intestinal villus height and mucosal thickness were decreased significantly. Burn injury could also markedly decrease the levels of ZO-1 and occludin in terminal ileum mucosal tissue (all PSplenectomy at 7th day after burn significantly reversed the burn-induced breakdown of ZO-1 and occludin (all PSplenectomy may provide a therapeutic benefit in restoring burn-induced intestinal barrier by decreasing the release of inflammatory cytokines and recovering TJ proteins.

  5. Potential in vitro model for testing the effect of exposure to nanoparticles on the lung alveolar epithelial barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Derk

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary barrier function plays a pivotal role in protection from inhaled particles. However, some nano-scaled particles, such as carbon nanotubes (CNT, have demonstrated the ability to penetrate this barrier in animal models, resulting in an unusual, rapid interstitial fibrosis. To delineate the underlying mechanism and specific bio-effect of inhaled nanoparticles in respiratory toxicity, models of lung epithelial barriers are required that allow accurate representation of in vivo systems; however, there is currently a lack of consistent methods to do so. Thus, this work demonstrates a well-characterized in vitro model of pulmonary barrier function using Calu-3 cells, and provides the experimental conditions required for achieving tight junction complexes in cell culture, with trans-epithelial electrical resistance measurement used as a biosensor for proper barrier formation and integrity. The effects of cell number and serum constituents have been examined and we found that changes in each of these parameters can greatly affect barrier formation. Our data demonstrate that use of 5.0 × 104 Calu-3 cells/well in the Transwell cell culture system, with 10% serum concentrations in culture media is optimal for assessing epithelial barrier function. In addition, we have utilized CNT exposure to analyze the dose-, time-, and nanoparticle property-dependent alterations of epithelial barrier permeability as a means to validate this model. Such high throughput in vitro cell models of the epithelium could be used to predict the interaction of other nanoparticles with lung epithelial barriers to mimic respiratory behavior in vivo, thus providing essential tools and bio-sensing techniques that can be uniformly employed.

  6. Breakdown of Epithelial Barrier Integrity and Overdrive Activation of Alveolar Epithelial Cells in the Pathogenesis of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Lung Fibrosis

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    Shigehisa Yanagi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Individual alveolar epithelial cells (AECs collaboratively form a tight barrier between atmosphere and fluid-filled tissue to enable normal gas exchange. The tight junctions of AECs provide intercellular sealing and are integral to the maintenance of the AEC barrier integrity. Disruption and failure of reconstitution of AEC barrier result in catastrophic consequences, leading to alveolar flooding and subsequent devastating fibrotic scarring. Recent evidences reveal that many of the fibrotic lung diseases involve AECs both as a frequent target of injury and as a driver of ongoing pathological processes. Aberrantly activated AECs express most of the growth factors and chemokines responsible for the proliferation, migration, and activation of fibroblasts. Current evidences suggest that AECs may acquire overdrive activation in the initial step of fibrosis by several mechanisms, including abnormal recapitulation of the developmental pathway, defects of the molecules essential for epithelial integrity, and acceleration of aging-related properties. Among these initial triggering events, epithelial Pten, a multiple phosphatase that negatively regulates the PI3K/Akt pathway and is crucial for lung development, is essential for the prevention of alveolar flooding and lung fibrosis through the regulation of AEC barrier integrity after injury. Reestablishment of AEC barrier integrity also involves the deployment of specialized stem/progenitor cells.

  7. Functional and cytometric examination of different human lung epithelial cell types as drug transport barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Kyoung Ah; Rosania, Gus R; Kim, Chong-Kook; Shin, Meong Cheol

    2016-03-01

    To develop inhaled medications, various cell culture models have been used to examine the transcellular transport or cellular uptake properties of small molecules. For the reproducible high throughput screening of the inhaled drug candidates, a further verification of cell architectures as drug transport barriers can contribute to establishing appropriate in vitro cell models. In the present study, side-by-side experiments were performed to compare the structure and transport function of three lung epithelial cells (Calu-3, normal human bronchial primary cells (NHBE), and NL-20). The cells were cultured on the nucleopore membranes in the air-liquid interface (ALI) culture conditions, with cell culture medium in the basolateral side only, starting from day 1. In transport assays, paracellular transport across all three types of cells appeared to be markedly different with the NHBE or Calu-3 cells, showing low paracellular permeability and high TEER values, while the NL-20 cells showed high paracellular permeability and low TEER. Quantitative image analysis of the confocal microscope sections further confirmed that the Calu-3 cells formed intact cell monolayers in contrast to the NHBE and NL-20 cells with multilayers. Among three lung epithelial cell types, the Calu-3 cell cultures under the ALI condition showed optimal cytometric features for mimicking the biophysical characteristics of in vivo airway epithelium. Therefore, the Calu-3 cell monolayers could be used as functional cell barriers for the lung-targeted drug transport studies.

  8. Interferon-γ induces expression of MHC class II on intestinal epithelial cells and protects mice from colitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Thelemann

    Full Text Available Immune responses against intestinal microbiota contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD and involve CD4(+ T cells, which are activated by major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII molecules on antigen-presenting cells (APCs. However, it is largely unexplored how inflammation-induced MHCII expression by intestinal epithelial cells (IEC affects CD4(+ T cell-mediated immunity or tolerance induction in vivo. Here, we investigated how epithelial MHCII expression is induced and how a deficiency in inducible epithelial MHCII expression alters susceptibility to colitis and the outcome of colon-specific immune responses. Colitis was induced in mice that lacked inducible expression of MHCII molecules on all nonhematopoietic cells, or specifically on IECs, by continuous infection with Helicobacter hepaticus and administration of interleukin (IL-10 receptor-blocking antibodies (anti-IL10R mAb. To assess the role of interferon (IFN-γ in inducing epithelial MHCII expression, the T cell adoptive transfer model of colitis was used. Abrogation of MHCII expression by nonhematopoietic cells or IECs induces colitis associated with increased colonic frequencies of innate immune cells and expression of proinflammatory cytokines. CD4(+ T-helper type (Th1 cells - but not group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILCs or Th17 cells - are elevated, resulting in an unfavourably altered ratio between CD4(+ T cells and forkhead box P3 (FoxP3(+ regulatory T (Treg cells. IFN-γ produced mainly by CD4(+ T cells is required to upregulate MHCII expression by IECs. These results suggest that, in addition to its proinflammatory roles, IFN-γ exerts a critical anti-inflammatory function in the intestine which protects against colitis by inducing MHCII expression on IECs. This may explain the failure of anti-IFN-γ treatment to induce remission in IBD patients, despite the association of elevated IFN-γ and IBD.

  9. A bovine mammary endothelial/epithelial cell culture model of the blood/milk barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidry, A J; O'Brien, C N; Douglass, L W

    1998-04-01

    The complex nature of the mammary gland has hampered in-depth studies of the relationship of the circulatory system to cells lining the teat ducts and alveoli of the gland. This study reports an in vitro model of endothelial and epithelial cells separated by a subcellular matrix that simulates the blood milk barrier of the bovine mammary gland. Dual chamber culture dishes with a porous membrane separating the upper and lower chamber were used. Endothelial and epithelial cells were cultured on opposite sides of the porous membrane. A collagen and fibroblast subcellular matrix, separating the 2 cell layers, simulated the in vivo interstitial tissue. Changes in surface binding of anti-bodies to polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) following their migration from the upper to the lower chamber simulated the passage of PMN from blood to milk. Changes in the binding of antibodies to PMN agreed with results observed following the migration of PMN from blood to milk in vivo. This gives credence to the model's potential value for studies where more direct observation of the blood/milk barrier is required. The model will be further tested for its usefulness as an assay for determining: 1) antibiotic diffusion from milk to blood and from blood to milk, 2) cytotoxicity of prophylactic and therapeutic mammary infusion products, 3) factors affecting bacterial adhesion and penetration of mammary epithelial tissue, 4) effectiveness of antibodies present in lacteal secretions in preventing bacterial adhesion, and 5) the feasibility of gene constructs to induce synthesis and secretion of mastitis-preventing compounds and prophylactic and therapeutic compounds for treatment of human disorders.

  10. Tumor necrosis factor alpha increases epithelial barrier permeability by disrupting tight junctions in Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, W; Li, L X; Sun, C M; Wen, Y; Zhou, Y; Dong, Y L; Liu, P

    2010-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) on intestinal epithelial cell permeability and the expression of tight junction proteins. Caco-2 cells were plated onto Transwell microporous filters and treated with TNF-alpha (10 or 100 ng/mL) for 0, 4, 8, 16, or 24 h. The transepithelial electrical resistance and the mucosal-to-serosal flux rates of the established paracellular marker Lucifer yellow were measured in filter-grown monolayers of Caco-2 intestinal cells. The localization and expression of the tight junction protein occludin were detected by immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis, respectively. SYBR-Green-based real-time PCR was used to measure the expression of occludin mRNA. TNF-alpha treatment produced concentration- and time-dependent decreases in Caco-2 transepithelial resistance and increases in transepithelial permeability to the paracellular marker Lucifer yellow. Western blot results indicated that TNF-alpha decreased the expression of phosphorylated occludin in detergent-insoluble fractions but did not affect the expression of non-phosphorylated occludin protein. Real-time RT-PCR data showed that TNF-alpha did not affect the expression of occludin mRNA. Taken together, our data demonstrate that TNF-alpha increases Caco-2 monolayer permeability, decreases occludin protein expression and disturbs intercellular junctions.

  11. Tumor necrosis factor alpha increases epithelial barrier permeability by disrupting tight junctions in Caco-2 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Cui

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α on intestinal epithelial cell permeability and the expression of tight junction proteins. Caco-2 cells were plated onto Transwell® microporous filters and treated with TNF-α (10 or 100 ng/mL for 0, 4, 8, 16, or 24 h. The transepithelial electrical resistance and the mucosal-to-serosal flux rates of the established paracellular marker Lucifer yellow were measured in filter-grown monolayers of Caco-2 intestinal cells. The localization and expression of the tight junction protein occludin were detected by immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis, respectively. SYBR-Green-based real-time PCR was used to measure the expression of occludin mRNA. TNF-α treatment produced concentration- and time-dependent decreases in Caco-2 transepithelial resistance and increases in transepithelial permeability to the paracellular marker Lucifer yellow. Western blot results indicated that TNF-α decreased the expression of phosphorylated occludin in detergent-insoluble fractions but did not affect the expression of non-phosphorylated occludin protein. Real-time RT-PCR data showed that TNF-α did not affect the expression of occludin mRNA. Taken together, our data demonstrate that TNF-α increases Caco-2 monolayer permeability, decreases occludin protein expression and disturbs intercellular junctions.

  12. Reovirus intermediate subviral particles constitute a strategy to infect intestinal epithelial cells by exploiting TGF-β dependent pro-survival signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanifer, Megan L; Rippert, Anja; Kazakov, Alexander; Willemsen, Joschka; Bucher, Delia; Bender, Silke; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Binder, Marco; Boulant, Steeve

    2016-12-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) constitute the primary barrier that separates us from the outside environment. These cells, lining the surface of the intestinal tract, represent a major challenge that enteric pathogens have to face. How IECs respond to viral infection and whether enteric viruses have developed strategies to subvert IECs innate immune response remains poorly characterized. Using mammalian reovirus (MRV) as a model enteric virus, we found that the intermediate subviral particles (ISVPs), which are formed in the gut during the natural course of infection by proteolytic digestion of the reovirus virion, trigger reduced innate antiviral immune response in IECs. On the contrary, infection of IECs by virions induces a strong antiviral immune response that leads to cellular death. Additionally, we determined that virions can be sensed by both TLR and RLR pathways while ISVPs are sensed by RLR pathways only. Interestingly, we found that ISVP infected cells secrete TGF-β acting as a pro-survival factor that protects IECs against virion induced cellular death. We propose that ISVPs represent a reovirus strategy to initiate primary infection of the gut by subverting IECs innate immune system and by counteracting cellular-death pathways. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. [Primary culture of cat intestinal epithelial cell and construction of its cDNA library].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, L; Gui-Hua, Z; Kun, Y; Hong-Fa, W; Ting, X; Gong-Zhen, L; Wei-Xia, Z; Yong, C

    2017-04-12

    Objective To establish the primary cat intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) culture methods and construct the cDNA library for the following yeast two-hybrid experiment, so as to screen the virulence interaction factors among the final host. Methods The primary cat IECs were cultured by the tissue cultivation and combined digestion with collagenase XI and dispase I separately. Then the cat IECs cultured was identified with the morphological observation and cyto-keratin detection, by using goat anti-cyto-keratin monoclonal antibodies. The mRNA of cat IECs was isolated and used as the template to synthesize the first strand cDNA by SMART™ technology, and then the double-strand cDNAs were acquired by LD-PCR, which were subsequently cloned into the plasmid PGADT7-Rec to construct yeast two-hybrid cDNA library in the yeast strain Y187 by homologous recombination. Matchmaker™ Insert Check PCR was used to detect the size distribution of cDNA fragments after the capacity calculation of the cDNA library. Results The comparison of the two cultivation methods indicated that the combined digestion of collagenase XI and dispase I was more effective than the tissue cultivation. The cat IECs system of continuous culture was established and the cat IECs with high purity were harvested for constructing the yeast two-hybrid cDNA library. The library contained 1.1×10 6 independent clones. The titer was 2.8×10 9 cfu/ml. The size of inserted fragments was among 0.5-2.0 kb. Conclusion The yeast two-hybrid cDNA library of cat IECs meets the requirements of further screen research, and this study lays the foundation of screening the Toxoplasma gondii virulence interaction factors among the cDNA libraries of its final hosts.

  14. Effects of biodegradable Mg–6Zn alloy extracts on apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhanhui; Yan Jun; Li Jianan; Zheng Qi; Wang Zhigang; Zhang Xiaonong; Zhang Shaoxiang

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We evaluated the effects of Mg–6Zn alloys on apoptosis of IEC-6 cells. ► The apoptosis was evaluated by investigating the expression of caspase-1 and Bcl-2. ► The IEC-6 cells displayed better cell functions in 60% or 20% extract. ► The conspicuous alkaline environment is disadvantageous to apoptosis of IEC cells. ► The excessive Mg concentration is disadvantageous to apoptosis of IEC-6 cells. - Abstract: In this study, intestinal epithelial cells (IEC)-6 were cultured in different concentration extracts of Mg–6Zn alloys for different time periods. To achieve a total of three concentrations (100%, 60% and 20% concentration), the extracts were serially diluted with Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium High Glucose to observe a dose–response relationship. We studied the indirect effects of Mg–6Zn alloys on IEC-6 cells apoptosis. The apoptosis of IEC-6 cells was measured using flow cytometry. And the apoptosis of IEC-6 cells was evaluated by investigating the expression of caspase-1and Bcl-2 using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blotting tests. It was found that the levels of apoptosis in IEC-6 cells cultured in 100% Mg–6Zn alloy extracts were significantly higher than those in 60% and 20% extracts; the 100% extract can down-regulate expression of Bcl-2 after culture. The in vitro results indicated that the conspicuous alkaline environment and excessive Mg concentration, even Zn concentration caused by rapid corrosion of Mg–6Zn alloys promote IEC-6 cells apoptosis, although further experiments will be necessary to formally prove our conclusions. Therefore, the adjustment of the degradation rate is needed for using Mg–Zn alloy as a surgical suture material.

  15. Serotonergic reinforcement of intestinal barrier function is impaired in irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keszthelyi, D; Troost, F J; Jonkers, D M; van Eijk, H M; Lindsey, P J; Dekker, J; Buurman, W A; Masclee, A A M

    2014-08-01

    Alterations in serotonergic (5-HT) metabolism and/or intestinal integrity have been associated with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). To assess the effects of the precursor of 5-HT, 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP), on mucosal 5-HT availability and intestinal integrity, and to assess potential differences between healthy controls and IBS patients. Fifteen IBS patients and 15 healthy volunteers participated in this randomised double-blind placebo-controlled study. Intestinal integrity was assessed by dual-sugar test and by determining the mucosal expression of tight junction proteins after ingestion of an oral bolus of 100 mg 5-HTP or placebo. Mucosal serotonergic metabolism was assessed in duodenal biopsy samples. 5-HTP administration significantly increased mucosal levels of 5-HIAA, the main metabolite of 5-HT, in both healthy controls (7.1 ± 1.7 vs. 2.5 ± 0.7 pmol/mg, 5-HTP vs. placebo, P = 0.02) and IBS patients (20.0 ± 4.8 vs. 8.1 ± 1.3 pmol/mg, 5-HTP vs. placebo, P = 0.02), with the latter group showing a significantly larger increase. Lactulose/L-rhamnose ratios were significantly lower after administration of 5-HTP (P HTP resulted in a further decrease in occludin expression. Oral 5-HTP induced alterations in mucosal 5-HT metabolism. In healthy controls, a reinforcement of the intestinal barrier was seen whereas such reaction was absent in IBS patients. This could indicate the presence of a serotonin-mediated mechanism aimed to reinforce intestinal barrier function, which seems to dysfunction in IBS patients. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Restoration of impaired intestinal barrier function by the hydrolysed casein diet contributes to the prevention of type 1 diabetes in the diabetes-prone BioBreeding rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, J. T. J.; Lammers, K.; Hoogendijk, A.; Boer, M. W.; Brugman, S.; Beijer-Liefers, S.; Zandvoort, A.; Harmsen, H.; Welling, G.; Stellaard, F.; Bos, N. A.; Fasano, A.; Rozing, J.

