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Sample records for interventional cardiology procedures

  1. Patient doses in interventional cardiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domienik, J.; Papierz, S.; Jankowski, J.; Peruga, J.Z.

    2008-01-01

    In most countries of European Union legislation requires the determination of the total skin dose to patient resulting from interventional procedures to assess the risk of deterministic effect. To this end, various dose indicators like dose area product (DAP), cumulative dose (CD) and entrance dose at the patient plane (EFD) are used in clinical practice. The study aims at relating those dose indicators with doses ascribe to the most irradiated areas of the patient skin usually expressed in terms of local maximal skin dose (MSD). For the study the local MSD and related to their areas are investigated and compared for coronary angiography CA and intervention (PCI). Two methods implying radiographic films Kodak EDR2 and matrixes of thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) are applied for direct measurements of dose distribution for selected procedures. Both methods are compared. Additionally, for patient dosimetry the following data: MSD, CD, EFD, fluoroscopy time (FT), number of acquired images, total DAP, fluoro-DAP and record-DAP were collected for randomly selected procedure. The statistical quantities like: median, 3 rd quartile, mean and standard deviation for all dosimetric parameters are determined. Preliminary study showed that the values of data collected for coronary procedures are in the ranges 0,7 - 27,3 min for fluoroscopy time, 50 - 350 Gy cm 2 for total DAP, 300 - 2000 mGy for CD, 140 - 2000 mGy for EFD and 100 - 1500 mGy for local maximal skin dose. For interventions the ranges are, accordingly 3,0 - 43,6 min , 25 - 450 Gy cm 2 , 270 - 6600 mGy, 80 - 2600 mGy and 80 - 1500 mGy. As a result of the study the correlations between dose indicators and local MSD are analyzed. The concentration of dose on irradiated films are going to be investigated in some detail as well. (author)

  2. Pediatric patient doses in interventional cardiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medeiros, R.B.; Murata, C.H.; Moreira, A.C.

    2014-01-01

    The radiation doses from interventional procedures is relevant when treating children because of their greater radiosensitivity compared with adults. The purposes of this paper were to estimate the dose received by 18 pediatric patients who underwent cardiac interventional procedures and to correlate the maximum entrance surface air kerma (Ke,max), estimated with radiochromic films, with the cumulative air kerma values displayed at the end of procedures. This study was performed in children up to 6 years. The study was performed in two hospitals, one located in Recife and the other one in São Paulo. The x-ray imaging systems used were Phillips Allura 12 model with image intensifier system and a Phillips Allura FD10 flat panel system. To estimate the Ke,max on the patient’s skin radiochromic films(Gafchromic XR-RV2) were used. These values were estimated from the maximum optical density measured on film using a calibration curve. The results showed cumulative air kerma values ranging from 78.3- 500.0mGy, with a mean value of 242,3 mGy. The resulting Ke,max values ranged from 20.0-461.8 mGy, with a mean value of 208,8 mGy. The Ke,max values were correlated with the displayed cumulative air kerma values. The correlation factor R² was 0.78, meaning that the value displayed in the equipment’s console can be useful for monitoring the skin absorbed dose throughout the procedure. The routine fluoroscopy time records is not able by itself alert the physician about the risk of dose exceeding the threshold of adverse reactions, which can vary from an early erythema to serious harmful skin damage. (author)

  3. Assessment of patients' skin dose during interventional cardiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsapaki, V.; Vardalaki, E.; Kottou, S.; Molfetas, M.; Neofotistou, V.

