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Sample records for intestinal diseases

  1. [Intestinal parasitic diseases in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mare, Anca; Man, A; Toma, Felicia; Székely, Edit; Lôrinczi, Lilla; Sipoş, Anca

    2007-01-01

    To compare the incidence of intestinal parasitosis between children with residence in urban and rural areas: to compare the efficacy of parasitologic diagnostic methods. In our study we included two lots of children. The first lot consisted in 74 children from rural areas from which we collected 44 samples of feces and 55 samples for the "Scotch tape" test. The second lot consisted in 214 children from urban areas from which we collected 44 samples of feces. We examined each sample of feces by three different methods. The study was performed between April to June 2006. The incidence of intestinal parasitosis increases in children from urban areas towards rural areas, and in children between 5 and 10 years. Ascariasis is the most frequent disease in both urban and rural areas. By examination of each fecal sample by three different methods, the number of positive cases increased. The residence in rural areas and age between 5 to 10 years are risk factors for intestinal parasitosis. The "Scotch tape" test was more efficient in Enterobius vermicularis infection than the methods performed from feces. We recommend using at the same time three diagnostic methods for feces examination to improve the diagnostic sensibility.

  2. Intestinal epithelium in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coskun, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    homeostasis. Therefore, dysregulation within the epithelial layer can increase intestinal permeability, lead to abnormalities in interactions between IECs and immune cells in underlying lamina propria, and disturb the intestinal immune homeostasis, all of which are linked to the clinical disease course......The intestinal epithelium has a strategic position as a protective physical barrier to luminal microbiota and actively contributes to the mucosal immune system. This barrier is mainly formed by a monolayer of specialized intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) that are crucial in maintaining intestinal...

  3. Intestinal epithelium in inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet eCoskun

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal epithelium has a strategic position as a protective physical barrier to luminal microbiota and actively contributes to the mucosal immune system. This barrier is mainly formed by a monolayer of specialized intestinal epithelial cells (IECs that are crucial in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. Therefore, dysregulation within the epithelial layer can increase intestinal permeability, lead to abnormalities in interactions between IECs and immune cells in underlying lamina propria, and disturb the intestinal immune homeostasis, all of which are linked to the clinical disease course of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Understanding the role of the intestinal epithelium in IBD pathogenesis might contribute to an improved knowledge of the inflammatory processes and the identification of potential therapeutic targets.

  4. Intestinal Microbiota Influences Non-intestinal Related Autoimmune Diseases

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    Maria C. Opazo

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The human body is colonized by millions of microorganisms named microbiota that interact with our tissues in a cooperative and non-pathogenic manner. These microorganisms are present in the skin, gut, nasal, oral cavities, and genital tract. In fact, it has been described that the microbiota contributes to balancing the immune system to maintain host homeostasis. The gut is a vital organ where microbiota can influence and determine the function of cells of the immune system and contributes to preserve the wellbeing of the individual. Several articles have emphasized the connection between intestinal autoimmune diseases, such as Crohn's disease with dysbiosis or an imbalance in the microbiota composition in the gut. However, little is known about the role of the microbiota in autoimmune pathologies affecting other tissues than the intestine. This article focuses on what is known about the role that gut microbiota can play in the pathogenesis of non-intestinal autoimmune diseases, such as Grave's diseases, multiple sclerosis, type-1 diabetes, systemic lupus erythematosus, psoriasis, schizophrenia, and autism spectrum disorders. Furthermore, we discuss as to how metabolites derived from bacteria could be used as potential therapies for non-intestinal autoimmune diseases.

  5. Intestinal tuberculosis sometimes mimics Crohn's disease.

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    Esfandiar Shojaei

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal tuberculosis is an uncommon presentation of tuberculosis (TB and has clinicopathological similarities with Crohn's disease. In regions where TB is endemic clinicians must aware of this condition and fully evaluate their patients when Crohn's disease is diagnosed. We recommend all pathologic specimens be evaluate effectively for TB.Smear,culture and PCR for Mycobacterium.tuberculosis from samples aside the pathological reviews help for better diagnosis. Here we present a case of intestinal tuberculosis which initially diagnosed as Crohn's disease but after starting immunosuppressive agents he presented with disseminated tuberculosis.

  6. Relationship between intestinal microflora imbalance and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

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    MA Ruijuan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal microecosystem is composed of natural microflora, intestinal epithelial cells, and intestinal mucosal immune system. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is a metabolic stress-induced liver injury associated with insulin resistance and genetic susceptibility. In recent years, there has been increasing evidence showing the involvement of imbalanced intestinal microflora in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. Overgrowth of intestinal microflora, increased permeability of intestinal mucosa, intestinal endotoxemia, and production of inflammatory cytokines play important roles in the development of NAFLD. Further studies on the relationship between intestinal microflora imbalance and the pathogenesis of NAFLD may shed light on the treatment and prevention of NAFLD.

  7. [Interaction between humans and intestinal bacteria as a determinant for intestinal health : intestinal microbiome and inflammatory bowel diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, Dirk; Hörmannsperger, G

    2015-02-01

    Recent scientific results underline the importance of the intestinal microbiome, the totality of all intestinal microbes and their genes, for the health of the host organism. The intestinal microbiome can therefore be considered as a kind of "external organ". It has been shown that the intestinal microbiota is a complex and dynamic ecosystem that influences host immunity and metabolism beyond the intestine. The composition and functionality of the intestinal microbiota is of major importance for the development and maintenance of intestinal functions. Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are characterized by dysregulated interactions between the host and its microbiota.The present contribution summarizes current knowledge of the composition and development of the intestinal microbiome and gives an overview of the bidirectional interaction between host and microbiota. The contribution informs about insights regarding the role of the intestinal microbiota in IBD and finally discusses the protective potential of microbial therapies in the context of IBD.

  8. Intestinal tuberculosis simulating Crohn's disease: Differential diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Morales, Natalia; García-Campos, María; Cordón, Gisselle; Iborra, Marisa

    2018-03-13

    Tuberculosis is a public health's problema in the world. Its incidence is increasing in our environment due to inmigration and the use of inmunosupressors. It's a systemic disease that can affect rarely the gastrointestinal tract. We should take into account the epidemiological and clinical context of each patient, because the differential diagnosis is broad. It can mimic with other diseases, such as Crohn's disease. We report a case of intestinal tuberculosis, and underline the importance of the differential diagnosis of these patients. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. MRI diagnosis of small intestinal Crohn's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Xiaojun; Zhang Shizheng; Zhang Qiaowei; Liu Hai

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of small intestinal Crohn's disease. Methods: The MRI findings in 13 cases of small intestinal Crohn's disease proved by surgery and pathology were analyzed retrospectively. The patients included 12 men and 1 woman, and their age ranged from 17 to 64 years. The MR images were reviewed for the number, location, and mural thickness of diseased bowel segments, for the ratio of signal intensity of diseased bowel wall to normal bowel wall after the IV administration of Gd-DTPA or enhanced ratio of diseased bowel wall, and for the complications (phlegmon, inflammatory mass, abscess, and fistula). Six patients received air-infused MR enteroclysis-enhanced scan was performed directly in the fat saturated coronal and axial plane after about 1000 ml of air was infused into small bowel through a nasoenteric catheter. Another 7 patients received small intestinal hydro-MRI--MR images were obtained in fat saturated enhanced coronal and axial plane as well as in unenhanced coronal plane.Twenty mg of IV anisodamine was given to reduce peristalsis in all patients, and fat saturation was used in all sequences. Results: The diseased bowel segment of every case was demonstrated in MRI. The sensitivity was 100%. Thirty-six inflammatory segments were revealed in all (mean 2.8 segments per patient). The MRI findings of small intestinal Crohn's disease were that the enhancement of diseased bowel wall increased significantly. The ratios of signal intensity of diseased bowel wall to normal bowel wall were 1.9-2.5 (mean, 2.1) in the group of air-infused enteroclysis. The ratios of signal intensity of diseased bowel wall to normal bowel wall were 1.3-2.9 (mean, 1.9) and the enhanced ratios of diseased bowel wall were 96%-223% (mean, 133%), but the enhanced ratios of normal bowel wall were 31%-78% (mean, 59%). Thirty-three segments (92%) of diseased bowel wall thickened (thickness between 5-27 mm), and the

  10. Intestinal barrier integrity and inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmberg, Fredrik Eric Olof; Pedersen, Jannie; Jørgensen, Peter

    2017-01-01

    of antimicrobial peptides. Inflammatory bowel disease is associated with life-long morbidity for affected patients, and both the incidence and prevalence is increasing globally, resulting in substantial economic strain for society. Mucosal healing and re-establishment of barrier integrity is associated......, novel treatment strategies to accomplish mucosal healing and to re-establish normal barrier integrity in inflammatory bowel disease are warranted, and luminal stem cell-based approaches might have an intriguing potential. Transplantation of in vitro expanded intestinal epithelial stem cells derived...

  11. Effects of Radiation on the Microbiota and Intestinal Inflammatory Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    evaluating the effects of these changes on intestinal susceptibility to inflammatory disease. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Radiation, microbiome , mycobiome...immune cells associated with the intestine and their interactions with the normal microbial contents of the gut. 2. KEYWORDS Radiation, microbiome ... microbiome following TBI. At the end of the experiment, we also harvested the intestines and mesenteric lymph nodes for multiparametric flow cytometry and

  12. Effects of Radiation on the Microbiota and Intestinal Inflammatory Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0300 TITLE: Effects of Radiation on the Microbiota and Intestinal Inflammatory Disease PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Effects of Radiation on the Microbiota and Intestinal Inflammatory Disease 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0300 5c...changes in the microbiota on intestinal susceptibility to inflammatory disease . 15. SUBJECT TERMS Radiation, microbiome, mycobiome, colitis, cancer 16

  13. Ileum Histoplasmosis Mimicking Intestinal Tuberculosis and Crohn's Disease.

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    Ai, Xin-Bo; Wang, Zhen-Jiang; Dong, Qi-Chao; Lin, Xu; Chen, Yu-Ping; Gong, Fei-Yue; Liang, Hui

    2018-01-01

    Gastrointestinal histoplasmosis (GIH) without pulmonary and bone marrow involvement is very rare worldwide. It can be misdiagnosed as intestinal tuberculosis or Crohn's disease. There are just few case reports of GIH in patients with a positive HIV antibody test. Here, we report a patient who presented to our hospital with repeated intestinal obstruction. The suspicious diagnosis was intestinal tuberculosis or Crohn's disease due to unspecific clinical manifestations and radiologic images. Our patient's HIV antibody test was negative. She had no medical prescriptions. Therefore, our differential diagnosis needed to include ileum histoplasmosis besides intestinal lymphoma, intestinal tuberculosis, and Crohn's disease. Finally, the patient was diagnosed with ileum histoplasmosis due to surgical resection. It is important to be aware of potential infectious diseases, such as ileum histoplasmosis, when making a differential diagnosis. Moreover, surgical resection might be the final approach for small-intestine stricture with fibrosis.

  14. Pediatric intestinal failure-associated liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Cathleen M; Warner, Brad W

    2017-06-01

    The goal of this review is to provide updates on the definition, pathophysiology, treatment, and prevention of intestinal failure-associated liver disease (IFALD) that are relevant to care of pediatric patients. Current literature emphasizes the multifactorial nature of IFALD. The pathogenesis is still largely unknown; however, molecular pathways have been identified. Key to these pathways are proinflammatory cytokines involved in hepatic inflammation and bile acids synthesis such as Toll-like receptor 4 and farnesoid X receptor, respectively. Research for prevention and treatment is aimed at alleviating risk factors associated with IFALD, principally those associated with parental nutrition. Multiple nutrients and amino acids are relevant to the development of IFALD, but lipid composition has been the primary focus. Lipid emulsions with a lower ratio of omega-6-to-omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (FAs) appear to improve bile flow and decrease intrahepatic inflammation. Long-term consequences of these alternative lipid emulsions are yet to be determined. IFALD remains the greatest contributor of mortality in patients with intestinal failure. Many factors contribute to its development, namely, alterations in the gut microbiome, sepsis, and lack of enteral intake. Novel combinations of lipid formulations are promising alternatives to purely soy-based formulas to reduce cholestasis.

  15. Fecal markers of intestinal inflammation and intestinal permeability are elevated in Parkinson's disease.

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    Schwiertz, Andreas; Spiegel, Jörg; Dillmann, Ulrich; Grundmann, David; Bürmann, Jan; Faßbender, Klaus; Schäfer, Karl-Herbert; Unger, Marcus M

    2018-02-12

    Intestinal inflammation and increased intestinal permeability (both possibly fueled by dysbiosis) have been suggested to be implicated in the multifactorial pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). The objective of the current study was to investigate whether fecal markers of inflammation and impaired intestinal barrier function corroborate this pathogenic aspect of PD. In a case-control study, we quantitatively analyzed established fecal markers of intestinal inflammation (calprotectin and lactoferrin) and fecal markers of intestinal permeability (alpha-1-antitrypsin and zonulin) in PD patients (n = 34) and controls (n = 28, group-matched for age) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The study design controlled for potential confounding factors. Calprotectin, a fecal marker of intestinal inflammation, and two fecal markers of increased intestinal permeability (alpha-1-antitrypsin and zonulin) were significantly elevated in PD patients compared to age-matched controls. Lactoferrin, as a second fecal marker of intestinal inflammation, showed a non-significant trend towards elevated concentrations in PD patients. None of the four fecal markers correlated with disease severity, PD subtype, dopaminergic therapy, or presence of constipation. Fecal markers reflecting intestinal inflammation and increased intestinal permeability have been primarily investigated in inflammatory bowel disease so far. Our data indicate that calprotectin, alpha-1-antitrypsin and zonulin could be useful non-invasive markers in PD as well. Even though these markers are not disease-specific, they corroborate the hypothesis of an intestinal inflammation as contributing factor in the pathogenesis of PD. Further investigations are needed to determine whether calprotectin, alpha-1-antitrypsin and zonulin can be used to define PD subgroups and to monitor the effect of interventions in PD. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Interactions between the intestinal microbiome and liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnabl, Bernd; Brenner, David A

    2014-05-01

    The human intestine harbors a diverse community of microbes that promote metabolism and digestion in their symbiotic relationship with the host. Disturbance of its homeostasis can result in disease. We review factors that disrupt intestinal homeostasis and contribute to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, steatohepatitis, alcoholic liver disease, and cirrhosis. Liver disease has long been associated with qualitative and quantitative (overgrowth) dysbiotic changes in the intestinal microbiota. Extrinsic factors, such as the Western diet and alcohol, contribute to these changes. Dysbiosis results in intestinal inflammation, a breakdown of the intestinal barrier, and translocation of microbial products in animal models. However, the contribution of the intestinal microbiome to liver disease goes beyond simple translocation of bacterial products that promote hepatic injury and inflammation. Microbial metabolites produced in a dysbiotic intestinal environment and host factors are equally important in the pathogenesis of liver disease. We review how the combination of liver insult and disruptions in intestinal homeostasis contribute to liver disease. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. New therapeutic approach in the management of intestinal disease: probiotics in intestinal disease in paediatric age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucchiara, S; Falconieri, P; Di Nardo, G; Parcelii, M A; Dito, L; Grandinetti, A

    2002-09-01

    Current evidence supports the view that oral administration of probiotics may be of therapeutic usefulness in several clinical disorders by reestablishing normal flora in the gastrointestinal tract. These entities include inflammatory and infectious diseases of the gut as well as extraintestinal disorders (such as atopic eczema) in which a defective intestinal permeability plays a role. The probiotic effects are attributed to restoration to normal of increased intestinal permeability, unbalanced gut microecology, improved immunological gut barrier function, downregulation of the intestinal inflammatory responses with reduced generation of proinflammatory cytokines. Entities for which the impact of probiotic administration can be considered as proven are Rotavirus diarrhoea, Clostridium difficile diarrhoea, post-antibiotic diarrhoea, allergic diseases. On the other hand, entities for which administration of probiotics is considered under investigation are inflammatory bowel disease, necrotizing enterocolitis, cystic fibrosis, small bowel bacterial contamination, functional gastrointestinal disorders. The value of probiotics as therapy for a variety of gastrointestinal disorders in childhood still needs to be investigated in detail, through well controlled and rigorous studies, including a placebo group and strict criteria of randomisation. Much work needs to be done in this area by clearly defining indications, delivery system, costs, safety long-term effects.

  18. Radiologic study on differential diagnosis of intestinal tuberculosis and intestinal Behcet's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Chul; Kim, Young Goo; Kim, Sang Joon; Choi, Byung Ihn; Park, Jae Hyung

    1986-01-01

    Radiologic findings in 30 patients with intestinal tuberculosis and 10 patients with intestinal Behcet's disease, who had been diagnosed at Seoul National University Hospital during the recent 5 years, were analysed retrospectively to evaluate the radiologic differential diagnosis of the two diseases. Intestinal tuberculosis severely involved the cecum, the ileocecal valve, the distal ileum and colons, but Behcet's disease mainly involved the distal ileum and infrequently the ileocecal valve and the cecum. The ulcers in tuberculosis were usually multiple small barium collected areas among pseudopolyps, on the contrary, those in Behcet's disease were multiple, discrete, well marinated, geographic, ring-like deep penetrating or collar-button shaped. Intestinal tuberculosis tended to involved long segments of intestines, with severer mucosal irregularity and deformity of the ileocecal valve and the ascending colon in comparison with Behcet's disease. Mesenteric and/or peritoneal involvement were accompanied in 1/3 cases of intestinal tuberculosis, and active pulmonary tuberculosis or pleural effusion also in 1/3 cases of intestinal tuberculosis.

  19. Intestinal permeability - a new target for disease prevention and therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bischoff, S.C.; Barbara, G.; Buurman, W.; Ockhuizen, T.; Schulzke, J.D.; Serino, M.; Tilg, H.; Watson, A.; Wells, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Data are accumulating that emphasize the important role of the intestinal barrier and intestinal permeability for health and disease. However, these terms are poorly defined, their assessment is a matter of debate, and their clinical significance is not clearly established. In the present review,

  20. Laminated Intestinal Calculi – A Rare Complication of Crohn's Disease

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    Hugh J Freeman

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available A 59-year-old male with a 36-year history of Crohn's disease and repeated resections for small intestinal strictures developed anemia and symptoms of an intermittent partial bowel obstruction. Barium studies showed recurrent small intestinal strictures as well as filling defects in a dilated loop proximal to a stenosed segment. Subsequent abdominal films and a computed tomographic study suggested laminated radiopaque calculi with peripheral calcification in the dilated small intestinal loop. Resection of the strictured segment confirmed the presence of intestinal enterolithiasis.

  1. Research Progress of Intestinal Microbiota in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

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    Shao-shun YE

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disseases (IBD are chronic recurrent diseases occurring in the gastrointestinal tract, mainly including ulcerative colitis (UC and Crohn’s disease (CD. At present, the etiological factors and mechanism of IBD are still unclear yet. However, it is widely believed that IBD is caused by immune dysfunction, genetic factors, gut barrier dysfuction and dysbacteriosis, change of dietary structure, use of antibiotics, smoking, and environment. Studies suggest that breaking the accurate balance between host and intestinal microbiota in patients with IBD can trigger immuno-inflammatory responses in genetically susceptible individuals. Therefore, regulating intestinal microbiota disturbance and recovery of intestinal homeostasis between host and intestinal microbiota become a new treatment direction for IBD. This article mainly reviewed research progress of intestinal microbiota in pathogenetic mechanism and treatment of IBD.

  2. Determination of Intestine Inflammation Markers in Diagnostic Search in Children with Intestinal Diseases

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    N.V. Pavlenko

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Prevalence of bowel diseases in children is the second, trailing only the diseases of gastroduodenal zone and growing in recent years. Actual one is the problem of differential diagnosis of functional and inflammatory intestinal diseases using non-invasive methods on the prehospital stage and as a screening. Objective. Comparative analysis of fecal markers of the bowel inflammation (lactoferrine and calprotectine with endoscopy and morphology of intestinal mucosa in children. Matherials and methods. 49 children aged 6–18 years were examined. All patients underwent endoscopic and morphological study of the intestine, coprotest, determination of fecal markers of bowel inflammation (lactoferrin and calprotectine. Results. It is shown that in young children, the intestinal mucosa mainly hadn’t endoscopic changes, coprotest and morphological examination didn’t reveal the signs of inflammation, fecal intestinal inflammation markers were negative (p < 0.05. In the group of older children, moderate or marked catarrhal changes were found endoscopically, coprotest results were typical of inflammation in the intestines, it was morphologically proved the presence of chronic inflammation of the mucous membrane of the colon with signs of atrophy, the results of lactoferrin and calprotectine determination were positive (p < 0.05. Conclusion. The findings suggest that the evaluation of calprotectine and lactoferrin can be used in pediatric patients because of its non-invasiveness as diagnostic screening for the selection of patients for the further endoscopic examination and diagnostic search.

  3. Bile acids and intestinal microbiota in autoimmune cholestatic liver diseases.

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    Li, You; Tang, Ruqi; Leung, Patrick S C; Gershwin, M Eric; Ma, Xiong

    2017-09-01

    Autoimmune cholestatic liver diseases, including primary biliary cholangitis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), are manifested as an impairment of normal bile flow and excessive accumulation of potentially toxic bile acids. Endogenous bile acids are involved in the pathogenesis and progression of cholestasis. Consequently, chronic cholestasis affects the expression of bile acid transporters and nuclear receptors, and results in liver injury. Several lines of evidence suggest that intestinal microbiota plays an important role in the etiopathogenesis of cholestatic liver diseases by regulating metabolism and immune responses. However, progression of the disease may also affect the composition of gut microbiota, which in turn exacerbates the progression of cholestasis. In addition, the interaction between intestinal microbiota and bile acids is not unidirectional. Bile acids can shape the gut microbiota community, and in turn, intestinal microbes are able to alter bile acid pool. In general, gut microbiota actively communicates with bile acids, and together play an important role in the pathogenesis of PBC and PSC. Targeting the link between bile acids and intestinal microbiota offers exciting new perspectives for the treatment of those cholestatic liver diseases. This review highlights current understanding of the interactions between bile acids and intestinal microbiota and their roles in autoimmune cholestatic liver diseases. Further, we postulate a bile acids-intestinal microbiota-cholestasis triangle in the pathogenesis of autoimmune cholestatic liver diseases and potential therapeutic strategies by targeting this triangle. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Intestinal disease in acquired immunodeficiency: evaluation by CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knollmann, F.D.; Maeurer, J.; Felix, R. [Strahlenklinik und Poliklinik, Virchow-Klinikum, Medizinische Fakultaet der Humboldt-Universitaet, Augustenburger Platz 1, D-13 353 Berlin (Germany); Gruenewald, T.; Pohle, H.D. [Medizinische Klinik II mit Schwerpunkt Infektionskrankheiten, Virchow-Klinikum, Medizinische Fakultaet der Humboldt-Universitaet, Augustenburger Platz 1, D-13 353 Berlin (Germany); Adler, A.; Hintze, R.E. [Klinik fuer Innere Medizin mit dem Schwerpunkt Gastroenterologie, Zentrale Interdisziplinaere Endoskopie, Virchow-Klinikum, Medizinische Fakultaet der Humboldt-Universitaet, Augustenburger Platz 1, D-13 353 Berlin (Germany)

    1997-12-01

    Intestinal symptoms affect most AIDS patients at some point in their disease. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of CT in this setting. A total of 339 abdominal CT exams were reviewed for signs of intestinal disease. Abdominal CT scans of 45 patients with intestinal symptoms were compared with colonoscopy and histologic data. The CT results were correlated with CD4{sup +} T-lymphocyte counts and patient survival. More than 14 % of all abdominal CT exams displayed signs of enteric disease. Of the 45 patients studied with both CT and colonoscopy, 35 (78 %) had signs of intestinal disease by CT. Of these 35 patients, colonoscopic signs of an intestinal lesion were found in 29 and histologic proof of disease was established in 30 cases. Colonoscopy and histology detected 8 lesions missed by CT. There were 14 cases of unspecific colitis, 15 cases of cytomegalovirus (CMV) colitis, and 4 cases of enteric tuberculosis as per biopsy. Five patients presented with Kaposi`s sarcoma and 1 with a non-Hodgkin`s lymphoma. Neither colonoscopic nor CT signs of intestinal disease did reliably distinguish between histologic subgroups. Specifically, CMV colitis could not be distinguished from unspecific colitis. CD4{sup +} T-lymphocyte counts for histologic subgroups were not significantly different, either. No colonoscopic or histologic feature predicted survival, whereas low CD4 counts and ascites on CT indicated a poor prognosis. Whereas CT detects signs of intestinal disease in most AIDS patients, these signs remain largely unspecific. Colonoscopy and biopsies provide no consistently valid standard with which to compare CT because of controversial sensitivity and specificity of these methods. The CT technique detects small bowel as well as extraintestinal disease. Therefore, CT is an important diagnostic modality in abdominal disease of immunocompromised patients. (orig.) With 7 figs., 6 tabs., 30 refs.

  5. Intestinal disease in acquired immunodeficiency: evaluation by CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knollmann, F.D.; Maeurer, J.; Felix, R.; Gruenewald, T.; Pohle, H.D.; Adler, A.; Hintze, R.E.

    1997-01-01

    Intestinal symptoms affect most AIDS patients at some point in their disease. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of CT in this setting. A total of 339 abdominal CT exams were reviewed for signs of intestinal disease. Abdominal CT scans of 45 patients with intestinal symptoms were compared with colonoscopy and histologic data. The CT results were correlated with CD4 + T-lymphocyte counts and patient survival. More than 14 % of all abdominal CT exams displayed signs of enteric disease. Of the 45 patients studied with both CT and colonoscopy, 35 (78 %) had signs of intestinal disease by CT. Of these 35 patients, colonoscopic signs of an intestinal lesion were found in 29 and histologic proof of disease was established in 30 cases. Colonoscopy and histology detected 8 lesions missed by CT. There were 14 cases of unspecific colitis, 15 cases of cytomegalovirus (CMV) colitis, and 4 cases of enteric tuberculosis as per biopsy. Five patients presented with Kaposi's sarcoma and 1 with a non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Neither colonoscopic nor CT signs of intestinal disease did reliably distinguish between histologic subgroups. Specifically, CMV colitis could not be distinguished from unspecific colitis. CD4 + T-lymphocyte counts for histologic subgroups were not significantly different, either. No colonoscopic or histologic feature predicted survival, whereas low CD4 counts and ascites on CT indicated a poor prognosis. Whereas CT detects signs of intestinal disease in most AIDS patients, these signs remain largely unspecific. Colonoscopy and biopsies provide no consistently valid standard with which to compare CT because of controversial sensitivity and specificity of these methods. The CT technique detects small bowel as well as extraintestinal disease. Therefore, CT is an important diagnostic modality in abdominal disease of immunocompromised patients. (orig.)

  6. Radiological aspects of Crohn's disease in small intestine: iconographic assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barros, Nestor de; Juliano, Adriana G.; Polizini, Jose M.R.; Rejtman, Debora; Cerri, Giovanni Guido; Rocha, Manoel de Souza

    1999-01-01

    The authors present the radiological features of Crohn's disease in small intestine as ways of differential diagnosis of others diseases of duodenum and adjacent organs. In this differentiation or confirmation of Crohn's disease the US and TC have proven to be clinically efficacious in the identification of lesions

  7. Intestinal tuberculosis versus crohn's disease: Clinical and radiological recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raju Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal tuberculosis is a common clinical problem in India. The clinical features of this disease are nonspecific and can be very similar to Crohn's disease. Radiological evaluation of the small bowel has undergone a paradigm shift in the last decade. This long tubular organ that has traditionally been difficult to evaluate can now be well-visualized by some innovative imaging and endoscopic techniques. This article highlights the state-of-the-art evaluation of ulceroconstrictive diseases of the bowel and provides recommendations for the differentiation of intestinal tuberculosis from Crohn's disease.

  8. Human organoids: a model system for intestinal diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Wiegerinck, C.L.

    2015-01-01

    You are what you eat. A common saying that indicates that your physical or mental state can be influenced by your choice of food. Unfortunately, not all people have the luxury to choose what to eat; this can be related to place of birth, social, economic state, or the physical inability of the diseased intestine to take up certain food. A cell layer, the epithelium, covers the intestine, and harbors the main functions of the intestine: uptake, digestion of food, and a barrier against unwanted...

  9. Intestinal fungi contribute to development of alcoholic liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, An-Ming; Inamine, Tatsuo; Hochrath, Katrin; Chen, Peng; Wang, Lirui; Llorente, Cristina; Bluemel, Sena; Hartmann, Phillipp; Koyama, Yukinori; Kisseleva, Tatiana; Torralba, Manolito G.; Moncera, Kelvin; Beeri, Karen; Chen, Chien-Sheng; Freese, Kim; Hellerbrand, Claus; Lee, Serene M.L.; Hoffman, Hal M.; Mehal, Wajahat Z.; Garcia-Tsao, Guadalupe; Mutlu, Ece A.; Keshavarzian, Ali; Brown, Gordon D.; Bataller, Ramon; Stärkel, Peter; Fouts, Derrick E.

    2017-01-01

    Chronic liver disease with cirrhosis is the 12th leading cause of death in the United States, and alcoholic liver disease accounts for approximately half of all cirrhosis deaths. Chronic alcohol consumption is associated with intestinal bacterial dysbiosis, yet we understand little about the contribution of intestinal fungi, or mycobiota, to alcoholic liver disease. Here we have demonstrated that chronic alcohol administration increases mycobiota populations and translocation of fungal β-glucan into systemic circulation in mice. Treating mice with antifungal agents reduced intestinal fungal overgrowth, decreased β-glucan translocation, and ameliorated ethanol-induced liver disease. Using bone marrow chimeric mice, we found that β-glucan induces liver inflammation via the C-type lectin–like receptor CLEC7A on Kupffer cells and possibly other bone marrow–derived cells. Subsequent increases in IL-1β expression and secretion contributed to hepatocyte damage and promoted development of ethanol-induced liver disease. We observed that alcohol-dependent patients displayed reduced intestinal fungal diversity and Candida overgrowth. Compared with healthy individuals and patients with non–alcohol-related cirrhosis, alcoholic cirrhosis patients had increased systemic exposure and immune response to mycobiota. Moreover, the levels of extraintestinal exposure and immune response correlated with mortality. Thus, chronic alcohol consumption is associated with an altered mycobiota and translocation of fungal products. Manipulating the intestinal mycobiome might be an effective strategy for attenuating alcohol-related liver disease. PMID:28530644

  10. Campylobacter concisus - a new player in intestinal disease

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    Nadeem Omar Kaakoush

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade Campylobacter concisus, a highly fastidious member of the Campylobacter genus has been described as an emergent pathogen of the human intestinal tract. Historically, C. concisus was associated with the human oral cavity and has been linked with periodontal lesions, including gingivitis and periodontitis, although currently its role as an oral pathogen remains contentious. Evidence to support the role of C. concisus in acute intestinal disease has come from studies that have detected or isolated C. concisus as sole pathogen in fecal samples from diarrheic patients. C. concisus has also been associated with chronic intestinal disease, its prevalence being significantly higher in children with newly diagnosed Crohn’s disease and adults with ulcerative colitis than in controls. Further C. concisus has been isolated from biopsy specimens of patients with Crohn’s disease. While such studies support the role of C. concisus as an intestinal pathogen, its isolation from healthy individuals, and failure of some studies to show a significant difference in C. concisus prevalence in subjects with diarrhea and healthy controls has raised contention as to its role in intestinal disease. Such findings could argue against the role of C. concisus in intestinal disease, however, the fact that C. concisus strains are genetically diverse raises the possibility that differences exist in their pathogenic potential. Evidence to support this view comes from studies showing strain specific differences in the ability of C. concisus to attach to and invade cells and produce virulence factors, including toxins and hemolytic phospholipase A. Further, sequencing of the genome of a C. concisus strain isolated from a child with Crohn’s disease (UNSWCD and comparison of this with the only other fully sequenced strain (BAA-1457 would suggest that major differences exist in the genetic make-up of this species which could explain different outcomes of C

  11. The role of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasano, Alfonso; Bove, Francesco; Gabrielli, Maurizio; Petracca, Martina; Zocco, Maria Assunta; Ragazzoni, Enzo; Barbaro, Federico; Piano, Carla; Fortuna, Serena; Tortora, Annalisa; Di Giacopo, Raffaella; Campanale, Mariachiara; Gigante, Giovanni; Lauritano, Ernesto Cristiano; Navarra, Pierluigi; Marconi, Stefano; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Bentivoglio, Anna Rita

    2013-08-01

    Parkinson's disease is associated with gastrointestinal motility abnormalities favoring the occurrence of local infections. The aim of this study was to investigate whether small intestinal bacterial overgrowth contributes to the pathophysiology of motor fluctuations. Thirty-three patients and 30 controls underwent glucose, lactulose, and urea breath tests to detect small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and Helicobacter pylori infection. Patients also underwent ultrasonography to evaluate gastric emptying. The clinical status and plasma concentration of levodopa were assessed after an acute drug challenge with a standard dose of levodopa, and motor complications were assessed by Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-IV and by 1-week diaries of motor conditions. Patients with small intestinal bacterial overgrowth were treated with rifaximin and were clinically and instrumentally reevaluated 1 and 6 months later. The prevalence of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth was significantly higher in patients than in controls (54.5% vs. 20.0%; P = .01), whereas the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection was not (33.3% vs. 26.7%). Compared with patients without any infection, the prevalence of unpredictable fluctuations was significantly higher in patients with both infections (8.3% vs. 87.5%; P = .008). Gastric half-emptying time was significantly longer in patients than in healthy controls but did not differ in patients based on their infective status. Compared with patients without isolated small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, patients with isolated small intestinal bacterial overgrowth had longer off time daily and more episodes of delayed-on and no-on. The eradication of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth resulted in improvement in motor fluctuations without affecting the pharmacokinetics of levodopa. The relapse rate of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth at 6 months was 43%. © 2013 Movement Disorder Society. Copyright © 2013 Movement

  12. Whole-Blood Taurine Concentrations in Cats With Intestinal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathrani, A; Fascetti, A J; Larsen, J A; Maunder, C; Hall, E J

    2017-07-01

    Increased delivery of taurine-conjugated bile acids to the distal bowel can lead to dysbiosis resulting in colitis in mouse models of inflammatory bowel disease. A similar situation also could occur in cats with intestinal disease and might therefore result in decreased whole-body taurine concentration. To determine whether whole-blood taurine concentrations are decreased at the time of diagnosis in cats with intestinal disease and to correlate concentrations with clinical and laboratory variables. Twenty-one cats with chronic inflammatory enteropathy and 7 cats with intestinal neoplasia from the University of Bristol. Cats that had undergone a thorough investigation consisting of a CBC, serum biochemistry, serum cobalamin and folate concentrations, transabdominal ultrasound examination and histopathology of intestinal biopsy specimens, as well as additional testing if indicated, were included. Whole-blood from these cats collected at the time of histologic diagnosis and stored in ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid was retrospectively analyzed for taurine with an automated high-performance liquid chromatography amino acid analyzer. Although whole-blood taurine concentrations remained within the reference range, those cats with predominantly large intestinal clinical signs had significantly lower concentrations than did cats with small intestinal and mixed bowel clinical signs (P = 0.033) and this difference also was significant when assessed only in cats with chronic inflammatory enteropathy (P = 0.019). Additional studies are needed to determine whether large intestinal signs in cats with chronic inflammatory enteropathy are caused by alterations in the microbiota arising as a consequence of increased delivery of taurine-conjugated bile acids. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  13. Autophagy and tight junction proteins in the intestine and intestinal diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-An A. Hu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal epithelium (IE forms an indispensible barrier and interface between the intestinal interstitium and the luminal environment. The IE regulates water, ion and nutrient transport while providing a barrier against toxins, pathogens (bacteria, fungi and virus and antigens. The apical intercellular tight junctions (TJ are responsible for the paracellular barrier function and regulate trans-epithelial flux of ions and solutes between adjacent cells. Increased intestinal permeability caused by defects in the IE TJ barrier is considered an important pathogenic factor for the development of intestinal inflammation, diarrhea and malnutrition in humans and animals. In fact, defects in the IE TJ barrier allow increased antigenic penetration, resulting in an amplified inflammatory response in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, necrotizing enterocolitis and ischemia-reperfusion injury. Conversely, the beneficial enhancement of the intestinal TJ barrier has been shown to resolve intestinal inflammation and apoptosis in both animal models of IBD and human IBD. Autophagy (self-eating mechanism is an intracellular lysosome-dependent degradation and recycling pathway essential for cell survival and homeostasis. Dysregulated autophagy has been shown to be directly associated with many pathological processes, including IBD. Importantly, the crosstalk between IE TJ and autophagy has been revealed recently. We showed that autophagy enhanced IE TJ barrier function by increasing transepithelial resistance and reducing the paracellular permeability of small solutes and ions, which is, in part, by targeting claudin-2, a cation-selective, pore-forming, transmembrane TJ protein, for lysosome (autophagy-mediated degradation. Interestingly, previous studies have shown that the inflamed intestinal mucosa in patients with active IBD has increased claudin-2 expression. In addition, inflammatory cytokines (for example, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6

  14. Small intestinal biopsies in celiac disease: duodenal or jejunal?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, JW; Wahab, PJ; Mulder, C.J.J.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For diagnosis and follow-up of celiac disease, pediatric societies advise that intestinal mucosal specimens should be obtained using suction capsule from the jejunum. This procedure is strenuous for patients, time-consuming, expensive and requires radiographic guidance. Mucosal biopsies

  15. The intestinal microflora of childhood patients with indicated celiac disease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kopečný, Jan; Mrázek, Jakub; Fliegerová, Kateřina; Frühauf, P.; Tučková, Ludmila

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 3 (2008), s. 214-216 ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/07/0414 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : celiac disease * intestinal microflora Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.172, year: 2008

  16. PENDING ISSUES OF PATHOGENESIS IN CHILDREN’S INFLAMMATORY INTESTINAL DISEASES. THE ROLE OF INTESTINAL PARIETAL MICROFLORA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.V. Shumilov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory intestinal diseases are among the critical issues in modern pediatrics. The article discusses the specific nature of genetic predisposition and immune mechanisms of this pathology, as well as the impact of intestinal microflora on the development and evolution of inflammatory intestinal diseases in children. It outlines current views on pathogenesis of Crohn’s disease and non-specific ulcerative colitis. It describes in detail the local immune system functioning mechanism of the digestive tract system and functions of its individual components. It explains the phenomenon of food tolerance. It demonstrates the results of modern research and further problem study prospects.Key words: inflammatory intestinal diseases, non-specific ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease, pathogenesis, intestinal microflora, children. (Pediatric Pharmacology. – 2010; 7(5:54-58

  17. X-ray diagnosis of Crohn's disease in the intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuster, R.; Erkelenz, I.

    1980-01-01

    The article describes the essential roentgenologic findings associated with Crohn's disease in the intestine, manifested as stenoses, thickening of the walls, fistula formation and pseudodiverticula or appearance of Bodart's intermediary segment, on the basis of characteristic findings, followed by valuation in respect of the exclusive possibility of diagnosis via radiology. The article goes into details in respect of differential diagnosis criteria, particularly whithin the frame of tumour diagnosis. Differentiation can be effected with the help of findings in peritoneal carcinosis and intestinal changes induced by radiation. (orig.) [de

  18. The intestinal barrier function and its involvement in digestive disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvo Romero, Eloísa; Alonso Cotoner, Carmen; Pardo Camacho, Cristina; Casado Bedmar, Maite; Vicario, María

    2015-11-01

    The gastrointestinal mucosal surface is lined with epithelial cells representing an effective barrier made up with intercellular junctions that separate the inner and the outer environments, and block the passage of potentially harmful substances. However, epithelial cells are also responsible for the absorption of nutrients and electrolytes, hence a semipermeable barrier is required that selectively allows a number of substances in while keeping others out. To this end, the intestine developed the "intestinal barrier function", a defensive system involving various elements, both intra- and extracellular, that work in a coordinated way to impede the passage of antigens, toxins, and microbial byproducts, and simultaneously preserves the correct development of the epithelial barrier, the immune system, and the acquisition of tolerance against dietary antigens and the intestinal microbiota. Disturbances in the mechanisms of the barrier function favor the development of exaggerated immune responses; while exact implications remain unknown, changes in intestinal barrier function have been associated with the development of inflammatory conditions in the gastrointestinal tract. This review details de various elements of the intestinal barrier function, and the key molecular and cellular changes described for gastrointestinal diseases associated with dysfunction in this defensive mechanism.

  19. Value of computed tomography in diagnosis of intestinal diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujikawa, Koichi; Yamane, Kosuke; Nakanishi, Tadashi; Miura, Yoshio; Kato, Yoshitaka; Yahata, Noriko; Iwamoto, Toshiyuki; Katayama, Hiroshi; Katsuta, Shizutomo.

    1987-01-01

    CT findings of 46 cases with inflammatory and other nontumoral bowel diseases were retrospectively studied. Patients were given 500 to 1000 ml of lukewarm water orally or rectally to distend the intestinal lumen. In all cases water-soluble iodine contrast media was administered intravenously. The CT findings in Crohn's disease included mural thickening, luminal narrowing, bowel wall enhancement, wall rigidity, serration of intestinal border, dilatation of mesenteric vessels, periintestinal blurring (inflamatory reaction of mesentery), fibrofatty proliferation, effusion, abscess and fistula. Many of these findings suggested the transmural nature of the disease and gave diagnostic clues of the disease. In cases with ulcerative colitis, thickening of bowel wall was insignificant and extraintestinal complications were absent. CT appears to play an important role in distinguishing Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Luminal narrowing and mural thickening were also observed in a case with intestinal ischemia, but these mural changes were not accompanied by mesenteric abnormalities to the degree of Crohn's disease. In cases with penetrating peptic ulcer and diverticulitis, CT demonstrated inflammatory reactions of surrounding tissue such as thickening of neighboring fascia, increase in attenuation value of mesenteric fat, effusion and abscess. Even in cases with confusing clinical symptoms, appendicitis was easily diagnosed on CT which showed swelling of appendix and inflammatory changes of surrounding structures. Mechanical obstruction of the intestine could be identified on CT by a notable change of luminal sizes at the site of obstruction. CT appearances of intussusception were distinctive and a soft tissue mass (intussusceptum) and mesenteric fat was seen within a markedly dilated intussuscipiens. CT could also reveal pancreatitis and splenic infarction as the causes of clinically-undiagnosed paralytic ileus. (J.P.N.)

  20. Intestinal Coccidiosis in a Patient with Alpha-chain Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Kristin; Bird, R. G.; Doe, W. F.

    1974-01-01

    During an ultrastructural study of small-intestinal mucosa from a patient suffering from alpha-chain disease organisms were identified within the epithelial cytoplasm which showed the fine structural features of the coccidian group. Though coccidiosis is well recognized as causing a diarrhoeal and often lethal illness in animals it has been neglected as a cause of disease in man. Thus this finding may be significant and warrants further investigation into its possible role in the pathogenesis of alpha-chain disease. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4 PMID:4131643

  1. Increased risk of intestinal cancer in Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jess, Tine; Gamborg, Michael; Matzen, Peter

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The risk of intestinal malignancy in Crohn's disease (CD) remains uncertain since risk estimates vary worldwide. The global CD population is growing and there is a demand for better knowledge of prognosis of this disease. Hence, the aim of the present study was to conduct a meta......-analysis of population-based data on intestinal cancer risk in CD. METHODS: The MEDLINE search engine and abstracts from international conferences were searched for the relevant literature by use of explicit search criteria. All papers fulfilling the strict inclusion criteria were scrutinized for data on population size......, time of follow-up, and observed to expected cancer rates. STATA meta-analysis software was used to perform overall pooled risk estimates (standardized incidence ratio (SIR), observed/expected) and meta-regression analyses of the influence of specific variables on SIR. RESULTS: Six papers fulfilled...

  2. Trust Your Gut: Galvanizing Nutritional Interest in Intestinal Cholesterol Metabolism for Protection Against Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyoung Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated that the intestine is a key target organ for overall health and longevity. Complementing these studies is the discovery of the trans-intestinal cholesterol efflux pathway and the emerging role of the intestine in reverse cholesterol transport. The surfacing dynamics of the regulation of cholesterol metabolism in the intestine provides an attractive platform for intestine-specific nutritional intervention strategies to lower blood cholesterol levels for protection against cardiovascular diseases. Notably, there is mounting evidence that stimulation of pathways associated with calorie restriction may have a large effect on the regulation of cholesterol removal by the intestine. However, intestinal energy metabolism, specifically the idiosyncrasies surrounding intestinal responses to energy deprivation, is poorly understood. The goal of this paper is to review recent insights into cholesterol regulation by the intestine and to discuss the potential for positive regulation of intestine-driven cholesterol removal through the nutritional induction of pathways associated with calorie restriction.

  3. Intestinal antimicrobial peptides during homeostasis, infection and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana R Muniz

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs, including defensins and cathelicidins, constitute an arsenal of innate regulators of paramount importance in the gut. The intestinal epithelium is exposed to myriad of enteric pathogens and these endogenous peptides are essential to fend off microbes and protect against infections. It is becoming increasingly evident that AMPs shape the composition of the commensal microbiota and help maintain intestinal homeostasis. They contribute to innate immunity, hence playing important functions in health and disease. AMP expression is tightly controlled by the engagement of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs and their impairment is linked to abnormal host responses to infection and inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD. In this review, we provide an overview of the mucosal immune barriers and the intricate crosstalk between the host and the microbiota during homeostasis. We focus on the AMPs and pay particular attention to how PRRs promote their secretion in the intestine. Furthermore, we discuss their production and main functions in three different scenarios, at steady state, throughout infection with enteric pathogens and IBD.

  4. [Intestinal failure and transplantation in microvillous inclusion disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Caamaño, B; Quiles Blanco, M J; Fernández Tomé, L; Burgos Lizáldez, E; Sarría Osés, J; Molina Arias, M; Prieto Bozano, G

    2015-09-01

    Microvillous inclusion disease is a rare autosomal recessive condition, characterized by severe secretory diarrhea that produces a permanent intestinal failure and dependency on parenteral nutrition. It usually begins in the neonatal period, and the only treatment at present is intestinal transplantation. A retrospective review was conducted on 6 patients (three males and three females) diagnosed with microvillous inclusion disease between 1998 and 2013. All debuted in the first month of life, with a median age of three days (range, 3-30 days), and had secretory diarrhea dependent on parenteral nutrition, with fasting fecal volume of 150-200ml/kg/day. Light microscopy of duodenal biopsy samples showed varying degrees of villous atrophy without cryptic hyperplasia, accumulation of PAS positive material in the cytoplasm of enterocytes brush border, and anti-CD10 immunostaining was suggestive of intracytoplasmic inclusions. Diagnostic confirmation was performed with electron microscopy. Two of them had a genetic study, and showed mutations in MYO5B gene. Three died and three are alive; two of them with an intestinal transplantation and the third waiting for a multivisceral transplantation. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Potential beneficial effects of butyrate in intestinal and extraintestinal diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canani, Roberto Berni; Costanzo, Margherita Di; Leone, Ludovica; Pedata, Monica; Meli, Rosaria; Calignano, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    The multiple beneficial effects on human health of the short-chain fatty acid butyrate, synthesized from non-absorbed carbohydrate by colonic microbiota, are well documented. At the intestinal level, butyrate plays a regulatory role on the transepithelial fluid transport, ameliorates mucosal inflammation and oxidative status, reinforces the epithelial defense barrier, and modulates visceral sensitivity and intestinal motility. In addition, a growing number of studies have stressed the role of butyrate in the prevention and inhibition of colorectal cancer. At the extraintestinal level, butyrate exerts potentially useful effects on many conditions, including hemoglobinopathies, genetic metabolic diseases, hypercholesterolemia, insulin resistance, and ischemic stroke. The mechanisms of action of butyrate are different; many of these are related to its potent regulatory effects on gene expression. These data suggest a wide spectrum of positive effects exerted by butyrate, with a high potential for a therapeutic use in human medicine. PMID:21472114

  6. Crohn’s disease and extra intestinal granulomatous lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasello, G; Scaglione, M; Mazzola, M; Gerges Geaga, A; Jurjus, A; Gagliardo, C; Sinagra, E; Damiani, P; Carini, F; Leone, A

    2018-01-01

    Crohn’s disease (CD) is an inflammatory bowel disease with a multifactorial etiology. Clinical features include mucosal erosion, diarrhea, weight loss and other complications such as formation of granuloma. In CD, granuloma is a non-neoplastic epithelioid lesion, formed by a compact aggregate of histiocytes with the absence of a central necrosis, however, the correlation among CD and the formation of granulomas is unknown. Many cases of granulomas in the extracellular site, related to CD, have been reported in the literature. These granulomas, at times, represented the only visible manifestation of the pathology. Extra intestinal granulomas have been found on ovaries, lungs, male genitalia, female genitalia, orofacial regions and skin. From the data in the literature it could be hypothesized that there is a cross-reaction of the immune system with similar antigenic epitopes belonging to different sites. This hypothesis, if checked, can place CD not only among inflammatory bowel disease but also among inflammatory diseases with systemic involvement.

  7. Immune Development and Intestinal Microbiota in Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Pozo-Rubio

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is an immune-mediated enteropathy, triggered by dietary wheat gluten and similar proteins of barley and rye in genetically susceptible individuals. The etiology of this disorder is complex, involving both environmental and genetic factors. The major genetic risk factor for CD is represented by HLA-DQ genes, which account for approximately 40% of the genetic risk; however, only a small percentage of carriers develop the disease. Gluten is the main environmental factor responsible for the signs and symptoms of the disease, but exposure to gluten does not fully explain the manifestation of CD. Epidemiological and clinical data suggest that environmental factors other than gluten might play a role in disease development, including early feeding practices (e.g., breast milk versus formula and duration of breastfeeding, infections, and alterations in the intestinal microbiota composition. Herein, we review what is known about the influence of dietary factors, exposure to infectious agents, and intestinal microbiota composition, particularly in early life, on the risk of developing CD, as well as the possible dietary strategies to induce or increase gluten tolerance.

  8. Zonulin, a newly discovered modulator of intestinal permeability, and its expression in coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasano, A; Not, T; Wang, W; Uzzau, S; Berti, I; Tommasini, A; Goldblum, S E

    2000-04-29

    We identified zonulin, a novel human protein analogue to the Vibrio cholerae derived Zonula occludens toxin, which induces tight junction disassembly and a subsequent increase in intestinal permeability in non-human primate intestinal epithelia. Zonulin expression was raised in intestinal tissues during the acute phase of coeliac disease, a clinical condition in which tight junctions are opened and permeability is increased.

  9. On infectious intestinal disease surveillance using social media content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zou, Bin; Lampos, Vasileios; Gorton, Russell

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates whether infectious intestinal diseases (IIDs) can be detected and quantified using social media content. Experiments are conducted on user-generated data from the microblogging service, Twitter. Evaluation is based on the comparison with the number of IID cases reported...... by traditional health surveillance methods. We employ a deep learning approach for creating a topical vocabulary, and then apply a regularised linear (Elastic Net) as well as a nonlinear (Gaussian Process) regression function for inference. We show that like previous text regression tasks, the nonlinear approach...

  10. [Intestinal parasitic diseases in HIV-infected patients in Uzbekistan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurtaev, Kh S; Badalova, N S; Zalialieva, M V; Osipova, S O

    2005-01-01

    Intestinal parasitic diseases were diagnosed in 100 HIV-infected patients at different stages of disease (its asymptomatic form, persistent generalized lymphoadenopathy, pre-AIDS, and AIDS) (Group 1), 100 Tashkent residents (Group 2), and 349 patients with gastrointestinal diseases, allergic dermatoses, and skin depigmentation foci (Group 3). The HIV-infected patients were found to have virtually all parasites, such as Giardia lamblia, Cryptosporidium parvum, Chilomastix mesnili, Entamoeba coli, Iodamoeba butschlii, Entamoeba histolytica/dispar, Endolimax nana, Blastocystis hominis, Enlerobius vermicularis, Ascaris lumbricoides, Hymenolepis nana, detectable in the population of Tashkent. The highest infestation with intestinal protozoa, including nonpathogenic amoebas and helmninths, was found in Groups 1 and 3. However, in all the forms of HIV infection, the infestation with E. histolytical/dispar was 10 times greater than that in Groups 2 and 3 (1% and 0.8%, respectively). G. lamblia was detected in 16, 21, and 45.2% in Groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. In all the HIV-infected patients, the content of CD8 lymphocytes was increased, but that of CD20 lymphocytes was normal. Parasites were detectable with different levels of CD4 lymphocytes, but C. parvum was found only if its count was > 200/ml. In the HIV-infected patients, the hyperproduction of IgE was caused mainly by helminths rather than protozoa. In these patients, the increased level of IgE was also noted in the absence of parasites.

  11. A Case of Intestinal Mastocytosis Misdiagnosed as Crohn's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Reggiani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Systemic mastocytosis (SM is a rare, heterogeneous and progressive disease, characterized by the accumulation of atypical mast cells in various organs, including the gastrointestinal tract. Gastrointestinal symptoms are present in up to 80% of patients with SM, the most common being abdominal pain, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting. Up to 50% of patients with SM do not have classical skin lesions at presentation, and in these patients the diagnosis of SM can be difficult for years. Here we report a case of SM that initially mimicked inflammatory bowel disease, although the patient showed poor response to steroid therapy. The right diagnosis was made only on the surgical specimen obtained after emergency surgery for intestinal obstruction. SM should therefore be considered in the diagnostic approach in patients with gastrointestinal symptoms not attributable to other pathologies and in cases of suspected inflammatory bowel disease with unusual course.

  12. Crosstalk between the intestinal microbiota and the innate immune system in intestinal homeostasis and inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupaul-Chicoine, Jeremy; Dagenais, Maryse; Saleh, Maya

    2013-09-01

    : Inflammatory bowel diseases are a set of complex and chronic disorders that arise in genetically predisposed individuals due to a lack of tolerance to the gut microflora. Although the intestinal microbiota is required for the proper development of the host and the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis, its dysbiosis is associated with inflammatory bowel diseases pathogenesis. In this review, we focus the discussion on the crosstalk between the innate immune system and the microbiota. We examine new findings from genetic and functional studies investigating the critical role of the intestinal epithelial cell layer and the processes that maintain its integrity in health and disease. We further explore the mechanisms of the mucosal innate immune system including dendritic cells, macrophages, and innate-like lymphocytes in mediating immunological tolerance at the steady state or pathogenic inflammatory responses in inflammatory bowel diseases.

  13. Is the Diagnosis of Celiac Disease Possible Without Intestinal Biopsy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maha Shomaf

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Coeliac disease is defined as a state of immune-mediated hyper-responsiveness to dietary gluten from wheat, barley, or rye in genetically predisposed individuals that results in tissue damage. The diagnosis is made by microscopic examination of a small intestinal biopsy, although serological testing for antibodies against tissue transglutaminase and deamidated gliadin peptide can be of great advantage. It has been suggested that duodenal biopsy can be avoided in patients with high levels of the tissue transglutaminase antibody, since a relationship has been found to be present between tissue transglutaminase antibody titres and coeliac disease. Aims: To study the correlation between tissue transglutaminase titre and small intestinal biopsy findings in patients with coeliac disease. Study Design: Diagnostic accuracy study. Methods: Ninety-five cases of patients diagnosed with coeliac disease and with positive serum tissue transglutaminase titres were retrieved from the Jordan University Hospital archives between December 2014 and December 2015. All the cases were classified according to the Marsh classification. Results: Ninety-five cases with a positive titre for the antibody were included in this study, 73 (76.8% of them were females and 22 cases (23.2% were males. The age of the patients ranged between 4 and 75 years with a mean age ± standard deviation of 32.3±14.7. The sensitivity was the highest in Marsh IIIC and lowest in Marsh IIIA (95% versus 68% respectively. The specificity was moderate (76% for all subtypes of Marsh III. Conclusion: This study showed a positive correlation between the tissue transglutaminase titre and the degree of duodenal damage (Marsh IIIC in patients with coeliac disease. In the presence of high tissue transglutaminase levels, duodenal biopsy might not be always necessary for diagnosis, particularly in symptomatic patients

  14. Constitutive STAT3 activation in intestinal T cells from patients with Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lovato, Paola; Brender, Christine; Agnholt, Jørgen

    2003-01-01

    Via cytoplasmic signal transduction pathways, cytokines induce a variety of biological responses and modulate the outcome of inflammatory diseases and malignancies. Crohn's disease is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease of unknown etiology. Perturbation of the intestinal cytokine homeostasis is ...

  15. Microbiome Heterogeneity Characterizing Intestinal Tissue and Inflammatory Bowel Disease Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Andrea D; Kirsch, Richard; Milgrom, Raquel; Stempak, Joanne M; Kabakchiev, Boyko; Silverberg, Mark S

    2016-04-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease has been associated with differential abundance of numerous organisms when compared to healthy controls (HCs); however, few studies have investigated variability in the microbiome across intestinal locations and how this variability might be related to disease location and phenotype. In this study, we have analyzed the microbiome of a large cohort of individuals recruited at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto, Canada. Biopsies were taken from subjects with Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, and HC, and also individuals having undergone ileal pouch-anal anastomosis for treatment of ulcerative colitis or familial adenomatous polyposis. Microbial 16S rRNA was sequenced using the Illumina MiSeq platform. We observed a great deal of variability in the microbiome characterizing different sampling locations. Samples from pouch and afferent limb were comparable in microbial composition. When comparing sigmoid and terminal ileum samples, more differences were observed. The greatest number of differentially abundant microbes was observed when comparing either pouch or afferent limb samples to sigmoid or terminal ileum. Despite these differences, we were able to observe modest microbial variability between inflammatory bowel disease phenotypes and HCs, even when controlling for sampling location and additional experimental factors. Most detected associations were observed between HCs and Crohn's disease, with decreases in specific genera in the families Ruminococcaceae and Lachnospiraceae characterizing tissue samples from individuals with Crohn's disease. This study highlights important considerations when analyzing the composition of the microbiome and also provides useful insight into differences in the microbiome characterizing these seemingly related phenotypes.

  16. Small Intestine Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease Crohn's disease Infections Intestinal cancer Intestinal obstruction Irritable bowel syndrome Ulcers, such as peptic ulcer Treatment of disorders of the small intestine depends on the cause.

  17. Nutritional components regulate the gut immune system and its association with intestinal immune disease development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamichhane, Aayam; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Kunisawa, Jun

    2013-12-01

    The gut is equipped with a unique immune system for maintaining immunological homeostasis, and its functional immune disruption can result in the development of immune diseases such as food allergy and intestinal inflammation. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that nutritional components play an important role in the regulation of gut immune responses and also in the development of intestinal immune diseases. In this review, we focus on the immunological functions of lipids, vitamins, and nucleotides in the regulation of the intestinal immune system and as potential targets for the control of intestinal immune diseases. © 2013 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. Fecal microbiome in dogs with inflammatory bowel disease and intestinal lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    OMORI, Marie; MAEDA, Shingo; IGARASHI, Hirotaka; OHNO, Koichi; SAKAI, Kosei; YONEZAWA, Tomohiro; HORIGOME, Ayako; ODAMAKI, Toshitaka; MATSUKI, Naoaki

    2017-01-01

    Although alteration of commensal microbiota is associated with chronic gastrointestinal (GI) diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in dogs, the microbiota composition in intestinal lymphoma, an important differential diagnosis of canine IBD, has not been investigated. The objective of this study was to compare the fecal microbiota in dogs with IBD, dogs with intestinal lymphoma, and healthy dogs. Eight dogs with IBD, eight dogs with intestinal lymphoma, and fifteen healthy dogs we...

  19. Celiac disease and intestinal metaplasia of the esophagus (Barrett's esophagus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maieron, Roberto; Elli, Luca; Marino, Marco; Floriani, Irene; Minerva, Francesco; Avellini, Claudio; Falconieri, Giovanni; Pizzolitto, Stefano; Zilli, Maurizio

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies on celiac patients demonstrated that exposure to gliadin alters the motility of the upper gastrointestinal tract, leading to increased acid reflux. No literature is available regarding the possible presence of specialized intestinal metaplasia of the esophagus as a consequence of chronic reflux in adult celiac patients. Our purpose was to evaluate endoscopically and histologically the esophagi of a group of untreated celiac patients. We studied 60 celiac patients, 13 men and 47 women (mean age, 40 +/- 14 [SD] years; range, 18-80 years), at their first endoscopy (following a normal diet). The distal esophagus was evaluated and multiple biopsies were taken. Hematoxylin-eosin and alcian blue stainings were performed. A group of nonceliac, age- and sex-matched patients was used as a control. We found intestinal metaplasia in the distal esophagus of 16 of 60 (26.6%) celiacs (mean age, 45 +/- 13 years; range, 27-75 years), in comparison with a control-group prevalence of 10.9% (OR, 3.9; 95% CI, 1.4-11.2%). Among the celiac group with metaplasia, only one patient had reflux-like symptoms. None had esophagitis. In conclusion, we observed an increased prevalence of esophageal metaplasia in patients with celiac disease. This finding could be the result of motor abnormalities leading to chronic acid reflux, combined with a mucosa which is sensitive to gliadin.

  20. INTESTINAL PERMEABILITY IN PATIENTS WITH CELIAC-DISEASE AND RELATIVES OF PATIENTS WITH CELIAC-DISEASE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANELBURG, RM; UIL, JJ; MULDER, CJJ; HEYMANS, HSA

    The functional integrity of the small bowel is impaired in coeliac disease. Intestinal permeability, as measured by the sugar absorption test probably reflects this phenomenon. In the sugar absorption test a solution of lactulose and mannitol was given to the fasting patient and the

  1. The Intestinal Microbiome in Infectious Diseases: The Clinical Relevance of a Rapidly Emerging Field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harris, Vanessa C.; Haak, Bastiaan W.; Boele van Hensbroek, Michaël; Wiersinga, Willem J.

    2017-01-01

    The field of infectious disease is undergoing a paradigm shift as the intestinal microbiome is becoming understood. The aim of this review is to inform infectious disease physicians of the potential relevance of the intestinal microbiome to their practice. We searched Medline using both index and

  2. Impaired intestinal cholecystokinin secretion, a fascinating but overlooked link between coeliac disease and cholesterol gallstone disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Helen H; Liu, Min; Li, Xiaodan; Portincasa, Piero; Wang, David Q-H

    2017-04-01

    Coeliac disease is a chronic, small intestinal, immune-mediated enteropathy caused by a permanent intolerance to dietary gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. Clinical studies have found that intestinal cholecystokinin secretion and gallbladder emptying in response to a fatty meal are impaired before coeliac patients start the gluten-free diet (GFD). However, it was never really appreciated whether coeliac disease is associated with gallstones because there were very few studies investigating the mechanism underlying the impact of coeliac disease on the pathogenesis of gallstones. We summarize recent progress on the relationship between coeliac disease and gallstones and propose that coeliac disease is an important risk factor for gallstone formation because defective intestinal cholecystokinin secretion markedly increases susceptibility to cholesterol gallstones via a mechanism involving dysmotility of both the gallbladder and the small intestine. Because GFD can significantly improve the coeliac enteropathy, early diagnosis and therapy in coeliac patients is crucial for preventing the long-term impact of cholecystokinin deficiency on the biliary and intestinal consequences. When gluten is reintroduced, clinical and histologic relapse often occurs in coeliac patients. Moreover, some of the coeliac patients do not respond well to GFD. It is imperative to routinely examine by ultrasonography whether gallbladder motility function is preserved in coeliac patients and monitor whether biliary sludge (a precursor of gallstones) appears in the gallbladder, regardless of whether they are under the GFD programme. To prevent gallstones in coeliac patients, it is urgently needed to investigate the prevalence and pathogenesis of gallstones in these patients. © 2017 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  3. Intestinal and Circulating MicroRNAs in Coeliac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felli, Cristina; Baldassarre, Antonella; Masotti, Andrea

    2017-09-06

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level and play a key role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune and gastrointestinal diseases. Previous studies have revealed that miRNAs are dysregulated in intestinal biopsies of patients affected by coeliac disease (CD). Combined bioinformatics analyses of miRNA expression profiles and mRNA target genes as classified by Gene Ontology, are powerful tools to investigate the functional role of miRNAs in coeliac disease. However, little is still known about the function of circulating miRNAs, their expression level compared to tissue miRNAs, and whether the mechanisms of post-transcriptional regulation are the same of tissue miRNAs. In any case, if we assume that a cell-cell communication process has to occur, and that circulating miRNAs are delivered to recipient cells, we can derive useful information by performing target predictions. Interestingly, all of the mRNA targets of dysregulated miRNAs reported in the literature (i.e., miR-31-5p, miR-192, miR-194, miR-449a and miR-638) belong to several important biological processes, such as Wnt signaling, cell proliferation and differentiation, and adherens junction pathways. Although we think that these predictions have to be necessarily confirmed by "wet-lab" data, the miRNAs dysregulated during the development of CD could be potentially involved in the pathogenesis of coeliac disease and their correlation with circulating miRNAs offers new possibilities to use them as disease biomarkers.

  4. Intestinal Microbiota and the Innate Immune System - A Crosstalk in Crohn's Disease Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haag, Lea-Maxie; Siegmund, Britta

    2015-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic, relapsing inflammatory disorder that can occur anywhere along the gastrointestinal tract. The precise etiology of CD is still unclear but it is widely accepted that a complex series of interactions between susceptibility genes, the immune system and environmental factors are implicated in the onset and perpetuation of the disease. Increasing evidence from experimental and clinical studies implies the intestinal microbiota in disease pathogenesis, thereby supporting the hypothesis that chronic intestinal inflammation arises from an abnormal immune response against the microorganisms of the intestinal flora in genetically susceptible individuals. Given that CD patients display changes in their gut microbiota composition, collectively termed "dysbiosis," the question raises whether the altered microbiota composition is a cause of disease or rather a consequence of the inflammatory state of the intestinal environment. This review will focus on the crosstalk between the gut microbiota and the innate immune system during intestinal inflammation, thereby unraveling the role of the microbiota in CD pathogenesis.

  5. Living with intestinal failure caused by Crohn disease: not letting the disease conquer life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Eva; Persson, Eva

    2015-01-01

    This article reports the findings of what it means to live with intestinal failure caused by Crohn disease and how it influences daily life. Ten patients, 7 with an ostomy and 7 on home parenteral nutrition followed up at an outpatient clinic for patients with intestinal failure, were interviewed using a qualitative, phenomenological-hermeneutic method. The analysis of the transcribed data is described thematically and resulted in 3 main themes; (a) struggling to not be controlled by the disease, (b) walking on a thin thread, and (c) being seen as a person, not just as a patient. These themes led to the comprehensive understanding that living with intestinal failure was interpreted as the criticality of maintaining control over one's life and body while maintaining autonomy and not letting the disease conquer life. Life entails a constant struggle with much planning to live as normally as possible and get the most out of life. It was of great importance to be seen as a person and not just as a disease, affirm that life as it is has meaning, there is a state of suffering related to the disease, there are existential issues, and suffering is related to care.

  6. Value of computed tomography in diagnosis of intestinal diseases. CT findings in nontumoral bowel diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujikawa, Koichi; Yamane, Kosuke; Nakanishi, Tadashi; Miura, Yoshio; Kato, Yoshitaka; Yahata, Noriko; Iwamoto, Toshiyuki; Katayama, Hiroshi; Katsuta, Shizutomo

    1987-03-01

    CT findings of 46 cases with inflammatory and other nontumoral bowel diseases were retrospectively studied. Patients were given 500 to 1000 ml of lukewarm water orally or rectally to distend the intestinal lumen. In all cases water-soluble iodine contrast media was administered intravenously. The CT findings in Crohn's disease included mural thickening, luminal narrowing, bowel wall enhancement, wall rigidity, serration of intestinal border, dilatation of mesenteric vessels, periintestinal blurring (inflamatory reaction of mesentery), fibrofatty proliferation, effusion, abscess and fistula. Many of these findings suggested the transmural nature of the disease and gave diagnostic clues of the disease. In cases with ulcerative colitis, thickening of bowel wall was insignificant and extraintestinal complications were absent. CT appears to play an important role in distinguishing Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Luminal narrowing and mural thickening were also observed in a case with intestinal ischemia, but these mural changes were not accompanied by mesenteric abnormalities to the degree of Crohn's disease. In cases with penetrating peptic ulcer and diverticulitis, CT demonstrated inflammatory reactions of surrounding tissue such as thickening of neighboring fascia, increase in attenuation value of mesenteric fat, effusion and abscess. Even in cases with confusing clinical symptoms, appendicitis was easily diagnosed on CT which showed swelling of appendix and inflammatory changes of surrounding structures. Mechanical obstruction of the intestine could be identified on CT by a notable change of luminal sizes at the site of obstruction. CT appearances of intussusception were distinctive and a soft tissue mass (intussusceptum) and mesenteric fat was seen within a markedly dilated intussuscipiens. CT could also reveal pancreatitis and splenic infarction as the causes of clinically-undiagnosed paralytic ileus. (J.P.N.).

  7. Role of the intestinal microbiome in health and disease: from correlation to causation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, de W.M.; Vos, E.A.

    2012-01-01

    Recorded observations indicating an association between intestinal microbes and health are long-standing in terms of specific diseases, but emerging high-throughput technologies that characterize microbial communities in the intestinal tract are suggesting new roles for the supposedly normal

  8. Obesity, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and atherothrombosis: a role for the intestinal microbiota?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knaapen, M.; Kootte, R.S.; Zoetendal, E.G.; Vos, de W.M.; Dallinga-Thie, G.M.; Levi, M.; Stroes, E.S.; Nieuwdorp, M.