    2010-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Impaired intestinal barrier function is observed in type I diabetes patients and animal models of the disease. Exposure to diabetogenic antigens from the intestinal milieu due to a compromised intestinal barrier is considered essential for induction of the autoimmune process leading

  17. Intestinal epithelium in inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet eCoskun

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal epithelium has a strategic position as a protective physical barrier to luminal microbiota and actively contributes to the mucosal immune system. This barrier is mainly formed by a monolayer of specialized intestinal epithelial cells (IECs that are crucial in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. Therefore, dysregulation within the epithelial layer can increase intestinal permeability, lead to abnormalities in interactions between IECs and immune cells in underlying lamina propria, and disturb the intestinal immune homeostasis, all of which are linked to the clinical disease course of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Understanding the role of the intestinal epithelium in IBD pathogenesis might contribute to an improved knowledge of the inflammatory processes and the identification of potential therapeutic targets.

  18. Lychee (Litchi chinensis Sonn.) Pulp Phenolic Extract Provides Protection against Alcoholic Liver Injury in Mice by Alleviating Intestinal Microbiota Dysbiosis, Intestinal Barrier Dysfunction, and Liver Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Juan; Zhang, Ruifen; Zhou, Qiuyun; Liu, Lei; Huang, Fei; Deng, Yuanyuan; Ma, Yongxuan; Wei, Zhencheng; Tang, Xiaojun; Zhang, Mingwei

    2017-11-08

    Liver injury is the most common consequence of alcohol abuse, which is promoted by the inflammatory response triggered by gut-derived endotoxins produced as a consequence of intestinal microbiota dysbiosis and barrier dysfunction. The aim of this study was to investigate whether modulation of intestinal microbiota and barrier function, and liver inflammation contributes to the hepatoprotective effect of lychee pulp phenolic extract (LPPE) in alcohol-fed mice. Mice were treated with an ethanol-containing liquid diet alone or in combination with LPPE for 8 weeks. LPPE supplementation alleviated ethanol-induced liver injury and downregulated key markers of inflammation. Moreover, LPPE supplementation reversed the ethanol-induced alteration of intestinal microbiota composition and increased the expression of intestinal tight junction proteins, mucus protecting proteins, and antimicrobial proteins. Furthermore, in addition to decreasing serum endotoxin level, LPPE supplementation suppressed CD14 and toll-like receptor 4 expression, and repressed the activation of nuclear factor-κB p65 in the liver. These data suggest that intestinal microbiota dysbiosis, intestinal barrier dysfunction, and liver inflammation are improved by LPPE, and therefore, the intake of LPPE or Litchi pulp may be an effective strategy to alleviate the susceptibility to alcohol-induced hepatic diseases.

  19. High-mobility group box 1 impairs airway epithelial barrier function through the activation of the RAGE/ERK pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    HUANG, WUFENG; ZHAO, HAIJIN; DONG, HANGMING; WU, YUE; YAO, LIHONG; ZOU, FEI; CAI, SHAOXI

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) and the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) contribute to the pathogenesis of asthma. However, whether the activation of the HMGB1/RAGE axis mediates airway epithelial barrier dysfunction remains unknown. Thus, the aim of this study was to examine the effects of HMGB1 and its synergistic action with interleukin (IL)-1β on airway epithelial barrier properties. We evaluated the effects of recombinant human HMGB1 alone or in combination with IL-1β on ionic and macromolecular barrier permeability, by culturing air-liquid interface 16HBE cells with HMGB1 to mimic the differentiated epithelium. Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining were utilized to examine the level and structure of major junction proteins, namely E-cadherin, β-catenin, occludin and claudin-1. Furthermore, we examined the effects of RAGE neutralizing antibodies and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitors on epithelial barrier properties in order to elucidate the mechanisms involved. HMGB1 increased FITC-dextran permeability, but suppressed epithelial resistance in a dose-and time-dependent manner. HMGB1-mediated barrier hyperpermeability was accompanied by a disruption of cell-cell contacts, the selective downregulation of occludin and claudin-1, and the redistribution of E-cadherin and β-catenin. HMGB1 in synergy with IL-1β induced a similar, but greater barrier hyperpermeability and induced the disruption of junction proteins. Furthermore, HMGB1 elicited the activation of the RAGE/extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK)1/2 signaling pathway, which correlated with barrier dysfunction in the 16HBE cells. Anti-RAGE antibody and the ERK1/2 inhibitor, U0126, attenuated the HMGB1-mediated changes in barrier permeability, restored the expression levels of occludin and claudin-1 and pevented the redistribution of E-cadherin and β-catenin. Taken together, the findings of our study

  20. Suppressive effect of nobiletin and epicatechin gallate on fructose uptake in human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satsu, Hideo; Awara, Sohei; Unno, Tomonori; Shimizu, Makoto

    2018-04-01

    Inhibition of excessive fructose intake in the small intestine could alleviate fructose-induced diseases such as hypertension and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. We examined the effect of phytochemicals on fructose uptake using human intestinal epithelial-like Caco-2 cells which express the fructose transporter, GLUT5. Among 35 phytochemicals tested, five, including nobiletin and epicatechin gallate (ECg), markedly inhibited fructose uptake. Nobiletin and ECg also inhibited the uptake of glucose but not of L-leucine or Gly-Sar, suggesting an inhibitory effect specific to monosaccharide transporters. Kinetic analysis further suggested that this reduction in fructose uptake was associated with a decrease in the apparent number of cell-surface GLUT5 molecules, and not with a change in the affinity of GLUT5 for fructose. Lastly, nobiletin and ECg suppressed the permeation of fructose across Caco-2 cell monolayers. These findings suggest that nobiletin and ECg are good candidates for preventing diseases caused by excessive fructose intake.

  1. Analysis of the human intestinal epithelial cell transcriptional response to Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus salivarius, Bifidobacterium lactis and Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Putaala, H; Barrangou, R; Leyer, G J

    2010-01-01

    a comparative analysis of the global in vitro transcriptional response of human intestinal epithelial cells to Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM™, Lactobacillus salivarius Ls-33, Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis 420, and enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EHEC). Interestingly, L. salivarius Ls-33......, fundamental differences were observed between the pathogenic and probiotic treatments in the Toll-like receptor pathway, especially for adapter molecules with a lowered level of transcriptional activation of MyD88, TRIF, IRAK1 and TRAF6 by probiotics compared to EHEC. The results in this study provide...

  2. Mice overexpressing CD97 in intestinal epithelial cells provide a unique model for mammalian postnatal intestinal cylindrical growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aust, Gabriela; Kerner, Christiane; Gonsior, Susann; Sittig, Doreen; Schneider, Hartmut; Buske, Peter; Scholz, Markus; Dietrich, Norman; Oldenburg, Sindy; Karpus, Olga N.; Galle, Jörg; Amasheh, Salah; Hamann, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Postnatal enlargement of the mammalian intestine comprises cylindrical and luminal growth, associated with crypt fission and crypt/villus hyperplasia, respectively, which subsequently predominate before and after weaning. The bipartite adhesion G protein-coupled receptor CD97 shows an expression

  3. Glucocorticoid action in human corneal epithelial cells establishes roles for corticosteroids in wound healing and barrier function of the eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadmiel, Mahita; Janoshazi, Agnes; Xu, Xiaojiang; Cidlowski, John A

    2016-11-01

    Glucocorticoids play diverse roles in almost all physiological systems of the body, including both anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive roles. Synthetic glucocorticoids are one of the most widely prescribed drugs and are used in the treatment of conditions such as autoimmune diseases, allergies, ocular disorders and certain types of cancers. In the interest of investigating glucocorticoid actions in the cornea of the eye, we established that multiple cell types in mouse corneas express functional glucocorticoid receptor (GR) with corneal epithelial cells having robust expression. To define glucocorticoid actions in a cell type-specific manner, we employed immortalized human corneal epithelial (HCE) cell line to define the glucocorticoid transcriptome and elucidated its functions in corneal epithelial cells. Over 4000 genes were significantly regulated within 6 h of dexamethasone treatment, and genes associated with cell movement, cytoskeletal remodeling and permeability were highly regulated. Real-time in vitro wound healing assays revealed that glucocorticoids delay wound healing by attenuating cell migration. These functional alterations were associated with cytoskeletal remodeling at the wounded edge of a scratch-wounded monolayer. However, glucocorticoid treatment improved the organization of tight-junction proteins and enhanced the epithelial barrier function. Our results demonstrate that glucocorticoids profoundly alter corneal epithelial gene expression and many of these changes likely impact both wound healing and epithelial cell barrier function. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. IL-33 Signaling Protects from Murine Oxazolone Colitis by Supporting Intestinal Epithelial Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, Amanda; Vallance, Jefferson E; Moore, Preston D; Hummel, Amy T; Wu, David; Shanmukhappa, Shiva K; Fei, Lin; Washington, M Kay; Minar, Phillip; Coburn, Lori A; Nakae, Susumu; Wilson, Keith T; Denson, Lee A; Hogan, Simon P; Rosen, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    IL-33, a member of the IL-1 cytokine family that signals through ST2, is upregulated in ulcerative colitis (UC); however, the role of IL-33 in colitis remains unclear. IL-33 augments type 2 immune responses, which have been implicated in UC pathogenesis. We sought to determine the role of IL-33 signaling in oxazolone (OXA) colitis, a type 2 cytokine-mediated murine model of UC. Colon mucosal IL-33 expression was compared between pediatric and adult UC and non-IBD patients using immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR. OXA colitis was induced in WT, IL-33, and ST2 mice, and histopathology, cytokine levels, and goblet cells were assessed. Transepithelial resistance was measured across IL-33-treated T84 cell monolayers. Colon mucosal IL-33 was increased in pediatric patients with active UC and in OXA colitis. IL-33 and ST2 OXA mice exhibited increased disease severity compared with WT OXA mice. OXA induced a mixed mucosal cytokine response, but few differences were observed between OXA WT and IL-33 or ST2 mice. Goblet cells were significantly decreased in IL-33 and ST2 OXA compared with WT OXA mice. IL-33 augmented transepithelial resistance in T84 cells, and this effect was blocked by the ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98,059. OXA colitis is exacerbated in IL-33 and ST2 mice. Increased mucosal IL-33 in human UC and murine colitis may be a homeostatic response to limit inflammation, potentially through effects on epithelial barrier function. Further investigation of IL-33 protective mechanisms would inform the development of novel therapeutic approaches.

  5. Dietary soy isoflavone attenuated growth performance and intestinal barrier functions in weaned piglets challenged with lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Cui; Wu, Yunpeng; Jiang, Zongyong; Zheng, Chuntian; Wang, Li; Yang, Xuefen; Ma, Xianyong; Gao, Kaiguo; Hu, Youjun

    2015-09-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the protective roles of soy isoflavone in weaned pigs challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). A total of 72 weaned piglets (14 days of age) were randomly allotted into either 0 (control group) or 40 mg/kg soy isoflavone (ISO) supplementation group. On days 7 and 14, half of the pigs in each group were challenged with LPS. Soy isoflavone increased average daily gain (ADG) and average daily feed intake (ADFI) of piglets challenged with LPS at days 7-14 (PSoy isoflavone reduced the incidence of diarrhea and plasma concentrations of endotoxin in piglets challenged with LPS (Psoy isoflavone upregulated (Psoy isoflavone reduced their activations (Psoy isoflavone could partly attenuate the barrier-damaged effects of LPS and improve the intestinal barrier function of weaned piglets, at least partially by inhibiting activations of p38 and TLR4 dependent pathways induced by LPS. This study provides a potential usage of soy isoflavone for alleviating intestinal barrier damages of neonates and piglets. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Transcriptional response of HT-29 intestinal epithelial cells to human and bovine milk oligosaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Jonathan A; O'Callaghan, John; Carrington, Stephen D; Hickey, Rita M

    2013-12-01

    Human milk oligosaccharides (HMO) have been shown to interact directly with immune cells. However, large quantities of HMO are required for intervention or clinical studies, but these are unavailable in most cases. In this respect, bovine milk is potentially an excellent source of commercially viable analogues of these unique molecules. In the present study, we compared the transcriptional response of colonic epithelial cells (HT-29) to the entire pool of HMO and bovine colostrum oligosaccharides (BCO) to determine whether the oligosaccharides from bovine milk had effects on gene expression that were similar to those of their human counterparts. Gene set enrichment analysis of the transcriptional data revealed that there were a number of similar biological processes that may be influenced by both treatments including a response to stimulus, signalling, locomotion, and multicellular, developmental and immune system processes. For a more detailed insight into the effects of milk oligosaccharides, the effect on the expression of immune system-associated glycogenes was chosen as a case study when performing validation studies. Glycogenes in the current context are genes that are directly or indirectly regulated in the presence of glycans and/or glycoconjugates. RT-PCR analysis revealed that HMO and BCO influenced the expression of cytokines (IL-1β, IL-8, colony-stimulating factor 2 (granulocyte-macrophage) (GM-CSF2), IL-17C and platelet factor 4 (PF4)), chemokines (chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (CXCL1), chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 3 (CXCL3), chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 20 (CCL20), chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 2 (CXCL2), chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 6 (CXCL6), chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5 (CCL5), chemokine (C-X3-C motif) ligand 1 (CX3CL1) and CXCL2) and cell surface receptors (interferon γ receptor 1 (IFNGR1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-2 (ICAM-2) and IL-10 receptor α (IL10RA)). The present study suggests

  7. Pilot study of lithium to restore intestinal barrier function in severe graft-versus-host disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gideon Steinbach

    Full Text Available Severe intestinal graft-vs-host disease (GVHD after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT causes mucosal ulceration and induces innate and adaptive immune responses that amplify and perpetuate GVHD and the associated barrier dysfunction. Pharmacological agents to target mucosal barrier dysfunction in GVHD are needed. We hypothesized that induction of Wnt signaling by lithium, an inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase (GSK3, would potentiate intestinal crypt proliferation and mucosal repair and that inhibition of GSK3 in inflammatory cells would attenuate the deregulated inflammatory response to mucosal injury. We conducted an observational pilot study to provide data for the potential design of a randomized study of lithium. Twenty patients with steroid refractory intestinal GVHD meeting enrollment criteria were given oral lithium carbonate. GVHD was otherwise treated per current practice, including 2 mg/kg per day of prednisone equivalent. Seventeen patients had extensive mucosal denudation (extreme endoscopic grade 3 in the duodenum or colon. We observed that 8 of 12 patients (67% had a complete remission (CR of GVHD and survived more than 1 year (median 5 years when lithium administration was started promptly within 3 days of endoscopic diagnosis of denuded mucosa. When lithium was started promptly and less than 7 days from salvage therapy for refractory GVHD, 8 of 10 patients (80% had a CR and survived more than 1 year. In perspective, a review of 1447 consecutive adult HCT patients in the preceding 6 years at our cancer center showed 0% one-year survival in 27 patients with stage 3-4 intestinal GVHD and grade 3 endoscopic appearance in the duodenum or colon. Toxicities included fatigue, somnolence, confusion or blunted affect in 50% of the patients. The favorable outcomes in patients who received prompt lithium therapy appear to support the future conduct of a randomized study of lithium for management of severe GVHD with

  8. A Mathematical Model of the Human Small Intestine Following Acute Radiation and Burn Exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    intestinal lumen Cell Migration Radiation damages proliferating crypt cells, causing mitotic arrest and delaying regeneration Burns can...04-08-2016 Technical Report A Mathematical Model of the Human Small Intestine Following Acute Radiation and Burn Exposures HDTRA1...the small intestine , reducing the density of the gut barrier. A reduced epithelial lining can result in suppressed nutrient absorption, bacterial

  9. Reduced mucin sulfonation and impaired intestinal barrier function in the hyposulfataemic NaS1 null mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, P A; Huxley, S; Gardiner, B; Tran, T; McAuley, J L; Grimmond, S; McGuckin, M A; Markovich, D

    2009-07-01

    Sulfate (SO(4)(2-)) is an abundant component of intestinal mucins and its content is decreased in certain gastrointestinal diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease. In this study, the hyposulfataemic NaS1 sulfate transporter null (Nas1(-/-)) mice were used to investigate the physiological consequences of disturbed sulfate homeostasis on (1) intestinal sulfomucin content and mRNA expression; (2) intestinal permeability and proliferation; (3) dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis; and (4) intestinal barrier function against the bacterial pathogen, Campylobacter jejuni. Intestinal sulfomucins and sialomucins were detected by high iron diamine staining, permeability was assessed by fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran uptake, and proliferation was assessed by 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation. Nas1(-/-) and wild-type (Nas1(+/+)) mice received DSS in drinking water, and intestinal damage was assessed by histological, clinical and haematological measurements. Mice were orally inoculated with C jejuni, and intestinal and systemic infection was assessed. Ileal mRNA expression profiles of Nas1(-/-) and Nas1(+/+) mice were determined by cDNA microarrays and validated by quantitative real-time PCR. Nas1(-/-) mice exhibited reduced intestinal sulfomucin content, enhanced intestinal permeability and DSS-induced colitis, and developed systemic infections when challenged orally with C jejuni. The transcriptional profile of 41 genes was altered in Nas1(-/-) mice, with the most upregulated gene being pancreatic lipase-related protein 2 and the most downregulated gene being carbonic anhydrase 1 (Car1). Sulfate homeostasis is essential for maintaining a normal intestinal metabolic state, and hyposulfataemia leads to reduced intestinal sulfomucin content, enhanced susceptibility to toxin-induced colitis and impaired intestinal barrier to bacterial infection.