    2002-01-01

    During the last 30 years the use of Interventional Cardiology (IC) procedures has increased significantly, mainly due to the benefits and advantages of the method that offers more accurate diagnosis and treatment along with less complications and hospitalization. However, IC procedures are based on the use of x-ray radiation, mostly localized at certain areas of patient's body and for extended periods of time. Consequently, patient may receive high radiation dose and deterministic effects, such as erythema, epilation or even dermal necrosis may be observed. Therefore, the need for reducing radiation dose is highly important. In order to achieve this, good knowledge of the dose levels delivered to the patient during IC procedures is essential since radiation effects are known to increase with dose. It is of great interest to know the point where the maximum skin dose (MSD) is noted since individual sensitivity may vary. MSDs greater than 1 Gy should be recorded. Patient dosimetry during IC procedures is a complex task since these type of procedures depend on various factors, such as complexity and severity of case, different specifications of x-ray equipment and patient's physical characteristics. Moreover, cardiologist's experience plays an important role. For these reasons, Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) as well as the World Health Organization (WHO), have published documents on radiation safety and ways to reduce skin injuries during IC procedures. Various methods have been proposed for measuring MSD such as the use of slow radiotherapy films, thermoluminescent detectors (TLD), scintillation detectors, Dose-Area Product (DAP) meter, as well as a combination of DAP and air kerma. A literature review on MSDs measured during IC procedures showed that doses ranged from 300 to 43000 mGy

  4. Radiation-Induced Noncancer Risks in Interventional Cardiology: Optimisation of Procedures and Staff and Patient Dose Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairuddin Md Yusof, Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Concerns about ionizing radiation during interventional cardiology have been increased in recent years as a result of rapid growth in interventional procedure volumes and the high radiation doses associated with some procedures. Noncancer radiation risks to cardiologists and medical staff in terms of radiation-induced cataracts and skin injuries for patients appear clear potential consequences of interventional cardiology procedures, while radiation-induced potential risk of developing cardiovascular effects remains less clear. This paper provides an overview of the evidence-based reviews of concerns about noncancer risks of radiation exposure in interventional cardiology. Strategies commonly undertaken to reduce radiation doses to both medical staff and patients during interventional cardiology procedures are discussed; optimisation of interventional cardiology procedures is highlighted. PMID:24027768

  5. Evaluation of occupational radiation exposure in cardiology interventional procedures in some Khartoum hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, Doaa Mohammed Ali

    2015-12-01

    The number of cardiology interventional procedures has significantly increased recently. This is due to the reliability of the diagnostic equipment to diagnose many heart diseases. In the procedures the x-ray used results in increasing radiation doses to the staff. The cardiologists and other staff member in interventional cardiology are usually working close to the area under examination and receive the dose primarily as well as from scattered radiation from the patients. In this study three electronic personal dosimeters (EPDs) were used to measured personal equivalent dose Hp (10) for assessment staff doses were monitoring during interventional cardiology procedure, totally in (100) procedures were performed in two clinical. The procedures was collect in two main hospitals in Khartoum State, the staff workers include cardiologists, technologists and nurses. The EPDs were used by each worker at the two cardiology centers, was one worn under a protective apron attach to chest. The annual doses received by 6 cardiologists, 6 nurses and 2 technologists at the sudan heart center were tn the range: (27.25-33.5) μSv, (3.25-3.66) μSv, (3.25-3.66) μSv, (3.23 and 3.70) μSv respectively. In the royal care hospital the annual doses received by 2 doctors, 4 nurses and 2 technologists were in the range ( 38.375 and 39.375) μSv (12.06-14.125) μSv, (8.5 and 9.25) μSv respectively, estimated for four weeks. The highest doses were received by the cardiologist followed by nurses and the x-ray technicians. The results showed that the annual doses received by the workers do not exceed 20 mSv. Recommendation on how to reduce staff doses in interventional cardiology are presented.(Author)