    2013-01-01

    Whereas the association between intestinal microorganisms and health has been widely accepted in the area of infectious disease, recent advances have now implied a role for the intestinal microbiota in human energy balance. In fact, numerous studies support an intricate relationship between the

  9. The pathogenic potential of Campylobacter concisus strains associated with chronic intestinal diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadeem O Kaakoush

    Full Text Available Campylobacter concisus has garnered increasing attention due to its association with intestinal disease, thus, the pathogenic potential of strains isolated from different intestinal diseases was investigated. A method to isolate C. concisus was developed and the ability of eight strains from chronic and acute intestinal diseases to adhere to and invade intestinal epithelial cells was determined. Features associated with bacterial invasion were investigated using comparative genomic analyses and the effect of C. concisus on host protein expression was examined using proteomics. Our isolation method from intestinal biopsies resulted in the isolation of three C. concisus strains from children with Crohn's disease or chronic gastroenteritis. Four C. concisus strains from patients with chronic intestinal diseases can attach to and invade host cells using mechanisms such as chemoattraction to mucin, aggregation, flagellum-mediated attachment, "membrane ruffling", cell penetration and damage. C. concisus strains isolated from patients with chronic intestinal diseases have significantly higher invasive potential than those from acute intestinal diseases. Investigation of the cause of this increased pathogenic potential revealed a plasmid to be responsible. 78 and 47 proteins were upregulated and downregulated in cells infected with C. concisus, respectively. Functional analysis of these proteins showed that C. concisus infection regulated processes related to interleukin-12 production, proteasome activation and NF-κB activation. Infection with all eight C. concisus strains resulted in host cells producing high levels of interleukin-12, however, only strains capable of invading host cells resulted in interferon-γ production as confirmed by ELISA. These findings considerably support the emergence of C. concisus as an intestinal pathogen, but more significantly, provide novel insights into the host immune response and an explanation for the heterogeneity

  10. Intestinal permeability to [51Cr]EDTA in children with Crohn's disease and celiac disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turck, D.; Ythier, H.; Maquet, E.; Deveaux, M.; Marchandise, X.; Farriaux, J.P.; Fontaine, G.

    1987-01-01

    [ 51 Cr]EDTA was used as a probe molecule to assess intestinal permeability in 7 healthy control adults, 11 control children, 17 children with Crohn's disease, and 6 children with untreated celiac disease. After subjects fasted overnight, 75 kBq/kg (= 2 microCi/kg) 51 Cr-labeled EDTA was given by mouth; 24-h urinary excretion of [ 51 Cr]EDTA was measured and expressed as a percentage of the total oral dose. Mean and SD were as follows: control adults 1.47 +/- 0.62, control children 1.59 +/- 0.55, and patients with Crohn's disease or celiac disease 5.35 +/- 1.94. The difference between control children and patients was statistically significant (p less than 0.001). These results show that intestinal permeability to [ 51 Cr]EDTA is increased among children with active or inactive Crohn's disease affecting small bowel only or small bowel and colon, and with untreated celiac disease. The [ 51 Cr]EDTA permeability test could facilitate the decision to perform more extensive investigations in children suspected of small bowel disease who have atypical or poor clinical and biological symptomatology

  11. Contrasting Ecological Processes and Functional Compositions Between Intestinal Bacterial Community in Healthy and Diseased Shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jinyong; Dai, Wenfang; Qiu, Qiongfen; Dong, Chunming; Zhang, Jinjie; Xiong, Jinbo

    2016-11-01

    Intestinal bacterial communities play a pivotal role in promoting host health; therefore, the disruption of intestinal bacterial homeostasis could result in disease. However, the effect of the occurrences of disease on intestinal bacterial community assembly remains unclear. To address this gap, we compared the multifaceted ecological differences in maintaining intestinal bacterial community assembly between healthy and diseased shrimps. The neutral model analysis shows that the relative importance of neutral processes decreases when disease occurs. This pattern is further corroborated by the ecosphere null model, revealing that the bacterial community assembly of diseased samples is dominated by stochastic processes. In addition, the occurrence of shrimp disease reduces the complexity and cooperative activities of species-to-species interactions. The keystone taxa affiliated with Alphaproteobacteria and Actinobacteria in healthy shrimp gut shift to Gammaproteobacteria species in diseased shrimp. Changes in intestinal bacterial communities significantly alter biological functions in shrimp. Within a given metabolic pathway, the pattern of enrichment or decrease between healthy and deceased shrimp is correlated with its functional effects. We propose that stressed shrimp are more prone to invasion by alien strains (evidenced by more stochastic assembly and higher migration rate in diseased shrimp), which, in turn, disrupts the cooperative activity among resident species. These findings greatly aid our understanding of the underlying mechanisms that govern shrimp intestinal community assembly between health statuses.

  12. Intestinal barrier loss as a critical pathogenic link between inflammatory bowel disease and graft-versus-host disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalle, S C; Turner, J R

    2015-07-01

    Compromised intestinal barrier function is a prominent feature of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, links between intestinal barrier loss and disease extend much further, including documented associations with celiac disease, type I diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and multiple sclerosis. Intestinal barrier loss has also been proposed to have a critical role in the pathogenesis of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), a serious, potentially fatal consequence of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Experimental evidence has begun to support this view, as barrier loss and its role in initiating and establishing a pathogenic inflammatory cycle in GVHD is emerging. Here we discuss similarities between IBD and GVHD, mechanisms of intestinal barrier loss in these diseases, and the crosstalk between barrier loss and the immune system, with a special focus on natural killer (NK) cells. Unanswered questions and future research directions on the topic are discussed along with implications for treatment.

  13. Can probiotics modulate human disease by impacting intestinal barrier function?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bron, Peter A.; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Brummer, Robert Jan; Cani, Patrice D.; Mercenier, Annick; MacDonald, Thomas T.; Garcia-Ródenas, Clara L.; Wells, Jerry M.

    2017-01-01

    Intestinal barrier integrity is a prerequisite for homeostasis of mucosal function, which is balanced to maximise absorptive capacity, while maintaining efficient defensive reactions against chemical and microbial challenges. Evidence is mounting that disruption of epithelial barrier integrity is

  14. Current X-ray diagnosis of Crohn's disease of the small intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portnoj, L.M.; Isakov, V.A.; Kazantseva, I.A.; Petukhova, N.Yu.; Stashuk, G.A.; Gaganov, L.E.

    2001-01-01

    The paper evaluates the patients for x-ray diagnosis of Crohn's disease of the small intestine in 18 patients using the new barium contrast medium Entero-VU intended for examination of the small intestine. The authors provide a detailed description of the examination technique, x-ray appearance of Crohn's disease and make a comparative analysis of the diagnostic potential for the use of the common barium suspension and the contrast agent Entero-VU. The cases of Crohn's disease analyzed in the paper encompass its different stages and sites in the small intestine. The group of patients presenting with Crohn's disease accrued subjects who had undergone surgical treatment followed by reexamination of the small intestine using Entero-VU [ru

  15. The Gut-Associated Lymphoid Tissues in the Small Intestine, Not the Large Intestine, Play a Major Role in Oral Prion Disease Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, David S; Else, Kathryn J; Mabbott, Neil A

    2015-09-01

    Prion diseases are infectious neurodegenerative disorders characterized by accumulations of abnormally folded cellular prion protein in affected tissues. Many natural prion diseases are acquired orally, and following exposure, the early replication of some prion isolates upon follicular dendritic cells (FDC) within gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT) is important for the efficient spread of disease to the brain (neuroinvasion). Prion detection within large intestinal GALT biopsy specimens has been used to estimate human and animal disease prevalence. However, the relative contributions of the small and large intestinal GALT to oral prion pathogenesis were unknown. To address this issue, we created mice that specifically lacked FDC-containing GALT only in the small intestine. Our data show that oral prion disease susceptibility was dramatically reduced in mice lacking small intestinal GALT. Although these mice had FDC-containing GALT throughout their large intestines, these tissues were not early sites of prion accumulation or neuroinvasion. We also determined whether pathology specifically within the large intestine might influence prion pathogenesis. Congruent infection with the nematode parasite Trichuris muris in the large intestine around the time of oral prion exposure did not affect disease pathogenesis. Together, these data demonstrate that the small intestinal GALT are the major early sites of prion accumulation and neuroinvasion after oral exposure. This has important implications for our understanding of the factors that influence the risk of infection and the preclinical diagnosis of disease. Many natural prion diseases are acquired orally. After exposure, the accumulation of some prion diseases in the gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT) is important for efficient spread of disease to the brain. However, the relative contributions of GALT in the small and large intestines to oral prion pathogenesis were unknown. We show that the small intestinal

  16. Is butyrate the link between diet, intestinal microbiota and obesity-related metabolic diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahe, L K; Astrup, A; Larsen, L H

    2013-12-01

    It is increasingly recognized that there is a connection between diet, intestinal microbiota, intestinal barrier function and the low-grade inflammation that characterizes the progression from obesity to metabolic disturbances, making dietary strategies to modulate the intestinal environment relevant. In this context, the ability of some Gram-positive anaerobic bacteria to produce the short-chain fatty acid butyrate is interesting. A lower abundance of butyrate-producing bacteria has been associated with metabolic risk in humans, and recent studies suggest that butyrate might have an anti-inflammatory potential that can alleviate obesity-related metabolic complications, possibly due to its ability to enhance the intestinal barrier function. Here, we review and discuss the potential of butyrate as an anti-inflammatory mediator in metabolic diseases, and the potential for dietary interventions increasing the intestinal availability of butyrate. © 2013 The Authors. obesity reviews © 2013 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  17. Wireless capsule endoscopy for diagnosis of acute intestinal graft-versus-host disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Susanne; Schoppmeyer, Konrad; Lange, Thoralf; Wiedmann, Marcus; Golsong, Johannes; Tannapfel, Andrea; Mossner, Joachim; Niederwieser, Dietger; Caca, Karel

    2007-03-01

    The small intestine is the most common location of intestinal graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). EGD with duodenal biopsies yields the highest diagnostic sensitivity, but the jejunum and ileum are not accessible by regular endoscopy. In contrast, wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) is a noninvasive imaging procedure offering complete evaluation of the small intestine. The objective was to compare the diagnostic value of EGD, including biopsies, with the results of WCE in patients with acute intestinal symptoms who received allogeneic blood stem cell transplantation and to analyze the appearance and distribution of acute intestinal GVHD lesions in these patients. An investigator-blinded, single-center prospective study. Patients with acute intestinal symptoms after allogeneic stem cell transplantation underwent both EGD and WCE within 24 hours. Clinical data were recorded during 2 months of follow-up. Fourteen consecutive patients with clinical symptoms of acute intestinal GVHD were recruited. In 1 patient, the capsule remained in the stomach and was removed endoscopically. In 7 of 13 patients who could be evaluated, acute intestinal GVHD was diagnosed by EGD with biopsies, but 3 of these would have been missed by EGD alone. In all 7 patients with histologically confirmed acute intestinal GVHD, WCE revealed typical signs of GVHD. Lesions were scattered throughout the small intestine, but were most accentuated in the ileum. This study had a small number of patients. WCE, which is less invasive than EGD with biopsies, showed a comparable sensitivity and a high negative predictive value for diagnosing acute intestinal GVHD. It may be helpful to avoid repeated endoscopic procedures in patients who have undergone stem cell transplantation.

  18. Maintaining Intestinal Health: The Genetics and Immunology of Very Early Onset Inflammatory Bowel DiseaseSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith R. Kelsen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is a multifactoral disease caused by dysregulated immune responses to commensal or pathogenic microbes in the intestine, resulting in chronic intestinal inflammation. An emerging population of patients with IBD younger than 5 years of age represent a unique form of disease, termed very early onset IBD (VEO-IBD, which is phenotypically and genetically distinct from older-onset IBD. VEO-IBD is associated with increased disease severity, aggressive progression, and poor responsiveness to most conventional therapies. Further investigation into the causes and pathogenesis of VEO-IBD will help improve treatment strategies and may lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms that are essential to maintain intestinal health or provoke the development of targeted therapeutic strategies to limit intestinal inflammation and promote tissue repair. Here, we discuss the phenotypic nature of VEO-IBD, the recent identification of novel gene variants associated with disease, and functional immunologic studies interrogating the contribution of specific genetic variants to the development of chronic intestinal inflammation. Keywords: Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Very Early Onset Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Whole Exome Sequencing, Mucosal Immunology

  19. Treatment and outcomes: medical and surgical treatment for intestinal Behçet's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadakazu Hisamatsu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Behçet's disease (BD is a chronic relapsing disease involving multiple organ systems. BD is characterized clinically by oral and genital aphthae, cutaneous lesions, and ophthalmological, neurological, and/or gastrointestinal manifestations. It is widely recognized that the presence of intestinal lesions may be a poor prognostic factor in intestinal BD, increasing the risk of surgery and decreasing the quality of life. Despite this, the management of intestinal BD has not been standardized. Empirical therapies including 5-aminosalicylic acid and corticosteroids have been used anecdotally to treat intestinal BD, but recent studies have provided evidence for the efficacy of anti-tumor necrosis factor α monoclonal antibodies. The development of agents targeting tumor necrosis factor α continues, it seems likely that they will change the therapeutic strategy and clinical outcomes of intestinal BD and inflammatory bowel disease. Monitoring disease activity such as endoscopic evaluation will become more important to obtain better outcomes. Here, we review current and future perspectives in the treatment and outcomes of intestinal BD.

  20. The interplay between intestinal bacteria and host metabolism in health and disease: lessons from Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam C. N. Wong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available All higher organisms negotiate a truce with their commensal microbes and battle pathogenic microbes on a daily basis. Much attention has been given to the role of the innate immune system in controlling intestinal microbes and to the strategies used by intestinal microbes to overcome the host immune response. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that the metabolisms of intestinal microbes and their hosts are linked and that this interaction is equally important for host health and well-being. For instance, an individual's array of commensal microbes can influence their predisposition to chronic metabolic diseases such as diabetes and obesity. A better understanding of host–microbe metabolic interactions is important in defining the molecular bases of these disorders and could potentially lead to new therapeutic avenues. Key advances in this area have been made using Drosophila melanogaster. Here, we review studies that have explored the impact of both commensal and pathogenic intestinal microbes on Drosophila carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. These studies have helped to elucidate the metabolites produced by intestinal microbes, the intestinal receptors that sense these metabolites, and the signaling pathways through which these metabolites manipulate host metabolism. Furthermore, they suggest that targeting microbial metabolism could represent an effective therapeutic strategy for human metabolic diseases and intestinal infection.

  1. Diagnosing norovirus-associated infectious intestinal disease using viral load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tam Clarence C

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR is the main method for laboratory diagnosis of norovirus-associated infectious intestinal disease (IID. However, up to 16% of healthy individuals in the community, with no recent history of IID, may be RT-PCR positive; so it is unclear whether norovirus is actually the cause of illness in an IID case when they are RT-PCR positive. It is important to identify the pathogen causing illness in sporadic IID cases, for clinical management and for community based incidence studies. The aim of this study was to investigate how faecal viral load can be used to determine when norovirus is the most likely cause of illness in an IID case. Methods Real-time RT-PCR was used to determine the viral load in faecal specimens collected from 589 IID cases and 159 healthy controls, who were infected with genogroup II noroviruses. Cycle threshold (Ct values from the real-time RT-PCR were used as a proxy measure of viral load. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC analysis was used to identify a cut-off in viral load for attributing illness to norovirus in IID cases. Results One hundred and sixty-nine IID cases and 159 controls met the inclusion criteria for the ROC analysis. The optimal Ct value cut-off for attributing IID to norovirus was 31. The same cut-off was selected when using healthy controls, or IID cases who were positive by culture for bacterial pathogens, as the reference negative group. This alternative reference negative group can be identified amongst specimens routinely received in clinical virology laboratories. Conclusion We demonstrated that ROC analysis can be used to select a cut-off for a norovirus real time RT-PCR assay, to aid clinical interpretation and diagnose when norovirus is the cause of IID. Specimens routinely received for diagnosis in clinical virology laboratories can be used to select an appropriate cut-off. Individual laboratories can use this method to

  2. The Incidence of Intestinal Obstructive Diseases in Selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    They are characterized by severe hypovolemia and septic shock secondary to devitalization of the intestinal wall. The consequent surgical complications such as ileus, adhesions and short bowel syndrome with resultant death of the patients also pose management challenges to the clinician. This study investigated the ...

  3. Diet and the intestinal microbiome: associations, functions, and implications for health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albenberg, Lindsey G; Wu, Gary D

    2014-05-01

    The mutual relationship between the intestinal microbiota and its mammalian host is influenced by diet. Consumption of various nutrients affects the structure of the microbial community and provides substrates for microbial metabolism. The microbiota can produce small molecules that are absorbed by the host and affect many important physiological processes. Age-dependent and societal differences in the intestinal microbiota could result from differences in diet. Examples include differences in the intestinal microbiota of breastfed vs formula-fed infants or differences in microbial richness in people who consume an agrarian plant-based vs a Western diet, which is high in meat and fat. We review how diet affects the structure and metabolome of the human intestinal microbiome and may contribute to health or the pathogenesis of disorders such as coronary vascular disease and inflammatory bowel disease. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Maintaining intestinal health: the genetics and immunology of very early onset inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, Judith R; Baldassano, Robert N; Artis, David; Sonnenberg, Gregory F

    2015-09-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a multifactoral disease caused by dysregulated immune responses to commensal or pathogenic microbes in the intestine, resulting in chronic intestinal inflammation. An emerging population of patients with IBD occurring before the age of 5 represent a unique form of disease, termed Very Early Onset (VEO)-IBD, which is phenotypically- and genetically-distinct from older-onset IBD. VEO-IBD is associated with increased disease severity, aggressive progression and poor responsiveness to most conventional therapies. Further investigation into the causes and pathogenesis of VEO-IBD will help improve treatment strategies, and may lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms that are essential to maintain intestinal health or provoke the development of targeted therapeutic strategies to limit intestinal disease. Here we discuss the phenotypic nature of VEO-IBD, the recent identification of novel gene variants associated with disease, and functional immunologic studies interrogating the contribution of specific genetic variants to the development of chronic intestinal inflammation.

  5. Intestinal colonization with phylogenetic group B2 Escherichia coli related to inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Andreas Munk; Halkjær, Sofie Ingdam; Gluud, Lise Lotte

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Increased numbers of Escherichia coli and, furthermore, specific subtypes of E. coli, such as E. coli of the phylogenetic groups B2 and D have been found in the intestine of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In this review, we wanted to evaluate...... on 163 patients with IBD and 89 controls. Among IBD patients, 57 patients had ulcerative colitis (UC) and 95 Crohn's disease (CD). Random-effects meta-analysis showed that IBD patients were more likely to have B2 E. coli intestinal colonization compared with controls (odds ratio [OR]: 2.28; 95...... to be related to IBD, UC or CD. CONCLUSIONS: Our study reveals that intestinal colonization with phylogenetic group B2 E. coli is associated with UC. Due to the design, we are unable to determine if the colonization with B2 E. coli leads to the development of the disease or the disease increases the risk...

  6. Henoch’s disease complicated by intestinal intussusception in a 5-year-old child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. G. Artamonov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal syndrome accompanied by abdominal pains is common in children with Henoch’s disease. One of the rare complications of the syndrome may be bowel intussusception. The paper describes a case of Henoch’s disease complicated intestinal intussusception.

  7. Innate immune signalling at the intestinal epithelium in homeostasis and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pott, Johanna; Hornef, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium—which constitutes the interface between the enteric microbiota and host tissues—actively contributes to the maintenance of mucosal homeostasis and defends against pathogenic microbes. The recognition of conserved microbial products by cytosolic or transmembrane pattern recognition receptors in epithelial cells initiates signal transduction and influences effector cell function. However, the signalling pathways, effector molecules and regulatory mechanisms involved are not yet fully understood, and the functional outcome is poorly defined. This review analyses the complex and dynamic role of intestinal epithelial innate immune recognition and signalling, on the basis of results in intestinal epithelial cell-specific transgene or gene-deficient animals. This approach identifies specific epithelial cell functions within the diverse cellular composition of the mucosal tissue, in the presence of the complex and dynamic gut microbiota. These insights have thus provided a more comprehensive understanding of the role of the intestinal epithelium in innate immunity during homeostasis and disease. PMID:22801555

  8. Intestinal Microbiota and the Innate Immune System – A Crosstalk in Crohn’s Disease Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haag, Lea-Maxie; Siegmund, Britta

    2015-01-01

    Crohn’s disease (CD) is a chronic, relapsing inflammatory disorder that can occur anywhere along the gastrointestinal tract. The precise etiology of CD is still unclear but it is widely accepted that a complex series of interactions between susceptibility genes, the immune system and environmental factors are implicated in the onset and perpetuation of the disease. Increasing evidence from experimental and clinical studies implies the intestinal microbiota in disease pathogenesis, thereby supporting the hypothesis that chronic intestinal inflammation arises from an abnormal immune response against the microorganisms of the intestinal flora in genetically susceptible individuals. Given that CD patients display changes in their gut microbiota composition, collectively termed “dysbiosis,” the question raises whether the altered microbiota composition is a cause of disease or rather a consequence of the inflammatory state of the intestinal environment. This review will focus on the crosstalk between the gut microbiota and the innate immune system during intestinal inflammation, thereby unraveling the role of the microbiota in CD pathogenesis. PMID:26441993

  9. Non-IPSID small intestinal lymphoma: Evidence for disseminated disease at presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milanovic, N.; Jelic, S.; Kovcin, V.; Opric, M.; Marinkovic, M.; Jovanovic, V.

    1994-01-01

    During the period 1984-1989 the authors have observed 20 patients with non-immuno-proliferative small intestinal disease (non-IPSID) small intestinal lymphomas, 11 males and 9 females. In 11 patients the first symptoms were abdominal cramps requiring laparotomy, in 4 ills, and in 5 perforation with peritonitis. Resection of the involved part of the intestine was performed in 17 patients. Lymphoma tissue was present in 4 of 5 retrogradely examined resection lines on macroscopically normal small intestine. According to Working Formulation, 3 patients had low grade, 3 intermediate grade and 14 high grade histology. Affection of extra intestinal/mesenteric structures was found in 18 of 20 patients, with a total of other lymphoma localizations. 8 of 20 affection of the nasopharynx and/or Waldeyer's ring. According to Crowther's classification 55 % patients were in Stage IV, 35 % in Stage III and 10 % in stage Ib. All patients were treated with chemotherapy, 13 with ProMACE regimen and 7 with CHOP-type regimens. Ten of twenty patients are alive and in complete remission for over 5 years (7 of 11 of Stage IV and 3 of 9 of Stage Ib/III; 8 of 14 with high grade and 2 of 6 with intermediate/low grade histology). Our results point to the fact that in non-IPSID lymphoma of the small intestine, lymphoma involvement of the intestinal wall might be present beyond obvious lymphoma lesions. Most patients with apparently primary small intestinal lymphoma have a widespread disease. Thus, local forms of treatment such as surgery and/or radiotherapy can not be expected to be curative in the majority of patients. Data from this study suggest that following initial surgery the chemotherapy is the treatment of choice for these patients. (author)

  10. Compartmentalised expression of meprin in small intestinal mucosa: enhanced expression in lamina propria in coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lottaz, Daniel; Buri, Caroline; Monteleone, Giovanni; Rösmann, Sandra; Macdonald, Thomas T; Sanderson, Ian R; Sterchi, Erwin E

    2007-03-01

    Epithelial cells in the human small intestine express meprin, an astacin-like metalloprotease, which accumulates normally at the brush border membrane and in the gut lumen. Therefore, meprin is targeted towards luminal components. In coeliac disease patients, peptides from ingested cereals trigger mucosal inflammation in the small intestine, disrupting epithelial cell differentiation and function. Using in situ hybridisation on duodenal tissue sections, we observed a marked shift of meprin mRNA expression from epithelial cells, the predominant expression site in normal mucosa, to lamina propria leukocytes in coeliac disease. Meprin thereby gains access to the substrate repertoire present beneath the epithelium.

  11. Curcumin and Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD: Major Mode of Action through Stimulating Endogenous Intestinal Alkaline Phosphatase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddhartha S. Ghosh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin, an active ingredient in the traditional herbal remedy and dietary spice turmeric (Curcuma longa, has significant anti-inflammatory properties. Chronic kidney disease (CKD, an inflammatory disease, can lead to end stage renal disease resulting in dialysis and transplant. Furthermore, it is frequently associated with other inflammatory disease such as diabetes and cardiovascular disorders. This review will focus on the clinically relevant inflammatory molecules that play a role in CKD and associated diseases. Various enzymes, transcription factors, growth factors modulate production and action of inflammatory molecules; curcumin can blunt the generation and action of these inflammatory molecules and ameliorate CKD as well as associated inflammatory disorders. Recent studies have shown that increased intestinal permeability results in the leakage of pro-inflammatory molecules (cytokines and lipopolysaccharides from gut into the circulation in diseases such as CKD, diabetes and atherosclerosis. This change in intestinal permeability is due to decreased expression of tight junction proteins and intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP. Curcumin increases the expression of IAP and tight junction proteins and corrects gut permeability. This action reduces the levels of circulatory inflammatory biomolecules. This effect of curcumin on intestine can explain why, despite poor bioavailability, curcumin has potential anti-inflammatory effects in vivo and beneficial effects on CKD.

  12. Intestinal permeability to 99mTc-diethylenetriaminopentaacetic acid in inflammatory bowel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casellas, F.; Aguade, S.; Soriano, B.; Accarino, A.; Molero, J.; Guarner, L.

    1986-01-01

    Intestinal permeability in inflammatory bowel disease and its relation to periods of disease activity has been investigated by measuring the urinary excretion of DTPA labeled with 99mTc. Urine excretion in 10 control subjects was 2.7 +/- 1% of the test dose. Twelve patients with ulcerative colitis excreted 5.08 +/- 1.6% in remission, 10.61 +/- 2% during periods of mild activity, 19.41 +/- 0.9% during moderate activity, and 15.41 +/- 6.3% with severe activity. Sixteen patients with Crohn's disease excreted 5.7 +/- 1.9% in remission, 8.47 +/- 2.8% during mild activity of the disease, and 14.29 +/- 5.8% during moderate activity. No differences were observed between ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, or between ileal and colonic forms of Crohn's disease. Excretion in remission was significantly greater than in control subjects and there was a correlation between excretion and disease activity. In serial determinations done in seven patients we found that urine excretion of the test substance correlated with disease activity. We also studied DTPA excretion in 10 cases with gastric or duodenal ulcer (2.28 +/- 1.4%), six cases of acute gastroenteritis (4.87 +/- 3.1%) and nine cases with other intestinal diseases (3.6 +/- 1.1%). In all these cases, DTPA excretion was lower than in inflammatory bowel disease. Our results show that the urinary excretion of DTPA is a simple test that measures accurately the degree of activity of inflammatory bowel disease. The test is useful in Crohn's disease as well as in ulcerative colitis, and detects intestinal permeability abnormalities even in clinical remission. Significantly lower excretions are found in other intestinal diseases. The test may be recommended as a screening test for use in clinical practice

  13. Role of damage control enterostomy in management of children with peritonitis from acute intestinal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel A Ameh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intestinal anastomosis in severely ill children with peritonitis from intestinal perforation, intestinal gangrene or anastomotic dehiscence (acute intestinal disease is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Enterostomy as a damage control measure may be an option to minimize the high morbidity and mortality. This report evaluates the role of damage control enterostomy in the treatment of these patients. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of 52 children with acute intestinal disease who had enterostomy as a damage control measure in 12 years. Results: There were 34 (65.4% boys and 18 (34.6% girls aged 3 days-13 years (median 9 months, comprising 27 (51.9% neonates and infants and 25 (48.1% older children. The primary indication for enterostomy in neonates and infants was intestinal gangrene 25 (92.6% and perforated typhoid ileitis 22 (88% in older children. Enterostomy was performed as the initial surgery in 33 (63.5% patients and as a salvage procedure following anastomotic dehiscence in 19 (36.5% patients. Enterostomy-related complications occurred in 19 (36.5% patients, including 11 (21.2% patients with skin excoriations and eight (15.4% with hypokalaemia. There were four (7.7% deaths (aged 19 days, 3 months, 3½ years and 10 years, respectively directly related to the enterostomy, from hypokalaemia at 4, 12, 20 and 28 days postoperatively, respectively. Twenty other patients died shortly after surgery from their primary disease. Twenty of 28 surviving patients have had their enterostomy closed without complications, while eight are awaiting enterostomy closure. Conclusion: Damage-control enterostomy is useful in management of severely ill children with intestinal perforation or gangrene. Careful and meticulous attention to fluid and electrolyte balance, and stoma care, especially in the first several days following surgery, are important in preventing morbidity and mortality.

  14. Progression of the load of waterborne and intestinal parasitic diseases in the State of Amazonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Marilaine; Lacerda, Marcus Vinícius Guimarães; Monteiro, Wuelton Marcelo; Moura, Marco Antonio Saboia; Santos, Eyde Cristianne Saraiva; Saraceni, Valéria; Saraiva, Maria Graças Gomes

    2015-01-01

    In the State of Amazonas, Brazil, urban expansion together with precarious basic sanitation conditions and human settlement on river banks has contributed to the persistence of waterborne and intestinal parasitic diseases. Time series of the recorded cases of cholera, typhoid fever, hepatitis A and leptospirosis are described, using data from different levels of the surveillance systems. The sources for intestinal parasitosis prevalence data (non-compulsory reporting in Brazil) were Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE), Literatura Latino-Americana (LILACS) and the annals of major scientific meetings. Relevant papers and abstracts in all languages were accessed by two independent reviewers. The references cited by each relevant paper were scrutinized to locate additional papers. Despite its initial dissemination across the entire State of Amazonas, cholera was controlled in 1998. The magnitude of typhoid fever has decreased; however, a pattern characterized by eventual outbreaks still remains. Leptospirosis is an increasing cause of concern in association with the annual floods. The overall prevalence of intestinal parasites is high regardless of the municipality and the characteristics of areas and populations. The incidence of hepatitis A has decreased over the past decade. A comparison of older and recent surveys shows that the prevalence of intestinal parasitic diseases has remained constant. The load of waterborne and intestinal parasitic diseases ranks high among the health problems present in the State of Amazonas. Interventions aiming at basic sanitation and vaccination for hepatitis A were formulated and implemented, but assessment of their effectiveness in the targeted populations is still needed.

  15. Intestinal Microbiota and the Innate Immune System – A Crosstalk in Crohn’s Disease Pathogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Haag, Lea-Maxie; Siegmund, Britta

    2015-01-01

    Crohn’s disease (CD) is a chronic, relapsing inflammatory disorder that can occur anywhere along the gastrointestinal tract. The precise etiology of CD is still unclear but it is widely accepted that a complex series of interactions between susceptibility genes, the immune system and environmental factors are implicated in the onset and perpetuation of the disease. Increasing evidence from experimental and clinical studies implies the intestinal microbiota in disease pathogenesis, thereby sup...

  16. [Scanning electron microscopy (S.E.M.) aspects of intestinal mucosal surface in childhood coeliac disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patanè, R; Bottaro, G; Ricca, O; Galasso, S

    1982-01-01

    Intestinal mucosal surface in 5 children suffered with Coeliac Disease was observed at Scanning Electron Microscopy. The comparison between two techniques of dehydration demonstrated that the Alcool-Amile Acetate dehydration reduces the technical errors to the minimum. Therefore, a better visualization allows us to recognize the surface coat, the microvillous and some mucosal functional aspects (scale off), which were previously undistinguished. There are no differences between the mucosal aspects in adult coeliac disease and childhood coelia disease.

  17. Assessment of acute intestinal graft versus host disease by abdominal magnetic resonance imaging at 3 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budjan, Johannes; Michaely, Henrik J.; Attenberger, Ulrike; Haneder, Stefan; Schoenberg, Stefan O. [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Heidenreich, Daniela; Kreil, Sebastian; Nolte, Florian; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Klein, Stefan A. [University Medical Center Mannheim, Department of Hematology and Oncology, Mannheim (Germany)

    2014-08-15

    After allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT), a reliable diagnosis of acute graft versus host disease (aGvHD) is essential for an early and successful treatment. It is the aim of this analysis to assess intestinal aGvHD by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Prior to allogeneic SCT, 64 consecutive patients underwent abdominal MRI examination on a 3 T MR system, including axial and coronal T2w sequences and a three-dimensional dynamic T1w, contrast enhanced sequence. After SCT, 20 patients with suspected aGvHD received a second MRI as well as an endoscopic examination. Nine patients suffered from histologically proven intestinal aGvHD. In eleven patients intestinal aGvHD was excluded. In all aGvHD patients typical MRI findings with long-segment bowel wall thickening - always involving the terminal ileum - with profound submucosal oedema, were detected. The bowel wall was significantly thickened in patients with intestinal aGvHD. Bowel contrast enhancement spared the submucosa while demonstrating strong mucosal hyperemia. In intestinal aGvHD, a characteristic MR-appearance can be detected. This MRI pattern might facilitate an early and non-invasive diagnosis of intestinal aGvHD. MRI might thus be used as a sensitive tool to rule out or support the clinical diagnosis of aGvHD. (orig.)

  18. Naturally occurring glycoalkaloids in potatoes aggravate intestinal inflammation in two mouse models of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iablokov, Vadim; Sydora, Beate C; Foshaug, Rae; Meddings, Jon; Driedger, Darcy; Churchill, Tom; Fedorak, Richard N

    2010-11-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may be initiated following disruption of the intestinal epithelial barrier. This disruption, in turn, permits luminal antigens unfettered access to the mucosal immune system and leads to an uncontrolled inflammatory response. Glycoalkaloids, which are found in potatoes, disrupt cholesterol-containing membranes such as those of the intestinal epithelium. Glycoalkaloid ingestion through potatoes may play a role in the initiation and/or perpetuation of IBD. To determine if commercial and high glycoalkaloids containing fried potato skins aggravate intestinal inflammation using two different animal models of IBD. Fried potato skins from commercial potatoes containing low/medium glycoalkaloid levels and high glycoalkaloids potatoes were fed for 20 days to interleukin 10 gene-deficient mice and dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitic mice. Intestinal permeability, mucosal cytokine and myeloperoxidase levels and body weight were determined to assess intestinal injury. Deep frying potato skins markedly increased glycoalkaloid content. Interleukin 10 gene-deficient mice fed fried commercial potato skins with medium glycoalkaloid content exhibited significantly elevated levels of ileal IFN-γ relative to controls. Mice in the dextran sodium sulfate colitis model that were fed the same strain of potatoes demonstrated significantly elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-17 in the colon in addition to an enhanced colonic permeability. Inflammatory response was intensified when the mice were fed potatoes with higher glycoalkaloid contents. Our results demonstrate that consumption of potato skins containing glycoalkaloids can significantly aggravate intestinal inflammation in predisposed individuals.

  19. Intestinal T-cell responses in celiac disease - impact of celiac disease associated bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Sjöberg

    Full Text Available A hallmark of active celiac disease (CD, an inflammatory small-bowel enteropathy caused by permanent intolerance to gluten, is cytokine production by intestinal T lymphocytes. Prerequisites for contracting CD are that the individual carries the MHC class II alleles HLA-DQ2 and/or HLA-DQ8 and is exposed to gluten in the diet. Dysbiosis in the resident microbiota has been suggested to be another risk factor for CD. In fact, rod shaped bacteria adhering to the small intestinal mucosa were frequently seen in patients with CD during the "Swedish CD epidemic" and bacterial candidates could later be isolated from patients born during the epidemic suggesting long-lasting changes in the gut microbiota. Interleukin-17A (IL-17A plays a role in both inflammation and anti-bacterial responses. In active CD IL-17A was produced by both CD8(+ T cells (Tc17 and CD4(+ T cells (Th17, with intraepithelial Tc17 cells being the dominant producers. Gluten peptides as well as CD associated bacteria induced IL-17A responses in ex vivo challenged biopsies from patients with inactive CD. The IL-17A response was suppressed in patients born during the epidemic when a mixture of CD associated bacteria was added to gluten, while the reverse was the case in patients born after the epidemic. Under these conditions Th17 cells were the dominant producers. Thus Tc17 and Th17 responses to gluten and bacteria seem to pave the way for the chronic disease with interferon-γ-production by intraepithelial Tc1 cells and lamina propria Th1 cells. The CD associated bacteria and the dysbiosis they might cause in the resident microbiota may be a risk factor for CD either by directly influencing the immune responses in the mucosa or by enhancing inflammatory responses to gluten.

  20. Microbial Activities and Intestinal Homeostasis: A Delicate Balance Between Health and DiseaseSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina L. Ohland

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept that the intestinal microbiota modulates numerous physiologic processes, including immune development and function, nutrition and metabolism, and pathogen exclusion, is relatively well established in the scientific community. The molecular mechanisms driving these various effects and the events leading to the establishment of a “healthy” microbiome are slowly emerging. This review brings into focus important aspects of microbial/host interactions in the intestine and discusses key molecular mechanisms controlling health and disease states. We discuss the evidence of how microbes interact with the host and one another and their impact on intestinal homeostasis. Keywords: Bacterial Communication, Bowel Disease, Host-Microbe Interactions, Inflammatory, Microbiome

  1. Intestinal Microbiota and Celiac Disease: Cause, Consequence or Co-Evolution?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Carmen Cenit

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available It is widely recognized that the intestinal microbiota plays a role in the initiation and perpetuation of intestinal inflammation in numerous chronic conditions. Most studies report intestinal dysbiosis in celiac disease (CD patients, untreated and treated with a gluten-free diet (GFD, compared to healthy controls. CD patients with gastrointestinal symptoms are also known to have a different microbiota compared to patients with dermatitis herpetiformis and controls, suggesting that the microbiota is involved in disease manifestation. Furthermore, a dysbiotic microbiota seems to be associated with persistent gastrointestinal symptoms in treated CD patients, suggesting its pathogenic implication in these particular cases. GFD per se influences gut microbiota composition, and thus constitutes an inevitable confounding factor in studies conducted in CD patients. To improve our understanding of whether intestinal dysbiosis is the cause or consequence of disease, prospective studies in healthy infants at family risk of CD are underway. These studies have revealed that the CD host genotype selects for the early colonizers of the infant’s gut, which together with environmental factors (e.g., breast-feeding, antibiotics, etc. could influence the development of oral tolerance to gluten. Indeed, some CD genes and/or their altered expression play a role in bacterial colonization and sensing. In turn, intestinal dysbiosis could promote an abnormal response to gluten or other environmental CD-promoting factors (e.g., infections in predisposed individuals. Here, we review the current knowledge of host-microbe interactions and how host genetics/epigenetics and environmental factors shape gut microbiota and may influence disease risk. We also summarize the current knowledge about the potential mechanisms of action of the intestinal microbiota and specific components that affect CD pathogenesis.

  2. Intestinal Microbiota and Celiac Disease: Cause, Consequence or Co-Evolution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenit, María Carmen; Olivares, Marta; Codoñer-Franch, Pilar; Sanz, Yolanda

    2015-08-17

    It is widely recognized that the intestinal microbiota plays a role in the initiation and perpetuation of intestinal inflammation in numerous chronic conditions. Most studies report intestinal dysbiosis in celiac disease (CD) patients, untreated and treated with a gluten-free diet (GFD), compared to healthy controls. CD patients with gastrointestinal symptoms are also known to have a different microbiota compared to patients with dermatitis herpetiformis and controls, suggesting that the microbiota is involved in disease manifestation. Furthermore, a dysbiotic microbiota seems to be associated with persistent gastrointestinal symptoms in treated CD patients, suggesting its pathogenic implication in these particular cases. GFD per se influences gut microbiota composition, and thus constitutes an inevitable confounding factor in studies conducted in CD patients. To improve our understanding of whether intestinal dysbiosis is the cause or consequence of disease, prospective studies in healthy infants at family risk of CD are underway. These studies have revealed that the CD host genotype selects for the early colonizers of the infant's gut, which together with environmental factors (e.g., breast-feeding, antibiotics, etc.) could influence the development of oral tolerance to gluten. Indeed, some CD genes and/or their altered expression play a role in bacterial colonization and sensing. In turn, intestinal dysbiosis could promote an abnormal response to gluten or other environmental CD-promoting factors (e.g., infections) in predisposed individuals. Here, we review the current knowledge of host-microbe interactions and how host genetics/epigenetics and environmental factors shape gut microbiota and may influence disease risk. We also summarize the current knowledge about the potential mechanisms of action of the intestinal microbiota and specific components that affect CD pathogenesis.

  3. Intestinal Microbiota and Celiac Disease: Cause, Consequence or Co-Evolution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenit, María Carmen; Olivares, Marta; Codoñer-Franch, Pilar; Sanz, Yolanda

    2015-01-01

    It is widely recognized that the intestinal microbiota plays a role in the initiation and perpetuation of intestinal inflammation in numerous chronic conditions. Most studies report intestinal dysbiosis in celiac disease (CD) patients, untreated and treated with a gluten-free diet (GFD), compared to healthy controls. CD patients with gastrointestinal symptoms are also known to have a different microbiota compared to patients with dermatitis herpetiformis and controls, suggesting that the microbiota is involved in disease manifestation. Furthermore, a dysbiotic microbiota seems to be associated with persistent gastrointestinal symptoms in treated CD patients, suggesting its pathogenic implication in these particular cases. GFD per se influences gut microbiota composition, and thus constitutes an inevitable confounding factor in studies conducted in CD patients. To improve our understanding of whether intestinal dysbiosis is the cause or consequence of disease, prospective studies in healthy infants at family risk of CD are underway. These studies have revealed that the CD host genotype selects for the early colonizers of the infant’s gut, which together with environmental factors (e.g., breast-feeding, antibiotics, etc.) could influence the development of oral tolerance to gluten. Indeed, some CD genes and/or their altered expression play a role in bacterial colonization and sensing. In turn, intestinal dysbiosis could promote an abnormal response to gluten or other environmental CD-promoting factors (e.g., infections) in predisposed individuals. Here, we review the current knowledge of host-microbe interactions and how host genetics/epigenetics and environmental factors shape gut microbiota and may influence disease risk. We also summarize the current knowledge about the potential mechanisms of action of the intestinal microbiota and specific components that affect CD pathogenesis. PMID:26287240

  4. Risk of extra-intestinal cancer in inflammatory bowel disease: meta-analysis of population-based cohort studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Eva Natalia G.; Duricova, Dana; Elkjaer, Margarita

    2010-01-01

    Extra-intestinal manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are relatively common, whereas the risk of extra-intestinal cancer (EIC) remains uncertain. The aim of this study was to obtain a reliable estimate of the risk of EIC in Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC...

  5. Interactions between intestinal microbiota and innate immune system in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucchiara, Salvatore; Stronati, Laura; Aloi, Marina

    2012-10-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is the result of an altered immune homeostasis within the intestinal mucosa against the gut microbiota, leading to chronic inflammation in genetically predisposed individuals. Under normal conditions, the immune system defends against pathogens and prevents the passage of excessive intestinal bacteria; regulatory pathways must maintain a low-grade, controlled inflammation in a healthy gut, but also induce a protective response against pathogens. The innate immune system is the first-line defense from microbes; dendritic cells, macrophages, and epithelial cells produce an initial, immediate response. The immune system constantly controls commensal bacteria and utilizes constitutive antimicrobial mechanisms to sustain immune homeostasis. The discovery that several genes linked to IBD modulate microbial recognition and innate immune pathways, such as nucleotide oligomerization domain 2 (Nod2), and genes that mediate autophagy (ie, ATG16L1, IRGM), has highlighted the critical role of host-microbe interactions in controlling intestinal immune homeostasis. Commensal microorganisms actively interact with the intestinal mucosa and influence the activity of the immune system as well as the amplitude of the immune response. In contrast, host factors can influence microbes, which in turn modulate disease susceptibility. In this paper, we focus on the mechanisms that mediate host-microbe interactions and how the disruption of this balance leads to chronic intestinal inflammation in IBD.

  6. Immunoproteomic to Identify Antigens in the Intestinal Mucosa of Crohn's Disease Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Guosheng; Wang, Gefei; Wu, Wenyong; Zhang, Changle; Ren, Jianan

    2013-01-01

    Incidences of Crohn disease (CD) have increased significantly in the last decade. Immunoproteomics are a promising method to identify biomarkers of different diseases. In the present study, we used immunoproteomics to study proteins of intestinal mucosal lesions and neighboring normal intestinal mucosa of 8 CD patients. Reactive proteins were validated by Western blotting. Approximately 50 protein spots localized in the 4 to 7 pI range were detected on two-dimensional electrophoresis gels, and 6 differentially expressed protein spots between 10 and 100 kDa were identified. Reactive proteins were identified as prohibitin, calreticulin, apolipoprotein A-I, intelectin-1, protein disulfide isomerase, and glutathione s-transferase Pi. Western blotting was conducted on the intestinal mucosa of another 4 CD patients to validate the reactive proteins. We found that intestinal mucosal lesions had high levels of prohibitin expression. Glutathione s-transferase expression was detected in 100% of the intestinal mucosa examined. Thus, we report 6 autoantigens of CD, including 3 new and 3 previously reported autoantigens. Intelectin-1, protein disulfide isomerase, and glutathione-s-transferases may be used as biomarkers for CD pathogenesis. PMID:24358121

  7. Microbial Sensing by the Intestinal Epithelium in the Pathogenesis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Scharl

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have raised evidence that the intestinal microbiota plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory bowels diseases. This evidence comes from several observations. First, animals raised under germ-free conditions do not develop intestinal inflammation in several different model systems. Second, antibiotics are able to modulate the course of experimental colitis. Third, genetic polymorphisms in a variety of genes of the innate immune system have been associated with chronic intestinal inflammatory diseases. Dysfunction of these molecules results in an inappropriate response to bacterial and antigenic stimulation of the innate immune system in the gastrointestinal tract. Variants of pattern recognition receptors such as NOD2 or TLRs by which commensal and pathogenic bacteria can be detected have been shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of IBD. But not only pathways of microbial detection but also intracellular ways of bacterial processing such as autophagosome function are associated with the risk to develop Crohn's disease. Thus, the “environment concept” and the “genetic concept” of inflammatory bowel disease pathophysiology are converging via the intestinal microbiota and the recognition mechanisms for an invasion of members of the microbiota into the mucosa.

  8. Inhibitors of apoptosis (IAPs) regulate intestinal immunity and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jannie; LaCasse, Eric C; Seidelin, Jakob B

    2014-01-01

    -linked lymphoproliferative disease type 2 (XLP2), in which 20% of patients develop severe intestinal inflammation. In addition, 4% of males with early-onset IBD also have inactivating mutations in XIAP. Therefore, the IAPs play a greater role in gut homeostasis, immunity and IBD development than previously suspected...

  9. Severity of atopic disease inversely correlates with intestinal microbiota diversity and butyrate-producing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nylund, L.; Nermes, M.; Isolauri, E.; Salminen, S.; Vos, de W.M.; Satokari, R.

    2015-01-01

    The reports on atopic diseases and microbiota in early childhood remain contradictory and both decreased and increased microbiota diversity have been associated with atopic eczema. In this study, the intestinal microbiota signatures associated with the severity of eczema in 6-month-old infants were

  10. Transcutaneous port for levodopa/carbidopa intestinal gel administration in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Laar, T.; Nyholm, D.; Nyman, R.

    Objective - To evaluate the safety and tolerability of the T-Port (R) for intestinal infusion of levodopa/carbidopa gel in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). Methods - This prospective study was carried out in 24 patients with PD (15 males, mean age 61.8 years, mean duration PD 18.7

  11. Predictors of failure of fish-oil therapy for intestinal failure–associated liver disease in children12

    OpenAIRE

    Nandivada, Prathima; Baker, Meredith A; Mitchell, Paul D; O’Loughlin, Alison A; Potemkin, Alexis K; Anez-Bustillos, Lorenzo; Carlson, Sarah J; Dao, Duy T; Fell, Gillian L; Gura, Kathleen M; Puder, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Background: Parenteral fish-oil (FO) therapy is a safe and effective treatment for intestinal failure–associated liver disease (IFALD). Patients whose cholestasis does not resolve with FO may progress to end-stage liver disease.

  12. MARKERS OF THE ENTERIC INFLAMMATION IN THE EVENT OF INTESTINAL DISEASES: LITERATURE REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.F. Tat'yanina

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors provided modern information on the basic noninvasive methods to assess the inflammatory process in the intestine in crohn's disease and colitis gravis. The researchers thoroughly described the opportunities and limitations for the use of faecal calprotectin as a marker of the inflammatory enteric diseases. Importance of this marker for the differential diagnostics of  the inflammatory and functional enteric diseases has been shown.Key words: markers of the enteric inflammation, faecal calprotectin, inflammatory bowel diseases, colitis gravis, сrohn's disease.

  13. Increased intestinal permeability correlates with sigmoid mucosa alpha-synuclein staining and endotoxin exposure markers in early Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher B Forsyth

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder of aging. The pathological hallmark of PD is neuronal inclusions termed Lewy bodies whose main component is alpha-synuclein protein. The finding of these Lewy bodies in the intestinal enteric nerves led to the hypothesis that the intestine might be an early site of PD disease in response to an environmental toxin or pathogen. One potential mechanism for environmental toxin(s and proinflammatory luminal products to gain access to mucosal neuronal tissue and promote oxidative stress is compromised intestinal barrier integrity. However, the role of intestinal permeability in PD has never been tested. We hypothesized that PD subjects might exhibit increased intestinal permeability to proinflammatory bacterial products in the intestine. To test our hypothesis we evaluated intestinal permeability in subjects newly diagnosed with PD and compared their values to healthy subjects. In addition, we obtained intestinal biopsies from both groups and used immunohistochemistry to assess bacterial translocation, nitrotyrosine (oxidative stress, and alpha-synuclein. We also evaluated serum markers of endotoxin exposure including LPS binding protein (LBP. Our data show that our PD subjects exhibit significantly greater intestinal permeability (gut leakiness than controls. In addition, this intestinal hyperpermeability significantly correlated with increased intestinal mucosa staining for E. coli bacteria, nitrotyrosine, and alpha-synuclein as well as serum LBP levels in PD subjects. These data represent not only the first demonstration of abnormal intestinal permeability in PD subjects but also the first correlation of increased intestinal permeability in PD with intestinal alpha-synuclein (the hallmark of PD, as well as staining for gram negative bacteria and tissue oxidative stress. Our study may thus shed new light on PD pathogenesis as well as provide a new method for earlier

  14. Crohn's disease and intestinal endometriosis: an intriguing co-existence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Craninx, M.; D'Haens, G.; Cokelaere, K.; Baert, F.; Penninckx, F.; D'Hoore, A.; Ectors, N.; Rutgeerts, P.; Geboes, K.

    2000-01-01

    We present a series of eight female patients who came to surgery for complicated Crohn's disease of the terminal ileum (n = 7) or colon (n = 1). Indications for surgery were medically intractable disease in three, steroid dependence in four and ileal perforation in one. Histological examination

  15. Intestinal Ultrasonography in the Diagnosis and Management of Colonic Diverticular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maconi, Giovanni; Carmagnola, Stefania; Guzowski, Tom

    2016-10-01

    Diverticula of the colon and their symptomatic manifestations, including acute diverticulitis (AD), are frequent complaints and the cause of an increasing burden of ambulatory visits, diagnostic procedures, and hospital admissions. Endoscopic and radiologic diagnostic procedures have a well-known role in the diagnosis and management of the disease, but recently intestinal ultrasonography has been proposed as a complementary tool in the diagnosis and follow-up of diverticular disease. This review shows the main sonographic features of diverticula and discusses the potential role of ultrasound in suggesting the presence of symptomatic uncomplicated diverticular disease of the colon. Moreover, the sonographic features of AD, diagnostic accuracy, advantages, and limitations of the technique will be discussed. We place special emphasis on the present role of intestinal ultrasonography in patients with suspected AD. Owing to its high sensitivity and high positive predictive value in assessing AD, intestinal ultrasound is currently suggested by some European national consensus guidelines as the first-line examination in this setting. In fact, to minimize false-negative findings and avoid unnecessary radiation exposure in patients with suspected AD, intestinal ultrasound might be used as the first-line examination in a sequential diagnostic strategy, followed by computed tomography only in the case of negative or inconclusive findings.

  16. Immune-Mediated Mechanisms of Action of Probiotics and Synbiotics in Treating Pediatric Intestinal Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Campos, Mercedes

    2018-01-01

    The pediatric population is continually at risk of developing infectious and inflammatory diseases. The treatment for infections, particularly gastrointestinal conditions, focuses on oral or intravenous rehydration, nutritional support and, in certain case, antibiotics. Over the past decade, the probiotics and synbiotics administration for the prevention and treatment of different acute and chronic infectious diseases has dramatically increased. Probiotic microorganisms are primarily used as treatments because they can stimulate changes in the intestinal microbial ecosystem and improve the immunological status of the host. The beneficial impact of probiotics is mediated by different mechanisms. These mechanisms include the probiotics’ capacity to increase the intestinal barrier function, to prevent bacterial transferation and to modulate inflammation through immune receptor cascade signaling, as well as their ability to regulate the expression of selected host intestinal genes. Nevertheless, with respect to pediatric intestinal diseases, information pertaining to these key mechanisms of action is scarce, particularly for immune-mediated mechanisms of action. In the present work, we review the biochemical and molecular mechanisms of action of probiotics and synbiotics that affect the immune system. PMID:29303974

  17. [An analysis of the DNA fingerprinting of intestinal flora in inflammatory bowel disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Run-mei; Han, Ying; Wang, Ji-heng; Wang, Zhi-hong

    2007-02-01

    DNA fingerprinting for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients and healthy subjects was carried out to compare the difference of intestinal flora between the two groups. DNA fingerprinting for IBD patients and healthy persons was set up with enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC-PCR) technology and the difference of intestinal flora between the two groups compared. DNA fingerprinting of the IBD patients and healthy subjects was identified and a significant difference was noticed between them. There were lots of bands in the DNA fingerprinting of the healthy subjects but few in that of the IBD patients. Strikingly, same distribution of the principal band of DNA fingerprinting was noticed in IBD patients. The variety of intestinal flora in healthy subjects is more apparent than that in IBD patients. An unique principal band might be the sequence of the presence of specific etiopathogenetic bacterium, or it might be the combined sequence of mixed bacterial flora.

  18. Recurrent spontaneous subserosal hematoma of ileum causing intestinal obstruction in a patient with menkes disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Shu-Chao; Hsu, Chyong-Hsin; Wang, Nien-Lu; Lin, Shuan-Pei; Jiang, Chuen-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Menkes disease (MD) is a disorder of copper metabolism due to ATP7A gene mutation that leads to severe copper deficiency. Deformed blood vessels can be found in many parts of the body, and intracranial hematoma is generally reported. Methods: We report a Taiwanese boy with MD who had recurrent spontaneous subserosal hematoma of ileum presenting as intestinal obstruction, with the 2 episodes 23 months apart. The patient returned to the usual physical status after surgical removal of the hematoma. Results: The defective copper metabolism causes dysfunction of a plenty of copper-dependent enzymes, giving rise to unique kinky hair appearance, progressive neurodegeneration, and connective tissue abnormalities. To our knowledge, this is the first report on recurrent subserosal hemorrhage of intestine in MD. Conclusion: Owing to the fragile structure of blood vessels, subserosal hematoma should be considered when patients with MD having intestinal obstruction. PMID:27631241

  19. Intestinal microbiota pathogenesis and fecal microbiota transplantation for inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zi-Kai; Yang, Yun-Sheng; Chen, Ye; Yuan, Jing; Sun, Gang; Peng, Li-Hua

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota plays an important role in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The pathogenesis of IBD involves inappropriate ongoing activation of the mucosal immune system driven by abnormal intestinal microbiota in genetically predisposed individuals. However, there are still no definitive microbial pathogens linked to the onset of IBD. The composition and function of the intestinal microbiota and their metabolites are indeed disturbed in IBD patients. The special alterations of gut microbiota associated with IBD remain to be evaluated. The microbial interactions and host-microbe immune interactions are still not clarified. Limitations of present probiotic products in IBD are mainly due to modest clinical efficacy, few available strains and no standardized administration. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) may restore intestinal microbial homeostasis, and preliminary data have shown the clinical efficacy of FMT on refractory IBD or IBD combined with Clostridium difficile infection. Additionally, synthetic microbiota transplantation with the defined composition of fecal microbiota is also a promising therapeutic approach for IBD. However, FMT-related barriers, including the mechanism of restoring gut microbiota, standardized donor screening, fecal material preparation and administration, and long-term safety should be resolved. The role of intestinal microbiota and FMT in IBD should be further investigated by metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses combined with germ-free/human flora-associated animals and chemostat gut models. PMID:25356041

  20. Intestinal Epithelial Cell Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Inflammatory Bowel Disease Pathogenesis: An Update Review

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    Xiaoshi Ma

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal epithelial cells serve essential roles in maintaining intestinal homeostasis, which relies on appropriate endoplasmic reticulum (ER function for proper protein folding, modification, and secretion. Exogenous or endogenous risk factors with an ability to disturb the ER function can impair the intestinal barrier function and activate inflammatory responses in the host. The last decade has witnessed considerable progress in the understanding of the functional role of ER stress and unfolded protein response (UPR in the gut homeostasis and its significant contribution to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Herein, we review recent evidence supporting the viewpoint that deregulation of ER stress and UPR signaling in the intestinal epithelium, including the absorptive cells, Paneth cells, goblet cells, and enteroendocrine cells, mediates the action of genetic or environmental factors driving colitis in experimental animals and IBD patients. In addition, we highlight pharmacologic application of chaperones or small molecules that enhance protein folding and modification capacity or improve the function of the ER. These molecules represent potential therapeutic strategies in the prevention or treatment of IBD through restoring ER homeostasis in intestinal epithelial cells.

  1. The Neuromodulation of the Intestinal Immune System and Its Relevance in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giovangiulio, Martina; Verheijden, Simon; Bosmans, Goele; Stakenborg, Nathalie; Boeckxstaens, Guy E; Matteoli, Gianluca

    2015-01-01

    One of the main tasks of the immune system is to discriminate and appropriately react to "danger" or "non-danger" signals. This is crucial in the gastrointestinal tract, where the immune system is confronted with a myriad of food antigens and symbiotic microflora that are in constant contact with the mucosa, in addition to any potential pathogens. This large number of antigens and commensal microflora, which are essential for providing vital nutrients, must be tolerated by the intestinal immune system to prevent aberrant inflammation. Hence, the balance between immune activation versus tolerance should be tightly regulated to maintain intestinal homeostasis and to prevent immune activation indiscriminately against all luminal antigens. Loss of this delicate equilibrium can lead to chronic activation of the intestinal immune response resulting in intestinal disorders, such as inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). In order to maintain homeostasis, the immune system has evolved diverse regulatory strategies including additional non-immunological actors able to control the immune response. Accumulating evidence strongly indicates a bidirectional link between the two systems in which the brain modulates the immune response via the detection of circulating cytokines and via direct afferent input from sensory fibers and from enteric neurons. In the current review, we will highlight the most recent findings regarding the cross-talk between the nervous system and the mucosal immune system and will discuss the potential use of these neuronal circuits and neuromediators as novel therapeutic tools to reestablish immune tolerance and treat intestinal chronic inflammation.

  2. Diet-Induced Dysbiosis of the Intestinal Microbiota and the Effects on Immunity and Disease

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    Deanna L. Gibson

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The gastrointestinal (GI microbiota is the collection of microbes which reside in the GI tract and represents the largest source of non-self antigens in the human body. The GI tract functions as a major immunological organ as it must maintain tolerance to commensal and dietary antigens while remaining responsive to pathogenic stimuli. If this balance is disrupted, inappropriate inflammatory processes can result, leading to host cell damage and/or autoimmunity. Evidence suggests that the composition of the intestinal microbiota can influence susceptibility to chronic disease of the intestinal tract including ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease, celiac disease and irritable bowel syndrome, as well as more systemic diseases such as obesity, type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Interestingly, a considerable shift in diet has coincided with increased incidence of many of these inflammatory diseases. It was originally believed that the composition of the intestinal microbiota was relatively stable from early childhood; however, recent evidence suggests that diet can cause dysbiosis, an alteration in the composition of the microbiota, which could lead to aberrant immune responses. The role of the microbiota and the potential for diet-induced dysbiosis in inflammatory conditions of the GI tract and systemic diseases will be discussed.

  3. Cell Death and Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: Apoptosis, Necrosis, and Autophagy in the Intestinal Epithelium

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    Tiago Nunes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell death mechanisms have been associated with the development of inflammatory bowel diseases in humans and mice. Recent studies suggested that a complex crosstalk between autophagy/apoptosis, microbe sensing, and enhanced endoplasmic reticulum stress in the epithelium could play a critical role in these diseases. In addition, necroptosis, a relatively novel programmed necrosis-like pathway associated with TNF receptor activation, seems to be also present in the pathogenesis of Crohn’s disease and in specific animal models for intestinal inflammation. This review attempts to cover new data related to cell death mechanisms and inflammatory bowel diseases.

  4. The extent of intestinal failure-associated liver disease in patients referred for intestinal rehabilitation is associated with increased mortality: an analysis of the pediatric intestinal failure consortium database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javid, Patrick J; Oron, Assaf P; Duggan, Christopher; Squires, Robert H; Horslen, Simon P

    2017-09-05

    The advent of regional multidisciplinary intestinal rehabilitation programs has been associated with improved survival in pediatric intestinal failure. Yet, the optimal timing of referral for intestinal rehabilitation remains unknown. We hypothesized that the degree of intestinal failure-associated liver disease (IFALD) at initiation of intestinal rehabilitation would be associated with overall outcome. The multicenter, retrospective Pediatric Intestinal Failure Consortium (PIFCon) database was used to identify all subjects with baseline bilirubin data. Conjugated bilirubin (CBili) was used as a marker for IFALD, and we stratified baseline bilirubin values as CBili4 mg/dL. The association between baseline CBili and mortality was examined using Cox proportional hazards regression. Of 272 subjects in the database, 191 (70%) children had baseline bilirubin data collected. 38% and 28% of patients had CBili >4 mg/dL and CBili 4 mg/dL, prematurity, race, and small bowel atresia. On regression analysis controlling for age, prematurity, and diagnosis, the risk of mortality was increased by 3-fold for baseline CBili 2-4 mg/dL (HR 3.25 [1.07-9.92], p=0.04) and 4-fold for baseline CBili >4 mg/dL (HR 4.24 [1.51-11.92], p=0.006). On secondary analysis, CBili >4 mg/dL at baseline was associated with a lower chance of attaining enteral autonomy. In children with intestinal failure treated at intestinal rehabilitation programs, more advanced IFALD at referral is associated with increased mortality and decreased prospect of attaining enteral autonomy. Early referral of children with intestinal failure to intestinal rehabilitation programs should be strongly encouraged. Treatment Study, Level III. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The Role of Fecal Calprotectin in Evaluating Intestinal Involvement of Behçet’s Disease

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    Burak Özşeker

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the regions of involvement of Behçet’s disease (BD, a systematic inflammatory vasculitis with unknown etiology, is the gastrointestinal (GI tract. Upper GI endoscopy, colonoscopy, and capsule endoscopy are frequently used methods to diagnose the intestinal involvement of BD. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of fecal calprotectin (FC in the evaluation of intestinal involvement in BD. Material and Method. A total of 30 patients who were diagnosed with BD and had no GI symptoms and 25 individuals in the control group were included in this study. Results. Levels of FC were statistically significantly higher in patients with BD compared to the control group (p<0.001. The correlation analysis performed including FC and markers of disease activity revealed a positive and statistically significant correlation between FC level and CRP and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (r: 0.255, p<0.049, and r: 0.404, p<0.001, resp.. FC levels in patients who were detected to have ulcers in the terminal ileum and colon in the colonoscopic examination were statistically significantly higher compared to the patients with BD without intestinal involvement (p=0.01. Conclusion. The measurement of FC levels, in patients with BD who are asymptomatic for GI involvement, may be helpful to detect the possible underlying intestinal involvement.

  6. Progression of the load of waterborne and intestinal parasitic diseases in the State of Amazonas

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    Marilaine Martins

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the State of Amazonas, Brazil, urban expansion together with precarious basic sanitation conditions and human settlement on river banks has contributed to the persistence of waterborne and intestinal parasitic diseases. Time series of the recorded cases of cholera, typhoid fever, hepatitis A and leptospirosis are described, using data from different levels of the surveillance systems. The sources for intestinal parasitosis prevalence data (non-compulsory reporting in Brazil were Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE, Literatura Latino-Americana (LILACS and the annals of major scientific meetings. Relevant papers and abstracts in all languages were accessed by two independent reviewers. The references cited by each relevant paper were scrutinized to locate additional papers. Despite its initial dissemination across the entire State of Amazonas, cholera was controlled in 1998. The magnitude of typhoid fever has decreased; however, a pattern characterized by eventual outbreaks still remains. Leptospirosis is an increasing cause of concern in association with the annual floods. The overall prevalence of intestinal parasites is high regardless of the municipality and the characteristics of areas and populations. The incidence of hepatitis A has decreased over the past decade. A comparison of older and recent surveys shows that the prevalence of intestinal parasitic diseases has remained constant. The load of waterborne and intestinal parasitic diseases ranks high among the health problems present in the State of Amazonas. Interventions aiming at basic sanitation and vaccination for hepatitis A were formulated and implemented, but assessment of their effectiveness in the targeted populations is still needed.

  7. Intestinal absorption of water-soluble vitamins in health and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, Hamid M.

    2014-01-01

    Our knowledge of the mechanisms and regulation of intestinal absorption of water-soluble vitamins under normal physiological conditions, and of the factors/conditions that affect and interfere with theses processes has been significantly expanded in recent years as a result of the availability of a host of valuable molecular/cellular tools. Although structurally and functionally unrelated, the water-soluble vitamins share the feature of being essential for normal cellular functions, growth and development, and that their deficiency leads to a variety of clinical abnormalities that range from anaemia to growth retardation and neurological disorders. Humans cannot synthesize water-soluble vitamins (with the exception of some endogenous synthesis of niacin) and must obtain these micronutrients from exogenous sources. Thus body homoeostasis of these micronutrients depends on their normal absorption in the intestine. Interference with absorption, which occurs in a variety of conditions (e.g. congenital defects in the digestive or absorptive system, intestinal disease/resection, drug interaction and chronic alcohol use), leads to the development of deficiency (and sub-optimal status) and results in clinical abnormalities. It is well established now that intestinal absorption of the water-soluble vitamins ascorbate, biotin, folate, niacin, pantothenic acid, pyridoxine, riboflavin and thiamin is via specific carrier-mediated processes. These processes are regulated by a variety of factors and conditions, and the regulation involves transcriptional and/or post-transcriptional mechanisms. Also well recognized now is the fact that the large intestine possesses specific and efficient uptake systems to absorb a number of water-soluble vitamins that are synthesized by the normal microflora. This source may contribute to total body vitamin nutrition, and especially towards the cellular nutrition and health of the local colonocytes. The present review aims to outline our current

  8. Reversal of intestinal failure-associated liver disease (IFALD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Christian; Kodjabashia, Kamelia; Nixon, Emma

    2016-01-01

    in an adult patient with IF secondary to severe Crohn's disease and multiple small bowel resections. The patient developed liver dysfunction and pathology consistent with IFALD. Multiple causal factors were implicated, including nutrition-related factors, catheter sepsis and the use of hepatotoxic medications....... Multidisciplinary treatment in a tertiary IF referral centre included aggressive sepsis management, discontinuation of hepatotoxic medications and a reduction of parenteral nutrition dependency through optimisation of enteral nutrition via distal enteral tube feeding. Upon this, liver function tests normalised....

  9. Treatment of Cushing's disease in juveniles with intestinal pituitary irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassar, J.; Doyle, F.H.; Mashiter, K.; Joplin, G.F.

    1979-01-01

    Nine juvenile patients (five boys and four girls aged 10-18) with Cushing's disease were treated with pituitary implantation of 198 Au and/or 90 Y. No patient had any surgical complication from this procedure. At the latest assessment. 3 months to 17 years after operation, Cushing's disease was in remission in all the patients; the response time following operation was a few days to 3 months. Radiology of the pituitary fossa at time of pituitary implantation was normal in all patients and remains so. The final height in six patients is 149-172 cm (59-67.5 inches) and three patients who continue to grow have increased by 13.6 and 3 cm since implantation. Only one patient required full pituitary hormone replacement therapy, and he had been previously treated by external irradiation, and one other patient failed to complete puberty. In all the other seven sexual maturation is normal and one has fathered two children. It is concluded that pituitary implantation with interstitial irradiation is a satisfactory form of treatment for Cushing's disease in juveniles. (author)

  10. Roles of amino acids in preventing and treating intestinal diseases: recent studies with pig models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yulan; Wang, Xiuying; Hou, Yongqing; Yin, Yulong; Qiu, Yinsheng; Wu, Guoyao; Hu, Chien-An Andy

    2017-08-01

    Animal models are needed to study and understand a human complex disease. Because of their similarities in anatomy, structure, physiology, and pathophysiology, the pig has proven its usefulness in studying human gastrointestinal diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease, ischemia/reperfusion injury, diarrhea, and cancer. To understand the pathogenesis of these diseases, a number of experimental models generated in pigs are available, for example, through surgical manipulation, chemical induction, microbial infection, and genetic engineering. Our interests have been using amino acids as therapeutics in pig and human disease models. Amino acids not only play an important role in protein biosynthesis, but also exert significant physiological effects in regulating immunity, anti-oxidation, redox regulation, energy metabolism, signal transduction, and animal behavior. Recent studies in pigs have shown that specific dietary amino acids can improve intestinal integrity and function under normal and pathological conditions that protect the host from different diseases. In this review, we summarize several pig models in intestinal diseases and how amino acids can be used as therapeutics in treating pig and human diseases.