  10. Chromatin remodeling mediated by the FOXA1/A2 transcription factors activates CFTR expression in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerschner, Jenny L; Gosalia, Nehal; Leir, Shih-Hsing; Harris, Ann

    2014-04-01

    The forkhead box A transcription factors, FOXA1 and FOXA2, function as pioneer factors to open condensed chromatin and facilitate binding of other proteins. We showed previously that these factors are key components of a transcriptional network that drives enhancer function at the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) locus in intestinal epithelial cells. The CFTR promoter apparently lacks tissue-specific regulatory elements and expression of the gene is controlled by multiple cis-acting elements, which coordinate gene expression in different cell types. Here we show that concurrent depletion of FOXA1 and FOXA2 represses CFTR expression and alters the three-dimensional architecture of the active locus by diminishing interactions between the promoter and intronic cis-acting elements. Reduction of FOXA1/A2 also modifies the enrichment profile of the active enhancer marks H3K27ac and H3K4me2 across the CFTR locus and alters chromatin accessibility at individual cis-elements. Moreover, loss of FOXA1/A2 suppresses the recruitment of other members of the transcriptional network including HNF1 and CDX2, to multiple cis-elements. These data reveal a complex molecular mechanism underlying the role of FOXA1/A2 in achieving high levels of CFTR expression in intestinal epithelial cells.

  11. Butyrate Produced by Commensal Bacteria Potentiates Phorbol Esters Induced AP-1 Response in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepelska, Malgorzata; Cultrone, Antonietta; Béguet-Crespel, Fabienne; Le Roux, Karine; Doré, Joël; Arulampalam, Vermulugesan; Blottière, Hervé M.

    2012-01-01

    The human intestine is a balanced ecosystem well suited for bacterial survival, colonization and growth, which has evolved to be beneficial both for the host and the commensal bacteria. Here, we investigated the effect of bacterial metabolites produced by commensal bacteria on AP-1 signaling pathway, which has a plethora of effects on host physiology. Using intestinal epithelial cell lines, HT-29 and Caco-2, stably transfected with AP-1-dependent luciferase reporter gene, we tested the effect of culture supernatant from 49 commensal strains. We observed that several bacteria were able to activate the AP-1 pathway and this was correlated to the amount of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) produced. Besides being a major source of energy for epithelial cells, SCFAs have been shown to regulate several signaling pathways in these cells. We show that propionate and butyrate are potent activators of the AP-1 pathway, butyrate being the more efficient of the two. We also observed a strong synergistic activation of AP-1 pathway when using butyrate with PMA, a PKC activator. Moreover, butyrate enhanced the PMA-induced expression of c-fos and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, but not p38 and JNK. In conclusion, we showed that SCFAs especially butyrate regulate the AP-1 signaling pathway, a feature that may contribute to the physiological impact of the gut microbiota on the host. Our results provide support for the involvement of butyrate in modulating the action of PKC in colon cancer cells. PMID:23300800

  12. Lipoteichoic Acid of Probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum Attenuates Poly I:C-Induced IL-8 Production in Porcine Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung Whun Kim

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics in livestock feed supplements are considered a replacement for antibiotics that enhance gastrointestinal immunity. Although bacterial cell wall components have been proposed to be associated with probiotic function, little evidence demonstrates that they are responsible for probiotic functions in livestock. The present study demonstrated that lipoteichoic acid (LTA of Lactobacillus plantarum (Lp.LTA confers anti-inflammatory responses in porcine intestinal epithelial cell line, IPEC-J2. A synthetic analog of viral double-stranded RNA, poly I:C, dose-dependently induced IL-8 production at the mRNA and protein levels in IPEC-J2 cells. Lp.LTA, but not lipoprotein or peptidoglycan from L. plantarum, exclusively suppressed poly I:C-induced IL-8 production. Compared with LTAs from other probiotic Lactobacillus strains including L. delbrueckii, L. sakei, and L. rhamnosus GG, Lp.LTA had higher potential to suppress poly I:C-induced IL-8 production. Dealanylated or deacylated Lp.LTA did not suppress poly I:C-induced IL-8 production, suggesting that D-alanine and lipid moieties in the Lp.LTA structure were responsible for the inhibition. Furthermore, Lp.LTA attenuated the phosphorylation of ERK and p38 kinase as well as the activation of NF-κB, resulting in decreased IL-8 production. Taken together, these results suggest that Lp.LTA acts as an effector molecule to inhibit viral pathogen-induced inflammatory responses in porcine intestinal epithelial cells.

  13. Kefir-isolated bacteria and yeasts inhibit Shigella flexneri invasion and modulate pro-inflammatory response on intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolla, P A; Abraham, A G; Pérez, P F; de Los Angeles Serradell, M

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the ability of a kefir-isolated microbial mixture containing three bacterial and two yeast strains (MM) to protect intestinal epithelial cells against Shigella flexneri invasion, as well as to analyse the effect on pro-inflammatory response elicited by this pathogen. A significant decrease in S. flexneri strain 72 invasion was observed on both HT-29 and Caco-2 cells pre-incubated with MM. Pre-incubation with the individual strains Saccharomyces cerevisiae CIDCA 8112 or Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis CIDCA 8221 also reduced the internalisation of S. flexneri into HT-29 cells although in a lesser extent than MM. Interestingly, Lactobacillus plantarum CIDCA 83114 exerted a protective effect on the invasion of Caco-2 and HT-29 cells by S. flexneri. Regarding the pro-inflammatory response on HT-29 cells, S. flexneri infection induced a significant activation of the expression of interleukin 8 (IL-8), chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 20 (CCL20) and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) encoding genes (Pkefir, resulted in inhibition of S. flexneri internalisation into human intestinal epithelial cells, along with the inhibition of the signalling via NF-κB that in turn led to the attenuation of the inflammatory response.

  14. Influence of Physicochemical Properties and PEG Modification of Magnetic Liposomes on Their Interaction with Intestinal Epithelial Caco-2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Yusuke; Jinzai, Hitomi; Kotera, Yota; Fujita, Takuya

    2017-12-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effect of particle size (100, 500 nm), surface charge (cationic, neutral and anionic) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) modification of magnetic liposomes on their interaction with the human intestinal epithelial cell line, Caco-2. The cellular associated amount of all the magnetic liposomes was significantly increased by the presence of a magnetic field. The highest association and internalization into Caco-2 cells was observed with magnetic cationic liposomes. Moreover, small magnetic liposomes were more efficiently associated and taken up into the cells, than large ones. In contrast, PEG modification significantly attenuated the enhancing effect of the magnetic field on the cellular association of magnetic liposomes. We also found that magnetic cationic liposomes had the highest retention properties to Caco-2 cells. Moreover, the retention of large magnetic liposomes to the cells was much longer than that of small ones. In addition, magnetic cationic and neutral liposomes had relatively high stability in Caco-2 cells, whereas magnetic anionic liposomes rapidly degraded. These results indicate that the physicochemical properties and PEG modification of magnetic liposomes greatly influences their intestinal epithelial transport.

  15. Transcriptional regulation of the human Na+/H+ exchanger NHE3 by serotonin in intestinal epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, Md Ruhul; Ghannad, Leda; Othman, Ahmad; Gill, Ravinder K.; Dudeja, Pradeep K.; Ramaswamy, Krishnamurthy; Malakooti, Jaleh

    2009-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) decreases NHE2 and NHE3 activities under acute conditions in human intestinal epithelial cells. Here, we have investigated the effects of 5-HT on expression of the human NHE3 gene and the mechanisms underlying its transcriptional regulation in differentiated C2BBe1 cells. Treatment of the human intestinal epithelial cell line, C2BBe1, with 5-HT (20 μM) resulted in a significant decrease in NHE3 mRNA and protein expression. In transient transfection studies, 5-HT repressed the NHE3 promoter activity by ∼55%. The repression of the NHE3 promoter activity in response to 5-HT was accompanied by reduced DNA-binding activity of transcription factors Sp1 and Sp3 to the NHE3 promoter without alteration in their nuclear levels. Pharmacological inhibitors of protein kinase C reversed the inhibitory effect of 5-HT on the promoter activity. Our data indicate that 5-HT suppresses the transcriptional activity of the NHE3 promoter and this effect may be mediated by PKCα and modulation of DNA-binding affinities of Sp1 and Sp3.

  16. Dietary Bacillus subtilis-based direct-fed microbials alleviate LPS-induced intestinal immunological stress and improve intestinal barrier gene expression in commercial broiler chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present study investigated the effects of B. subtilis-based probiotics on performance, modulation of host inflammatory responses and intestinal barrier integrity of broilers subjected to LPS challenge. Birds at day 0 of age were randomly allocated to one of the 3 dietary treatments - controls, ...

  17. Host-dependent zonulin secretion causes the impairment of the small intestine barrier function after bacterial exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Asmar, Ramzi; Panigrahi, Pinaki; Bamford, Penelope; Berti, Irene; Not, Tarcisio; Coppa, Giovanni V; Catassi, Carlo; Fasano, Alessio; El Asmar, Rahzi

    2002-11-01

    Enteric infections have been implicated in the pathogenesis of both food intolerance and autoimmune diseases secondary to the impairment of the intestinal barrier. On the basis of our recent discovery of zonulin, a modulator of small-intestinal tight junctions, we asked whether microorganisms might induce zonulin secretion and increased small-intestinal permeability. Both ex vivo mammalian small intestines and intestinal cell monolayers were exposed to either pathogenic or nonpathogenic enterobacteria. Zonulin production and changes in paracellular permeability were monitored in Ussing chambers and micro-snapwells. Zonula occludens 1 protein redistribution after bacteria colonization was evaluated on cell monolayers. Small intestines exposed to enteric bacteria secreted zonulin. This secretion was independent of either the species of the small intestines or the virulence of the microorganisms tested, occurred only on the luminal aspect of the bacteria-exposed small-intestinal mucosa, and was followed by a decrease in small-intestinal tissue resistance (transepithelial electrical resistance). The transepithelial electrical resistance decrement was secondary to the zonulin-induced tight junction disassembly, as also shown by the disengagement of the protein zonula occludens 1 protein from the tight junctional complex. This zonulin-driven opening of the paracellular pathway may represent a defensive mechanism, which flushes out microorganisms and contributes to the host response against bacterial colonization of the small intestine.

  18. Effect of breast milk and weaning on epithelial growth of the small intestine in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Cummins, A G; Thompson, F M

    2002-01-01

    Breast feeding and weaning are important physiologically significant luminal events that influence the growth of the small intestine in humans. A variety of factors including genetic preprogramming, systemic and local hormones, and permissive factors contribute and modulate intestinal growth. Here, we offer a view that integrates some of these factors, especially those relating to breast feeding and weaning.

  19. Effect of breast milk and weaning on epithelial growth of the small intestine in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, A G; Thompson, F M

    2002-11-01

    Breast feeding and weaning are important physiologically significant luminal events that influence the growth of the small intestine in humans. A variety of factors including genetic preprogramming, systemic and local hormones, and permissive factors contribute and modulate intestinal growth. Here, we offer a view that integrates some of these factors, especially those relating to breast feeding and weaning.

  20. Lactobacillus reuteri strains protect epithelial barrier integrity of IPEC-J2 monolayers from the detrimental effect of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Shokoufeh; Jonsson, Hans; Lundh, Torbjörn; Roos, Stefan

    2018-01-01

    Lactobacillus reuteri is an inhabitant of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of mammals and birds and several strains of this species are known to be effective probiotics. The mechanisms by which L. reuteri confers its health-promoting effects are far from being fully understood, but protection of the mucosal barrier is thought to be important. Leaky gut is a state of abnormal intestinal permeability with implications for the pathophysiology of various gastrointestinal disorders. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) can invade the intestinal mucosa and induce changes in barrier function by producing enterotoxin or by direct invasion of the intestinal epithelium. Our hypothesis was that L. reuteri can protect the mucosal barrier, and the goal of the study was to challenge this hypothesis by monitoring the protective effect of L. reuteri strains on epithelial dysfunction caused by ETEC. Using an infection model based on the porcine intestinal cell line IPEC-J2, it was demonstrated that pretreatment of the cells with human-derived L. reuteri strains (ATCC PTA 6475, DSM 17938 and 1563F) and a rat strain (R2LC) reduced the detrimental effect of ETEC in a dose-dependent manner, as monitored by permeability of FITC-dextran and transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER). Moreover, the results revealed that ETEC upregulated proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNFα and decreased expression of the shorter isoform of ZO-1 (187 kDa) and E-cadherin. In contrast, pretreatment with L. reuteri DSM 17938 and 1563F downregulated expression of IL-6 and TNFα, and led to an increase in production of the longer isoform of ZO-1 (195 kDa) and maintained E-cadherin expression. Interestingly, expression of ZO-1 (187 kDa) was preserved only when the infected cells were pretreated with strain 1563F. These findings demonstrate that L. reuteri strains exert a protective effect against ETEC-induced mucosal integrity disruption. © 2018 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by

  1. Increased production of the ether-lipid platelet-activating factor in intestinal epithelial cells infected by Salmonella enteritidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea, Laia; Giménez, Rosa; Lúcia, David; Modolell, Ines; Badía, Josefa; Baldoma, Laura; Aguilar, Juan

    2008-05-01

    When exposed to enteric pathogens intestinal epithelial cells produce several cytokines and other proinflammatory mediators. To date there is no evidence that the ether-lipid platelet-activating factor (PAF) is one of these mediators. Our results revealed a significant increase in PAF production by human colonic tissue 4 h after infection by enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) or Salmonella enteritidis. PAF is produced in the gut by cells of the immune system in response to bacterial infection. To determine whether the epithelial cells of colonic mucosa might also modulate PAF levels, we carried out PAF quantification and analysis of the enzymes involved in PAF synthesis in 5-day-old (undifferentiated) or 28-day-old (differentiated) Caco-2 cell cultures. Infection of undifferentiated Caco-2 cells with either bacterium had no effect on PAF levels, whereas in differentiated cells, infection by S. enteritidis increased PAF levels. Following infection by S. enteritidis, there were no changes in the activity of dithiothreitol-insensitive choline phosphotransferase. However, the enzymes of the remodeling pathway cytosolic phospholipase A(2), which catalyzes the formation of the PAF precursor lysoPAF, and lysoPAF acetyltransferase, are activated in the infected epithelial cells. This response is Ca(2+)-dependent.

  2. The Bacterial Species Campylobacter jejuni Induce Diverse Innate Immune Responses in Human and Avian Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A. John

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter remain the major cause of human gastroenteritis in the Developed World causing a significant burden to health services. Campylobacter are pathogens in humans and chickens, although differences in mechanistic understanding are incomplete, in part because phenotypic strain diversity creates inconsistent findings. Here, we took Campylobacter jejuni isolates (n = 100 from multi-locus sequence typed collections to assess their pathogenic diversity, through their inflammatory, cytotoxicity, adhesion, invasion and signaling responses in a high-throughput model using avian and human intestinal epithelial cells. C. jejuni induced IL-8 and CXCLi1/2 in human and avian epithelial cells, respectively, in a MAP kinase-dependent manner. In contrast, IL-10 responses in both cell types were PI 3-kinase/Akt-dependent. C. jejuni strains showed diverse levels of invasion with high invasion dependent on MAP kinase signaling in both cell lines. C. jejuni induced diverse cytotoxic responses in both cell lines with cdt-positive isolates showing significantly higher toxicity. Blockade of endocytic pathways suggested that invasion by C. jejuni was clathrin- and dynamin-dependent but caveolae- independent in both cells. In contrast, IL-8 (and CXCLi1/2 production was dependent on clathrin, dynamin, and caveolae. This study is important because of its scale, and the data produced, suggesting that avian and human epithelial cells use similar innate immune pathways where the magnitude of the response is determined by the phenotypic diversity of the Campylobacter species.

  3. Naturally Occurring Deletion Mutants of the Pig-Specific, Intestinal Crypt Epithelial Cell Protein CLCA4b without Apparent Phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Plog

    Full Text Available The human CLCA4 (chloride channel regulator, calcium-activated modulates the intestinal phenotype of cystic fibrosis (CF patients via an as yet unknown pathway. With the generation of new porcine CF models, species-specific differences between human modifiers of CF and their porcine orthologs are considered critical for the translation of experimental data. Specifically, the porcine ortholog to the human CF modulator gene CLCA4 has recently been shown to be duplicated into two separate genes, CLCA4a and CLCA4b. Here, we characterize the duplication product, CLCA4b, in terms of its genomic structure, tissue and cellular expression patterns as well as its in vitro electrophysiological properties. The CLCA4b gene is a pig-specific duplication product of the CLCA4 ancestor and its protein is exclusively expressed in small and large intestinal crypt epithelial cells, a niche specifically occupied by no other porcine CLCA family member. Surprisingly, a unique deleterious mutation of the CLCA4b gene is spread among modern and ancient breeds in the pig population, but this mutation did not result in an apparent phenotype in homozygously affected animals. Electrophysiologically, neither the products of the wild type nor of the mutated CLCA4b genes were able to evoke a calcium-activated anion conductance, a consensus feature of other CLCA proteins. The apparently pig-specific duplication of the CLCA4 gene with unique expression of the CLCA4b protein variant in intestinal crypt epithelial cells where the porcine CFTR is also present raises the question of whether it may modulate the porcine CF phenotype. Moreover, the naturally occurring null variant of CLCA4b will be valuable for the understanding of CLCA protein function and their relevance in modulating the CF phenotype.