  6. Estimation of staff lens doses during interventional procedures. Comparing cardiology, neuroradiology and interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vano, E.; Sanchez, R.M.; Fernandez, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to estimate lens doses using over apron active personal dosemeters in interventional catheterisation laboratories (cardiology IC, neuroradiology IN and radiology IR) and to investigate correlations between occupational lens doses and patient doses. Active electronic personal dosemeters placed over the lead apron were used on a sample of 204 IC procedures, 274 IN and 220 IR (all performed at the same university hospital). Patient dose values (kerma area product) were also recorded to evaluate correlations with occupational doses. Operators used the ceiling-suspended screen in most cases. The median and third quartile values of equivalent dose Hp(10) per procedure measured over the apron for IC, IN and IR resulted, respectively, in 21/67, 19/44 and 24/54 μSv. Patient dose values (median/third quartile) were 75/128, 83/176 and 61/159 Gy cm 2 , respectively. The median ratios for dosemeters worn over the apron by operators ( protected by the ceiling-suspended screen) and patient doses were 0.36; 0.21 and 0.46 μSv Gy -1 cm -2 , respectively. With the conservative approach used (lens doses estimated from the over apron chest dosemeter) we came to the conclusion that more than 800 procedures y -1 and per operator were necessary to reach the new lens dose limit for the three interventional specialties. (authors)

  7. Estimation of staff lens doses during interventional procedures. Comparing cardiology, neuroradiology and interventional radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vano, E; Sanchez, R M; Fernandez, J M

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to estimate lens doses using over apron active personal dosemeters in interventional catheterisation laboratories (cardiology IC, neuroradiology IN and radiology IR) and to investigate correlations between occupational lens doses and patient doses. Active electronic personal dosemeters placed over the lead apron were used on a sample of 204 IC procedures, 274 IN and 220 IR (all performed at the same university hospital). Patient dose values (kerma area product) were also recorded to evaluate correlations with occupational doses. Operators used the ceiling-suspended screen in most cases. The median and third quartile values of equivalent dose Hp(10) per procedure measured over the apron for IC, IN and IR resulted, respectively, in 21/67, 19/44 and 24/54 µSv. Patient dose values (median/third quartile) were 75/128, 83/176 and 61/159 Gy cm(2), respectively. The median ratios for dosemeters worn over the apron by operators (protected by the ceiling-suspended screen) and patient doses were 0.36; 0.21 and 0.46 µSv Gy(-1) cm(-2), respectively. With the conservative approach used (lens doses estimated from the over apron chest dosemeter) we came to the conclusion that more than 800 procedures y(-1) and per operator were necessary to reach the new lens dose limit for the three interventional specialties. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Clinical pathway across tertiary and community care after an interventional cardiology procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, K; Sampson, B; Staus, R; Ahern, C; Schiro, D

    1997-01-01

    Many patients who receive medical interventional cardiology procedures at a tertiary hospital live outside the metropolitan area and may experience fragmentation in care, less emotional support by family members, inaccurate and delayed communication, and lack of educational follow-up on discharge from the hospital. A clinical pathway titled "Heart Health Care Patterns" was developed to link acute phase, recovery phase, rehabilitation phase, and enhancement/maintenance phase. The 12-month clinical pathway combines Gordon's Functional Health Patterns and the Omaha System developed by the Omaha Visiting Nurse Association. The rating scale for outcomes assesses the patient at different phases to provide objective data and information throughout the year.

  9. Patient dose assessment in various Interventional radiology and cardiology procedures in Algeria (IAEA regional project results)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khelassi-Toutaoui, Nadia; Merad, Ahmed; Toutaoui, A.E.K.; Bairi, Souad