  11. Pathogenic aspects and therapeutic avenues of intestinal fibrosis in Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzi, Francesca; Calabrese, Emma; Monteleone, Giovanni

    2015-12-01

    In Crohn's disease, one of the two major forms of inflammatory bowel diseases in human beings, persistent and chronic inflammation promotes fibrotic processes thereby facilitating formation of strictures, the most common indication for surgical intervention in this disorder. The pathogenesis of Crohn's disease-associated fibrosis is not fully understood, but variants of genes involved in the recognition of microbial components/products [e.g. CARD15 (caspase-activating recruitment domain 15) and ATG16L1 (autophagy-related 16-like 1)] are associated with this phenotype, and experimental evidence suggests that intestinal fibrosis results from an altered balance between deposition of ECM (extracellular matrix) and degradation of ECM by proteases. Studies have also contributed to identify the main phenotypic and functional alterations of cells involved in the fibrogenic process, as well as molecules that stimulate such cells to produce elevated amounts of collagen and other ECM-related proteins. In the present review, we assess the current knowledge about cellular and molecular mediators of intestinal fibrosis and describe results of recent studies aimed at testing the preventive/therapeutic effect of compounds in experimental models of intestinal fibrosis. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  12. Intestinal invasion and disseminated disease associated with Penicillium chrysogenum

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    Herchline Thomas E

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Penicillium sp., other than P. marneffei, is an unusual cause of invasive disease. These organisms are often identified in immunosuppressed patients, either due to human immunodeficiency virus or from immunosuppressant medications post-transplantation. They are a rarely identified cause of infection in immunocompetent hosts. Case presentation A 51 year old African-American female presented with an acute abdomen and underwent an exploratory laparotomy which revealed an incarcerated peristomal hernia. Her postoperative course was complicated by severe sepsis syndrome with respiratory failure, hypotension, leukocytosis, and DIC. On postoperative day 9 she was found to have an anastamotic breakdown. Pathology from the second surgery showed transmural ischemic necrosis with angioinvasion of a fungal organism. Fungal blood cultures were positive for Penicillium chrysogenum and the patient completed a 6 week course of amphotericin B lipid complex, followed by an extended course oral intraconazole. She was discharged to a nursing home without evidence of recurrent infection. Discussion Penicillium chrysogenum is a rare cause of infection in immunocompetent patients. Diagnosis can be difficult, but Penicillium sp. grows rapidly on routine fungal cultures. Prognosis remains very poor, but aggressive treatment is essential, including surgical debridement and the removal of foci of infection along with the use of amphotericin B. The clinical utility of newer antifungal agents remains to be determined.

  13. Imbalance in the intestinal microbiota as a risk factor of cardiometabolic diseases

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    Yu. V. Lobzin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The review shows the role of the intestinal microflora in the development of atherosclerosis, coronary heart disease, overweight / obesity and diabetes. It is well known that consumption of foods rich in saturated fats and cholesterol (meat, egg yolk and milk products with high fat content is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. However, new studies show that the atherogenic properties of these products are also due to the high content of L-carnitine and its structural analog choline, which, after entering the body is metabolized by intestinal bacteria up to trimethylamine (TMA, and then converted in the liver to trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO having direct atherogenic action. It was found that elevated levels of TMAO increases the risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, cardiac failure and death, including the common causes. In the center of international attention is also the question of the role of the intestinal microbiota imbalance in the development of insulin resistance, endothelial dysfunction, increase of the adhesive properties of macrophages, the appearance of dyslipidemia, elevated blood pressure, overweight. Attention of the doctors is focused on the extremely importance of maintaining a normal balance of the intestinal microbiota to prevent cardiometabolic diseases apart from implementation of already well-known and generally accepted preventive measures.

  14. Role of colonoscopy in differentiating intestinal tuberculosis from Crohn's disease

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    P Rajesh Prabhu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The interface between tuberculosis (TB and Crohn's disease (CD is relevant as TB complicates both the diagnosis and management of CD. Aim: This study aimed to identify the distinctive characteristics of ileocaecal and colonic TB (C-TB and colonic CD (C-CD at colonoscopy and to correlate the colonoscopy findings with histology. Materials and Methods: This prospective study included consecutive patients presenting with classical symptoms of TB or CD. The colonoscopic findings were compared with histology, which was taken as gold standard. Appropriate statistical tests were applied. Results: Fifty-eight individuals fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Nine and 16 patients with C-TB and C-CD, respectively, had histological confirmation of respective diagnosis. In 33 specimens, the histological diagnosis was inconclusive. The sensitivity of colonoscopy for diagnosing C-TB was high at 88.9% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 51.8–99.7. It was 50% (95% CI: 24.7–75.4 for CD. The reverse was true for CD whose specificity was high at 71.4% (95% CI: 55.3–84.3 and low for TB at 46.9% (95% CI: 32.5–61.7. All the patients diagnosed as confirmed CD or TB responded well to respective treatment. Six of the thirty patients with failed response to anti-TB treatment required surgery or change in treatment after 2 months. Conclusion: Colonoscopic findings of isolated ileal involvement, aphthous ulcer, cobble stoning, long-segment strictures, skip lesions and perianal involvement favored a diagnosis of CD. Correlation of colonoscopy with histology is poor for both CD and TB. The accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of colonoscopy were better and superior for the diagnosis of CD, than in the diagnosis of TB.

  15. Intestinal permeability to (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA in children with Crohn's disease and celiac disease

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    Turck, D.; Ythier, H.; Maquet, E.; Deveaux, M.; Marchandise, X.; Farriaux, J.P.; Fontaine, G.

    1987-07-01

    (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA was used as a probe molecule to assess intestinal permeability in 7 healthy control adults, 11 control children, 17 children with Crohn's disease, and 6 children with untreated celiac disease. After subjects fasted overnight, 75 kBq/kg (= 2 microCi/kg) /sup 51/Cr-labeled EDTA was given by mouth; 24-h urinary excretion of (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA was measured and expressed as a percentage of the total oral dose. Mean and SD were as follows: control adults 1.47 +/- 0.62, control children 1.59 +/- 0.55, and patients with Crohn's disease or celiac disease 5.35 +/- 1.94. The difference between control children and patients was statistically significant (p less than 0.001). These results show that intestinal permeability to (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA is increased among children with active or inactive Crohn's disease affecting small bowel only or small bowel and colon, and with untreated celiac disease. The (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA permeability test could facilitate the decision to perform more extensive investigations in children suspected of small bowel disease who have atypical or poor clinical and biological symptomatology.

  16. Intestine transplantation

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    Tadeja Pintar

    2011-02-01

    Conclusion: Intestine transplantation is reserved for patients with irreversible intestinal failure due to short gut syndrome requiring total paranteral nutrition with no possibility of discontinuation and loss of venous access for patient maintenance. In these patients complications of underlying disease and long-term total parenteral nutrition are present.

  17. Subversion of human intestinal mucosa innate immunity by a Crohn's disease-associated E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarry, A; Crémet, L; Caroff, N; Bou-Hanna, C; Mussini, J M; Reynaud, A; Servin, A L; Mosnier, J F; Liévin-Le Moal, V; Laboisse, C L

    2015-05-01

    Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC), associated with Crohn's disease, are likely candidate contributory factors in the disease. However, signaling pathways involved in human intestinal mucosa innate host response to AIEC remain unknown. Here we use a 3D model of human intestinal mucosa explant culture to explore the effects of the AIEC strain LF82 on two innate immunity platforms, i.e., the inflammasome through evaluation of caspase-1 status, and NFκB signaling. We showed that LF82 bacteria enter and survive within a few intestinal epithelial cells and macrophages, without altering the mucosa overall architecture. Although 4-h infection with a Salmonella strain caused crypt disorganization, caspase-1 activation, and mature IL-18 production, LF82 bacteria were unable to activate caspase-1 and induce IL-18 production. In parallel, LF82 bacteria activated NFκB signaling in epithelial cells through IκBα phosphorylation, NFκBp65 nuclear translocation, and TNFα secretion. In addition, NFκB activation was crucial for the maintenance of epithelial homeostasis upon LF82 infection. In conclusion, here we decipher at the whole-mucosa level the mechanisms of the LF82-induced subversion of innate immunity that, by maintaining host cell integrity, ensure intracellular bacteria survival.

  18. A new anastomosis technique for intestinal diseases with proximal dilated segments

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    Metin Gündüz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of techniques have been described for intestinal anastomosis. We describe a different, simple, and safe technique that can be used in patients with intestinal diseases, such as jejunoileal atresia and perforation that has proximal dilated segments. In this technique, an atraumatic bowel clamp was applied on the proximal dilated bowel at a 90° angle. In the narrow distal segment, we resected the bowel at a 0° angle and continued at a 30° angle from the antimesenteric side. Finally, a two-layer interrupted anastomosis was performed. We applied this technique to a 31-day-old patient who had a divided jejunostomy due to malrotation and perforation with a proximal dilated bowel. Neither anastomotic complications nor feeding and passage problems were seen postoperatively.

  19. Computed tomography enterography and magnetic resonance enterography in small intestine of Crohn's disease

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    Aida Cristina Correia Oliveira Azevedo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Crohn disease is defined as a chronic inflammatory and idiopathic process that can affect any portion of the gastrointestinal tract. The small intestine is the most frequently affected place, so small bowel morphology investigation is often mandatory.For decades small bowel was almost inaccessible to endoscopies, and, studies like enteroclysis and bowel transit time test, were considered gold standard tests. Recently, innovative imaging techniques, improved diagnosis and follow-up of Crohn disease patients by allowing the exploration of this gut segment.Authors review literature, concerning the role of computed tomography enterography and magnetic resonance enterography in the evaluation of small bowel Crohn disease.Authors conclude that the choice of examination to be made should be weighted considering several factors such as the age of the patient, their tolerability, the Crohn's disease phenotype and the availability of hospital resources. Resumo: A doença de Crohn é definida como um processo inflamatório e idiopático crônico que pode afetar qualquer parte do trato gastrintestinal. O intestino delgado é o local mais frequentemente afetado e, assim, com frequência torna-se obrigatória uma investigação da morfologia do intestino delgado.Durante décadas, o intestino delgado era praticamente inacessível às endoscopias; nesse contexto, estudos como a enteróclise e a determinação do tempo de trânsito intestinal eram considerados como os critérios diagnósticos principais. Recentemente, técnicas imaginológicas inovadoras aperfeiçoaram o diagnóstico e seguimento de pacientes com doença de Crohn, por permitirem a exploração desse segmento intestinal.Os autores revisam a literatura pertinente ao papel da enterografia por tomografia computadorizada e da enterografia por ressonância magnética na avaliação da doença de Crohn no intestino delgado.Os autores concluem que a escolha do exame a ser realizado deve levar em conta

  20. Intestinal tissue transglutaminase in coeliac disease of children and adults: ultrastructural localization and variation in expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skovbjerg, H; Hansen, G H; Niels-Christiansen, L L; Anthonsen, D; Ascher, H; Midhagen, G; Hallert, C; Norén, O; Sjöström, H

    2004-12-01

    Tissue transglutaminase is the main antigen for the anti-endomysial antibodies used for diagnosis of coeliac disease and can with some specificity in vitro deamidate gliadins generating potent epitopes. The intestinal levels and the ultrastructural localization of tissue transglutaminase in normal and affected persons were investigated to provide further information on its role in this disease. Intestinal biopsies were taken from normal and coeliac children and adults. The level of transglutaminase was analysed by means of a quantitative enzymatic assay and its ultrastructural localization by immunogold electronmicroscopy using a monoclonal antibody against tissue transglutaminase. In relation to normal individuals, the enzymatic activity of tissue transglutaminase in adult coeliac patients was increased. The enzyme was found in the enterocytes and in increased amount just beneath the enterocytes, where cytosolic and nuclear labelling of distinct elongated cells was seen in addition to extracellular labelling close to collagen fibrils. In children, the enzymatic activity and the immunogold labelling could not be shown to be related to disease. In all cases the enzyme activity was EDTA-sensitive. The increased amount of tissue transglutaminase activity in coeliac adults was shown to be due to the appearance of the enzyme in enterocytes and increased expression in the lamina propria. No evidence was found to support the idea of a changed localization or changed amounts as primary elements in coeliac disease pathogenesis, nor for the involvement of non-calcium dependent microbial transglutaminases.

  1. Role of intestinal microbiota and metabolites on gut homeostasis and human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lan; Zhang, Jianqiong

    2017-01-06

    A vast diversity of microbes colonizes in the human gastrointestinal tract, referred to intestinal microbiota. Microbiota and products thereof are indispensable for shaping the development and function of host innate immune system, thereby exerting multifaceted impacts in gut health. This paper reviews the effects on immunity of gut microbe-derived nucleic acids, and gut microbial metabolites, as well as the involvement of commensals in the gut homeostasis. We focus on the recent findings with an intention to illuminate the mechanisms by which the microbiota and products thereof are interacting with host immunity, as well as to scrutinize imbalanced gut microbiota (dysbiosis) which lead to autoimmune disorders including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), Type 1 diabetes (T1D) and systemic immune syndromes such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In addition to their well-recognized benefits in the gut such as occupation of ecological niches and competition with pathogens, commensal bacteria have been shown to strengthen the gut barrier and to exert immunomodulatory actions within the gut and beyond. It has been realized that impaired intestinal microbiota not only contribute to gut diseases but also are inextricably linked to metabolic disorders and even brain dysfunction. A better understanding of the mutual interactions of the microbiota and host immune system, would shed light on our endeavors of disease prevention and broaden the path to our discovery of immune intervention targets for disease treatment.

  2. Tight Junctions, Intestinal Permeability, and Autoimmunity Celiac Disease and Type 1 Diabetes Paradigms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Jeroen; Rozing, Jan; Sapone, Anna; Lammers, Karen; Fasano, Alessio

    2010-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by tissue damage and loss of function due to an immune response that is directed against specific organs. This review is focused on celiac disease (CD), an autoimmune enteropathy, and type 1 diabetes (T1D), a hyperglycosaemia caused by a destructive autoimmune process targeting the insulin-producing pancreatic islet cells. Even if environmental factors and genetic susceptibility are clearly involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity, for most autoimmune disorders there is no or little knowledge about the causing agent or genetic makeup underlying the disease. In this respect, CD represents a unique autoimmune disorder because a close genetic association with HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8 haplotypes and, more importantly, the environmental trigger (the gliadin fraction of gluten-containing grains wheat, barley, and rye) are known. Conversely, the trigger for autoimmune destruction of pancreatic ß cells in T1D is unclear. Interestingly, recent data suggest that gliadin is also involved in the pathogenesis of T1D. There is growing evidence that increased intestinal permeability plays a pathogenic role in various autoimmune diseases including CD and T1D. Therefore, we hypothesize that besides genetic and environmental factors, loss of intestinal barrier function is necessary to develop autoimmunity. In this review, each of these components will be briefly reviewed. PMID:19538307

  3. Intestinal permeability of 51Cr-labelled ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid in patients with Crohn's disease and their healthy relatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ainsworth, M.; Eriksen, J.; Rasmussen, J.W.; Muckadell, O.B.S. de

    1989-01-01

    An increased intestinal permeability has been proposed as an aetiologic factor in Crohn's disease. The 24-h urinary excretion of 100 μCi 51 Cr-labelled ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) was used to test the permeability in 15 patients with Crohn's disease and in 20 healthy first-degree relatives, who were known to have a genetic predisposition to inflammatory bowel disease. Twenty-eight healthy persons not related to patients with inflammatory bowel disease served as control material. The 51 Cr-EDTA excretion of the relatives was not significantly higher than that of the controls, whereas patients with Crohn's disease had a significantly higher excretion than both the relatives and the controls. Among patients the increased excretion was found only if the small intestine was involved. It is concluded that 1) as a group, patient with Crohn's disease in the small intestine have an increased intestinal permeability, in contrast to their healthy relatives, who have a normal permeability; 2) a considerable overlap of the results of the 51 Cr-EDTA test was found between the groups studied, and the test is not suitable for evaluating individual patients; 3) the results do not support the hypothesis of an increase in intestinal permeability as an aetiologic factor in Crohn's disease. 29 refs

  4. Intestinal detoxification time of hand-foot-and-mouth disease in children with EV71 infection and the related factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Shu; Wei, Yi; Zhao, Shi-Yong; Lin, Xian-Yao; Shao, Qi-Min; Wang, Juan

    2015-11-01

    Hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) is a common pediatric infectious disease caused by a variety of intestinal viruses. Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is the primary pathogen that might cause severe symptoms and even death in children with HFMD. This study aimed to investigate the intestinal detoxification time of HFMD children with EV71 infection and its related factors. Sixty-five HFMD children with EV71 infection were followed up. Their stool samples were collected once every 4 to 7 days. Viral nucleic acids were detected by fluorescent polymerase chain reaction until the results became negative. The positive rates of viral nucleic acids were analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method. The Log-rank test and Cox-Mantel test were used to analyze factors affecting the HFMD children with EV71 infection. On the 2nd, 4th, 6th and 10th week, the positive rates of viral nucleic acids in stool samples of the 65 children were 94.6%, 48.1%, 17.2% and 0, respectively. Univariate analysis showed that the intestinal detoxification time of the children were related to gender, pre-admission disease course, severity of disease, and use of steroids or gamma globulin (Pdisease was an independent factor affecting the intestinal detoxification time (Pdisease was an important factor affecting the intestinal detoxification time of HFMD children with EV71 infection. Severe HFMD children with EV71 infection had a longer intestinal detoxification time.

  5. ASSOCIATION OF INTESTINAL AMOEBIASIS WITH NONALCOHOLIC FATTY LIVER DISEASE (NAFLD- A CASE-CONTROL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amarendra Narayan Choudhary

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Little work has been done to show the association of intestinal amoebiasis with the nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. There are so many factors, which are related with the causation of NAFLD as for example obesity, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hypercholesteraemia and sedentary living. Besides these, there are many unknown or little known factors, which should be studied. Amoebiasis is very common infection in North India including Gangetic plain of Bihar. These two conditions are very frequently observed together in a same person; therefore, a case-control study was done to confirm the association between these two conditions. MATERIALS AND METHODS In the present study, 120 cases of diagnosed NAFLD were taken of the age group between 30 years to 60 years, both male and female. 130 persons who were not suffering from NAFLD were taken as a control group in the same age and sex composition in the same community. Stool examination of all these 250 persons were done and cases of amoebiasis were diagnosed after getting at least two positive findings out of three examinations. RESULTS Prevalence of amoebiasis was clearly in excess in the NAFLD group in comparison to control group. This difference was tested statistically by calculating standard error of difference between two proportions and Chi-square test. The result showed a positive, strong and statistically significant association between NAFLD and intestinal amoebiasis. CONCLUSION There is a strong association between NAFLD and intestinal amoebiasis and further study is needed to show the biological plausibility to establish the causation.

  6. Significance of X-ray examinations of patients with Crohn's disease after intestinal-tract resections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulke, H.; Hoerl, M.; Kasper, H.; Auer, I.O.

    1988-12-01

    After intestinal tract resection, the status of the intestinal tract of patients with Crohn's disease who had recurrent anastomoses versus those that did not analyzed using standardized procedures of stomach X-ray with small bowel follow through, barium enema and fistulography. The intestinal tract resections included ileostomy, transverse ileostomy, rectal ileostomy, and atypical procedures. The anstomoses and surrounding tissue were evaluated. The results were discussed and the X-ray characteristics of the current anastomosis and the existing changes in its environment were analyzed.

  7. The significance of X-ray examinations of patients with Crohn's disease after intestinal-tract resections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulke, H.; Hoerl, M.; Kasper, H.; Auer, I.O.

    1988-01-01

    After intestinal tract resection, the status of the intestinal tract of patients with Crohn's disease who had recurrent anastomoses versus those that did not analyzed using standardized procedures of stomach X-ray with small bowel follow through, barium enema and fistulography. The intestinal tract resections included ileostomy, transverse ileostomy, rectal ileostomy, and atypical procedures. The anstomoses and surrounding tissue were evaluated. The results were discussed and the X-ray characteristics of the current anastomosis and the existing changes in its environment were analyzed. (orig.) [de

  8. Pilot study of lithium to restore intestinal barrier function in severe graft-versus-host disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gideon Steinbach

    Full Text Available Severe intestinal graft-vs-host disease (GVHD after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT causes mucosal ulceration and induces innate and adaptive immune responses that amplify and perpetuate GVHD and the associated barrier dysfunction. Pharmacological agents to target mucosal barrier dysfunction in GVHD are needed. We hypothesized that induction of Wnt signaling by lithium, an inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase (GSK3, would potentiate intestinal crypt proliferation and mucosal repair and that inhibition of GSK3 in inflammatory cells would attenuate the deregulated inflammatory response to mucosal injury. We conducted an observational pilot study to provide data for the potential design of a randomized study of lithium. Twenty patients with steroid refractory intestinal GVHD meeting enrollment criteria were given oral lithium carbonate. GVHD was otherwise treated per current practice, including 2 mg/kg per day of prednisone equivalent. Seventeen patients had extensive mucosal denudation (extreme endoscopic grade 3 in the duodenum or colon. We observed that 8 of 12 patients (67% had a complete remission (CR of GVHD and survived more than 1 year (median 5 years when lithium administration was started promptly within 3 days of endoscopic diagnosis of denuded mucosa. When lithium was started promptly and less than 7 days from salvage therapy for refractory GVHD, 8 of 10 patients (80% had a CR and survived more than 1 year. In perspective, a review of 1447 consecutive adult HCT patients in the preceding 6 years at our cancer center showed 0% one-year survival in 27 patients with stage 3-4 intestinal GVHD and grade 3 endoscopic appearance in the duodenum or colon. Toxicities included fatigue, somnolence, confusion or blunted affect in 50% of the patients. The favorable outcomes in patients who received prompt lithium therapy appear to support the future conduct of a randomized study of lithium for management of severe GVHD with

  9. Intestinal microbiota in pediatric patients with end stage renal disease: a Midwest Pediatric Nephrology Consortium study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo-Salgado, Janice; Vehaskari, V Matti; Stewart, Tyrus; Ferris, Michael; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Guangdi; Blanchard, Eugene E; Taylor, Christopher M; Kallash, Mahmoud; Greenbaum, Larry A; Aviles, Diego H

    2016-09-17

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) is associated with uremia and increased systemic inflammation. Alteration of the intestinal microbiota may facilitate translocation of endotoxins into the systemic circulation leading to inflammation. We hypothesized that children with ESRD have an altered intestinal microbiota and increased serum levels of bacterially derived uremic toxins. Four groups of subjects were recruited: peritoneal dialysis (PD), hemodialysis (HD), post-kidney transplant and healthy controls. Stool bacterial composition was assessed by pyrosequencing analysis of 16S rRNA genes. Serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), D-lactate, p-cresyl sulfate and indoxyl sulfate were measured. Compared to controls, the relative abundance of Firmicutes (P = 0.0228) and Actinobacteria (P = 0.0040) was decreased in PD patients. The relative abundance of Bacteroidetes was increased in HD patients (P = 0.0462). Compared to HD patients the relative abundance of Proteobacteria (P = 0.0233) was increased in PD patients. At the family level, Enterobacteriaceae was significantly increased in PD patients (P = 0.0020) compared to controls; whereas, Bifidobacteria showed a significant decrease in PD and transplant patients (P = 0.0020) compared to control. Alpha diversity was decreased in PD patients and kidney transplant using both phylogenetic and non-phylogenetic diversity measures (P = 0.0031 and 0.0003, respectively), while beta diversity showed significant separation (R statistic = 0.2656, P = 0.010) between PD patients and controls. ESRD patients had increased serum levels of p-cresyl sulfate and indoxyl sulfate (P intestinal microbiota and CRP, D-lactate, or uremic toxins. Oral iron supplementation results in expansion of the phylum Proteobacteria. Children with ESRD have altered intestinal microbiota and increased bacterially derived serum uremic toxins.

  10. Purinergic Ligands as Potential Therapeutic Tools for the Treatment of Inflammation-Related Intestinal Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Dal Ben

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation-related intestinal diseases are a set of various conditions presenting an overactive enteric immune system. A continuous overproduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines and a decreased production of anti-inflammatory modulators are generally observed, while morpho-functional alterations of the enteric nervous system lead to intestinal secretory and motor dysfunctions. The factors at the basis of these conditions are still to be totally identified and current therapeutic strategies are aimed only at achieving and maintaining remission states, by using therapeutic tools like aminosalicylates, corticosteroids, immunomodulators, biological drugs (i.e., monoclonal antibodies, and eventually surgery. Recent reports described a key role of purinergic mediators (i.e., adenosine and its nucleotides ATP and ADP in the regulation of the activity of immune cells and enteric nervous system, showing also that alterations of the purinergic signaling are linked to pathological conditions of the intestinal tract. These data prompted to a series of investigations to test the therapeutic potential for inflammation-related intestinal conditions of compounds able to restore or modulate an altered purinergic signaling within the gut. This review provides an overview on these investigations, describing the results of preclinical and/or clinical evaluation of compounds able to stimulate or inhibit specific P2 (i.e., P2X7 or P1 (i.e., A2A or A3 receptor signaling and to modify the adenosine levels through the modulation of enzymes activity (i.e., Adenosine Deaminase or nucleoside transporters. Recent developments in the field are also reported and the most promising purine-based therapeutic strategies for the treatment of inflammation-related gastrointestinal disorders are schematically summarized.

  11. Acute inflammatory bowel disease of the small intestine in adult: MDCT findings and criteria for differential diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romano, Stefania; Russo, Anna; Daniele, Stefania; Tortora, Giovanni; Maisto, Francesco; Romano, Luigia

    2009-01-01

    Inflammatory changes of the intestine leading to acute abdomen could represent a frequent diagnostic challenge for radiologists actively involved in the emergency area. MDCT imaging findings needs to be evaluated considering the clinical history and symptoms and other abdominal findings that could be of help in differential diagnosis. Several protocols have been suggested and indicated in the imaging of patient with acute intestine. However, a CT protocol in which the precontrast scanning of the abdomen is followed by i.v. administration of contrast medium using the 45-55 s delay could be effective for an optimal visualization of the bowel wall. It is important to learn to recognize how the intestine reacts to the injury and how it 'talks', in order to become aware of the different patterns of disease manifestation related to an acute intestinal condition, for an effective diagnosis of active and acute inflammatory bowel disease.

  12. Acute inflammatory bowel disease of the small intestine in adult: MDCT findings and criteria for differential diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romano, Stefania [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, A.Cardarelli Hospital, Naples (Italy)], E-mail: stefromano@libero.it; Russo, Anna [Institute of Radiology, Second University of Naples, Naples (Italy); Daniele, Stefania; Tortora, Giovanni [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, A.Cardarelli Hospital, Naples (Italy); Maisto, Francesco [Institute of Radiology, Second University of Naples, Naples (Italy); Romano, Luigia

    2009-03-15

    Inflammatory changes of the intestine leading to acute abdomen could represent a frequent diagnostic challenge for radiologists actively involved in the emergency area. MDCT imaging findings needs to be evaluated considering the clinical history and symptoms and other abdominal findings that could be of help in differential diagnosis. Several protocols have been suggested and indicated in the imaging of patient with acute intestine. However, a CT protocol in which the precontrast scanning of the abdomen is followed by i.v. administration of contrast medium using the 45-55 s delay could be effective for an optimal visualization of the bowel wall. It is important to learn to recognize how the intestine reacts to the injury and how it 'talks', in order to become aware of the different patterns of disease manifestation related to an acute intestinal condition, for an effective diagnosis of active and acute inflammatory bowel disease.

  13. [X-ray diagnostic of partial intestinal obstruction in small intestine diseases: a glance on the problem of radiologist-gastroenterologist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levchenko, S V; Kotovshchikova, A A; Orlova, N V

    2013-01-01

    The article is devoted to special features of X-ray examining of patients suffering from acute abdomen pain and X-ray paradigma of some intestine diseases as a cause of partial bowel obstruction. Own clinical data are presented. Long-term experience of our X-ray department is summarized. The possibilities of X-ray examining of abdomen with and without contrast in patients with partial bowel obstruction are described.

  14. Outbreaks of infectious intestinal disease associated with person to person spread in hotels and restaurants.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McDonnell, R J

    1995-09-15

    Twenty-eight outbreaks of infectious intestinal disease, reported as being transmitted mainly by the person to person route, were identified in association with retail catering premises, such as hotels, restaurants, and public houses, in England and Wales between 1992 and 1994. Five thousand and forty-eight people were at risk in these outbreaks and 1234 were affected. Most of the outbreaks (over 90%) occurred in hotels. Small round structured viruses were the most commonly detected pathogens. Diarrhoea and vomiting were common symptoms and most of the outbreaks occurred in the summer months. Control measures to contain infectious individuals and improved hygiene measures are necessary to contain such outbreaks.

  15. The real-world effectiveness of vedolizumab on intestinal and articular outcomes in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaluso, Fabio Salvatore; Orlando, Rosalba; Fries, Walter; Scolaro, Mariangela; Magnano, Antonio; Pluchino, Dario; Cappello, Maria; Morreale, Gaetano Cristian; Siringo, Sebastiano; Privitera, Antonino Carlo; Ferracane, Concetta; Belluardo, Nunzio; Alberghina, Nadia; Ventimiglia, Marco; Rizzuto, Giulia; Renna, Sara; Cottone, Mario; Orlando, Ambrogio

    2018-03-01

    The effectiveness of vedolizumab in real-world practice is under evaluation, while its role in inflammatory bowel disease-associated spondyloarthritis is still unclear. To report real-world data about the effectiveness of vedolizumab on intestinal and articular symptoms after 10 and 22 weeks of treatment. Web-based data from the cohort of the Sicilian Network for Inflammatory Bowel Disease (SN-IBD) were extracted to perform a prospective multicentre observational study. 163 patients (84 with Crohn's disease and 79 with ulcerative colitis) were included. At week 10, a steroid-free remission was achieved in 71 patients (43.6%), while at week 22 a steroid-free remission was obtained in 40.8% of patients. A response on articular symptoms was reported after 10 weeks of treatment in 17 out of 43 (39.5%) patients with active spondyloarthritis at baseline, and in 10 out of 22 (45.4%) patients at week 22. The only factor associated with articular response was the coexistence of clinical benefit on intestinal symptoms (at week 10: OR 8.471, p = 0.05; at week 22: OR 5.600, p = 0.08). Vedolizumab showed good effectiveness after 10 and 22 weeks of treatment. A subset of patients reported improvement also on articular symptoms, probably as a consequence of the concomitant control of gut inflammation. Copyright © 2018 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Imaging of small intestinal Crohn's disease: comparison between MR enteroclysis and conventional enteroclysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas C.; Grammatikakis, John; Papamastorakis, George; Papanikolaou, Nickolas [University Hospital of Heraklion, Department of Radiology, University of Crete Faculty of Medicine, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Koutroumbakis, John; Rousomoustakaki, Maria [University of Crete, Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital of Heraklion, Heraklion (Greece); Prassopoulos, Panos [University of Thrace, Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Alexandroupoli, Alexandroupoli (Greece)

    2006-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare MR enteroclysis (MRE) with conventional enteroclysis (CE) in patients with small intestinal Crohn's disease. Fifty-two consecutive patients with known or suspected Crohn's disease underwent MR and conventional enteroclysis, which was considered the gold standard. Eleven imaging features, classified in three groups, mucosal, transmural and extraintestinal, were subjectively evaluated by two experienced radiologists. MRE and CE were in full agreement in revealing, localizing and estimating the length of all involved segments of the small bowel. The sensitivity of MRE for the detection of superficial ulcers, fold distortion and fold thickening was 40, 30 and 62.5%, respectively. The sensitivity of MRE for the detection of deep ulcers, cobble-stoning pattern, stenosis and prestenostic dilatation was 89.5, 92.3, 100 and 100%, respectively. Additional findings demonstrated on MRE images included fibrofatty proliferation in 15 cases and mesenteric lymphadenopathy in 19 cases. MRE strongly correlates with CE in the detection of individual lesions expressing small intestinal Crohn's disease. It provides additional information from the mesenteries; however, its capability to detect subtle lesions is still inferior to conventional enteroclysis. (orig.)

  17. Innovative Disease Model: Zebrafish as an In Vivo Platform for Intestinal Disorder and Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeng-Wei Lu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is one of the world’s most common cancers and is the second leading cause of cancer deaths, causing more than 50,000 estimated deaths each year. Several risk factors are highly associated with CRC, including being overweight, eating a diet high in red meat and over-processed meat, having a history of inflammatory bowel disease, and smoking. Previous zebrafish studies have demonstrated that multiple oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes can be regulated through genetic or epigenetic alterations. Zebrafish research has also revealed that the activation of carcinogenesis-associated signal pathways plays an important role in CRC. The biology of cancer, intestinal disorders caused by carcinogens, and the morphological patterns of tumors have been found to be highly similar between zebrafish and humans. Therefore, the zebrafish has become an important animal model for translational medical research. Several zebrafish models have been developed to elucidate the characteristics of gastrointestinal diseases. This review article focuses on zebrafish models that have been used to study human intestinal disorders and tumors, including models involving mutant and transgenic fish. We also report on xenograft models and chemically-induced enterocolitis. This review demonstrates that excellent zebrafish models can provide novel insights into the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal diseases and help facilitate the evaluation of novel anti-tumor drugs.

  18. Imaging of small intestinal Crohn's disease: comparison between MR enteroclysis and conventional enteroclysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas C.; Grammatikakis, John; Papamastorakis, George; Papanikolaou, Nickolas; Koutroumbakis, John; Rousomoustakaki, Maria; Prassopoulos, Panos

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare MR enteroclysis (MRE) with conventional enteroclysis (CE) in patients with small intestinal Crohn's disease. Fifty-two consecutive patients with known or suspected Crohn's disease underwent MR and conventional enteroclysis, which was considered the gold standard. Eleven imaging features, classified in three groups, mucosal, transmural and extraintestinal, were subjectively evaluated by two experienced radiologists. MRE and CE were in full agreement in revealing, localizing and estimating the length of all involved segments of the small bowel. The sensitivity of MRE for the detection of superficial ulcers, fold distortion and fold thickening was 40, 30 and 62.5%, respectively. The sensitivity of MRE for the detection of deep ulcers, cobble-stoning pattern, stenosis and prestenostic dilatation was 89.5, 92.3, 100 and 100%, respectively. Additional findings demonstrated on MRE images included fibrofatty proliferation in 15 cases and mesenteric lymphadenopathy in 19 cases. MRE strongly correlates with CE in the detection of individual lesions expressing small intestinal Crohn's disease. It provides additional information from the mesenteries; however, its capability to detect subtle lesions is still inferior to conventional enteroclysis. (orig.)

  19. Manifestaciones reumatológicas de la enfermedad inflamatoria intestinal Rheumatologic manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavio Germán Muñoz Maya

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available La enfermedad inflamatoria intestinal (EII se caracteriza por la activación inapropiada del sistema inmune de la mucosa intestinal y sus dos formas de presentación son: la colitis ulcerativa y la enfermedad de Crohn. Las manifestaciones extraintestinales se presentan hasta en el 36% de los pacientes y pueden comprometer cualquier órgano o sistema. La disfunción inmune se caracteriza por el desequilibrio entre los mediadores proinflamatorios y los antinflamatorios y se expresa como una enfermedad sistémica. Las manifestaciones reumatológicas asociadas a la EII son de tres tipos: la artritis periférica, la espondiloartropatía y una tercera categoría que incluye lesiones dérmicas, oftálmicas y del metabolismo óseo, entre otras. El manejo de estas manifestaciones se basa en la terapia sistémica para el control de la actividad inflamatoria local utilizando esteroides, derivados de la 5-ASA, inmunomoduladores y, en los últimos años, terapia anti-TNF. The main feature of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is the continuous activation of the mucosa-associated immune system; the disease has two major forms of presentation: ulcerative colitis and Crohn´s disease. The extraintestinal manifestations are present in 36% of patients, and any organ can be affected. There is an imbalance between proinflammatory and antinflammatory cytokines leading to a systemic disease. The rheumatologic manifestations of the IBD are: Peripheral arthritis, spondyloarthropathy and a third category that includes dermic and ocular lesions as well as metabolic bone disease. Control of the extraintestinal manifestations is based on systemic therapy with steroids, 5-ASA derivatives and biological anti-TNF therapy.

  20. An Integrated Outlook on the Metagenome and Metabolome of Intestinal Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanping Aw

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Recently, metagenomics and metabolomics are the two most rapidly advancing “omics” technologies. Metagenomics seeks to characterize the composition of microbial communities, their operations, and their dynamically co-evolving relationships with the habitats they occupy, whereas metabolomics studies unique chemical endpoints (metabolites that specific cellular processes leave behind. Remarkable progress in DNA sequencing and mass spectrometry technologies has enabled the comprehensive collection of information on the gut microbiome and its metabolome in order to assess the influence of the gut microbiota on host physiology on a whole-systems level. Our gut microbiota, which consists of prokaryotic cells together with its metabolites, creates a unique gut ecosystem together with the host eukaryotic cells. In this review, we will highlight the detailed relationships between gut microbiota and its metabolites on host health and the pathogenesis of various intestinal diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer. Therapeutic interventions such as probiotic and prebiotic administrations and fecal microbiota transplantations will also be discussed. We would like to promote this unique biology-wide approach of incorporating metagenome and metabolome information as we believe that this can help us understand the intricate interplay between gut microbiota and host metabolism to a greater extent. This novel integration of microbiome, metatranscriptome, and metabolome information will help us have an improved holistic understanding of the complex mammalian superorganism, thereby allowing us to gain new and unprecedented insights to providing exciting novel therapeutic approaches for optimal intestinal health.

  1. Intestinal microbiota in health and disease: role of bifidobacteria in gut homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tojo, Rafael; Suárez, Adolfo; Clemente, Marta G; de los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G; Margolles, Abelardo; Gueimonde, Miguel; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia

    2014-11-07

    The pool of microbes inhabiting our body is known as "microbiota" and their collective genomes as "microbiome". The colon is the most densely populated organ in the human body, although other parts, such as the skin, vaginal mucosa, or respiratory tract, also harbour specific microbiota. This microbial community regulates some important metabolic and physiological functions of the host, and drives the maturation of the immune system in early life, contributing to its homeostasis during life. Alterations of the intestinal microbiota can occur by changes in composition (dysbiosis), function, or microbiota-host interactions and they can be directly correlated with several diseases. The only disease in which a clear causal role of a dysbiotic microbiota has been demonstrated is the case of Clostridium difficile infections. Nonetheless, alterations in composition and function of the microbiota have been associated with several gastrointestinal diseases (inflammatory bowel disease, colorectal cancer, or irritable bowel syndrome), as well as extra-intestinal pathologies, such as those affecting the liver, or the respiratory tract (e.g., allergy, bronchial asthma, and cystic fibrosis), among others. Species of Bifidobacterium genus are the normal inhabitants of a healthy human gut and alterations in number and composition of their populations is one of the most frequent features present in these diseases. The use of probiotics, including bifidobacteria strains, in preventive medicine to maintain a healthy intestinal function is well documented. Probiotics are also proposed as therapeutic agents for gastrointestinal disorders and other pathologies. The World Gastroenterology Organization recently published potential clinical applications for several probiotic formulations, in which species of lactobacilli are predominant. This review is focused on probiotic preparations containing Bifidobacterium strains, alone or in combination with other bacteria, which have been tested

  2. Intestinal microbiota in health and disease: Role of bifidobacteria in gut homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tojo, Rafael; Suárez, Adolfo; Clemente, Marta G; de los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G; Margolles, Abelardo; Gueimonde, Miguel; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    The pool of microbes inhabiting our body is known as “microbiota” and their collective genomes as “microbiome”. The colon is the most densely populated organ in the human body, although other parts, such as the skin, vaginal mucosa, or respiratory tract, also harbour specific microbiota. This microbial community regulates some important metabolic and physiological functions of the host, and drives the maturation of the immune system in early life, contributing to its homeostasis during life. Alterations of the intestinal microbiota can occur by changes in composition (dysbiosis), function, or microbiota-host interactions and they can be directly correlated with several diseases. The only disease in which a clear causal role of a dysbiotic microbiota has been demonstrated is the case of Clostridium difficile infections. Nonetheless, alterations in composition and function of the microbiota have been associated with several gastrointestinal diseases (inflammatory bowel disease, colorectal cancer, or irritable bowel syndrome), as well as extra-intestinal pathologies, such as those affecting the liver, or the respiratory tract (e.g., allergy, bronchial asthma, and cystic fibrosis), among others. Species of Bifidobacterium genus are the normal inhabitants of a healthy human gut and alterations in number and composition of their populations is one of the most frequent features present in these diseases. The use of probiotics, including bifidobacteria strains, in preventive medicine to maintain a healthy intestinal function is well documented. Probiotics are also proposed as therapeutic agents for gastrointestinal disorders and other pathologies. The World Gastroenterology Organization recently published potential clinical applications for several probiotic formulations, in which species of lactobacilli are predominant. This review is focused on probiotic preparations containing Bifidobacterium strains, alone or in combination with other bacteria, which have been

  3. Association between anti-endomysial antibody and total intestinal villous atrophy in children with coeliac disease.

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    Ozgenc F

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is growing evidence to suggest that detection of anti-gliadin antibody (AGA and anti-endomysial antibody (EmA can serve as sensitive markers of the degree of histological abnormalities in patients with coeliac disease. AIM: To evaluate the association between the presence of AGA and EmA and villous atrophy in intestinal biopsies of children with suspected coeliac disease. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: Intestinal samples of 46 children with failure to thrive, chronic diarrhoea, malabsorption and short stature with either AGA and/or EmA positivity were evaluated, retrospectively. The diagnosis of coeliac disease was based on ESPGHAN criteria. METHODS AND MATERIAL: Patients with total villous atrophy who fulfilled the ESPGHAN criteria for the diagnosis of coeliac disease were diagnosed to have coeliac disease. Nine patients without villous atrophy were taken as negative controls for this study. AGA-IgA was measured both by immunoflourescence (IF and ELISA and EmA-IgA by IF while patients were on normal diet. Relationship between autoantibody positivity and intestinal total villous atrophy was evaluated. RESULTS: Overall positivity for AGA IgA was 85% (39/46 by IF+ELISA and EmA positivity was 85% (39/46 by IF within the study group. Histological examination revealed total villous atrophy with lymphocyte infiltration and crypt hyperplasia in 37 (80% patients. AGA IgA was positive in 14 (38% and 31 (84% of these children by ELISA and IF, respectively. EmA positivity was detected in 35/37 (95% cases with atrophy and 4/9 (44% without atrophy (p=0.002. Thirty out of 37 (81% patients with villous atrophy had both AGA IgA (IF and EmA positivity (p=0.186. All of the sixteen patients that had both positive AGA IgA (ELISA+IF and EmA had total villous atrophy (p=0.037. CONCLUSION: A significant association between total villous atrophy and EmA positivity has been documented in this study.

  4. The State of Pancreatobiliary System and Intestinal Microflora in Children with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

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    N.Yu. Zavgorodnya

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD combines with a variety of liver pathologies, including hepatic steatosis, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, fibrosis and cirrhosis, and acts as hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome. Not only the liver is a target organ in the formation of metabolic syndrome: also exist a possibility of gallbladder, pancreas and biliary tract steatosis. Fatty infiltration of the pancreatobiliary system associates with disturbance of digestive processes that promotes dysbiotic changes and intestinal disorders. Changes in intestinal microbiota, in turn, may induce systemic inflammatory response and promote NAFLD development and progression. Objective: to explore the structural and functional state of the pancreatobiliary system and changes of the enteric microflora in children with NAFLD. Methods. In 34 children with disorders of the gastrointestinal tract, we have determined controlled attenuation parameter by means of FibroScan. Assessment of functional status of biliary tract was performed using an ultrasound examination of the abdominal organs with test meal in order to determine gallbladder contractility and the sphincter of Oddi function. To characterize the state of the enteric microbiota, there was carried out a hydrogen breath test with glucose or lactose loading. Children were divided into groups according to the the transient elastography of the liver (FibroScan: the control group was represented by 21 patients without liver steatosis, the main group — 13 patients with liver steatosis. Results. Children with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease had signs of not only liver pathology, but also of the bile ducts and the pancreas. Biliary tract dysfunction in patients with NAFLD more often manifested as hypotension of the sphincter of Oddi and the gallbladder hypokinesia. Lesions of the pancreas function in children with NAFLD can be explained by the sphincter of Oddi disorders and manifestations of pancreatic

  5. Ability of Lactobacillus plantarum LS/07 to modify intestinal enzymes activity in chronic diseases prevention.

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    Hijová, Emília; Kuzma, Jozef; Strojný, Ladislav; Bomba, Alojz; Bertková, Izabela; Chmelárová, Anna; Hertelyová, Zdena; Benetinová, Veronika; Štofilová, Jana; Ambro, Ľuboš

    2017-01-01

    The ability of probiotic strain Lactobacillus plantarum LS/07 to modify the activity of intestinal bacterial enzymes - β-glucuronidase (β-GLUCUR), β-galactosidase (β-GAL), and β-glucosidase (β-GLU) in prevention of chronic diseases - cancer, atherosclerosis and dysbiosis was investigated. The male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 12 experimental groups: controls groups - C (control), AT (atherosclerotic), CC (carcinogenic), dysbiotic groups - each group in combination with antibiotics (ATB), probiotics groups - in combinatioan with probiotic (PRO) alone, and each group with combination of antibiotic and probiotic (ATB+PRO). In the control group the β-glucuronidase activity did not change throughout the experiment. High fat diet in atherosclerotic group significantly increased the activity of β-glucuronidase (PLS/07 and suggest its use in disease prevention in human medicine and some animal species.

  6. The Multibiome: The Intestinal Ecosystem's Influence on Immune Homeostasis, Health, and Disease.

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    Filyk, Heather A; Osborne, Lisa C

    2016-11-01

    Mammalian evolution has occurred in the presence of mutualistic, commensal, and pathogenic micro- and macro-organisms for millennia. The presence of these organisms during mammalian evolution has allowed for intimate crosstalk between these colonizing species and the host immune system. In this review, we introduce the concept of the 'multibiome' to holistically refer to the biodiverse collection of bacteria, viruses, fungi and multicellular helminthic worms colonizing the mammalian intestine. Furthermore, we discuss new insights into multibiome-host interactions in the context of host-protective immunity and immune-mediated diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease and multiple sclerosis. Finally, we provide reasons to account for the multibiome in experimental design, analysis and in therapeutic applications. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The Role of Intestinal Bacteria Overgrowth in Obesity-Related Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

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    Silvia M. Ferolla

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is the most common chronic liver disease worldwide. It is a progressive disorder involving a spectrum of conditions that include pure steatosis without inflammation, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, fibrosis and cirrhosis. The key factor in the pathophysiology of NAFLD is insulin resistance that determines lipid accumulation in the hepatocytes, which may be followed by lipid peroxidation, production of reactive oxygen species and consequent inflammation. Recent studies suggest that the characteristics of the gut microbiota are altered in NAFLD, and also, that small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO contributes to the pathogenesis of this condition. This review presents the chief findings from all the controlled studies that evaluated SIBO, gut permeability and endotoxemia in human NAFLD. We also discuss the possible mechanisms involving SIBO, lipid accumulation and development of NASH. The understanding of these mechanisms may allow the development of new targets for NASH treatment in the future.

  8. Intestinal protozoa infections among patients with ulcerative colitis: prevalence and impact on clinical disease course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto-Furusho, Jesús K; Torijano-Carrera, Emma

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiological and microbiologic studies suggest that enteropathogenic microorganisms play a substantial role in the clinical initiation and relapses of inflammatory bowel disease. To explore the prevalence of intestinal protozoa in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and its impact on clinical disease course. A total of 215 patients with definitive diagnosis of UC were studied. Fresh feces samples taken from all UC patients were examined immediately using trichrome-staining methods. A total of 103 female and 112 male UC patients were analyzed. The mean age at diagnosis was 30.5 +/- 10.8 years. The prevalence of overall parasitic infections was 24% and distributed as follows: Blastocystis hominis in 22 patients (10%), Endolimax nana in 19 cases (9%), and Entamoebahistolytica in 11 cases (5%). A significantly increased frequency of protozoa infection was found in those patients with persistent activity and intermittent activity as compared to active than inactive group (p = 1 x 10(-7), OR 13.05, 95% CI 4.28-42.56, and p = 0.003, OR 1.42-14.47, respectively). Interestingly, this association remained significant when we compared the persistent activity group versus intermittent activity group (p = 0.003, OR 2.97, 95% CI 1.35-6.59). Subgroup analysis showed no association between protozoa infection (E. histolytica, B. hominis, and E. nana) and other clinical variables such as gender, extent of disease, extraintestinal complications, medical treatment and grade of disease activity. The prevalence of intestinal protozoa infections in Mexican UC patients was 24% and these microorganisms could be a contributing cause of persistent activity despite medical treatment in our population. 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Sarcopenia is a predictive factor for intestinal resection in admitted patients with Crohn's disease.

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    Shigeki Bamba

    Full Text Available The relationship between skeletal muscle volume and the prognosis of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD remains undetermined. We conducted a retrospective study of 72 IBD patients who were admitted to the hospital due to disease exacerbation. We enrolled IBD patients who had undergone abdominal computed tomography and assessed the nutritional indices, such as the Onodera's prognostic nutritional index (O-PNI and the controlling nutritional status (CONUT index. The L3 skeletal muscle index (SMI, which is the ratio of the cross-sectional area of skeletal muscles at the level of the third lumbar (L3 vertebra to the height squared, was used to identify sarcopenia. Sarcopenia, defined as a low SMI, was observed in 42% of all IBD patients (37% with Crohn's disease (CD and 48% with ulcerative colitis (UC. In UC patients, the O-PNI and CONUT values, height, and albumin levels were significantly lower than in CD patients. The SMI strongly correlated with sex, body weight, albumin level, and O-PNI in IBD patients. Multivariate analysis using the Cox regression model demonstrated that the presence of sarcopenia (P = 0.015 and disease type (CD or UC (P = 0.007 were significant factors predicting intestinal resection. The cumulative operation-free survival rate was significantly lower for sarcopenic patients than in all IBD patients (P = 0.003 and a stratified analysis of CD patients (P = 0.001 using the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test. The L3 skeletal muscle area is a prognostic factor for intestinal resection in patients with CD.

  10. Oral activated charcoal adsorbent (AST-120) ameliorates chronic kidney disease-induced intestinal epithelial barrier disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaziri, Nosratola D; Yuan, Jun; Khazaeli, Mahyar; Masuda, Yuichi; Ichii, Hirohito; Liu, Shuman

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) impairs intestinal barrier function which by allowing influx of noxious products causes systemic inflammation. We have recently shown that intestinal barrier dysfunction in CKD is due to degradation of epithelial tight junction (TJ) which is, in part, mediated by influx of urea and its conversion to ammonia by microbial urease. We hypothesized that by adsorbing urea and urea-derived ammonia, oral activated charcoal (AST-120) may ameliorate CKD-induced intestinal epithelial barrier disruption and systemic inflammation. Rats were randomized to the CKD or control groups. The CKD group was fed a chow containing 0.7% adenine for 2 weeks. They were then randomized to receive a chow with or without AST-120 (4 g/kg/day) for 2 weeks. Rats consuming regular diet served as controls. Animals were then euthanized, colons were removed and processed for Western blot and immunohistology, and plasma was used to measure endotoxin and oxidative and inflammatory markers. Compared with the controls, the untreated CKD rats showed elevated plasma endotoxin, IL-6, TNF-α, MCP-1, CINC-3, L-selectin, ICAM-1, and malondialdehyde, and depletions of colonic epithelial TJ proteins, claudin-1, occludin, and ZO1. Administration of AST-120 resulted in partial restoration of the epithelial TJ proteins and reduction in plasma endotoxin and markers of oxidative stress and inflammation. CKD animals exhibited depletion of the key protein constituents of the colonic epithelial TJ which was associated with systemic inflammation, oxidative stress and endotoxemia. Administration of AST-120 attenuated uremia-induced disruption of colonic epithelial TJ and the associated endotoxemia, oxidative stress and inflammation. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Microbial Population Differentials between Mucosal and Submucosal Intestinal Tissues in Advanced Crohn's Disease of the Ileum.

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    Rodrick J Chiodini

    Full Text Available Since Crohn's disease is a transmural disease, we hypothesized that examination of deep submucosal tissues directly involved in the inflammatory disease process may provide unique insights into bacterial populations transgressing intestinal barriers and bacterial populations more representative of the causes and agents of the disease. We performed deep 16s microbiota sequencing on isolated ilea mucosal and submucosal tissues on 20 patients with Crohn's disease and 15 non-inflammatory bowel disease controls with a depth of coverage averaging 81,500 sequences in each of the 70 DNA samples yielding an overall resolution down to 0.0001% of the bacterial population. Of the 4,802,328 total sequences generated, 98.9% or 4,749,183 sequences aligned with the Kingdom Bacteria that clustered into 8545 unique sequences with <3% divergence or operational taxonomic units enabling the identification of 401 genera and 698 tentative bacterial species. There were significant differences in all taxonomic levels between the submucosal microbiota in Crohn's disease compared to controls, including organisms of the Order Desulfovibrionales that were present within the submucosal tissues of most Crohn's disease patients but absent in the control group. A variety of organisms of the Phylum Firmicutes were increased in the subjacent submucosa as compared to the parallel mucosal tissue including Ruminococcus spp., Oscillospira spp., Pseudobutyrivibrio spp., and Tumebacillus spp. In addition, Propionibacterium spp. and Cloacibacterium spp. were increased as well as large increases in Proteobacteria including Parasutterella spp. and Methylobacterium spp. This is the first study to examine the microbial populations within submucosal tissues of patients with Crohn's disease and to compare microbial communities found deep within the submucosal tissues with those present on mucosal surfaces. Our data demonstrate the existence of a distinct submucosal microbiome and ecosystem

  12. [Expression of vasoactive intestinal peptide in peripheral blood of children with hand, foot and mouth disease].

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    Ren, Jin-Song; Sun, Hao-Miao; Zhang, Lei; Lin, Jing-De; Wen, Cheng; Fang, Dai-Hua

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the expression of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in peripheral blood of children with hand, foot and mouth disease and its significance. According to the condition of the disease, 86 children with hand, foot and mouth disease were classified into phase 1 group (19 children) and phase 2 group (67 children). ELISA was used to measure the concentrations of plasma VIP, interferon-γ (IFN-γ), and interleukin-4 (IL-4) in peripheral blood. Flow cytometry was used to measure CD3 + , CD4 + , and CD8 + T lymphocyte subsets. RT-PCR was used for qualitative detection of enterovirus 71 (EV71) RNA in stool. Compared with the phase 1 group, the phase 2 group had a significantly higher positive rate of EV71-RNA (Phand, foot and mouth disease, the concentration of VIP in peripheral blood was positively correlated with the proportion of CD4 + T lymphocyte subset and CD4 + /CD8 + ratio (r=0.533 and 0.532 respectively; Phand, foot and mouth disease.

  13. Transamidation of wheat flour inhibits the response to gliadin of intestinal T cells in celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianfrani, Carmen; Siciliano, Rosa A; Facchiano, Angelo M; Camarca, Alessandra; Mazzeo, Maria F; Costantini, Susan; Salvati, Virginia M; Maurano, Francesco; Mazzarella, Giuseppe; Iaquinto, Gaetano; Bergamo, Paolo; Rossi, Mauro

    2007-09-01

    Celiac disease is characterized by activation of HLA-DQ2/DQ8-restricted intestinal gluten-specific CD4(+) T cells. In particular, gluten becomes a better T-cell antigen following deamidation catalyzed by tissue transglutaminase. To date, the only available therapy is represented by adherence to a gluten-free diet. Here, we examined a new enzyme strategy to preventively abolish gluten activity. Enzyme modifications of the immunodominant alpha-gliadin peptide p56-68 were analyzed by mass spectrometry, and peptide binding to HLA-DQ2 was simulated by modeling studies. Wheat flour was treated with microbial transglutaminase and lysine methyl ester; gliadin was subsequently extracted, digested, and deamidated. Gliadin-specific intestinal T-cell lines (iTCLs) were generated from biopsy specimens from 12 adult patients with celiac disease and challenged in vitro with different antigen preparations. Tissue transglutaminase-mediated transamidation with lysine or lysine methyl ester of p56-68 or gliadin in alkaline conditions inhibited the interferon gamma expression in iTCLs; also, binding to DQ2 was reduced but not abolished, as suggested by in silico analysis. Lysine methyl ester was particularly effective in abrogating the activity of gliadin. Notably, a block in the response was observed when iTCLs were challenged with gliadin extracted from flour pretreated with microbial transglutaminase and lysine methyl ester. Transamidation of wheat flour with a food-grade enzyme and an appropriate amine donor can be used to block the T cell-mediated gliadin activity. Considering the crucial role of adaptive immunity in celiac disease, our findings highlight the potential of the proposed treatment to prevent cereal toxicity.

  14. Diagnostic and Research Aspects of Small Intestinal Disaccharidases in Coeliac Disease

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    Tanja Šuligoj

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Disaccharidases (DS are brush border enzymes embedded in the microvillous membrane of small intestinal enterocytes. In untreated coeliac disease (CD, a general decrease of DS activities is seen. This manuscript reviews different aspects of DS activities in CD: their utility in the diagnosis and their application to in vitro toxicity testing. The latter has never been established in CD research. However, with the recent advances in small intestinal organoid techniques, DS might be employed as a biomarker for in vitro studies. This includes establishment of self-renewing epithelial cells raised from tissue, which express differentiation markers, including the brush border enzymes. Determining duodenal DS activities may provide additional information during the diagnostic workup of CD: (i quantify the severity of the observed histological lesions, (ii provide predictive values for the grade of mucosal villous atrophy, and (iii aid diagnosing CD where minor histological changes are seen. DS can also provide additional information to assess the response to a gluten-free diet as marked increase of their activities occurs four weeks after commencing it. Various endogenous and exogenous factors affecting DS might also be relevant when considering investigating the role of DS in other conditions including noncoeliac gluten sensitivity and DS deficiencies.

  15. Zonulin Regulates Intestinal Permeability and Facilitates Enteric Bacteria Permeation in Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuanwei; Gao, Min; Zhang, Wen; Chen, Caiyu; Zhou, Faying; Hu, Zhangxu; Zeng, Chunyu

    2016-06-29

    Several studies have reported an association between enteric bacteria and atherosclerosis. Bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene belong to Enterobacteriaceae have been detected in atherosclerotic plaques. How intestinal bacteria go into blood is not known. Zonulin reversibly modulate intestinal permeability (IP), the circulating zonulin levels were increased in diabetes, obesity, all of which are risk factors for atherosclerosis. It is unclear whether the circulating zonulin levels were changed in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients and modulate IP. The 16S rRNA gene of bacteria in blood sample was checked by 454 pyrosequencing. The zonulin levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods. The distribution of zonulin was detected by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. Bacteria and Caco-2 cell surface micro-structure were checked by transmission electron microscopy. A high diversity of bacterial 16S rRNA gene can be detected in samples from CAD patients, most of them (99.4%) belong to Enterobacteriaceaes, eg. Rahnella. The plasma zonulin levels were significantly higher in CAD patients. Pseudomonas fluorescens exposure significantly increased zonulin expression and decreased IP in a time dependent manner. The elevated zonulin increase IP and may facilitate enteric translocation by disassembling the tight junctions, which might explain the observed high diversity of bacterial 16S rRNA genes in blood samples.

  16. Role of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on intestinal permeability and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

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    Utzeri, Erika; Usai, Paolo

    2017-06-14

    The use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is widespread worldwide thanks to their analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antipyretic effects. However, even more attention is placed upon the recurrence of digestive system complications in the course of their use. Recent data suggests that the complications of the lower gastro-intestinal tract may be as frequent and severe as those of the upper tract. NSAIDs enteropathy is due to enterohepatic recycling of the drugs resulting in a prolonged and repeated exposure of the intestinal mucosa to the compound and its metabolites. Thus leading to so-called topical effects, which, in turn, lead to an impairment of the intestinal barrier. This process determines bacterial translocation and toxic substances of intestinal origin in the portal circulation, leading to an endotoxaemia. This condition could determine a liver inflammatory response and might promote the development of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, mostly in patients with risk factors such as obesity, metabolic syndrome and a high fat diet, which may induce a small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and dysbiosis. This alteration of gut microbiota may contribute to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and its related disorders in two ways: firstly causing a malfunction of the tight junctions that play a critical role in the increase of intestinal permeability, and then secondly leading to the development of insulin resistance, body weight gain, lipogenesis, fibrogenesis and hepatic oxidative stress.

  17. The interplay between the gut immune system and microbiota in health and disease: nutraceutical intervention for restoring intestinal homeostasis.

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    Magrone, Thea; Jirillo, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    Gut immune system is daily exposed to a plethora of antigens contained in the environment as well as in food. Both secondary lymphoid tissue, such as Peyer's patches, and lymphoid follicles (tertiary lymphoid tissue) are able to respond to antigenic stimuli releasing cytokines or producing antibodies (secretory IgA). Intestinal epithelial cells are in close cooperation with intraepithelial lymphocytes and possess Toll-like receptors on their surface and Nod-like receptors (NLRs) which sense pathogens or pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Intestinal microbiota, mainly composed of Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes, generates tolerogenic response acting on gut dendritic cells and inhibiting the T helper (h)-17 cell anti-inflammatory pathway. This is the case of Bacteroides fragilis which leads to the production of interleukin-10, an anti-inflammatory cytokine, from both T regulatory cells and lamina propria macrophages. Conversely, segmented filamentous bacteria rather induce Th17 cells, thus promoting intestinal inflammation. Intestinal microbiota and its toxic components have been shown to act on both Nod1 and Nod2 receptors and their defective signaling accounts for the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In IBD a loss of normal tolerance to intestinal microbiota seems to be the main trigger of mucosal damage. In addition, intestinal microbiota thanks to its regulatory function of gut immune response can prevent or retard neoplastic growth. In fact, chronic exposure to environmental microorganisms seems to be associated with low frequency of cancer risk. Major nutraceuticals or functional foods employed in the modulation of intestinal microbiota are represented by prebiotics, probiotics, polyunsaturated fatty acids, amino acids and polyphenols. The cellular and molecular effects performed by these natural products in terms of modulation of the intestinal microbiota and mostly attenuation of the inflammatory pathway are described.

  18. Amiloidosis secundaria en la enfermedad inflamatoria intestinal Secondary amyloidosis in Chrohn's disease

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    S. Seijo Ríos

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available La amiloidosis es una entidad clínica que se produce a consecuencia del depósito a nivel extracelular de un material proteico amorfo, causando una desorganización de la arquitectura normal de múltiples órganos y tejidos y, por tanto, una alteración funcional de los mismos. La amiloidosis secundaria es una complicación infrecuente pero muy grave que aparece en el contexto de neoplasias, enfermedades infecciosas e inflamatorias de curso crónico, como es el caso de la enfermedad inflamatoria intestinal, principalmente enfermedad de Crohn, ensombreciendo el pronóstico de estos pacientes. A continuación presentamos dos casos clínicos correspondientes a dos pacientes con enfermedad de Crohn que desarrollaron amiloidosis secundaria.Amyloidosis is a clinical entity that results from the deposition of an extracellular protein material that causes disruption in the normal architecture of multiple organs and tissues, and impairs their function. Secondary amyloidosis is a rare but serious complication that may worsen the prognosis of patients with cancer, infection or chronic inflammatory disease, including inflammatory bowel disease, particularly Crohn's disease. We report two cases of Crohn's disease associated with secondary amyloidosis.

  19. C1 Inhibitor Deficiency and Angioedema of the Small Intestine Masquerading as Crohn’s Disease

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    Kelly W Burak

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of C1 inhibitor deficiency presenting as localized edema of the small intestine is described. A 16-year-old, previously healthy woman presented with recurrent attacks of abdominal pain and vomiting following minor abdominal trauma. Investigations including computed tomography scan and barium studies confirmed localized edema of the jejunum. At laparoscopy, Crohn’s disease was suspected; however, a subsequent enteroscopy was normal. Complement levels revealed a low C4 level, and C1 inhibitor deficiency was later confirmed. Attacks of abdominal pain began after starting oral contraceptives and have not returned since stopping the birth control pill. This rare cause of abdominal pain is examined, and C1 inhibitor deficiency and angioedema are reviewed.

  20. Enteral bile acid treatment improves parenteral nutrition-related liver disease and intestinal mucosal atrophy in neonatal pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is essential for patients with impaired gut function but leads to parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD). TPN disrupts the normal enterohepatic circulation of bile acids, and we hypothesized that it would decrease intestinal expression of the newly des...

  1. Analysis of the RET, GDNF, EDN3, and EDNRB genes in patients with intestinal neuronal dysplasia and Hirschsprung disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gath, R; Goessling, A; Keller, KM; Koletzko, S; Coerdt, W; Muntefering, H; Wirth, S; Hofstra, RMW; Mulligan, L; Eng, C; von Deimling, A

    Background-Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) is a frequent congenital disorder with an incidence of 1 in 5000 live births, characterised by the absence of parasympathetic intramural ganglion cells in the hindgut resulting in intestinal obstruction in neonates and severe constipation in infants and adults.

  2. Spondylodiscitis with presacral abscess formation due to fistulisation in a patient with Crohn's disease in the small intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zajac, M.; Engelhard, K.; Schuhmann, R.

    2000-01-01

    The double contrast examination according to Sellink continues to play a significant role for the detection of Crohn's disease in the small intestine. For detection of accompanying complications, such as fistulisation or abscess formation, CT and MRI perform better than the double contrast examination. Sometimes, however, supplementing examinations may lead to wrong conclusions, as is shown with the case reported. (orig./CB) [de

  3. Increased epithelial gaps in the small intestines of patients with inflammatory bowel disease: density matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Julia J; Wong, Karen; Thiesen, Aducio L; Mah, Stephanie J; Dieleman, Levinus A; Claggett, Brian; Saltzman, John R; Fedorak, Richard N

    2011-06-01

    Epithelial gaps created by shedding of epithelial cells in the small intestine can be visualized by using confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE). The density of epithelial gaps in the small bowels of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and controls without IBD is unknown. To determine whether the epithelial gap density in patients with IBD is different from that in controls. Prospective, controlled, cohort study. A tertiary-care referral center. This study involved patients with IBD and control patients without IBD undergoing colonoscopy. Probe-based CLE (pCLE) was used to image the terminal ileum. The primary outcome of the study was gap density, defined as the total number of gaps per 1000 cells counted in adequately imaged villi by using pCLE. The pCLE images were blindly reviewed, and the number of epithelial gaps and cells were manually counted. The secondary outcomes were correlation of gap density with disease activity, location, and severity of clinical disease. There were 30 controls and 28 patients with IBD. Of the patients with IBD, 16 had Crohn's disease, and 12 had ulcerative colitis. The median epithelial gap densities for controls and patients with IBD were 18 and 61 gaps/1000 cells, respectively (P < .001). Gap density did not correlate with disease activity. Patients with ulcerative pan-colitis tended toward gap densities lower than those of patients with limited colitis (32 versus 97 gaps/1000 cells, P = .06). Patients with IBD with severe clinical disease also had lower median gap densities (37 vs 90 gaps/1000 cells, P = .04). A single-center study. The epithelial gap density was significantly increased in patients with IBD compared with controls. ( NCT00988273.). Copyright © 2011. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  4. Functional impacts of the intestinal microbiome in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jennifer; Butcher, James; Mack, David; Stintzi, Alain

    2015-01-01

    : The human intestinal microbiome plays a critical role in human health and disease, including the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Numerous studies have identified altered bacterial diversity and abundance at varying taxonomic levels through biopsies and fecal samples of patients with IBD and diseased model animals. However, inconsistent observations regarding the microbial compositions of such patients have hindered the efforts in assessing the etiological role of specific bacterial species in the pathophysiology of IBD. These observations highlight the importance of minimizing the confounding factors associated with IBD and the need for a standardized methodology to analyze well-defined microbial sampling sources in early IBD diagnosis. Furthermore, establishing the linkage between microbiota compositions with their function within the host system can provide new insights on the pathogenesis of IBD. Such research has been greatly facilitated by technological advances that include functional metagenomics coupled with proteomic and metabolomic profiling. This review provides updates on the composition of the microbiome in IBD and emphasizes microbiota dysbiosis-involved mechanisms. We highlight functional roles of specific bacterial groups in the development and management of IBD. Functional analyses of the microbiome may be the key to understanding the role of microbiota in the development and chronicity of IBD and reveal new strategies for therapeutic intervention.