  4. Low Dosage of Chitosan Supplementation Improves Intestinal Permeability and Impairs Barrier Function in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guiping Guan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to explore relationships between low dose dietary supplementation with chitosan (COS and body weight, feed intake, intestinal barrier function, and permeability in mice. Twenty mice were randomly assigned to receive an unadulterated control diet (control group or a dietary supplementation with 30 mg/kg dose of chitosan (COS group for two weeks. Whilst no significant differences were found between the conditions for body weight or food and water intake, mice in the COS group had an increased serum D-lactate content (P<0.05 and a decreased jejunal diamine oxidase (DAO activity (P<0.05. Furthermore, mice in COS group displayed a reduced expression of occludin and ZO-1 (P<0.05 and a reduced expression of occludin in the ileum (P<0.05. The conclusion drawn from these findings showed that although 30 mg/kg COS-supplemented diet had no effect on body weight or feed intake in mice, this dosage may compromise intestinal barrier function and permeability. This research will contribute to the guidance on COS supplements.

  5. Barriers to coliphage infection of commensal intestinal flora of laboratory mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasman Laura M

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Growth characteristics of coliphage viruses indicate that they are adapted to live with their Eschericia coli hosts in the intestinal tract. However, coliphage experimentally introduced by ingestion persist only transiently if at all in the gut of humans and other animals. This study attempted to identify the barriers to long term establishment of exogenous coliphage in the gastrointestinal (GI tracts of laboratory mice. Intestinal contents were screened for the presence of coliphage and host bacteria, and strains of E. coli bacteria from different segments of the GI tract were tested for susceptibility to six common laboratory coliphages. Results Contrary to expectations, coliphage were not evident in the GI tracts of laboratory mice, although they were occasionally detected in feces. Commensal flora showed extreme variability within groups of mice despite identical handling and diet. Less than 20% of 48 mice tested carried E. coli in their gut, and of 22 commensal E. coli strains isolated and tested, 59% were completely resistant to infection by lambda, M13, P1, T4, T7, and PhiX174 coliphage. Lysogeny could not be demonstrated in the commensal strains as mitomycin C failed to induce detectable phage. Pre-existing immunity to phages was not evident as sera and fecal washes did not contain significant antibody titers to six laboratory phage types. Conclusion Lack of sufficient susceptible host bacteria seems to be the most likely barrier to establishment of new coliphage infections in the mouse gut.

  6. Sodium caprate transiently opens claudin-5-containing barriers at tight junctions of epithelial and endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Vecchio, G; Tscheik, C; Tenz, K; Helms, H C; Winkler, L; Blasig, R; Blasig, I E

    2012-09-04

    Claudin-5 is a tight junction (TJ) protein which limits the diffusion of small hydrophilic molecules. Thus, it represents a potential pharmacological target to improve drug delivery to the tissues protected by claudin-5-dependent barriers. Sodium caprate is known as an absorption enhancer which opens the paracellular space acting on TJ proteins and actin cytoskeleton. Its action on claudin-5 is not understood so far. Epithelial and endothelial systems were used to evaluate the effect of caprate on claudin-5 in TJ-free cells and on claudin-5 fully integrated in TJ. To this aim, confocal microscopy on live and fixed cells and isolated mouse brain capillaries, Western blotting and permeability assays were employed. Caprate reversibly reduced claudin-5 trans-interactions in TJ-free human embryonic kidney-293 cells expressing claudin-5-YFP. It decreased the membranous claudin-5 and the F-actin content in Madin-Darby canine kidney-II cells expressing Flag-claudin-5, thereby increasing the permeability to the small molecule lucifer yellow. Interestingly, zonula occludens protein 1 (ZO-1), which links transmembranous TJ proteins to the actin cytoskeleton, was not affected by caprate treatment. Similarly, endogenous claudin-5 in the membrane of brain endothelia was displaced together with F-actin, whereas ZO-1 remained unaffected. Caprate transiently opens the paracellular space, reducing the intercellular claudin-5/claudin-5 interactions and the polymerized actin at the perijunctional region of endothelial and epithelial cells. In conclusion, the study further elucidates the cellular effects of caprate at the tight junctions.

  7. Correlation between oral drug absorption in humans and apparent drug permeability coefficients in human intestinal epithelial (Caco-2) cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artursson, P.; Karlsson, J. (Uppsala Univ., (Sweden))

    1991-03-29

    Monolayers of a well differentiated human intestinal epithelial cell line, Caco-2, were used as a model to study passive drug absorption across the intestinal epithelium. Absorption rate constants (expressed as apparent permeability coefficients) were determined for 20 drugs and peptides with different structural properties. The permeability coefficients ranged from approximately 5 x 10{sup {minus} 8} to 5 x 10{sup {minus} 5} cm/s. A good correlation was obtained between data on oral absorption in humans and the results in the Caco-2 model. Drugs that are completely absorbed in humans had permeability coefficients greater than 1 x 10{sup {minus} 6} cm/s. Drugs that are absorbed to greater than 1% but less than 100% had permeability coefficients of 0.1-1.0 x 10{sup {minus} 6} cm/s while drugs and peptides that are absorbed to less than 1% had permeability coefficients of less than or equal to 1 x 10{sup {minus} 7} cm/s. The results indicate that Caco-2 monolayers can be used as a model for studies on intestinal drug absorption.

  8. Giardia duodenalis cathepsin B proteases degrade intestinal epithelial interleukin-8 and attenuate interleukin-8-induced neutrophil chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, James A; Bhargava, Amol; Ferraz, Jose G; Yates, Robin M; Beck, Paul L; Buret, Andre G

    2014-07-01

    Giardia duodenalis (syn. G. intestinalis, G. lamblia) infections are a leading cause of waterborne diarrheal disease that can also result in the development of postinfectious functional gastrointestinal disorders via mechanisms that remain unclear. Parasite numbers exceed 10(6) trophozoites per centimeter of gut at the height of an infection. Yet the intestinal mucosa of G. duodenalis-infected individuals is devoid of signs of overt inflammation. G. duodenalis infections can also occur concurrently with infections with other proinflammatory gastrointestinal pathogens. Little is known of whether and how this parasite can attenuate host inflammatory responses induced by other proinflammatory stimuli, such as a gastrointestinal pathogen. Identifying hitherto-unrecognized parasitic immunomodulatory pathways, the present studies demonstrated that G. duodenalis trophozoites attenuate secretion of the potent neutrophil chemoattractant interleukin-8 (CXCL8); these effects were observed in human small intestinal mucosal tissues and from intestinal epithelial monolayers, activated through administration of proinflammatory interleukin-1β or Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. This attenuation is caused by the secretion of G. duodenalis cathepsin B cysteine proteases that degrade CXCL8 posttranscriptionally. Furthermore, the degradation of CXCL8 via G. duodenalis cathepsin B cysteine proteases attenuates CXCL8-induced chemotaxis of human neutrophils. Taken together, these data demonstrate for the first time that G. duodenalis trophozoite cathepsins are capable of attenuating a component of their host's proinflammatory response induced by a separate proinflammatory stimulus. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Cellular mechanisms underlying the inhibitory effect of flufenamic acid on chloride secretion in human intestinal epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawin Pongkorpsakol

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal Cl− secretion is involved in the pathogenesis of secretory diarrheas including cholera. We recently demonstrated that flufenamic acid (FFA suppressed Vibrio cholerae El Tor variant-induced intestinal fluid secretion via mechanisms involving AMPK activation and NF-κB-suppression. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of FFA on transepithelial Cl− secretion in human intestinal epithelial (T84 cells. FFA inhibited cAMP-dependent Cl− secretion in T84 cell monolayers with IC50 of ∼8 μM. Other fenamate drugs including tolfenamic acid, meclofenamic acid and mefenamic acid exhibited the same effect albeit with lower potency. FFA also inhibited activities of CFTR, a cAMP-activated apical Cl− channel, and KCNQ1/KCNE3, a cAMP-activated basolateral K+ channel. Mechanisms of CFTR inhibition by FFA did not involve activation of its negative regulators. Interestingly, FFA inhibited Ca2+-dependent Cl− secretion with IC50 of ∼10 μM. FFA inhibited activities of Ca2+-activated Cl− channels and KCa3.1, a Ca2+-activated basolateral K+ channels, but had no effect on activities of Na+–K+–Cl− cotransporters and Na+–K+ ATPases. These results indicate that FFA inhibits both cAMP and Ca2+-dependent Cl− secretion by suppressing activities of both apical Cl− channels and basolateral K+ channels. FFA and other fenamate drugs may be useful in the treatment of secretory diarrheas.

  10. Effect of fluoride on the intestinal epithelial cell brush border membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rastogi, R.; Upreti, R.K.; Kidwai, A.M.

    1987-07-01

    Fluoride consumed by man and animals is chiefly absorbed in the intestine. Chronic fluoride exposure causes mottled teeth and osteosclerosis. Over-fluoridation (126 mM) of drinking water have been reported to cause nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. Furthermore, the effect of acute and low concentrations of fluoride on gastric secretion, ion transport and other disorders have also been studied. Fluoride also causes alterations in the permeability of membranes and membrane bound enzymes. The intestinal cell lining plays an important role in digestion and absorption. It automatically becomes the most exposed site of contact to fluoride following ingestion. Earlier study have shown significant alterations in the formation of lipid peroxides in rat intestine following oral administration of fluoride. The present study was undertaken to investigate the damage of rat intestinal epithelium in situ caused by relatively high and low fluoride concentrations.

  11. Immuno-localization of type-IV collagen in the blood-gas barrier and the epithelial-epithelial cell connections of the avian lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimoh, S A; Maina, J N

    2013-02-23

    The terminal respiratory units of the gas exchange tissue of the avian lung, the air capillaries (ACs) and the blood capillaries (BCs), are small and rigid: the basis of this mechanical feature has been highly contentious. Because the strength of the blood-gas barrier (BGB) of the mammalian lung has been attributed to the presence of type-IV collagen (T-IVc), localization of T-IVc in the basement membranes (BM) of the BGB and the epithelial-epithelial cell connections (E-ECCs) of the exchange tissue of the lung of the avian (chicken) lung was performed in order to determine whether it may likewise contribute to the strength of the BGB. T-IVc was localized in both the BM and the E-ECCs. As part of an integrated fibroskeletal scaffold on the lung, T-IVc may directly contribute to the strengths of the ACs and the BCs.

  12. Evaluation of intestinal absorption of amtolmetin guacyl in rats: breast cancer resistant protein as a primary barrier of oral bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Zhihui; Xu, Yanjiao; Zhang, Chengliang; Xiang, Daochun; Li, Xiping; Liu, Dong

    2013-02-27

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the role of efflux transporters on the intestinal absorption of amtolmetin guacyl (MED-15). The effects of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multiple resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2), and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) inhibitors on intestinal absorption amount of MED-5 (tolmetin-glycine amide derivative), the metabolite formed from MED-15 in the intestinal epithelial cells were studied in the in vitro everted gut sac experiments. Moreover, the in situ single-pass intestine perfusion was adopted to clarify the role of efflux transporters in excreting MED-5 in knockout mice. The plasma concentration of MED-5 and tolmetin, the metabolite formed from MED-5 was determined in Bcrp1 knockout mice and wild-type mice. BCRP inhibitor Ko143 (50 μM and 100 μM) significantly increased the intestinal absorption amount in jejunum, ileum and colon (pintestinal segment. Furthermore, the plasma concentration MED-5 and tolmetin, metabolites of MED-15, increased 2-fold and 4-fold, respectively, in Bcrp1 knockout mice compared with wild-type mice after the single-pass perfusion of small intestine with MED-15. It may be concluded that BCRP plays an important role in the intestinal efflux of MED-5 and limits the bioavailability after oral administration of MED-15. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Protective effect of lactobacillus acidophilus and isomaltooligosaccharide on intestinal mucosal barriers in rat models of antibiotic-associated diarrhea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Dan; Fang Lichao; Chen Bingbo; Wei Hong

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the protective effect of synbiotics combined lactobacillus acidophilus and iso-malto-oligosaccharide (IMO) on intestinal mucosal barriers in rat models of antibiotic-associated diarrhea(AAD). Methods: Rat models of AAD were prepared with lincomycin gavage for 5 days. The synbiotics was orally administered to the AAD rats daily at three different strengths for 7 days. The intestinal flora and intestinal mucus SIgA levels were determined on d6, d9 and d13. The histopathological changes of ileal mucosa were studied on d13. Results: In the prepared AAD model rats (on d6) there were lower intestinal mucus SIgA levels and intestinal flora disorders were demonstrated. The intestinal floras of the rats administering synbiotics were readjusted to the similar pattern of healthy rats with bacterial translocation corrected on d13 and the levels of SIgA were not significantly different from of the control (P>0.05). The histopathological picture was basically normal in the treated models on d13. Conclusion: The synbiotics combined lactobacillus acidophilus and isomaltooligosaccharide possessed good protective effect on the intestinal mucosal barrier in lincomycin induced rat models of AAD. (authors)

  14. In Vitro Evaluation of Swine-Derived Lactobacillus reuteri: Probiotic Properties and Effects on Intestinal Porcine Epithelial Cells Challenged with Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli K88.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhilin; Wang, Li; Chen, Zhuang; Ma, Xianyong; Yang, Xuefen; Zhang, Jian; Jiang, Zongyong

    2016-06-28

    Probiotics are considered as the best effective alternatives to antibiotics. The aim of this study was to characterize the probiotic potential of lactobacilli for use in swine farming by using in vitro evaluation methods. A total of 106 lactic acid bacterial isolates, originating from porcine feces, were first screened for the capacity to survive stresses considered important for putative probiotic strains. Sixteen isolates showed notable acid and bile resistance, antibacterial activity, and adherence to intestinal porcine epithelial cells (IPEC-1). One isolate, LR1, identified as Lactobacillus reuteri, was selected for extensive study of its probiotic and functional properties in IPEC-1 cell models. L. reuteri LR1 exhibited good adhesion to IPEC-1 cells and could inhibit the adhesion of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) to IPEC-1 cells. L. reuteri LR1 could also modulate transcript and protein expression of cytokines involved in inflammation in IPEC-1 cells; the Lactobacillus strain inhibited the ETEC-induced expression of proinflammatory transcripts (IL-6 and TNF-α) and protein (IL-6), and increased the level of anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10). Measurement of the permeation of FD-4 showed that L. reuteri LR1 could maintain barrier integrity in monolayer IPEC-1 cells exposed to ETEC. Immunolocalization experiments showed L. reuteri LR1 could also prevent ETEC-induced tight junction ZO-1 disruption. Together, these results indicate that L. reuteri LR1 exhibits desirable probiotic properties and could be a potential probiotic for use in swine production.