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Purpose: To evaluate patient doses in Interventional Radiology (IR) and Cardiology (IC) procedures in Algeria, within the framework of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) regional project on radiation protection of patients and medical exposure control (RAF 9033). Materials and Methods: Three public hospitals (CHU Bab el Oued, CHU Parnet and CHU Mustapha) and one specialised Cardiology Service (Clinique Maouche) were chosen for the study. For Maximum Skin Dose (MSD) evaluation, gafchromic films XR type R were used, placed on patient's back before the procedure. The Dose Area Product (DAP) and MSD were measured in 57 IR and IC procedures, either diagnostic or therapeutic. Results: The results revealed large variations in MSD (0.06-3.3 Gy) and DAP (5.5-332 mGycm 2 ). Mean MSD was 0.227 Gy in cerebral angiography, 0.202 Gy in coronary angiography, 1.162 Gy in Percutaneus Transluminal Coronary Angioplasty (PTCA) and 0.128 in abdominal angiography. The correlation of DAP and MSD was significant (r = 0.7). The correlation was DAP and fluoroscopy time was also significant (r = 0.8). Conclusion: The highest MSD values were found in PTCA which is a therapeutic procedure. Two PTCAs out of the 57 procedures measured in total had MSD over the threshold of 2 Gy for deterministic effects (MSD 1 = 3.0 Gy and MSD 2 3.3 Gy). The large variations in MSD reveal the need to continuously monitor patient doses in IR and IC procedures with special emphasis in PTCA procedure. (author)

  10. Patient radiation doses in the most common interventional cardiology procedures in croatia: First results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brnic, Z.; Krpan, T.; Faj, D.; Kubelka, D.; Ramac, J. P.; Posedel, D.; Steiner, R.; Vidjak, V.; Brnic, V.; Viskovic, K.; Baraban, V.

    2010-01-01

    Apart from its benefits, the interventional cardiology (IC) is known to generate high radiation doses to patients and medical staff involved. The European Union Medical Exposures Directive 97/43/EURATOM strongly recommend patient dosimetry in interventional radiology, including IC. IC patient radiation doses in four representative IC rooms in Croatia were investigated. Setting reference levels for these procedures have difficulties due to the large difference in procedure complexity. Nevertheless, it is important that some guideline values are available as a benchmark to guide the operators during these potentially high-dose procedures. Local and national diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) were proposed as a guidance. A total of 138 diagnostic (coronary angiography, CA) and 151 therapeutic (PTCA, stenting) procedures were included. Patient irradiation was measured in terms of kerma-area product (KAP), fluoroscopy time (FT) and number of cine-frames (F). KAP was recorded using calibrated KAP-meters. DRLs of KAP, FT and F were calculated as third quartile values rounded up to the integer. Skin doses were assessed on a selected sample of high skin dose procedures, using radiochromic films, and peak skin doses (PSD) were presented. A relative large range of doses in IC was detected. National DRLs were proposed as follows: 32 Gy cm 2 , 6.6 min and 610 frames for CA and 72 Gy cm 2 , 19 min and 1270 frames for PTCA. PSD 2 Gy in 8% of selected patients. Measuring the patient doses in radiological procedures is required by law, but rarely implemented in Croatia. The doses recorded in the study are acceptable when compared with the literature, but optimisation is possible. The preliminary DRL values proposed may be used as a guideline for local departments, and should be a basis for radiation reduction measures and quality assurance programmes in IC in Croatia. (authors)

  11. Evaluation of patients skin dose undergoing interventional cardiology procedure using radiochromic films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Mauro W. Oliveira da; Canevaro, Lucia V.; Rodrigues, Barbara B. Dias

    2011-01-01

    In interventional cardiology (IC), coronary angiography (CA) and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) procedures are the most frequent ones. Since the 1990s, the number of IC procedures has increased rapidly. It is also known that these procedures are associated with high radiation doses due to long fluoroscopy time (FT) and large number of cine-frames (CF) acquired to document the procedure. Mapping skin doses in IC is useful to find the probability of skin injuries, to detect areas of overlapping field, and to get a permanent record of the most exposed areas of skin. The purpose of this study was to estimate the maximum skin dose (MSD) in patients undergoing CA and PTCA, and to compare these values with the reference levels proposed in the literature. Patients' dose measurements were carried out on a sample of 38 patients at the hemodynamic department, in four local hospitals in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, using Gafchromic XR-RV2 films. In PTCA procedures, the median and third quartile values of MSD were estimated at 2.5 and 5.3 Gy, respectively. For the CA procedures, the median and third quartile values of MSD were estimated at 0.5 and 0.7 Gy, respectively. In this paper, we used the Pearson's correlation coefficient (r), and we found a fairly strong correlation between FT and MSD (r=0.8334, p<0.0001), for CA procedures. The 1 Gy threshold for deterministic effects was exceeded in nine patients. The use of Gafchromic XR-RV2 films was shown to be an effective method to measure MSD and the dose distribution map. The method is effective to identify the distribution of radiation fields, thus allowing the follow-up of the patient to investigate the appearance of skin injuries. (author)