  5. Enhanced platelet adhesion induces angiogenesis in intestinal inflammation and inflammatory bowel disease microvasculature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutella, Sergio; Vetrano, Stefania; Correale, Carmen; Graziani, Cristina; Sturm, Andreas; Spinelli, Antonino; De Cristofaro, Raimondo; Repici, Alessandro; Malesci, Alberto; Danese, Silvio

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Although angiogenesis is viewed as a fundamental component of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) pathogenesis, we presently lack a thorough knowledge of the cell type(s) involved in its induction and maintenance in the inflamed intestinal mucosa. This study aimed to determine whether platelet (PLT) adhesion to inflamed intestinal endothelial cells of human origin may favour angiogenesis. Unstimulated or thrombin-activated human PLT were overlaid on resting or tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α-treated human intestinal microvascular endothelial cells (HIMEC), in the presence or absence of blocking antibodies to either vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1, intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, integrin αvβ3, tissue factor (TF) or fractalkine (FKN). PLT adhesion to HIMEC was evaluated by fluorescence microscopy, and release of angiogenic factors (VEGF and soluble CD40L) was measured by ELISA. A matrigel tubule formation assay was used to estimate PLT capacity to induce angiogenesis after co-culturing with HIMEC. TNF-α up-regulated ICAM-1, αvβ3 and FKN expression on HIMEC. When thrombin-activated PLT were co-cultured with unstimulated HIMEC, PLT adhesion increased significantly, and this response was further enhanced by HIMEC activation with TNF-α. PLT adhesion to HIMEC was VCAM-1 and TF independent but ICAM-1, FKN and integrin αvβ3 dependent. VEGF and sCD40L were undetectable in HIMEC cultures either before or after TNF-α stimulation. By contrast, VEGF and sCD40L release significantly increased when resting or activated PLT were co-cultured with TNF-α-pre-treated HIMEC. These effects were much more pronounced when PLT were derived from IBD patients. Importantly, thrombin-activated PLT promoted tubule formation in HIMEC, a functional estimate of their angiogenic potential. In conclusion, PLT adhesion to TNF-α-pre-treated HIMEC is mediated by ICAM-1, FKN and αvβ3, and is associated with VEGF and sCD40L release. These findings suggest that

  6. Expert beliefs regarding novel lipid-based approaches to pediatric intestinal failure-associated liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Ivan R; Grant, Robert C; Feldman, Brian M; Tomlinson, George A; Pencharz, Paul B; Ling, Simon C; Moore, Aideen M; Wales, Paul W

    2014-08-01

    To determine expert beliefs regarding the probability of intestinal failure-associated liver disease (IFALD) with novel lipid-based approaches (lipid minimization/ω-3 lipids) in managing IFALD to facilitate Bayesian analyses of clinical trials of these therapies. Structured interviews were conducted using a validated approach to belief elicitation with 60 intestinal failure (IF) experts from across North America. Participants were asked to estimate, in an average population of infants referred for management of IF with early IFALD, the probability of advanced IFALD at 3 months following referral in each of 3 scenarios: (1) conventional lipid, (2) ω-3 lipids, and (3) lipid minimization. Probability distributions of the risk of advanced IFALD with each strategy were developed. Distributions of the elicited treatment effect for the novel approaches, relative to conventional lipid, were calculated. Median duration of experience of participants managing patients with IF was 8.5 (range, 2-35) years. The median probability of advanced IFALD using conventional lipid was 32.5%; ω-3 lipids, 17.5%; and lipid minimization, 13%. The median of the elicited treatment effects relative to conventional lipid was a relative risk of 0.53 for the ω-3 lipid and 0.45 for lipid minimization. There was consistent expert opinion that the novel lipid-based approaches are superior to conventional therapy, with similar estimates of treatment efficacy for the 2 approaches. The distributions of the elicited treatment effects can be used as prior distributions in Bayesian analyses of clinical trials of these novel strategies. © 2013 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  7. Changes in intestinal tight junction permeability associated with industrial food additives explain the rising incidence of autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Aaron; Matthias, Torsten

    2015-06-01

    The incidence of autoimmune diseases is increasing along with the expansion of industrial food processing and food additive consumption. The intestinal epithelial barrier, with its intercellular tight junction, controls the equilibrium between tolerance and immunity to non-self-antigens. As a result, particular attention is being placed on the role of tight junction dysfunction in the pathogenesis of AD. Tight junction leakage is enhanced by many luminal components, commonly used industrial food additives being some of them. Glucose, salt, emulsifiers, organic solvents, gluten, microbial transglutaminase, and nanoparticles are extensively and increasingly used by the food industry, claim the manufacturers, to improve the qualities of food. However, all of the aforementioned additives increase intestinal permeability by breaching the integrity of tight junction paracellular transfer. In fact, tight junction dysfunction is common in multiple autoimmune diseases and the central part played by the tight junction in autoimmune diseases pathogenesis is extensively described. It is hypothesized that commonly used industrial food additives abrogate human epithelial barrier function, thus, increasing intestinal permeability through the opened tight junction, resulting in entry of foreign immunogenic antigens and activation of the autoimmune cascade. Future research on food additives exposure-intestinal permeability-autoimmunity interplay will enhance our knowledge of the common mechanisms associated with autoimmune progression. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Comparison between Two Decades of Prevalence of Intestinal Parasitic Diseases and Risk Factors in a Brazilian Urban Centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Aparecida Alves de Oliveira Serra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. This study’s objective was to compare the prevalence of intestinal parasites and associated risk factors in children in urban communities, in the Brazilian Northeast, between two decades. Methods. This quantitative transversal study consisted of a comparative analysis of two different samples: the first viewing the years 1992–1996 and the other through a coproepidemiological data survey undertaken in 2010-2011. Results. It was evidenced that there was a reduction of intestinal parasites and that there were improvements in the socioenvironmental conditions between the two decades evaluated. It was observed that, in the period 1992–1996, playing out in the streets was associated with a higher risk for acquiring intestinal parasites. Over the 2010-2011 period, the characteristics of more than five residents per household, houses with dirt floors, children who live in homes without piped water, and children who play out in the streets were associated with a higher risk of intestinal parasitic infection. Conclusion. The study showed a reduction of intestinal parasitic diseases to 23.8% in 2010-2011 from 81.3% in 1992–1996 and improvement of the social-sanitary conditions of the population between the decades analyzed.

  9. Glutathione redox cycle in small intestinal mucosa and peripheral blood of pediatric celiac disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesnać Stojiljković

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The celiac disease is an autoimmune gastrointestinal disorder caused by gluten from wheat, rye or barley. In genetically predisposed persons, gluten induces the immune-mediated inflammation of small intestinal mucosa. Histological lesions include intraepithelial lymphocytosis, crypt hypertrophy and villous atrophy, resulting in malabsorption of micro- and macronutrients. The only treatment for celiac patients is a permanent gluten-free diet (GFD. Reactive oxygen species (ROS and oxidative stress are strongly associated with the celiac disease. Glutathione (GSH is a main detoxifier of endogenous and exogenous ROS in the intestine. In order to explain the role of glutathione redox cycle in celiac patients, we examined the activities of GSH-related antioxidant (AO enzymes glutathione peroxidase (GPx and glutathione reductase (GR, as well as the concentration of GSH in small intestinal biopsies and peripheral blood of children affected by the celiac disease. The concentration of lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH as markers of oxidative damage was measured in the same samples. The results clearly demonstrate a significant malfunction of GSH redox cycle with a concomitant decrease in the capacity to regenerate GSH and detoxify LOOH in celiac patients, even after several years of GFD. The oral administration of GSH and a diet rich in natural antioxidants, as well as appropriate dietary supplements, could be of great benefit to the patients.A doença celíaca é uma desordem gastrointestinal causada pelo glúten proveniente do trigo, centeio ou cevada. Em pessoas geneticamente predispostas, o glúten induz uma inflamação imune da mucosa do intestino delgado. As lesões histológicas incluem linfocitose intraepitelial, hipertrofia de criptas e atrofia vilosa, resultando em malabsorção de micro- e macronutrientes. O único tratamento para os pacientes celíacos é a restrição permanente de glúten na dieta (GFD.Espécies reativas de oxigênio (ROS e o

  10. /sup 51/Cr-EDTA//sup 14/C-mannitol intestinal permeability test. Clinical use in screening for coeliac disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fotherby, K.J.; Wraight, E.P.; Neale, G.

    1988-01-01

    An intestinal permeability test with a combination of /sup 51/Cr-EDTA and /sup 14/C-mannitol was performed under routine conditions on 176 occasions in 161 adult patients. Of these patients, 116 were under investigation for possible coeliac disease, 33 were known to have coeliac disease, and 12 had inflammatory bowel disease. Small-bowel biopsies were performed in 61 patients. Expressing the results as the ratio of the 6-h urinary recoveries of the two probes was as sensitive as 95%, but more specific for histological mucosal abnormality (62% versus 46%) than measuring the urinary recovery of /sup 51/Cr-EDTA alone. All but two of the patients with active inflammatory bowel disease, whether Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis, had an abnormal ratio. The /sup 51/Cr-EDTA//sup 14/C-mannitol intestinal permeablity test with a 6-h urine collection is a rapid and simple test of small-intestinal function suitable for routine use. 19 refs.

  11. Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide Nanomedicine for the Management of Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayawardena, Dulari; Anbazhagan, Arivarasu N; Guzman, Grace; Dudeja, Pradeep K; Onyuksel, Hayat

    2017-11-06

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic relapsing disorder of the intestine, with increasing incidence worldwide. At present, the management of IBD is an unmet medical need due to the ineffectiveness of currently available drugs in treating all patients, and there is strong demand for novel therapeutics. In this regard, vasoactive intestinal peptide, a potent anti-inflammatory endogenous hormone, has shown promise in managing multiple immune disorders in animal models. However, when administered in the free form, VIP undergoes rapid degradation in vivo, and with continuous infusion, it causes severe dose limiting side effects. To overcome these barriers, we have developed a superior mode to deliver VIP in its native form, using sterically stabilized micelles (VIP-SSM). Our previous studies demonstrated that, VIP, when administered in SSM, prevented joint damage and inflammation in a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis at a significantly lower dose than the free peptide, completely abrogating the serious side effect of hypotension associated with VIP. In the current study, we demonstrate the therapeutic benefit of VIP-SSM over free peptide in reversing severe colitis associated with IBD. First, we conducted preliminary studies with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) induced colitis in mice, to determine the effectiveness of VIP administered on alternate days in reducing disease severity. Thereafter, a single intra peritoneal injection of VIP-SSM or the free peptide was used to determine its therapeutic effect on the reversal of colitis and associated diarrhea. The results demonstrated that when administered on alternate days, both VIP-SSM and VIP were capable of alleviating DSS colitis in mice. However, when administered as a single dose, in a therapeutic setting, VIP-SSM showed superior benefits compared to the free peptide in ameliorating colitis phenotype. Namely, the loss of solid fecal pellets and increased fluid accumulation in colon resulting from DSS insult

  12. Differential IL-13 Production by Small Intestinal Leukocytes in Active Coeliac Disease versus Refractory Coeliac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sascha Gross

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A small fraction of coeliac disease (CD patients have persistent villous atrophy despite strict adherence to a gluten-free diet. Some of these refractory CD (RCD patients develop a clonal expansion of lymphocytes with an aberrant phenotype, referred to as RCD type II (RCDII. Pathogenesis of active CD (ACD has been shown to be related to gluten-specific immunity whereas the disease is no longer gluten driven in RCD. We therefore hypothesized that the immune response is differentially regulated by cytokines in ACD versus RCDII and investigated mucosal cytokine release after polyclonal stimulation of isolated mucosal lymphocytes. Secretion of the TH2 cytokine IL-13 was significantly higher in lamina propria leukocytes (LPLs isolated from RCDII patients as compared to LPL from ACD patients (P=0.05. In patients successfully treated with a gluten-free diet LPL-derived IL-13 production was also higher as compared to ACD patients (P=0.02. IL-13 secretion correlated with other TH2 as well as TH1 cytokines but not with IL-10 secretion. Overall, the cytokine production pattern of LPL in RCDII showed more similarities with LPL isolated from GFD patients than from ACD patients. Our data suggest that different immunological processes are involved in RCDII and ACD with a potential role for IL-13.

  13. Reduced expression of aquaporins in human intestinal mucosa in early stage inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricanek P

    2015-01-01

    -dimensional structures of AQP1, 3, 7, and 8 were modeled. Results: AQP1, 3, 7, and 8 mRNAs were detected in all parts of the intestinal mucosa. Notably, AQP1 and AQP3 mRNA levels were reduced in the ileum of patients with Crohn's disease, and AQP7 and AQP8 mRNA levels were reduced in the ileum and the colon of patients with ulcerative colitis. Immunofluorescence confocal microscopy showed localization of AQP3, 7, and 8 at the mucosal epithelium, whereas the expression of AQP1 was mainly confined to the endothelial cells and erythrocytes. The reduction in the level of AQP3, 7, and 8 mRNA was confirmed by immunofluorescence, which also indicated a reduction of apical immunolabeling for AQP8 in the colonic surface epithelium and crypts of the IBD samples. This could indicate loss of epithelial polarity in IBD, leading to disrupted barrier function. Conclusion: AQPs 1 and 8 and the aquaglyceroporins AQPs 3 and 7 are the AQPs predominantly expressed in the lower intestinal tract of humans. Their expression is significantly reduced in patients with IBD, and they are differentially expressed in specific bowel segments in patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. The data present a link between gut inflammation and water/solute homeostasis, suggesting that AQPs may play a significant role in IBD pathophysiology. Keywords: inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, aquaporins, aquaglyceroporins

  14. Mutation of RET proto-oncogene in Hirschsprung’s disease and intestinal neuronal dysplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tou, Jin-Fa; Li, Min-Ju; Guan, Tao; Li, Ji-Cheng; Zhu, Xiong-Kai; Feng, Zhi-Gang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the genetic relationship between Hirschsprung’s disease (HD) and intestinal neuronal dysplasia (IND) in Chinese population. METHODS: Peripheral blood samples were obtained from 30 HD patients, 20 IND patients, 18 HD/IND combined patients and 20 normal individuals as control. Genomic DNA was extracted according to standard procedure. Exons 11,13,15,17 of RET proto-oncogene were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The mutations of RET proto-oncogene were analyzed by single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) and sequencing of the positive amplified products was performed. RESULTS: Eight germline sequence variants were detected. In HD patients, 2 missense mutations in exon 11 at nucleotide 15165 G→A (G667S), 2 frameshift mutations in exon 13 at nucleotide 18974 (18974insG), 1 missense mutation in exon 13 at nucleotide 18919 A→G (K756E) and 1 silent mutation in exon 15 at nucleotide 20692 G→A(Q916Q) were detected. In HD/IND combined patients, 1 missense mutation in exon 11 at nucleotide 15165 G→A and 1 silent mutation in exon 13 at nucleotide 18888 T→G (L745L) were detected. No mutation was found in IND patients and controls. CONCLUSION: Mutation of RET proto-oncogene is involved in the etiopathogenesis of HD. The frequency of RET proto-oncogene mutation is quite different between IND and HD in Chinese population. IND is a distinct clinical entity genetically different from HD. PMID:16534860

  15. Intestinal parasitic infections, cysticercosis and hydatic diseases Parasitosis intestinales, cisticercosis e hidatidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Botero

    1990-03-01

    Full Text Available

    This paper offers an up to date review of the intestinal parasitic infections, cysticercosis and hydatic disease found In Colombia. Their main epidemiological, clinical, preventive and therapeutic features are presented, to provide the reader with a current view of their public health Importance, prevalence and impact on morbidity and mortality.

    Se presenta una revisión actualizada sobre las parasitosis intestinales, la cisticercosis y la hidatidosis en Colombia, con una breve descripción de la prevalencia, las características epidemiológicas, los efectos sobre la salud y algunos aspectos de control y tratamiento. Con esta revisión se busca tener información resumida sobre las parasitosis que se encuentran en Colombia y su mayor o menor Importancia en salud pública. TambIén se pretende ofrecer una Idea del nivel de gravedad de estas entidades como causas de morbilidad y mortalidad en este país. 

  16. Infectious Intestinal Diseases and Residential Water Services in Mexico: a Spatial Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas P. Sisto

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Infectious intestinal diseases (IID represent a widespread public health problem in Mexico. The country also faces major challenges with respect to the provision of residential water services (piped water and sewer—an essential input for hygiene and cleanliness in homes. This paper analyzes morbidity rates from several IID associated with unsanitary living conditions along with a series of residential water services indicators for Mexico’s 2,456 municipalities. With data obtained through a special request to the federal epidemiological authority as well as official census data for 2010, we find stark regional contrasts and identify interesting spatial structures for both IID morbidity and residential water services indicators. In particular, municipalities tend to present values similar to neighboring municipalities, forming clusters of relatively high-value (or low-value municipalities. Moreover we find that municipalities with a relatively high level of access to residential water services tend to present relatively low IID morbidity rates. These results have multiple public policy implications. In order to reduce the incidence of IID effectively and efficiently, interventions should explicitly consider the spatial structure of morbidity and target problem spots—which typically spill over state, municipal and other administrative boundaries. Moreover, improvements in the quality of access to piped water (for example, increasing the frequency of supply may be as important for reducing morbidity as the expansion of basic access to this service.

  17. Altered systemic bile acid homeostasis contributes to liver disease in pediatric patients with intestinal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yong-Tao; Cao, Yi; Zhou, Ke-Jun; Lu, Li-Na; Cai, Wei

    2016-12-15

    Intestinal failure (IF)-associated liver disease (IFALD), as a major complication, contributes to significant morbidity in pediatric IF patients. However, the pathogenesis of IFALD is still uncertain. We here investigate the roles of bile acid (BA) dysmetabolism in the unclear pathogenesis of IFALD. It found that the histological evidence of pediatric IF patients exhibited liver injury, which was characterized by liver bile duct proliferation, inflammatory infiltration, hepatocyte apoptosis and different stages of fibrosis. The BA compositions were altered in serum and liver of pediatric IF patients, as reflected by a primary BA dominant composition. In IF patients, the serum FGF19 levels decreased significantly, and were conversely correlated with ileal inflammation grades (r = -0.50, p liver, the expression of induction of the rate-limiting enzyme in bile salt synthesis, cytochrome P450 7a1 (CYP7A1) increased evidently. In conclusion, ileum inflammation decreases FXR expression corresponding to reduce serum FGF19 concentration, along with increased hepatic bile acid synthesis, leading to liver damages in IF patients.

  18. Extra intestinal influences on exhaled breath hydrogen measurements during the investigation of gastrointestinal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D G; Binfield, P; De Belder, A; O'Brien, J; Warren, S; Wilson, M

    1985-12-01

    During the clinical investigation of patients with gastrointestinal disease by exhaled breath hydrogen measurement, the occurrence of inexplicable variations in recorded hydrogen values led to a search for extra intestinal factors which were capable of adversely influencing breath hydrogen concentration and impairing the diagnostic accuracy of the test. Serial breath samples were collected from normal subjects under a variety of conditions which might occur during routine clinical study, including, hyperventilation, exercise, cigarette smoking, and carbohydrate ingestion. Breath hydrogen concentrations were consistently reduced by hyperventilation (p less than 0.01) and exercise (p less than 0.05). Cigarette smoking, in contrast, caused a marked rise in measured breath hydrogen (p less than 0.01), as did oral carbohydrate (p less than 0.05). Prior bactericidal mouthwash abolished this carbohydrate associated rise, suggesting that the hydrogen was the result of fermentation by oropharyngeal bacteria. Because, in all instances, the changes in breath hydrogen were of sufficient magnitude to interfere with data interpretation, it is recommended that these factors are eliminated, whenever possible, from conditions of study.

  19. Autoimmune diseases involving skin and intestinal mucosa are more frequent in adolescents and young adults suffering from atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipriani, Francesca; Marzatico, Alice; Ricci, Giampaolo

    2017-12-01

    Evidence has emerged about the relationship between atopic dermatitis (AD) and autoimmune diseases, but the underlying mechanism of this association is complex and still unclear. Recent epidemiological data from the published work suggest a positive correlation. The aim of this review is to analyze the frequency of co-occurrence of AD and autoimmune diseases. Our systematic review included 22 articles from PubMed describing the reciprocal association between AD and autoimmune diseases. Although not all the studies achieved statistically significant results, patients suffering from autoimmune diseases involving skin and intestinal mucosa, such as vitiligo, alopecia areata, celiac disease and inflammatory bowel diseases, showed a higher risk to have AD as comorbidity. In contrast, patients with rheumatological autoimmune disorders did not show a significant correlation with AD. By analyzing the occurrence of autoimmune disorders in patients with AD, we confirmed a positive correlation between AD and autoimmune diseases involving skin and intestinal mucosa, but also with systemic lupus erythematosus, while the association between AD and type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroiditis and rheumatoid arthritis showed conflicting results. Further investigations are need to explain the mechanism underlying the observed comorbidity between AD and autoimmune diseases and to develop targeted prevention strategies and treatment. © 2017 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  20. Increased risk of intestinal cancer in Crohn's disease: A meta-analysis of population-based cohort studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jess, Tine; Gamborg, Michael; Matzen, Peter

    2005-01-01

    , time of follow-up, and observed to expected cancer rates. STATA meta-analysis software was used to perform overall pooled risk estimates (standardized incidence ratio (SIR), observed/expected) and meta-regression analyses of the influence of specific variables on SIR. RESULTS: Six papers fulfilled......OBJECTIVES: The risk of intestinal malignancy in Crohn's disease (CD) remains uncertain since risk estimates vary worldwide. The global CD population is growing and there is a demand for better knowledge of prognosis of this disease. Hence, the aim of the present study was to conduct a meta......-analysis of population-based data on intestinal cancer risk in CD. METHODS: The MEDLINE search engine and abstracts from international conferences were searched for the relevant literature by use of explicit search criteria. All papers fulfilling the strict inclusion criteria were scrutinized for data on population size...

  1. Rifaximin-extended intestinal release induces remission in patients with moderately active Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prantera, Cosimo; Lochs, Herbert; Grimaldi, Maria; Danese, Silvio; Scribano, Maria Lia; Gionchetti, Paolo

    2012-03-01

    Bacteria might be involved in the development and persistence of inflammation in patients with Crohn's disease (CD), and antibiotics could be used in therapy. We performed a clinical phase 2 trial to determine whether a gastroresistant formulation of rifaximin (extended intestinal release [EIR]) induced remission in patients with moderately active CD. We performed a multicenter, randomized, double-blind trial of the efficacy and safety of 400, 800, and 1200 mg rifaximin-EIR, given twice daily to 402 patients with moderately active CD for 12 weeks. Data from patients given rifaximin-EIR were compared with those from individuals given placebo, and collected during a 12-week follow-up period. The primary end point was remission (Crohn's Disease Activity Index <150) at the end of the treatment period. At the end of the 12-week treatment period, 62% of patients who received the 800-mg dosage of rifaximin-EIR (61 of 98) were in remission, compared with 43% of patients who received placebo (43 of 101) (P = .005). A difference was maintained throughout the 12-week follow-up period (45% [40 of 89] vs 29% [28 of 98]; P = .02). Remission was achieved by 54% (56 of 104) and 47% (47 of 99) of the patients given the 400-mg and 1200-mg dosages of rifaximin-EIR, respectively; these rates did not differ from those of placebo. Patients given the 400-mg and 800-mg dosages of rifaximin-EIR had low rates of withdrawal from the study because of adverse events; rates were significantly higher among patients given the 1200-mg dosage (16% [16 of 99]). Administration of 800 mg rifaximin-EIR twice daily for 12 weeks induced remission with few adverse events in patients with moderately active CD. Copyright © 2012 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Intestinal biospy in children with coeliac disease; a Swedish national study of radiation dose and risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persliden, J.; Pettersson, H.B.L. [Linkoeping Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Radiation Physics; Faelth-Magnusson, K. [University of Linkoeping (Sweden). Faculty of Health Sciences

    1995-12-31

    In paediatric patients, fluoroscopy is used to monitor intestinal biopsies obtained for the diagnosis of coeliac disease. The radiation dose to the child is dependent on the equipment, the sedation of the patient and the experience of the operator. This study presents patient measurements from a national study in Sweden. The cancer excess lifetime mortality risk (CELMR) and the loss of life expectancy (LLE) are calculated for this patient group. TLD measurements were performed by dosemeters at 40 Swedish paediatric departments performing these biopsies. Information was received on sedation techniques, equipment used and fluoroscopy duration. An exponential curve fit was applied to the entrance and exit dose values and this dose distribution was integrated to get the integral dose. From this the mean absorbed dose in the irradiated volume was calculated. The mean and the median of the mean absorbed dose in the irradiated volume to the children was found to be 1.3 mGy (range 0.05-17.5 mGy) and 0.56 mGy respectively. The mean value of the entrance surface dose was 3.0 mGy (range 0.10-27.1 mGy) and the median was 1.4 mGy. The annual collective dose was calculated to 3.3 man Gy, based on 2500 biopsies per year. Variation in doses was found to depend on, e.g. the age of the equipment, focus to patient distance, sedation and operator experience. With this knowledge of doses received by the children in the diagnosis of coeliac disease, CELMR was found to be 0.5 per 25000 biopsies and LLE was 18 years. Recommendations are given on the proper choice of equipment for the reduction of fluoroscopy doses in pediatric radiology. (Author).

  3. Heavy rainfall and risk of infectious intestinal diseases in the most populous city in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phung, Dung; Chu, Cordia; Rutherford, Shannon; Nguyen, Huong Lien Thi; Luong, Mai Anh; Do, Cuong Manh; Huang, Cunrui

    2017-02-15

    The association between heavy rainfall and infectious intestinal diseases (IID) has not been well described and little research has been conducted in developing countries. This study examines the association between heavy rainfall and hospital admissions for IID in Ho Chi Minh City, the most populous city in Vietnam. An interrupted time-series method was used to examine the effect of each individual heavy rainfall event (HRE) on IID. The percentage changes in post-HRE level and trends of IID were estimated for 30days following each HRE. Then a random-effect meta-analysis was used to quantify the pooled estimate of effect sizes of all HREs on IID. The pooled estimates were calculated over a 21day lag period. The effects of a HRE on IID varied across individual HREs. The pooled estimates indicate that the levels of IID following a HRE increased from 7.3% to 13.5% for lags from 0 to 21days, however statistically significant increases were only observed for lags from 4 to 6days (13.5%, 95%CI: 1.4-25.4; 13.3%, 95%CI: 1.5-25.0; and 12.9%, 95%CI: 1.6-24.1 respectively). An average decrease of 0.11% (95%CI: -0.55-0.33) per day was observed for the post-HRE trend. This finding has important implications for the projected impacts on residents living in this city which is highly vulnerable to increased heavy rainfall associated with climate change. Adaptation and intervention programs should be developed to prevent this additional burden of disease and to protect residents from the adverse impacts of extreme weather events. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Magnetic Resonance Enteroclysis in the Diagnosis of Small-Intestinal Crohn's Disease: Diagnostic Accuracy and Inter- and Intra-observer Agreement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negaard, A.; Sandvik, L.; Mulahasanovic, A.; Berstad, A.E.; Klow, N.E.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and inter- and intra-observer agreement of magnetic resonance enteroclysis (MRE) in patients with or without Crohn's disease of the small intestine. Material and Methods: 60 consecutive patients with or without Crohn's disease examined with MRE were included. Two observers independently reviewed the MRE examinations, searching for 12 pathological signs. The reference standard was ileoscopy or surgery of the terminal ileum performed in 41 patients. Results: Crohn's disease of the small intestine was found in 24 (40%) patients. MRE findings of increased intestinal wall thickness, intestinal wall enhancement, intestinal wall ulcer, and inflammatory activity of the terminal ileum showed high sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values. Intestinal stenosis had sensitivities ranging from 43% to 100%, depending on the cut-off value. Inter- and intra-observer agreement was good or excellent for most pathological signs. However, observer agreement of intestinal wall edema was only fair and moderate. Conclusion: MRE evaluated Crohn's disease with a high diagnostic accuracy in the terminal ileum. Most MRE variables were evaluated with good or excellent observer agreement, indicating that the method was highly reproducible. Our study supports the notion that MRE is an appropriate method for diagnosing Crohn's disease

  5. Symptoms of Functional Intestinal Disorders Are Common in Patients with Celiac Disease Following Transition to a Gluten-Free Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvester, Jocelyn A; Graff, Lesley A; Rigaux, Lisa; Bernstein, Charles N; Leffler, Daniel A; Kelly, Ciarán P; Walker, John R; Duerksen, Donald R

    2017-09-01

    Celiac disease and functional intestinal disorders may overlap, yet the natural history of functional symptoms in patients with celiac disease is unknown. To investigate the prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), functional dyspepsia (FD), and functional bloating (FB) symptoms among patients with celiac disease at diagnosis and during the first year of a gluten-free diet. Adults with a new diagnosis of celiac disease were surveyed at baseline, 6 months and 1 year using standardized measures for intestinal symptoms [Rome III diagnostic questionnaire and celiac symptom index (CSI)] and gluten-free diet adherence [gluten-free eating assessment tool (GF-EAT) and celiac diet adherence test]. At diagnosis, two-thirds fulfilled Rome III diagnostic questionnaire symptom criteria for IBS (52%), functional dyspepsia (27%), and/or functional bloating (9%). One year post-diagnosis, there was high adherence to a gluten-free diet as 93% reported gluten exposure less than once per month on the GF-EAT and only 8% had ongoing celiac disease symptoms (CSI score >45). The rates of those meeting IBS (22%) and functional dyspepsia (8%) symptom criteria both decreased significantly on a gluten-free diet. The prevalence of functional symptoms (any of IBS, FD or FB) at 1 year was 47%. Long-term follow-up of patients with celiac disease is necessary because many patients with celiac disease who are adherent to a gluten-free diet have persistent gastrointestinal symptoms.

  6. Characterization of stable RNAs from the resected intestinal tissues of individuals with either Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Guylaine; Mercure, Stéphane; Beuvon, Frédéric; Perreault, Jean-Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Circular RNAs reminiscent of viroids and the human hepatitis delta virus have been proposed as possible nonconventional pathogens responsible for Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, two inflammatory bowel diseases. Consequently, RNA was extracted from various areas of intestinal tissues from individuals with either Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis as well as several appropriate control diseases, and analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. No circular viroid-like RNAs (28S ribosomal RNA cleavage product characterized previously; a 5.8S ribosomal RNA conformer; and a fragment homologous to transcripts from DNA CpG islands. The two last RNAs were detected prior to visible morphological tissue alterations, suggesting that they are produced early during the inflammation and that they have value as molecular diagnostic tools for the inflammatory bowel diseases. The potential cellular mechanisms producing these RNAs and their involvement in inflammatory bowel disease are discussed. PMID:9599669

  7. Zonulin Regulates Intestinal Permeability and Facilitates Enteric Bacteria Permeation in Coronary Artery Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Chuanwei; Gao, Min; Zhang, Wen; Chen, Caiyu; Zhou, Faying; Hu, Zhangxu; Zeng, Chunyu

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have reported an association between enteric bacteria and atherosclerosis. Bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene belong to Enterobacteriaceae have been detected in atherosclerotic plaques. How intestinal bacteria go into blood is not known. Zonulin reversibly modulate intestinal permeability (IP), the circulating zonulin levels were increased in diabetes, obesity, all of which are risk factors for atherosclerosis. It is unclear whether the circulating zonulin levels were cha...

  8. Intestinal cell damage and systemic immune activation in individuals reporting sensitivity to wheat in the absence of coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhde, Melanie; Ajamian, Mary; Caio, Giacomo; De Giorgio, Roberto; Indart, Alyssa; Green, Peter H; Verna, Elizabeth C; Volta, Umberto; Alaedini, Armin

    2016-12-01

    Wheat gluten and related proteins can trigger an autoimmune enteropathy, known as coeliac disease, in people with genetic susceptibility. However, some individuals experience a range of symptoms in response to wheat ingestion, without the characteristic serological or histological evidence of coeliac disease. The aetiology and mechanism of these symptoms are unknown, and no biomarkers have been identified. We aimed to determine if sensitivity to wheat in the absence of coeliac disease is associated with systemic immune activation that may be linked to an enteropathy. Study participants included individuals who reported symptoms in response to wheat intake and in whom coeliac disease and wheat allergy were ruled out, patients with coeliac disease and healthy controls. Sera were analysed for markers of intestinal cell damage and systemic immune response to microbial components. Individuals with wheat sensitivity had significantly increased serum levels of soluble CD14 and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein, as well as antibody reactivity to bacterial LPS and flagellin. Circulating levels of fatty acid-binding protein 2 (FABP2), a marker of intestinal epithelial cell damage, were significantly elevated in the affected individuals and correlated with the immune responses to microbial products. There was a significant change towards normalisation of the levels of FABP2 and immune activation markers in a subgroup of individuals with wheat sensitivity who observed a diet excluding wheat and related cereals. These findings reveal a state of systemic immune activation in conjunction with a compromised intestinal epithelium affecting a subset of individuals who experience sensitivity to wheat in the absence of coeliac disease. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  9. Glycoprotein A33 deficiency: a new mouse model of impaired intestinal epithelial barrier function and inflammatory disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin B. Williams

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The cells of the intestinal epithelium provide a selectively permeable barrier between the external environment and internal tissues. The integrity of this barrier is maintained by tight junctions, specialised cell-cell contacts that permit the absorption of water and nutrients while excluding microbes, toxins and dietary antigens. Impairment of intestinal barrier function contributes to multiple gastrointestinal disorders, including food hypersensitivity, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD and colitis-associated cancer (CAC. Glycoprotein A33 (GPA33 is an intestinal epithelium-specific cell surface marker and member of the CTX group of transmembrane proteins. Roles in cell-cell adhesion have been demonstrated for multiple CTX family members, suggesting a similar function for GPA33 within the gastrointestinal tract. To test a potential requirement for GPA33 in intestinal barrier function, we generated Gpa33−/− mice and subjected them to experimental regimens designed to produce food hypersensitivity, colitis and CAC. Gpa33−/− mice exhibited impaired intestinal barrier function. This was shown by elevated steady-state immunosurveillance in the colonic mucosa and leakiness to oral TRITC-labelled dextran after short-term exposure to dextran sodium sulphate (DSS to injure the intestinal epithelium. Gpa33−/− mice also exhibited rapid onset and reduced resolution of DSS-induced colitis, and a striking increase in the number of colitis-associated tumours produced by treatment with the colon-specific mutagen azoxymethane (AOM followed by two cycles of DSS. In contrast, Gpa33−/− mice treated with AOM alone showed no increase in sporadic tumour formation, indicating that their increased tumour susceptibility is dependent on inflammatory stimuli. Finally, Gpa33−/− mice displayed hypersensitivity to food allergens, a common co-morbidity in humans with IBD. We propose that Gpa33−/− mice provide a valuable model to study the mechanisms

  10. Small intestinal submucosa for patch grafting after plaque incision in the treatment of Peyronie's disease

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    Eugene W. Lee

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Report the results using porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS as a graft material in the surgical management of Peyronie's disease (PD. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed a retrospective chart review of men with PD who underwent surgical correction of the curvature by plaque “H” incision and patch grafting with 4-ply SIS (Cook, Bloomington, IN by a single surgeon at our institution. Degree and direction of curvature, sexual function, and co-morbidities were assessed pre- and postoperatively. RESULTS: Thirteen patients were identified. Mean age was 57 ± 8, range 42-70 years. Median follow-up was 14 months, range 3-89 months. At presentation, all reported penile curvature. Also reported were difficulty with vaginal penetration (determined by question number 2 of the sexual encounter profile questionnaire - SEP2, palpable plaque, hourglass deformity, difficulty with firmness, and difficulty with sustaining erection (determined by SEP3 in77%, 69%, 77%, 62%, and 46% of patients, respectively. Mean and median degrees of curvature of the primary deformity were 71 and 67.5 degrees, respectively. Three patients had secondary curves of less than 30 degrees in a different direction. Mean and median plaque size were 3.5 and 2.7 cm², respectively. Seven patients had one graft and six patients had two grafts placed with a mean size of 15 ± 0 cm². CONCLUSIONS: For the patient with PD, SIS grafting can achieve a functionally straight erection with durable results yet with relatively high rates of erectile dysfunction. SIS is a viable graft material for use in the surgical treatment of PD.

  11. Contaminated small drinking water supplies and risk of infectious intestinal disease: a prospective cohort study.

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    Helen L Risebro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study sought to identify whether elevated risk of infectious intestinal disease (IID exists in contaminated small water supply consumers compared with consumers drinking from small supplies complying with current standards and whether this effect is modified by age. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A prospective cohort study of 611 individuals receiving small supplies in England was conducted. Water supplies received sanitary inspection and examination for indicator bacteria and participants maintained a daily record of IID. Regression modeling with generalized estimating equations that included interaction terms between age and indicators of fecal pollution was performed. Crude IID prevalence was 9 · 3 days with symptoms/1000 person days (95%CI: 8 · 4, 10 · 1 and incidence was 3 · 2 episodes/1000 person days (95%CI, 2 · 7, 3 · 7 or 1 · 2 episodes per person year. Although there was no overall association between IID risk and indicator presence, there was strong interaction between age and indicator presence. In children under ten, relative risk (RR of IID in those drinking from enterococci contaminated supplies was 4.8 (95%CI: 1.5, 15.3 for incidence and 8.9 (95%CI: 2.8, 27.5 for prevalence. In those aged 10 to 59, IID risk was lower but not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: Contaminated small water supplies pose a substantial risk of IID to young children who live in homes reliant on these supplies. By contrast older children and adults do not appear to be at increased risk. Health care professionals with responsibility for children living in homes provided by very small water supplies should make parents aware of the risk.

  12. Magnetic resonance enterography for assessment of intestinal graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derlin, Thorsten [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); Hanover Medical School, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hanover (Germany); Laqmani, Azien; Adam, Gerhard; Bannas, Peter [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); Veldhoen, Simon [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); University Medical Center Wuerzburg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Apostolova, Ivayla [Otto-von-Guericke University, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Magdeburg (Germany); Ayuk, Francis; Kroeger, Nicolaus [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Stem Cell Transplantation, Hamburg (Germany)

    2015-05-01

    To determine the diagnostic performance of MR enterography (MRE) for detection and grading of gastrointestinal graft-versus-host disease (GI GvHD) after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT). Forty-one patients with known GvHD or suspected GvHD underwent MRE and GI endoscopy with multi-level biopsies. MRE images were reviewed for presence of intestinal wall inflammation. Clinical grading of GI GvHD was performed. Histopathological evaluation (HPE) served as the reference standard. Overall, MRE demonstrated a per-patient sensitivity of 81.5 % for detection of GI GvHD. The most common findings were intestinal wall thickening (81.5 % of GvHD patients), luminal stenosis (81.5 %), mural contrast enhancement (70.4 %), and ascites (59.3 %). These findings were also observed in other conditions than GvHD. The most frequently involved intestinal segment was the sigmoid colon (63.0 %), followed by the ileum (59.3 %) and the jejeunum (51.9 %). The number of involved segments (r{sub s} =0.54, p =0.009) correlated significantly with clinical severity as determined by GvHD grading. After allogeneic stem cell transplantation, MRE may (1) contribute to detection and localization of GI GvHD, and (2) add information indicating the clinical severity of disease, but findings are unspecific. False negative results may be observed not only in low-grade GI GvHD. (orig.)

  13. Evidence in favor of a severely impaired net intestinal calcium absorption in patients with (early-stage) chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viaene, L; Meijers, B K I; Vanrenterghem, Y; Evenepoel, P

    2012-01-01

    Calcium and phosphorus are essential to many vital physiological processes. Little is known about the net and fractional intestinal absorption of calcium and phosphorus in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and their clinical and hormonal determinants. Blood and 24-hour urine samples were collected in 20 healthy volunteers (HV) and 72 stable CKD stage 1-4 patients and analyzed for parameters of mineral metabolism including calcidiol, calcitriol, and parathyroid hormone (PTH). Dietary intake was assessed by dietary history. The 24-hour urinary calcium excretion, as opposed to the phosphorus excretion, showed a stepwise decrease across CKD stages (median of 219, 84, 40, and 22 mg/day in HV and patients with CKD stages 1-2, 3 and 4, respectively). Younger age, high serum calcitriol, and high estimated GFR were associated with a high 24-hour urinary calcium excretion. High serum calcitriol levels and dietary phosphorus intake were associated with a high 24-hour urinary phosphorus excretion. The fractional intestinal calcium absorption, as estimated by the urinary-to-ingested calcium ratio, decreased across CKD stages. The 24-hour urinary excretion of calcium, as opposed to phosphorus, is markedly decreased in CKD, even in early-stage disease. This is partly explained by low calcitriol levels and older age. Assuming a neutral calcium balance at the time of urine collection, we infer that net intestinal calcium absorption may be severely impaired in CKD. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. The Vat-AIEC protease promotes crossing of the intestinal mucus layer by Crohn's disease-associated Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibold, Lucie; Garenaux, Estelle; Dalmasso, Guillaume; Gallucci, Camille; Cia, David; Mottet-Auselo, Benoit; Faïs, Tiphanie; Darfeuille-Michaud, Arlette; Nguyen, Hang Thi Thu; Barnich, Nicolas; Bonnet, Richard; Delmas, Julien

    2016-05-01

    The aetiology of Crohn's disease (CD) involves disorders in host genetic factors and intestinal microbiota. Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) are receiving increased attention because in studies of mucosa-associated microbiota, they are more prevalent in CD patients than in healthy subjects. AIEC are associated both with ileal and colonic disease phenotypes. In this study, we reported a protease called Vat-AIEC from AIEC that favours the mucosa colonization. The deletion of the Vat-AIEC-encoding gene resulted in an adhesion-impaired phenotype in vitro and affected the colonization of bacteria in contact with intestinal epithelial cells in a murine intestinal loop model, and also their gut colonization in vivo. Furthermore, unlike LF82Δvat-AIEC, wild-type AIEC reference strain LF82 was able to penetrate a mucus column extensively and promoted the degradation of mucins and a decrease in mucus viscosity. Vat-AIEC transcription was stimulated by several chemical conditions found in the ileum environment. Finally, the screening of E. coli strains isolated from CD patients revealed a preferential vat-AIEC association with AIEC strains belonging to the B2 phylogroup. Overall, this study revealed a new component of AIEC virulence that might favour their implantation in the gut of CD patients. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Prevalence of intestinal parasites among HIV/AIDS patients attending Infectious Disease Hospital Kano, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegede, Ebenezer Feyisayo; Oyeyi, Esther Tinuade Ibijoke; Bichi, ArmaYau Hamisu; Mbah, Henry Akwen; Torpey, Kwasi

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal parasitic infection has been a major source of morbidity in tropical countries especially among HIV patients. The aim of this study was to determine prevalence of intestinal parasites and its association with immunological status and risk factors among HIV infected patients in Kano, Nigeria. 105 HIV+ subjects and 50 HIV- controls were recruited into the studies from June to December 2010. Clinical information was collected using a questionnaire. Single stool and venous blood samples were collected from each subject. Stool examination and CD4+ count were performed. Prevalence of intestinal parasites was 11.4% and 6% among the HIV+ and control subjects respectively with no statistically significant difference (p = 0.389). Specifically, the following intestinal parasites were isolated from HIV+ subjects: Entamoebahistolytica (5.7%), hookworm (3.8%), Entamoeba coli (1%), Blastocystishominis (1%). Only Entamoebahistolytica was isolated among the control subjects. The mean CD4+ count of HIV+ and control subjects was 287 cells/ul and 691 cells/µl respectively while the median was 279(Q1-120, Q3-384) cell/µl and 691(Q1-466, Q3-852) cell/µl respectively with statistically significant difference (P= 0.021). Diarrhea and the absence of anti-parasitic therapy seem to be important risk factors associated with the occurrence of intestinal parasites among HIV+ subjects. A higher prevalence (14.5%) of intestinal parasites was observed in subject with CD4+ count 350 cell/µl. Routine examination for intestinal parasites should be carried out for better management of HIV/AIDS patients.

  16. Risk of cancer, with special reference to extra-intestinal malignancies, in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algaba, Alicia; Guerra, Iván; Castaño, Angel; de la Poza, Gema; Castellano, Víctor M; López, Montserrat; Bermejo, Fernando

    2013-12-28

    To determine the incidence and characteristics of intestinal and extra-intestinal cancers among patients with inflammatory bowel disease in a Spanish hospital and to compare them with those of the local population. This was a prospective, observational, 7-year follow-up, cohort study. Cumulative incidence, incidence rates based on person-years of follow-up and relative risk were calculated for patients with inflammatory bowel disease and compared with the background population. The incidence of cancer was determined using a hospital-based data registry from Hospital Universitario de Fuenlabrada. Demographic data and details about time from diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease to occurrence of cancer, disease extent, inflammatory bowel disease treatment, cancer therapy and cancer evolution were also collected in the inflammatory bowel disease cohort. Eighteen of 590 patients with inflammatory bowel disease developed cancer [cumulative incidence = 3% (95%CI: 1.58-4.52) vs 2% (95%CI: 1.99-2.11) in the background population; RR = 1.5; 95%CI: 0.97-2.29]. The cancer incidence among inflammatory bowel disease patients was 0.53% (95%CI: 0.32-0.84) per patient-year of follow-up. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease had a significantly increased relative risk of urothelial carcinoma (RR = 5.23, 95%CI: 1.95-13.87), appendiceal mucinous cystadenoma (RR = 36.6, 95%CI: 7.92-138.4), neuroendocrine carcinoma (RR = 13.1, 95%CI: 1.82-29.7) and rectal carcinoid (RR = 8.94, 95%CI: 1.18-59.7). Colorectal cancer cases were not found. The overall risk of cancer did not significantly increase in our inflammatory bowel disease patients. However, there was an increased risk of urinary bladder cancer and, with less statistical power, an increased risk of appendiceal mucinous cystadenoma and of neuroendocrine tumors. Colorectal cancer risk was low in our series.

  17. Immune deficiency vs. immune excess in inflammatory bowel diseases-STAT3 as a rheo-STAT of intestinal homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppkes, Moritz; Neurath, Markus F; Herrmann, Martin; Becker, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have provided many genetic alterations, conferring susceptibility to multifactorial polygenic diseases, such as inflammatory bowel diseases. Yet, how specific genetic alterations functionally affect intestinal inflammation often remains elusive. It is noteworthy that a large overlap of genes involved in immune deficiencies with those conferring inflammatory bowel disease risk has been noted. This has provided new arguments for the debate on whether inflammatory bowel disease arises from either an excess or a deficiency in the immune system. In this review, we highlight the functional effect of an inflammatory bowel disease-risk allele, which cannot be deduced from genome-wide association studies data alone. As exemplified by the transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), we show that a single gene can have a plethora of effects in various cell types of the gut. These effects may individually contribute to the restoration of intestinal homeostasis on the one hand or pave the way for excessive immunopathology on the other, as an inflammatory "rheo-STAT". © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  18. Prevalence of Campylobacter species in adult Crohn's disease and the preferential colonization sites of Campylobacter species in the human intestine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikneswari Mahendran

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Crohn's disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC are the two major forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. A high prevalence of Campylobacter concisus was previously detected in paediatric CD and adult UC. Currently, the prevalence of C. concisus in adult CD and the preferential colonization sites of Campylobacter species in the human intestine are unknown. In this study, we examined the prevalence of Campylobacter species in biopsies collected from multiple anatomic sites of adult patients with IBD and controls. METHODS: Three hundred and one biopsies collected from ileum, caecum, descending colon and rectum of 28 patients IBD (15 CD and 13 UC and 33 controls were studied. Biopsies were used for DNA extraction and detection of Campylobacter species by PCR-sequencing and Campylobacter cultivation. RESULTS: A significantly higher prevalence of C. concisus in colonic biopsies of patients with CD (53% was detected as compared with the controls (18%. Campylobacter genus-PCR positivity and C. concisus positivity in patients with UC were 85% and 77% respectively, being significantly higher than that in the controls (48% and 36%. C. concisus was more often detected in descending colonic and rectal biopsies from patients with IBD in comparison to the controls. C. concisus was isolated from patients with IBD. CONCLUSION: The high intestinal prevalence of C. concisus in patients with IBD, particularly in the proximal large intestine, suggests that future studies are needed to investigate the possible involvement of C. concisus in a subgroup of human IBD. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the association between adult CD and C. concisus as well as the first study of the preferential colonization sites of C. concisus in the human intestine.

  19. Prevalence of Campylobacter Species in Adult Crohn's Disease and the Preferential Colonization Sites of Campylobacter Species in the Human Intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahendran, Vikneswari; Riordan, Stephen M.; Grimm, Michael C.; Tran, Thi Anh Tuyet; Major, Joelene; Kaakoush, Nadeem O.; Mitchell, Hazel; Zhang, Li

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are the two major forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). A high prevalence of Campylobacter concisus was previously detected in paediatric CD and adult UC. Currently, the prevalence of C. concisus in adult CD and the preferential colonization sites of Campylobacter species in the human intestine are unknown. In this study, we examined the prevalence of Campylobacter species in biopsies collected from multiple anatomic sites of adult patients with IBD and controls. Methods Three hundred and one biopsies collected from ileum, caecum, descending colon and rectum of 28 patients IBD (15 CD and 13 UC) and 33 controls were studied. Biopsies were used for DNA extraction and detection of Campylobacter species by PCR-sequencing and Campylobacter cultivation. Results A significantly higher prevalence of C. concisus in colonic biopsies of patients with CD (53%) was detected as compared with the controls (18%). Campylobacter genus-PCR positivity and C. concisus positivity in patients with UC were 85% and 77% respectively, being significantly higher than that in the controls (48% and 36%). C. concisus was more often detected in descending colonic and rectal biopsies from patients with IBD in comparison to the controls. C. concisus was isolated from patients with IBD. Conclusion The high intestinal prevalence of C. concisus in patients with IBD, particularly in the proximal large intestine, suggests that future studies are needed to investigate the possible involvement of C. concisus in a subgroup of human IBD. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the association between adult CD and C. concisus as well as the first study of the preferential colonization sites of C. concisus in the human intestine. PMID:21966525

  20. The role of the intestinal microvasculature in inflammatory bowel disease: studies with a modified Caco-2 model including endothelial cells resembling the intestinal barrier in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Jennifer Y; Hermanns, Maria Iris; Cavelius, Christian; Kraegeloh, Annette; Jung, Thomas; Danzebrink, Rolf; Unger, Ronald E; Kirkpatrick, Charles James

    2016-01-01

    The microvascular endothelium of the gut barrier plays a crucial role during inflammation in inflammatory bowel disease. We have modified a commonly used intestinal cell model based on the Caco-2 cells by adding microvascular endothelial cells (ISO-HAS-1). Transwell filters were used with intestinal barrier-forming Caco-2 cells on top and the ISO-HAS-1 on the bottom of the filter. The goal was to determine whether this coculture mimics the in vivo situation more closely, and whether the model is suitable to evaluate interactions of, for example, prospective nanosized drug vehicles or contrast agents with this coculture in a physiological and inflamed state as it would occur in inflammatory bowel disease. We monitored the inflammatory responsiveness of the cells (release of IL-8, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1, and soluble E-selectin) after exposure to inflammatory stimuli (lipopolysaccharide, TNF-α, INF-γ, IL1-β) and a nanoparticle (Ba/Gd: coprecipitated BaSO4 and Gd(OH)3), generally used as contrast agents. The barrier integrity of the coculture was evaluated via the determination of transepithelial electrical resistance and the apparent permeability coefficient (Papp) of NaFITC. The behavior of the coculture Caco-1/ISO-HAS-1 was compared to the respective monocultures Caco-2 and ISO-HAS-1. Based on transepithelial electrical resistance, the epithelial barrier integrity of the coculture remained stable during incubation with all stimuli, whereas the Papp decreased after exposure to the cytokine mixture (TNF-α, INF-γ, IL1-β, and Ba/Gd). Both the endothelial and epithelial monocultures showed a high inflammatory response in both the upper and lower transwell-compartments. However, in the coculture, inflammatory mediators were only detected on the epithelial side and not on the endothelial side. Thus in the coculture, based on the Papp, the epithelial barrier appears to prevent a potential inflammatory overreaction in the underlying endothelial cells

  1. Inflammatory bowel diseases influence major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) and II compartments in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bär, F; Sina, C; Hundorfean, G; Pagel, R; Lehnert, H; Fellermann, K; Büning, J

    2013-05-01

    Antigen presentation by intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) is crucial for intestinal homeostasis. Disturbances of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I)- and II-related presentation pathways in IEC appear to be involved in an altered activation of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in inflammatory bowel disease. However, a comprehensive analysis of MHC I- and II-enriched compartments in IEC of the small and large bowel in the healthy state as opposed to inflammatory bowel diseases is lacking. The aim of this study was to characterize the subcellular expression of MHC I and II in the endocytic pathway of IEC throughout all parts of the intestinal tract, and to identify differences between the healthy state and inflammatory bowel diseases. Biopsies were taken by endoscopy from the duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon in healthy individuals (n = 20). In Crohn's disease (CD), biopsies were obtained from the ileum and colon and within the colon from ulcerative colitis (UC) patients (n = 15). Analysis of IEC was performed by immunoelectron microscopy. MHC I and II were identified in early endosomes and multi-vesicular, multi-lamellar, electrondense and vacuolar late endosomes. Both molecules were enriched in multi-vesicular bodies. No differences were found between the distinct parts of the gut axis. In CD and UC the expression of MHC I and II showed a shift from multi-vesicular bodies towards the basolateral membranes. Within the multi-vesicular bodies, MHC I and II moved from internal vesicles to the limiting membranes upon inflammation in CD and UC. MHC I- and II-enriched compartments in IEC were identical in all parts of the small and large bowel. CD and UC appear to modulate the MHC I- and II-related presentation pathways of exogenous antigens in IEC. © 2012 British Society for Immunology.

  2. Inhibition of miR122a by Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG culture supernatant increases intestinal occludin expression and protects mice from alcoholic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Haiyang; Zhao, Cuiqing; Dong, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Min; Wang, Yuhua; Li, Fengyuan; Li, Xiaokun; McClain, Craig; Yang, Shulin; Feng, Wenke

    2015-05-05

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) has a high morbidity and mortality. Chronic alcohol consumption causes disruption of intestinal microflora homeostasis, intestinal tight junction barrier dysfunction, increased endotoxemia, and eventually liver steatosis/steatohepatitis. Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and the bacteria-free LGG culture supernatant (LGGs) have been shown to promote intestinal epithelial integrity and protect intestinal barrier function in ALD. However, little is known about how LGGs mechanistically works to increase intestinal tight junction proteins. Here we show that chronic ethanol exposure increased intestinal miR122a expression, which decreased occludin expression leading to increased intestinal permeability. Moreover, LGGs supplementation decreased ethanol-elevated miR122a level and attenuated ethanol-induced liver injury in mice. Similar to the effect of ethanol exposure, overexpression of miR122a in Caco-2 monolayers markedly decreased occludin protein levels. In contrast, inhibition of miR122a increased occludin expression. We conclude that LGGs supplementation functions in intestinal integrity by inhibition of miR122a, leading to occludin restoration in mice exposed to chronic ethanol. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  3. Similar Responses of Intestinal T Cells From Untreated Children and Adults With Celiac Disease to Deamidated Gluten Epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ráki, Melinda; Dahal-Koirala, Shiva; Yu, Hao; Korponay-Szabó, Ilma R; Gyimesi, Judit; Castillejo, Gemma; Jahnsen, Jørgen; Qiao, Shuo-Wang; Sollid, Ludvig M

    2017-09-01

    Celiac disease is a chronic small intestinal inflammatory disorder mediated by an immune response to gluten peptides in genetically susceptible individuals. Celiac disease is often diagnosed in early childhood, but some patients receive a diagnosis late in life. It is uncertain whether pediatric celiac disease is distinct from adult celiac disease. It has been proposed that gluten-reactive T cells in children recognize deamidated and native gluten epitopes, whereas T cells from adults only recognize deamidated gluten peptides. We studied the repertoire of gluten epitopes recognized by T cells from children and adults. We examined T-cell responses against gluten by generating T-cell lines and T-cell clones from intestinal biopsies of adults and children and tested proliferative response to various gluten peptides. We analyzed T cells from 14 children (2-5 years old) at high risk for celiac disease who were followed for celiac disease development. We also analyzed T cells from 6 adults (26-55 years old) with untreated celiac disease. All children and adults were positive for HLA-DQ2.5. Biopsies were incubated with gluten digested with chymotrypsin (modified or unmodified by the enzyme transglutaminase 2) or the peptic-tryptic digest of gliadin (in native and deamidated forms) before T-cell collection. Levels of T-cell responses were higher to deamidated gluten than to native gluten in children and adults. T cells from children and adults each reacted to multiple gluten epitopes. Several T-cell clones were cross-reactive, especially clones that recognized epitopes from γ-and ω-gliadin. About half of the generated T-cell clones from children and adults reacted to unknown epitopes. T-cell responses to different gluten peptides appear to be similar between adults and children at the time of diagnosis of celiac disease. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Effective Treatment of Intestinal Behçet's Disease with Long-Term, Low-Dose Clarithromycin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukiya Hakozaki

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A 51-year-old man was referred for body weight loss and lower right abdominal pain. Total colonoscopy revealed discrete and round ulceration at the ileocecal valve, and he was diagnosed with intestinal Behçet's disease (BD. By treatment with glucocorticoid, colchicine and salazosulfapyridine, the symptoms and ulceration were improved, but cessation of glucocorticoid resulted in relapse of ulceration at the terminal ileum. Long-term, low-dose treatment with clarithromycin (CAM was implemented for chronic respiratory infections. Furthermore, we expected that this CAM treatment would also be effective in BD. During this long-term, low-dose treatment with CAM, discrete ulceration at the terminal ileum was never revealed by follow-up total colonoscopy once or twice per year for 7 years. No reports have described the effectiveness of this treatment in patients with intestinal BD; however, we confirm that long-term treatment with low-dose CAM might have clinical benefits for patients with intestinal BD.

  5. Intestinal microbiota in human health and disease: the impact of probiotics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, J.; Smidt, H.; Rijkers, G.T.; Vos, de W.M.

    2011-01-01

    The complex communities of microorganisms that colonise the human gastrointestinal tract play an important role in human health. The development of culture-independent molecular techniques has provided new insights in the composition and diversity of the intestinal microbiota. Here, we summarise the

  6. Changes of intestinal mucosa in hand-fed rats-model for human coeliac disease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kozáková, Hana; Štěpánková, Renata; Kolínská, Jiřina; Tučková, Ludmila; Tlaskalová, Helena

    1998-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 4 (1998), s. 336 ISSN 0044-2771. [European Intestinal Transport Group Meeting /15./. Sundvollen, 17.05.1998-21.05.1998] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA303/96/1256; GA ČR GA311/97/0784; GA MZd IZ3761 Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 0.890, year: 1998

  7. Expression of CD45RB functionally distinguishes intestinal T lymphocytes in inflammatory bowel disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hove, T. ten; The Olle, F.; Berkhout, M.; Bruggeman, J.P.; Vyth-Dreese, F.A.; Slors, J.F.M.; Deventer, S.J.H. van; Velde, A.A. te

    2004-01-01

    The importance of CD45RB expression on T cells was already shown in mice where CD45RB(high) expression determines pathogenic potential. In this study, we analyzed the expression of CD45RA, CD45RB, and CD45RO on CD4(+) T lymphocytes in the intestinal mucosa and in the circulation of patients with

  8. Expression of CD45RB functionally distinguishes intestinal T lymphocytes in inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Hove, Tessa; The Olle, F.; Berkhout, Marloes; Bruggeman, Joost P.; Vyth-Dreese, Florry A.; Slors, J. Frederik M.; van Deventer, Sander J. H.; te Velde, Anje A.

    2004-01-01

    The importance of CD45RB expression on T cells was already shown in mice where CD45RB(high) expression determines pathogenic potential. In this study, we analyzed the expression of CD45RA, CD45RB, and CD45RO on CD4(+) T lymphocytes in the intestinal mucosa and in the circulation of patients with

  9. Small intestinal absorption in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease complicated by cor pulmonale - A pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Sara Korsgaard; Hardis, Anne L S; Tupper, Oliver Djurhuus

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cor pulmonale is a common complication to Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), and may result in increased pressure in the inferior caval vein and stasis of the liver. The chronic pulmonary hypertension may lead to stasis in the veins from the small intestine and thereby...... compromise absorption of nutrients. AIM: To investigate whether patients with pulmonary hypertension have reduced absorption capacity compared to COPD patients without cor pulmonale. METHODS: Absorption of d-xylose (25 g) and zinc (132 mg), administered as a single dose, was tested in 14 COPD patients, seven...

  10. Liver disease associated with intestinal failure in the small bowel syndrome Doença hepática associada à falência intestinal na síndrome do intestino curto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Kemp

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of the Total Parenteral Nutrition (TPN has given rise to a new hope in the treatment of intestinal failure (LF associated with the Short Bowel Syndrome (SBS. However, together with the TPN and the increase of survival of these patients, new problems and questions have emerged, as well as new therapeutical procedures. Taking into consideration this emerging reality, this paper has the purpose to undertake a review of current concepts and available treatments for patients with IF associated-liver disease. Although TPN provides an increase of survival of patients with intestinal failure, it is a potential source of complication such as: septicemia, hyperglycemia, venous thrombosis and liver disease. There are several hypothesis conceived to explain the liver disease associated to intestinal failure, however the only definite treatment as a potential to reverse the non-cirrhotic liver disease is the small intestine transplantation. Despite indications for intestine transplantation are not entirely defined in literature, the trend is its early indication in high-risk patients, preserving the liver integrity and preventing the eventual need of both liver and intestine transplantations altogether.A introdução da Nutrição Parenteral Total (NPT despertou uma nova esperança para o tratamento da falência intestina (FI associada a Síndrome do Intestino Curto (SIC. No entanto, junto com a NPT e o aumento da sobrevida destes pacientes, novos problemas e perguntas emergiram, assim como novas terapêuticas. Tendo em vista esta realidade emergente, o intuito deste artigo é realizar uma revisão dos conceitos atuais e dos tratamentos disponíveis para pacientes com doença hepática associada a FI. A NPT apesar de proporcionar aumento da sobrevida nos pacientes com falência intestinal é fonte potencial de complicações, como: septicemia, hiperglicemia, trombose venosa e doença hepática. Diversas são as hipóteses aventadas para

  11. Small intestine contrast ultrasonography vs computed tomography enteroclysis for assessing ileal Crohn's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onali, Sara; Calabrese, Emma; Petruzziello, Carmelina; Zorzi, Francesca; Sica, Giuseppe; Fiori, Roberto; Ascolani, Marta; Lolli, Elisabetta; Condino, Giovanna; Palmieri, Giampiero; Simonetti, Giovanni; Pallone, Francesco; Biancone, Livia

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To compare computed tomography enteroclysis (CTE) vs small intestine contrast ultrasonography (SICUS) for assessing small bowel lesions in Crohn's disease (CD), when using surgical pathology as gold standard. METHODS: From January 2007 to July 2008, 15 eligible patients undergoing elective resection of the distal ileum and coecum (or right colon) were prospectively enrolled. All patients were under follow-up. The study population included 6 males and 9 females, with a median age of 44 years (range: 18-80 years). Inclusion criteria: (1) certain diagnosis of small bowel requiring elective ileo-colonic resection; (2) age between 18-80 years; (3) elective surgery in our Surgical Unit; and (4) written informed consent. SICUS and CTE were performed ≤ 3 mo before surgery, followed by surgical pathology. The following small bowel lesions were blindly reported by one sonologist, radiologist, surgeon and histolopathologist: disease site, extent, strictures, abscesses, fistulae, small bowel dilation. Comparison between findings at SICUS, CTE, surgical specimens and histological examination was made by assessing the specificity, sensitivity and accuracy of each technique, when using surgical findings as gold standard. RESULTS: Among the 15 patients enrolled, CTE was not feasible in 2 patients, due to urgent surgery in one patients and to low compliance in the second patient, refusing to perform CTE due to the discomfort related to the naso-jejunal tube. The analysis for comparing CTE vs SICUS findings was therefore performed in 13 out of the 15 CD patients enrolled. Differently from CTE, SICUS was feasible in all the 15 patients enrolled. No complications were observed when using SICUS or CTE. Surgical pathology findings in the tested population included: small bowel stricture in 13 patients, small bowel dilation above ileal stricture in 10 patients, abdominal abscesses in 2 patients, enteric fistulae in 5 patients, lymphnodes enlargement (> 1 cm) in 7 patients and

  12. Differing patterns of transforming growth factor-beta expression in normal intestinal mucosa and in active celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lionetti, P; Pazzaglia, A; Moriondo, M; Azzari, C; Resti, M; Amorosi, A; Vierucci, A

    1999-09-01

    Growth-inhibitory autocrine polypeptides such as transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta may play a role in the control of normal epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation. In addition, TGF-beta has a central role in extracellular matrix homeostasis and regulates the immune response at the local level. In this study immunohistochemistry was used to examine the pattern of TGF-beta protein distribution and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to determine levels of TGF-beta messenger RNA expression in normal intestinal mucosa and in the flat mucosa of children with celiac disease. Small intestinal biopsies were performed in children with active celiac disease and in histologically normal control subjects. Frozen sections were single stained using an anti-TGF-beta monoclonal antibody and were double stained for TGF-beta and T cell, macrophages, and the activation marker CD25. Total RNA was extracted from frozen specimens and competitive quantitative RT-PCR performed for TGF-beta mRNA using internal synthetic standard RNA. In normal intestinal mucosa, by immunohistochemistry, TGF-beta expression was most prominent in the villous tip epithelium, whereas in the lamina propria, weak immunoreactivity was present. The celiac mucosa showed weak and patchy epithelial TGF-beta immunoreactivity. In contrast, an intense staining positivity was present in the lamina propria localized mostly in the subepithelial region where T cells, macrophages, and CD25+ cells were detected by double staining. By quantitative RT-PCR, levels of TGF-beta mRNA transcripts appeared to be increased in celiac intestinal mucosa compared with that in control subjects, although the difference did not reach statistical significance. These observations suggest that TGF-beta expression is associated with differentiated enterocyte function. In celiac disease the lower TGF-beta epithelial cell expression could be a consequence of the preponderance of a less

  13. The small intestine and colon: Scintigraphic quantitation of motility in health and disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamm, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Radioisotopes allow accurate quantitation of the pattern and effectiveness of the transit of chyme through the small and large intestines. Abnormalities of small bowel transit can be demonstrated in patients with the irritable bowel syndrome, and patients with chronic idiopathic intestinal pseudo-obstruction due to either a visceral myopathy or neuropathy. In the colon, radioisotopic studies of transit have demonstrated the site of delayed transit in some severely constipated patients. In patients with these disorders of transit, functional studies may influence the choice of medical or surgical therapy although there are few prospective studies which have established their worth in this context. Radioisotope studies can also be utilised to study the effectiveness of delivery of drugs to the small and large bowel, and to study the adequacy of rectal evacuation in patients with a defaecatory disturbance. The low radiation dose and possibility of frequent observations make radioisotope studies valuable for clinical and research studies in functional gastrointestinal disorders. (orig.)

  14. The small intestine and colon: Scintigraphic quantitation of motility in health and disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamm, M.A. (Saint Mark' s Hospital, London (United Kingdom). Medical Physiology Unit)

    1992-10-01

    Radioisotopes allow accurate quantitation of the pattern and effectiveness of the transit of chyme through the small and large intestines. Abnormalities of small bowel transit can be demonstrated in patients with the irritable bowel syndrome, and patients with chronic idiopathic intestinal pseudo-obstruction due to either a visceral myopathy or neuropathy. In the colon, radioisotopic studies of transit have demonstrated the site of delayed transit in some severely constipated patients. In patients with these disorders of transit, functional studies may influence the choice of medical or surgical therapy although there are few prospective studies which have established their worth in this context. Radioisotope studies can also be utilised to study the effectiveness of delivery of drugs to the small and large bowel, and to study the adequacy of rectal evacuation in patients with a defaecatory disturbance. The low radiation dose and possibility of frequent observations make radioisotope studies valuable for clinical and research studies in functional gastrointestinal disorders. (orig.).

  15. Review article: the many potential roles of intestinal serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) signalling in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, M D; Tekin, I; Vrana, K E; Mawe, G M

    2017-09-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) is an important mediator of every major gut-related function. Recent investigations also suggest that 5-HT can influence the development and severity of inflammation within the gut, particularly in the setting of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). To review the roles that the intestinal serotonin signalling system plays in gut function, with a specific focus on IBD. We reviewed manuscripts from 1952 to 2017 that investigated and discussed roles for 5-HT signalling in gastrointestinal function and IBD, as well as the influence of inflammation on 5-HT signalling elements within the gut. Inflammation appears to affect every major element of intestinal 5-HT signalling, including 5-HT synthesis, release, receptor expression and reuptake capacity. Importantly, many studies (most utilising animal models) also demonstrate that modulation of selective serotonergic receptors (via agonism of 5-HT 4 R and antagonism of 5-HT 3 R) or 5-HT signal termination (via serotonin reuptake inhibitors) can alter the likelihood and severity of intestinal inflammation and/or its complicating symptoms. However, there are few human studies that have studied these relationships in a targeted manner. Insights discussed in this review have strong potential to lead to new diagnostic and therapeutic tools to improve the management of IBD and other related disorders. Specifically, strategies that focus on modifying the activity of selective serotonin receptors and reuptake transporters in the gut could be effective for controlling disease activity and/or its associated symptoms. Further studies in humans are required, however, to more completely understand the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the roles of 5-HT in this setting. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Expression Patterns of TNFα, MAdCAM1, and STAT3 in Intestinal and Skin Manifestations of Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavricka, Stephan R; Galván, Jose A; Dawson, Heather; Soltermann, Alex; Biedermann, Luc; Scharl, Michael; Schoepfer, Alain M; Rogler, Gerhard; Prinz Vavricka, Mareike B; Terracciano, Luigi; Navarini, Alexander; Zlobec, Inti; Lugli, Alessandro; Greuter, Thomas

    2018-02-28

    Pathogenesis of cutaneous extraintestinal manifestations [EIM] in inflammatory bowel disease [IBD] remains elusive. Efficacy of anti-TNF agents suggests TNF-dependent mechanisms. The role of other biologics, such as anti-integrins or JAK-inhibitors, is not yet clear. We performed immunohistochemistry for TNFα, NFκB, STAT1/STAT3, MAdCAM1, CD20/68, caspase 3/9, IFNγ, and Hsp-27/70 on 240 intestinal [55 controls, 185 IBD] and 64 skin biopsies [11 controls, 18 erythema nodosum [EN], 13 pyoderma gangenosum [PG], 22 psoriasis]. A semiquantitative score [0-100%] was used for evaluation. TNFα was upregulated in intestinal biopsies from active Crohn`s disease [CD] vs controls [36.2 vs 12.1, p skin biopsies from EN, PG, and psoriasis. No MAdCAM1 overexpression was seen in skin tissues, whereas it was upregulated in active UC vs controls [57.5 vs 35.4, p = 0.003]. STAT3 was overexpressed in the intestinal mucosa of active and non-active IBD, and a similar upregulation was seen in skin biopsies from EN [84.7 vs 22.3, p skin biopsies distinguished EN/PG from psoriasis and controls. Upregulation of TNFα/NFκB in EN and PG is compatible with the efficacy of anti-TNF in EIM management. Data on overexpressed STAT3, but not MAdCAM1, support a rationale for JAK-inhibitors in EN and PG, while questioning the role of vedolizumab. Copyright © 2017 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  17. Primary intestinal lymphoma in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: a descriptive series from the prebiologic therapy era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holubar, Stefan D; Dozois, Eric J; Loftus, Edward V; Teh, Swee H; Benavente, Luis A; Harmsen, W Scott; Wolff, Bruce G; Cima, Robert R; Larson, David W

    2011-07-01

    Primary intestinal lymphoma in the setting of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is uncommon and may be associated with immune suppressive therapy. We report clinical features and outcomes in patients with both conditions prior to use of biologic therapy. All patients with primary intestinal lymphoma and IBD at our institution from 1960-2000 were retrospectively identified. Data reported are frequency (proportion) or median (interquartile range). Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed. Fifteen patients were identified: 14 (93%) were male, 10 (66%) had Crohn's disease. Median age at diagnosis of IBD and lymphoma was 30 (22-51) and 47 (28-68) years, respectively, with bloody diarrhea the most common presenting symptom for each diagnosis. Lymphoma location was colorectal in nine (60%), small bowel in four (27%), and one (6.25%) each: stomach, duodenum, and ileal pouch. Treatments were surgery plus chemotherapy (n = 6), surgery alone (n = 3), chemotherapy alone (n = 2), chemotherapy and radiation (n = 1), surgery and radiation (n = 1); two patients died before treatment. Most patients (n = 11, 73%) were Ann Arbor stages I or II. Large cell B-type histology was most common (n = 9, 60%). Three patients died within 30 days of lymphoma diagnosis. Survival free of death from lymphoma at 1- and 5-years was 78% and 63%, respectively, and was associated with advanced lymphoma stage (P = 0.004). Diagnosis and treatment of primary intestinal lymphoma in patients with IBD can be challenging and requires a high index of suspicion. Optimal survival requires multimodality therapy. Copyright © 2010 Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America, Inc.