  15. Selective non-steroidal glucocorticoid receptor agonists attenuate inflammation but do not impair intestinal epithelial cell restitution in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin C Reuter

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Despite the excellent anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive action of glucocorticoids (GCs, their use for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD still carries significant risks in terms of frequently occurring severe side effects, such as the impairment of intestinal tissue repair. The recently-introduced selective glucocorticoid receptor (GR agonists (SEGRAs offer anti-inflammatory action comparable to that of common GCs, but with a reduced side effect profile. METHODS: The in vitro effects of the non-steroidal SEGRAs Compound A (CpdA and ZK216348, were investigated in intestinal epithelial cells and compared to those of Dexamethasone (Dex. GR translocation was shown by immunfluorescence and Western blot analysis. Trans-repressive effects were studied by means of NF-κB/p65 activity and IL-8 levels, trans-activation potency by reporter gene assay. Flow cytometry was used to assess apoptosis of cells exposed to SEGRAs. The effects on IEC-6 and HaCaT cell restitution were determined using an in vitro wound healing model, cell proliferation by BrdU assay. In addition, influences on the TGF-β- or EGF/ERK1/2/MAPK-pathway were evaluated by reporter gene assay, Western blot and qPCR analysis. RESULTS: Dex, CpdA and ZK216348 were found to be functional GR agonists. In terms of trans-repression, CpdA and ZK216348 effectively inhibited NF-κB activity and IL-8 secretion, but showed less trans-activation potency. Furthermore, unlike SEGRAs, Dex caused a dose-dependent inhibition of cell restitution with no effect on cell proliferation. These differences in epithelial restitution were TGF-β-independent but Dex inhibited the EGF/ERK1/2/MAPK-pathway important for intestinal epithelial wound healing by induction of MKP-1 and Annexin-1 which was not affected by CpdA or ZK216348. CONCLUSION: Collectively, our results indicate that, while their anti-inflammatory activity is comparable to Dex, SEGRAs show fewer side effects with

  16. Lactobacillus GG-fermented milk prevents DSS-induced colitis and regulates intestinal epithelial homeostasis through activation of epidermal growth factor receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoda, Kazutoyo; Miyazawa, Kenji; Hosoda, Masataka; Hiramatsu, Masaru; Yan, Fang; He, Fang

    2014-01-01

    Background Fermented milk is considered one of the best sources for efficient consumption of probiotic strains by hosts to promote good health. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of orally administering LGG-fermented milk (LGG milk) on intestinal inflammation and injury and to study the mechanisms of LGG milk's action. Methods LGG milk and non-LGG-fermented milk (non-LGG milk) were administered through gavage to mice before and during dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced intestinal injury and colitis. Inflammatory/injury score and colon length were assessed. Intestinal epithelial cells were treated with the soluble fraction of LGG milk to detect its effects on the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and its down stream target, Akt activation, cytokine-induced apoptosis, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced disruption of tight junctions. Results LGG milk treatment significantly reduced DSS-induced colonic inflammation and injury, and colon shortening in mice, compared to that in non-LGG milk-treated and untreated mice. The soluble fraction of LGG milk, but not non-LGG milk, stimulated activation of EGFR and Akt in a concentration-dependent manner, suppressed cytokine-induced apoptosis, and attenuated H2O2-induced disruption of tight junction complex in the intestinal epithelial cells. These effects of LGG milk were blocked by the EGFR kinase inhibitor. LGG milk, but not non-LGG milk, contained two soluble proteins, p40 and p75, which have been reported to promote survival and growth of intestinal epithelial cells through activation of EGFR. Depletion of p40 and p75 from LGG milk abolished the effects of LGG milk on prevention of cytokine-induced apoptosis and H2O2-induced disruption of tight junctions. Conclusions These results suggest that LGG milk may regulate intestinal epithelial homeostasis and potentially prevent intestinal inflammatory diseases through activation of EGFR by LGG-derived proteins. PMID:23468308

  17. Lactobacillus GG-fermented milk prevents DSS-induced colitis and regulates intestinal epithelial homeostasis through activation of epidermal growth factor receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoda, Kazutoyo; Miyazawa, Kenji; Hosoda, Masataka; Hiramatsu, Masaru; Yan, Fang; He, Fang

    2014-02-01

    Fermented milk is considered one of the best sources for efficient consumption of probiotic strains by hosts to promote good health. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of orally administering LGG-fermented milk (LGG milk) on intestinal inflammation and injury and to study the mechanisms of LGG milk's action. LGG milk and non-LGG-fermented milk (non-LGG milk) were administered through gavage to mice before and during dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced intestinal injury and colitis. Inflammatory/injury score and colon length were assessed. Intestinal epithelial cells were treated with the soluble fraction of LGG milk to detect its effects on the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and its downstream target, Akt activation, cytokine-induced apoptosis, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced disruption of tight junctions. LGG milk treatment significantly reduced DSS-induced colonic inflammation and injury, and colon shortening in mice, compared to that in non-LGG milk-treated and -untreated mice. The soluble fraction of LGG milk, but not non-LGG milk, stimulated the activation of EGFR and Akt in a concentration-dependent manner, suppressed cytokine-induced apoptosis, and attenuated H2O2-induced disruption of tight junction complex in the intestinal epithelial cells. These effects of LGG milk were blocked by the EGFR kinase inhibitor. LGG milk, but not non-LGG milk, contained two soluble proteins, p40 and p75, that have been reported to promote survival and growth of intestinal epithelial cells through the activation of EGFR. Depletion of p40 and p75 from LGG milk abolished the effects of LGG milk on prevention of cytokine-induced apoptosis and H2O2-induced disruption of tight junctions. These results suggest that LGG milk may regulate intestinal epithelial homeostasis and potentially prevent intestinal inflammatory diseases through activation of EGFR by LGG-derived proteins.

  18. Partial Enteral Nutrition Preserves Elements of Gut Barrier Function, Including Innate Immunity, Intestinal Alkaline Phosphatase (IAP) Level, and Intestinal Microbiota in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xiao; Bi, Jingcheng; Gao, Xuejin; Tian, Feng; Wang, Xinying; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2015-08-03

    Lack of enteral nutrition (EN) during parenteral nutrition (PN) leads to higher incidence of infection because of gut barrier dysfunction. However, the effects of partial EN on intestina linnate immunity, intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) and microbiota remain unclear. The mice were randomized into six groups to receive either standard chow or isocaloric and isonitrogenous nutritional support with variable partial EN to PN ratios. Five days later, the mice were sacrificed and tissue samples were collected. Bacterial translocation, the levels of lysozyme, mucin 2 (MUC2), and IAP were analyzed. The composition of intestinal microbiota was analyzed by 16S rRNA pyrosequencing. Compared with chow, total parenteral nutrition (TPN) resulted in a dysfunctional mucosal barrier, as evidenced by increased bacterial translocation (p < 0.05), loss of lysozyme, MUC2, and IAP, and changes in the gut microbiota (p < 0.001). Administration of 20% EN supplemented with PN significantly increased the concentrations of lysozyme, MUC2, IAP, and the mRNA levels of lysozyme and MUC2 (p < 0.001). The percentages of Bacteroidetes and Tenericutes were significantly lower in the 20% EN group than in the TPN group (p < 0.001). These changes were accompanied by maintained barrier function in bacterial culture (p < 0.05). Supplementation of PN with 20% EN preserves gut barrier function, by way of maintaining innate immunity, IAP and intestinal microbiota.

  19. Role of Vitamin D in Maintaining Renal Epithelial Barrier Function in Uremic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milos Mihajlovic

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available As current kidney replacement therapies are not efficient enough for end-stage renal disease (ESRD treatment, a bioartificial kidney (BAK device, based on conditionally immortalized human proximal tubule epithelial cells (ciPTEC, could represent an attractive solution. The active transport activity of such a system was recently demonstrated. In addition, endocrine functions of the cells, such as vitamin D activation, are relevant. The organic anion transporter 1 (OAT-1 overexpressing ciPTEC line presented 1α-hydroxylase (CYP27B1, 24-hydroxylase (CYP24A1 and vitamin D receptor (VDR, responsible for vitamin D activation, degradation and function, respectively. The ability to produce and secrete 1α,25-dihydroxy-vitamin D3, was shown after incubation with the precursor, 25-hydroxy-vitamin D3. The beneficial effect of vitamin D on cell function and behavior in uremic conditions was studied in the presence of an anionic uremic toxins mixture. Vitamin D could restore cell viability, and inflammatory and oxidative status, as shown by cell metabolic activity, interleukin-6 (IL-6 levels and reactive oxygen species (ROS production, respectively. Finally, vitamin D restored transepithelial barrier function, as evidenced by decreased inulin-FITC leakage in biofunctionalized hollow fiber membranes (HFM carrying ciPTEC-OAT1. In conclusion, the protective effects of vitamin D in uremic conditions and proven ciPTEC-OAT1 endocrine function encourage the use of these cells for BAK application.

  20. Chitin protects the gut epithelial barrier in a protochordate model of DSS-induced colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assunta Liberti

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The gastrointestinal tract of Ciona intestinalis, a solitary tunicate that siphon-filters water, shares similarities with its mammalian counterpart. The Ciona gut exhibits other features that are unique to protochordates, including certain immune molecules, and other characteristics, e.g. chitin-rich mucus, which appears to be more widespread than considered previously. Exposure of Ciona to dextran sulphate sodium (DSS induces a colitis-like phenotype similar to that seen in other systems, and is characterized by alteration of epithelial morphology and infiltration of blood cells into lamina propria-like regions. DSS treatment also influences the production and localization of a secreted immune molecule shown previously to co-localize to chitin-rich mucus in the gut. Resistance to DSS is enhanced by exposure to exogenous chitin microparticles, suggesting that endogenous chitin is critical to barrier integrity. Protochordates, such as Ciona, retain basic characteristics found in other more advanced chordates and can inform us of uniquely conserved signals shaping host-microbiota interactions in the absence of adaptive immunity. These simpler model systems may also reveal factors and processes that modulate recovery from colitis, the role gut microbiota play in the onset of the disease, and the rules that help govern the reestablishment and maintenance of gut homeostasis.

  1. Conjugated primary bile salts reduce permeability of endotoxin through bacteria-stimulated intestinal epithelial cells and synergize with lecithin in suppression of inflammatory cytokine production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parlesak, Alexandr; Schaeckeler, Simone; Moser, Lydia

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Endotoxemia was shown to be integral in the pathophysiology of obstructive jaundice. In the current study, the role of conjugated primary bile salts (CPBS) and phosphatidylcholine on the permeability of endotoxin through a layer of intestinal epithelial cells and the consequent...

  2. Novel polyfucosylated N-linked glycopeptides with blood group A, H, X and Y determinants from human small intestinal epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Finne, J.; Breimer, M.E.; Hansson, G.C.; Karlsson, K.-A.; Leffler, H.; Halbeek, H. van

    1989-01-01

    A novel type of N-linked glycopeptides representing a major part of the glycans in human small intestinal epithelial cells from blood group A and O individuals were isolated by gel filtrations and affinity chromatography on concanavalin A-Sepharose and Bandeiraea simplicifolia lectin I-Sepharose.

  3. Conjugated primary bile salts reduce permeability of endotoxin through intestinal epithelial cells and synergize with phosphatidylcholine in suppression of inflammatory cytokine production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parlesak, Alexandr; Schaeckeler, S.; Moser, L.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Endotoxemia was shown to be integral in the pathophysiology of obstructive jaundice. In the current study, the role of conjugated primary bile salts (CPBS) and phosphatidylcholine on the permeability of endotoxin through a layer of intestinal epithelial cells and the consequent...

  4. Cigarette smoke extract (CSE delays NOD2 expression and affects NOD2/RIPK2 interactions in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian C Aldhous

    Full Text Available Genetic and environmental factors influence susceptibility to Crohn's disease (CD: NOD2 is the strongest individual genetic determinant and smoking the best-characterised environmental factor. Carriage of NOD2 mutations predispose to small-intestinal, stricturing CD, a phenotype also associated with smoking. We hypothesised that cigarette smoke extract (CSE altered NOD2 expression and function in intestinal epithelial cells.Intestinal epithelial cell-lines (SW480, HT29, HCT116 were stimulated with CSE and nicotine (to mimic smoking ±TNFα (to mimic inflammation. NOD2 expression was measured by qRT-PCR and western blotting; NOD2-RIPK2 interactions by co-immunoprecipitation (CoIP; nuclear NFκB-p65 by ELISA; NFκB activity by luciferase reporter assays and chemokines (CCL20, IL8 in culture supernatants by ELISA. In SW480 and HT29 cells the TNFα-induced NOD2 expression at 4 hours was reduced by CSE (p = 0.0226, a response that was dose-dependent (p = 0.003 and time-dependent (p = 0.0004. Similar effects of CSE on NOD2 expression were seen in cultured ileal biopsies from healthy individuals. In SW480 cells CSE reduced TNFα-induced NFκB-p65 translocation at 15 minutes post-stimulation, upstream of NOD2. Levels of the NOD2-RIPK2 complex were no different at 8 hours post-stimulation with combinations of CSE, nicotine and TNFα, but at 18 hours it was increased in cells stimulated with TNFα+CSE but decreased with TNFα alone (p = 0.0330; CSE reduced TNFα-induced NFκB activity (p = 0.0014 at the same time-point. At 24 hours, basal CCL20 and IL8 (p<0.001 for both and TNFα-induced CCL20 (p = 0.0330 production were decreased by CSE. CSE also reduced NOD2 expression, CCL20 and IL8 production seen with MDP-stimulation of SW480 cells pre-treated with combinations of TNFα and CSE.CSE delayed TNFα-induced NOD2 mRNA expression and was associated with abnormal NOD2/RIPK2 interaction, reduced NFκB activity and decreased chemokine

  5. Short-Chain Fatty Acids Activate AMP-Activated Protein Kinase and Ameliorate Ethanol-Induced Intestinal Barrier Dysfunction in Caco-2 Cell Monolayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eamin, E.E.; Masclee, A.A.; Dekker, J.; Pieters, H.J.; Jonkers, D.M.

    2013-01-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) have been shown to promote intestinal barrier function, but their protective effects against ethanol-induced intestinal injury and underlying mechanisms remain essentially unknown. The aim of the study was to analyze the influence of SCFAs on ethanol-induced barrier

  6. Hes1 promotes the IL-22-mediated antimicrobial response by enhancing STAT3-dependent transcription in human intestinal epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murano, Tatsuro; Okamoto, Ryuichi; Ito, Go; Nakata, Toru; Hibiya, Shuji; Shimizu, Hiromichi; Fujii, Satoru; Kano, Yoshihito; Mizutani, Tomohiro; Yui, Shiro; Akiyama-Morio, Junko; Nemoto, Yasuhiro; Tsuchiya, Kiichiro; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •Hes1 enhances IL-22-STAT3 signaling in human intestinal epithelial cells. •Hes1 enhances REG family gene induction by IL-22-STAT3 signaling. •Protein level of Hes1 restricts the response to IL-22. •Present regulation of a cytokine signal represents a new mode of Hes1 function. -- Abstract: Notch signaling plays an essential role in the proliferation and differentiation of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). We have previously shown that Notch signaling is up-regulated in the inflamed mucosa of ulcerative colitis (UC) and thereby plays an indispensable role in tissue regeneration. Here we show that in addition to Notch signaling, STAT3 signaling is highly activated in the inflamed mucosa of UC. Forced expression of the Notch target gene Hes1 dramatically enhanced the IL-22-mediated STAT3-dependent transcription in human IECs. This enhancement of STAT3-dependent transcription was achieved by the extended phosphorylation of STAT3 by Hes1. Microarray analysis revealed that Hes1-mediated enhancement of IL-22-STAT3 signaling significantly increased the induction of genes encoding antimicrobial peptides, such as REG1A, REG3A and REG3G, in human IECs. Conversely, the reduction of Hes1 protein levels with a γ-secretase inhibitor significantly down-regulated the induction of those genes in IECs, resulting in a markedly poor response to IL-22. Our present findings identify a new role for the molecular function of Hes1 in which the protein can interact with cytokine signals and regulate the immune response of IECs

  7. Hes1 promotes the IL-22-mediated antimicrobial response by enhancing STAT3-dependent transcription in human intestinal epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murano, Tatsuro [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Okamoto, Ryuichi, E-mail: rokamoto.gast@tmd.ac.jp [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Advanced GI Therapeutics, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Ito, Go; Nakata, Toru; Hibiya, Shuji; Shimizu, Hiromichi; Fujii, Satoru; Kano, Yoshihito; Mizutani, Tomohiro; Yui, Shiro; Akiyama-Morio, Junko; Nemoto, Yasuhiro [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Tsuchiya, Kiichiro; Nakamura, Tetsuya [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Advanced GI Therapeutics, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Watanabe, Mamoru [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •Hes1 enhances IL-22-STAT3 signaling in human intestinal epithelial cells. •Hes1 enhances REG family gene induction by IL-22-STAT3 signaling. •Protein level of Hes1 restricts the response to IL-22. •Present regulation of a cytokine signal represents a new mode of Hes1 function. -- Abstract: Notch signaling plays an essential role in the proliferation and differentiation of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). We have previously shown that Notch signaling is up-regulated in the inflamed mucosa of ulcerative colitis (UC) and thereby plays an indispensable role in tissue regeneration. Here we show that in addition to Notch signaling, STAT3 signaling is highly activated in the inflamed mucosa of UC. Forced expression of the Notch target gene Hes1 dramatically enhanced the IL-22-mediated STAT3-dependent transcription in human IECs. This enhancement of STAT3-dependent transcription was achieved by the extended phosphorylation of STAT3 by Hes1. Microarray analysis revealed that Hes1-mediated enhancement of IL-22-STAT3 signaling significantly increased the induction of genes encoding antimicrobial peptides, such as REG1A, REG3A and REG3G, in human IECs. Conversely, the reduction of Hes1 protein levels with a γ-secretase inhibitor significantly down-regulated the induction of those genes in IECs, resulting in a markedly poor response to IL-22. Our present findings identify a new role for the molecular function of Hes1 in which the protein can interact with cytokine signals and regulate the immune response of IECs.

  8. Epithelial-Mesenchymal Interactions in Urinary Bladder and Small Intestine and How to Apply Them in Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerman, Urška Dragin; Kreft, Mateja Erdani; Veranič, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Reciprocal interactions between the epithelium and mesenchyme are essential for the establishment of proper tissue morphology during organogenesis and tissue regeneration as well as for the maintenance of cell differentiation. With this review, we highlight the importance of epithelial-mesenchymal cross talk in healthy tissue and further discuss its significance in engineering functional tissues in vitro. We focus on the urinary bladder and small intestine, organs that are often compromised by disease and are as such in need of research that would advance effective treatment or tissue replacement. To date, the understanding of epithelial-mesenchymal reciprocal interactions has enabled the development of in vitro biomimetic tissue equivalents that have provided many possibilities in treating defective, damaged, or even cancerous tissues. Although research of the past several years has advanced the field of bladder and small intestine tissue engineering, one must be aware of its current limitations in successfully and above all safely introducing tissue-engineered constructs into clinical practice. Special attention is in particular needed when treating cancerous tissues, as initially successful tumor excision and tissue reconstruction may later on result in cancer recurrence due to oncogenic signals originating from an altered stroma. Recent rather poor outcomes in pioneering clinical trials of bladder reconstructions should serve as a reminder that recreating a functional organ to replace a dysfunctional one is an objective far more difficult to reach than initially foreseen. When considering effective tissue engineering approaches for diseased tissues in humans, it is imperative to introduce animal models with dysfunctional or, even more importantly, cancerous organs, which would greatly contribute to predicting possible complications and, hence, reducing risks when translating to the clinic.