  12. Towards the definition of Institutional diagnostic reference levels in paediatric interventional cardiology procedures in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottou, S; Kollaros, N; Plemmenos, C; Mastorakou, I; Apostolopoulou, S C; Tsapaki, V

    2018-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate paediatric radiation doses in a dedicated cardiology hospital, with the objective of characterising patterns in dose variation. The ultimate purpose was to define Local (Institutional) Diagnostic Reference Levels (LDRLs) for different types of paediatric cardiac interventional procedures (IC), according to patient age. From a total of 710 cases performed during three consecutive years, by operators with more than 15 years of experience, the age was noted in only 477 IC procedures. The median values obtained for Fluoroscopy Time (FT), Number of Frames (N) and Kerma Area Product (P KA ) by age range were 5.8 min, 1322 and 2.0 Gy.cm 2 for definition of LDRLs presents challenges mainly due to the multiple clinical and technical factors affecting the outcome. On the other hand the lack of paediatric IC DRLs makes the identification of good practices more difficult. A consensus is needed on IC procedures nomenclature and grouping in order to allow a common assessment and comparison of doses. Copyright © 2018 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Multiple procedures and cumulative individual radiation exposure in interventional cardiology: A long-term retrospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weltermann, Birgitta M.; Rock, Thomas; Berndt, Peter; Viehmann, Anja; Reinders, Sabrina; Gesenhues, Stefan [University of Duisburg-Essen, Institute for General Medicine, University Hospital, Essen (Germany); Brix, Gunnar; Schegerer, Alexander [Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Department of Radiation Protection and Health, Neuherberg (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    Various studies address discrepancies between guideline recommendations for coronary angiographies and clinical practice. While the issue of the appropriateness of recurrent angiographies was studied focusing on the role of the cardiologist, little is known about individual patients' histories and the associated radiation exposures. We analyzed all patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) in an academic teaching practice who underwent at least one angiography with or without intervention between 2004 and 2009. All performed angiographies in these patients were analyzed and rated by three physicians for appropriateness levels according to cardiology guidelines. Typical exposure data from the medical literature were used to estimate individual radiation exposure. In the cohort of 147 patients, a total of 441 procedures were analyzed: between 1981 and 2009, three procedures were performed per patient (range 1-19) on average. Appropriateness ratings were 'high/intermediate' in 71 %, 'low/no' in 27.6 % and data were insufficient for ratings in 1.4 %. Procedures with 'low/no' ratings were associated with potentially avoidable exposures of up to 186 mSv for single patients. Using retrospective data, we exemplify the potential benefit of guideline adherence to decrease patients' radiation exposures. (orig.)

  14. Main clinical, therapeutic and technical factors related to patient's maximum skin dose in interventional cardiology procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journy, N; Sinno-Tellier, S; Maccia, C; Le Tertre, A; Pirard, P; Pagès, P; Eilstein, D; Donadieu, J; Bar, O