  18. Intestinal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... connects your stomach to your large intestine. Intestinal cancer is rare, but eating a high-fat diet ... increase your risk. Possible signs of small intestine cancer include Abdominal pain Weight loss for no reason ...

  19. The Multibiome: The Intestinal Ecosystem's Influence on Immune Homeostasis, Health, and Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Filyk, Heather A; Osborne, Lisa C

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian evolution has occurred in the presence of mutualistic, commensal, and pathogenic micro- and macro-organisms for millennia. The presence of these organisms during mammalian evolution has allowed for intimate crosstalk between these colonizing species and the host immune system. In this review, we introduce the concept of the ‘multibiome’ to holistically refer to the biodiverse collection of bacteria, viruses, fungi and multicellular helminthic worms colonizing the mammalian intestine...

  20. Epicatechin Used in the Treatment of Intestinal Inflammatory Disease: An Analysis by Experimental Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo César de Paula Vasconcelos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study was pathway of (−-epicatechin (EC in the prevention and treatment of intestine inflammation in acute and chronic rat models. Methods. Intestine inflammation was induced in rats using TNBS. The morphological, inflammatory, immunohistochemical, and immunoblotting characteristics of colon samples were examined. The effects of EC were evaluated in an acute model at doses of 5, 10, 25, and 50 mg/kg by gavage for 5 days. The chronic colitis model was induced 1st day, and treated for 21 days. For the colitis relapse model, the induction was repeated on 14th. Results. EC10 and EC50 effectively reduced the lesion size, as assessed macroscopically; and confirmed by microscopy for EC10. The glutathione levels were higher in EC10 group but decreased COX-2 expression and increased cell proliferation (PC were observed, indicating an anti-inflammatory activity and a proliferation-stimulating effect. In the chronic colitis model, EC10 showed lower macroscopic and microscopic lesion scores and increase in glutathione levels. As in the acute model, a decrease in COX-2 expression and an increase in PC in EC10, the chronic model this increase maybe by the pathway EGF expression. Conclusion. These results confirm the activity of EC as an antioxidant that reduces of the lesion and that has the potential to stimulate tissue healing, indicating useful for preventing and treating intestine inflammation.

  1. [Risk factor of intestinal colonization with vancomycin resistant Enterococcus spp in hospitalized pediatric patients with oncological disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyola, Paula; Tordecilla, Juan; Benadof, Dona; Yohannessen, Karla; Acuña, Mirta

    2015-08-01

    The isolation of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus spp (ERV) has increased significantly within the last few years, along with the risk of infection and dissemination of these bacteria. Our aim was to determine risk factors (RF) for intestinal colonization in hospitalized pediatric patients with oncological disease at Hospital de Niños Roberto del Río. Between January 2012 and December 2013 a transversal study was performed with 107 rectal swabs and processed with a PCR for ERV. The patients were classified as "colonized with ERV" and "not colonized with ERV" and we evaluated possible RF for intestinal colonization in both groups. VRE colonization was found in 51 patients (52%). The median of time elapsed between oncological diagnosis and VRE colonization was 35 days. The significant RF associated with VRE colonization were days of hospitalization prior to study, neutropenia and treatment with antibiotics within 30 days prior to study and mucositis. According to the RF revealed in this study we may suggest prevention standards to avoid ERV colonization. This is the first investigation in our country in hospitalized pediatric patients with oncological disease and processed with a multiplex PCR for ERV, therefore it is a great contribution about this subject in Chile.

  2. From sensing to shaping microbiota: insights into the role of NOD2 in intestinal homeostasis and progression of Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Iyshwarya; Gao, Nan

    2017-07-01

    NOD2 was the first susceptibility gene identified for Crohn's disease (CD), one of the major forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The field of NOD2 research has opened up many questions critical to understanding the complexities of microbiota-host interactions. In addition to sensing its specific bacterial components as a cytosolic pattern recognition receptor, NOD2 also appears to shape the colonization of intestinal microbiota. Activated NOD2 triggers downstream signaling cascades exampled by the NF-κB pathway to induce antimicrobial activities, however, defective or loss of NOD2 functions incur a similarly activated inflammatory response. Additional studies have identified the involvement of NOD2 in protection against non-microbiota-related intestinal damages as well as extraintestinal infections. We survey recent molecular and genetic studies of NOD2-mediated bacterial sensing and immunological modulation, and integrate evidence to suggest a highly reciprocal but still poorly understood cross talk between enteric microbiota and host cells. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Baseline disease is a more important predictor of intestinal necrosis than CT findings in patients with acute mesenteric ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichiba, Toshihisa; Hara, Masahiko; Yunoki, Keiji; Urashima, Masaki; Harano, Masao; Naitou, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Kouji; Shintani, Ayumi

    2016-12-01

    Acute mesenteric ischemia (AMI) is a potentially fatal vascular emergency, and several computed tomographic (CT) findings have been introduced to determine the presence of intestinal ischemia or necrosis, although the most useful finding is unknown. We retrospectively analyzed data of 43 consecutive patients with AMI who were treated during the period from 2006 to 2015. Study patients included both superior mesenteric artery dissection (n = 29) and thrombosis (SMAT, n = 14). Epidemiological data, CT findings, and the primary end point defined as the composite of intestinal ischemia or necrosis based on surgical finding and in-hospital mortality were investigated. The classification and regression tree was used to assess determinants of the primary end point, and area under the curve of receiver operating characteristics was used to evaluate discriminating accuracy. In total, the primary end point occurred in 27.9% (0.0% in superior mesenteric artery dissection and 85.7% in SMAT). Classification and regression tree demonstrated that the baseline disease was the only and strong determinant of the primary outcome (P< .001), which was also confirmed by the highest area under the curve of 0.968 (95% confidence interval, 0.924-1.000). The baseline disease rather than CT findings is the most important determinant of the primary end point. In patients with AMI, SMAT should undergo exploratory surgery and subsequent surgical treatment without delay. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Intestinal microbiota and ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2015-11-01

    There is a close relationship between the human host and the intestinal microbiota, which is an assortment of microorganisms, protecting the intestine against colonization by exogenous pathogens. Moreover, the intestinal microbiota play a critical role in providing nutrition and the modulation of host immune homeostasis. Recent reports indicate that some strains of intestinal bacteria are responsible for intestinal ulceration and chronic inflammation in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). Understanding the interaction of the intestinal microbiota with pathogens and the human host might provide new strategies treating patients with IBD. This review focuses on the important role that the intestinal microbiota plays in maintaining innate immunity in the pathogenesis and etiology of UC and discusses new antibiotic therapies targeting the intestinal microbiota. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Increased intestinal permeability to macromolecules and endotoxemia in patients with chronic alcohol abuse in different stages of alcohol-induced liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parlesak, Alexandr; Schäfer, C.; Schütz, Tanja

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: No information is yet available about the influence of alcohol abuse on the translocation of larger molecules (Mr>1200) through the intestinal mucosa in man. The present study aimed to determine the intestinal permeability to macromolecules in patients with chronic alcohol abuse...... and mild to more advanced stages of liver disease, and to measure the concentration of endotoxins in the plasma, as these compounds derive from the intestinal flora and are suspected to contribute to the development of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). METHODS: The permeability to polyethylene glycol Mr 400......, Mr 1500, Mr 4000, and Mr 10,000 and endotoxin plasma concentrations were measured in 54 patients with alcoholic liver disease, 19 of them with cirrhosis, and in 30 non-alcoholic healthy controls. RESULTS: Permeability to polyethylene glycol Mr 400 was found to be unchanged in patients with ALD...

  6. [Alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH), alkaline phosphatase (AP) and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGP) in intestinal diseases of dogs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodurka, T; Kraft, W

    1995-07-01

    331 dogs, suffering from different intestinal diseases with diarrhea, were classified into the groups of "acute noninfectious", "infectious", "chronic" and "secondary enteropathies". The serum enzymes ALT, AST, GLDH, AP and GGT were determined. In all groups increases of enzyme activities were to be found. The highest and most frequent increases have been observed in acute noninfectious and in secondary enteropathies. The enzyme pattern in acute noninfectious enteropathies indicate a secondary liver disturbance in consequence of the intestinal disease, whereas the liver participation in secondary enteropathies is the effect of the primary disease other than intestinal disturbances. In comparison to this the height and number of increases of liver enzyme activities were low in acute infectious and in chronic enteropathies.

  7. A B-Cell Gene Signature Correlates With the Extent of Gluten-Induced Intestinal Injury in Celiac DiseaseSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell E. Garber

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Celiac disease (CeD provides an opportunity to study autoimmunity and the transition in immune cells as dietary gluten induces small intestinal lesions. Methods: Seventy-three celiac disease patients on a long-term, gluten-free diet ingested a known amount of gluten daily for 6 weeks. A peripheral blood sample and intestinal biopsy specimens were taken before and 6 weeks after initiating the gluten challenge. Biopsy results were reported on a continuous numeric scale that measured the villus-height–to–crypt-depth ratio to quantify gluten-induced intestinal injury. Pooled B and T cells were isolated from whole blood, and RNA was analyzed by DNA microarray looking for changes in peripheral B- and T-cell gene expression that correlated with changes in villus height to crypt depth, as patients maintained a relatively healthy intestinal mucosa or deteriorated in the face of a gluten challenge. Results: Gluten-dependent intestinal damage from baseline to 6 weeks varied widely across all patients, ranging from no change to extensive damage. Genes differentially expressed in B cells correlated strongly with the extent of intestinal damage. A relative increase in B-cell gene expression correlated with a lack of sensitivity to gluten whereas their relative decrease correlated with gluten-induced mucosal injury. A core B-cell gene module, representing a subset of B-cell genes analyzed, accounted for the correlation with intestinal injury. Conclusions: Genes comprising the core B-cell module showed a net increase in expression from baseline to 6 weeks in patients with little to no intestinal damage, suggesting that these individuals may have mounted a B-cell immune response to maintain mucosal homeostasis and circumvent inflammation. DNA microarray data were deposited at the GEO repository (accession number: GSE87629; available: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/. Keywords: Oral Tolerance, Mucosal Immunity, Autoimmunity

  8. Concise Review: Cellular Therapies: The Potential to Regenerate and Restore Tolerance in Immune-Mediated Intestinal Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccocioppo, Rachele; Cangemi, Giuseppina Cristina; Kruzliak, Peter; Corazza, Gino Roberto

    2016-06-01

    Chronic inflammatory enteropathies, including celiac disease, Crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis, are lifelong disabling conditions whose cure is still an unmet need, despite the great strides made in understanding their complex pathogenesis. The advent of cellular therapies, mainly based on the use of stem cells, represents a great step forward thanks to their multitarget strategy. Both hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) have been employed in the treatment of refractory cases with promising results. The lack of immunogenicity makes MSC more suitable for therapeutic purposes as their infusion may be performed across histocompatibility locus antigen barriers without risk of rejection. The best outcome has been obtained when treating fistulizing Crohn's disease with local injections of MSC. In addition, both HSC and MSC proved successful in promoting regeneration of intestinal mucosa, and favoring the expansion of a T-cell regulatory subset. By virtue of the ability to favor mucosal homeostasis, this last cell population has been exploited in clinical trials, with inconsistent results. Finally, the recent identification of the epithelial stem cell marker has opened up the possibility of tissue engineering, with an array of potential applications for intestinal diseases. However, the underlying mechanisms of action of these interconnected therapeutic strategies are still poorly understood. It is conceivable that over the next few years their role will become clearer as the biological interactions with injured tissues and the hierarchy by which they deliver their action are unraveled through a continuous moving from bench to bedside and vice versa. Stem Cells 2016;34:1474-1486. © 2016 AlphaMed Press.

  9. Intestinal Barrier and Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julio-Pieper, M; Bravo, J A

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal barrier function contributes to gut homeostasis by modulating absorption of water, electrolytes, and nutrients from the lumen into the circulation while restricting the passage of noxious luminal substances and microorganisms. Chronic conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and celiac disease are associated to intestinal barrier dysfunction. Here, the hypothesis is that a leaky intestinal wall allowing for indiscriminate passage of intraluminal compounds to the vascular compartment could in turn lead to systemic inflammation. An increasing number of studies are now investigating the association between gut permeability and CNS disorders, under the premise that translocation of intestinal luminal contents could affect CNS function, either directly or indirectly. Still, it is unknown whether disruption of intestinal barrier is a causative agent or a consequence in these situations. Here, we discuss the latest evidence pointing to an association between increased gut permeability and disrupted behavioral responses. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Use of micro-lightguide spectrophotometry for evaluation of microcirculation in the small and large intestines of horses without gastrointestinal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Christof; Kästner, Sabine B R; Hopster, Klaus; Rohn, Karl; Rötting, Anna K

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate the use of a micro-lightguide tissue spectrophotometer for measurement of tissue oxygenation and blood flow in the small and large intestines of horses under anesthesia. 13 adult horses without gastrointestinal disease. Horses were anesthetized and placed in dorsal recumbency. Ventral midline laparotomy was performed. Intestinal segments were exteriorized to obtain measurements. Spectrophotometric measurements of tissue oxygenation and regional blood flow of the jejunum and pelvic flexure were obtained under various conditions that were considered to have a potential effect on measurement accuracy. In addition, arterial oxygen saturation at the measuring sites was determined by use of pulse oximetry. 12,791 single measurements of oxygen saturation, relative amount of hemoglobin, and blood flow were obtained. Errors occurred in 381 of 12,791 (2.98%) measurements. Most measurement errors occurred when surgical lights were directed at the measuring site; covering the probe with the surgeon's hand did not eliminate this error source. No measurement errors were observed when the probe was positioned on the intestinal wall with room light, at the mesenteric side, or between the mesenteric and antimesenteric side. Values for blood flow had higher variability, and this was most likely caused by motion artifacts of the intestines. The micro-lightguide spectrophotometry system was easy to use on the small and large intestines of horses and provided rapid evaluation of the microcirculation. Results indicated that measurements should be performed with room light only and intestinal motion should be minimized.

  11. A.S.P.E.N. clinical guidelines: support of pediatric patients with intestinal failure at risk of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wales, Paul W; Allen, Nancy; Worthington, Patricia; George, Donald; Compher, Charlene; Teitelbaum, Daniel

    2014-07-01

    Children with severe intestinal failure and prolonged dependence on parenteral nutrition are susceptible to the development of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD). The purpose of this clinical guideline is to develop recommendations for the care of children with PN-dependent intestinal failure that have the potential to prevent PNALD or improve its treatment. A systematic review of the best available evidence to answer a series of questions regarding clinical management of children with intestinal failure receiving parenteral or enteral nutrition was undertaken and evaluated using concepts adopted from the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) Working Group. A consensus process was used to develop the clinical guideline recommendations prior to external and internal review and approval by the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition Board of Directors. (1) Is ethanol lock effective in preventing bloodstream infection and catheter removal in children at risk of PNALD? (2) What fat emulsion strategies can be used in pediatric patients with intestinal failure to reduce the risk of or treat PNALD? (3) Can enteral ursodeoxycholic acid improve the treatment of PNALD in pediatric patients with intestinal failure? (4) Are PNALD outcomes improved when patients are managed by a multidisciplinary intestinal rehabilitation team? © 2014 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  12. Gliadin stimulation of murine macrophage inflammatory gene expression and intestinal permeability are MyD88-dependent: role of the innate immune response in Celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Karen E; Sapone, Anna; Fasano, Alessio; Vogel, Stefanie N

    2006-02-15

    Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of TLR signaling in intestinal homeostasis. Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune enteropathy triggered in susceptible individuals by the ingestion of gliadin-containing grains. In this study, we sought to test the hypothesis that gliadin initiates this response by stimulating the innate immune response to increase intestinal permeability and by up-regulating macrophage proinflammatory gene expression and cytokine production. To this end, intestinal permeability and the release of zonulin (an endogenous mediator of gut permeability) in vitro, as well as proinflammatory gene expression and cytokine release by primary murine macrophage cultures, were measured. Gliadin and its peptide derivatives, 33-mer and p31-43, were found to be potent inducers of both a zonulin-dependent increase in intestinal permeability and macrophage proinflammatory gene expression and cytokine secretion. Gliadin-induced zonulin release, increased intestinal permeability, and cytokine production were dependent on myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), a key adapter molecule in the TLR/IL-1R signaling pathways, but were neither TLR2- nor TLR4-dependent. Our data support the following model for the innate immune response to gliadin in the initiation of CD. Gliadin interaction with the intestinal epithelium increases intestinal permeability through the MyD88-dependent release of zonulin that, in turn, enables paracellular translocation of gliadin and its subsequent interaction with macrophages within the intestinal submucosa. There, the interaction of gliadin with macrophages elicits a MyD88-dependent proinflammatory cytokine milieu that facilitates the interaction of T cells with APCs, leading ultimately to the Ag-specific adaptive immune response seen in patients with CD.

  13. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth prevalence in celiac disease patients is similar in healthy subjects and lower in irritable bowel syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasa, J S; Zubiaurre, I; Fanjul, I; Olivera, P; Soifer, L

    2015-01-01

    Untreated celiac disease has traditionally been linked to a greater risk for small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, but the existing evidence is inconclusive. To compare the prevalence of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in subjects with celiac disease compared with control subjects and patients with irritable bowel syndrome. The study included 15 untreated celiac disease patients, 15 subjects with irritable bowel syndrome, and 15 healthy controls. All enrolled patients underwent a lactulose breath test measuring hydrogen and methane. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth was defined according to previously published criteria. No differences were found in relation to age or sex. The prevalence of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth was similar between the celiac disease patients and the controls (20 vs. 13.33%, P=NS), whereas it was higher in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (66.66%, Pintestinal bacterial overgrowth between the untreated celiac disease patients and healthy controls. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of Gliadin on Permeability of Intestinal Biopsy Explants from Celiac Disease Patients and Patients with Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollon, Justin; Leonard Puppa, Elaine; Greenwald, Bruce; Goldberg, Eric; Guerrerio, Anthony; Fasano, Alessio

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intestinal exposure to gliadin leads to zonulin upregulation and consequent disassembly of intercellular tight junctions and increased intestinal permeability. We aimed to study response to gliadin exposure, in terms of barrier function and cytokine secretion, using intestinal biopsies obtained from four groups: celiac patients with active disease (ACD), celiac patients in remission (RCD), non-celiac patients with gluten sensitivity (GS) and non-celiac controls (NC). Methods: Ex-vivo human duodenal biopsies were mounted in microsnapwells and luminally incubated with either gliadin or media alone. Changes in transepithelial electrical resistance were monitored over 120 min. Media was subsequently collected and cytokines quantified. Results: Intestinal explants from all groups (ACD (n = 6), RCD (n = 6), GS (n = 6), and NC (n = 5)) demonstrated a greater increase in permeability when exposed to gliadin vs. media alone. The increase in permeability in the ACD group was greater than in the RCD and NC groups. There was a greater increase in permeability in the GS group compared to the RCD group. There was no difference in permeability between the ACD and GS groups, between the RCD and NC groups, or between the NC and GS groups. IL-10 was significantly greater in the media of the NC group compared to the RCD and GS groups. Conclusions: Increased intestinal permeability after gliadin exposure occurs in all individuals. Following gliadin exposure, both patients with gluten sensitivity and those with active celiac disease demonstrate a greater increase in intestinal permeability than celiacs in disease remission. A higher concentration of IL-10 was measured in the media exposed to control explants compared to celiac disease in remission or gluten sensitivity. PMID:25734566

  15. Effect of Gliadin on Permeability of Intestinal Biopsy Explants from Celiac Disease Patients and Patients with Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Hollon

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intestinal exposure to gliadin leads to zonulin upregulation and consequent disassembly of intercellular tight junctions and increased intestinal permeability. We aimed to study response to gliadin exposure, in terms of barrier function and cytokine secretion, using intestinal biopsies obtained from four groups: celiac patients with active disease (ACD, celiac patients in remission (RCD, non-celiac patients with gluten sensitivity (GS and non-celiac controls (NC. Methods: Ex-vivo human duodenal biopsies were mounted in microsnapwells and luminally incubated with either gliadin or media alone. Changes in transepithelial electrical resistance were monitored over 120 min. Media was subsequently collected and cytokines quantified. Results: Intestinal explants from all groups (ACD (n = 6, RCD (n = 6, GS (n = 6, and NC (n = 5 demonstrated a greater increase in permeability when exposed to gliadin vs. media alone. The increase in permeability in the ACD group was greater than in the RCD and NC groups. There was a greater increase in permeability in the GS group compared to the RCD group. There was no difference in permeability between the ACD and GS groups, between the RCD and NC groups, or between the NC and GS groups. IL-10 was significantly greater in the media of the NC group compared to the RCD and GS groups. Conclusions: Increased intestinal permeability after gliadin exposure occurs in all individuals. Following gliadin exposure, both patients with gluten sensitivity and those with active celiac disease demonstrate a greater increase in intestinal permeability than celiacs in disease remission. A higher concentration of IL-10 was measured in the media exposed to control explants compared to celiac disease in remission or gluten sensitivity.

  16. Small intestine biopsy of children with coeliac disease: Influence of X-ray equipment on radiation dosage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persliden, J. [Dept. of Radiation Physics, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linkoeping Univ. (Sweden); Pettersson, H.B.L. [Dept. of Radiation Physics, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linkoeping Univ. (Sweden); Stenhammar, L. [Dept. of Paediatrics, Central Hospital, Linkoeping (Sweden); Faelth-Magnusson, K. [Dept. of Paediatrics, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linkoeping Univ. (Sweden)

    1994-10-01

    In paediatric radiology intestinal biopsies for the diagnosis of coeliac disease are performed using fluoroscopy. The radiation exposure to the child depends on the X-ray equipment. We report patient measurements from three different equipments (A, B and C) together with a phantom study simulating children of different thicknesses relative to age. The median values of the mean absorbed dose to the child in the irradiated volume were 1.2 mGy (A), 0.79 mGy (B) and 0.15 mGy (C). The results show that the increase in tube potential with increasing distance in one equipment decreases the dosage, and also that modern equipment should be employed. Particularly old image intensifiers should not be used. With an optimal choice of equipment the dosage to the child can be reduced fourfold. The combination of an optimal technique of sedation and an experienced operator can reduce the dosage tenfold. (orig.)

  17. Enteral bile acid treatment improves parenteral nutrition-related liver disease and intestinal mucosal atrophy in neonatal pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Ajay Kumar; Stoll, Barbara; Burrin, Douglas G

    2012-01-01

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is essential for patients with impaired gut function but leads to parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD). TPN disrupts the normal enterohepatic circulation of bile acids, and we hypothesized that it would decrease intestinal expression of the newly...... described metabolic hormone fibroblast growth factor-19 (FGF19) and also glucagon-like peptides-1 and -2 (GLP-1 and GLP-2). We tested the effects of restoring bile acids by treating a neonatal piglet PNALD model with chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA). Neonatal pigs received enteral feeding (EN), TPN, or TPN...... growth marked by weight and villus/crypt ratio was significantly reduced in the TPN group compared with the EN group, and CDCA treatment increased both parameters. These results suggest that decreased circulating FGF19 during TPN may contribute to PNALD. Moreover, we show that enteral CDCA not only...

  18. Extension of the celiac intestinal antibody (CIA) pattern through eight antibody assessments in fecal supernatants from patients with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Tola, Marco; Marino, Mariacatia; Casale, Rossella; Di Battista, Valeria; Borghini, Raffaele; Picarelli, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Detection of anti-transglutaminase, anti-endomysium and anti-gliadin antibodies is commonly used to screen celiac disease patients. Besides that in serum, these antibodies are detectable in culture supernatants of oral, duodenal and colonic biopsy samples, saliva, gut lavage fluid samples, and fecal supernatants. Our aim was to extend the intestinal antibody pattern in fecal supernatants from patients with celiac disease. The fecal supernatants obtained from 25 celiac disease patients and 12 healthy volunteers were used to determine IgA and IgG1 anti-endomysium by immunofluorescence analysis, IgA and IgG anti-transglutaminase, IgA and IgG anti-deamidated gliadin peptides, IgA/IgG anti-transglutaminase/deamidated gliadin peptides and IgA anti-actin by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. IgA anti-endomysium were found in 11 of 25 (44.0%) celiac disease patients and in none of healthy volunteers (p=0.0066). The levels of IgA anti-transglutaminase, IgA anti-deamidated gliadin peptides, IgA/IgG anti-transglutaminase/deamidated gliadin peptides and IgA anti-actin determined in celiac disease patients were significantly higher (p=0.0005, p=0.0018, p=0.0061 and p=0.0477, respectively) than those measured in healthy volunteers. The ROC curve analysis showed a diagnostic significance in IgA anti-transglutaminase (AUC=0.862, pceliac disease. Further studies are needed to better evaluate the role of fecal antibody tests in identifying celiac disease patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibody is not useful to differentiate between Crohn′s disease and intestinal tuberculosis in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghoshal U

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Context : Clinical, endoscopic, radiological and histological parameters of intestinal tuberculosis (IT and Crohn′s disease (CD are so similar that differentiation between these two diseases, which require different treatment, is difficult. Anti- Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibody (ASCA, which is often present in the sera of patients with CD, may be potentially useful to differentiate CD from IT. Aim : To evaluate the role of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay test for ASCA in serum in differentiating CD from intestinal tuberculosis. Settings and Design : Prospective case-control study. Materials and Methods: Sixteen patients with IT, 16 CD, 36 UC diagnosed using standard parameters and 12 controls (11 healthy subjects and one with colonic carcinoma were tested for IgG ASCA in serum. Statistical Analysis Used : Categorical variables were analyzed using Chi-square test with Yates′ correction, as applicable. Continuous variables were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U test. Results : Eight of 16 (50% patients with IT, 10 of 16 with CD (62%, nine of 35 with UC (26% and one of 12 controls tested positive for ASCA in serum. Though the frequency of ASCA in serum was comparable among patients with IT and CD (8/16 vs. 10/16, P = ns, IT and UC (8/16 vs. 9/35, P =ns, CD and UC (10/16 vs. 9/35, P =ns, its frequency in CD or IT but not in UC was higher than healthy controls ( P < 0.01. Conclusions : Serum ASCA is unlikely to be useful to differentiate between CD and IT in India.

  20. Intestinal health and disease prevention: a story of wheat and oats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilissen, L.J.W.J.; Timmer, R.D.; Meer, van der I.M.; Smulders, M.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    During the last decades, the prevalence of nutrition-related chronic diseases, such as diabetes type 2, obesity, coronary heart disease, hypertension, and food allergies and intolerances (such as celiac disease), as well as some types of cancer, has been gradually increasing, with a growing impact

  1. Bariumexaminations of the small intestine and the colon in inflammatory bowel disease; Konventionelle Duenn- und Dickdarmdiagnostik bei entzuendlichen Darmerkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antes, G. [Abteilung fuer Radiologie, Klinikum Kempten-Oberallgaeu g, GmbH, Kempten (Germany)

    2003-01-01

    This article gives an overview of the possibilities of conventional radiography in the diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease of the small intestine and colon.Material and methods For more than 25 years we examine the small bowel employing enteroclysis with barium and methylcellulose and the colon with the usual double-contrast method. In the last 152 months 1560 small bowel enemas were performed. In the last 40 months 410 examinations of the colon were performed. There is a thirty percent decrease in enteroclysis examinations within the past 5 years,however, the rate of examinations with positive results increased from 46 to 57%.The proportion of the inflammatory small intestinal diseases (not only Crohn's disease) remained constant with 18%.Concerning the examinations of the colon for inflammatory disease we confirmed the diagnosis in seven cases.The radiation exposure for the enteroclysis in inflammatory diseases was 7mSv, for colon examinations 14 mSv. Barium examinations, especially of the stomach and colon are decreasing in frequency.Therefore the art of performance and interpretation might get lost.Enteroclysis, however, is still the method of reference for the other imaging methods.The advantages compared to the other imaging methods are the excellent presentation of the details of the mucosal surface and the observation of functional disorders. (orig.) [German] Zielsetzung Diese Uebersichtsarbeit soll die Moeglichkeiten der konventionellen Roentgendiagnostik an Duenndarm und Kolon bei entzuendlichen Darmerkrankungen aufzeigen.Material und Methoden Seit mehr als 25 Jahren untersuchen wir den Duenndarm mit dem Enteroklysma mit Barium und Methylzellulose und das Kolon mit der ueblichen Doppelkontrastmethode. In den letzten 152 Monaten wurden 1560 Duenndarmuntersuchungen durchgefuehrt. In den letzten 40 Monaten erfolgten 410 Kolonuntersuchungen.Ergebnisse Bei den Duenndarmuntersuchungen wurde in den letzten 5 Jahren ein Rueckgang um 30% beobachtet

  2. A Pilot Study on the Noninvasive Evaluation of Intestinal Damage in Celiac Disease Using I-FABP and L-FABP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derikx, Joep P. M.; Vreugdenhil, Atita C. E.; Van den Neucker, Anita M.; Grootjans, Joep; van Bijnen, Annemarie A.; Damoiseaux, Jan G. M. C.; van Heurn, L. W. Ernest; Heineman, Erik; Buurman, Wim A.

    Background and Goals: In the clinical management of celiac disease, new noninvasive tools for evaluation of intestinal damage are needed for diagnosis and for follow-up of diet effects. Fatty acid binding proteins (FABP) are potentially useful for this purpose as these arc small cytosolic proteins

  3. Differences in the location and activity of intestinal Crohn's disease lesions between adult and paediatric patients detected with MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maccioni, Francesca; Carrozzo, Federica; Pino, Anna Rosaria; Staltari, Ilaria; Ansari, Najwa Al; Marini, Mario; Viola, Franca; Di Nardo, Giovanni; Cucchiara, Salvatore; Vestri, Annarita; Signore, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    To prospectively compare paediatric patients (PP) and adult patients (AP) affected by Crohn's disease (CD) in terms of the location and activity of intestinal lesions. Forty-three children (mean age 15 years) and 43 adults (mean age 48 years) with proven CD underwent magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) to localise lesions and detect their activity in 9 segments of the small and large bowel. The results were analysed on a per patient and per segment basis. Ileo-colonoscopy was performed in all patients. P values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Involvement of terminal ileum was significantly different in the two groups: observed in 100 % of AP (43/43) versus 58 % (23/43) of PP (P < 0.0001). Conversely, the colon was diseased in 84 % of PP versus 64 % of AP. In particular, left colonic segments were significantly more involved in PP (descending colon 53 % versus 21 %, P < 0.01; rectum 67 % versus 23 %, P < 0.0001; sigmoid colon 56 % versus 37 %, not significant), whereas caecal involvement was equal in both groups. In children the maximal disease activity was found in left colonic segments, whereas in adults it was in the terminal ileum. MRE detected significant differences between the two populations, showing a more extensive and severe involvement of the left colon in children but the distal ileum in adults. (orig.)

  4. Cytomegalovirus infection in inflammatory bowel disease is not associated with worsening of intestinal inflammatory activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Medeiros do Carmo

    Full Text Available Cytomegalovirus is highly prevalent virus and usually occurs in immunocompromised patients. The pathophysiology and treatment of inflammatory bowel disease often induce a state of immunosuppression. Because this, there are still doubts and controversies about the relationship between inflammatory bowel disease and cytomegalovirus.Evaluate the frequency of cytomegalovirus in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and identify correlations.Patients with inflammatory bowel disease underwent an interview, review of records and collection of blood and fecal samples. The search for cytomegalovirus was performed by IgG and IgM blood serology, by real-time PCR in the blood and by qualitative PCR in feces. Results were correlated with red blood cell levels, C-reactive protein levels, erythrocyte sedimentation rates and fecal calprotectin levels for each patient.Among the 400 eligible patients, 249 had Crohn's disease, and 151 had ulcerative colitis. In the group of Crohn's disease, 67 of the patients had moderate or severe disease, but 126 patients presented with active disease, based on the evaluation of the fecal calprotectin. In patients with ulcerative colitis, only 21 patients had moderate disease, but 76 patients presented with active disease, based on the evaluation of the fecal calprotectin. A large majority of patients had positive CMV IgG. Overall, 10 patients had positive CMV IgM, and 9 patients had a positive qualitative detection of CMV DNA by PCR in the feces. All 400 patients returned negative results after the quantitative detection of CMV DNA in blood by real-time PCR. Analyzing the 19 patients with active infections, we only found that such an association occurred with the use of combined therapy (anti-TNF-alpha + azathioprine.The findings show that latent cytomegalovirus infections are frequent and active cytomegalovirus infection is rare. We did not find any association between an active infection of CMV and inflammatory bowel

  5. Healthy effects of prebiotics and their metabolites against intestinal diseases and colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Fernández

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A specific group of plant and animal oligosaccharides does not suffer enzymatic digestion in the human upper intestinal tract, achieving the colon microbial ecosystem in intact form. The reason for that is their diverse glycosidic bond structure, in comparison with common energetic polysaccharides as starch or glycogen. In this complex ecosystem, these molecules serve as energy sources, via fermentation, of distinctive beneficial bacterial groups, mainly belonging to the Anaerostipes, Bifidobacterium, Coprococcus, Faecalibacterium, Lactobacillus, Roseburia and other genera. The main catabolic products of these fermentations are short-chain fatty acids (SCFA as acetate, propionate and butyrate, which appear in high concentrations in the lumen around the colon mucosa. Acetate and propionate are associated to energetic purposes for enterocytes, hepatocytes and other cells. Butyrate is the preferred energy source for colonocytes where it controls their cell cycle; butyrate is able to induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in tumor colonocytes. These oligosaccharides that increase beneficial colon bacterial populations and induce SCFA production in this ecosystem are called prebiotics. Here, different sources and chemical structures for prebiotics are described, as well as their modulatory effect on the growth of specific probiotic bacterial groups in the colon, and how their fermentation renders diverse SCFA, with beneficial effects in gut health.

  6. Oedema disease is associated with metabolic acidosis and small intestinal acidosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nabuurs, M.J.A.; Weijgert, van de E.; Grootendorst, A.F.; Niewold, T.A.

    2001-01-01

    Limited information is available about the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of oedema disease (OD). Oedema disease is caused by specific enterotoxemic Escherichia coli (SLTIIv-toxin producing) strains; however, the same strains are also found in non-afflicted pigs. Furthermore, it is unclear how the

  7. Ex vivo intestinal adhesion of Escherichia coli LF82 in Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Stina Rikke; Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2011-01-01

    Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) are reported to inhabit the gut mucosa in Crohn's disease (CD), however, little is known about the importance of host factors for the interplay between AIEC and the human gut. To examine if differences in bacterial adhesion patterns are disease associated...

  8. Tight Junctions, Intestinal Permeability, and Autoimmunity Celiac Disease and Type 1 Diabetes Paradigms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Jeroen; Rozing, Jan; Sapone, Anna; Lammers, Karen; Fasano, Alessio; Fromm, M; Schulzke, JD

    2009-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by tissue damage and loss of function due to an immune response that is directed against specific organs. This review is focused on celiac disease (CD), an autoimmune enteropathy, and type I diabetes (TID), a hyperglycosaemia caused by a destructive autoimmune

  9. Intestinal fibrosis is associated with lack of response to Infliximab therapy in Crohn's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruyn, Jessica R.; Becker, Marte A.; Steenkamer, Jessica; Wildenberg, Manon E.; Meijer, Sybren L.; Buskens, Christianne J.; Bemelman, Willem A.; Löwenberg, Mark; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y.; van den Brink, Gijs R.; D'Haens, Geert R.

    2018-01-01

    Overt fibrostenotic disease is a relative contraindication for anti-TNF therapy in Crohn's disease. We hypothesized that subclinical fibrosis may also contribute to an incomplete response to anti-TNF therapy before the onset of symptomatic stenosis. In a previous trial, patients with ileocecal

  10. Early-life stress origins of gastrointestinal disease: animal models, intestinal pathophysiology, and translational implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Calvin S.; Medland, Julia E.

    2015-01-01

    Early-life stress and adversity are major risk factors in the onset and severity of gastrointestinal (GI) disease in humans later in life. The mechanisms by which early-life stress leads to increased GI disease susceptibility in adult life remain poorly understood. Animal models of early-life stress have provided a foundation from which to gain a more fundamental understanding of this important GI disease paradigm. This review focuses on animal models of early-life stress-induced GI disease, with a specific emphasis on translational aspects of each model to specific human GI disease states. Early postnatal development of major GI systems and the consequences of stress on their development are discussed in detail. Relevant translational differences between species and models are highlighted. PMID:26451004

  11. Intestinal Obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the obstruction along the intestines. Treatment Suction via nasogastric tube Fluids given by vein Surgery for strangulation Sometimes ... nose and placed in the stomach (called a nasogastric tube) or into the intestine. Suction is applied to ...

  12. [Tunisian version validation of quality life's questionnaire for chronic inflammatory disease of intestine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mnif, L; Medhioub, M; Boudabbous, M; Chtourou, L; Amouri, A; Tahri, N

    2013-12-01

    The systematic evaluation of the quality of life is essential in the management of patients with chronic bowel disease ( IBD) inflammatory diseases. Translate in Tunisian Arabic dialect the English version of «inflammatory bowel disease questionnaire» (UK- IBDQ ) and validated by studying its psychometric validity, discriminative ability, reliability and sensitivity to change. 80 Tunisian patients with IBD completed the Tunisian version of the IBDQ (T- IBDQ ) , a visual analog scale , the SF- 36, the Harvey- Bradshaw index for Crohn's disease , and the index Simple clinical colitis activity for ulcerative colitis. The T- IBDQ included in the final version 5 fields. The internal validity of the items was satisfactory for all patients. TIBDQ was correlated with scores of SF- 36, visual analog scale scores and indices of activity of IBD. T- IBDQ distinguish between active disease and inactive disease . He was also sensitive to changes in disease activity . We validated in this work a Tunisian dialect Arabic version of the IBDQ : T- IBDQ . Its validity, discriminative ability , reliability and sensitivity to change were demonstrated.

  13. Profile of levodopa/carbidopa intestinal gel and its potential in the treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skodda S

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Sabine SkoddaDepartment of Neurology, Knappschaftskrankenhaus, Ruhr-University of Bochum, Bochum, GermanyAbstract: Parkinson's disease (PD is characterized by a progression of symptoms in the course of time which typically leads to the occurrence of motor complications in the advanced stages of disease. In this stage of “motor complication”, conventional oral polypharmacotherapy often fails to preserve sufficiently stable motor function during the course of the day. Continuous infusions of levodopa/carbidopa gel (LCIG delivered directly into the small intestine by a portable pump have been shown to stabilize levodopa plasma levels and to ameliorate motor fluctuations and troublesome dyskinesias in patients in the advanced stages of PD. Furthermore, there are also some first indications for beneficial effects on dopamine-related nonmotor symptoms of PD and an amelioration of overall quality of life. On the other hand, LCIG is an elaborate and expensive therapy, which requires the assured access to a medical team who are experienced with the management of adverse events and technical problems related to the tube and pump delivery system. This review focuses on the principle of LCIG infusion therapy and gives a comprehensive summary of the existing data on therapeutic effects and adverse events and possible complications.Keywords: motor complications, continuous dopaminergic stimulation, dyskinesia, nonmotor symptoms, quality of life

  14. Estimating the Incidence of Acute Infectious Intestinal Disease in the Community in the UK: A Retrospective Telephone Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Viviani

    Full Text Available To estimate the burden of intestinal infectious disease (IID in the UK and determine whether disease burden estimations using a retrospective study design differ from those using a prospective study design.A retrospective telephone survey undertaken in each of the four countries comprising the United Kingdom. Participants were randomly asked about illness either in the past 7 or 28 days.14,813 individuals for all of whom we had a legible recording of their agreement to participate.Self-reported IID, defined as loose stools or clinically significant vomiting lasting less than two weeks, in the absence of a known non-infectious cause.The rate of self-reported IID varied substantially depending on whether asked for illness in the previous 7 or 28 days. After standardising for age and sex, and adjusting for the number of interviews completed each month and the relative size of each UK country, the estimated rate of IID in the 7-day recall group was 1,530 cases per 1,000 person-years (95% CI: 1135-2113, while in the 28-day recall group it was 533 cases per 1,000 person-years (95% CI: 377-778. There was no significant variation in rates between the four countries. Rates in this study were also higher than in a related prospective study undertaken at the same time.The estimated burden of disease from IID varied dramatically depending on study design. Retrospective studies of IID give higher estimates of disease burden than prospective studies. Of retrospective studies longer recall periods give lower estimated rates than studies with short recall periods. Caution needs to be exercised when comparing studies of self-reported IID as small changes in study design or case definition can markedly affect estimated rates.

  15. Continuous intestinal infusion of levodopa-carbidopa in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease in Spain: Subanalysis by autonomous community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-García, D; Catalán, M J; Puente, V; Valldeoriola, F; Regidor, I; Mir, P; Matías-Arbelo, J; Parra, J C; Grandas, F

    2018-01-12

    To compare the characteristics of patients undergoing treatment with continuous intestinal infusion of levodopa-carbidopa (CIILC) for advanced Parkinson's disease and the data on the effectiveness and safety of CIILC in the different autonomous communities (AC) of Spain. A retrospective, longitudinal, observational study was carried out into 177 patients from 11 CAs who underwent CIILC between January 2006 and December 2011. We analysed data on patients' clinical and demographic characteristics, variables related to effectiveness (changes in off time/on time with or without disabling dyskinesia; changes in Hoehn and Yahr scale and Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale scores; non-motor symptoms; and Clinical Global Impression scale scores) and safety (adverse events), and the rate of CIILC discontinuation. Significant differences were observed between CAs for several baseline variables: duration of disease progression prior to CIILC onset, off time (34.9-59.7%) and on time (2.6-48.0%; with or without disabling dyskinesia), Hoehn and Yahr score during on time, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-III score during both on and off time, presence of≥ 4 motor symptoms, and CIILC dose. Significant differences were observed during follow-up (> 24 months in 9 of the 11 CAs studied) for the percentage of off time and on time without disabling dyskinesia, adverse events frequency, and Clinical Global Impression scores. The rate of CIILC discontinuation was between 20-40% in 9 CAs (78 and 80% in remaining 2 CAs). This study reveals a marked variability between CAs in terms of patient selection and CIILC safety and effectiveness. These results may have been influenced by patients' baseline characteristics, the availability of multidisciplinary teams, and clinical experience. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Intestinal fibrosis is associated with lack of response to Infliximab therapy in Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruyn, Jessica R; Becker, Marte A; Steenkamer, Jessica; Wildenberg, Manon E; Meijer, Sybren L; Buskens, Christianne J; Bemelman, Willem A; Löwenberg, Mark; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y; van den Brink, Gijs R; D'Haens, Geert R

    2018-01-01

    Overt fibrostenotic disease is a relative contraindication for anti-TNF therapy in Crohn's disease. We hypothesized that subclinical fibrosis may also contribute to an incomplete response to anti-TNF therapy before the onset of symptomatic stenosis. In a previous trial, patients with ileocecal Crohn's disease were randomized to either immediate ileocecal resection or medical treatment with Infliximab. In case of insufficient response to Infliximab, the latter underwent secondary ileocecal resection. We compared specimens from those patients undergoing immediate resection (Infliximab naïve, n = 20) to those who failed Infliximab therapy (n = 20). Infliximab naïve and Infliximab failure patients had similar severity of inflammation when assessed by CRP levels (median 14 vs 9 mg/L) and histology (Geboes-D'Haens-score, median 10 vs 11 points). On immunohistochemistry, collagen-III and fibronectin depositions were increased in patients previously exposed to Infliximab compared to patients naïve to Infliximab. On mRNA level, procollagen peptidase showed significantly more mucosal mRNA expression in Crohn's disease patients who failed Infliximab. Infliximab responders showed no increase of this marker after 4 weeks of successful Infliximab treatment. Failure to Infliximab therapy is associated with subclinical fibrosis in Crohn's disease.

  17. Ex vivo intestinal adhesion of Escherichia coli LF82 in Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Stina Rikke; Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2011-01-01

    Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) are reported to inhabit the gut mucosa in Crohn's disease (CD), however, little is known about the importance of host factors for the interplay between AIEC and the human gut. To examine if differences in bacterial adhesion patterns are disease associated......, the AIEC-prototype strain LF82 was evaluated for its ability to adhere to ileal and colonic biopsies from CD and healthy controls (HC). Moreover, the efficacy of the non-pathogenic E. coli Nissle 1917 (ECN) in averting LF82 adhesion to ileal mucosa was assessed. Similar numbers of LF82 adhered to biopsies...

  18. Culturing human intestinal stem cells for regenerative applications in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmberg, Fredrik Eo; Seidelin, Jakob B; Yin, Xiaolei

    2017-01-01

    Both the incidence and prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasing globally; in the industrialized world up to 0.5% of the population are affected and around 4.2 million individuals suffer from IBD in Europe and North America combined. Successful engraftment in experimental colit...

  19. Intestinal lesions in pediatric Crohn disease: comparative detectability among pulse sequences at MR enterography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Beomseok; Kim, Myung-Joon; Lee, Mi-Jung [Severance Children' s Hospital, Yonsei University, College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Koh, Hong [Severance Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Kyung Hwa [Yonsei University, College of Medicine, Biostatistics Collaboration Unit, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-15

    Variable sequences can be used in MR enterography, and no consensus exists for the best protocol in children with Crohn disease. To compare the lesion detectability of various MR enterography sequences and to correlate the findings of these sequences with the Pediatric Crohn's Disease Activity Index (PCDAI) in children with Crohn disease. Children with clinically or pathologically confirmed Crohn disease underwent MR enterography, including a single-shot fast spin-echo (SSFSE) sequence, motility imaging (coronal 2-D balanced fast field echo), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and dynamic contrast enhancement imaging (including arterial, portal and delayed phases). The lesion detectability of each sequence was graded 0-2 for each involved bowel segment. The lesion detectability and PCDAI result on different sequences were compared using the weighted least squares method and Student's t-test, respectively. Fifteen children (11 boys, 4 girls, mean age 13.7 ± 1.4 years) with a total of 41 lesions were included in this study. All lesions detected in more than two sequences were visible on the single-shot fast spin-echo (SSFSE) sequence. The relative lesion detection rate was 78.1% on motility imaging, 90.2% on DWI, and 92.7% on arterial, 95.1% on portal and 95.1% on delayed phase imaging. Compared to the SSFSE sequence, motility imaging (P < 0.001) and DWI (P = 0.039) demonstrated lower detectability. The mean PCDAI result in the detected lesions was statistically higher only on dynamic enhancement imaging (P < 0.001). All MR enterography sequences were found to have relatively high lesion detectability in children with Crohn disease, while motility imaging showed the lowest lesion detectability. Lesions detected on dynamic enhancement imaging showed a higher PCDAI result, which suggests that this sequence is specific for active inflammation. (orig.)

  20. Intestinal lesions in pediatric Crohn disease: comparative detectability among pulse sequences at MR enterography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, Beomseok; Kim, Myung-Joon; Lee, Mi-Jung; Koh, Hong; Han, Kyung Hwa

    2014-01-01

    Variable sequences can be used in MR enterography, and no consensus exists for the best protocol in children with Crohn disease. To compare the lesion detectability of various MR enterography sequences and to correlate the findings of these sequences with the Pediatric Crohn's Disease Activity Index (PCDAI) in children with Crohn disease. Children with clinically or pathologically confirmed Crohn disease underwent MR enterography, including a single-shot fast spin-echo (SSFSE) sequence, motility imaging (coronal 2-D balanced fast field echo), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and dynamic contrast enhancement imaging (including arterial, portal and delayed phases). The lesion detectability of each sequence was graded 0-2 for each involved bowel segment. The lesion detectability and PCDAI result on different sequences were compared using the weighted least squares method and Student's t-test, respectively. Fifteen children (11 boys, 4 girls, mean age 13.7 ± 1.4 years) with a total of 41 lesions were included in this study. All lesions detected in more than two sequences were visible on the single-shot fast spin-echo (SSFSE) sequence. The relative lesion detection rate was 78.1% on motility imaging, 90.2% on DWI, and 92.7% on arterial, 95.1% on portal and 95.1% on delayed phase imaging. Compared to the SSFSE sequence, motility imaging (P < 0.001) and DWI (P = 0.039) demonstrated lower detectability. The mean PCDAI result in the detected lesions was statistically higher only on dynamic enhancement imaging (P < 0.001). All MR enterography sequences were found to have relatively high lesion detectability in children with Crohn disease, while motility imaging showed the lowest lesion detectability. Lesions detected on dynamic enhancement imaging showed a higher PCDAI result, which suggests that this sequence is specific for active inflammation. (orig.)

  1. Ex vivo intestinal adhesion of Escherichia coli LF82 in Crohn’s disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Stina Rikke; Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2011-01-01

    Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) are reported to inhabit the gut mucosa in Crohn’s disease (CD), however, little is known about the importance of host factors for the interplay between AIEC and the human gut.To examine if differences in bacterial adhesion patterns are disease associated......, the AIEC-prototype strain LF82 was evaluated for its ability to adhere to ileal and colonic biopsies from CD and healthy controls (HC). Moreover, the efficacy of the non-pathogenic E. coli Nissle 1917 (ECN) in averting LF82 adhesion to ileal mucosa was assessed.Similar numbers of LF82 adhered to biopsies...... from CD and HC. A significantly greater LF82 attachment to ileal versus colonic mucosa was found in HC (P adhesion of LF82 to ileal specimens in CD or HC.These results show that enhanced bacterial adhesion ability is unlikely to play any significant...

  2. Spontaneous in vitro IL-6 production in various intestinal segments in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Drastich, P.; Frolová-Břízová, Lenka; Zanvit, P.; Špičák, J.; Tlaskalová-Hogenová, Helena

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 3 (2011), 185-190 ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1QS500200572; GA ČR GA305/08/0535; GA ČR GD310/08/H077; GA MŠk 2B06155 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : NECROSIS-FACTOR-ALPHA * ULCERATIVE-COLITIS * CROHNS - DISEASE Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 0.677, year: 2011

  3. Endometriosis of the intestinal tract: a study of 44 cases of a disease that may cause diverse challenges in clinical and pathologic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yantiss, R K; Clement, P B; Young, R H

    2001-04-01

    Endometriosis of the intestinal tract may mimic a number of diseases both clinically and pathologically. The authors evaluated 44 cases of intestinal endometriosis in which endometriosis was the primary pathologic diagnosis, and evaluated them for a variety of gross and histologic changes. Cases with preneoplastic or neoplastic changes were excluded specifically because they were the subject of a previous study. The patients ranged in age from 28 to 56 years (mean age, 44 years), and presenting complaints included abdominal pain (n = 15), an abdominal mass (n = 12), obstruction (n = 8), rectal bleeding (n = 2), infertility (n = 3), diarrhea (n = 2), and increasing urinary frequency (n = 1). The clinical differential diagnoses included diverticulitis, appendicitis, Crohn's disease, tubo-ovarian abscess, irritable bowel syndrome, carcinoma, and lymphoma. Forty-two patients underwent resection of the diseased intestine and two patients underwent endoscopic biopsies. In 13 patients there were predominantly mural masses, which were multiple in two patients (mean size, 2.6 cm). In addition, 11 cases had luminal stenosis or strictures, six had mucosal polyps, four had submucosal masses that ulcerated the mucosa (sometimes simulating carcinoma), three had serosal adhesions, one had deep fissures in the mucosa, and one was associated with appendiceal intussusception. Involvement of the lamina propria or submucosa was identified in 29 cases (66%) and, of these, 19 had features of chronic injury including architectural distortion (n = 19), dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates (n = 7), pyloric metaplasia of the ileum (n = 1), and fissures (n = 1). Three cases had features of mucosal prolapse (7%), ischemic changes were seen in four (9%), and segmental acute colitis and ulceration were seen in four and six cases (9% and 13%) respectively. In 14 patients, endometriosis formed irregular congeries of glands involving the intestinal surface epithelium, mimicking adenomatous changes

  4. Intestinal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of MALT type: clinical manifestation and outcome of a rare disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sung Yong; Kwon, Hyuk-Chan; Kim, Won Seog; Hwang, In Gyu; Park, Yeon Hee; Kim, Kihyun; Ko, Young Hae; Ryoo, Baek-Yeol; Kang, Hye Jin; Nam, Eunmi; Lee, Jae-Hoon; Kim, Jung Han; Kim, Hyo-Jin

    2007-10-01

    Intestinal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of the MALT type (I-MZL) is a relatively uncommon form of lymphoma. Twenty-seven patients with histologically-confirmed I-MZL were analyzed. The patients initially presented with abdominal pain (62.9%), and diarrhea (22.2%). The most common involved site was the ileo-caecal area (40.7%). Musshoff's stage I(E), II(E)1, II(E)2, III(E) and IV were present in 44%, 15%, 11%, 7.4% and 22% respectively. Sixty-three percent were in the low-risk group according to the Follicular Lymphoma International Prognostic Index. Complete response and partial response were achieved in 82% and 4% patients. The estimated 5-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) rates were 86% and 54%. Stage > or = II(E)2 was determined to be a poor prognostic factor for PFS and OS. I-MZL commonly manifests in an early-stage, low-risk state and tends to respond well to local and systemic treatment with favorable prognosis. I-MZL tends to be an indolent disease - characterized by prolonged survival with frequent relapses, similarly to other site MZLs.

  5. Increase of faecal tryptic activity relates to changes in the intestinal microbiome: analysis of Crohn's disease with a multidisciplinary platform.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tore Midtvedt

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate-by molecular, classical and functional methods-the microbiota in biopsies and faeces from patients with active Crohn's disease (CD and controls. DESIGN: The microbiota in biopsies was investigated utilizing a novel molecular method and classical cultivation technology. Faecal samples were investigated by classical technology and four functional methods, reflecting alterations in short chain fatty acids pattern, conversion of cholesterol and bilirubin and inactivation of trypsin. RESULTS: By molecular methods we found more than 92% similarity in the microbiota on the biopsies from the two groups. However, 4.6% of microbes found in controls were lacking in CD patients. Furthermore, NotI representation libraries demonstrate two different clusters representing CD patients and controls, respectively. Utilizing conventional technology, Bacteroides (alt. Parabacteroides was less frequently detected in the biopsies from CD patients than from controls. A similar reduction in the number of Bacteroides was found in faecal samples. Bacteroides is the only group of bacteria known to be able to inactivate pancreatic trypsin. Faecal tryptic activity was high in CD patients, and inversely correlated to the levels of Bacteroides. CONCLUSIONS: CD patients have compositional and functional alterations in their intestinal microbiota, in line with the global description hypothesis rather than the candidate microorganism theory. The most striking functional difference was high amount of faecal tryptic activity in CD patients, inversely correlated to the levels of Bacteroides in faeces.

  6. Systematic and intestinal antibody-secreting cell responses and correlates of protective immunity to human rotavirus in a gnotobiotic pig model of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, L; Ward, L A; Rosen, B I; To, T L; Saif, L J

    1996-05-01

    Neonatal gnotobiotic pigs orally inoculated with virulent (intestinal-suspension) Wa strain human rotavirus (which mimics human natural infection) developed diarrhea, and most pigs which recovered (87% protection rate) were immune to disease upon homologous virulent virus challenge at postinoculation day (PID) 21. Pigs inoculated with cell culture-attenuated Wa rotavirus (which mimics live oral vaccines) developed subclinical infections and seroconverted but were only partially protected against challenge (33% protection rate). Isotype-specific antibody-secreting cells (ASC were enumerated at selected PID in intestinal (duodenal and ileal lamina propria and mesenteric lymph node [MLN]) and systemic (spleen and blood) lymphoid tissues by using enzyme-linked immunospot assays. At challenge (PID 21), the numbers of virus-specific immunoglobulin A (IgA) ASC, but not IgG ASC, in intestines and blood were significantly greater in virulent-Wa rotavirus-inoculated pigs than in attenuated-Wa rotavirus-inoculated pigs and were correlated (correlation coefficients: for duodenum and ileum, 0.9; for MLN, 0.8; for blood, 0.6) with the degree of protection induced. After challenge, the numbers of IgA and IgG virus-specific ASC and serum-neutralizing antibodies increased significantly in the attenuated-Wa rotavirus-inoculated pigs but not in the virulent-Wa rotavirus-inoculated pigs (except in the spleen and except for IgA ASC in the duodenum). The transient appearance of IgA ASC in the blood mirrored the IgA ASC responses in the gut, albeit at a lower level, suggesting that IgA ASC in the blood of humans could serve as an indicator for IgA ASC responses in the intestine after rotavirus infection. To our knowledge, this is the first report to study and identify intestinal IgA ASC as a correlate of protective active immunity in an animal model of human-rotavirus-induced disease.

  7. Small intestinal absorption in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease complicated by cor pulmonale - A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, S K; Hardis, A L S; Tupper, O D; Soja, A M B; Nilsson, B; Ulrik, C S; Andersen, J R

    2018-04-01

    Cor pulmonale is a common complication to Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), and may result in increased pressure in the inferior caval vein and stasis of the liver. The chronic pulmonary hypertension may lead to stasis in the veins from the small intestine and thereby compromise absorption of nutrients. To investigate whether patients with pulmonary hypertension have reduced absorption capacity compared to COPD patients without cor pulmonale. Absorption of d-xylose (25 g) and zinc (132 mg), administered as a single dose, was tested in 14 COPD patients, seven with and seven without cor pulmonale. The presence of cor pulmonale was determined by echocardiography. The concentration of d-xylose and zinc were measured in peripheral blood one, two and three hours after ingestion and used as markers of absorption. Furthermore, urine was collected for five hours to determine the amount of excreted d-xylose. No significant difference in absorption of d-xylose (p = 0.28) or zinc (p = 0.51) was found between the two groups. However, a trend towards a delay in d-xylose absorption, as assessed by time-to-peak concentration, was observed in patients with cor pulmonale (p = 0.08). There was no significant difference in the amount of excreted d-xylose in the urine between the groups (p = 0.52). No correlation was found between the tricuspid regurgitation gradient and the absorption of both test-markers (rs = 0.34 and rs = -0.25). Likewise, no correlations were found between the inferior caval pressure during the in- and expiration phases and the absorption of d-xylose (rs = -0.09 rs = 0.23) or zinc (rs = -0.39, rs = -0.39). We found no indications that small intestinal absorption is affected in a clinically relevant degree in patients with cor pulmonale. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Practical Considerations and the Intestinal Microbiome in Disease: Antibiotics for IBD Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorak, Richard N; Ismond, Kathleen P

    2016-01-01

    The inflammatory bowel diseases, Crohn's and ulcerative colitis, have been treated with a range of antibiotics for inducing and maintaining remission, as well as the prevention of post-operative symptoms. To date, many studies have been performed assessing the efficacy of antibiotics when used alone, in combination with other antibiotics, or as an adjunctive therapy to other pharmaceutical treatments. Literature evidence supporting the use of antibiotics in IBD can be ambiguous, especially when considering the potential role of dysbiosis in the gastrointestinal tract. The review considers the systemic effect of antibiotics and the evidence base for their efficacy in the treatment of IBD. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Variability of resting energy expenditure in infants and young children with intestinal failure-associated liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duro, Debora; Mitchell, Paul D; Mehta, Nilesh M; Bechard, Lori J; Yu, Yong-Ming; Jaksic, Tom; Duggan, Christopher

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the study was to determine, in a cohort of young children with intestinal failure (IF), whether the estimates of basal metabolic rate (BMR) by standard equations can approximate measured resting energy expenditure (REE) by indirect calorimetry (IC). IC was performed using the dilutional canopy technique. REE measurements were compared with standard, age-based estimation equations (World Health Organization) for BMR. Subjects were classified as hypermetabolic (REE > 110% BMR), hypometabolic (REE BMR), or normal (REE = 90%-110% BMR). Twenty-eight IF patients (11 girls, 17 boys) had an underlying diagnosis of necrotizing enterocolitis (n = 10) or a congenital gastrointestinal defect (n = 18). Median age was 5.3 months. Median interquartile range (IQR) REE was 46 (42-58) kcal · kg · day. Median (IQR) total energy intake provided 209% (172%-257%) of REE, with parenteral nutrition providing 76% (23%) of total energy intake. REE was variable, with 39% (n = 11) of measurements hypermetabolic, 39% (n = 11) hypometabolic, and the remaining 21% (n = 6) normal. Although REE was well correlated with estimated BMR (r = 0.82, P BMR was not consistently an adequate predictor of REE. BMR over- or underestimated REE by >10 kcal · kg · day in 15 of 28 (54%) patients. REE was not significantly correlated with severity of liver disease, nutritional status, total energy intake, or gestational age. Energy expenditure is variable among children with IF and IF-associated liver disease, with approximately 80% of our cohort exhibiting either hypo- or hypermetabolism. Standard estimation equations frequently do not correctly predict individual REE. Longitudinal studies of energy expenditure and body composition may be needed to guide provision of nutrition regimens.

  10. Bicentric prospective evaluation of corporoplasty with porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS) in patients with severe Peyronie's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayedahmed, K; Rosenhammer, B; Spachmann, P J; Burger, M; Aragona, M; Kaftan, B T; Olianas, R; Fritsche, H M

    2017-07-01

    Advanced Peyronie's disease (PD) with severe penile deviation demands grafting procedures following plaque incision or partial plaque excision in order to avoid penile shortening and to improve quality of life of affected patients. Small intestinal submucosa (SIS) is an established xenograft. The objective of the present study was to validate external results in a bicentric prospective manner. Patient selection criteria, surgical technique and standards for pre- and postoperative care were defined. Consecutively, patients with severe penile deviation in stable disease and sufficient erectile function were included between 2007 and 2015. After plaque incision, grafting was performed using SIS in a standardized manner. The postoperative evaluation using a non-validated questionnaire included complications, correction of curvature, pre- and postoperative erectile function, change in penile length and general satisfaction with the procedure. Forty-three patients underwent surgery between 2007 and 2015. The mean degree of preoperative curvature was 73.8° (range 60-90°). No intraoperative or major postoperative complications were reported. After a mean follow-up of 33.0 months (range 10-59), complete straightening of the penis was achieved in 74.4%. 88.4% of all patients were able to achieve satisfying sexual intercourse (67.4% unaided, 21.0% with assistance). The IIEF-5 score was improved in 69.8% (mean improvement 4.0 points). Overall 86.0% were satisfied with the surgical treatment. Corporoplasty with SIS in patients with PD and severe penile curvature is a safe approach and shows good long-term results. A thorough patient selection and a standardized pre-, intra- and postoperative procedure are decisive for a satisfying outcome.

  11. Alert for bone alterations and low serum concentrations of vitamin D in patients with intestinal inflammatory disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorete Maria da Silva Kotze

    Full Text Available Summary Background: Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD, including Crohn's disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC, are characterized by chronic inflammation of the intestine that can reduce the absorption of nutrients such as vitamin D and calcium. Objective: To investigate bone alterations and serum levels of vitamin D in patients with IBD. Method: This was a cross-sectional study based on a review of medical records of patients from a private office in Curitiba, PR, Brazil. Serum levels of vitamin D and bone densitometry were measured at diagnosis of IBD. A total of 105 patients were included; 38 (58.4% with CD; 27 (41.6% with UC and 40 with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS as comparison group. Results: When compared to patients with UC, CD patients showed a higher prevalence of bone alterations, being 15.8% with osteoporosis and 36.8% with osteopenia. In UC, bone alterations occurred in 29.6% of cases, 3.7% with osteoporosis and 25.9% with osteopenia. As for vitamin D levels, among CD patients, 10.5% had vitamin deficiency, 65.8% insufficiency and 23.7% were sufficient. In UC, 7.4% of cases had deficiency, 74.1% insufficiency and 18.5% had sufficient serum levels of vitamin D. In the group with IBS, deficiency was observed in 17.5% of cases, insufficiency in 55% and sufficiency in 27.5% of them. There was no significant difference between groups. Conclusion: IBD patients have a high prevalence of bone changes, especially those with CD. Serum levels of vitamin D are below the recommended in all the evaluated groups.

  12. Systematic and intestinal antibody-secreting cell responses and correlates of protective immunity to human rotavirus in a gnotobiotic pig model of disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, L; Ward, L A; Rosen, B I; To, T L; Saif, L J

    1996-01-01

    Neonatal gnotobiotic pigs orally inoculated with virulent (intestinal-suspension) Wa strain human rotavirus (which mimics human natural infection) developed diarrhea, and most pigs which recovered (87% protection rate) were immune to disease upon homologous virulent virus challenge at postinoculation day (PID) 21. Pigs inoculated with cell culture-attenuated Wa rotavirus (which mimics live oral vaccines) developed subclinical infections and seroconverted but were only partially protected agai...

  13. Treatment of inflammatory bowel disease associated E. coli with ciprofloxacin and E. coli Nissle in the streptomycin-treated mouse intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Andreas Munk; Schjørring, Susanne; Gerstrøm, Sarah Choi

    2011-01-01

    E. coli belonging to the phylogenetic group B2 are linked to Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). Studies have shown that antimicrobials have some effect in the treatment of IBD, and it has been demonstrated that E. coli Nissle has prophylactic abilities comparable to 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA......) therapy in ulcerative colitis. The objective of this study was to test if ciprofloxacin and/or E. coli Nissle could eradicate IBD associated E. coli in the streptomycin-treated mouse intestine....

  14. Enzymes in intestinal juice from patients with liver diseases and colon polyps: measurement of bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase, aspartate aminotransferase and lactate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Y; Saitoh, H; Ying, H; Tamai, Y; Ono, F; Yoshiike, M; Munakata, A; Yoshida, Y

    1996-02-01

    Since the amounts of hepatogenous enzymes discharged into the intestinal tract remain unknown, this study was initiated to evaluate the amounts of the enzymes in the intestinal tract. Whole gut lavage fluid (polyethyleneglycol electrolyte solution) was administered orally to 42 subjects, consisting of 5 patients with hepatoma, 10 with chronic hepatitis, 10 with colon polyps, and 17 control subjects without liver disease. Two hr after the large intestinal lavage, the digestive tract juice was aspirated by colonoscopy, and the bilirubin (Bil), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in the aspirates were measured. A positive correlation between the AST and LDH values was found, and a significant difference in these values between the hepatic disorders and the normal controls was noticed. A significant positive correlation between the ALP and Bil values was found, and a statistical difference in these values between the group of colon polyps and the controls and other groups was observed. This lavage fluid technique enables to estimate the amounts of hepatic enzymes discharged into the intestinal tract, thereby opening a new avenue for future enzyme research.

  15. Anaesthetic management of a patient with microvillus inclusion disease for intestinal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Luis J; Santamaría, Manuel López; Gámez, Manuel

    2002-03-01

    We report the anaesthetic management of a 3-year-old-child with microvillus inclusion disease undergoing isolated small bowel transplantation. He required long-term total parenteral nutrition which was complicated with numerous episodes of catheter related sepsis. This resulted in thrombosis of the major blood vessels which critically restricted vascular access available for intravenous nutrition, becoming a life-threatening condition for the patient. Haemodynamic, respiratory parameters and urinary output were well preserved throughout the procedure. Besides a transitory increase in potassium following graft revascularization, biochemical changes were small. Anaesthetic management included comprehensive preoperative assessment, central venous angiography to depict accessibility of central and peripheral veins, assurance of additional vascular access through the intraoperative catheterization of the left renal vein, perioperative epidural analgesia and preservation of splanchnic perfusion to ensure implant viability.

  16. Analysis of the Risk Factors of Surgery after Endoscopic Balloon Dilation for Small Intestinal Strictures in Crohn's Disease Using Double-balloon Endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Yu; Hosomi, Shuhei; Yamagami, Hirokazu; Yukawa, Tomomi; Nagami, Yasuaki; Tanaka, Fumio; Kamata, Noriko; Tanigawa, Tetsuya; Shiba, Masatsugu; Watanabe, Toshio; Tominaga, Kazunari; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Arakawa, Tetsuo

    2017-09-01

    Objective Balloon-assisted endoscopy enables access to and treatment of strictures in the small intestine using endoscopic balloon dilation (EBD); however, the long-term outcomes of EBD have not been sufficiently evaluated. This study evaluated the long-term outcomes of EBD in Crohn's disease to identify the risk factors associated with the need for subsequent surgical intervention. Methods We retrospectively analyzed patients with Crohn's disease who had undergone EBD with double-balloon endoscopy (DBE) for small intestinal strictures at a single center between 2006 and 2015. The long-term outcomes were assessed based on the cumulative surgery-free rate following initial EBD. Results Seventy-two EBD with DBE sessions and 112 procedures were performed for 37 patients during this period. Eighteen patients (48.6%) required surgery during follow-up. Significant factors associated with the need for surgery in a multivariate analysis were multiple strictures (adjusted hazard ratio, 14.94; 95% confidence interval, 1.91-117.12; p=0.010). One patient (6.7%) required surgery among 15 who had single strictures compared to 17 (77.3%) among 22 patients with multiple strictures. Conclusion In a multivariate analysis, the presence of multiple strictures was a significant risk factor associated with the need for surgery; therefore, a single stricture might be a good indication for EBD using DBE for small intestinal strictures in Crohn's disease patients.