  9. New insights into mycotoxin mixtures: The toxicity of low doses of Type B trichothecenes on intestinal epithelial cells is synergistic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alassane-Kpembi, Imourana [INRA, UMR 1331 Toxalim, Research Center in Food Toxicology, F-31027 Toulouse (France); Université de Toulouse, ENVT, INP, UMR 1331 Toxalim, F-31076 Toulouse (France); Institut des Sciences Biomédicales Appliquées, Cotonou, Bénin (Benin); Kolf-Clauw, Martine; Gauthier, Thierry; Abrami, Roberta [INRA, UMR 1331 Toxalim, Research Center in Food Toxicology, F-31027 Toulouse (France); Université de Toulouse, ENVT, INP, UMR 1331 Toxalim, F-31076 Toulouse (France); Abiola, François A. [Institut des Sciences Biomédicales Appliquées, Cotonou, Bénin (Benin); Oswald, Isabelle P., E-mail: Isabelle.Oswald@toulouse.inra.fr [INRA, UMR 1331 Toxalim, Research Center in Food Toxicology, F-31027 Toulouse (France); Université de Toulouse, ENVT, INP, UMR 1331 Toxalim, F-31076 Toulouse (France); Puel, Olivier [INRA, UMR 1331 Toxalim, Research Center in Food Toxicology, F-31027 Toulouse (France); Université de Toulouse, ENVT, INP, UMR 1331 Toxalim, F-31076 Toulouse (France)

    2013-10-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is the most prevalent trichothecene mycotoxin in crops in Europe and North America. DON is often present with other type B trichothecenes such as 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol (3-ADON), 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol (15-ADON), nivalenol (NIV) and fusarenon-X (FX). Although the cytotoxicity of individual mycotoxins has been widely studied, data on the toxicity of mycotoxin mixtures are limited. The aim of this study was to assess interactions caused by co-exposure to Type B trichothecenes on intestinal epithelial cells. Proliferating Caco-2 cells were exposed to increasing doses of Type B trichothecenes, alone or in binary or ternary mixtures. The MTT test and neutral red uptake, respectively linked to mitochondrial and lysosomal functions, were used to measure intestinal epithelial cytotoxicity. The five tested mycotoxins had a dose-dependent effect on proliferating enterocytes and could be classified in increasing order of toxicity: 3-ADON < 15-ADON ≈ DON < NIV ≪ FX. Binary or ternary mixtures also showed a dose-dependent effect. At low concentrations (cytotoxic effect between 10 and 30–40%), mycotoxin combinations were synergistic; however DON–NIV–FX mixture showed antagonism. At higher concentrations (cytotoxic effect around 50%), the combinations had an additive or nearly additive effect. These results indicate that the simultaneous presence of low doses of mycotoxins in food commodities and diet may be more toxic than predicted from the mycotoxins alone. Considering the frequent co-occurrence of trichothecenes in the diet and the concentrations of toxins to which consumers are exposed, this synergy should be taken into account. - Highlights: • We assessed the individual and combined cytotoxicity of five trichothecenes. • The tested concentrations correspond to the French consumer exposure levels. • The type of interaction in combined cytotoxicity varied with the effect level. • Low doses of Type B trichothecenes induced synergistic

  10. Lactic Acid Bacteria May Impact Intestinal Barrier Function by Modulating Goblet Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Chengcheng; Dokter-Fokkens, Jelleke; Figueroa Lozano, Susana; Zhang, Qiuxiang; de Haan, Bart J; Zhang, Hao; Faas, Marijke M; de Vos, Paul

    2018-01-15

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are recognized to promote gastrointestinal health by mechanisms that are not fully understood. LABs might modulate the mucus and thereby enhance intestinal barrier function. Herein, we investigate effects of different LAB strains and species on goblet cell genes involved in mucus synthesis. Gene expression profiles of goblet-cell-associated products (mucin MUC2, trefoil factor 3, resistin-like molecule β, carbohydrate sulfotransferase 5, and galactose-3-O-sulfotransferase 2) induced by LAB or their derived conditioned medium in human goblet cell line LS174T are studied. Effects of LAB on gene transcription are assessed with or without exposure to TNF-α, IL-13, or the mucus damaging agent tunicamycin. LAB do impact the related genes in a species- and strain-specific fashion and their effects are different in the presence of the cytokines and tunicamycin. Bioactive factors secreted by some strains are also found to regulate goblet cell-related genes. Our findings provide novel insights in differences in modulatory efficacy on mucus genes between LAB species and strains. This study further unravels direct interactions between LAB and intestinal goblet cells, and highlights the importance of rationally selecting appropriate LAB candidates to achieve specific benefits in the gut. © 2018 The Authors. Published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Portal vein thrombosis in cirrhosis is not associated with intestinal barrier disruption or increased platelet aggregability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wosiewicz, Piotr; Żorniak, Michał; Hartleb, Marek; Barański, Kamil; Hartleb, Maciej; Onyszczuk, Magdalena; Pilch-Kowalczyk, Joanna; Kyrcz-Krzemień, Sławomira

    2016-12-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is a common complication of cirrhosis, but its pathogenesis is unclear. We tested the hypotheses that PVT is the result of platelet hyperactivity or intestinal barrier disruption. This study included 49 patients with cirrhosis (15 females) of mixed etiology. Based on spiral computed-tomography, the patients were divided into two groups: with PVT (n=16) and without PVT (n=33). Serum biomarkers of intestinal barrier integrity were endotoxins and zonulin, and platelet activity was assessed with multiple electrode aggregometry. The levels of endotoxin (43.5±18.3ng/ml vs. 36.9±7.5ng/ml; P=0.19) and zonulin (56.3±31.1ng/ml vs. 69.3±63.1ng/ml; P=0.69) were not different between the patients with and without PVT. Moreover, endotoxin and zonulin did not correlate with the coagulation and platelet parameters. The platelet aggregability measured with the TRAP and the ADP tests was decreased in PVT patients. In the logistic regression analysis the PVT incidence was related to the levels of D-dimer and bilirubin as well as the TRAP test results. Patients with PVT presented with significantly higher levels of D-dimer (4.45±2.59 vs. 3.03±2.97mg/l; P<0.05) and prothrombin levels (175±98.8μg/ml vs. 115±72.9μg/ml; P<0.05) than patients without thrombosis. PVT could be excluded with a 90% negative predictive value when the D-dimer level was below 1.82mg/l. Endotoxemia and platelet activity are not determinants of PVT in patients with cirrhosis. The D-dimer measurement has diagnostic significance for PVT in patients with liver cirrhosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Brucella invasion of human intestinal epithelial cells elicits a weak proinflammatory response but a significant CCL20 secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero, Mariana C; Fossati, Carlos A; Rumbo, Martín; Baldi, Pablo C

    2012-10-01

    In spite of the frequent acquisition of Brucella infection by the oral route in humans, the interaction of the bacterium with cells of the intestinal mucosa has been poorly studied. Here, we show that different Brucella species can invade human colonic epithelial cell lines (Caco-2 and HT-29), in which only smooth species can replicate efficiently. Infection with smooth strains did not produce a significant cytotoxicity, while the rough strain RB51 was more cytotoxic. Infection of Caco-2 cells or HT-29 cells with either smooth or rough strains of Brucella did not result in an increased secretion of TNF-α, IL-1β, MCP-1, IL-10 or TGF-β as compared with uninfected controls, whereas all the infections induced the secretion of IL-8 and CCL20 by both cell types. The MCP-1 response to flagellin from Salmonella typhimurium was similar in Brucella-infected or uninfected cells, ruling out a bacterial inhibitory mechanism as a reason for the weak proinflammatory response. Infection did not modify ICAM-1 expression levels in Caco-2 cells, but increased them in HT-29 cells. These results suggest that Brucella induces only a weak proinflammatory response in gut epithelial cells, but produces a significant CCL20 secretion. The latter may be important for bacterial dissemination given the known ability of Brucella to survive in dendritic cells. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Potential of Lactobacillus plantarum CCFM639 in Protecting against Aluminum Toxicity Mediated by Intestinal Barrier Function and Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Leilei; Zhai, Qixiao; Tian, Fengwei; Liu, Xiaoming; Wang, Gang; Zhao, Jianxin; Zhang, Hao; Narbad, Arjan; Chen, Wei

    2016-12-02

    Aluminum (Al) is a ubiquitous metal that can seriously harm the health of animals and humans. In our previous study, we demonstrated that Lactobacillus plantarum CCFM639 can decrease Al burden in the tissues of mice by inhibiting intestinal Al absorption. The main aim of the present research was to investigate whether the protection by the strain is also associated with enhancement of the intestinal barrier, alleviation of oxidative stress and modulation of the inflammatory response. In an in vitro cell model, two protection modes (intervention and therapy) were examined and the results indicated that L. plantarum CCFM639 alleviated Al-induced cytotoxicity. In a mouse model, L. plantarum CCFM639 treatment was found to significantly alleviate oxidative stress in the intestinal tract, regulate the function of the intestinal mucosal immune system, restore the integrity of tight junction proteins and maintain intestinal permeability. These results suggest that in addition to Al sequestration, L. plantarum CCFM639 can also inhibit Al absorption by protecting the intestinal barrier, alleviating Al-induced oxidative stress and inflammatory response. Therefore, L. plantarum CCFM639 has the potential to be a dietary supplement ingredient that provides protection against Al-induced gut injury.

  14. Potential of Lactobacillus plantarum CCFM639 in Protecting against Aluminum Toxicity Mediated by Intestinal Barrier Function and Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leilei Yu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum (Al is a ubiquitous metal that can seriously harm the health of animals and humans. In our previous study, we demonstrated that Lactobacillus plantarum CCFM639 can decrease Al burden in the tissues of mice by inhibiting intestinal Al absorption. The main aim of the present research was to investigate whether the protection by the strain is also associated with enhancement of the intestinal barrier, alleviation of oxidative stress and modulation of the inflammatory response. In an in vitro cell model, two protection modes (intervention and therapy were examined and the results indicated that L. plantarum CCFM639 alleviated Al-induced cytotoxicity. In a mouse model, L. plantarum CCFM639 treatment was found to significantly alleviate oxidative stress in the intestinal tract, regulate the function of the intestinal mucosal immune system, restore the integrity of tight junction proteins and maintain intestinal permeability. These results suggest that in addition to Al sequestration, L. plantarum CCFM639 can also inhibit Al absorption by protecting the intestinal barrier, alleviating Al-induced oxidative stress and inflammatory response. Therefore, L. plantarum CCFM639 has the potential to be a dietary supplement ingredient that provides protection against Al-induced gut injury.

  15. Genome-wide analysis of CDX2 binding in intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyd, Mette; Hansen, Morten; Jensen, Tine G K

    2010-01-01

    , revealing a critical role of CDX2 in the formation of the normal intestinal identity. The identification of direct targets of transcription factors is a key problem in the study of gene regulatory networks. The ChIP-seq technique combines chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) with next generation sequencing...

  16. Histidine deficiency attenuates cell viability in rat intestinal epithelial cells by apoptosis via mitochondrial dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsunobu Matsui, M.S.

    2017-06-01

    Conclusions: This is the first report showing that histidine deficiency reduced cell viability and induced apoptosis in IEC-6 cells, and that a small amount of histidine supplementation prevented and improved the IEC-6 cell injury. This is a potential new clinical treatment against intestinal and/or gastric cell injury that would improve the patient's quality of life.

  17. Physiological, pathological, and therapeutic implications of zonulin-mediated intestinal barrier modulation: living life on the edge of the wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasano, Alessio

    2008-11-01

    The anatomical and functional arrangement of the gastrointestinal tract suggests that this organ, beside its digestive and absorptive functions, regulates the trafficking of macromolecules between the environment and the host through a barrier mechanism. Under physiological circumstances, this trafficking is safeguarded by the competency of intercellular tight junctions, structures whose physiological modulation is mediated by, among others, the recently described protein zonulin. To prevent harm and minimize inflammation, the same paracellular pathway, in concert with the gut-associated lymphoid tissue and the neuroendocrine network, controls the equilibrium between tolerance and immunity to nonself antigens. The zonulin pathway has been exploited to deliver drugs, macromolecules, or vaccines that normally would not be absorbed through the gastrointestinal mucosal barrier. However, if the tightly regulated trafficking of macromolecules is jeopardized secondary to prolonged zonulin up-regulation, the excessive flow of nonself antigens in the intestinal submucosa can cause both intestinal and extraintestinal autoimmune disorders in genetically susceptible individuals. This new paradigm subverts traditional theories underlying the development of autoimmunity, which are based on molecular mimicry and/or the bystander effect, and suggests that the autoimmune process can be arrested if the interplay between genes and environmental triggers is prevented by re-establishing intestinal barrier competency. Understanding the role of zonulin-dependent intestinal barrier dysfunction in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases is an area of translational research that encompasses many fields.

  18. Partial Enteral Nutrition Preserves Elements of Gut Barrier Function, Including Innate Immunity, Intestinal Alkaline Phosphatase (IAP) Level, and Intestinal Microbiota in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Wan, Xiao; Bi, Jingcheng; Gao, Xuejin; Tian, Feng; Wang, Xinying; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2015-01-01

    Lack of enteral nutrition (EN) during parenteral nutrition (PN) leads to higher incidence of infection because of gut barrier dysfunction. However, the effects of partial EN on intestina linnate immunity, intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) and microbiota remain unclear. The mice were randomized into six groups to receive either standard chow or isocaloric and isonitrogenous nutritional support with variable partial EN to PN ratios. Five days later, the mice were sacrificed and tissue sampl...

  19. Functional Analysis of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Pili in Relation to Adhesion and Immunomodulatory Interactions with Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claes, Ingmar; Tytgat, Hanne L. P.; Verhoeven, Tine L. A.; Marien, Eyra; von Ossowski, Ingemar; Reunanen, Justus; Palva, Airi; de Vos, Willem M.; De Keersmaecker, Sigrid C. J.; Vanderleyden, Jos

    2012-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, a probiotic with good survival capacity in the human gut, has well-documented adhesion properties and health effects. Recently, spaCBA-encoded pili that bind to human intestinal mucus were identified on its cell surface. Here, we report on the phenotypic analysis of a spaCBA pilus knockout mutant in comparison with the wild type and other adhesin mutants. The SpaCBA pilus of L. rhamnosus GG showed to be key for efficient adherence to the Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) line and biofilm formation. Moreover, the spaCBA mutant induces an elevated level of interleukin-8 (IL-8) mRNA in Caco-2 cells compared to the wild type, possibly involving an interaction of lipoteichoic acid with Toll-like receptor 2. In contrast, an L. rhamnosus GG mutant without exopolysaccharides but with an increased exposure of pili leads to the reduced expression of IL-8. Using Transwells to partition bacteria from Caco-2 cells, IL-8 induction is blocked completely regardless of whether wild-type or mutant L. rhamnosus GG cells are used. Taken together, our data suggest that L. rhamnosus GG SpaCBA pili, while promoting strong adhesive interactions with IECs, have a functional role in balancing IL-8 mRNA expression induced by surface molecules such as lipoteichoic acid. PMID:22020518

  20. Functional analysis of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG pili in relation to adhesion and immunomodulatory interactions with intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebeer, Sarah; Claes, Ingmar; Tytgat, Hanne L P; Verhoeven, Tine L A; Marien, Eyra; von Ossowski, Ingemar; Reunanen, Justus; Palva, Airi; Vos, Willem M de; Keersmaecker, Sigrid C J De; Vanderleyden, Jos

    2012-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, a probiotic with good survival capacity in the human gut, has well-documented adhesion properties and health effects. Recently, spaCBA-encoded pili that bind to human intestinal mucus were identified on its cell surface. Here, we report on the phenotypic analysis of a spaCBA pilus knockout mutant in comparison with the wild type and other adhesin mutants. The SpaCBA pilus of L. rhamnosus GG showed to be key for efficient adherence to the Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) line and biofilm formation. Moreover, the spaCBA mutant induces an elevated level of interleukin-8 (IL-8) mRNA in Caco-2 cells compared to the wild type, possibly involving an interaction of lipoteichoic acid with Toll-like receptor 2. In contrast, an L. rhamnosus GG mutant without exopolysaccharides but with an increased exposure of pili leads to the reduced expression of IL-8. Using Transwells to partition bacteria from Caco-2 cells, IL-8 induction is blocked completely regardless of whether wild-type or mutant L. rhamnosus GG cells are used. Taken together, our data suggest that L. rhamnosus GG SpaCBA pili, while promoting strong adhesive interactions with IECs, have a functional role in balancing IL-8 mRNA expression induced by surface molecules such as lipoteichoic acid.