    2012-01-01

    Objective The study aimed to characterise the factors related to the X-ray dose delivered to the patient's skin during interventional cardiology procedures. Methods We studied 177 coronary angiographies (CAs) and/or percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasties (PTCAs) carried out in a French clinic on the same radiography table. The clinical and therapeutic characteristics, and the technical parameters of the procedures, were collected. The dose area product (DAP) and the maximum skin dose (MSD) were measured by an ionisation chamber (Diamentor; Philips, Amsterdam, The Netherlands) and radiosensitive film (Gafchromic; International Specialty Products Advanced Materials Group, Wayne, NJ). Multivariate analyses were used to assess the effects of the factors of interest on dose. Results The mean MSD and DAP were respectively 389 mGy and 65 Gy cm−2 for CAs, and 916 mGy and 69 Gy cm−2 for PTCAs. For 8% of the procedures, the MSD exceeded 2 Gy. Although a linear relationship between the MSD and the DAP was observed for CAs (r=0.93), a simple extrapolation of such a model to PTCAs would lead to an inadequate assessment of the risk, especially for the highest dose values. For PTCAs, the body mass index, the therapeutic complexity, the fluoroscopy time and the number of cine frames were independent explanatory factors of the MSD, whoever the practitioner was. Moreover, the effect of technical factors such as collimation, cinematography settings and X-ray tube orientations on the DAP was shown. Conclusion Optimising the technical options for interventional procedures and training staff on radiation protection might notably reduce the dose and ultimately avoid patient skin lesions. PMID:22457404

  15. Equipment standards for interventional cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowling, A.; Gallagher, A.; Walsh, C.; Malone, J.

    2005-01-01

    Interventional radiology has seen rapid growth in cardiology and represents an alternative to hazardous surgery. Recently there has been a substantial growth in the number of procedures being performed and interventional cardiology (IC) procedures are the most common interventional procedures in Europe. Advances in imaging technology have facilitated the development of increasingly complex radiological IC equipment. Currently, the technology is developing at a rate ahead of supporting research, equipment standards and a regulatory framework. International standards play a key role in the design, manufacture and performance of radiological IC equipment. A survey of 12 IC systems (15 imaging chains) was conducted in Irish hospitals. The aim of the study was to assess the imbalance between rapidly advancing technology and existing standards and to propose recommendations for new IC equipment standards. The results demonstrate the need for definitive equipment requirements and standardisation in the design, manufacture, acceptance and maintenance of IC equipment. (authors)

  16. Patient doses in interventional cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrera, F.; Ojeda, C.; Ruiz-Cruces, R.; Francisco Diaz, J.; Sanchez, A.; Tort, I.

    2001-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the first cause of death in Spain. The most usual procedures in interventional cardiology are coronariography and PTCA. The first is a diagnostic technique, and the second one is interventional. Our goal has been to study procedures made during the first six months in the Interventional Cardiology Unit of the Juan Ramon Jimenez Hospital (Huelva-Spain), taking into account radiation protection issues. We have studied 178 patients; 145 of them underwent coronariography, and 33 of the patients had PTCA too. Every case was analyzed taking into account technical and dosimetric parameters. We show parameters values gathered: Diagnostic techniques (valvular and non-valvular patients), and interventional techniques (coronariography and PTCA in different or in the same intervention). Higher doses were obtained with valvular patients, although the number of frames was similar. Attending to therapeutic procedures, the highest values were gotten with the 'double' interventions. Interventional procedures exceed in 60% doses gotten in diagnostic studies: this is because of the number of series and number of frames per series. Similar values obtained by other authors have been gotten. (author)

  17. Economic appraisal of the angioplasty procedures performed in 2004 in a high-volume diagnostic and interventional cardiology unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manari, Antonio; Costa, Elena; Scivales, Alessandro; Ponzi, Patrizia; Di Stasi, Francesca; Guiducci, Vincenzo; Pignatelli, Gianluca; Giacometti, Paola