  17. Changes in causes of acute gastroenteritis in the United Kingdom over 15 years: microbiologic findings from 2 prospective, population-based studies of infectious intestinal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Clarence C; O'Brien, Sarah J; Tompkins, David S; Bolton, Frederick J; Berry, Lisa; Dodds, Julie; Choudhury, Dalia; Halstead, Fenella; Iturriza-Gómara, Miren; Mather, Katherine; Rait, Greta; Ridge, Alan; Rodrigues, Laura C; Wain, John; Wood, Bernard; Gray, James J

    2012-05-01

    Large-scale, prospective studies of infectious intestinal disease (IID) in developed countries are uncommon. Two studies of IID incidence and etiology have been conducted in the United Kingdom: the Infectious Intestinal Disease Study in England (IID1) in 1993-1996 and the Second Study of Infectious Intestinal Disease in the Community (IID2) in 2008-2009. We examined changes in etiology and diagnostic yield of IID cases over 15 years. Fecal samples submitted by IID cases were examined for a range of bacterial, viral, and protozoal pathogens using traditional and molecular microbiological methods. We calculated the percentage of specimens positive for each organism based on traditional methods and on traditional and molecular methods combined. We compared the distributions of organisms in the 2 studies. For pathogens investigated in both studies, 40% of fecal samples submitted by cases in IID2 were positive compared with 28% in IID1. Viruses were most frequent among community cases in IID2. Campylobacter was the most common bacterial pathogen among cases presenting to healthcare. Major differences between the 2 studies were increases in the detection of norovirus and sapovirus and a decline Salmonella. Most fecal specimens were negative for the pathogens tested in both studies, so new strategies are needed to close the diagnostic gap. Among known pathogens, effective control of norovirus, rotavirus, and Campylobacter remain high priorities. The reduction in nontyphoidal salmonellosis demonstrates the success of Europe-wide control strategies, notably an industry-led Salmonella control program in poultry in the United Kingdom.

  18. Changes in the Abundance of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii Phylogroups I and II in the Intestinal Mucosa of Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Patients with Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Siles, Mireia; Martinez-Medina, Margarita; Surís-Valls, Romà; Aldeguer, Xavier; Sabat-Mir, Miriam; Duncan, Sylvia H; Flint, Harry J; Garcia-Gil, L Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Faecalibacterium prausnitzii comprises 2 phylogroups, whose abundance in healthy and diseased gut and in conjunction with Escherichia coli has not yet been studied. This work aims to determine the contribution of F. prausnitzii phylogroups I and II in intestinal disease and to assess their potential diagnostic usefulness as biomarkers for gut diseases. Total F. prausnitzii, its phylogroups, and E. coli loads were determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction targeting the 16S rRNA gene on biopsies from 31 healthy controls (H), 45 patients with Crohn's disease (CD), 25 patients with ulcerative colitis, 10 patients with irritable bowel syndrome, and 20 patients with colorectal cancer. Data were normalized to total bacterial counts and analyzed according to patients' disease location and clinical characteristics. Lower levels of both total F. prausnitzii and phylogroup I were found in subjects with CD, ulcerative colitis, and colorectal cancer (P bowel disease location. Phylogroup I was lower in active patients with CD, whereas those CD with intestinal resection showed a reduction in phylogroup II. Treatments with mesalazine and immunosuppressants did not result in the recovery of F. prausnitzii phylogroups abundance. F. prausnitzii phylogroup I was depleted in CD, ulcerative colitis, and colorectal cancer, whereas phylogroup II was specifically reduced in CD. Quantification of F. prausnitzii phylogroups and E. coli may help to identify gut disorders and to classify inflammatory bowel disease location.

  19. [Intestinal failure: from adaptation to transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messing, B; Corcos, O; Amiot, A; Joly, F

    2009-01-01

    Optimised Home Parenteral Nutrition is still, after 35 years of progress, the of benign but chronic Intestinal Failure. A better recognition of chronic Intestinal Failure, in its multiple facets, is warranted for a better approach of associated treatment to Home Parenteral Nutrition, i.e., intestinal trophic factors (growth hormone, Glucagon Like Peptide-2), rehabilitative surgery (reestablishment of colonic continuity, reverse jejunal segment in severe short gut type II) and/or reconstructive surgery (intestinal transplantation for end stage intestinal failure patients). Boundaries of permanent, judged irreversible, intestinal failure will be certainly modified in the following years by combining the various and effective therapies which optimise management by ameliorating absorption of the remnant short gut. The work done on short bowel syndrome in the past 20 years should be done in the next years for chronic-intestinal - pseudo-obstruction patients presenting with intestinal failure on a large European scale because chronic-intestinal - pseudo-obstruction is a group of heterogeneous but rare intestinal diseases. Intestinal transplantation is now a mature therapy with formal indication especially in case of Home Parenteral Nutrition failure (mainly Home Parenteral Nutrition-associated severe liver disease) where combined Liver-intestine transplantation is indicated before end-stage liver failure occurs. For high-risk patients, "preemptive" indication for intestinal transplantation alone will be discussed before home parenteral nutrition complications occur. No doubt that, for improving overall outcome in intestinal failure patients, reference centres should have in expert hands the whole spectrum of medicosurgical therapies for intestinal failure.

  20. [Consensus inflammatory intestinal diseases in children: ulcerative colitis and Crohn disease. Work Group Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büller, H A; Maas, S M

    1996-03-09

    Members of different societies, including Paediatrics, Gastroenterology, Clinical Chemistry, Radiology and Pathology, involved in the treatment of children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) reached consensus during 12 meetings about definition, clinical and diagnostic work-up as well as initial treatment options in paediatric IBD. On the basis of history and physical examination a distinction is made between colitis-like or Crohn-like appearance. Further laboratory investigations are required in the presence of malnutrition, extraintestinal manifestations or growth retardation. Pathology plays an important part in the final diagnosis. Special attention is given to pubertal staging and height measurements as routine aspects of the treatment of children with IBD.

  1. UPPER GASTRO-INTESTINAL BLEEDING IN THE YOUNG - GASTRIC GIST TUMOR OR PEPTIC ULCER DISEASE?

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    Ayodele Atolagbe

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available GIST tumors is very unusual in the young and middle aged and a high index of suspicion is needed for the diagnosis in young patients who present with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Appropriate imaging such as a Computed tomographic scan (CT scan may identify this tumor which may easily be misdiagnosed as a bleeding Peptic Ulcer Disease in the young. We present a case of a healthy 38 year old man with no alcohol use who presented with epigastric pain and melena and subsequent torrential bleeding uncontrolled during endoscopy necessitating an emergency exploratory laparotomy by the general surgery team. The bleeding intraluminal component of the tumor with gross splenic and pancreatic involvement was identified and surgical management consisted of a wedge resection of the greater curvature of the stomach incorporating the tumor and the spleen with successful dissection of the tumor off the tail of the pancreas. Histology was positive for C-KIT and DOG-1 markers. Postoperative course was uneventful and he is presently on Imatinib Mesylate.

  2. Increased IGF-IEc expression and mechano-growth factor production in intestinal muscle of fibrostenotic Crohn's disease and smooth muscle hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chao; Vu, Kent; Hazelgrove, Krystina; Kuemmerle, John F

    2015-12-01

    The igf1 gene is alternatively spliced as IGF-IEa and IGF-IEc variants in humans. In fibrostenotic Crohn's disease, the fibrogenic cytokine TGF-β1 induces IGF-IEa expression and IGF-I production in intestinal smooth muscle and results in muscle hyperplasia and collagen I production that contribute to stricture formation. Mechano-growth factor (MGF) derived from IGF-IEc induces skeletal and cardiac muscle hypertrophy following stress. We hypothesized that increased IGF-IEc expression and MGF production mediated smooth muscle hypertrophy also characteristic of fibrostenotic Crohn's disease. IGF-IEc transcripts and MGF protein were increased in muscle cells isolated from fibrostenotic intestine under regulation by endogenous TGF-β1. Erk5 and MEF2C were phosphorylated in vivo in fibrostenotic muscle; both were phosphorylated and colocalized to nucleus in response to synthetic MGF in vitro. Smooth muscle-specific protein expression of α-smooth muscle actin, γ-smooth muscle actin, and smoothelin was increased in affected intestine. Erk5 inhibition or MEF2C siRNA blocked smooth muscle-specific gene expression and hypertrophy induced by synthetic MGF. Conditioned media of cultured fibrostenotic muscle induced muscle hypertrophy that was inhibited by immunoneutralization of endogenous MGF or pro-IGF-IEc. The results indicate that TGF-β1-dependent IGF-IEc expression and MGF production in patients with fibrostenotic Crohn's disease regulates smooth muscle cell hypertrophy a critical factor that contributes to intestinal stricture formation. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Complications after intestinal resection in Crohn's disease: laparoscopic versus conventional approach

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    Paulo Gustavo Kotze

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: significant advances in medical therapy for Crohn's disease (CD occurred in the last 12 years, mainly due to the introduction of anti-TNF therapy. Laparoscopic colorectal surgery represented the most important advance on surgical treatment in the management of CD, as it also had developed in the treatment of other conditions. There is a tendency for lower complication rates after laparoscopic bowel resections as compared to open surgery. The aim of this study was to analyze and compare the complication rates after bowel resections for CD between the two approaches in a Brazilian case series. Methods: this was a retrospective longitudinal study, including CD patients submitted to bowel resections from a single Brazilian Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD referral center, treated between January 2008 and June 2012 with laparoscopic approach (LA or conventional approach (CA. Variables analyzed: age at surgery, gender, Montreal classification, smoking, concomitant medication, type of surgery, surgical approach, presence and type of complication up to 30 days after the procedures. Readmission and reoperation rates, as well as mortality, were also analyzed. Patients were allocated in two groups regarding the type of procedure (LA or CA, and complication rates and characteristics were compared. Statistical analysis was performed with Mann-Whitney test (quantitative variables and chi-square test (qualitative variables, with p < 0.05 considered significant. Results: a total of 46 patients (25 men were included (16 submitted to LA, with mean age of 38.1 (± 12.7 years. The groups were considered homogeneous according to age, gender, CD location, perianal disease and concomitant medications. There were more patients with fistulizing CD on the CA group (p = 0.029. The most common procedure performed was ileocolic resection on both groups (56.7% of the CA and 75% of the LA patients – p = 0.566. Overall, total complications (surgical and medical

  4. Endometriose intestinal: uma doença benigna? Bowel endometriosis: a benign disease?

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    Marco Antonio Bassi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A despeito do caráter benigno da endometriose, estima-se que 1% dos casos esteja relacionado com câncer, especialmente quando ambas as condições ocorrem nos ovários. Lesões extra-ovarianas encontradas no septo retovaginal, cólon, bexiga, vagina e peritônio da região pélvica também já foram associadas com neoplasias malignas. Várias características do tecido endometrial ectópico o aproximam do fenótipo neoplásico, e a própria endometriose possui comportamento tipicamente neoplásico com capacidade de invasão do estroma adjacente e associação com lesões à distância. Esta revisão atualiza conhecimentos diagnósticos, clínicos e terapêuticos dos implantes intestinais de tecido endometriótico, bem como sua relação com processos neoplásicos para melhor compreensão de seu caráter benigno ou de seu eventual potencial para malignidade.Endometriosis is generally assumed to be a benign disease, but it is estimated that 1% of cases are associated with cancer, especially when both conditions are present in the ovary. Extra-ovarian lesions in the rectovaginal septum, colon, bladder, vagina and peritoneum were already associated with malign neoplasia. Several characteristics of endometrial tissue are very similar to the neoplasia phenotype. Endometriosis itself typically behaves as a neoplasia process, spreading over adjacent stroma and being associated with distant lesions. This is an update on the diagnostic, clinical, and therapeutic knowledge of, management of bowel implants of endometrial tissue, as well as the relation with neoplastic processes to better understand its benign nature or eventual potential for malignancy.

  5. Stapled side-to-side anastomosis might be benefit in intestinal resection for Crohn's disease: A systematic review and network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jin-Shan; Li, Jin-Yu; Yang, Zheng; Chen, Xiu-Yan; Mo, Jia-Jie; Li, Shang-Hai

    2018-04-01

    Intestinal anastomosis is an essential step in the intestinal resection in patients with Crohn's disease (CD). Anastomotic configuration such as handsewn end-to-end anastomosis (HEEA), stapled side-to-side anastomosis (SSSA) and so on may be a predictor of prognosis for postoperative CD patients. However, the association between anastomotic types and surgical outcomes are controversial. The aim of this review is to identify the optimal anastomosis for intestinal resection in patients with CD. Clinical trials comparing anastomosis after intestinal resection in patients with CD were searched in the database of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library. Outcomes such as postoperative hospital stay, complications, mortality, recurrence, and reoperation were evaluated. Pairwise treatment effects were estimated through a random-effects network meta-analysis based on the frequency framework by using the STATA software and reported as the estimated summary effect for each comparison between the 2 treatments in the network with a 95% credible interval. A total of 1113 patients in 11 trials were included. In pair-wise comparisons between groups, for overall postoperative complications, SSSA showed a more probability of superiority to HEEA; for complications other than anastomotic leak, anastomotic leak, wound infection, postoperative hospital stay and mortality, there were no significant difference between groups; for clinical recurrence, SSSA showed a more probability of superiority to HEEA; for reoperation, SSSA showed a more probability of superiority to HEEA. The number of eligible randomized controlled trails (RCTs) was small, and more than half of the included trials were retrospective studies; selection bias may lead to a less power in this assessment; follow-up time between different groups was different, which may possibly have affected the interpretation of the analysis of long-term outcome. By comprehensive analyzing all the postoperative outcomes, SSSA appeared

  6. [The usefulness of in vitro interferon-gamma assay for differential diagnosis between intestinal tuberculosis and Crohns disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Nam; Ryu, Dong Yup; Park, Sung Han; You, Hyun Seok; Lee, Bong Eun; Kim, Dong Uk; Kim, Tae Oh; Heo, Jeong; Kim, Gwang Ha; Song, Geun Am; Kim, Suk; Park, Do Youn

    2010-06-01

    It is difficult to clinically and endoscopically differentiate intestinal tuberculosis (ITB) and Crohns disease (CD). The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of in vitro interferon-gamma (INF-gamma) assay for differential diagnosis between ITB and CD. Sixty patients for whom differential diagnosis between ITB and CD was difficult were enrolled between January 2007 and January 2009. The INF-gamma-producing T-cell response to early secreted antigenic target 6 and culture filtrate protein 10 were measured by T-SPOT.TB blood test in vitro. We evaluated the usefulness of T-SPOT.TB blood test by comparing its results with the final diagnosis. Twenty and forty patients were revealed to be positive and negative in T-SPOT.TB blood test, respectively. Of the 20 patients found to be positive, 12 patients (60%) were finally diagnosed as ITB, 6 patients as CD, and 2 patients as Behcets enterocolitis. Of the 40 patients with negative results, 38 patients (95%) were diagnosed as CD; one as Behcets enterocolitis; one as nonspecific colitis; none as ITB. The sensitivity and specificity of T-SPOT.TB blood test for ITB were 100% and 83.3%, respectively. Positive and negative predictive values of T-SPOT.TB blood test for ITB were 60.0% and 100%, respectively. When differential diagnosis between ITB and CD is difficult, T-SPOT.TB blood test may be a helpful and rapid diagnostic tool to exclude ITB. Prospective large-scaled studies are required for further evaluation of the usefulness of T-SPOT.TB blood test for differential diagnosis between ITB and CD.

  7. Long-term safety and efficacy of adalimumab for intestinal Behçet's disease in the open label study following a phase 3 clinical trial

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    Nagamu Inoue

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Intestinal Behçet's disease (BD is an immune-mediated inflammatory disorder. We followed up the patients and evaluated safety profile and effectiveness of adalimumab for the treatment of intestinal BD through 100 weeks rolled over from the 52 week clinical trial (NCT01243671.Methods: Patients initiated adalimumab therapy at 160 mg at week 0, followed by 80 mg at week 2, followed by 40 mg every other week until the end of the study. Long-term safety and all adverse events (AEs were examined. The efficacy was assessed on the basis of marked improvement (MI and complete remission (CR using a composite efficacy index, which combined global gastrointestinal symptoms and endoscopic assessments.Results: Twenty patients were enrolled in this study; 15 patients received adalimumab treatment until study completion. The incidence of AEs through week 100 was 544.4 events/100 person-years, which was comparable to the incidence through week 52 (560.4 events/100 person-years. No unexpected trend was observed and adalimumab was well tolerated. At weeks 52 and 100, 60.0% and 40.0% of patients showed MI, respectively, and 20.0% and 15.0% of patients showed CR, respectively.Conclusions: This report demonstrates 2 years safety and effectiveness of adalimumab in intestinal BD patients. Patients with intestinal BD refractory to conventional treatment receiving up to 2 years of adalimumab treatment demonstrated safety outcomes consistent with the known profile of adalimumab, and the treatment led to sustained reduction of clinical and endoscopic disease activity.

  8. miR-122 targets NOD2 to decrease intestinal epithelial cell injury in Crohn’s disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yu; Wang, Chengxiao; Liu, Ying; Tang, Liwei; Zheng, Mingxia [Department of Pediatrics, Jiangwan Hospital of Shanghai, Shanghai 200434 (China); Xu, Chundi [Department of Pediatrics, Ruijin affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 200025 (China); Song, Jian, E-mail: jiansongkxy@126.com [Department of Gastroenterology, Jiangwan Hospital of Shanghai, Shanghai 200434 (China); Meng, Xiaochun [Department of Pediatrics, Jiangwan Hospital of Shanghai, Shanghai 200434 (China)

    2013-08-16

    Highlights: •NOD2 is a target gene of miR-122. •miR-122 inhibits LPS-induced apoptosis by suppressing NOD2 in HT-29 cells. •miR-122 reduces the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IFN-γ). •miR-122 promotes the release of anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10). •NF-κB signaling pathway is involved in inflammatory response induced by LPS. -- Abstract: Crohn’s disease (CD) is one of the two major types of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) thought to be caused by genetic and environmental factors. Recently, miR-122 was found to be deregulated in association with CD progression. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, the gene nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2/CARD15), which is strongly associated with susceptibility to CD, was identified as a functional target of miR-122. MiR-122 inhibited LPS-induced apoptosis by suppressing NOD2 in HT-29 cells. NOD2 interaction with LPS initiates signal transduction mechanisms resulting in the activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and the stimulation of downstream pro-inflammatory events. The activation of NF-κB was inhibited in LPS-stimulated HT-29 cells pretreated with miR-122 precursor or NOD2 shRNA. The expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IFN-γ was significantly decreased, whereas therelease of the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-10 was increased in LPS-stimulated HT-29 cells pretreated with miR-122 precursor, NOD2 shRNA or the NF-κB inhibitor QNZ. Taken together, these results indicate that miR-122 and its target gene NOD2 may play an important role in the injury of intestinal epithelial cells induced by LPS.

  9. Intestinal failure: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Philip; Lal, Simon

    2018-01-01

    Intestinal failure (IF) is the inability of the gut to absorb necessary water, macronutrients (carbohydrate, protein, and fat), micronutrients, and electrolytes sufficient to sustain life and requiring intravenous supplementation or replacement. Acute IF (types 1 and 2) is the initial phase of the illness and may last for weeks to a few months, and chronic IF (type 3) from months to years. The challenge of caring for patients with IF is not merely the management of the underlying condition leading to IF or the correct provision of appropriate nutrition or both but also the prevention of complications, whether thromboembolic phenomenon (for example, venous occlusion), central venous catheter-related bloodstream infection, IF-associated liver disease, or metabolic bone disease. This review looks at recent questions regarding chronic IF (type 3), its diagnosis and management, the role of the multidisciplinary team, and novel therapies, including hormonal treatment for short bowel syndrome but also surgical options for intestinal lengthening and intestinal transplant. PMID:29399329

  10. A model of metabolic syndrome and related diseases with intestinal endotoxemia in rats fed a high fat and high sucrose diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xin; Han, Dewu; Xu, Ruiling; Li, Suhong; Wu, Huiwen; Qu, Chongxiao; Wang, Feng; Wang, Xiangyu; Zhao, Yuanchang

    2014-01-01

    We sought develop and characterize a diet-induced model of metabolic syndrome and its related diseases. The experimental animals (Spague-Dawley rats) were randomly divided into two groups, and each group was fed a different feed for 48 weeks as follows: 1) standard control diet (SC), and 2) a high sucrose and high fat diet (HSHF). The blood, small intestine, liver, pancreas, and adipose tissues were sampled for analysis and characterization. Typical metabolic syndrome (MS), non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and type II diabetes (T2DM) were common in the HSHF group after a 48 week feeding period. The rats fed HSHF exhibited signs of obesity, dyslipidemia, hyperglycaemia, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance (IR). At the same time, these animals had significantly increased levels of circulating LPS, TNFα, and IL-6 and increased ALP in their intestinal tissue homogenates. These animals also showed a significant reduction in the expression of occluding protein. The HSHF rats showed fatty degeneration, inflammation, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and lipid accumulation when their liver pathologies were examined. The HSHF rats also displayed increased islet diameters from 12 to 24 weeks, while reduced islet diameters occurred from 36 to 48 weeks with inflammatory cell infiltration and islet fat deposition. The morphometry of adipocytes in HSHF rats showed hypertrophy and inflammatory cell infiltration. HSHF CD68 analysis showed macrophage infiltration and significant increases in fat and pancreas size. HSHF Tunel analysis showed significant increases in liver and pancreas cell apoptosis. This work demonstrated the following: 1) a characteristic rat model of metabolic syndrome (MS) can be induced by a high sucrose and high fat diet, 2) this model can be used to research metabolic syndrome and its related diseases, such as NAFLD and T2DM, and 3) intestinal endotoxemia (IETM) may play an important role in the pathogenesis of MS and related diseases, such as NAFLD and

  11. A model of metabolic syndrome and related diseases with intestinal endotoxemia in rats fed a high fat and high sucrose diet.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Zhou

    Full Text Available We sought develop and characterize a diet-induced model of metabolic syndrome and its related diseases.The experimental animals (Spague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into two groups, and each group was fed a different feed for 48 weeks as follows: 1 standard control diet (SC, and 2 a high sucrose and high fat diet (HSHF. The blood, small intestine, liver, pancreas, and adipose tissues were sampled for analysis and characterization.Typical metabolic syndrome (MS, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, and type II diabetes (T2DM were common in the HSHF group after a 48 week feeding period. The rats fed HSHF exhibited signs of obesity, dyslipidemia, hyperglycaemia, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance (IR. At the same time, these animals had significantly increased levels of circulating LPS, TNFα, and IL-6 and increased ALP in their intestinal tissue homogenates. These animals also showed a significant reduction in the expression of occluding protein. The HSHF rats showed fatty degeneration, inflammation, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and lipid accumulation when their liver pathologies were examined. The HSHF rats also displayed increased islet diameters from 12 to 24 weeks, while reduced islet diameters occurred from 36 to 48 weeks with inflammatory cell infiltration and islet fat deposition. The morphometry of adipocytes in HSHF rats showed hypertrophy and inflammatory cell infiltration. HSHF CD68 analysis showed macrophage infiltration and significant increases in fat and pancreas size. HSHF Tunel analysis showed significant increases in liver and pancreas cell apoptosis.This work demonstrated the following: 1 a characteristic rat model of metabolic syndrome (MS can be induced by a high sucrose and high fat diet, 2 this model can be used to research metabolic syndrome and its related diseases, such as NAFLD and T2DM, and 3 intestinal endotoxemia (IETM may play an important role in the pathogenesis of MS and related diseases, such as NAFLD

  12. How early to take arms against a sea of troubles? The case for aggressive early therapy in Crohn's disease to prevent fibrotic intestinal strictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govani, Shail M; Stidham, Ryan W; Higgins, Peter D R

    2013-12-01

    While potent anti-inflammatory medications have reduced the symptoms of Crohn's disease, more than 60% of patients eventually require surgery due to the development of fibrosis. Even after the introduction of biologic drugs, the population-based rate of surgery for Crohn's disease has not decreased. We suspect this is due to late initiation of these therapies, after the fibrosis cascade is unstoppable. We review the evidence that suggests early aggressive therapy is beneficial, especially in patients diagnosed before age 40, and with ileal or perianal disease. Patients with symptomatic strictures may benefit from early surgery (before penetrating complications) followed by initiation of biologics. With increased early use of biologics and better control of inflammation, we hope to see a global reduction in intestinal fibrosis and related complications of Crohn's disease. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Nutritional status variation and intestinal and extra intestinal symptomatology in patients with celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity given specialized dietary advice

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    Priscila Vaz de Melo RIBEIRO

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To investigate the nutritional status variation and symptomatology of patients with celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity after specialized dietary advice Methods: This prospective study included 80 patients with celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Clinical, metabolic, and nutritional variables were collected from medical records, and the symptomatology was investigated by the Metabolic Screening Questionnaire. The variables were assessed on two occasions (T1 - before dietary advice and T2 - after dietary advice with an interval of three months between T1 and T2 Results: The median age was 42 years. The prevalences of celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity were 66.2% and 33.8%, respectively. Normal weight prevailed at T1 (58.8% and T2 (56.3%, but 30.0% of the patients at T1 and 34.9% of the patients at T2 had excess weight. The two conditions had similar symptomatology. The most frequent signs and symptoms on both occasions involved the gastrointestinal tract, followed by energy/activity and emotions. All symptoms decreased significantly after the introduction of a proper diet Conclusion: The patients were normal weight on both study occasions (T1 and T2, and the symptoms improved after dietary advice. Thus, we reinforce the importance of proper dietary management in both clinical conditions to make dietary adjustments that improve these individuals' symptomatology.

  14. Intestinal Ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... weight loss Intestinal ischemia Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  15. Streptozotocin-induced type-1-diabetes disease onset in Sprague-Dawley rats is associated with an altered intestinal microbiota composition and decreased diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Elaine; Marques, Tatiana M; O'Sullivan, Orla; Fitzgerald, Patrick; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Cotter, Paul D; Dinan, Timothy G; Cryan, John F; Stanton, Catherine; Ross, R Paul

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing appreciation that microbiota composition can significantly affect host health and play a role in disease onset and progression. This study assessed the impact of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type-1-diabetes (T1D) on intestinal microbiota composition and diversity in Sprague-Dawley rats, compared with healthy controls over time. T1D was induced by injection of a single dose (60 mg STZ kg(-1)) of STZ, administered via the intraperitoneal cavity. Total DNA was isolated from faecal pellets at weeks 0 (pre-STZ injection), 1, 2 and 4 and from caecal content at week 5 from both healthy and T1D groups. High-throughput 16S rRNA sequencing was employed to investigate intestinal microbiota composition. The data revealed that although intestinal microbiota composition between the groups was similar at week 0, a dramatic impact of T1D development on the microbiota was apparent post-STZ injection and for up to 5 weeks. Most notably, T1D onset was associated with a shift in the Bacteroidetes : Firmicutes ratio (Pmicrobiota composition and reduced microbial diversity over time. © 2015 The Authors.

  16. Infliximab associated with life-threatening lung infection in a patient with Behcet disease with intestinal and hematopoietic system involvement: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; Shen, Yan; Ma, Hai-Fen; Cai, Jian-Fei; Hua, Yan-Qin; Zou, Jun; Guan, Jian-Long

    2017-12-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) participates in the pathophysiology of Behcet's disease (BD) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Infliximab is recommaned for the most severe type of BD, however, there is little evidence for its effectiveness in BD associated MDS. A 46-year-old female, initially diagnosed with intestinal BD and leukopenia was later diagnosed as MDS. Treatement with infliximab and other immunoregulators lead to life-threatening pneumonia. Intestinal BD associated with MDS involving trisomy 8. The patient initially treated with methylprednisolone, thalidomide, cyclosporine A, and infliximab, which lead to severe lung infection. Therefore, the patient was transferred to Intensive Care Unit for life supportive, anti-infection and immune improving therapy. The patient survived from the lung infection. With combination of methylprednisolone, thalidomide and cyclosporine A, the patient recovered from her intestinal ulceration and MDS manifestations. Infliximab treatment may not benefit a patient with BD associated with MDS but place the patient at risk of infection. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Intestinal Coccidia

    OpenAIRE

    MJ Ggaravi

    2007-01-01

    Intestinal Coccidia are a subclass of Apicomplexa phylum. Eucoccidida are facultative heteroxenous, but some of them are monoxenous. They have sexual and asexual life cycle. Some coccidia are human pathogens, for example: Cryptosporidium: Cryptosporidiums has many species that are mammalian intestinal parasites.C. Parvum specie is a human pathogenic protozoa. Cryptosporidum has circle or ellipse shapes and nearly 4-6 mm. It is transmitted in warm seasons. Oocyst is obtained insexual life cycl...

  18. Molecular signatures for the dynamic process of establishing intestinal host-microbial homeostasis: potential for disease diagnostics?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aidy, El S.F.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review: The dynamic interplay of the intestinal microbiota and host has been the focus of many studies because of its impact on the health status in human life. Recent reports on the time-resolved immune and metabolic interactions between the host and microbiota, as well as the molecular

  19. Giardia co-infection promotes the secretion of antimicrobial peptides beta-defensin 2 and trefoil factor 3 and attenuates attaching and effacing bacteria-induced intestinal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manko, Anna; Motta, Jean-Paul; Cotton, James A; Feener, Troy; Oyeyemi, Ayodele; Vallance, Bruce A; Wallace, John L; Buret, Andre G

    2017-01-01

    Our understanding of polymicrobial gastrointestinal infections and their effects on host biology remains incompletely understood. Giardia duodenalis is an ubiquitous intestinal protozoan parasite infecting animals and humans. Concomitant infections with Giardia and other gastrointestinal pathogens commonly occur. In countries with poor sanitation, Giardia infection has been associated with decreased incidence of diarrheal disease and fever, and reduced serum inflammatory markers release, via mechanisms that remain obscure. This study analyzed Giardia spp. co-infections with attaching and effacing (A/E) pathogens, and assessed whether and how the presence of Giardia modulates host responses to A/E enteropathogens, and alters intestinal disease outcome. In mice infected with the A/E pathogen Citrobacter rodentium, co-infection with Giardia muris significantly attenuated weight loss, macro- and microscopic signs of colitis, bacterial colonization and translocation, while concurrently enhancing the production and secretion of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) mouse β-defensin 3 and trefoil factor 3 (TFF3). Co-infection of human intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2) monolayers with G. duodenalis trophozoites and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) enhanced the production of the AMPs human β-defensin 2 (HBD-2) and TFF3; this effect was inhibited with treatment of G. duodenalis with cysteine protease inhibitors. Collectively, these results suggest that Giardia infections are capable of reducing enteropathogen-induced colitis while increasing production of host AMPs. Additional studies also demonstrated that Giardia was able to directly inhibit the growth of pathogenic bacteria. These results reveal novel mechanisms whereby Giardia may protect against gastrointestinal disease induced by a co-infecting A/E enteropathogen. Our findings shed new light on how microbial-microbial interactions in the gut may protect a host during concomitant infections.

  20. Comparison of the intestinal mucosal microbiota in dogs diagnosed with idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease and dogs with food-responsive diarrhea before and after treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalenyak, Katja; Isaiah, Anitha; Heilmann, Romy M; Suchodolski, Jan S; Burgener, Iwan A

    2018-02-01

    We report the first study to evaluate the intestinal mucosal microbiota of dogs with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and dogs with food-responsive diarrhea (FRD) before and after treatment. It was hypothesized that differences in the microbial composition exist between both disease groups and within groups pre- vs. post-treatment. Duodenal and colonic biopsies were obtained endoscopically from 24 dogs (15 FRD, 9 IBD) before and after treatment. The intestinal microbiota was evaluated by Illumina sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. The global bacterial composition did not differ between IBD and FRD dogs, nor between treatment status. However, several bacterial taxa showed a difference in abundance. Comparing disease groups, an unclassified genus of Neisseriaceae was abundant in the duodenum in the IBD group, whereas Bilophila occurred more frequently in the duodenum and Burkholderia in the colon of FRD dogs. Comparing the microbiota pre- and post-treatment revealed Enterococcus, Corynebacterium and Proteobacteria to be enriched in the duodenum of FRD dogs pre-treatment, while Bacteroides was abundant in the colon post-treatment. In dogs with IBD, Bacteroides also reached significant abundance in the colon post-treatment. In conclusion, some differences in individual bacterial taxa were identified between IBD and FRD dogs and between treatment status. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Intestinal anisakidosis (anisakiosis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takei, Hidehiro; Powell, Suzanne Z

    2007-10-01

    A case of intestinal anisakidosis in a 42-year-old man in Japan is presented. His chief complaint was an acute onset of severe abdominal pain. Approximately 12 hours before the onset of this symptom, he had eaten sliced raw mackerel ("sashimi"). Upper endoscopy was unremarkable. At exploratory laparotomy, an edematous, diffusely thickened segment of jejunum was observed, which was resected. The postoperative course was uneventful. The segment of small intestine showed a granular indurated area on the mucosal surface, and microscopically, a helminthic larva penetrating the intestinal wall, which was surrounded by a cuff of numerous neutrophils and eosinophils, as well as diffuse acute serositis. A cross section of the larva revealed the internal structures, pathognomonic of Anisakis simplex. Although anisakidosis is rare in the United States, with the increasing popularity of Japanese cuisine, the incidence is expected to increase, and pathologists should be familiar with this disease.

  2. Small intestine diverticuli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomakov, P.; Risov, A.

    1991-01-01

    The routine method of contrast matter passage applied to 850 patients with different gastrointestinal diseases proved inefficient to detect any small-intestinal diverticuli. The following modiffications of the method have been tested in order to improve the diagnostic possibilities of the X-ray: study at short intervals, assisted passage, enteroclysm, pharmacodynamic impact, retrograde filling of the ileum by irrigoscopy. Twelve diverticuli of the small-intestinal loops were identified: 5 Meckel's diverticuli, 2 solitary of which one of the therminal ileum, 2 double diverticuli and 1 multiple diverticulosis of the jejunum. The results show that the short interval X-ray examination of the small intestines is the method of choice for identifying local changes in them. The solitary diverticuli are not casuistic scarcity, its occurrence is about 0.5% at purposeful X-ray investigation. The assisted passage method is proposed as a method of choice for detection of the Meckel's diverticulum. 5 figs., 3 tabs. 18 refs

  3. Chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeon, Kyung Mo; Seo, Jeong Kee; Lee, Yong Seok

    1992-01-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction syndrome is a rare clinical condition in which impaired intestinal peristalsis causes recurrent symptoms of bowel obstruction in the absence of a mechanical occlusion. This syndrome may involve variable segments of small or large bowel, and may be associated with urinary bladder retention. This study included 6 children(3 boys and 3 girls) of chronic intestinal obstruction. Four were symptomatic at birth and two were of the ages of one month and one year. All had abdominal distension and deflection difficulty. Five had urinary bladder distension. Despite parenteral nutrition and surgical intervention(ileostomy or colostomy), bowel obstruction persisted and four patients expired from sepses within one year. All had gaseous distension of small and large bowel on abdominal films. In small bowel series, consistent findings were variable degree of dilatation, decreased peristalsis(prolonged transit time) and microcolon or microrectum. This disease entity must be differentiated from congenital megacolon, ileal atresia and megacystis syndrome

  4. Crohn's disease intestinal CD4+ T cells have impaired interleukin-10 productionwhich is not restored by probiotic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Christian L; Kelsen, Jens; Agnholt, Jørgen

    2007-01-01

    /ml+/-standard error of the mean 1.1 ng/ml) but low levels of IL-10 (0.7 ng/ml+/-0.1 ng/ml). In contrast, HV intestinal T cells produced less IFN-gamma (3.9 ng/ml+/-0.8 ng/ml, p=0.06) and more IL-10 (4.6 ng/ml+/-0.9 ng/ml, p=0.0001) than CD intestinal T cells. Co-culture with Lactobacilli failed to revert...... a pro-inflammatory cytokine profile with impaired production of the regulatory cytokine IL-10. Tolerogenic bacteria (Lactobacilli) failed to restore this regulatory defect....

  5. Prebiotic Supplementation Has Only Minimal Effects on Growth Efficiency, Intestinal Health and Disease Resistance of Westslope Cutthroat Trout Oncorhynchus clarkii lewisi Fed 30% Soybean Meal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy M. Sealey

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Prebiotics have successfully been used to prevent infectious diseases in aquaculture and there is an increasing amount of literature that suggests that these products can also improve alternative protein utilization and digestion. Therefore, the objective of this study was to examine whether prebiotic supplementation increased the growth efficiency, intestinal health and disease resistance of cutthroat trout fed a high level of dietary soybean meal. To achieve this objective, juvenile Westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii lewisi were fed a practical type formulation with 0 or 30% dietary soybean meal with or without the commercial prebiotic (Grobiotic-A prior to experimental exposure to Flavobacterium psychrophilum. Juvenile Westslope cutthroat trout (initial weight 7.8 g/fish ± standard deviation of 0.5 g were stocked at 30 fish/tank in 75 L tanks with six replicate tanks per diet and fed their respective diets for 20 weeks. Final weights of Westslope cutthroat trout were affected by neither dietary soybean meal inclusion level (P=0.9582 nor prebiotic inclusion (P=0.9348 and no interaction was observed (P=0.1242. Feed conversion ratios were similarly not affected by soybean meal level (P=0.4895, prebiotic inclusion (P=0.3258 or their interaction (P=0.1478. Histological examination of the distal intestine of Westslope cutthroat trout demonstrated increases in inflammation due to both increased soybean meal inclusion level (P=0.0038 and prebiotic inclusion (P=0.0327 without significant interaction (P=0.3370. Feeding dietary soybean meal level at 30% increased mortality of F.psychrophilum cohabitation challenged Westslope cutthroat trout (P=0.0345 while prebiotic inclusion tended to decrease mortality (P=0.0671. These results indicate that subclinical alterations in intestinal inflammation levels due to high dietary inclusion levels of soybean meal could predispose Westslope cutthroat trout to F.psychrophilum infection.

  6. The Contributions of Human Mini-Intestines to the Study of Intestinal Physiology and Pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Huimin; Hasan, Nesrin M; In, Julie G; Estes, Mary K; Kovbasnjuk, Olga; Zachos, Nicholas C; Donowitz, Mark

    2017-02-10

    The lack of accessibility to normal and diseased human intestine and the inability to separate the different functional compartments of the intestine even when tissue could be obtained have held back the understanding of human intestinal physiology. Clevers and his associates identified intestinal stem cells and established conditions to grow "mini-intestines" ex vivo in differentiated and undifferentiated conditions. This pioneering work has made a new model of the human intestine available and has begun making contributions to the understanding of human intestinal transport in normal physiologic conditions and the pathophysiology of intestinal diseases. However, this model is reductionist and lacks many of the complexities of normal intestine. Consequently, it is not yet possible to predict how great the advances using this model will be for understanding human physiology and pathophysiology, nor how the model will be modified to include multiple other intestinal cell types and physical forces necessary to more closely approximate normal intestine. This review describes recent studies using mini-intestines, which have readdressed previously established models of normal intestinal transport physiology and newly examined intestinal pathophysiology. The emphasis is on studies with human enteroids grown either as three-dimensional spheroids or two-dimensional monolayers. In addition, comments are provided on mouse studies in cases when human studies have not yet been described.

  7. Prevalence and risk factors for development of hemorrhagic gastro-intestinal disease in veterinary intensive care units in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swann, James W; Maunder, Christina L; Roberts, Emma; McLauchlan, Gerard; Adamantos, Sophie

    2016-05-01

    To determine the prevalence of hemorrhagic gastro-intestinal (GI) disease developing in dogs and cats admitted for management of non-GI disease in veterinary intensive care units (ICUs). Retrospective study of animals presented between October 2012 and July 2013. Three ICUs located in veterinary teaching hospitals in the United Kingdom. Dogs (n = 272) and cats (n = 94) were consecutively enrolled from 3 ICUs if they were hospitalized in the unit for at least 24 hours. Cases were excluded if they had hemorrhagic GI disease in the 48-hour period before presentation or in the 24-hour period after admission. Cases were also excluded if they suffered skull fracture, epistaxis, or hemoptysis, if they underwent surgical procedures of the GI or upper respiratory tracts, or if they were presented for management of GI disease. Hemorrhagic GI disease was observed in dogs at all 3 units, but at different rates (Center 1: 10.3%, Center 2: 4.8%, Center 3: 2.2%). Hemorrhagic GI disease was not observed in cats at any of the participating centers. Construction of a multivariable logistic regression model revealed that serum albumin concentration, administration of prophylactic gastro-protectant drugs, and institution were significantly associated with the development of hemorrhagic GI disease in dogs. Development of hemorrhagic GI disease and placement of a feeding tube were significantly associated with mortality during the period of hospitalization in dogs. Thirty-seven (13.6%) dogs and 12 (12.8%) cats died or were euthanized while hospitalized, with a higher mortality rate (42.1%) in dogs with hemorrhagic GI disease. Hemorrhagic GI disease does develop in dogs hospitalized for management of non-GI disease, but this phenomenon was not observed in cats. Development of hemorrhagic GI disease appeared to have a significant impact on survival in veterinary ICUs. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2015.

  8. Utility of Aminotransferase/Platelet Ratio Index to Predict Liver Fibrosis in Intestinal Failure-Associated Liver Disease in Pediatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumbo, Carolina; Martinez, María Inés; Cabanne, Ana; Trentadue, Julio; Fernández, Adriana; Gondolesi, Gabriel

    2017-07-01

    Intestinal failure-associated liver disease (IFALD) is a frequent indication for intestinal transplantation. Liver biopsy (LBX) is the gold standard test for its diagnosis. Identifying noninvasive markers of fibrosis progression would be of considerable clinical use. Aspartate aminotransferase/platelet ratio index (APRI) has a good correlation in adult patients with chronic liver disease; few studies have been performed in children with IFALD. To evaluate APRI in a cohort of children with IFALD. Retrospective analysis of a prospective database of patients failure and at least 1 LBX, registered in our unit from March 2006 to December 2014. Forty-nine LBX were done on 36 patients: 20 were male, and 31 had short gut. Fibrosis was found in 71% of LBX. Biopsies were grouped according to the fibrosis stage (METAVIR [M]): (1) group 1 (G1) LBX with M 0, 1, 2 (n = 33) and (2) group 2 (G2) LBX with M 3, 4 (n = 16). The median APRI score was 0.92 (interquartile range [IQR] 0.63-1.50) for G1 and 2.50 (IQR 1.81-5.82) for G2 ( P = .001) The c statistic of the receiving operating characteristic curve was 0.79 (95% CI 0.64-0.94; P 1.6 correlates with advanced fibrosis.

  9. Evaluation of Multiple Diagnostic Indicators in Comparison to the Intestinal Biopsy as the Golden Standard in Diagnosing Celiac Disease in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabet Hollén

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is a chronic small intestinal enteropathy triggered by gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. The susceptibility is strongly associated with certain human leukocyte antigen (HLA-genes, but efforts are being made in trying to find non-HLA genes that are predictive for the disease. The criteria for diagnosing CD were previously based primarily on histologic evaluation of small intestinal biopsies, but nowadays are often based only on blood tests and symptoms. In this context, we elucidated the accuracy of three diagnostic indicators for CD, alone or in combination. Genetic analyses of HLA-type and nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs known to be associated with CD were performed in 177 children previously investigated for the suspicion of CD. CD was confirmed in 109 children, while 68 were considered non-celiacs. The antibodies and urinary nitrite/nitrate concentrations of all of them were measured. The combinations of all the variables used in the study would classify 93% of the study population in the correct diagnostic group. The single best predictors were antibodies (i.e., anti-endomysium immunoglobulin A (IgA (EMA and transglutaminase IgA (TGA, followed by HLA-type and nitric oxide (NO-metabolites. The nine SNPs used did not contribute to the right diagnoses. Although our control group consisted of children with mostly gastrointestinal symptoms, the presented methodology predicted a correct classification in more than 90% of the cases.

  10. Small intestine and microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, Paul D

    2011-03-01

    To highlight the recent studies which have enhanced our appreciation of the composition of the microbiota in the human small intestine and its relevance to the health of the host. In the past number of years, the composition of the microorganisms present in our small intestines has been the subject of greater scrutiny than ever before. These investigations have been possible as a consequence of the development and utilization of new molecular tools which have revolutionized the field of microbial ecology and have focused predominantly on the small intestinal microbiota associated with pediatric celiac disease, inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome and pouchitis. The impact of invasive procedures, such as small bowel transplant, ileostomy and ileal pouch anal anastomosis, on the ileal microbiota has also been investigated. The ever greater appreciation of the link between the small intestinal microbiota and the health status of the host has the potential to lead to the development of new strategies to alter this microbiota in a targeted way to prevent or treat specific disorders.

  11. Elevated Basal Pre-infection CXCL10 in Plasma and in the Small Intestine after Infection Are Associated with More Rapid HIV/SIV Disease Onset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploquin, Mickaël J.; Casrouge, Armanda; Huot, Nicolas; Passaes, Caroline; Lécuroux, Camille; Essat, Asma; Boufassa, Faroudy; Jacquelin, Béatrice; Jochems, Simon P.; Petitjean, Gaël; Angin, Mathieu; Gärtner, Kathleen; Garcia-Tellez, Thalía; Booiman, Thijs; Boeser-Nunnink, Brigitte D.; Roques, Pierre; Saez-Cirion, Asier; Vaslin, Bruno; Dereudre-Bosquet, Nathalie; Barré-Sinoussi, Françoise; Ghislain, Mathilde; Rouzioux, Christine; Lambotte, Olivier; Albert, Matthew L.; Goujard, Cécile; Kootstra, Neeltje; Meyer, Laurence; Müller-Trutwin, Michaela C.

    2016-01-01

    Elevated blood CXCL10/IP-10 levels during primary HIV-1 infection (PHI) were described as an independent marker of rapid disease onset, more robust than peak viremia or CD4 cell nadir. IP-10 enhances the recruitment of CXCR3+ cells, which include major HIV-target cells, raising the question if it promotes the establishment of viral reservoirs. We analyzed data from four cohorts of HIV+ patients, allowing us to study IP-10 levels before infection (Amsterdam cohort), as well as during controlled and uncontrolled viremia (ANRS cohorts). We also addressed IP-10 expression levels with regards to lymphoid tissues (LT) and blood viral reservoirs in patients and non-human primates. Pre-existing elevated IP-10 levels but not sCD63 associated with rapid CD4 T-cell loss upon HIV-1 infection. During PHI, IP-10 levels and to a lesser level IL-18 correlated with cell-associated HIV DNA, while 26 other inflammatory soluble markers did not. IP-10 levels tended to differ between HIV controllers with detectable and undetectable viremia. IP-10 was increased in SIV-exposed aviremic macaques with detectable SIV DNA in tissues. IP-10 mRNA was produced at higher levels in the small intestine than in colon or rectum. Jejunal IP-10+ cells corresponded to numerous small and round CD68neg cells as well as to macrophages. Blood IP-10 response negatively correlated with RORC (Th17 marker) gene expression in the small intestine. CXCR3 expression was higher on memory CD4+ T cells than any other immune cells. CD4 T cells from chronically infected animals expressed extremely high levels of intra-cellular CXCR3 suggesting internalization after ligand recognition. Elevated systemic IP-10 levels before infection associated with rapid disease progression. Systemic IP-10 during PHI correlated with HIV DNA. IP-10 production was regionalized in the intestine during early SIV infection and CD68+ and CD68neg haematopoietic cells in the small intestine appeared to be the major source of IP-10. PMID:27509048

  12. Elevated Basal Pre-infection CXCL10 in Plasma and in the Small Intestine after Infection Are Associated with More Rapid HIV/SIV Disease Onset.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mickaël J Ploquin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Elevated blood CXCL10/IP-10 levels during primary HIV-1 infection (PHI were described as an independent marker of rapid disease onset, more robust than peak viremia or CD4 cell nadir. IP-10 enhances the recruitment of CXCR3+ cells, which include major HIV-target cells, raising the question if it promotes the establishment of viral reservoirs. We analyzed data from four cohorts of HIV+ patients, allowing us to study IP-10 levels before infection (Amsterdam cohort, as well as during controlled and uncontrolled viremia (ANRS cohorts. We also addressed IP-10 expression levels with regards to lymphoid tissues (LT and blood viral reservoirs in patients and non-human primates. Pre-existing elevated IP-10 levels but not sCD63 associated with rapid CD4 T-cell loss upon HIV-1 infection. During PHI, IP-10 levels and to a lesser level IL-18 correlated with cell-associated HIV DNA, while 26 other inflammatory soluble markers did not. IP-10 levels tended to differ between HIV controllers with detectable and undetectable viremia. IP-10 was increased in SIV-exposed aviremic macaques with detectable SIV DNA in tissues. IP-10 mRNA was produced at higher levels in the small intestine than in colon or rectum. Jejunal IP-10+ cells corresponded to numerous small and round CD68neg cells as well as to macrophages. Blood IP-10 response negatively correlated with RORC (Th17 marker gene expression in the small intestine. CXCR3 expression was higher on memory CD4+ T cells than any other immune cells. CD4 T cells from chronically infected animals expressed extremely high levels of intra-cellular CXCR3 suggesting internalization after ligand recognition. Elevated systemic IP-10 levels before infection associated with rapid disease progression. Systemic IP-10 during PHI correlated with HIV DNA. IP-10 production was regionalized in the intestine during early SIV infection and CD68+ and CD68neg haematopoietic cells in the small intestine appeared to be the major source of IP-10.

  13. Intestinal Microbiota Signatures Associated With Histological Liver Steatosis in Pediatric-Onset Intestinal Failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korpela, K.; Mutanen, A.; Salonen, A.; Savilahti, E.; Vos, de W.M.; Pakarinen, M.P.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intestinal failure (IF)-associated liver disease (IFALD) is the major cause of mortality in IF. The link between intestinal microbiota and IFALD is unclear. METHODS: We compared intestinal microbiota of patients with IF (n = 23) with healthy controls (n = 58) using culture-independent

  14. The intestinal T cell response to alpha-gliadin in adult celiac disease is focused on a single deamidated glutamine targeted by tissue transglutaminase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arentz-Hansen, H; Körner, R; Molberg, O

    2000-01-01

    The great majority of patients that are intolerant of wheat gluten protein due to celiac disease (CD) are human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQ2(+), and the remaining few normally express HLA-DQ8. These two class II molecules are chiefly responsible for the presentation of gluten...... peptides to the gluten-specific T cells that are found only in the gut of CD patients but not of controls. Interestingly, tissue transglutaminase (tTG)-mediated deamidation of gliadin plays an important role in recognition of this food antigen by intestinal T cells. Here we have used recombinant antigens...... for T cell recognition. Gluten-specific T cell lines from 16 different adult patients all responded to one or both of these deamidated peptides, indicating that these epitopes are highly relevant to disease pathology. Binding studies showed that the deamidated peptides displayed an increased affinity...

  15. The intestinal calcistat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M K Garg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The main physiological function of vitamin D is maintenance of calcium homeostasis by its effect on calcium absorption, and bone health in association with parathyroid gland. Vitamin D deficiency (VDD is defined as serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25OHD levels <20 ng/ml. Do all subjects with VDD have clinical disease according to this definition? We hypothesize that there exist an intestinal calcistat, which controls the calcium absorption independent of PTH levels. It consists of calcium sensing receptor (CaSR on intestinal brush border, which senses calcium in intestinal cells and vitamin D system in intestinal cells. CaSR dampens the generation of active vitamin D metabolite in intestinal cells and decrease active transcellular calcium transport. It also facilitates passive paracellular diffusion of calcium in intestine. This local adaptation adjusts the fractional calcium absorption according the body requirement. Failure of local adaptation due to decreased calcium intake, decreased supply of 25OHD, mutation in CaSR or vitamin D system decreases systemic calcium levels and systemic adaptations comes into the play. Systemic adaptations consist of rise in PTH and increase in active vitamin D metabolites. These adaptations lead to bone resorption and maintenance of calcium homeostasis. Not all subjects with varying levels of VDD manifest with secondary hyperparathyroidism and decreased in bone mineral density. We suggest that rise in PTH is first indicator of VDD along with decrease in BMD depending on duration of VDD. Hence, subjects with any degree of VDD with normal PTH and BMD should not be labeled as vitamin D deficient. These subjects can be called subclinical VDD, and further studies are required to assess beneficial effect of vitamin D supplementation in this subset of population.

  16. Disease surveillance of Atlantic herring: molecular characterization of hepatic coccidiosis and a morphological report of a novel intestinal coccidian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, Sarah E; Lovy, Jan; Hershberger, Paul K

    2016-07-07

    Surveillance for pathogens of Atlantic herring, including viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), Ichthyophonus hoferi, and hepatic and intestinal coccidians, was conducted from 2012 to 2016 in the NW Atlantic Ocean, New Jersey, USA. Neither VHSV nor I. hoferi was detected in any sample. Goussia clupearum was found in the livers of 40 to 78% of adult herring in varying parasite loads; however, associated pathological changes were negligible. Phylogenetic analysis based on small subunit 18S rRNA gene sequences placed G. clupearum most closely with other extraintestinal liver coccidia from the genus Calyptospora, though the G. clupearum isolates had a unique nucleotide insertion between 604 and 729 bp that did not occur in any other coccidian species. G. clupearum oocysts from Atlantic and Pacific herring were morphologically similar, though differences occurred in oocyst dimensions. Comparison of G. clupearum genetic sequences from Atlantic and Pacific herring revealed 4 nucleotide substitutions and 2 gaps in a 1749 bp region, indicating some divergence in the geographically separate populations. Pacific G. clupearum oocysts were not directly infective, suggesting that a heteroxenous life cycle is likely. Intestinal coccidiosis was described for the first time from juvenile and adult Atlantic herring. A novel intestinal coccidian species was detected based on morphological characteristics of exogenously sporulated oocysts. A unique feature in these oocysts was the presence of 3 long (15.1 ± 5.1 µm, mean ±SD) spiny projections on both ends of the oocyst. The novel morphology of this coccidian led us to tentatively name this parasite G. echinata n. sp.

  17. Disease surveillance of Atlantic herring: molecular characterization of hepatic coccidiosis and a morphological report of a novel intestinal coccidian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, Sarah E; Lovey, J; Hershberger, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Surveillance for pathogens of Atlantic herring, including viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV),Ichthyophonus hoferi, and hepatic and intestinal coccidians, was conducted from 2012 to 2016 in the NW Atlantic Ocean, New Jersey, USA. Neither VHSV nor I. hoferi was detected in any sample. Goussia clupearum was found in the livers of 40 to 78% of adult herring in varying parasite loads; however, associated pathological changes were negligible. Phylogenetic analysis based on small subunit 18S rRNA gene sequences placed G. clupearum most closely with other extraintestinal liver coccidia from the genus Calyptospora, though the G. clupearum isolates had a unique nucleotide insertion between 604 and 729 bp that did not occur in any other coccidian species. G. clupearum oocysts from Atlantic and Pacific herring were morphologically similar, though differences occurred in oocyst dimensions. Comparison of G. clupearum genetic sequences from Atlantic and Pacific herring revealed 4 nucleotide substitutions and 2 gaps in a 1749 bp region, indicating some divergence in the geographically separate populations. Pacific G. clupearum oocysts were not directly infective, suggesting that a heteroxenous life cycle is likely. Intestinal coccidiosis was described for the first time from juvenile and adult Atlantic herring. A novel intestinal coccidian species was detected based on morphological characteristics of exogenously sporulated oocysts. A unique feature in these oocysts was the presence of 3 long (15.1 ± 5.1 µm, mean ±SD) spiny projections on both ends of the oocyst. The novel morphology of this coccidian led us to tentatively name this parasite G. echinata n. sp.

  18. Long-Term Intravenous Ketamine for Analgesia in a Child with Severe Chronic Intestinal Graft versus Host Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Busse

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ketamine is reported to be an effective adjuvant to opioids in the treatment of refractory cancer pain; however, the use of high doses of ketamine for extended periods in pediatric patients has not been described. We present a five-year-old male with grade IV intestinal GVHD whose abdominal pain required both hydromorphone and ketamine for a period of over four months. There was no evidence of hepatotoxicity, hemorrhagic cystitis, or other adverse effects. Possible withdrawal symptoms were mild and were readily mitigated by gradually weaning ketamine.

  19. Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease early before it causes damage to the intestine. But because it's easy to confuse the symptoms with other intestinal disorders, such as irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease , or lactose intolerance , teens with ...

  20. Dysbiosis gut microbiota associated with inflammation and impaired mucosal immune function in intestine of humans with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Weiwei; Wu, Na; Wang, Xuemei; Chi, Yujing; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Qiu, Xinyun; Hu, Ying; Li, Jing; Liu, Yulan

    2015-02-03

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has recently been considered to be under the influence of the gut microbiota, which might exert toxic effects on the human host after intestinal absorption and delivery to the liver via the portal vein. In this study, the composition of the gut microbiota in NAFLD patients and healthy subjects was determined via 16S ribosomal RNA Illumina next-generation sequencing. Among those taxa displaying greater than 0.1% average abundance in all samples, five genera, including Alistipes and Prevotella, were significantly more abundant in the gut microbiota of healthy subjects compared to NAFLD patients. Alternatively, Escherichia, Anaerobacter, Lactobacillus and Streptococcus were increased in the gut microbiota of NAFLD patients compared to healthy subjects. In addition, decreased numbers of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes and increased levels of TNF-α, IL-6 and IFN-γ were detected in the NAFLD group compared to the healthy group. Furthermore, irregularly arranged microvilli and widened tight junctions were observed in the gut mucosa of the NAFLD patients via transmission electron microscopy. We postulate that aside from dysbiosis of the gut microbiota, gut microbiota-mediated inflammation of the intestinal mucosa and the related impairment in mucosal immune function play an important role in the pathogenesis of NAFLD.

  1. Evaluation of the safety of ancient strains of wheat in coeliac disease reveals heterogeneous small intestinal T cell responses suggestive of coeliac toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šuligoj, Tanja; Gregorini, Armando; Colomba, Mariastella; Ellis, H Julia; Ciclitira, Paul J

    2013-12-01

    Coeliac disease is a chronic small intestinal immune-mediated enteropathy triggered by dietary gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. Since it is unknown if all wheat varieties are equally toxic to coeliac patients seven Triticum accessions showing different origin (ancient/modern) and ploidy (di-, tetra- hexaploid) were studied. Selected strains of wheat were ancient Triticum monococcum precoce (AA genome) and Triticum speltoides (BB genome), accessions of Triticum turgidum durum (AABB genome) including two ancient (Graziella Ra and Kamut) and two modern (Senatore Cappelli and Svevo) durum strains of wheat and Triticum aestivum compactum (AABBDD genome). Small intestinal gluten-specific T-cell lines generated from 13 coeliac patients were tested with wheat accessions by proliferation assays. All strains of wheat independent of ploidy or ancient/modern origin triggered heterogeneous responses covering wide ranges of stimulation indices. Ancient strains of wheat, although previously suggested to be low or devoid of coeliac toxicity, should be tested for immunogenicity using gluten-specific T-cell lines from multiple coeliac patients rather than gluten-specific clones to assess their potential toxicity. Our findings provide further evidence for the need for a strict gluten-free diet in coeliac patients, including avoidance of ancient strains of wheat. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  2. Functions and Signaling Pathways of Amino Acids in Intestinal Inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Fang He; Chenlu Wu; Pan Li; Nengzhang Li; Dong Zhang; Quoqiang Zhu; Wenkai Ren; Yuanyi Peng

    2018-01-01

    Intestine is always exposed to external environment and intestinal microorganism; thus it is more sensitive to dysfunction and dysbiosis, leading to intestinal inflammation, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and diarrhea. An increasing number of studies indicate that dietary amino acids play significant roles in preventing and treating intestinal inflammation. The review aims to summarize the functions and signaling mechanisms of amino acids in intestin...

  3. Parenteral Nutrition and Intestinal Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielawska, Barbara; Allard, Johane P

    2017-05-06

    Severe short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a major cause of chronic (Type 3) intestinal failure (IF) where structural and functional changes contribute to malabsorption and risk of micronutrient deficiencies. Chronic IF may be reversible, depending on anatomy and intestinal adaptation, but most patients require long-term nutritional support, generally in the form of parenteral nutrition (PN). SBS management begins with dietary changes and pharmacologic therapies taking into account individual anatomy and physiology, but these are rarely sufficient to avoid PN. New hormonal therapies targeting intestinal adaptation hold promise. Surgical options for SBS including intestinal transplant are available, but have significant limitations. Home PN (HPN) is therefore the mainstay of treatment for severe SBS. HPN involves chronic administration of macronutrients, micronutrients, fluid, and electrolytes via central venous access in the patient's home. HPN requires careful clinical and biochemical monitoring. Main complications of HPN are related to venous access (infection, thrombosis) and metabolic complications including intestinal failure associated liver disease (IFALD). Although HPN significantly impacts quality of life, outcomes are generally good and survival is mostly determined by the underlying disease. As chronic intestinal failure is a rare disease, registries are a promising strategy for studying HPN patients to improve outcomes.

  4. Ischemia-reperfusion and neonatal intestinal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Christopher M; Kingma, Sandra D K; Neu, Josef

    2011-02-01

    We review research relating ischemia/reperfusion to injury in the neonatal intestine. Epidemiologic evidence suggests that the most common form of necrotizing enterocolitis is not triggered by a primary hypoxic-ischemic event. Its late occurrence, lack of preceding ischemic events, and evidence for microbial and inflammatory processes preclude a major role for primary hypoxic ischemia as the sentinel pathogenic event. However, term infants, especially those with congenital heart disease who have development of intestinal necrosis, and those preterm infants with spontaneous intestinal perforations, are more likely to have intestinal ischemia as a primary component of their disease pathogenesis. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Intestinal parasitic diseases in an urban environment in Sahel. A study in a district of Niamey, Niger].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julvez, J; Badé, M A; Lamotte, M; Campagne, G; Garba, A; Gragnic, G; Bui, A; Kehren, S; Cluzel, F; Chippaux, J P

    1998-01-01

    Health and environment in Niamey, a capital in Sahel, are particularly linked owing to population growth, promiscuity and large pollution induced by human and animal excreta. One district, located in the centre of the town, was surveyed for drinking water quality (ammoniac and bacterial count) and use, as well as for the prevalence of parasites through both a random sample (fixed tools with methiolate-iodine-formaldehyde) and a systematic one (scotch-test). Water consumption was 16.5 litres/day/man from fresh water supplies (87%) and private wells (13%). Ammoniac measures were low in the wells but high in running water (pool and river). It was the same for faecal coliform bacteria. These results give evidence of biotope faecal pollution. The random sample (322 persons, male/female sex ratio 0,85, average age 20,6 years) showed a 42.1% parasitic prevalence. Amoeba was the most frequent parasite (53.6%); and Giardia (14.9%) was the most frequent pathogenic parasite. In the second sample (161 children under 10 years), 24.2% were carriers of oxyuris. This large intestinal parasitism, without any change in connection with previous data in Niger, points to an important fecal contamination of the people more by the way of "dirty hands" than consumption of drinking water. The parasites observed have a short biological cycle, not necessitating long-term maturation in the environment. Those whose ova or larvae must complete their cycle outside have no possibility of surviving in Sahel, thanks to the beneficial effect of sunlight (heat and ultraviolet light). The inhabitants of this district seem to have adapted to intestinal parasitism. But the occurrence of malnutrition linked to a new drought could lead rapidly to a very serious adverse result.

  6. Comparison of time until elective intestinal resection regarding previous anti-tumor necrosis factor exposure: a Brazilian study on patients with Crohn's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Gustavo Kotze

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The use of anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF agents seems to reduce surgical rates and delay surgical procedures in prospective trials and population-based studies in the management of Crohn's disease (CD. This study aimed to identify whether preoperative anti-TNF agents influence the time from diagnosis to surgery. Methods: An observational retrospective cohort study was conducted on patients with CD submitted to intestinal resections due to complications or medical therapy failure in a period of 7 years. The patients were allocated into 2 groups according to their previous exposure to anti-TNF agents in the preoperative period. Epidemiological aspects regarding age at diagnosis, smoking, perianal disease, and preoperative conventional therapy were considered. A Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was used to outline possible differences between the groups regarding the time to surgery. Results: A total of 123 patients were included (71 and 52 with and without previous exposure to biologics, respectively. The overall time to surgery was 108±6.9 months (maximum, 276 months. The survival estimation revealed no difference in the mean time to intestinal resection between the groups (99.78±10.62 months in the patients without and 114.01±9.07 months in those with previous anti-TNF use (log-rank P=0.35. There was no significant difference in the time to surgery regarding perianal CD (P=0.49, smoking (P=0.63, preoperative azathioprine (P=0.073 and steroid use (P=0.58. Conclusions: The time from diagnosis to surgery was not influenced by the preoperative use of anti-TNF therapy in this cohort of patients.

  7. Intestinal Metabolites Are Profoundly Altered in the Context of HLA-B27 Expression and Functionally Modulate Disease in a Rat Model of Spondyloarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asquith, Mark; Davin, Sean; Stauffer, Patrick; Michell, Claire; Janowitz, Cathleen; Lin, Phoebe; Ensign-Lewis, Joe; Kinchen, Jason M; Koop, Dennis R; Rosenbaum, James T

    2017-10-01

    HLA-B27-associated spondyloarthritides are associated with an altered intestinal microbiota and bowel inflammation. We undertook this study to identify HLA-B27-dependent changes in both host and microbial metabolites in the HLA-B27/β 2 -microglobulin (β 2 m)-transgenic rat and to determine whether microbiota-derived metabolites could impact disease in this major model of spondyloarthritis. Cecal contents were collected from Fischer 344 33-3 HLA-B27/β 2 m-transgenic rats and wild-type controls at 6 weeks (before disease) and 16 weeks (with active bowel inflammation). Metabolomic profiling was performed by high-throughput gas and liquid chromatography-based mass spectrometry. HLA-B27/β 2 m-transgenic rats were treated with the microbial metabolites propionate or butyrate in drinking water for 10 weeks, and disease activity was subsequently assessed. Our screen identified 582 metabolites, of which more than half were significantly altered by HLA-B27 expression at 16 weeks. Both microbial and host metabolites were altered, with multiple pathways affected, including those for amino acid, carbohydrate, xenobiotic, and medium-chain fatty acid metabolism. Differences were even observed at 6 weeks, with up-regulation of histidine, tyrosine, spermidine, N-acetylmuramate, and glycerate in HLA-B27/β 2 m-transgenic rats. Administration of the short-chain fatty acid propionate significantly attenuated HLA-B27-associated inflammatory disease, although this was not associated with increased FoxP3+ T cell induction or with altered expression of the immunomodulatory cytokines interleukin-10 (IL-10) or IL-33 or of the tight junction protein zonula occludens 1. HLA-B27 expression was also associated with altered host expression of messenger RNA for the microbial metabolite receptors free fatty acid receptor 2 (FFAR2), FFAR3, and niacin receptor 1. HLA-B27 expression profoundly impacts the intestinal metabolome, with changes evident in rats even at age 6 weeks. Critically, we

  8. IgA anti-Actin antibodies in children with celiac disease: comparison of immunofluorescence with Elisa assay in predicting severe intestinal damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mora Stefano

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have demonstrated that the presence of serum IgA antibodies against actin filaments (AAA in patients with celiac disease (CD is strongly associated with mucosal damage and severe degrees of villous atrophy. The aims of the present study were (1 to verify the effectiveness of IgA-AAA in newly diagnosed CD patients in a clinical setting (2 to compare the immunofluorescence assay with ELISA assay; (3 to compare the correlation of our IgA anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies (tTG-Ab class with mucosal intestinal lesions. Methods 90 patients underwent endoscopy and multiple biopsies for suspected CD on the basis of symptoms, in presence of positive tTG-Ab tests. Twenty biopsied and 25 not-biopsied subjects with negative tTG-Ab were tested as control groups. IgA-AAA assays were performed by indirect immunofluorescence using rat epithelial intestinal cells, and by ELISA with a commercial kit. tTG-Ab assay was a radio-binding assay. Intestinal specimens were collected by upper endoscopy and the histological study was done according to the Marsh's classification modified by Oberhuber (M/O. Auto-antibodies assays and histological evaluation have been performed blindly by skilled operators. Results CD diagnosis was confirmed in 82 patients (type I M/O in 2 patients, IIIA in 18 patients, IIIB in 29 patients and IIIC in 33 patients. Two patients with type 1 lesion in presence of positive tTG-Ab and abdominal complaints, started a gluten free diet. The rate of IgA-AAA positivity (sensitivity by IFI and ELISA in histologically proven celiac disease patients, were 5.5% and 25% patients in IIIA, 27.5% and 34.4% patients in IIIB, 78.8% and 75% in IIIC patients, respectively. Patients with normal or nearly normal mucosa, regardless of tTG-Ab status, presented negative IgA-AAA IFI assay. On the other hand, 1 patient with normal mucosa but positive tTG-Ab, also presented positive IgA-AAA ELISA. All healthy non biopsied

  9. [Role of intestinal microbiocenosis and endotoxemia in the development of accompanying diseases and functional status of liver in patients after hemicolectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazebnik, L B; Li, I A; Varvanina, G G

    2011-01-01

    The state of dynamic equilibrium between the host micro-organisms, it settled, and the environment called "eubiosis" in which human health is at an optimum level. The development of the gastrointestinal tract requiring surgical intervention was determined not only by the degree of pathological process activity, endotoxemia level dysbiotic bowel disturbances, but also disturbances in the patient's immune system. The aim of our study was to examine the influence of gut microbiota and endotoxemia on the development of comorbidity and functional status of the liver in patients after hemicolectomy. Were studied a total of 365 patients after undergoing surgery hemicolectomy (right-and left-handed). violations in microbiocenosis intestine, which is most frequently observed in patients after left-sided hemicolectomy, leads to the development of endotoxemia, its toxic effects on the liver, were realized in the development of liver steatosis and steatohepatitis. Thus, the left-sided hemicolectomy increases the risk of steatohepatitis in the late period, which may affect the core functions of the liver and the development of other metabolic disorders. Hyperendotoxemia that was developed in patients as a result of violations of microbiota after left-sided hemicolectomy, increases the risk of developing diseases pancreat-duodenal zone and cardiovascular changes. Certainly, the pathogenesis of these diseases was not determined by left-sided hemicolectomy, but her conduct contributed to the development and progression of these diseases.