  1. Protein kinase C-dependent signaling controls the midgut epithelial barrier to malaria parasite infection in anopheline mosquitoes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazzy Pakpour

    Full Text Available Anopheline mosquitoes are the primary vectors of parasites in the genus Plasmodium, the causative agents of malaria. Malaria parasites undergo a series of complex transformations upon ingestion by the mosquito host. During this process, the physical barrier of the midgut epithelium, along with innate immune defenses, functionally restrict parasite development. Although these defenses have been studied for some time, the regulatory factors that control them are poorly understood. The protein kinase C (PKC gene family consists of serine/threonine kinases that serve as central signaling molecules and regulators of a broad spectrum of cellular processes including epithelial barrier function and immunity. Indeed, PKCs are highly conserved, ranging from 7 isoforms in Drosophila to 16 isoforms in mammals, yet none have been identified in mosquitoes. Despite conservation of the PKC gene family and their potential as targets for transmission-blocking strategies for malaria, no direct connections between PKCs, the mosquito immune response or epithelial barrier integrity are known. Here, we identify and characterize six PKC gene family members--PKCδ, PKCε, PKCζ, PKD, PKN, and an indeterminate conventional PKC--in Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles stephensi. Sequence and phylogenetic analyses of the anopheline PKCs support most subfamily assignments. All six PKCs are expressed in the midgut epithelia of A. gambiae and A. stephensi post-blood feeding, indicating availability for signaling in a tissue that is critical for malaria parasite development. Although inhibition of PKC enzymatic activity decreased NF-κB-regulated anti-microbial peptide expression in mosquito cells in vitro, PKC inhibition had no effect on expression of a panel of immune genes in the midgut epithelium in vivo. PKC inhibition did, however, significantly increase midgut barrier integrity and decrease development of P. falciparum oocysts in A. stephensi, suggesting that PKC

  2. A hypermorphic epithelial β-catenin mutation facilitates intestinal tumorigenesis in mice in response to compounding WNT-pathway mutations

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    Michael Buchert

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway occurs in the vast majority of colorectal cancers. However, the outcome of the disease varies markedly from individual to individual, even within the same tumor stage. This heterogeneity is governed to a great extent by the genetic make-up of individual tumors and the combination of oncogenic mutations. In order to express throughout the intestinal epithelium a degradation-resistant β-catenin (Ctnnb1, which lacks the first 131 amino acids, we inserted an epitope-tagged ΔN(1-131-β-catenin-encoding cDNA as a knock-in transgene into the endogenous gpA33 gene locus in mice. The resulting gpA33ΔN-Bcat mice showed an increase in the constitutive Wnt/β-catenin pathway activation that shifts the cell fate towards the Paneth cell lineage in pre-malignant intestinal epithelium. Furthermore, 19% of all heterozygous and 37% of all homozygous gpA33ΔN-Bcat mice spontaneously developed aberrant crypt foci and adenomatous polyps, at frequencies and latencies akin to those observed in sporadic colon cancer in humans. Consistent with this, the Wnt target genes, MMP7  and Tenascin-C, which are most highly expressed in benign human adenomas and early tumor stages, were upregulated in pre-malignant tissue of gpA33ΔN-Bcat mice, but those Wnt target genes associated with excessive proliferation (i.e. Cdnn1, myc were not. We also detected diminished expression of membrane-associated α-catenin and increased intestinal permeability in gpA33ΔN-Bcat mice in challenge conditions, providing a potential explanation for the observed mild chronic intestinal inflammation and increased susceptibility to azoxymethane and mutant Apc-dependent tumorigenesis. Collectively, our data indicate that epithelial expression of ΔN(1-131-β-catenin in the intestine creates an inflammatory microenvironment and co-operates with other mutations in the Wnt/β-catenin pathway to facilitate and promote tumorigenesis.

  3. Tumor necrosis factor receptor 1-dependent depletion of mucus in immature small intestine: a potential role in neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis

    OpenAIRE

    McElroy, Steven J.; Prince, Lawrence S.; Weitkamp, Jörn-Hendrik; Reese, Jeff; Slaughter, James C.; Polk, D. Brent

    2011-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in premature infants. NEC is believed to occur when intestinal bacteria invade the intestinal epithelial layer, causing subsequent inflammation and tissue necrosis. Mucins are produced and secreted by epithelial goblet cells as a key component of the innate immune system and barrier function of the intestinal tract that help protect against bacterial invasion. To better understand the role of mucins in NEC, we quant...

  4. Inflammatory bowel diseases influence major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) and II compartments in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bär, F; Sina, C; Hundorfean, G; Pagel, R; Lehnert, H; Fellermann, K; Büning, J

    2013-05-01

    Antigen presentation by intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) is crucial for intestinal homeostasis. Disturbances of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I)- and II-related presentation pathways in IEC appear to be involved in an altered activation of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in inflammatory bowel disease. However, a comprehensive analysis of MHC I- and II-enriched compartments in IEC of the small and large bowel in the healthy state as opposed to inflammatory bowel diseases is lacking. The aim of this study was to characterize the subcellular expression of MHC I and II in the endocytic pathway of IEC throughout all parts of the intestinal tract, and to identify differences between the healthy state and inflammatory bowel diseases. Biopsies were taken by endoscopy from the duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon in healthy individuals (n = 20). In Crohn's disease (CD), biopsies were obtained from the ileum and colon and within the colon from ulcerative colitis (UC) patients (n = 15). Analysis of IEC was performed by immunoelectron microscopy. MHC I and II were identified in early endosomes and multi-vesicular, multi-lamellar, electrondense and vacuolar late endosomes. Both molecules were enriched in multi-vesicular bodies. No differences were found between the distinct parts of the gut axis. In CD and UC the expression of MHC I and II showed a shift from multi-vesicular bodies towards the basolateral membranes. Within the multi-vesicular bodies, MHC I and II moved from internal vesicles to the limiting membranes upon inflammation in CD and UC. MHC I- and II-enriched compartments in IEC were identical in all parts of the small and large bowel. CD and UC appear to modulate the MHC I- and II-related presentation pathways of exogenous antigens in IEC. © 2012 British Society for Immunology.

  5. The H2 receptor antagonist nizatidine is a P-glycoprotein substrate: characterization of its intestinal epithelial cell efflux transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan, Arik; Sabit, Hairat; Amidon, Gordon L

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the intestinal epithelial cell efflux transport processes that are involved in the intestinal transport of the H(2) receptor antagonist nizatidine. The intestinal epithelial efflux transport mechanisms of nizatidine were investigated and characterized across Caco-2 cell monolayers, in the concentration range 0.05-10 mM in both apical-basolateral (AP-BL) and BL-AP directions, and the transport constants of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) efflux activity were calculated. The concentration-dependent effects of various P-gp (verapamil, quinidine, erythromycin, ketoconazole, and cyclosporine A), multidrug resistant-associated protein 2 (MRP2; MK-571, probenecid, indomethacin, and p-aminohipuric acid), and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP; Fumitremorgin C) inhibitors on nizatidine bidirectional transport were examined. Nizatidine exhibited 7.7-fold higher BL-AP than AP-BL Caco-2 permeability, indicative of net mucosal secretion. All P-gp inhibitors investigated displayed concentration-dependent inhibition on nizatidine secretion in both directions. The IC(50) of verapamil on nizatidine P-gp secretion was 1.2 x 10(-2) mM. In the absence of inhibitors, nizatidine displayed concentration-dependent secretion, with one saturable (J(max) = 5.7 x 10(-3) nmol cm(-2) s(-1) and K(m) = 2.2 mM) and one nonsaturable component (K(d) = 7 x 10(-4) microL cm(-2) s(-1)). Under complete P-gp inhibition, nizatidine exhibited linear secretory flux, with a slope similar to the nonsaturable component. V(max) and K(m) estimated for nizatidine P-gp-mediated secretion were 4 x 10(-3) nmol cm(-2) s(-1) and 1.2 mM, respectively. No effect was obtained with the MRP2 or the BCRP inhibitors. Being a drug commonly used in pediatrics, adults, and elderly, nizatidine susceptibility to efflux transport by P-gp revealed in this paper may be of significance in its absorption, distribution, and clearance, as well as possible drug-drug interactions.

  6. Identification of a Predominantly Interferon-λ-Induced Transcriptional Profile in Murine Intestinal Epithelial Cells

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    Tharini A. Selvakumar

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Type I (α and β and type III (λ interferons (IFNs induce the expression of a large set of antiviral effector molecules via their respective surface membrane receptors. Whereas most cell types respond to type I IFN, type III IFN preferentially acts on epithelial cells and protects mucosal organs such as the lung and gastrointestinal tract. Despite the engagement of different receptor molecules, the type I and type III IFN-induced signaling cascade and upregulated gene profile is thought to be largely identical. Here, we comparatively analyzed the response of gut epithelial cells to IFN-β and IFN-λ2 and identified a set of genes predominantly induced by IFN-λ2. We confirm the influence of epithelial cell polarization for enhanced type III receptor expression and demonstrate the induction of predominantly IFN-λ2-induced genes in the gut epithelium in vivo. Our results suggest that IFN-λ2 targets the epithelium and induces genes to adjust the antiviral host response to the requirements at mucosal body sites.

  7. Alteration of intestinal barrier function during activity-based anorexia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jésus, Pierre; Ouelaa, Wassila; François, Marie; Riachy, Lina; Guérin, Charlène; Aziz, Moutaz; Do Rego, Jean-Claude; Déchelotte, Pierre; Fetissov, Sergueï O; Coëffier, Moïse

    2014-12-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a severe eating disorder often leading to malnutrition and cachexia, but its pathophysiology is still poorly defined. Chronic food restriction during anorexia nervosa may induce gut barrier dysfunction, which may contribute to disease development and its complications. Here we have characterized intestinal barrier function in mice with activity-based anorexia (ABA), an animal model of anorexia nervosa. Male C57Bl/6 ABA or limited food access (LFA) mice were placed respectively in cages with or without activity wheel. After 5 days of acclimatization, both ABA and LFA mice had progressively limited access to food from 6 h/d at day 6 to 3 h/d at day 9 and until the end of experiment at day 17. A group of pair-fed mice (PF) was also compared to ABA. On day 17, food intake was lower in ABA than LFA mice (2.0 ± 0.18 g vs. 3.0 ± 0.14 g, p anorexia nervosa. The role of these alterations in the pathophysiology of anorexia nervosa should be further evaluated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  8. Digestive enzyme expression and epithelial structure of small intestine in neonatal rats after 16 days spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, M.; Yamasaki, M.; Hazama, A.; Ijiri, K.; Shimizu, T.

    It is important to assure whether digestive system can develop normally in neonates during spaceflight. Because the small intestine changes its function and structure drastically around weaning known as redifferentiation. Lactase expression declines and sucrase increases in small intestine for digestion of solid food before weaning. In this paper, we compared this enzyme transition and structural development of small intestine in neonatal rats after spaceflight. To find digestive genes differentially expressed in fight rats, DNA membrane macroarray was also used. Eight-day old rats were loaded to Space Shuttle Columbia, and housed in the animal facility for 16 days in space (STS-90, Neurolab mission). Two control groups (AGC; asynchronous ground control and VIV; vivarium) against flight group (FLT) were prepared. There was no difference in structure (crypt depth) and cell differentiation of epithelium between FLT and AGC by immunohistochemical analysis. We found that the amount of sucrase mRNA compared to lactase was decreased in FLT by RT-PCR. It reflected the enzyme transition was inhibited. Increase of 5 genes (APO A-I, APO A-IV, ACE, aFABP and aminopeptidase M) and decrease of carboxypeptidase-D were detected in FLT using macroarray. We think nutrition differences (less nourishment and late weaning) during spaceflight may cause inhibition of enzyme transition at least partly. The weightlessness might contribute to the inhibition through behavioral change.

  9. The ESRP1-GPR137 axis contributes to intestinal pathogenesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Mager, Lukas Franz; Kölzer, Viktor Hendrik; Stuber Roos, Regula; Thoo Sin Lang, Lester; Keller, Irene; Köck, Ivonne; Langenegger, Maya; Simillion, Cedric; Pfister, Simona P; Faderl, Martin Richard; Genitsch Gratwohl, Vera; Tcymbarevich, Irina; Juillerat, Pascal; Li, Xiaohong; Xia, Yu

    2017-01-01

    eLife digest The lining of the intestine is just one cell thick, and yet it can act as an effective barrier between the inside of the body and the contents of the digestive system. This lining is often disturbed during bowel cancer, inflammatory bowel disease and other intestinal diseases, causing the barrier to fail and the gut to become leaky. These diseases often reduce patient life expectancy and quality of life. Intestinal epithelial cells make up the lining of the intestine and the norm...

  10. Up-regulation of intestinal epithelial cell derived IL-7 expression by keratinocyte growth factor through STAT1/IRF-1, IRF-2 pathway.

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    Yu-Jiao Cai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Epithelial cells(EC-derived interleukin-7 (IL-7 plays a crucial role in control of development and homeostasis of neighboring intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL, and keratinocyte growth factor (KGF exerts protective effects on intestinal epithelial cells and up-regulates EC-derived IL-7 expression through KGFR pathway. This study was to further investigate the molecular mechanism involved in the regulation of IL-7 expression by KGF in the intestine. METHODS: Intestinal epithelial cells (LoVo cells and adult C57BL/6J mice were treated with KGF. Epithelial cell proliferation was studied by flow cytometry for BrdU-incorporation and by immunohistochemistry for PCNA staining. Western blot was used to detect the changes of expression of P-Tyr-STAT1, STAT1, and IL-7 by inhibiting STAT1. Alterations of nuclear extracts and total proteins of IRF-1, IRF-2 and IL-7 following IRF-1 and IRF-2 RNA interference with KGF treatment were also measured with western blot. Moreover, IL-7 mRNA expressions were also detected by Real-time PCR and IL-7 protein level in culture supernatants was measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay(ELISA. RESULTS: KGF administration significantly increased LoVo cell proliferation and also increased intestinal wet weight, villus height, crypt depth and crypt cell proliferation in mice. KGF treatment led to increased levels of P-Tyr-STAT1, RAPA and AG490 both blocked P-Tyr-STAT1 and IL-7 expression in LoVo cells. IRF-1 and IRF-2 expression in vivo and in vitro were also up-regulated by KGF, and IL-7 expression was decreased after IRF-1 and IRF-2 expression was silenced by interfering RNA, respectively. CONCLUSION: KGF could up-regulate IL-7 expression through the STAT1/IRF-1, IRF-2 signaling pathway, which is a new insight in potential effects of KGF on the intestinal mucosal immune system.

  11. Thyroid hormone-regulated Wnt5a/Ror2 signaling is essential for dedifferentiation of larval epithelial cells into adult stem cells in the Xenopus laevis intestine.

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    Atsuko Ishizuya-Oka

    Full Text Available Amphibian intestinal remodeling, where thyroid hormone (T3 induces some larval epithelial cells to become adult stem cells analogous to the mammalian intestinal ones, serves as a unique model for studying how the adult stem cells are formed. To clarify its molecular mechanisms, we here investigated roles of non-canonical Wnt signaling in the larval-to-adult intestinal remodeling during Xenopus laevis metamorphosis.Our quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR and immunohistochemical analyses indicated that the expressions of Wnt5a and its receptors, frizzled 2 (Fzd2 and receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor 2 (Ror2 are up-regulated by T3 and are spatiotemporally correlated with adult epithelial development in the X. laevis intestine. Notably, changes in morphology of larval absorptive epithelial cells expressing Ror2 coincide well with formation of the adult stem cells during metamorphosis. In addition, by using organ cultures of the tadpole intestine, we have experimentally shown that addition of exogenous Wnt5a protein to the culture medium causes morphological changes in the larval epithelium expressing Ror2 even in the absence of T3. In contrast, in the presence of T3 where the adult stem cells are formed in vitro, inhibition of endogenous Wnt5a by an anti-Wnt5a antibody suppressed the epithelial morphological changes, leading to the failure of stem cell formation.Our findings strongly suggest that the adult stem cells originate from the larval absorptive cells expressing Ror2, which require Wnt5a/Ror2 signaling for their dedifferentiation accompanied by changes in cell morphology.

  12. Effects of quinoa hull meal on piglet performance and intestinal epithelial physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlson, Dorthe; Fernandez, J.A.; Poulsen, H.D.

    2012-01-01

    Saponin-containing feed additives have shown positive effects on pig performance. Quinoa hull has high saponin content and may be of interest as a feed additive. This study aimed to evaluate quinoa hull meal (QHM) as a feed additive in a pig diet. The effects of QHM were assessed for three dosage...... that consumed 100 or 300 mg/kg SA-QHM. The secretory response to 5-HT was not affected (p = 0.59) by dietary treatments, but the theophylline-induced secretion decreased (p = 0.02) with increasing dietary SA-QHM. The changes in epithelial physiology mea...