    2007-10-01

    Growing interest in the use of drug-eluting stents (DESs) in coronary angioplasty has prompted the Healthcare Agency of the Emilia Romagna Region to draw up recommendations for their appropriate clinical use in high-risk patients. Since the adoption of any new technology necessitates economic appraisal, we analysed the resource consumption of the various types of angioplasty procedures and the impact on the budget of a cardiology department. A retrospective economic appraisal was carried out on the coronary angioplasty procedures performed in 2004 in the Department of Interventional Cardiology of Reggio Emilia. On the basis of the principles of activity-based costing, detailed hospital costs were estimated for each procedure and compared with the relevant diagnosis-related group (DRG) reimbursement. In 2004, the Reggio Emilia hospital performed 806 angioplasty procedures for a total expenditure of euro 5,176,268. These were 93 plain old balloon angioplasty procedures (euro 487,329), 401 procedures with bare-metal stents (euro 2,380,071), 249 procedures with DESs (euro 1,827,386) and 63 mixed procedures (euro 481,480). Reimbursements amounted to euro 5,816,748 (11% from plain old balloon angioplasty, 50% from bare-metal stent, 31% from DES and 8% from mixed procedures) with a positive margin of about euro 680,480 between costs incurred and reimbursements obtained, even if the reimbursement for DES and mixed procedures was not covering all the incurred costs. Analysis of the case-mix of procedures revealed that an overall positive margin between costs and DRG reimbursements was achieved. It therefore emerges that adherence to the indications of the Healthcare Agency of the Emilia Romagna Region for the appropriate clinical use of DESs is economically sustainable from the hospital enterprise point of view, although the DRG reimbursements are not able to differentiate among resource consumptions owing to the adoption of innovative technologies.

  18. [Quality assurance in interventional cardiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gülker, H

    2009-10-01

    Quality assurance in clinical studies aiming at approval of pharmaceutical products is submitted to strict rules, controls and auditing regulations. Comparative instruments to ensure quality in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures are not available in interventional cardiology, likewise in other fields of cardiovascular medicine. Quality assurance simply consists of "quality registers" with basic data not externally controlled. Based on the experiences of clinical studies and their long history of standardization it is assumed that these data may be severely flawed thus being inappropriate to set standards for diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. The precondition for quality assurance are quality data. In invasive coronary angiography and intervention medical indications, the decision making process interventional versus surgical revascularization, technical performance and after - care are essential aspects affecting quality of diagnostics and therapy. Quality data are externally controlled data. To collect quality data an appropriate infrastructure is a necessary precondition which is not existent. For an appropriate infrastructure investments have to be done both to build up as well as to sustain the necessary preconditions. As long as there are no infrastructure and no investments there will be no "quality data". There exist simply registers of data which are not proved to be a basis for significant assurance and enhancement in quality in interventional coronary cardiology. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart, New York.

  19. Pediatric patient doses in interventional cardiology procedures; Doses em paciente pediatrico em procedimentos de cardiologia intervencionista

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medeiros, R.B.; Murata, C.H.; Moreira, A.C., E-mail: rbitelli2012@gmail.com, E-mail: camila.murata@gmail.com, E-mail: antonio.xray@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola Pulista de Medicina; Khoury, H.J.; Borras, C., E-mail: hjkhoury@gmail.com, E-mail: cariborras@starpower.net [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (DEN/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear; Silva, M.S.R da, E-mail: msrochas2003@yahoo.com.br [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Pernambuco (IFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    The radiation doses from interventional procedures is relevant when treating children because of their greater radiosensitivity compared with adults. The purposes of this paper were to estimate the dose received by 18 pediatric patients who underwent cardiac interventional procedures and to correlate the maximum entrance surface air kerma (Ke,max), estimated with radiochromic films, with the cumulative air kerma values displayed at the end of procedures. This study was performed in children up to 6 years. The study was performed in two hospitals, one located in Recife and the other one in São Paulo. The x-ray imaging systems used were Phillips Allura 12 model with image intensifier system and a Phillips Allura FD10 flat panel system. To estimate the Ke,max on the patient’s skin radiochromic films(Gafchromic XR-RV2) were used. These values were estimated from the maximum optical density measured on film using a calibration curve. The results showed cumulative air kerma values ranging from 78.3- 500.0mGy, with a mean value of 242,3 mGy. The resulting Ke,max values ranged from 20.0-461.8 mGy, with a mean value of 208,8 mGy. The Ke,max values were correlated with the displayed cumulative air kerma values. The correlation factor R² was 0.78, meaning that the value displayed in the equipment’s console can be useful for monitoring the skin absorbed dose throughout the procedure. The routine fluoroscopy time records is not able by itself alert the physician about the risk of dose exceeding the threshold of adverse reactions, which can vary from an early erythema to serious harmful skin damage. (author)

  20. Radiation monitoring in interventional cardiology: a requirement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, T.; Uruchurtu, E. S.