  10. Differences in the location and activity of intestinal Crohn's disease lesions between adult and paediatric patients detected with MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maccioni, Francesca; Carrozzo, Federica; Pino, Anna Rosaria; Staltari, Ilaria; Ansari, Najwa Al; Marini, Mario [Rome University, Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncology and Pathology, Policlinico Umberto I Hospital, Rome (Italy); Viola, Franca; Di Nardo, Giovanni; Cucchiara, Salvatore [Rome University, Department of Pediatrics, Pediatric Gastroenterology and Liver Unit Policlinico Umberto I Hospital, Rome (Italy); Vestri, Annarita [Rome University, Department of Statistical Sciences, Policlinico Umberto I Hospital, Roma (Italy); Signore, Alberto [Rome University, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Faculty Medicine and Psychology, 2nd Faculty of Medicine, S. Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy)

    2012-11-15

    To prospectively compare paediatric patients (PP) and adult patients (AP) affected by Crohn's disease (CD) in terms of the location and activity of intestinal lesions. Forty-three children (mean age 15 years) and 43 adults (mean age 48 years) with proven CD underwent magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) to localise lesions and detect their activity in 9 segments of the small and large bowel. The results were analysed on a per patient and per segment basis. Ileo-colonoscopy was performed in all patients. P values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Involvement of terminal ileum was significantly different in the two groups: observed in 100 % of AP (43/43) versus 58 % (23/43) of PP (P < 0.0001). Conversely, the colon was diseased in 84 % of PP versus 64 % of AP. In particular, left colonic segments were significantly more involved in PP (descending colon 53 % versus 21 %, P < 0.01; rectum 67 % versus 23 %, P < 0.0001; sigmoid colon 56 % versus 37 %, not significant), whereas caecal involvement was equal in both groups. In children the maximal disease activity was found in left colonic segments, whereas in adults it was in the terminal ileum. MRE detected significant differences between the two populations, showing a more extensive and severe involvement of the left colon in children but the distal ileum in adults. (orig.)

  11. Small intestinal transplantation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quigley, E M

    2012-02-03

    The past few years have witnessed a considerable shift in the clinical status of intestinal transplantation. A great deal of experience has been gained at the most active centers, and results comparable with those reported at a similar stage in the development of other solid-organ graft programs are now being achieved by these highly proficient transplant teams. Rejection and its inevitable associate, sepsis, remain ubiquitous, and new immunosuppressant regimes are urgently needed; some may already be on the near horizon. The recent success of isolated intestinal grafts, together with the mortality and morbidity attendant upon the development of advanced liver disease related to total parenteral nutrition, has prompted the bold proposal that patients at risk for this complication should be identified and should receive isolated small bowel grafts before the onset of end-stage hepatic failure. The very fact that such a suggestion has begun to emerge reflects real progress in this challenging field.

  12. Oral and intestinal sweet and fat tasting: impact of receptor polymorphisms and dietary modulation for metabolic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvijanovic, Nada; Feinle-Bisset, Christine; Young, Richard L; Little, Tanya J

    2015-05-01

    The human body has evolved with a disposition for nutrient storage, allowing for periods of irregular food availability and famine. In contrast, the modern diet is characterized by excessive consumption of fats and sugars, resulting in a surge in the rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Although these metabolic disorders arise from a complex interaction of genetic, social, and environmental factors, evidence now points to fundamental changes in nutrient metabolism at the cellular level contributing to the underlying pathology. Taste receptors detect nutrients in the oral cavity and gastrointestinal tract and can influence the hormonal response to nutrients; they may also become maladaptive in conditions of excess fat or sugar consumption. Precise links between taste receptor activity, and downstream effects on energy intake and glycemia are not well defined. This review outlines the candidate taste receptors for carbohydrates and fats in the oral cavity and within the small intestine, highlighting the contributions of underlying genetics (polymorphisms) and sensory challenges (e.g., a high-fat diet) to the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Life Sciences Institute. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Intestinal pseudo-obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primary intestinal pseudo-obstruction; Acute colonic ileus; Colonic pseudo-obstruction; Idiopathic intestinal pseudo-obstruction; Ogilvie syndrome; Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction; Paralytic ileus - pseudo-obstruction

  14. Old friends in new places: exploring the role of extraintestinal E.coli in intestinal disease and foodborne illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    The emergence of new antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli pathotypes associated with human disease has led to an investigation in terms of the origins of these pathogens. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, unspecified agents are responsible for 38.4 million out of the 48 m...

  15. Treatment of inflammatory bowel disease associated E. coli with ciprofloxacin and E. coli Nissle in the streptomycin-treated mouse intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Andreas Munk; Schjørring, Susanne; Gerstrøm, Sarah Choi; Krogfelt, Karen Angeliki

    2011-01-01

    E. coli belonging to the phylogenetic group B2 are linked to Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). Studies have shown that antimicrobials have some effect in the treatment of IBD, and it has been demonstrated that E. coli Nissle has prophylactic abilities comparable to 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) therapy in ulcerative colitis. The objective of this study was to test if ciprofloxacin and/or E. coli Nissle could eradicate IBD associated E. coli in the streptomycin-treated mouse intestine. After successful colonization with the IBD associated E. coli strains in mice the introduction of E. coli Nissle did not result in eradication of either IBD associated strains or an E. coli from a healthy control, instead, co-colonization at high levels were obtained. Treatment of mice, precolonized with IBD associated E. coli, with ciprofloxacin for three days alone apparently resulted in effective eradication of tested E. coli. However, treatment of precolonized mice with a combination of ciprofloxacin for 3 days followed by E. coli Nissle surprisingly allowed one IBD associated E. coli to re-colonize the mouse intestine, but at a level 3 logs under E. coli Nissle. A prolonged treatment with ciprofloxacin for 7 days did not change this outcome. In the mouse model E. coli Nissle can not be used alone to eradicate IBD associated E. coli; rather, 3 days of ciprofloxacin are apparently efficient in eradicating these strains, but surprisingly, after ciprofloxacin treatment (3 or 7 days), the introduction of E. coli Nissle may support re-colonization with IBD associated E. coli.

  16. Intestinal disease of scattered mirror carp Cyprinus carpio caused by Thelohanellus kitauei and notes on the morphology and phylogeny of the myxosporean from Sichuan Province, southwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lingtong; Lu, Mingmiao; Quan, Keyan; Li, Wenxiang; Zou, Hong; Wu, Shangong; Wang, Jiangyong; Wang, Guitang

    2017-05-01

    The mass mortality of pond-reared scattered mirror carp, Cyprinus carpio, caused by Thelohanellus kitauei, occurred at fish farms in Sichuan Province, southwest China. Morphological and molecular analyses were supplemented with histological evaluation of infected tissues to better understand the route of infection and the pathological effects of T. kitauei on the fish host. The intestine of the diseased host was full of large cysts of the myxosporean. The cysts range from 2 cm to 3.6 cm in diameter. Histopathology indicated that T. kitaue i first invaded the submucosa of the host intestine and then moved into the mucosa layers with the development of their spores, finally entering into the enteric cavity of the hosts after the disruption of mucosa layers. The pyriform spores of T. kitauei were surrounded by the transparent spore sheath, measuring 25.98 μm±0.95 μm in body length, 8.72 μm±0.51 μm in body width, and 7.86 μm±0.26 μm in body thickness. The single polar capsule was pyriform, measuring 14.73 μm±0.92 μm in length and 6.82 μm±0.45 μm in width, with eight to 10 turns of filament coils winding inside. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 18S small-subunit ribosomal DNA sequences indicated that minimal genetic differences were present between T. kitauei samples from South Korea and from China. Close affinity was found between the genus Thelohanellus and Myxobolus. Additionally, two polar capsule nuclei were found at the anterior end of the single polar capsule in spores of T. kitauei stained with hematoxylin and eosin, which suggested the separation of the genus Thelohanellus from Myxobolus.

  17. Intestinal myiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U S Udgaonkar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Intestinal myiasis is a condition when the fly larvae inhabit the gastrointestinal tract and are passed out in faeces. This type of infestation results when eggs or larvae of the fly, deposited on food are inadvertently taken by man. They survive the unfavourable conditions within the gastrointestinal tract and produce disturbances, which may vary from mild to severe. The condition is not uncommon and is often misdiagnosed as pinworm infestation. Correct diagnosis by the clinical microbiologist is important to avoid unnecessary treatment. Materials and Methods: We had 7 cases of intestinal myiasis. In 2 cases the larvae were reared to adult fly in modified meat and sand medium (developed by Udgaonkar. This medium is simple and can be easily prepared in the laboratory. Results: Of the 7 larvae, 5 were Sarcophaga haemorrhoidalis, 1 Megaselia species and 1 was identified as Muscina stabulans. Conclusions: S. haemorrhoidalis was the commonest maggot involved. A high index of suspicion is required for clinical diagnosis when the patient complains of passing wriggling worms in faeces for a long period without any response to antihelminthics. The reason for long duration of illness and recurrence of infestation is baffling. The nearest to cure was colonic wash. We feel prevention is of utmost importance, which is to avoid eating food articles with easy access to flies.

  18. Modeling intestinal disorders using zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, X; Pack, M

    2017-01-01

    Although the zebrafish was initially developed as a model system to study embryonic development, it has gained increasing attention as an advantageous system to investigate human diseases, including intestinal disorders. Zebrafish embryos develop rapidly, and their digestive system is fully functional and visible by 5days post fertilization. There is a large degree of homology between the intestine of zebrafish and higher vertebrate organisms in terms of its cellular composition and function as both a digestive and immune organ. Furthermore, molecular pathways regulating injury and immune responses are highly conserved. In this chapter, we provide an overview of studies addressing developmental and physiological processes relevant to human intestinal disease. These studies include those related to congenital disorders, host-microbiota interactions, inflammatory diseases, motility disorders, and intestinal cancer. We also highlight the utility of zebrafish to functionally validate candidate genes identified through mutational analyses and genome-wide association studies, and discuss methodologies to investigate the intestinal biology that are unique to zebrafish. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Interleukin 35 (IL-35) and IL-37: Intestinal and peripheral expression by T and B regulatory cells in patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca-Camarillo, Gabriela; Furuzawa-Carballeda, Janette; Yamamoto-Furusho, Jesús K

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the study was to characterize and to quantify peripheral and tissue. IL-35- and IL-37-producing cells in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) patients. We studied a total of 38 active UC, 31 inactive UC, 17 active CD, and 13 inactive CD and 50 non-inflamed tissues as control group. Gene expression was measured by real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and protein expression was evaluated in tissue by immunohistochemistry and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells by flow cytometry. Higher levels of IL-35 was produced by intestinal regulatory B cells and circulating regulatory CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in active vs. inactive disease or healthy donors (P<0.05). The IL-37 was conspicuously synthesized by circulating B cells, active natural killer cells and monocytes. These results suggest that down-regulation of inflammation in active IBD patients might be based on the increased expression of IL-35 and IL-37. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Enhanced interferon-gamma production and B7-2 expression in isolated intestinal mononuclear cells from patients with Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, M; Hiwatashi, N; Liu, Z; Toyota, T

    1995-11-01

    Many of the in vivo activities of interferon (IFN)-gamma match the changes found in inflammatory bowel disease, but its importance is controversial. Interferon (IFN)-gamma induces the expression of B7-2 costimulatory molecules on monocytes. We measured levels of IFN-gamma production in intestinal mucosa and isolated lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMC) in patients with Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). We also investigated the induction of B7-2 on the LPMC by flow cytometry. Mucosal IFN-gamma production was higher than the control level in patients with CD, but this was not the case in UC. IFN-gamma production and B7-2 expression in the LPMC of CD were higher than in the LPMC of UC and controls, and high levels of B7-2 expression were observed on the LPMC of CD after incubation with endotoxin. The induction of B7-2 on the LPMC of CD may provide a mechanism for the amplification of T cell proliferation and lymphokine production by IFN-gamma-activated LPMC.

  1. Reduced diversity of the intestinal microbiota during infancy is associated with increased risk of allergic disease at school age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Hans; Li, Nan; Bonnelykke, Klavs

    2011-01-01

    Changes in the human microbiome have been suggested as a risk factor for a number of lifestyle-related disorders, such as atopic diseases, possibly through a modifying influence on immune maturation in infancy.......Changes in the human microbiome have been suggested as a risk factor for a number of lifestyle-related disorders, such as atopic diseases, possibly through a modifying influence on immune maturation in infancy....

  2. The HLA-DQ2 genotype selects for early intestinal microbiota composition in infants at high risk of developing coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares, M; Neef, A; Castillejo, G; Palma, G De; Varea, V; Capilla, A; Palau, F; Nova, E; Marcos, A; Polanco, I; Ribes-Koninckx, C; Ortigosa, L; Izquierdo, L; Sanz, Y

    2015-03-01

    Intestinal dysbiosis has been associated with coeliac disease (CD), but whether the alterations are cause or consequence of the disease is unknown. This study investigated whether the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQ2 genotype is an independent factor influencing the early gut microbiota composition of healthy infants at family risk of CD. As part of a larger prospective study, a subset (n=22) of exclusively breastfed and vaginally delivered infants with either high genetic risk (HLA-DQ2 carriers) or low genetic risk (non-HLA-DQ2/8 carriers) of developing CD were selected from a cohort of healthy infants with at least one first-degree relative with CD. Infant faecal microbiota was analysed by 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing and real time quantitative PCR. Infants with a high genetic risk had significantly higher proportions of Firmicutes and Proteobacteria and lower proportions of Actinobacteria compared with low-risk infants. At genus level, high-risk infants had significantly less Bifidobacterium and unclassified Bifidobacteriaceae proportions and more Corynebacterium, Gemella, Clostridium sensu stricto, unclassified Clostridiaceae, unclassified Enterobacteriaceae and Raoultella proportions. Quantitative real time PCR also revealed lower numbers of Bifidobacterium species in infants with high genetic risk than in those with low genetic risk. In high-risk infants negative correlations were identified between Bifidobacterium species and several genera of Proteobacteria (Escherichia/Shigella) and Firmicutes (Clostridium). The genotype of infants at family risk of developing CD, carrying the HLA-DQ2 haplotypes, influences the early gut microbiota composition. This finding suggests that a specific disease-biased host genotype may also select for the first gut colonisers and could contribute to determining disease risk. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  3. Campylobacter hepaticus, the cause of spotty liver disease in chickens, is present throughout the small intestine and caeca of infected birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van, Thi Thu Hao; Gor, Mian-Chee; Anwar, Arif; Scott, Peter C; Moore, Robert J

    2017-08-01

    Spotty liver disease (SLD) causes significant egg production losses and mortality in chickens and is therefore a disease of concern for some sectors of the poultry industry. Although the first reports of the disease came from the United States in the 1950s it is only recently that the organism that causes the disease was identified, isolated, and characterised as a new bacterial species, Campylobacter hepaticus. The first isolations of C. hepaticus were from the livers and bile of SLD affected birds. Isolates could only be recovered from samples that had a monoculture of C. hepaticus in the tissues, as a selective culturing method has not yet been developed. In non-selective growth conditions the slow growing C. hepaticus is quickly outgrown by many other members of the chicken microbiota. Therefore, it is currently not possible to use a culturing approach to evaluate C. hepaticus carriage in tissues, such as the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), that also carry complex microbial populations. As it is suspected that birds become infected via the faecal-oral route it is important that pathogen carriage in the GIT is investigated. In the present study, a specific and sensitive quantitative real-time PCR assay, based on the glycerol kinase gene of C. hepaticus, was developed. The assay facilitated the detection and quantification of C. hepaticus in tissue samples from clinical cases of SLD. It was shown that in infected birds C. hepaticus colonises the small intestine, increasing in abundance from duodenum to ileum, and is at highest levels within the ceaca. C. hepaticus was also readily detected in cloacal swabs, indicating that thecl-oral infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Species and prevalence determination of Human Intestinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intestinal parasitic infections constitute a global health burden causing clinical morbidity. Parasitic protozoa and helminthes are responsible for some of the most devastating and prevalent diseases of human. The study was conducted to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasites among patients attending Federal ...

  5. Species and prevalence determination of Human Intestinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    ABSTRACT: Intestinal parasitic infections constitute a global health burden causing clinical morbidity. Parasitic protozoa and helminthes are responsible for some of the most devastating and prevalent diseases of human. The study was conducted to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasites among patients attending ...

  6. Intestinal Failure (Short Bowel Syndrome)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intestinal Failure (Short Bowel Syndrome) What is intestinal failure? Intestinal failure occurs when a significant portion of the small ... intestine does. Who is at risk for intestinal failure? N Babies (usually premature) who have had surgery ...

  7. Ingestão alimentar em pacientes com doença inflamatória intestinal Food intake in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Freitas da Silva

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available RACIONAL: Pacientes com doença inflamatória intestinal podem apresentar deficiências nutricionais. OBJETIVO: Verificar a adequação da ingestão alimentar de pacientes com doença de Crohn e retocolite ulcerativa inespecífica. MÉTODOS: Para avaliação da ingestão alimentar de 55 pacientes, 28 com doença de Crohn e 27 com retocolite ulcerativa atendidos em ambulatório de gastroenterologia, utilizou-se o Recordatório Alimentar de 24 Horas e o Questionário de Frequência Alimentar. A atividade inflamatória da doença foi avaliada pelos níveis séricos de proteína C reativa e o Índice de Harvey e Bradshaw. Para comparação de médias foi usado o teste t não pareado e, para as médias não paramétricas, o teste de Mann-Whitney, considerando nível de significância valor de pBACKGROUND: Patients with inflammatory bowel disease may have nutritional deficiencies. AIM: To verify the adequacy of dietary intake of patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. METHODS: To assess food intake of 55 patients, 28 with Crohn's disease and 27 with ulcerative colitis treated in the gastroenterology clinic, was used the 24-Hour Food Recall and Food Frequency Questionnaire. The inflammatory activity of the disease was evaluated by serum C-reactive protein and Harvey and Bradshaw Index. For comparison of means t test was used, and the average on non-parametric, the Mann-Whitney test, with level of significance p <0.05. RESULTS: The patients were aged between 19 and 63 years and time since diagnosis was 7.9 years (1 to 22. According to the food intake was identified deficiency in energy intake, fiber, iron, potassium, sodium, magnesium, calcium, menadione, riboflavin, niacin, folate, pantothenic acid, tocopherol and cholecalciferol in Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, active or in remission. The intake of vegetables, fruits, dairy products and beans were low, and intake of fats and sweets was higher than the recommendations

  8. Vaccination of patients with inflammatory bowel disease: Practical recommendations Vacunación de pacientes con enfermedad inflamatoria intestinal: Recomendaciones prácticas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Campins

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD have a greater risk of infection associated with the endogenous immunosuppression brought about by their underlying disease as well as the exogenous immunosuppression resulting from their therapies. In the last few years guidelines and consensus papers have been issued on the indication of vaccines for these patients as primary prevention of infection. However, vaccine coverage is low, likely because the risk for infection and both safety and efficacy concerns regarding vaccines are scarcely perceived in such cases. The available scientific evidence shows that immunization is safe for most preparations, and bears no association with an increased risk for disease activity. This paper reviews the available scientific literature, and provides recommendations on the vaccination of adults with IBD.Los pacientes con enfermedad inflamatoria intestinal (EII tienen un mayor riesgo de infecciones, asociado tanto a la inmunosupresión endógena condicionada por su enfermedad de base, como a la exógena generada por los tratamientos que reciben. En los últimos años se han publicado guías y documentos de consenso sobre indicaciones de vacunación en estos pacientes, como medida de prevención primaria de infecciones. Sin embargo, las coberturas vacunales alcanzadas son bajas, probablemente por la falta de percepción del riesgo de infección y las dudas sobre la seguridad y eficacia de las vacunas en estos casos. La evidencia científica disponible muestra que la inmunización es segura para la mayoría de preparados y no se asocia a un incremento del riesgo de actividad de la enfermedad. En este documento se revisa la literatura científica disponible y se presentan unas recomendaciones de vacunación para pacientes adultos con EII.

  9. S100A4 expression is increased in stricture fibroblasts from patients with fibrostenosing Crohn's disease and promotes intestinal fibroblast migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Michael F; Docherty, Neil G; Burke, John P; O'Connell, P Ronan

    2010-08-01

    Fibroblasts represent the key cell type in fibrostenosing Crohn's disease (FCD) pathogenesis. S100A4 is an EF-hand calcium-binding protein family member, implicated in epithelial-mesenchymal transition and as a marker of activated T lymphocytes and fibroblasts in chronic tissue remodeling. The aim of this study was to examine the expression profile of S100A4 in the resected ileum of patients with FCD. Mucosa, seromuscular explants, and transmural biopsies were harvested from diseased and proximal, macroscopically normal margins of ileocecal resections from patients with FCD. Samples were processed for histochemistry, immunohistochemistry, real-time RT-PCR, Western blotting, and transmission electron microscopy. Primary explant cultures of seromuscular fibroblasts were exposed to transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 (1 ng/ml), and S100A4 expression and scratch wound-healing activity were assessed at 24 h. CCD-18Co fibroblasts were transfected with S100A4 small interfering RNA, treated with TGF-beta1 (1 ng/ml) for 30 min or 24 h, and then assessed for S100A4 and Smad3 expression and scratch wound-healing activity. S100A4 expression was increased in stricture mucosa, in the lamina propria, and in CD3-positive intraepithelial CD3-positive T lymphocytes. Fibroblastic S100A4 staining was observed in seromuscular scar tissue. Stricture fibroblast explant culture showed significant upregulation of S100A4 expression. TGF-beta1 increased S100A4 expression in cultured ileal fibroblasts. In CCD-18Co fibroblasts, S100A4 small interfering RNA inhibited scratch wound healing and modestly inhibited Smad3 activation. S100A4 expression is increased in fibroblasts, as well as immune cells, in Crohn's disease stricture and induced by TGF-beta1. Results from knockdown experiments indicate a potential role for S100A4 in mediating intestinal fibroblast migration.

  10. "Small intestinal biopsy and anti endomyosial sorologic test in children suspicious for celiac disease: a comparative study in Children Medical Center "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Mahjoub

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Celiac is one the most common causes of malabsorption and is an autoimmune disorder resulting in damage to intestinal epithelial cells by self T lymphocytes. The main culprit is gluten. The aim of our study was to assess the histopathologic findings of patients suspicious to have celiac disease in their first admission and compare them with serologic findings (endomyosial antibody test: EMA. Methods: The study is a prospective descriptional type and 95 patients suspicious to have celiac disease were included who went under upper endoscopy and sampling and also serologic studies. Histopathologic findings were grouped by Marsh classification. Specimens in Marsh stage 0 and 1 were also stained for leukocyte common antigen by immunohistochemistry Results: Ninety five patients, 49 males and 46 females, ranging from 9 months to 17 years (mean: 6.3 ys were included in the study The most common complaint was abdominal pain. EMA test was positive in 43 patients. Most specimens were categorized as Marsh stage IIIA (51 cases by histopatholgic examination, which can be seen in many other conditions. Only 16 patients were categorized as Marsh stage IIIB & IIIC, which are seen in established celiac patients No significant correlation was found between histopathologic and serologic findings. No difference was found between H&E staining and immunohistochemical staining in counting of intra- epithelial lymphocytes. Conclusion: Most of our patients had mild partial villous atrophy which is also seen in many other disorders and also EMA test was negative in this group. It appears that current assessment of celiac disease has many drawbacks and necessity of more specific methods is highly appreciated.

  11. The small intestine microbiota, nutritional modulation and relevance for health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El Aidy, Sahar; van den Bogert, Bartholomeus; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    The intestinal microbiota plays a profound role in human health and extensive research has been dedicated to identify microbiota aberrations that are associated with disease. Most of this work has been targeting the large intestine and fecal microbiota, while the small intestine microbiota may also

  12. INTESTINAL PERMEABILITY IN PEDIATRIC GASTROENTEROLOGY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANELBURG, RM; UIL, JJ; DEMONCHY, JGR; HEYMANS, HSA

    1992-01-01

    The role of the physiologic barrier function of the small bowel and its possible role in health and disease has attracted much attention over the past decade. The intestinal mucosal barrier for luminal macromolecules and microorganism is the result of non-immunologic and immunologic defense

  13. «Fast track» and intestinal surgery for Crohn's disease: Factors associated with prolonged hospital stay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enriquez-Navascués, José María; Elorza, Garazi; Placer, Carlos; Timoteo, Ander; Velaz, Leyre; Borda, Nerea; Saralegui, Yolanda

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine factors associated with a prolonged postoperative stay (PS) in patients operated on with bowel resection for Crohn's disease (CD) included in an enhanced recovery program (ERP). We included patients operated on for CD between January 2013 and December 2015. ERP was organized following an 8-point protocol. Variables studied were: age, sex, PS, ASA, location and type of CD, presence of perianal disease, Harvey-Bradshaw index, previous resection, type of surgery (minimally invasive vs. laparotomy) and Clavien Dindo. An inferential study was performed to identify factors related with a PS> 6 days and multivariate analysis. A total of 52 patients were operated on. The median PS was 8 days (IR: 5-11). In the univariate analysis, location (L1 vs. L2-3), type (B2 vs. B3), presence of perianal disease, prior surgery, type of surgery performed, Harvey-Bradshaw index and Clavien-Dindo were associated with a PS>or 6days contained the variable Harvey-Bradshaw (OR: 6,49; 95% CI: 1,46-28,8) and the type of surgery (OR: 0,23; 95%CI: 0,05-0,95). A prolonged postoperative stay after bowel resection for CD is more related to the type or severity of the disease and the type of surgery performed, than with other patient factors. Patients with CD need good coordination between prehabilitation, ERP and postoperative management. Copyright © 2016 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Regional specialization within the intestinal immune system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mowat, Allan M.; Agace, William Winston

    2014-01-01

    The intestine represents the largest compartment of the immune system. It is continually exposed to antigens and immunomodulatory agents from the diet and the commensal microbiota, and it is the port of entry for many clinically important pathogens. Intestinal immune processes are also increasingly...... implicated in controlling disease development elsewhere in the body. In this Review, we detail the anatomical and physiological distinctions that are observed in the small and large intestines, and we suggest how these may account for the diversity in the immune apparatus that is seen throughout...... the intestine. We describe how the distribution of innate, adaptive and innate-like immune cells varies in different segments of the intestine and discuss the environmental factors that may influence this. Finally, we consider the implications of regional immune specialization for inflammatory disease...

  15. A Cross-Talk Between Microbiota-Derived Short-Chain Fatty Acids and the Host Mucosal Immune System Regulates Intestinal Homeostasis and Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Pedro; Araújo, João Ricardo; Di Santo, James P

    2018-02-15

    Gut microbiota has a fundamental role in the energy homeostasis of the host and is essential for proper "education" of the immune system. Intestinal microbial communities are able to ferment dietary fiber releasing short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). The SCFAs, particularly butyrate (BT), regulate innate and adaptive immune cell generation, trafficing, and function. For example, BT has an anti-inflammatory effect by inhibiting the recruitment and proinflammatory activity of neutrophils, macrophages, dendritic cells, and effector T cells and by increasing the number and activity of regulatory T cells. Gut microbial dysbiosis, ie, a microbial community imbalance, has been suggested to play a role in the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The relationship between dysbiosis and IBD has been difficult to prove, especially in humans, and is probably complex and dynamic, rather than one of a simple cause and effect relationship. However, IBD patients have dysbiosis with reduced numbers of SCFAs-producing bacteria and reduced BT concentration that is linked to a marked increase in the number of proinflammatory immune cells in the gut mucosa of these patients. Thus, microbial dysbiosis and reduced BT concentration may be a factor in the emergence and severity of IBD. Understanding the relationship between microbial dysbiosis and reduced BT concentration to IBD may lead to novel therapeutic interventions.

  16. Hereditary intestinal polyposis syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, P A

    1996-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world, with overall mortality exceeding 40% even with treatment. Effective efforts for screening and prevention are most likely to succeed in patient groups identified as high risk for colorectal cancer, most notably the hereditary intestinal polyposis syndromes. In these syndromes, benign polyps develop throughout the intestinal tract prior to the development of colorectal cancer, marking the patient and associated family for precancer diagnosis followed by either close surveillance or preventive treatment. This review article was undertaken to discuss the most recent developments in the knowledge of hereditary intestinal polyposis syndromes, emphasizing the clinical approach to diagnosis and treatment relative to preventing the development of cancer. The most common of the hereditary polyposis syndromes is familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), which is characterized by the development of hundreds to thousands of adenomatous polyps in the colon followed at an early age by colorectal cancer. Colorectal cancer can be prevented in this autosomal dominant condition by prophylactic colectomy, though a risk for other tumors, including periampullary cancers, remains throughout life. Variant of FAP associated with fewer and smaller polyps (hereditary flat adenoma syndrome), or even CNS tumors (Turcot's syndrome) also carry this high risk of colorectal cancer. Hereditary hamartomatous polyposis syndromes such as juvenile polyposis and Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (also autosomal dominant) are characterized by less frequent polyps. Though these are generally benign polyps, they are also associated with a significant risk of colorectal and other cancers. Other polyposis syndromes, including neurofibromatosis and Cowden's disease, do not carry this increased risk of colorectal cancer, and therefore affect different treatment strategies. Analysis of genetic factors responsible for these and other hereditary syndromes with

  17. Estado nutricional e absorção intestinal de ferro em crianças com doença hepática crônica com e sem colestase Nutritional status and intestinal iron absorption in children with chronic hepatic disease with and without cholestasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Helena Guedes da Motta Mattar

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a ingestão alimentar, a ocorrência de desnutrição energético-protéica e de anemia e a absorção intestinal de ferro em crianças com doença hepática crônica. CASUÍSTICA E MÉTODOS: Foram estudados 25 pacientes com doença hepática crônica, sendo 15 com colestase e 11 sem colestase. A idade variou entre 6,5 meses e 12,1 anos. A absorção intestinal de ferro foi avaliada pela elevação do ferro sérico uma hora após a ingestão de 1 mg/kg de ferro elementar e pela resposta à ferroterapia oral. A absorção intestinal de ferro foi comparada com um grupo de crianças com anemia ferropriva. RESULTADOS: A ingestão média de energia e proteínas nos pacientes com doença hepática com colestase foi maior do que nos pacientes sem colestase. O déficit nutricional foi mais grave nos pacientes com colestase, predominando os déficits de estatura-idade e peso-idade. A anemia foi freqüente tanto nas crianças com doença hepática com colestase (11/14; 78,6% como nas sem colestase (7/11; 63,6%. Na doença hepática com colestase, observou-se menor (p OBJECTIVES: to evaluate food intake, occurrence of energy-protein malnutrition and anemia, and intestinal iron absorption in children with chronic liver disease. METHODS: The study included 25 children with chronic liver disease, 15 with cholestasis and 11 without cholestasis. The age varied between 6.5 months and 12.1 years. Intestinal iron absorption was evaluated by the increment of serum iron one hour after the ingestion of 1 mg/kg of elemental iron and by the response to oral iron therapy. Iron intestinal absorption was compared to a group with iron deficiency anemia (without liver disease. RESULTS: The mean intake of energy and protein in the cholestatic group was higher than in patients without cholestasis. The nutritional deficit was more severe in cholestatic patients, especially with regard to height-for-age and weight-for-age indices. Anemia was found in both

  18. Molecular characterization of intestinal protozoan parasites from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Koffi Mathurin

    2014-02-17

    AJEST. African Journal of Environmental Science and. Technology. Full Length Research Paper. Molecular characterization of intestinal protozoan parasites from children facing diarrheal disease and associated risk factors in ...

  19. Effect of Potential Probiotic Lactococcus lactis Subsp. lactis on Growth Performance, Intestinal Microbiota, Digestive Enzyme Activities, and Disease Resistance of Litopenaeus vannamei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adel, Milad; El-Sayed, Abdel-Fattah M; Yeganeh, Sakineh; Dadar, Maryam; Giri, Sib Sankar

    2017-06-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the effects of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis on the growth, intestinal microbiota, digestive enzyme activity, and disease resistance of Litopenaeus vannamei. Diets containing four different concentrations of L. lactis (0 [basal diet], 10 6 , 10 7 , and 10 8  CFU g -1 ) were fed to white shrimps L. vannamei (average weight 5.89 ± 0.36 g) for 8 weeks. At the end of the feeding trial, shrimps were immersed in Caspian Seawater (10.8 ppt) contaminated with 10 6  CFU ml -1 pathogenic V. anguillarum for 2 h. Results revealed that growth rate, survival, and body protein level were increased with dietary supplementation of L. lactis. The activities of digestive enzymes (cellulose, lipase, amylase, and protease) were significantly higher in the groups fed with diets containing 10 7 or 10 8  CFU g -1 L. lactis than those in the control. The Lactobacillus and Bacillus counts were higher (P lactis-supplemented diets. In addition, higher level of L. lactis supplementation decreased the Vibrio counts. Moreover, L. vannamei fed diet supplemented with 10 8  CFU g -1 of L. lactis exhibited significantly the highest hematocyte count and post-challenge survival rate (79.2 %). Collectively, these results suggest that dietary supplementation of L. lactis subsp. lactis at 10 8  CFU g -1 can promote growth performance, digestive enzyme activity, and disease resistance of L. vannamei.

  20. Intestinal absorption of fluorescently labeled nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simovic, Spomenka; Song, Yunmei; Nann, Thomas; Desai, Tejal A

    2015-07-01

    Characterization of intestinal absorption of nanoparticles is critical in the design of noninvasive anticancer, protein-based, and gene nanoparticle-based therapeutics. Here we demonstrate a general approach for the characterization of the intestinal absorption of nanoparticles and for understanding the mechanisms active in their processing within healthy intestinal cells. It is generally accepted that the cellular processing represents a major drawback of current nanoparticle-based therapeutic systems. In particular, endolysosomal trafficking causes degradation of therapeutic molecules such as proteins, lipids, acid-sensitive anticancer drugs, and genes. To date, investigations into nanoparticle processing within intestinal cells have studied mass transport through Caco-2 cells or everted rat intestinal sac models. We developed an approach to visualize directly the mechanisms of nanoparticle processing within intestinal tissue. These results clearly identify a mechanism by which healthy intestinal cells process nanoparticles and point to the possible use of this approach in the design of noninvasive nanoparticle-based therapies. Advances in nanomedicine have resulted in the development of new therapies for various diseases. Intestinal route of administration remains the easiest and most natural. The authors here designed experiments to explore and characterize the process of nanoparticle transport across the intestinal tissue. In so doing, further insights were gained for future drug design. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Circadian disorganization alters intestinal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Robin M; Forsyth, Christopher B; Green, Stefan J; Mutlu, Ece; Engen, Phillip; Vitaterna, Martha H; Turek, Fred W; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal dysbiosis and circadian rhythm disruption are associated with similar diseases including obesity, metabolic syndrome, and inflammatory bowel disease. Despite the overlap, the potential relationship between circadian disorganization and dysbiosis is unknown; thus, in the present study, a model of chronic circadian disruption was used to determine the impact on the intestinal microbiome. Male C57BL/6J mice underwent once weekly phase reversals of the light:dark cycle (i.e., circadian rhythm disrupted mice) to determine the impact of circadian rhythm disruption on the intestinal microbiome and were fed either standard chow or a high-fat, high-sugar diet to determine how diet influences circadian disruption-induced effects on the microbiome. Weekly phase reversals of the light:dark (LD) cycle did not alter the microbiome in mice fed standard chow; however, mice fed a high-fat, high-sugar diet in conjunction with phase shifts in the light:dark cycle had significantly altered microbiota. While it is yet to be established if some of the adverse effects associated with circadian disorganization in humans (e.g., shift workers, travelers moving across time zones, and in individuals with social jet lag) are mediated by dysbiosis, the current study demonstrates that circadian disorganization can impact the intestinal microbiota which may have implications for inflammatory diseases.

  2. Comparing outcomes between side-to-side anastomosis and other anastomotic configurations after intestinal resection for patients with Crohn's disease: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhen; Li, Yi; Zhu, Weiming; Gong, Jianfeng; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2013-04-01

    Anastomotic configurations may be a predictor of postoperative recurrence for Crohn's disease. One previous meta-analysis showed side-to-side anastomosis was associated with fewer anastomotic leaks but did not reduce postoperative recurrence rates. After 2007, more articles that found distinct results were published. We aimed to update the meta-analysis comparing outcomes between side-to-side anastomosis and other anastomotic configurations after intestinal resection for patients with Crohn's disease. A literature search that included PubMed, EMBASE, the Science Citation Index, and the Cochrane Library was conducted to identify studies up to May 2012. Trials comparing side-to-side anastomosis with other anastomotic configurations for Crohn's disease were analyzed. Sensitivity analysis and heterogeneity assessment were also performed. Eleven trials compared side-to-side with other anastomotic configurations were included. Overall, results showed a significant reduction in the overall postoperative complications [n = 777; odds ratio (OR) = 0.60; P = 0.01], but side-to-side anastomosis did not reduce the anastomotic leak rate (n = 879; OR = 0.48; P = 0.07), complications other than anastomotic leak (n = 777; OR = 0.72; P = 0.13), endoscopic recurrence rates [hazard ratio (HR) = 0.73; P = 0.07], symptomatic recurrence rates (HR = 0.74; P = 0.20), and reoperation rates for recurrence (HR = 0.37; P = 0.06). Sensitivity analysis including two randomized controlled trials found no significant differences in short-term complications between the two groups. Sensitivity analysis including nine trials comparing only stapled side-to-side anastomosis with other anastomotic configurations showed stapled side-to-side anastomosis could reduce reoperation rates (HR = 0.38; P = 0.01). Side-to-side anastomosis did not reduce short-term complications and postoperative recurrence for Crohn's disease. Stapled side-to-side anastomosis may lead to fewer reoperations needed for recurrence

  3. Diagnostic evaluation of chronic inflammatory intestinal diseases in children and adolescents: MRI with true-FISP as new gold standard?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohl, C.; Haage, P.; Krombach, G.A.; Schmidt, T.; Guenther, R.W.; Staatz, G.; Ahaus, M.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: to evaluate the impact of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with use of True-FISP sequences in the evaluation of inflammatory bowel-wall changes in children and adolescents with Crohn's disease. Furthermore, the diagnostic procedure in children and adolescents with chronic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) will be discussed in light of the relevant literature. Material and methods: twenty-four children and adolescents aged between 7 and 21 years with suspected or known IBD underwent MRI on a 1.5T-scanner (Philips ACS-NT, Best, Netherlands). One hour after 11 of a 2.5% mannitol solution was given orally, MR imaging was performed using coronal HASTE-M2D, coronal fat-suppressed T2-TSE, axial dynamic T1-weighted GE-sequences before and after i.v.-contrast material injection (0.1 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA) and using a 2D-balanced-FFE-sequence (True-FISP) before and after i.v.-contrast material injection in coronal and axial planes. The MR-images were correlated with endoscopy and the clinical findings. In 14 patients, a recently performed conventional radiographic enteroclysis was available. Each performed MRI sequence was evaluated by three experienced radiologists regarding the sensitivity and specificity of each sequence in the detection of inflammatory bowel wall changes. In addition, the image quality was assessed regarding the different tissue contrasts and the susceptibility to artifacts. The distension of the bowel wall and the patients' acceptance of the MRI examination were recorded. Results: with a sensitivity in detecting inflammatory small bowel changes of 93.3% (axial pre-contrast, coronal post-contrast) and 100% (axial post-contrast, coronal pre-contrast), the True-FISP outnumbers the other performed sequences (T1 = 80%, HASTE = 13.3% and T2-TSE = 53.3%). The difference between True-FISP and contrast-enhanced T1 was not statistically significant, whereas the difference between True-FISP and HASTE and T2-TSE, respectively. (orig.)

  4. Extra-intestinal malignancies in inflammatory bowel disease: results of the 3rd ECCO Pathogenesis Scientific Workshop (III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magro, Fernando; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent; Sokol, Harry; Aldeger, Xavier; Costa, Antonia; Higgins, Peter D; Joyce, Joel C; Katsanos, Konstantinos H; Lopez, Anthony; de Xaxars, Teresa Mas; Toader, Elena; Beaugerie, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of lymphoproliferative disorders (LD) is increasing in developed countries. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) exposed to thiopurines are at additional risk of three specific forms of LD: Epstein-Barr-Virus-related post-transplant like LD, hepato-splenic T-cell lymphoma and post-mononucleosis lymphoproliferation. The risk of the two latter forms of LD can be reduced when considering specific immunosuppressive strategies in young males. It is still unclear whether the risk of uterine cervix abnormalities is increased in IBD women, irrespective of the use of immunosuppressants. Given the excess risk demonstrated in various other contexts of immunosuppression, it is currently recommended that all women with IBD, particularly those receiving immunosuppressants, strictly adhere to a screening program of cervical surveillance and undergo vaccination against HPV, when appropriate. Patients with IBD receiving immunosuppressants are at increased risk of skin cancers. The risk of non-melanoma skin cancer is notably increased in patients receiving thiopurines. Recent data suggest that the risk of melanoma is mildly increased in patients exposed to anti-TNF therapy. All IBD patients should adhere to a program of sun protection and dermatological surveillance, whose details should take into account the other non-IBD-related risk factors. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Gallstone ileus resulting in strong intestinal obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Israel Szajnbok

    Full Text Available Mechanic intestinal obstruction, caused by the passage of biliary calculus from vesicle to intestine, through fistulization, although not frequent, deserve study due to the morbi-mortality rates. Incidence in elder people explains the association with chronic degenerative diseases, increasing complexity in terms of therapy decision. Literature discusses the need and opportunity for the one or two-phase surgical attack of the cholecystenteric fistule, in front of the resolution on the obstructive urgency and makes reference to Gallstone Ileus as an exception for strong intestinal obstruction. The more frequent intestinal obstruction observed is when it occurs a Gallstone Ileus impacting in terms of ileocecal valve. The authors submit a Gallstone Ileus manifestation as causing strong intestinal obstruction, discussing aspects regarding diagnostic and treatment.

  6. ACUTE INTESTINAL INFECTIONS: THERAPEUTICAL TACTICS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.N. Surkov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute intestinal infections are quite common among children. Their clinical presentations include intoxication syndrome (drowsiness, low appetite, fever etc, infectious toxic syndrome (toxicosis with exicosis, neurotoxicosi, hypovolemic or infectious-toxic shockand diarrhea syndrome. Sometimes intestinal infections can be quite severe and even lethal. However disease duration and outcome depend on timelines and adequacy of prescribed treatment. Main guidelines of intestinal infections treatment include probiotics. That is why the right choice of probiotics is important for a pediatrician. The article contains basic information upon etiopathogenesis, classification, diagnostic criteria and acute pediatric intestinal infections treatment guidelines.Key words: acute intestinal infections, etiopathogenesis, diagnostic criteria, treatment, probiotics, children. (Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. — 2011; 10 (6: 141–147

  7. Intestinal intraepithelial lymphocyte cytometric pattern is more accurate than subepithelial deposits of anti-tissue transglutaminase IgA for the diagnosis of celiac disease in lymphocytic enteritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Fernández-Bañares

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & AIMS: An increase in CD3+TCRγδ+ and a decrease in CD3- intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL is a characteristic flow cytometric pattern of celiac disease (CD with atrophy. The aim was to evaluate the usefulness of both CD IEL cytometric pattern and anti-TG2 IgA subepithelial deposit analysis (CD IF pattern for diagnosing lymphocytic enteritis due to CD. METHODS: Two-hundred and five patients (144 females who underwent duodenal biopsy for clinical suspicion of CD and positive celiac genetics were prospectively included. Fifty had villous atrophy, 70 lymphocytic enteritis, and 85 normal histology. Eight patients with non-celiac atrophy and 15 with lymphocytic enteritis secondary to Helicobacter pylori acted as control group. Duodenal biopsies were obtained to assess both CD IEL flow cytometric (complete or incomplete and IF patterns. RESULTS: Sensitivity of IF, and complete and incomplete cytometric patterns for CD diagnosis in patients with positive serology (Marsh 1+3 was 92%, 85 and 97% respectively, but only the complete cytometric pattern had 100% specificity. Twelve seropositive and 8 seronegative Marsh 1 patients had a CD diagnosis at inclusion or after gluten free-diet, respectively. CD cytometric pattern showed a better diagnostic performance than both IF pattern and serology for CD diagnosis in lymphocytic enteritis at baseline (95% vs 60% vs 60%, p = 0.039. CONCLUSIONS: Analysis of the IEL flow cytometric pattern is a fast, accurate method for identifying CD in the initial diagnostic biopsy of patients presenting with lymphocytic enteritis, even in seronegative patients, and seems to be better than anti-TG2 intestinal deposits.

  8. Influence of milk-feeding type and genetic risk of developing coeliac disease on intestinal microbiota of infants: the PROFICEL study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giada De Palma

    Full Text Available Interactions between environmental factors and predisposing genes could be involved in the development of coeliac disease (CD. This study has assessed whether milk-feeding type and HLA-genotype influence the intestinal microbiota composition of infants with a family history of CD. The study included 164 healthy newborns, with at least one first-degree relative with CD, classified according to their HLA-DQ genotype by PCR-SSP DQB1 and DQA1 typing. Faecal microbiota was analysed by quantitative PCR at 7 days, and at 1 and 4 months of age. Significant interactions between milk-feeding type and HLA-DQ genotype on bacterial numbers were not detected by applying a linear mixed-model analysis for repeated measures. In the whole population, breast-feeding promoted colonization of C. leptum group, B. longum and B. breve, while formula-feeding promoted that of Bacteroides fragilis group, C. coccoides-E. rectale group, E. coli and B. lactis. Moreover, increased numbers of B. fragilis group and Staphylococcus spp., and reduced numbers of Bifidobacterium spp. and B. longum were detected in infants with increased genetic risk of developing CD. Analyses within subgroups of either breast-fed or formula-fed infants indicated that in both cases increased risk of CD was associated with lower numbers of B. longum and/or Bifidobacterium spp. In addition, in breast-fed infants the increased genetic risk of developing CD was associated with increased C. leptum group numbers, while in formula-fed infants it was associated with increased Staphylococcus and B. fragilis group numbers. Overall, milk-feeding type in conjunction with HLA-DQ genotype play a role in establishing infants' gut microbiota; moreover, breast-feeding reduced the genotype-related differences in microbiota composition, which could partly explain the protective role attributed to breast milk in this disorder.

  9. Intravenous Fish Oil and Pediatric Intestinal Failure-Associated Liver Disease: Changes in Plasma Phytosterols, Cytokines, and Bile Acids and Erythrocyte Fatty Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkins, Kara L; DeBarber, Andrea; Steiner, Robert D; Flores, Martiniano J; Grogan, Tristan R; Henning, Susanne M; Reyen, Laurie; Venick, Robert S

    2017-05-01

    Soybean oil (SO) emulsions are associated with intestinal failure-associated liver disease (IFALD); fish oil (FO) emulsions are used to treat IFALD. SO and FO differ with respect to their fatty acid and phytosterol content. In children with IFALD whose SO was replaced with FO, we aimed to (1) quantify changes in erythrocyte fatty acids and plasma phytosterols, cytokines, and bile acids and (2) correlate these changes with direct bilirubin (DB). This study enrolled IFALD children who received 6 months of FO. Blood samples were collected prior to FO, and after 2 weeks and 3 and 6 months of FO. The primary outcome was 3-month vs baseline biomarker concentrations. At study initiation, the median patient age was 3 months (interquartile range, 3-17 months), and mean ± standard deviation DB was 5.6 ± 0.7 mg/dL (n = 14). Cholestasis reversed in 79% of subjects. Eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid was greater than baseline ( P < .001, all time points). Linoleic and arachidonic acid and sitosterol and stigmasterol were less than baseline ( P < .05, all time points). Three- and 6-month interleukin-8 (IL-8) and total and conjugated bile acids were less than baseline ( P < .05). Baseline IL-8 was correlated with baseline DB ( r = 0.71, P < .01). Early changes in stigmasterol and IL-8 were correlated with later DB changes ( r = 0.68 and 0.75, P < .05). Specific fat emulsion components may play a role in IFALD. Stigmasterol and IL-8 may predict FO treatment response.

  10. The diagnostic value of polymerase chain reaction for Mycobacterium tuberculosis to distinguish intestinal tuberculosis from crohn's disease: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ting; Fei, Baoying; Zhang, Yu; He, Xujun

    2017-01-01

    Intestinal tuberculosis (ITB) and Crohn's disease (CD) are important differential diagnoses that can be difficult to distinguish. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is an efficient and promising tool. This meta-analysis was performed to systematically and objectively assess the potential diagnostic accuracy and clinical value of PCR for MTB in distinguishing ITB from CD. We searched PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Science Direct, and the Cochrane Library for eligible studies, and nine articles with 12 groups of data were identified. The included studies were subjected to quality assessment using the revised Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS-2) tool. The summary estimates were as follows: sensitivity 0.47 (95% CI: 0.42-0.51); specificity 0.95 (95% CI: 0.93-0.97); the positive likelihood ratio (PLR) 10.68 (95% CI: 6.98-16.35); the negative likelihood ratio (NLR) 0.49 (95% CI: 0.33-0.71); and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) 21.92 (95% CI: 13.17-36.48). The area under the curve (AUC) was 0.9311, with a Q* value of 0.8664. Heterogeneity was found in the NLR. The heterogeneity of the studies was evaluated by meta-regression analysis and subgroup analysis. The current evidence suggests that PCR for MTB is a promising and highly specific diagnostic method to distinguish ITB from CD. However, physicians should also keep in mind that negative results cannot exclude ITB for its low sensitivity. Additional prospective studies are needed to further evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of PCR.

  11. CD4+ CD25+ FOXP3+ T cell frequency in the peripheral blood is a biomarker that distinguishes intestinal tuberculosis from Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Veena; Kedia, Saurabh; Garg, Sushil Kumar; Rampal, Ritika; Mouli, V Pratap; Purwar, Anuja; Mitra, D K; Das, Prasenjit; Dattagupta, S; Makharia, Govind; Acharya, S K; Ahuja, Vineet

    2018-01-01

    Distinguishing between Crohn's Disease (CD) and Intestinal Tuberculosis (ITB) has been a challenging task for clinicians due to their similar presentation. CD4+FOXP3+ T regulatory cells (Tregs) have been reported to be increased in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. However, there is no such data available in ITB. The aim of this study was to investigate the differential expression of FOXP3+ T cells in patients with ITB and CD and its utility as a biomarker. The study prospectively recruited 124 patients with CD, ITB and controls: ulcerative colitis (UC) and patients with only haemorrhoidal bleed. Frequency of CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ Tregs in peripheral blood (flow cytometry), FOXP3 mRNA expression in blood and colonic mucosa (qPCR) and FOXP3+ T cells in colonic mucosa (immunohistochemistry) were compared between controls, CD and ITB patients. Frequency of CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ Treg cells in peripheral blood was significantly increased in ITB as compared to CD. Similarly, significant increase in FOXP3+ T cells and FOXP3 mRNA expression was observed in colonic mucosa of ITB as compared to CD. ROC curve showed that a value of >32.5% for FOXP3+ cells in peripheral blood could differentiate between CD and ITB with a sensitivity of 75% and a specificity of 90.6%. Phenotypic enumeration of peripheral CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ Treg cells can be used as a non-invasive biomarker in clinics with a high diagnostic accuracy to differentiate between ITB and CD in regions where TB is endemic.

  12. Avaliação da densidade mineral óssea em pacientes com doença inflamatória intestinal Bone mineral density evaluation in inflammatory bowel disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Lígia Lora

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available RACIONAL: Pacientes com doença inflamatória intestinal têm maior prevalência de redução da densidade mineral óssea em comparação às pessoas saudáveis. OBJETIVO: Avaliar a densidade mineral óssea em uma população de pacientes com doença inflamatória intestinal. MÉTODOS: Noventa pacientes de 20 a 50 anos de idade, do ambulatório de doença inflamatória intestinal do Serviço de Gastroenterologia do Hospital de Clínicas da Universidade Federal do Paraná, Curitiba, PR, foram selecionados para avaliação. Desses, 76 completaram todas as etapas de avaliação. A densitometria foi realizada da coluna lombar e fêmur direito em aparelho Hologyc QDR 1000/W. RESULTADOS: Os pacientes com doença inflamatória intestinal tiveram significativa redução da densidade mineral óssea, avaliada por massa óssea em números absolutos (g/cm², em todas as regiões avaliadas, colo do fêmur, fêmur total e coluna lombar. As variáveis analisadas como, índice de atividade de doença, uso de corticóide, cirurgias prévias, índice de massa corpórea e falta de atividade física, não demonstraram correlação com a massa óssea, ou seja, não influenciaram os resultados da densidade mineral óssea no grupo estudado de doentes com doença inflamatória intestinal. CONCLUSÃO: Densidade mineral óssea reduzida foi encontrada nos pacientes com doença inflamatória intestinal do Ambulatório de Doença Inflamatória Intestinal do Serviço de Gastroenterologia do Hospital de Clínicas da Universidade Federal do Paraná, mais pronunciadamente nos pacientes com doença de Crohn, semelhante ao descrito na literatura. Nenhuma das variáveis analisadas mostrou correlação com a densidade mineral óssea.BACKGROUND: Inflammatory bowel disease patients have shown greater reduction of the bone mineral density compared to healthy people. AIM: To evaluate the bone mineral density in a population of patients with inflammatory bowel disease. METHODS: Ninety

  13. Intestinal microbiome landscaping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shetty, Sudarshan A.; Hugenholtz, Floor; Lahti, Leo; Smidt, Hauke; Vos, de Willem M.

    2017-01-01

    High individuality, large complexity and limited understanding of the mechanisms underlying human intestinal microbiome function remain the major challenges for designing beneficial modulation strategies. Exemplified by the analysis of intestinal bacteria in a thousand Western adults, we discuss

  14. An Ontology to Improve Transparency in Case Definition and Increase Case Finding of Infectious Intestinal Disease: Database Study in English General Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lusignan, Simon; Shinneman, Stacy; Yonova, Ivelina; van Vlymen, Jeremy; Elliot, Alex J; Bolton, Frederick; Smith, Gillian E; O'Brien, Sarah

    2017-09-28

    Infectious intestinal disease (IID) has considerable health impact; there are 2 billion cases worldwide resulting in 1 million deaths and 78.7 million disability-adjusted life years lost. Reported IID incidence rates vary and this is partly because terms such as "diarrheal disease" and "acute infectious gastroenteritis" are used interchangeably. Ontologies provide a method of transparently comparing case definitions and disease incidence rates. This study sought to show how differences in case definition in part account for variation in incidence estimates for IID and how an ontological approach provides greater transparency to IID case finding. We compared three IID case definitions: (1) Royal College of General Practitioners Research and Surveillance Centre (RCGP RSC) definition based on mapping to the Ninth International Classification of Disease (ICD-9), (2) newer ICD-10 definition, and (3) ontological case definition. We calculated incidence rates and examined the contribution of four supporting concepts related to IID: symptoms, investigations, process of care (eg, notification to public health authorities), and therapies. We created a formal ontology using ontology Web language. The ontological approach identified 5712 more cases of IID than the ICD-10 definition and 4482 more than the RCGP RSC definition from an initial cohort of 1,120,490. Weekly incidence using the ontological definition was 17.93/100,000 (95% CI 15.63-20.41), whereas for the ICD-10 definition the rate was 8.13/100,000 (95% CI 6.70-9.87), and for the RSC definition the rate was 10.24/100,000 (95% CI 8.55-12.12). Codes from the four supporting concepts were generally consistent across our three IID case definitions: 37.38% (3905/10,448) (95% CI 36.16-38.5) for the ontological definition, 38.33% (2287/5966) (95% CI 36.79-39.93) for the RSC definition, and 40.82% (1933/4736) (95% CI 39.03-42.66) for the ICD-10 definition. The proportion of laboratory results associated with a positive test

  15. Intestinal mucus accumulation in a child with acutemyeloblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namık Özbek

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal mucus accumulation is a very rare situation observed in some solid tumors, intestinal inflammation, mucosal hyperplasia, elevated intestinal pressure, and various other diseases. However, it has never been described in acute myeloblastic leukemia. The pathogenesis of intestinal mucus accumulation is still not clear. Here, we report a 14-year-old girl with acute myeloblastic leukemia and febrile neutropenia in addition to typhlitis. She was also immobilized due to joint contractures of the lower extremities and had intestinal mucus accumulation, which was, at first, misdiagnosed as intestinal parasitosis. We speculate that typhlitis, immobilization and decreased intestinal motility due to usage of antiemetic drugs might have been the potential etiologic factors in this case. However, its impact on prognosis of the primary disease is unknown.

  16. Robust bioengineered 3D functional human intestinal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Lin, Yinan; Davis, Kimberly M; Wang, Qianrui; Rnjak-Kovacina, Jelena; Li, Chunmei; Isberg, Ralph R; Kumamoto, Carol A; Mecsas, Joan; Kaplan, David L

    2015-09-16

    Intestinal functions are central to human physiology, health and disease. Options to study these functions with direct relevance to the human condition remain severely limited when using conventional cell cultures, microfluidic systems, organoids, animal surrogates or human studies. To replicate in vitro the tissue architecture and microenvironments of native intestine, we developed a 3D porous protein scaffolding system, containing a geometrically-engineered hollow lumen, with adaptability to both large and small intestines. These intestinal tissues demonstrated representative human responses by permitting continuous accumulation of mucous secretions on the epithelial surface, establishing low oxygen tension in the lumen, and interacting with gut-colonizing bacteria. The newly developed 3D intestine model enabled months-long sustained access to these intestinal functions in vitro, readily integrable with a multitude of different organ mimics and will therefore ensure a reliable ex vivo tissue system for studies in a broad context of human intestinal diseases and treatments.

  17. Cytokines and intestinal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamias, Giorgos; Cominelli, Fabio

    2016-11-01

    Cytokines of the intestinal microenvironment largely dictate immunological responses after mucosal insults and the dominance of homeostatic or proinflammatory pathways. This review presents important recent studies on the role of specific cytokines in the pathogenesis of intestinal inflammation. The particular mucosal effects of cytokines depend on their inherent properties but also the cellular origin, type of stimulatory antigens, intermolecular interactions, and the particular immunological milieu. Novel cytokines of the interleukin-1 (IL-1) family, including IL-33 and IL-36, have dominant roles in mucosal immunity, whereas more established ones such as IL-18 are constantly enriched with unique properties. Th17 cells are important mucosal constituents, although their profound plasticity, makes the specific set of cytokines they secrete more important than their mere numbers. Finally, various cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-like cytokine 1A, and death receptor, 3 demonstrate dichotomous roles with mucosa-protective function in acute injury but proinflammatory effects during chronic inflammation. The role of cytokines in mucosal health and disease is increasingly revealed. Such information not only will advance our understanding of the pathogenesis of gut inflammation, but also set the background for development of reliable diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers and cytokine-specific therapies.

  18. Dimethyloxalylglycine preserves the intestinal microvasculature and protects against intestinal injury in a neonatal mouse NEC model: role of VEGF signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowker, Rakhee M; Yan, Xiaocai; Managlia, Elizabeth; Liu, Shirley X L; Marek, Catherine; Tan, Xiao-Di; De Plaen, Isabelle G

    2018-02-01

    BackgroundNecrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a devastating neonatal disease characterized by intestinal necrosis. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) has a critical role in cellular oxygen homeostasis. Here, we hypothesized that prolyl hydroxylase (PHD) inhibition, which stabilizes HIF-1α, protects against NEC by promoting intestinal endothelial cell proliferation and improving intestinal microvascular integrity via vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling.MethodsTo assess the role of PHD inhibition in a neonatal mouse NEC model, we administered dimethyloxalylglycine (DMOG) or vehicle to pups before or during the NEC protocol, and determined mortality and incidence of severe intestinal injury. We assessed intestinal VEGF by western blot analysis and quantified endothelial cell and epithelial cell proliferation following immunofluorescence.ResultsDMOG decreased mortality and incidence of severe NEC, increased intestinal VEGF expression, and increased intestinal villus endothelial and epithelial cell proliferation in experimental NEC. Inhibiting VEGFR2 signaling eliminated DMOG's protective effect on intestinal injury severity, survival, and endothelial cell proliferation while sparing DMOG's protective effect on intestinal epithelial cell proliferation.ConclusionDMOG upregulates intestinal VEGF, promotes endothelial cell proliferation, and protects against intestinal injury and mortality in experimental NEC in a VEGFR2 dependent manner. DMOG's protective effect on the neonatal intestinal mucosa may be mediated via VEGFR2 dependent improvement of the intestinal microvasculature.

  19. The ESRP1-GPR137 axis contributes to intestinal pathogenesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Mager, Lukas Franz; Kölzer, Viktor Hendrik; Stuber Roos, Regula; Thoo Sin Lang, Lester; Keller, Irene; Köck, Ivonne; Langenegger, Maya; Simillion, Cedric; Pfister, Simona P; Faderl, Martin Richard; Genitsch Gratwohl, Vera; Tcymbarevich, Irina; Juillerat, Pascal; Li, Xiaohong; Xia, Yu

    2017-01-01

    eLife digest The lining of the intestine is just one cell thick, and yet it can act as an effective barrier between the inside of the body and the contents of the digestive system. This lining is often disturbed during bowel cancer, inflammatory bowel disease and other intestinal diseases, causing the barrier to fail and the gut to become leaky. These diseases often reduce patient life expectancy and quality of life. Intestinal epithelial cells make up the lining of the intestine and the norm...

  20. Small Intestine Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... all of an organ that contains cancer. The resection may include the small intestine and nearby organs (if the cancer has spread). The doctor may remove the section of the small intestine that contains cancer and perform an anastomosis (joining the cut ends of the intestine together). ...

  1. Innovative Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition Therapy for Intestinal Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Le, Hau D.; Fallon, Erica M.; de Meijer, Vincent E.; Malkan, Alpin D.; Puder, Mark; Gura, Kathleen M.

    2010-01-01

    Children with intestinal failure suffer from insufficient intestinal length or function, making them dependent on parenteral nutrition (PN) for growth and survival. PN and its components are associated with many complications ranging from simple electrolyte abnormalities to life-threatening PN-associated liver disease, which is also called intestinal failure-associated liver disease (ILALD). From a nutrition perspective, the ultimate goal is to provide adequate caloric requirements and make t...

  2. Haemorrhage and intestinal lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attilia M. Pizzini

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence of coeliac disease is around 1% in general population but this is often unrecognised. The classical presentation of adult coeliac disease is characterized by diarrhoea and malabsorption syndrome, but atypical presentations are probably more common and are characterized by iron deficiency anaemia, weight loss, fatigue, infertility, arthralgia, peripheral neuropathy and osteoporosis. Unusual are the coagulation disorders (prevalence 20% and these are due to vitamin K malabsorption (prolonged prothrombin time. Clinical case: A 64-year-old man was admitted to our Department for an extensive spontaneous haematoma of the right leg. He had a history of a small bowel resection for T-cell lymphoma, with a negative follow-up and he didn’t report any personal or familiar history of bleeding. Laboratory tests showed markedly prolonged prothrombin (PT and partial-thromboplastin time (PTT, corrected by mixing studies, and whereas platelet count and liver tests was normal. A single dose (10 mg of intravenous vitamin K normalized the PT. Several days before the patient had been exposed to a superwarfarin pesticide, but diagnostic tests for brodifacoum, bromadiolone or difenacoum were negative. Diagnosis of multiple vitamin K-dependent coagulationfactor deficiencies (II, VII, IX, X due to intestinal malabsorption was made and coeliac disease was detected. Therefore the previous lymphoma diagnosis might be closely related to coeliac disease. Conclusions: A gluten free diet improves quality of life and restores normal nutritional and biochemical status and protects against these complications.

  3. Is safety infliximab during pregnancy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease? ¿El tratamiento con infliximab es seguro durante el embarazo en pacientes con enfermedad inflamatoria intestinal?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Argüelles-Arias

    2012-02-01

    foetus. In fact, in our study and in some cases, its withdrawal may lead to a worsening of the disease. However, further control studies are required with larger samples to obtain more representative findings.Introducción: la enfermedad inflamatoria intestinal (EII es un trastorno crónico que debuta en la mayoría de los casos durante la edad reproductiva. Existen pocos datos sobre la seguridad durante el embarazo de los tratamientos disponibles, entre ellos los denominados biológicos, y estos están basados en resultados de casos esporádicos. Objetivos: determinar la seguridad del tratamiento con infliximab (IFX durante el embarazo en mujeres con EII. Un segundo objetivo es observar el efecto que sobre la actividad de la enfermedad tiene el abandono del tratamiento. Material y métodos: se trata de un estudio retrospectivo en el que se incluyeron mujeres con EII embarazadas y que estaban en tratamiento con IFX durante el embarazo. Se incluyeron en el estudio a 5 hospitales de España. La actividad de la enfermedad se midió según el CDAI en la enfermedad de Crohn (EC y la de la colitis ulcerosa (CU según el índice de Truelove-Witts en cada trimestre del embarazo. La edad gestacional, el peso y las enfermedades del feto se determinaron al nacimiento. Resultados: se incluyeron doce mujeres con una edad media de 29 años, 4 diagnosticadas de CU y 8 de EC, con una duración media de la enfermedad de 7 años. Todas salvo una, que se diagnosticó durante el embarazo estaban siendo tratadas con IFX en el momento de la concepción. Seis pacientes recibieron el tratamiento de forma ininterrumpida durante todo el embarazo, 2 suspendieron el tratamiento de forma voluntaria y a tres se les suspendió el tratamiento en el tercer trimestre. Recibieron una dosis media de IFX de 400 mg cada 8 semanas. De las 6 pacientes que recibieron tratamiento continuo, el 50% se mantuvo en remisión. De las pacientes que abandonaron el tratamiento, un 83,3% (todas menos una presentaron un

  4. Intestinal Colonization Dynamics of Vibrio cholerae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almagro-Moreno, Salvador; Pruss, Kali; Taylor, Ronald K.

    2015-01-01

    To cause the diarrheal disease cholera, Vibrio cholerae must effectively colonize the small intestine. In order to do so, the bacterium needs to successfully travel through the stomach and withstand the presence of agents such as bile and antimicrobial peptides in the intestinal lumen and mucus. The bacterial cells penetrate the viscous mucus layer covering the epithelium and attach and proliferate on its surface. In this review, we discuss recent developments and known aspects of the early stages of V. cholerae intestinal colonization and highlight areas that remain to be fully understood. We propose mechanisms and postulate a model that covers some of the steps that are required in order for the bacterium to efficiently colonize the human host. A deeper understanding of the colonization dynamics of V. cholerae and other intestinal pathogens will provide us with a variety of novel targets and strategies to avoid the diseases caused by these organisms. PMID:25996593

  5. Tissue levels and post-prandial secretion of the intestinal growth factor, glucagon-like peptide-2, in controls and inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Peter T; Ljung, Tryggve; Hartmann, Bolette

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) and peptide YY (PYY) are produced in endocrine L-cells of the intestine and secreted in response to food intake. GLP-2 has a trophic effect on the intestinal epithelium, whereas PYY has pro-absorptive effects. It can be speculated that...... the fasting plasma levels nor the meal responses of GLP-2 and PYY differed between controls and IBD patients. CONCLUSION: The similar responses of GLP-2 and PYY in patients and controls do not support the suggestion that L-cell secretion is altered in IBD. The decreased tissue PYY concentrations may...

  6. Celiac Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease and the intestinal disease respond to a gluten-free diet and recur if gluten is added back into ... intestinal condition, people with DH must maintain a gluten-free diet. Screening Screening for celiac disease means testing for ...

  7. Crohn's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crohn's disease causes inflammation of the digestive system. It is one of a group of diseases called inflammatory ... small intestine called the ileum. The cause of Crohn's disease is unknown. It may be due to an ...

  8. The friendly bacteria within us Commensal bacteria of the intestine ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The friendly bacteria within us Commensal bacteria of the intestine: Roles in health and disease B.S. Ramakrishna Professor & Head Gastroenterology & Hepatology Christian Medical College Vellore · Slide 2 · Intestinal bacteria: the hidden organ · Slide 4 · Slide 5 · The normal bacterial flora prevents GI disease · Slide 7.

  9. Gene expression profiling of chicken intestinal host responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemert, van S.

    2007-01-01

    Chicken lines differ in genetic disease susceptibility. The scope of the research described in this thesis was to identify genes involved in genetic disease resistance in the chicken intestine. Therefore gene expression in the jejunum was investigated using a microarray approach. An intestine

  10. Farewell to Animal Testing: Innovations on Human Intestinal Microphysiological Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Hyun Kang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The human intestine is a dynamic organ where the complex host-microbe interactions that orchestrate intestinal homeostasis occur. Major contributing factors associated with intestinal health and diseases include metabolically-active gut microbiota, intestinal epithelium, immune components, and rhythmical bowel movement known as peristalsis. Human intestinal disease models have been developed; however, a considerable number of existing models often fail to reproducibly predict human intestinal pathophysiology in response to biological and chemical perturbations or clinical interventions. Intestinal organoid models have provided promising cytodifferentiation and regeneration, but the lack of luminal flow and physical bowel movements seriously hamper mimicking complex host-microbe crosstalk. Here, we discuss recent advances of human intestinal microphysiological systems, such as the biomimetic human “Gut-on-a-Chip” that can employ key intestinal components, such as villus epithelium, gut microbiota, and immune components under peristalsis-like motions and flow, to reconstitute the transmural 3D lumen-capillary tissue interface. By encompassing cutting-edge tools in microfluidics, tissue engineering, and clinical microbiology, gut-on-a-chip has been leveraged not only to recapitulate organ-level intestinal functions, but also emulate the pathophysiology of intestinal disorders, such as chronic inflammation. Finally, we provide potential perspectives of the next generation microphysiological systems as a personalized platform to validate the efficacy, safety, metabolism, and therapeutic responses of new drug compounds in the preclinical stage.