  13. Cobalt chloride compromises transepithelial barrier properties of CaCo-2 BBe human gastrointestinal epithelial cell layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGuilio, K M; Valenzano, M C; Rybakovsky, E; Mullin, J M

    2018-01-05

    Elevation of the transcription factor HIF-1 is a prominent mediator of not only processes that accompany hypoxia, but also the tumor microenvironment and tissue regeneration. This study uses mediators of "chemical hypoxia" to ask the question whether HIF-1α elevation in a healthy epithelial cell layer leads to leakiness in its tight junctional seals. Transepithelial electrical resistance and transepithelial diffusion of 14 C-D-mannitol and other radiolabeled probes are used as indicators of transepithelial barrier function of CaCo-2 BBe human gastrointestinal epithelial cell layers cultured on permeable supports. Western immunoblot analyses of integral tight junctional proteins (occludin and claudins) are used as further indicators of barrier function change. Cobalt, an inhibitor of the prolyl hydroxylase enzymes governing HIF-1α breakdown in the cell, induces transepithelial leakiness in CaCo-2 BBe cell layers in a time and concentration-dependent manner. This increased leakiness is accompanied by significant changes in certain specific integral tight junctional (TJ) proteins such as a decreased level of occludin and increased level of claudin-5. Similar results regarding barrier function compromise also occur with other chemical inhibitors of HIF-1α breakdown, namely ciclopiroxolamine (CPX) and dimethyloxalylglycine (DMOG). The increased leak is manifested by both decreased transepithelial electrical resistance (R t ) and increased paracellular diffusion of D-mannitol (J m ). The induced transepithelial leak shows significant size selectivity, consistent with induced effects on TJ permeability. Less-differentiated cell layers were significantly more affected than well-differentiated cell layers regarding induced transepithelial leak. A genetically modified CaCo-2 variant with reduced levels of HIF-1β, showed reduced transepithelial leak in response to cobalt exposure, further indicating that elevation of HIF-1α levels induced by agents of "chemical hypoxia

  14. Effect of Ozone on Intestinal Epithelial Homeostasis in a Rat Model

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    Igor Sukhotnik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The positive effects of ozone therapy have been described in many gastrointestinal disorders. The mechanisms of this positive effect of ozone therapy are poorly understood. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether the use of ozone may potentiate the gut intestinal mucosal homeostasis in a rat model. Methods: Adult rats weighing 250–280 g were randomly assigned to one of three experimental groups of 8 rats each: 1 Control rats were given 2 mL of water by gavage and intraperitoneally (IP for 5 days; 2 O3-PO rats were treated with 2 mL of ozone/oxygen mixture by gavage and 2 mL of water IP for 5 days; 3 O3-IP rats were treated with 2 mL of water by gavage and 2 mL of ozone/oxygen mixture IP for 5 days. Rats were sacrificed on day 6. Bowel and mucosal weight, mucosal DNA and protein, villus height and crypt depth, and cell proliferation and apoptosis were evaluated following sacrifice. Results: The group of O3-IP rats demonstrated a greater jejunal and ileal villus height and crypt depth, a greater enterocyte proliferation index in jejunum, and lower enterocyte apoptosis in ileum compared to control animals. Oral administration of the ozone/oxygen mixture resulted in a less significant effect on cell turnover. Conclusions: Treatment with an ozone/oxygen mixture stimulates intestinal cell turnover in a rat model. Intraperitoneal administration of ozone resulted in a more significant intestinal trophic effect than oral administration.

  15. Immunomodulatory Effects of Lactobacillus plantarum Lp62 on Intestinal Epithelial and Mononuclear Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thalis Ferreira dos Santos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Probiotic lactic acid bacteria are known for their ability to modulate the immune system. They have been shown to inhibit inflammation in experiments with animal models, cell culture, and clinical trials. The objective of this study was to elucidate the anti-inflammatory potential of Lactobacillus plantarum Lp62, isolated from cocoa fermentation, in a cell culture model. Lp62 inhibited IL-8 production by Salmonella Typhi-stimulated HT-29 cells and prevented the adhesion of pathogens to these epithelial cells. The probiotic strain was able to modulate TNF-α, IL1-β, and IL-17 secretion by J774 macrophages. J774 activation was reduced by coincubation with Lp62. PBMC culture showed significantly higher levels of CD4+CD25+ T lymphocytes following treatment with Lp62. Probiotics also induced increased IL-10 secretion by mononuclear cells. L. plantarum Lp62 was able to inhibit inflammatory stimulation in epithelial cells and macrophages and activated a tolerogenic profile in mononuclear cells of healthy donors. These results indicate this strain for a possible application in the treatment or prevention of inflammatory diseases.

  16. Gut microbiota regulates NKG2D ligand expression on intestinal epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Camilla Hartmann Friis; Holm, Thomas L.; Krych, Lukasz

    2013-01-01

    expression on small IECs. Germ-free and ampicillin-treated mice were shown to have a significant increase in NKG2D ligand expression. Interestingly, vancomycin treatment, which propagated the bacterium Akkermansia muciniphila and reduced the level of IFN-¿ and IL-15 in the intestine, decreased the NKG2D...... that the constitutive levels of NKG2D ligand expression on IECs are regulated by microbial signaling in the gut and further disfavor the intuitive notion that IEC NKG2D ligand expression is caused by low-grade immune reaction against commensal bacteria. It is more likely that constitutively high IEC NKG2D ligand...

  17. (--Epicatechin protects the intestinal barrier from high fat diet-induced permeabilization: Implications for steatosis and insulin resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Cremonini

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Increased permeability of the intestinal barrier is proposed as an underlying factor for obesity-associated pathologies. Consumption of high fat diets (HFD is associated with increased intestinal permeabilization and increased paracellular transport of endotoxins which can promote steatosis and insulin resistance. This study investigated whether dietary (--epicatechin (EC supplementation can protect the intestinal barrier against HFD-induced permeabilization and endotoxemia, and mitigate liver damage and insulin resistance. Mechanisms leading to loss of integrity and function of the tight junction (TJ were characterized. Consumption of a HFD for 15 weeks caused obesity, steatosis, and insulin resistance in male C57BL/6J mice. This was associated with increased intestinal permeability, decreased expression of ileal TJ proteins, and endotoxemia. Supplementation with EC (2–20 mg/kg body weight mitigated all these adverse effects. EC acted modulating cell signals and the gut hormone GLP-2, which are central to the regulation of intestinal permeability. Thus, EC prevented HFD-induced ileum NOX1/NOX4 upregulation, protein oxidation, and the activation of the redox-sensitive NF-κB and ERK1/2 pathways. Supporting NADPH oxidase as a target of EC actions, in Caco-2 cells EC and apocynin inhibited tumor necrosis alpha (TNFα-induced NOX1/NOX4 overexpression, protein oxidation and monolayer permeabilization. Together, our findings demonstrate protective effects of EC against HFD-induced increased intestinal permeability and endotoxemia. This can in part underlie EC capacity to prevent steatosis and insulin resistance occurring as a consequence of HFD consumption. Keywords: Intestinal permeability, (--Epicatechin, Steatosis, Insulin resistance, Endotoxemia, NADPH oxidase

  18. (Na+ + K+)-ATPase and plasma membrane polarity of intestinal epithelial cells: Presence of a brush border antigen in the distal large intestine that is immunologically related to beta subunit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marxer, A.; Stieger, B.; Quaroni, A.; Kashgarian, M.; Hauri, H.P. (Univ. of Basel (Switzerland))

    1989-09-01

    The previously produced monoclonal antibody IEC 1/48 against cultured rat intestinal crypt cells was extensively characterized and found to be directed against the beta subunit of (Na+ + K+)-ATPase as assessed by immunological and enzymatic criteria. Under nondenaturing conditions the antibody precipitated the alpha-beta enzyme complex (98,000 and 48,000 Mr). This probe, together with the monoclonal antibody C 62.4 against the alpha subunit was used to localize (Na+ + K+)-ATPase in epithelial cells along the rat intestinal tract by immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy. Both antibodies exclusively labeled the basolateral membrane of small intestine and proximal colon epithelial cells. However, in the distal colon, IEC 1/48, but not C 62.4, also labeled the brush border membrane. The cross-reacting beta-subunit-like antigen on the apical cell pole was tightly associated with isolated brush borders but was apparently devoid of (Na+ + K+)-ATPase activity. Subcellular fractionation of colonocytes in conjunction with limited proteolysis and surface radioiodination of intestinal segments suggested that the cross-reacting antigen in the brush border may be very similar to the beta subunit. The results support the notion that in the small intestine and proximal colon the enzyme subunits are exclusively targeted to the basolateral membrane while in the distal colon nonassembled beta subunit or a beta-subunit-like protein is also transported to the apical cell pole.

  19. Host Epithelial Interactions with Helicobacter Pylori: A Role for Disrupted Gastric Barrier Function in the Clinical Outcome of Infection?

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    Andre G Buret

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection of the human stomach with Helicobacter pylori may develop into gastritis, ulceration, adenocarcinoma and mucosal lymphomas. The pathogenic mechanisms that determine the clinical outcome from this microbial-epithelial interaction remain poorly understood. An increasing number of reports suggests that disruptions of epithelial barrier function may contribute to pathology and postinfectious complications in a variety of gastrointestinal infections. The aim of this review is to critically discuss the implications of H pylori persistence on gastric disease, with emphasis on the role of myosin light chain kinase, claudins and matrix metalloproteinases in gastric permeability defects, and their contribution to the development of cancer. These mechanisms and the associated signalling events may represent novel therapeutic targets to control disease processes induced by H pylori, a microbial pathogen that colonizes the stomach of over 50% of the human population.

  20. Administration of Protein kinase D1 induce an immunomodulatory effect on lipopolysaccharide-induced intestinal inflammation in a co-culture model of intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells and RAW 264.7 macrophage cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ditte Søvsø Gundelund; Fredborg, Marlene; Andersen, Vibeke

    2017-01-01

    the effects of human PKD1 in relation to intestinal inflammation, using a co-culture model of intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells and RAW264.7 macrophages. An inflammatory response was induced in the macrophages by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), upregulating the expression of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF......-α), interleukin- (IL-) 1β, and IL-6 besides increasing the secretion of TNF-α protein. The effect of administering PKD1 to Caco-2 was evaluated in relation to both amelioration of inflammation and the ability to suppress inflammation initiation. Administration of PKD1 (10–100 ng/ml) following induction...

  1. Carbachol ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced intestinal epithelial tight junction damage by down-regulating NF-{kappa}{beta} and myosin light-chain kinase pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ying [Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care Medicine and Emergency Medicine Center, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071, Hubei Province, People' s Republic of China (China); Li, Jianguo, E-mail: 2010lijianguo@sina.cn [Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care Medicine and Emergency Medicine Center, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071, Hubei Province, People' s Republic of China (China)

    2012-11-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbachol reduced the lipopolysaccharide-induced intestinal barrier breakdown. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbachol ameliorated the lipopolysaccharide-induced ileal tight junction damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbachol prevented the LPS-induced NF-{kappa}{beta} and myosin light-chain kinase activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbachol exerted its beneficial effects in an {alpha}7 nicotinic receptor-dependent manner. -- Abstract: Carbachol is a cholinergic agonist that protects the intestines after trauma or burn injury. The present study determines the beneficial effects of carbachol and the mechanisms by which it ameliorates the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced intestinal barrier breakdown. Rats were injected intraperitoneally with 10 mg/kg LPS. Results showed that the gut barrier permeability was reduced, the ultrastructural disruption of tight junctions (TJs) was prevented, the redistribution of zonula occludens-1 and claudin-2 proteins was partially reversed, and the nuclear factor-kappa beta (NF-{kappa}{beta}) and myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK) activation in the intestinal epithelium were suppressed after carbachol administration in LPS-exposed rats. Pretreatment with the {alpha}7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ({alpha}7nAchR) antagonist {alpha}-bungarotoxin blocked the protective action of carbachol. These results suggested that carbachol treatment can protect LPS-induced intestinal barrier dysfunction. Carbachol exerts its beneficial effect on the amelioration of the TJ damage by inhibiting the NF-{kappa}{beta} and MLCK pathways in an {alpha}7nAchR-dependent manner.

  2. Sugars increase non-heme iron bioavailability in human epithelial intestinal and liver cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Christides

    Full Text Available Previous studies have suggested that sugars enhance iron bioavailability, possibly through either chelation or altering the oxidation state of the metal, however, results have been inconclusive. Sugar intake in the last 20 years has increased dramatically, and iron status disorders are significant public health problems worldwide; therefore understanding the nutritional implications of iron-sugar interactions is particularly relevant. In this study we measured the effects of sugars on non-heme iron bioavailability in human intestinal Caco-2 cells and HepG2 hepatoma cells using ferritin formation as a surrogate marker for iron uptake. The effect of sugars on iron oxidation state was examined by measuring ferrous iron formation in different sugar-iron solutions with a ferrozine-based assay. Fructose significantly increased iron-induced ferritin formation in both Caco-2 and HepG2 cells. In addition, high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS-55 increased Caco-2 cell iron-induced ferritin; these effects were negated by the addition of either tannic acid or phytic acid. Fructose combined with FeCl3 increased ferrozine-chelatable ferrous iron levels by approximately 300%. In conclusion, fructose increases iron bioavailability in human intestinal Caco-2 and HepG2 cells. Given the large amount of simple and rapidly digestible sugars in the modern diet their effects on iron bioavailability may have important patho-physiological consequences. Further studies are warranted to characterize these interactions.

  3. Sugars increase non-heme iron bioavailability in human epithelial intestinal and liver cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christides, Tatiana; Sharp, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that sugars enhance iron bioavailability, possibly through either chelation or altering the oxidation state of the metal, however, results have been inconclusive. Sugar intake in the last 20 years has increased dramatically, and iron status disorders are significant public health problems worldwide; therefore understanding the nutritional implications of iron-sugar interactions is particularly relevant. In this study we measured the effects of sugars on non-heme iron bioavailability in human intestinal Caco-2 cells and HepG2 hepatoma cells using ferritin formation as a surrogate marker for iron uptake. The effect of sugars on iron oxidation state was examined by measuring ferrous iron formation in different sugar-iron solutions with a ferrozine-based assay. Fructose significantly increased iron-induced ferritin formation in both Caco-2 and HepG2 cells. In addition, high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS-55) increased Caco-2 cell iron-induced ferritin; these effects were negated by the addition of either tannic acid or phytic acid. Fructose combined with FeCl3 increased ferrozine-chelatable ferrous iron levels by approximately 300%. In conclusion, fructose increases iron bioavailability in human intestinal Caco-2 and HepG2 cells. Given the large amount of simple and rapidly digestible sugars in the modern diet their effects on iron bioavailability may have important patho-physiological consequences. Further studies are warranted to characterize these interactions.

  4. Ghrelin ameliorates intestinal barrier dysfunction in experimental colitis by inhibiting the activation of nuclear factor-kappa B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Jian; Zhang, Lin [Department of Gastroenterology, Jinshan Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Dai, Weiqi [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai Tenth People' s Hospital, Tongji University, Shanghai (China); Mao, Yuqing [Department of Gastroenterology, Jinshan Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Li, Sainan [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai Tenth People' s Hospital, Tongji University, Shanghai (China); Wang, Jingjie; Li, Huanqing [Department of Gastroenterology, Jinshan Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Guo, Chuanyong [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai Tenth People' s Hospital, Tongji University, Shanghai (China); Fan, Xiaoming, E-mail: xiaomingfan57@sina.com [Department of Gastroenterology, Jinshan Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai (China)

    2015-02-27

    Aim: This study aimed to investigate the effect and underlying mechanism of ghrelin on intestinal barrier dysfunction in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. Methods and results: Acute colitis was induced in C57BL/6J mice by administering 2.5% DSS. Saline or 25, 125, 250 μg/kg ghrelin was administrated intraperitoneally (IP) to mice 1 day before colitis induction and on days 4, 5, and 6 after DSS administration. IP injection of a ghrelin receptor antagonist, [D-lys{sup 3}]-GHRP-6, was performed immediately prior to ghrelin injection. Ghrelin (125 or 250 μg/kg) could reduce the disease activity index, histological score, and myeloperoxidase activities in experimental colitis, and also prevented shortening of the colon. Ghrelin could prevent the reduction of transepithelial electrical resistance and tight junction expression, and bolstered tight junction structural integrity and regulated cytokine secretion. Ultimately, ghrelin inhibited nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), inhibitory κB-α, myosin light chain kinase, and phosphorylated myosin light chain 2 activation. Conclusions: Ghrelin prevented the breakdown of intestinal barrier function in DSS-induced colitis. The protective effects of ghrelin on intestinal barrier function were mediated by its receptor GHSR-1a. The inhibition of NF-κB activation might be part of the mechanism underlying the effects of ghrelin that protect against barrier dysfunction. - Highlights: • Ghrelin ameliorates intestinal barrier dysfunction in experimental colitis. • The effect of ghrelin is mediated by GHSR-1a. • Inhibition of NF-κB activation.

  5. Intestinal Epithelial Cell-Intrinsic Deletion of Setd7 Identifies Role for Developmental Pathways in Immunity to Helminth Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenery, Alistair L.; Redpath, Stephen A.; Braam, Mitchell J.; Perona-Wright, Georgia

    2016-01-01

    The intestine is a common site for a variety of pathogenic infections. Helminth infections continue to be major causes of disease worldwide, and are a significant burden on health care systems. Lysine methyltransferases are part of a family of novel attractive targets for drug discovery. SETD7 is a member of the Suppressor of variegation 3-9-Enhancer of zeste-Trithorax (SET) domain-containing family of lysine methyltransferases, and has been shown to methylate and alter the function of a wide variety of proteins in vitro. A few of these putative methylation targets have been shown to be important in resistance against pathogens. We therefore sought to study the role of SETD7 during parasitic infections. We find that Setd7 -/- mice display increased resistance to infection with the helminth Trichuris muris but not Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri. Resistance to T. muris relies on an appropriate type 2 immune response that in turn prompts intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) to alter differentiation and proliferation kinetics. Here we show that SETD7 does not affect immune cell responses during infection. Instead, we found that IEC-specific deletion of Setd7 renders mice resistant to T. muris by controlling IEC turnover, an important aspect of anti-helminth immune responses. We further show that SETD7 controls IEC turnover by modulating developmental signaling pathways such as Hippo/YAP and Wnt/β-Catenin. We show that the Hippo pathway specifically is relevant during T. muris infection as verteporfin (a YAP inhibitor) treat