  11. Neuroimmune regulation during intestinal development and homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga-Fernandes, Henrique; Pachnis, Vassilis

    2017-02-01

    Interactions between the nervous system and immune system are required for organ function and homeostasis. Evidence suggests that enteric neurons and intestinal immune cells share common regulatory mechanisms and can coordinate their responses to developmental challenges and environmental aggressions. These discoveries shed light on the physiology of system interactions and open novel perspectives for therapy designs that target underappreciated neurological-immunological commonalities. Here we highlight findings that address the importance of neuroimmune cell units (NICUs) in intestinal development, homeostasis and disease.

  12. Enteroscopia de doble balón para el diagnóstico de las enfermedades del intestino delgado en los niños Double-balloon enteroscope for the diagnosis of small intestine diseases in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Rubén Hernández Garcés

    2010-12-01

    and extent of the double balloon enteroscope screening in the diagnosis of small intestine diseases in children. Eight patients were studied by means of physical examination and negative complementary ones of small intestine disease, seen between November, 2008 and October, 2009. In three patients there was the clinical and radiological suspicion of Crohn's disease; in other three the suspicion of small intestine tumor and remainder were seen due to hidden bleeding of intestinal origin. RESULTS. Seven procedures were applied by retrograde route and two by the anterograde one, other patient undergoes total enteroscopy using both routes. The main extent of the oral DBE was of 62,5 min with an interval of 60 to 65min and by anal route it was of 50,7 min with an interval of 45 to 60 min. In all cases it was possible to identify some lesion explaining the symptoms. CONCLUSION. Double balloon enteroscope is a safe method for the diagnosis of small intestine disease in children.

  13. Entomoftoromicose intestinal: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábia Aparecida Carvalho

    1997-02-01

    Full Text Available Os autores relatam um caso de entomoftoromicose intestinal causada por Entomophthorales, em indivíduo de 19 anos, agricultor e sem doença associada. O paciente foi submetido a ressecção intestinal e o diagnóstico foi feito após análise da peça cirúrgica. Após revisão da literatura, são discutidos a evolução clínica, as características clinicopatológicas, as dificuldades no diagnóstico e o tratamento dessa entidade rara.A case of intestinal entomophthoramycosis caused by Entomophthorales in a man with 19 years-old, farmer and without associated disease. The patient was submitted to a intestinal ressection and diagnosis was carried through after analisys of the surgical specimen. After a review of the literature, the clinical evolution, clinico-pathologic features, difficulties in diagnosis and treatment are discussed.

  14. [Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly, Francisca; Amiot, Aurélien; Coffin, Benoît; Lavergne-Slove, Anne; Messing, Bernard; Bouhnik, Yoram

    2006-01-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) is a disease characterized by episodes resembling mechanical obstruction in the absence of organic, systemic, or metabolic disorders. Pseudo-obstruction is an uncommon condition and can result from primary (40%) or secondary (60%) causes. The most common symptoms are nausea, vomiting, abdominal distension, abdominal pain and constipation or diarrhea. These symptoms are usually present many years before CIPO diagnosis. They can lead to severe electrolyte disorders and malnutrition. Principles for management of patients with CIPO are: to establish a correct clinical diagnosis in excluding mechanical obstruction; to perform a symptomatic and physiologic assessment of the gastrointestinal tract involved; to look for extra-intestinal manifestations, especially for myopathy and neuropathy; to discuss in some cases a surgery for full-thickness intestinal biopsies, and/or a neuromuscular biopsy in case of mitochondrial cytopathy suspicion. The management is primarily focused on symptom control and nutritional support to prevent weight loss and malnutrition. Treatment of CIPO includes prokinetic agents which may help to reduce gastrointestinal symptoms Courses of antibiotics may be needed in patients with symptoms suggestive of bacterial overgrowth. When necessary, enteral nutrition is preferred. In carefully selected patients, feeding jejunostomy with or without decompression gastrostomy may be tried. Long term parenteral nutrition should be reserved for patients who can not tolerate enteral nutrition. Intestinal transplantation can be discussed in selected patients.

  15. Placental growth factor enhances angiogenesis in human intestinal microvascular endothelial cells via PI3K/Akt pathway: Potential implications of inflammation bowel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Yi, E-mail: mondayzy@126.com; Tu, Chuantao, E-mail: tu.chuantao@zs-hospital.sh.cn; Zhao, Yuan, E-mail: zhao.yuan@zs-hospital.sh.cn; Liu, Hongchun, E-mail: liuhch@aliyun.com; Zhang, Shuncai, E-mail: zhang.shuncai@zs-hospital.sh.cn

    2016-02-19

    Background: Angiogenesis plays a major role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Placental growth factor (PlGF) is a specific regulator of pathological angiogenesis and is upregulated in the sera of IBD patients. Therefore, the role of PlGF in IBD angiogenesis was investigated here using HIMECs. Methods: The expression of PlGF and its receptors in human intestinal microvascular endothelial cells (HIMECs) and inflamed mucosa of IBD patients were examined using quantitative PCR and western blot analysis and the role of PlGF in IBD HIMECs was further explored using small interfering RNA (siRNA). The induction of pro-inflammatory cytokine by PlGF in HIMECs was confirmed by ELISA. The capacity of PlGF to induce angiogenesis in HIMECs was tested through proliferation, cell-migration, matrigel tubule-formation assays and its underlying signaling pathway were explored by western blot analysis of ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt phosphorylation. Results: mRNA and protein expression of PlGF and its receptor NRP-1 were significantly increased in IBD HIMECs. Inflamed mucosa of IBD patients also displayed higher expression of PIGF. The production of IL-6 and TNF-α in culture supernatant of HIMECs treated with exogenous recombinant human PlGF-1 (rhPlGF-1) were increased. Furthermore, rhPlGF-1 significantly induced HIMECs migration and tube formation in a dose-dependent manner and knockdown of endogenous PlGF in IBD HIMECs using siRNA substantially reduced these angiogenesis activities. PlGF induced PI3K/Akt phosphorylation in HIMECs and pretreatment of PlGF-stimulated HIMECs with PI3K inhibitor (LY294002) significantly inhibited the PlGF-induced cell migration and tube formation. Conclusion: Our results demonstrated the pro-inflammatory and angiogenic effects of PlGF on HIMECs in IBD through activation of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. PlGF/PI3K/Akt signaling may serve as a potential therapeutic target for IBD. - Highlights: • Expression of PlGF and its receptor NRP-1

  16. A pilot study examining the relationship among Crohn disease activity, glucagon-like peptide-2 signalling and intestinal function in pediatric patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigalet, David L; Kravarusic, Dragan; Butzner, Decker

    2013-01-01

    and increased intestinal permeability. Healing of CD resulted in normalization of postprandial GLP-2 release and mucosal functioning (nutrient absorption and permeability), the latter due to an increase in mucosal surface area. These findings have implications for the use of GLP-2 and feeding strategies...

  17. Persistent changes in circulating and intestinal γδ T cell subsets, invariant natural killer T cells and mucosal-associated invariant T cells in children and adults with coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Margaret R; Elliott, Louise; Hussey, Seamus; Mahmud, Nasir; Kelly, Jacinta; Doherty, Derek G; Feighery, Conleth F

    2013-01-01

    Coeliac disease is a chronic small intestinal immune-mediated enteropathy precipitated by exposure to dietary gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. The only current therapy is a lifelong gluten free diet. While much work has focused on the gliadin-specific adaptive immune response in coeliac disease, little is understood about the involvement of the innate immune system. Here we used multi-colour flow cytometry to determine the number and frequency of γδ T cells (Vδ1, Vδ2 and Vδ3 subsets), natural killer cells, CD56(+) T cells, invariant NKT cells, and mucosal associated invariant T cells, in blood and duodenum from adults and children with coeliac disease and healthy matched controls. All circulating innate lymphocyte populations were significantly decreased in adult, but not paediatric coeliac donors, when compared with healthy controls. Within the normal small intestine, we noted that Vδ3 cells were the most abundant γδ T cell type in the adult epithelium and lamina propria, and in the paediatric lamina propria. In contrast, patients with coeliac disease showed skewing toward a predominant Vδ1 profile, observed for both adult and paediatric coeliac disease cohorts, particularly within the gut epithelium. This was concurrent with decreases in all other gut lymphocyte subsets, suggesting a specific involvement of Vδ1 cells in coeliac disease pathogenesis. Further analysis showed that γδ T cells isolated from the coeliac gut display an activated, effector memory phenotype, and retain the ability to rapidly respond to in vitro stimulation. A profound loss of CD56 expression in all lymphocyte populations was noted in the coeliac gut. These findings demonstrate a sustained aberrant innate lymphocyte profile in coeliac disease patients of all ages, persisting even after elimination of gluten from the diet. This may lead to impaired immunity, and could potentially account for the increased incidence of autoimmune co-morbidity.

  18. Persistent changes in circulating and intestinal γδ T cell subsets, invariant natural killer T cells and mucosal-associated invariant T cells in children and adults with coeliac disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret R Dunne

    Full Text Available Coeliac disease is a chronic small intestinal immune-mediated enteropathy precipitated by exposure to dietary gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. The only current therapy is a lifelong gluten free diet. While much work has focused on the gliadin-specific adaptive immune response in coeliac disease, little is understood about the involvement of the innate immune system. Here we used multi-colour flow cytometry to determine the number and frequency of γδ T cells (Vδ1, Vδ2 and Vδ3 subsets, natural killer cells, CD56(+ T cells, invariant NKT cells, and mucosal associated invariant T cells, in blood and duodenum from adults and children with coeliac disease and healthy matched controls. All circulating innate lymphocyte populations were significantly decreased in adult, but not paediatric coeliac donors, when compared with healthy controls. Within the normal small intestine, we noted that Vδ3 cells were the most abundant γδ T cell type in the adult epithelium and lamina propria, and in the paediatric lamina propria. In contrast, patients with coeliac disease showed skewing toward a predominant Vδ1 profile, observed for both adult and paediatric coeliac disease cohorts, particularly within the gut epithelium. This was concurrent with decreases in all other gut lymphocyte subsets, suggesting a specific involvement of Vδ1 cells in coeliac disease pathogenesis. Further analysis showed that γδ T cells isolated from the coeliac gut display an activated, effector memory phenotype, and retain the ability to rapidly respond to in vitro stimulation. A profound loss of CD56 expression in all lymphocyte populations was noted in the coeliac gut. These findings demonstrate a sustained aberrant innate lymphocyte profile in coeliac disease patients of all ages, persisting even after elimination of gluten from the diet. This may lead to impaired immunity, and could potentially account for the increased incidence of autoimmune co-morbidity.

  19. Regulation of intestinal homeostasis by innate immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayama, Hisako; Nishimura, Junichi; Takeda, Kiyoshi

    2013-12-01

    The intestinal immune system has an ability to distinguish between the microbiota and pathogenic bacteria, and then activate pro-inflammatory pathways against pathogens for host defense while remaining unresponsive to the microbiota and dietary antigens. In the intestine, abnormal activation of innate immunity causes development of several inflammatory disorders such as inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Thus, activity of innate immunity is finely regulated in the intestine. To date, multiple innate immune cells have been shown to maintain gut homeostasis by preventing inadequate adaptive immune responses in the murine intestine. Additionally, several innate immune subsets, which promote Th1 and Th17 responses and are implicated in the pathogenesis of IBD, have recently been identified in the human intestinal mucosa. The demonstration of both murine and human intestinal innate immune subsets contributing to regulation of adaptive immunity emphasizes the conserved innate immune functions across species and might promote development of the intestinal innate immunity-based clinical therapy.

  20. The role of CDX2 in intestinal homeostasis and inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coskun, Mehmet; Troelsen, Jesper Thorvald; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2011-01-01

    a causal role in a large number of diseases and developmental disorders. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by a chronically inflamed mucosa caused by dysregulation of the intestinal immune homeostasis. The aetiology of IBD is thought to be a combination of genetic and environmental factors......, including luminal bacteria. The Caudal-related homeobox transcription factor 2 (CDX2) is critical in early intestinal differentiation and has been implicated as a master regulator of the intestinal homeostasis and permeability in adults. When expressed, CDX2 modulates a diverse set of processes including...... of the intestinal homeostasis and further to reveal its potential role in inflammation....

  1. Fetal MRI of hereditary multiple intestinal atresia with postnatal correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Githu, Tangayi [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Radiology of Huntsville, P.C., Huntsville, AL (United States); Merrow, Arnold C.; Lee, Jason K. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Garrison, Aaron P. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Surgical Services, Division of Pediatric General and Thoracic Surgery, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Akron Children' s Hospital, Pediatric Surgery, Akron, OH (United States); Brown, Rebeccah L. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Surgical Services, Division of Pediatric General and Thoracic Surgery, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Hereditary multiple intestinal atresia (HMIA) is an extremely uncommon cause of congenital bowel obstruction. The morbidity and mortality of this disease differ significantly from those of isolated intestinal atresias and non-hereditary forms of multiple intestinal atresia. Most notably, despite successful operative repairs of the atresias found in this disease, HMIA maintains a 100% lethality rate from continued post-operative intestinal failure and an associated severe immunodeficiency. We present a case of HMIA evaluated with fetal MRI and subsequently diagnosed by a combination of corroborative postnatal imaging with surgical exploration and pathological examination. (orig.)

  2. Fetal MRI of hereditary multiple intestinal atresia with postnatal correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Githu, Tangayi; Merrow, Arnold C.; Lee, Jason K.; Garrison, Aaron P.; Brown, Rebeccah L.

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary multiple intestinal atresia (HMIA) is an extremely uncommon cause of congenital bowel obstruction. The morbidity and mortality of this disease differ significantly from those of isolated intestinal atresias and non-hereditary forms of multiple intestinal atresia. Most notably, despite successful operative repairs of the atresias found in this disease, HMIA maintains a 100% lethality rate from continued post-operative intestinal failure and an associated severe immunodeficiency. We present a case of HMIA evaluated with fetal MRI and subsequently diagnosed by a combination of corroborative postnatal imaging with surgical exploration and pathological examination. (orig.)

  3. The effect of Artemisia annua on broiler performance, on intestinal microbiota and on the course of a Clostridium perfringens infection applying a necrotic enteritis disease model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, Ricarda; Grevsen, Kai; Ivarsen, Elise

    2012-01-01

    and 20 g/kg) and n-hexane extract from fresh A. annua leaves (0, 125, 250 and 500 mg/kg) on broiler performance was investigated. Dried plant material decreased feed intake and body weight in a dose-dependent manner, and 10 and 20 g/kg diet tended to improve the feed conversion ratio. The n-hexane...... extract also reduced feed intake, but broiler weight tended to decrease only at the highest dietary concentration. The feed conversion ratio tended to improve when birds received 250 and 500 mg/kg n-hexane extract. In a third experiment, a necrotic enteritis disease model was applied to investigate...... the effect of the dietary addition of dried A. annua leaves (10 g/kg on top) or n-hexane extract of A. annua (250 mg/kg) on the severity of the disease in broilers. The addition of n-hexane extract reduced the intestinal C. perfringens numbers and the severity of the disease-related small intestinal lesions...

  4. A neonate with intestinal volvulus without malrotation exhibiting early jaundice with a suspected fetal onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Kaori; Kinoshita, Mari; Kin, Takane; Arimitsu, Takeshi; Matsuzaki, Yohei; Ikeda, Kazushige; Tomita, Hiroshi; Fujino, Akihiro; Kuroda, Tatsuo

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal volvulus without malrotation is a rare disease that causes volvulus of the small intestine despite normal intestinal rotation and fixation. We encountered a neonate with this disease who developed early jaundice and was suspected to have a fetal onset. This patient was characterized by early jaundice complicating intestinal volvulus without malrotation and is considered to have exhibited reduced fetal movement and early jaundice as a result of volvulus, necrosis, and hemorrhage of the small intestine in the fetal period. If abdominal distention accompanied by early jaundice is noted in a neonate, intestinal volvulus without malrotation and associated intraabdominal hemorrhage should be suspected and promptly treated.

  5. Gastric and intestinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossum, Theresa W; Hedlund, Cheryl S

    2003-09-01

    Gastric surgery is commonly performed to remove foreign bodies and correct gastric dilatation-volvulus and is less commonly performed to treat gastric ulceration or erosion, neoplasia, and benign gastric outflow obstruction. Intestinal surgery, although commonly performed by veterinarians, should never be considered routine. The most common procedures of the small intestinal tract performed in dogs and cats include enterotomy and resection/anastomosis. Surgery of the large intestine is indicated for lesions causing obstruction, perforations, colonic inertia, or chronic inflammation.

  6. TNF suppresses acute intestinal inflammation by inducing local glucocorticoid synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noti, Mario; Corazza, Nadia; Mueller, Christoph; Berger, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Although tumor necrosis factor (α) (TNF) exerts proinflammatory activities in a variety of diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease, there is increasing evidence for antiinflammatory actions of TNF. In contrast, glucocorticoids (GCs) are steroid hormones that suppress inflammation, at least in part by regulating the expression and action of TNF. We report that TNF induces extraadrenal production of immunoregulatory GCs in the intestinal mucosa during acute intestinal inflammation. The absence of TNF results in a lack of colonic GC synthesis and exacerbation of dextran sodium sulfate–induced colitis. TNF seems to promote local steroidogenesis by directly inducing steroidogenic enzymes in intestinal epithelial cells. Therapeutic administration of TNF induces GC synthesis in oxazolone-induced colitis and ameliorates intestinal inflammation, whereas inhibition of intestinal GC synthesis abrogates the therapeutic effect of TNF. These data show that TNF suppresses the pathogenesis of acute intestinal inflammation by promoting local steroidogenesis. PMID:20439544

  7. Radiological manifestations of intestinal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Im, Jae Hoon

    1974-01-01

    Radiological findings of 87 cases of intestinal tuberculosis are analyzed and presented. The diagnosis was based on histopathology in 29 cases, and on clinical ground and radiological findings in 58 cases. The radio of male and female patients was 4:6, and peak incidence is between 10 and 30. Abdominal pain, diarrhea, weight loss, fever and general weakness are frequent symptoms, and tenderness of abdomen, ascites with abdominal distension, malnutrition and emaciation are frequent signs of the patients. Laboratory investigation reveal anemia, raised ESR, hypoalbuminaemia and positive occult blood reaction in the stool in most of the patients. Chest film show activity pulmonary tuberculosis in only 1/3 patients. There is no pathognomonic radiological findings in intestinal tuberculosis and their manifestations are protean, and differentiation from other inflammatory diseases and malignant tumors in gastrointestinal tract is very difficult on radiological ground alone. However, in patients with complaining vague abdominal symptoms and signs, the radiological diagnosis is most certain means in the decision of existence of organic lesion and suggestion of tuberculosis in the gastrointestinal tract and its extent as yet. Multiplicity of the lesion, involvement of adjacent organ such as peritoneum or mesenteric lymph nodes, typical nodularity or irregularity of mesenteric border and existence of active pulmonary tuberculosis are the suggestive findings of intestinal tuberculosis. In the diagnosis of inflammatory disease or malignant tumor of gastrointestinal tract, the possibility of tuberculosis should be borne in mind, and vice versa

  8. Intestinal parasites and tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuar Alonso Cedeño-Burbano

    2017-10-01

    Conclusions: The available evidence was insufficient to affirm that intestinal parasites predispose to developing tuberculous. The studies carried out so far have found statistically insignificant results.

  9. Inflammasome in Intestinal Inflammation and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Nunes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The activation of specific cytosolic pathogen recognition receptors, the nucleotide-binding-oligomerization-domain- (NOD- like receptors (NLRs, leads to the assembly of the inflammasome, a multimeric complex platform that activates caspase-1. The caspase-1 pathway leads to the upregulation of important cytokines from the interleukin (IL-1 family, IL-1β, and IL-18, with subsequent activation of the innate immune response. In this review, we discuss the molecular structure, the mechanisms behind the inflammasome activation, and its possible role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases and intestinal cancer. Here, we show that the available data points towards the importance of the inflammasome in the innate intestinal immune response, being the complex involved in the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis, correct intestinal barrier function and efficient elimination of invading pathogens.

  10. Intestinal microbiota and HIV-1 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. B. S. M. Trindade

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal microbiota consists of a qualitatively and quantitatively diverse range of microorganisms dynamically interacting with the host. It is remarkably stable with regard to the presence of microorganisms and their roles which, however, can be altered due to pathological conditions, diet composition, gastrointestinal disturbances and/or drug ingestion. The present review aimed at contributing to the discussion about changes in the intestinal microbiota due to HIV-1 infection, focusing on the triad infection-microbiota-nutrition as factors that promote intestinal bacterial imbalance. Intestinal microbiota alterations can be due to the HIV-1 infection as a primary factor or the pharmacotherapy employed, or they can be one of the consequences of the disease.

  11. Small Intestinal Obstruction Caused by Anisakiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichi Takano

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Small intestinal anisakiasis is a rare disease that is very difficult to diagnose, and its initial diagnosis is often surgical. However, it is typically a benign disease that resolves with conservative treatment, and unnecessary surgery can be avoided if it is appropriately diagnosed. This case report is an example of small intestinal obstruction caused by anisakiasis that resolved with conservative treatment. A 63-year-old man admitted to our department with acute abdominal pain. A history of raw fish (sushi ingestion was recorded. Abdominal CT demonstrated small intestinal dilatation with wall thickening and contrast enhancement. Ascitic fluid was found on the liver surface and in the Douglas pouch. His IgE (RIST was elevated, and he tested positive for the anti-Anisakis antibodies IgG and IgA. Small intestinal obstruction by anisakiasis was highly suspected and conservative treatment was performed, ileus tube, fasting, and fluid replacement. Symptoms quickly resolved, and he was discharged on the seventh day of admission. Small intestinal anisakiasis is a relatively uncommon disease, the diagnosis of which may be difficult. Because it is a self-limiting disease that usually resolves in 1-2 weeks, a conservative approach is advisable to avoid unnecessary surgery.

  12. Adult intestinal failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, J., E-mail: Jdavidson@doctors.org.u [Salford Royal Hospital, Salford (United Kingdom); Plumb, A.; Burnett, H. [Salford Royal Hospital, Salford (United Kingdom)

    2010-05-15

    Intestinal failure (IF) is the inability of the alimentary tract to digest and absorb sufficient nutrition to maintain normal fluid balance, growth, and health. It commonly arises from disease affecting the mesenteric root. Although severe IF is usually managed in specialized units, it lies at the end of a spectrum with degrees of nutritional compromise being widely encountered, but commonly under-recognized. Furthermore, in the majority of cases, the initial enteric insult occurs in non-specialist IF centres. The aim of this article is to review the common causes of IF, general principles of its management, some commoner complications, and the role of radiology in the approach to a patient with severe IF. The radiologist has a crucial role in helping provide access for feeding solutions (both enteral and parenteral) and controlling sepsis (via drainage of collections) in an initial restorative phase of treatment, whilst simultaneously mapping bowel anatomy and quality, and searching for disease complications to assist the clinicians in planning a later, restorative phase of therapy.

  13. Intestinal amoebiasis in a patient with acute graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation successfully treated by metronidazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numata, A; Itabashi, M; Kishimoto, K; Motohashi, K; Hagihara, M; Kuwabara, H; Tanaka, M; Kato, H; Chiba, S; Kunisaki, R; Fujisawa, S

    2015-12-01

    Amoebiasis has rarely been reported in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, although it is a world-wide infection and extremely common. We present a case of intestinal amoebiasis unexpectedly revealed by colonoscopy after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation from a human leukocyte antigen-mismatched unrelated donor for acute myeloid leukemia arising from chronic myelomonocytic leukemia and successfully treated by metronidazole. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Regulation of Intestinal Homeostasis by Innate Immune Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kayama, Hisako; Nishimura, Junichi; Takeda, Kiyoshi

    2013-01-01

    The intestinal immune system has an ability to distinguish between the microbiota and pathogenic bacteria, and then activate pro-inflammatory pathways against pathogens for host defense while remaining unresponsive to the microbiota and dietary antigens. In the intestine, abnormal activation of innate immunity causes development of several inflammatory disorders such as inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Thus, activity of innate immunity is finely regulated in the intestine. To date, multiple...

  15. Seronegative Intestinal Villous Atrophy: A Diagnostic Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio Martins

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is the most important cause of intestinal villous atrophy. Seronegative intestinal villous atrophy, including those that are nonresponsive to a gluten-free diet, is a diagnostic challenge. In these cases, before establishing the diagnosis of seronegative celiac disease, alternative etiologies of atrophic enteropathy should be considered. Recently, a new clinical entity responsible for seronegative villous atrophy was described—olmesartan-induced sprue-like enteropathy. Herein, we report two uncommon cases of atrophic enteropathy in patients with arterial hypertension under olmesartan, who presented with severe chronic diarrhea and significant involuntary weight loss. Further investigation revealed intestinal villous atrophy and intraepithelial lymphocytosis. Celiac disease and other causes of villous atrophy were ruled out. Drug-induced enteropathy was suspected and clinical improvement and histologic recovery were verified after olmesartan withdrawal. These cases highlight the importance for clinicians to maintain a high index of suspicion for olmesartan as a precipitant of sprue-like enteropathy.

  16. Biologic therapies for chronic inflammatory bowel disease Tratamientos biológicos en la enfermedad inflamatoria crónica intestinal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Martínez-Montiel

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Crohn's disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC make up the so-called chronic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Advances in the understanding of IBD pathophysiologic mechanisms in the last few years have allowed the development of novel therapies such as biologic therapies, which at least theoretically represent a more specific management of this disease with fewer side effects. Currently, the only effective and widely accepted biologic therapy for the treatment of intraluminal, fistulizing CD, both for remission induction and maintenance, is infliximab. The role of other monoclonal antibodies such as adalimumab is not clearly established. It could be deemed an alternative for patients with allergic reactions to infliximab, and for those with lost response because of anti-infliximab antibody development. However, relevant issues such as dosage and administration regimen remain to be established. Anti-integrin α4 therapies, despite encouraging results in phase-3 studies, are still unavailable, as their marketing authorization was held back in view of a number of reports regarding progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy cases. Immunostimulating therapy may be highly relevant in the near future, as it represents a novel strategy against disease with the inclusion of granulocyte-monocyte colony-stimulating factors. Regarding ulcerative colitis, results from the ACT-1 and ACT-2 studies showed that infliximab is also useful for the management of serious UC flare-ups not responding to standard treatment, which will lead to a revision of therapeutic algorithms, where this drug should be given preference before intravenous cyclosporine. In the next few years, the role of anti-CD3 drugs (vilisilizumab, T-cell inhibiting therapies, and epithelial repair and healing stimulating factors will be established.La enfermedad de Crohn (EC y la colitis ulcerosa (CU constituyen la denominada enfermedad inflamatoria crónica intestinal (EII. Los avances producidos

  17. Intestinal Microbiota Signatures Associated With Histological Liver Steatosis in Pediatric-Onset Intestinal Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpela, Katri; Mutanen, Annika; Salonen, Anne; Savilahti, Erkki; de Vos, Willem M; Pakarinen, Mikko P

    2017-02-01

    Intestinal failure (IF)-associated liver disease (IFALD) is the major cause of mortality in IF. The link between intestinal microbiota and IFALD is unclear. We compared intestinal microbiota of patients with IF (n = 23) with healthy controls (n = 58) using culture-independent phylogenetic microarray analysis. The microbiota was related to histological liver injury, fecal markers of intestinal inflammation, matrix metalloproteinase 9 and calprotectin, and disease characteristics. Overabundance of Lactobacilli, Proteobacteria, and Actinobacteria was observed in IF, whereas bacteria related to Clostridium clusters III, IV, and XIVa along with overall diversity and richness were reduced. Patients were segregated into 3 subgroups based on dominating bacteria: Clostridium cluster XIVa, Proteobacteria, and bacteria related to Lactobacillus plantarum. In addition to liver steatosis and fibrosis, Proteobacteria were associated with prolonged current parenteral nutrition (PN) as well as liver and intestinal inflammation. Lactobacilli were related to advanced steatosis and fibrosis mostly after weaning off PN without associated inflammation. In multivariate permutational analysis of variance, liver steatosis, bowel length, PN calories, and antibiotic treatment best explained the microbiota variation among patients with IF. Intestinal microbiota composition was associated with liver steatosis in IF and better predicted steatosis than duration of PN or length of the remaining intestine. Our results may be explained by a model in which steatosis is initiated during PN in response to proinflammatory lipopolysaccharides produced by Proteobacteria and progresses after weaning off PN, as the L plantarum group Lactobacilli becomes dominant and affects lipid metabolism by altering bile acid signaling.

  18. Intestinal Epithelial Sirtuin 1 Regulates Intestinal Inflammation During Aging in Mice by Altering the Intestinal Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellman, Alicia S; Metukuri, Mallikarjuna R; Kazgan, Nevzat; Xu, Xiaojiang; Xu, Qing; Ren, Natalie S X; Czopik, Agnieszka; Shanahan, Michael T; Kang, Ashley; Chen, Willa; Azcarate-Peril, M Andrea; Gulati, Ajay S; Fargo, David C; Guarente, Leonard; Li, Xiaoling

    2017-09-01

    Intestinal epithelial homeostasis is maintained by complex interactions among epithelial cells, commensal gut microorganisms, and immune cells. Disruption of this homeostasis is associated with disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but the mechanisms of this process are not clear. We investigated how Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), a conserved mammalian NAD + -dependent protein deacetylase, senses environmental stress to alter intestinal integrity. We performed studies of mice with disruption of Sirt1 specifically in the intestinal epithelium (SIRT1 iKO, villin-Cre+, Sirt1 flox/flox mice) and control mice (villin-Cre-, Sirt1 flox/flox ) on a C57BL/6 background. Acute colitis was induced in some mice by addition of 2.5% dextran sodium sulfate to drinking water for 5-9 consecutive days. Some mice were given antibiotics via their drinking water for 4 weeks to deplete their microbiota. Some mice were fed with a cholestyramine-containing diet for 7 days to sequester their bile acids. Feces were collected and proportions of microbiota were analyzed by 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing and quantitative PCR. Intestines were collected from mice and gene expression profiles were compared by microarray and quantitative PCR analyses. We compared levels of specific mRNAs between colon tissues from age-matched patients with ulcerative colitis (n=10) vs without IBD (n=8, controls). Mice with intestinal deletion of SIRT1 (SIRT1 iKO) had abnormal activation of Paneth cells starting at the age of 5-8 months, with increased activation of NF-κB, stress pathways, and spontaneous inflammation at 22-24 months of age, compared with control mice. SIRT1 iKO mice also had altered fecal microbiota starting at 4-6 months of age compared with control mice, in part because of altered bile acid metabolism. Moreover, SIRT1 iKO mice with defective gut microbiota developed more severe colitis than control mice. Intestinal tissues from patients with ulcerative colitis expressed significantly lower

  19. adhesive intestinal obstruction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-06-01

    Jun 1, 2006 ... ABSTRACT. Background: Adhesions after abdominal and pelvic surgery are a major cause of intestinal obstruction in the western world and the pathology is steadily gaining prominence in our practice. Objective: To determine the magnitude of adhesive intestinal obstruction; to determine the types.

  20. Intestinal cytochromes P450 regulating the intestinal microbiota and its probiotic profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenia Elefterios Venizelos Bezirtzoglou

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Cytochromes P450 (CYPs enzymes metabolize a large variety of xenobiotic substances. In this vein, a plethora of studies were conducted to investigate their role, as cytochromes are located in both liver and intestinal tissues. The P450 profile of the human intestine has not been fully characterized. Human intestine serves primarily as an absorptive organ for nutrients, although it has also the ability to metabolize drugs. CYPs are responsible for the majority of phase I drug metabolism reactions. CYP3A represents the major intestinal CYP (80% followed by CYP2C9. CYP1A is expressed at high level in the duodenum, together with less abundant levels of CYP2C8-10 and CYP2D6. Cytochromes present a genetic polymorphism intra- or interindividual and intra- or interethnic. Changes in the pharmacokinetic profile of the drug are associated with increased toxicity due to reduced metabolism, altered efficacy of the drug, increased production of toxic metabolites, and adverse drug interaction. The high metabolic capacity of the intestinal flora is due to its enormous pool of enzymes, which catalyzes reactions in phase I and phase II drug metabolism. Compromised intestinal barrier conditions, when rupture of the intestinal integrity occurs, could increase passive paracellular absorption. It is clear that high microbial intestinal charge following intestinal disturbances, ageing, environment, or food-associated ailments leads to the microbial metabolism of a drug before absorption. The effect of certain bacteria having a benefic action on the intestinal ecosystem has been largely discussed during the past few years by many authors. The aim of the probiotic approach is to repair the deficiencies in the gut flora and establish a protective effect. There is a tentative multifactorial association of the CYP (P450 cytochrome role in the different diseases states, environmental toxic effects or chemical exposures and nutritional status.

  1. Intestinal Leiomyositis: A Cause of Chronic Intestinal Pseudo-Obstruction in 6 Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacuto, A C; Pesavento, P A; Hill, S; McAlister, A; Rosenthal, K; Cherbinsky, O; Marks, S L

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal leiomyositis is a suspected autoimmune disorder affecting the muscularis propria layer of the gastrointestinal tract and is a cause of chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction in humans and animals. To characterize the clinical presentation, histopathologic features, and outcome of dogs with intestinal leiomyositis in an effort to optimize treatment and prognosis. Six client-owned dogs. Retrospective case series. Medical records were reviewed to describe signalment, clinicopathologic and imaging findings, histopathologic diagnoses, treatment, and outcome. All biopsy specimens were reviewed by a board-certified pathologist. Median age of dogs was 5.4 years (range, 15 months-9 years). Consistent clinical signs included vomiting (6/6), regurgitation (2/6), and small bowel diarrhea (3/6). Median duration of clinical signs before presentation was 13 days (range, 5-150 days). Diagnostic imaging showed marked gastric distension with dilated small intestines in 4/6 dogs. Full-thickness intestinal biopsies were obtained in all dogs by laparotomy. Histopathology of the stomach and intestines disclosed mononuclear inflammation, myofiber degeneration and necrosis, and fibrosis centered within the region of myofiber loss in the intestinal muscularis propria. All dogs received various combinations of immunomodulatory and prokinetic treatment, antimicrobial agents, antiemetics, and IV fluids, but none of the dogs showed a clinically relevant improvement with treatment. Median survival was 19 days after diagnosis (range, 3-270 days). Intestinal leiomyositis is a cause of intestinal pseudo-obstruction and must be diagnosed by full-thickness intestinal biopsy. This disease should be considered in dogs with acute and chronic vomiting, regurgitation, and small bowel diarrhea. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  2. Intestinal, extra-intestinal and systemic sequelae of Toxoplasma gondii induced acute ileitis in mice harboring a human gut microbiota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane von Klitzing

    Full Text Available Within seven days following peroral high dose infection with Toxoplasma gondii susceptible conventionally colonized mice develop acute ileitis due to an underlying T helper cell (Th -1 type immunopathology. We here addressed whether mice harboring a human intestinal microbiota developed intestinal, extra-intestinal and systemic sequelae upon ileitis induction.Secondary abiotic mice were generated by broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment and associated with a complex human intestinal microbiota following peroral fecal microbiota transplantation. Within three weeks the human microbiota had stably established in the murine intestinal tract as assessed by quantitative cultural and culture-independent (i.e. molecular 16S rRNA based methods. At day 7 post infection (p.i. with 50 cysts of T. gondii strain ME49 by gavage human microbiota associated (hma mice displayed severe clinical, macroscopic and microscopic sequelae indicating acute ileitis. In diseased hma mice increased numbers of innate and adaptive immune cells within the ileal mucosa and lamina propria and elevated intestinal secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators including IFN-γ, IL-12 and nitric oxide could be observed at day 7 p.i. Ileitis development was accompanied by substantial shifts in intestinal microbiota composition of hma mice characterized by elevated total bacterial loads and increased numbers of intestinal Gram-negative commensals such as enterobacteria and Bacteroides / Prevotella species overgrowing the small and large intestinal lumen. Furthermore, viable bacteria translocated from the inflamed ileum to extra-intestinal including systemic compartments. Notably, pro-inflammatory immune responses were not restricted to the intestinal tract as indicated by increased pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion in extra-intestinal (i.e. liver and kidney and systemic compartments including spleen and serum.With respect to the intestinal microbiota composition "humanized" mice display

  3. Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia in adults - diagnostic and therapeutic challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jocić Tatiana

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia is a rare disorder, characterized by abnormal dilation of intestinal lymphatic vessels and extensive enteric loss of lymph rich in plasma proteins, lymphocytes and chylomicrons. The main characteristics of the disease are hypoalbuminemia, hypogammaglobulinemia, lymphocytopenia, and more rarely, the deficit of liposoluble vitamins and anemia. Except for primary, there are secondary lymphangiectasia, associated with celiac disease, malignant, infective and inflammatory diseases of the small intestine, fibrosis, liver and cardiovascular diseases. Case report. A male, 33 years of age, presented for his medical examination suffering from diarrhea and edema. The diagnosis was established upon the histological examination of a small intestine biopsy during double balloon enteroscopy, which revealed changes only in one segment of the intestine examined. Such a finding was later confirmed by the video endoscopy capsule. Conclusion. The diagnosis of intestinal lymphangiectasia is usually established before the age of 3, but it can also be diagnosed in adults. The diagnosis is based on the histological analysis of the intestinal mucosa biopsy, obtained by endoscopic procedures. The diagnosis of primary intestinal lymphangiectasia is also made upon the exclusion of secondary causes.

  4. Intestinal Ralstonia pickettii augments glucose intolerance in obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Udayappan, Shanthadevi D; Kovatcheva-Datchary, Petia; Bakker, Guido J

    2017-01-01

    An altered intestinal microbiota composition has been implicated in the pathogenesis of metabolic disease including obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Low grade inflammation, potentially initiated by the intestinal microbiota, has been suggested to be a driving force in the development ...

  5. Lactic Acid Bacteria and the Human Intestinal Microbiome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douillard, F.P.; Vos, de W.M.

    2015-01-01

    The great interest in the human microbiome has revived attention paid to LAB presence in the human intestine. This chapter first discusses the LAB associated with the human intestinal microbiota and their potential roles in health and diseases. It then addresses recent metagenomic studies that

  6. Prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections among school children in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IPIs due to intestinal protozoa and helminths are re- sponsible for some of the most devastating and preva- lent diseases of humans, i.e., Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura and hookworm, collectively referred to as soil- transmitted helminths (STHs), and are the most common intestinal parasites4; while Giardia ...

  7. Epidemiology of chronic inflammatory bowel disease in the Northern area of Huelva Estudio epidemiológico de la enfermedad inflamatoria intestinal en la zona norte de Huelva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Garrido

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to know the different epidemiologic aspects of chronic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD in the Northern area of the province of Huelva. Material and methods: we carried out a retrospective (1980-1996 and prospective (1996-2003 study of all patients diagnosed with IBD in the Northern area of Huelva, with 77,856 inhabitants. The distribution of Crohn's disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC was analyzed, as well as sex, age and smoking habit at the time of diagnosis, familial aggregation, appendicectomy rate, phenotype (anatomical site and clinical types, extraintestinal manifestations, and immunosuppressive therapy or surgical requirements. Results: 70 patients with IBD were studied, 40 with UC and 30 with CD. Sex distribution was 39 (55.7% males (55% with CD vs 56.6% with UC; NS and 31 (44.3% females (45% with CD vs 43.3% with UC; NS. Mean age at presentation was 44.7 ± 19.32 years in UC vs 32.3 ± 16.43 in CD; p Objetivo: conocer los distintos aspectos epidemiológicos de la enfermedad inflamatoria intestinal (EII en la zona norte de la provincia de Huelva. Material y métodos: se realizó un estudio retrospectivo (1980-1996 y prospectivo (1996-2003 sobre los pacientes diagnosticados de EII en la zona norte de Huelva con 77.856 habitantes. Se ha analizado la distribución de enfermedad de Crohn (EC y colitis ulcerosa (CU, sexo, edad y hábito tabáquico en el momento del diagnóstico, agregación familiar, antecedentes de apendicetomía, fenotipo (extensión y tipos clínicos, manifestaciones extraintestinales y necesidad de tratamiento inmunosupresor y/o quirúrgico. Resultados: se estudiaron 70 pacientes con EII, 40 con CU y 30 con EC. Un total de 39 (55,7% eran varones (55% en EC frente a 56,6% en CU; NS y 31 (44,3% mujeres (45% en EC frente a 43,3% en CU; NS. La media de edad en el momento de diagnóstico fue de 44,7±19,32 para CU frente a 32,3±16,43 para EC (p<0,001. La asociación familiar fue del 7,1%. Referían apendicectom

  8. [Malaria and intestinal protozoa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojo-Marcos, Gerardo; Cuadros-González, Juan

    2016-03-01

    Malaria is life threatening and requires urgent diagnosis and treatment. Incidence and mortality are being reduced in endemic areas. Clinical features are unspecific so in imported cases it is vital the history of staying in a malarious area. The first line treatments for Plasmodium falciparum are artemisinin combination therapies, chloroquine in most non-falciparum and intravenous artesunate if any severity criteria. Human infections with intestinal protozoa are distributed worldwide with a high global morbid-mortality. They cause diarrhea and sometimes invasive disease, although most are asymptomatic. In our environment populations at higher risk are children, including adopted abroad, immune-suppressed, travelers, immigrants, people in contact with animals or who engage in oral-anal sex. Diagnostic microscopic examination has low sensitivity improving with antigen detection or molecular methods. Antiparasitic resistances are emerging lately. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  9. Non-Meckel Small Intestine Diverticulitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamim Ejaz

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Non-Meckel small intestine diverticulitis can have many manifestations and its management is not well-defined. We report 4 unselect cases of small intestine diverticulitis; all patients were seen by the same physician at the Emergency Center at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center between 1999 and 2014. The median age at diagnosis of these patients was 82 years (range, 76–87 years. All 4 patients presented with acute onset of abdominal pain, and computed tomography scans showed characteristics of small intestine diverticulitis unrelated to cancer. Most of the diverticula were found in the region of the duodenum and jejuno-ileal segments of the small intestine. The patients, even those with peripancreatic inflammation and localized perforation, were treated conservatively. Non-Meckel diverticulitis can be overlooked in the initial diagnosis because of the location of the diverticulosis, the age of the patient, and the rarity of the disease. Because patients with non-Meckel small intestine diverticulitis can present with acute abdominal pain, non-Meckel small intestine diverticulitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with acute abdominal pain, and computed tomography scans can help identify the condition. Because of the rarity of non-Meckel small intestine diverticulitis, few studies have been published, and the data are inconclusive about how best to approach these patients. Our experience with these 4 elderly patients indicates that non-Meckel small intestine diverticulitis can be treated conservatively, which avoids the potential morbidity and mortality of a surgical approach.

  10. Intestinal Stem Cell Niche: The Extracellular Matrix and Cellular Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laween Meran

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal epithelium comprises a monolayer of polarised columnar cells organised along the crypt-villus axis. Intestinal stem cells reside at the base of crypts and are constantly nourished by their surrounding niche for maintenance, self-renewal, and differentiation. The cellular microenvironment including the adjacent Paneth cells, stromal cells, smooth muscle cells, and neural cells as well as the extracellular matrix together constitute the intestinal stem cell niche. A dynamic regulatory network exists among the epithelium, stromal cells, and the matrix via complex signal transduction to maintain tissue homeostasis. Dysregulation of these biological or mechanical signals could potentially lead to intestinal injury and disease. In this review, we discuss the role of different intestinal stem cell niche components and dissect the interaction between dynamic matrix factors and regulatory signalling during intestinal stem cell homeostasis.

  11. Intestinal microbiota in healthy adults: temporal analysis reveals individual and common core and relation to intestinal symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jalanka-Tuovinen, J.; Vos, de W.M.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: While our knowledge of the intestinal microbiota during disease is accumulating, basic information of the microbiota in healthy subjects is still scarce. The aim of this study was to characterize the intestinal microbiota of healthy adults and specifically address its temporal stability,

  12. Mycotoxins and the intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon Broom

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Fungal biochemical pathways can yield various compounds that are not considered to be necessary for their growth and are thus referred to as secondary metabolites. These compounds have been found to have wide ranging biological effects and include potent poisons (mycotoxins. Mycotoxins invariably contaminate crops and (thus animal feeds. The intestine is the key link between ingested mycotoxins and their detrimental effects on the animal. Effects on the intestine, or intestinal environment, and immune system have been reported with various mycotoxins. These effects are almost certainly occurring across species. Most, if not all, of the reported effects of mycotoxins are negative in terms of intestinal health, for example, decreased intestinal cell viability, reductions in short chain fatty acid (SCFA concentrations and elimination of beneficial bacteria, increased expression of genes involved in promoting inflammation and counteracting oxidative stress. This challenge to intestinal health will predispose the animal to intestinal (and systemic infections and impair efficient digestion and absorption of nutrients, with the associated effect on animal productivity.

  13. Microarray analysis reveals marked intestinal microbiota aberrancy in infants having eczema compared to healthy children in at-risk for atopic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nylund Lotta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deviations in composition and diversity of intestinal microbiota in infancy have been associated with both the development and recurrence of atopic eczema. Thus, we decided to use a deep and global microarray-based method to characterize the diversity and temporal changes of the intestinal microbiota in infancy and to define specific bacterial signatures associated with eczema. Faecal microbiota at 6 and 18 months of age were analysed from 34 infants (15 with eczema and 19 healthy controls selected from a prospective follow-up study based on the availability of faecal samples. The infants were originally randomized to receive either Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG or placebo. Results Children with eczema harboured a more diverse total microbiota than control subjects as assessed by the Simpson’s reciprocal diversity index of the microarray profiles. Composition of the microbiota did not differ between study groups at age of 6 months, but was significantly different at age of 18 months as assessed by MCPP (p=0.01. At this age healthy children harboured 3 -fold greater amount of members of the Bacteroidetes (p=0.01. Microbiota of children suffering from eczema had increased abundance of the Clostridium clusters IV and XIVa, which are typically abundant in adults. Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG supplementation in early infancy was observed to have minor long-term effects on the microbiota composition. Conclusion A diverse and adult-type microbiota in early childhood is associated with eczema and it may contribute to the perpetuation of eczema.

  14. Inflammatory mediators and intestinal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, M S; MacKendrick, W

    1994-06-01

    Although the causes of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) are not well understood, there is compelling evidence to suggest that the inflammatory mediators play an important role in the pathophysiology of the disease. This article examines the role of platelet-activating factor (PAF) and other mediators on the development of NEC, and attempts to explain the association of the putative NEC risk factors with altered mediator production and subsequent intestinal injury. The authors hypothesize that PAF is a key mediator in the final common pathway leading to NEC.

  15. Intestinal solute carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffansen, Bente; Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Brodin, Birger

    2004-01-01

    A large amount of absorptive intestinal membrane transporters play an important part in absorption and distribution of several nutrients, drugs and prodrugs. The present paper gives a general overview on intestinal solute carriers as well as on trends and strategies for targeting drugs and...... membrane transporters in the small intestine in order to increase oral bioavailabilities of drug or prodrug, the major influence on in vivo pharmacokinetics is suggested to be dose-dependent increase in bioavailability as well as prolonged blood circulation due to large capacity facilitated absorption...

  16. Intestinal solute carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffansen, Bente; Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Brodin, Birger

    2004-01-01

    membrane transporters in the small intestine in order to increase oral bioavailabilities of drug or prodrug, the major influence on in vivo pharmacokinetics is suggested to be dose-dependent increase in bioavailability as well as prolonged blood circulation due to large capacity facilitated absorption......A large amount of absorptive intestinal membrane transporters play an important part in absorption and distribution of several nutrients, drugs and prodrugs. The present paper gives a general overview on intestinal solute carriers as well as on trends and strategies for targeting drugs and...

  17. Congenital Central Hypoventilation Syndrome And Intestinal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to progressive hypercapnia and sustained hypoxaemia. Neonates with this condition experience hypoventilation or apnoea while asleep. Patients may also have congenital intestinal aganglionosis (CIA), aganglionic megacolon or Hirschsprung's disease, suggesting an aberrant phenotype arising from a defect of migration ...

  18. characterization of intestinal microbiota in celiac children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    F. Lahcene1*, A. Tir Touil Meddah1, K. Bouziane-Nedjadi2, B. Meddah1, A. Leke3

    2016-09-01

    Sep 1, 2016 ... In this study, 13 Samples of intestinal biopsy, ... Research Article. Journal of Fundamental and Applied Sciences is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0. International License. ... disease are caused by several factors among, the ingestion of gluten, and it has been suggested.

  19. Intestinal obstruction secondary to infantile polyarteritis nodosa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Polyarteritis Nodosa (PAN) is a rare systemic necrotising vasculitis of medium and small-sized arteries. Patients typically present with systemic symptoms. Obstructive intestinal symptoms are described but usually resolve with treatment of the underlying vascular disease. We report a case of a one year old boy with multiple ...

  20. Spondylodiscitis with presacral abscess formation due to fistulisation in a patient with Crohn's disease in the small intestine; Spondylodiszitis mit praesakraler Abszedierung durch Fistelung bei Morbus Crohn des Duenndarmes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zajac, M.; Engelhard, K. [Krankenhaus Martha-Maria, Nuernberg (Germany). Abt. fuer Diagnostische Radiologie; Schuhmann, R. [Krankenhaus Martha-Maria, Nuernberg (Germany). Chirurgische Klinik

    2000-07-01

    The double contrast examination according to Sellink continues to play a significant role for the detection of Crohn's disease in the small intestine. For detection of accompanying complications, such as fistulisation or abscess formation, CT and MRI perform better than the double contrast examination. Sometimes, however, supplementing examinations may lead to wrong conclusions, as is shown with the case reported. (orig./CB) [German] Die Duenndarm-Doppelkontrastuntersuchung nach Sellink hat weiterhin einen hohen Stellenwert bei der Abklaerung eines Duenndarmbefalles bei Morbus Crohn. Bei der Erkennung von begleitenden Komplikationen wie Fistelbildungen und Abszessen sind die Computertomographie und die Kernspintomographie der Duenndarmdoppelkontrastuntersuchung ueberlegen. Gelegentlich koennen jedoch ergaenzende Untersuchungen zu einer irrefuehrenden Diagnostik fuehren, wie der vorliegende Fall aufzeigt. (orig.)

  1. [Clinical and laboratory characteristics of the acetonemia syndrome in children with severe acute intestinal infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zriachkin, N I; Chudakova, T K; Buchkova, T N

    2012-12-01

    A total of 55 children suffering from acute intestinal infection severe in age from 3 months to 7 years; of these, 37 patients with atsetonemicheskim syndrome (AS). Found that the development AS in children with acute intestinal infections severe, aggravate the disease. In children with acute intestinal infection with the syndrome, the duration of atsetonemicheskim main symptoms of intoxication in the 1,2-1,5 times longer than those of children suffering from acute intestinal infection without atsetonemicheskogo syndrome.

  2. TTC7A mutations disrupt intestinal epithelial apicobasal polarity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bigorgne, Amélie E; Farin, Henner F; Lemoine, Roxane; Mahlaoui, Nizar; Lambert, Nathalie; Gil, Marine; Schulz, Ansgar; Philippet, Pierre; Schlesser, Patrick; Abrahamsen, Tore G; Oymar, Knut; Davies, E Graham; Ellingsen, Christian Lycke; Leteurtre, Emmanuelle; Moreau-Massart, Brigitte; Berrebi, Dominique; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Nischke, Patrick; Brousse, Nicole; Fischer, Alain; Clevers, Hans; de Saint Basile, Geneviève

    Multiple intestinal atresia (MIA) is a rare cause of bowel obstruction that is sometimes associated with a combined immunodeficiency (CID), leading to increased susceptibility to infections. The factors underlying this rare disease are poorly understood. We characterized the immunological and

  3. Intestinal parasitiasis: Positive cases and low haematocrit among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    %) of stool samples examined. No characteristic symptoms of intestinal parasitic disease were observed in any of the infected women. However haematocrit results show low PCV (20-29%) in more of the infected than the uninfected women.

  4. Intestinal cholesterol transport: Measuring cholesterol absorption and its reverse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jakulj, L.

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal cholesterol transport might serve as an attractive future target for cardiovascular disease reduction, provided that underlying molecular mechanisms are more extensively elucidated, combined with improved techniques to measure changes in cholesterol fluxes and their possible

  5. Radiological findings in amoebiasis of the large intestine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, H.; Echazarreta, R.G.; Pekanan, P.; Vogel-Karl, B.; Eggers-Stroeder, G.; Morantes, J.G.

    1983-07-01

    This amoebiasis is caused by the parasite Entamoebia histolytica. The findings in amoebiasis of the large intestine include ulcera, filling defects, mucosal changes, changes in sacculation. Their radiological morphology is discussed as a function of stage and severeness of disease.

  6. Persistently increased intestinal fraction of alkaline phosphatase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nathan, E; Baatrup, G; Berg, H

    1984-01-01

    Persistent elevation of the intestinal fraction of the alkaline phosphatase (API) as an isolated finding has to our knowledge not been reported previously. It was found in a boy followed during a period of 5.5 years. The only symptom was transient periodic fatigue observed at home, but not apparent...... during hospitalization. His blood type was O, RH+, Le (a-, b+) and he was a secretor of H-substance, which may be associated with rising API activity after fat-loading. In this case API was unchanged after fat-loading. Neither intestinal nor liver diseases were found, and no other cause for the elevated...

  7. Neonatal intestinal obstruction in Benin, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osifo Osarumwense

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intestinal obstruction is a life threatening condition in the newborn, with attendant high mortality rate especially in underserved subregion. This study reports the aetiology, presentation, and outcome of intestinal obstruction management in neonates. Materials and Methods: A prospective study of neonatal intestinal obstruction at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin, Nigeria, between January 2006-June 2008. Data were collated on a structured proforma and analysed for age, sex, weight, presentation, type/date of gestation/delivery, aetiology, clinical presentation, associated anomaly, treatment, and outcome. Results: There were 71 neonates, 52 were males and 19 were females (2.7:1. Their age range was between 12 hours and 28 days (mean, 7.9 ± 2.7 days and they weighed between 1.8 and 5.2 kg (average, 3.2 kg. The causes of intestinal obstruction were: Anorectal anomaly, 28 (39.4%; Hirschsprung′s disease, 8 (11.3%′ prematurity, 3 (4.2%; meconeum plug, 2 (2.8%; malrotation, 6 (8.5%; intestinal atresia, 8 (11.3%; necrotising enterocolitis (NEC, 4 (5.6%; obstructed hernia, 4 (5.6%; and spontaneous gut perforation, 3 (4.2%. Also, 27 (38% children had colostomy, 24 (33.8% had laparotomy, 9 (12.8% had anoplasty, while 11 (15.4% were managed nonoperatively. A total of 41 (57.7% neonates required incubator, 26 (36.6% needed total parenteral nutrition, while 15 (21.1% require d paediatric ventilator. Financial constraint, late presentation, presence of multiple anomalies, aspiration, sepsis, gut perforation, and bowel gangrene were the main contributors to death. Neonates with lower obstructions had a better outcome compared to those having upper intestinal obstruction ( P < 0.0001. Conclusion: Outcomes of intestinal obstruction are still poor in our setting; late presentation, financial constraints, poor parental motivation and lack of basic facilities were the major determinants of mortality.

  8. CT evaluation of mechanical intestinal obstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Sung Tag; Kim, Ho Kyun; Jeon, Jeong Dong; Kim, Young Tong [Gollege of Medicine, Inje University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-11-15

    To evaluate the usefulness of CT for the diagnosis and treatment planning of mechanical intestinal obstruction. We retrospectively reviewed 38 patients who were clinically suspected of mechanical intestinal obstruction and had undergone abdominal CT. The CT scans were evaluated for the absence or presence, severity, cause and site of intestinal obstruction. CT findings were compared with the results of laparotomy, barium study and clinical course. The absence or presence and severity of intestinal obstruction were classified into no obstruction, partial obstruction, complete obstruction. Diagnosis was established by means of laparotomy in 20 cases, barium study in 9 cases and clinical course in 9 cases. Of 38 cases, 7(18.4%) showed no obstruction, 22(57.9%) showed partial obstruction, and 9(23.7%) showed complete obstruction. The presence or absence and severity on CT scans were correctly predicted in 36 of 38 cases (sensitivity 95 %, specificity 97 %, accuracy 96 %) (in case of no obstruction: sensitivity 100 %, specificity 94%, accuracy 95%; in case of partial obstruction : sensitivity 91%, specificity 100%, accuracy 95%; in case of complete obstruction : sensitivity 100%, specificity 100%, accuracy 100%). All 9 cases with complete obstruction underwent prompt and immediate laparotomy. 13 cases, excluding those with mass around the site of transition and adhesion with strangulation, with partial obstruction improved with conservative treatment without laparotomy. The causes of obstruction were adhesion in 13, hernia in 6, primary cancer in 5, metastatic cancer in 3, abscess in 2, intestinal tbc in 1, and Crohn's disease in 1. The cause of obstruction on CT scans were correctly predicted in 27 of 31 cases (87.1 %). The sites of obstruction on CT scans were correctly predicted in 22 of 26 cases (84.6%). CT is valuable in the evaluation of absence or presence, severity, cause and site of intestinal obstruction, and is considered to be helpful in treatment

  9. Innate Immune Activation in Intestinal Homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison, Oliver J.; Maloy, Kevin J.

    2011-01-01

    Loss of intestinal immune regulation leading to aberrant immune responses to the commensal microbiota are believed to precipitate the chronic inflammation observed in the gastrointestinal tract of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Innate immune receptors that recognize conserved components derived from the microbiota are widely expressed by both epithelial cells and leucocytes of the gastrointestinal tract and play a key role in host prot...

  10. Pig models on intestinal development and therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Lanmei; Yang, Huansheng; Li, Jianzhong; Li, Yali; Ding, Xueqing; Wu, Guoyao; Yin, Yulong

    2017-12-01

    The gastrointestinal tract plays a vital role in nutrient supply, digestion, and absorption, and has a crucial impact on the entire organism. Much attention is being paid to utilize animal models to study the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal diseases in response to intestinal development and health. The piglet has a body size similar to that of the human and is an omnivorous animal with comparable anatomy, nutritional requirements, and digestive and associated inflammatory processes, and displays similarities to the human intestinal microbial ecosystem, which make piglets more appropriate as an animal model for human than other non-primate animals. Therefore, the objective of this review is to summarize key attributes of the piglet model with which to study human intestinal development and intestinal health through probing into the etiology of several gastrointestinal diseases, thus providing a theoretical and hopefully practical, basis for further studies on mammalian nutrition, health, and disease, and therapeutics. Given the comparable nutritional requirements and strikingly similar brain developmental patterns between young piglets and humans, the piglet has been used as an important translational model for studying neurodevelopmental outcomes influenced by pediatric nutrition. Because of similarities in anatomy and physiology between pigs and mankind, more emphasises are put on how to use the piglet model for human organ transplantation research.

  11. Small Bowel Obstruction due to Intestinal Xanthomatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. E. Barrera-Herrera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vast majority of bowel obstruction is due to postoperative adhesions, malignancy, intestinal inflammatory disease, and hernias; however, knowledge of other uncommon causes is critical to establish a prompt treatment and decrease mortality. Xanthomatosis is produced by accumulation of cholesterol-rich foamy macrophages. Intestinal xanthomatosis is an uncommon nonneoplastic lesion that may cause small bowel obstruction and several cases have been reported in the English literature as obstruction in the jejunum. We report a case of small intestinal xanthomatosis occurring in a 51-year-old female who presented with one day of copious vomiting and intermittent abdominal pain. Radiologic images revealed jejunal loop thickening and inflammatory changes suggestive of foreign body obstruction, diagnostic laparoscopy found two strictures at the jejunum, and a pathologic examination confirmed a segmental small bowel xanthomatosis. This case illustrates that obstruction even without predisposing factors such as hyperlipidemia or lymphoproliferative disorders.

  12. Intestinal infarction: A complication of endovascular therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    England, Andrew [Department of Radiology, South Manchester University Hospitals NHS Trust, Southmoor Road, Wythenshawe, Manchester M23 9LT (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: andrew.england@smtr.nhs.uk; Butterfield, John S. [Department of Radiology, South Manchester University Hospitals NHS Trust, Southmoor Road, Wythenshawe, Manchester M23 9LT (United Kingdom); Sukumar, Sathi [Department of Radiology, South Manchester University Hospitals NHS Trust, Southmoor Road, Wythenshawe, Manchester M23 9LT (United Kingdom); Thompson, David [Department of Radiology, South Manchester University Hospitals NHS Trust, Southmoor Road, Wythenshawe, Manchester M23 9LT (United Kingdom); Roulson, Jo-An [Department of Histopathology, South Manchester University Hospitals NHS Trust, Southmoor Road, Wythenshawe, Manchester M23 9LT (United Kingdom); Pritchard, Susan [Department of Histopathology, South Manchester University Hospitals NHS Trust, Southmoor Road, Wythenshawe, Manchester M23 9LT (United Kingdom); Ashleigh, Raymond J. [Department of Radiology, South Manchester University Hospitals NHS Trust, Southmoor Road, Wythenshawe, Manchester M23 9LT (United Kingdom)

    2007-08-15

    This report presents a rare case of intestinal infarction following endovascular therapy. A female patient who had undergone an internal carotid artery stenting procedure presented suddenly with abdominal pain. Radiological and clinical examinations at the time suggested a picture of intestinal ischaemia, in view of the patient's general conditions and co-existing morbidities surgical intervention was not considered to be an option. The patient died 4 days after the carotid stenting procedure, post-mortem examination revealed infarction of the ileum and caecum. The learning outcomes are if performing endovascular therapy in a patient with diffuse atherosclerotic disease early consideration of intestinal ischaemia should be given to any patient who presents with acute post-procedural abdominal pain.

  13. Intestinal infarction: A complication of endovascular therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    England, Andrew; Butterfield, John S.; Sukumar, Sathi; Thompson, David; Roulson, Jo-An; Pritchard, Susan; Ashleigh, Raymond J.

    2007-01-01

    This report presents a rare case of intestinal infarction following endovascular therapy. A female patient who had undergone an internal carotid artery stenting procedure presented suddenly with abdominal pain. Radiological and clinical examinations at the time suggested a picture of intestinal ischaemia, in view of the patient's general conditions and co-existing morbidities surgical intervention was not considered to be an option. The patient died 4 days after the carotid stenting procedure, post-mortem examination revealed infarction of the ileum and caecum. The learning outcomes are if performing endovascular therapy in a patient with diffuse atherosclerotic disease early consideration of intestinal ischaemia should be given to any patient who presents with acute post-procedural abdominal pain

  14. Macrophages in intestinal homeostasis and inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Calum C; Mowat, Allan McI

    2014-01-01

    The intestine contains the largest pool of macrophages in the body which are essential for maintaining mucosal homeostasis in the face of the microbiota and the constant need for epithelial renewal but are also important components of protective immunity and are involved in the pathology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, defining the biological roles of intestinal macrophages has been impeded by problems in defining the phenotype and origins of different populations of myeloid cells in the mucosa. Here, we discuss how multiple parameters can be used in combination to discriminate between functionally distinct myeloid cells and discuss the roles of macrophages during homeostasis and how these may change when inflammation ensues. We also discuss the evidence that intestinal macrophages do not fit the current paradigm that tissue-resident macrophages are derived from embryonic precursors that self-renew in situ, but require constant replenishment by blood monocytes. We describe our recent work demonstrating that classical monocytes constantly enter the intestinal mucosa and how the environment dictates their subsequent fate. We believe that understanding the factors that drive intestinal macrophage development in the steady state and how these may change in response to pathogens or inflammation could provide important insights into the treatment of IBD. PMID:24942685

  15. [Intestinal endometriosis - a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzemiński, Sławomir

    2017-03-21

    Endometriosis intestines due to its non-specific symptoms can pose diagnostic problems, a lack of or incorrect treatment worsens the quality of life, sometimes leading to serious complications. The differential diagnosis of abdominal pain, especially in patients of reproductive age should be taken disease into account. Often abdominal pain in young women are classified as a functional gastrointestinal disorder, and only carefully collected intelligence allows you to focus on the diagnosis of endometriosis, especially if the symptoms significantly impair quality of life. A woman 32 year old who was admitted to the department of gastroenterology because of increasing pain in the abdomen. Due to the deteriorating condition of the patient, the characteristics of mechanical obstruction on imaging studies was transferred to the surgical ward with suspected Crohn's disease. She was treated surgically. Histopathological examination found endometriosis. Endometriosis outside the sex system can lead to serious complications.

  16. Diagnosis of intestinal and extra intestinal amoebiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, Myriam Consuelo; Quiroz, Damian Arnoldo; Pinilla, Analida Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    The objective is to carry out a review of the national and international literature as of the XXth century in order to update the advances for the diagnosis of complex odd Entamoeba histolytic / Entamoeba dispar and that of intestinal and extra intestinal amoebiasis that may be of use to the scientific community. As well as to unify the diagnostic criteria of this parasitosis known as a public health problem, and as a consequence of that, optimize the quality of population care. Data source: there was a systematic search for the scientific literature Publisher in Spanish and English since 1960 until today, this selection started on the first semester of 2006 until 2007, in the development of the line on intestinal and extra-intestinal amoebiasis of the Medical School of the National University of Colombia. A retrospective search process was carried out, systematically reviewing the most relevant articles as well as the products of this research line. In deciding how to make this article, there was a continuous search in different data bases such as Medline, SciELO and other bases in the library of the National University of Colombia, as well as other classical books related to the subject. For that purpose the terms amoebiasis, odd Entamoeba histolytic, Entamoeba, diagnosis, epidemiology, dysentery, amoebic liver abscess, were used. Studies selection: titles and abstracts were reviewed to select the original publications and the most representative ones related to this article's subject. Data extraction: the articles were classified according to the subject, the chronology and the authors according to the scientific contribution to solve the problem. Synthesis of the data: in the fi rst instance, a chronological critical analysis was carried out to order and synthesize the progress made in the diagnosis until confirmation of the experts' agreements in the field of amoebiasis was obtained throughout the world. Conclusion: this article summarizes what has taken place

  17. Lethal pneumatosis coli in a 12-month-old child caused by acute intestinal gas gangrene after prolonged artificial nutrition: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kircher, Stefan; Wössner, Rupert; Müller-Hermelink, Hans-Konrad; Völker, Hans-Ullrich

    2008-07-24

    Pneumatosis coli is a rare disease with heterogeneous symptoms which can be detected in the course of various acute and chronic intestinal diseases in children, such as necrotizing enterocolitis, intestinal obstruction and intestinal bacteriological infections. We report the case of a 12-month-old boy who died of pneumatosis coli caused by an acute intestinal gas gangrene after prolonged artificial alimentation. While intestinal gas gangrene is a highly uncommon cause of pneumatosis coli, it is important to consider it as a differential diagnosis, especially in patients receiving a prolonged artificial food supply. These patients may develop intestinal gas gangrene due to a dysfunctional intestinal barrier.

  18. Het effect van voersamenstelling op bacteriële darmaandoeningen bij varkens = The effect of feed composition on bacterial intestinal diseases in pigs

    OpenAIRE

    Meulen, van der, J.; Peet-Schwering, van der, C.M.C.

    2007-01-01

    Feed composition, and especially carbohydrate composition, may affect the development of enteric bacterial diseases. Also the kind of feed ingredients (soybean or not) and feed treatment (milling size, pelletizing, fermentation) may be important. A more coarse grinding, no pelletizing and fermentation may be preferable in the reduction of the development of enteric bacterial diseases.

  19. Small Intestinal Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munot, Khushboo; Kotler, Donald P

    2016-06-01

    Small intestinal infections are extremely common worldwide. They may be bacterial, viral, or parasitic in etiology. Most are foodborne or waterborne, with specific etiologies differing by region and with diverse pathophysiologies. Very young, very old, and immune-deficient individuals are the most vulnerable to morbidity or mortality from small intestinal infections. There have been significant advances in diagnostic sophistication with the development and early application of molecular diagnostic assays, though these tests have not become mainstream. The lack of rapid diagnoses combined with the self-limited nature of small intestinal infections has hampered the development of specific and effective treatments other than oral rehydration. Antibiotics are not indicated in the absence of an etiologic diagnosis, and not at all in the case of some infections.

  20. Mucus reduction promotes acetyl salicylic acid-induced small intestinal mucosal injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyama, Yosuke; Handa, Osamu; Naito, Yuji; Takayama, Shun; Mukai, Rieko; Ushiroda, Chihiro; Majima, Atsushi; Yasuda-Onozawa, Yuriko; Higashimura, Yasuki; Fukui, Akifumi; Dohi, Osamu; Okayama, Tetsuya; Yoshida, Naohisa; Katada, Kazuhiro; Kamada, Kazuhiro; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Takagi, Tomohisa; Konishi, Hideyuki; Itoh, Yoshito

    2018-03-25

    Acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) is a useful drug for the secondary prevention of cerebro-cardiovascular diseases, but it has adverse effects on the small intestinal mucosa. The pathogenesis and prophylaxis of ASA-induced small intestinal injury remain unclear. In this study, we focused on the intestinal mucus, as the gastrointestinal tract is covered by mucus, which exhibits protective effects against various gastrointestinal diseases. ASA was injected into the duodenum of rats, and small intestinal mucosal injury was evaluated using Evans blue dye. To investigate the importance of mucus, Polysorbate 80 (P80), an emulsifier, was used before ASA injection. In addition, rebamipide, a mucus secretion inducer in the small intestine, was used to suppress mucus reduction in the small intestine of P80-administered rats. The addition of P80 reduced the mucus and exacerbated the ASA-induced small intestinal mucosal injury. Rebamipide significantly suppressed P80-reduced small intestinal mucus and P80-increased intestinal mucosal lesions in ASA-injected rats, demonstrating that mucus is important for the protection against ASA-induced small intestinal mucosal injury. These results provide new insight into the mechanism of ASA-induced small intestinal mucosal injury. Mucus secretion-increasing therapy might be useful in preventing ASA-induced small intestinal mucosal injury. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.