    2017-01-01

    The increasing of procedures using fluoroscopy in interventional cardiology procedures may increase medical and patients to levels of radiation that manifest in unintended outcomes. Such outcomes may include skin injury and cancer. The cardiologists and other staff members in interventional cardiology are usually working close to the area under examination and they receive the dose primarily from scattered radiation from the patient. Mexico does not have a formal policy for monitoring and recording the radiation dose delivered in hemodynamic establishments. Deterministic risk management can be improved by monitoring the radiation delivered from X-ray devices. The objective of this paper is to provide cardiologist, techniques, nurses, and all medical staff an information on DR levels, about X-ray risks and a simple a reliable method to control cumulative dose.

  1. Organ doses of the cardiologists and their assistants during interventional cardiology procedures at teaching general hospitals in Mashhad/ Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahreyni Toosi, M.; Zare, H.; Bayani, Sh.; Esmaili, S.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Protection of medical personnel in interventional cardiology is now days one of the most important issues of radiological protection. Due to the rapid increase of coronary heart disease in developed and developing countries, application of interventional techniques such as coronary angiography and angioplasty have also increased sharply over past two decades. While these procedures are carried out cardiologists and their assistants are remained close to the patient and within the hot area of the radiation field. Therefore they are subject to receive significant doses of radiation. In this study doses received by critical and more vulnerable organs of cardiologists and their assistants were measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters (T.L.D.). T.L.D. measurements were carried for 115 coronary angiography (C.A.) and 30 pre-cutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (P.T.C.A.) procedures at teaching general hospitals in Mashhad-Iran. Doses received by thyroid, gonad, right and left hands of the study groups were measured. For this purpose T.L.D. were placed on and underneath of the lead apron adjacent to gonads and on the wrist of both hands. The results of this study imply that: a) For both groups left hands are subject to receiving the highest mean dose (0.18 mGy/P.T.C.A.) b) Thyroid mean dose per P.T.C.A. received by the T.L.D. chips on the shield is 0.72 mGy and is much higher than corresponding value for the T.L.D. placed underneath the shield. c) Gonads would receive the highest mean dose per P.T.C.A. (0.16 mGy), second to left hand, if lead apron is not worn, but lead apron reduces the dose by a factor of nearly six. d) General speaking assistants, mostly stood on the right side of cardiologists, receive smaller dose. e) P.T.C.A. induces a higher dose to all organs of both cardiologists and their assistants when compared with the corresponding doses arising from C.A. procedure. (authors)

  2. Organ doses of the cardiologists and their assistants during interventional cardiology procedures at teaching general hospitals in Mashhad/ Iran

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahreyni Toosi, M.; Zare, H.; Bayani, Sh.; Esmaili, S. [Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Medical Physics Dep., Faculty of Medicine, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2006-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Protection of medical personnel in interventional cardiology is now days one of the most important issues of radiological protection. Due to the rapid increase of coronary heart disease in developed and developing countries, application of interventional techniques such as coronary angiography and angioplasty have also increased sharply over past two decades. While these procedures are carried out cardiologists and their assistants are remained close to the patient and within the hot area of the radiation field. Therefore they are subject to receive significant doses of radiation. In this study doses received by critical and more vulnerable organs of cardiologists and their assistants were measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters (T.L.D.). T.L.D. measurements were carried for 115 coronary angiography (C.A.) and 30 pre-cutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (P.T.C.A.) procedures at teaching general hospitals in Mashhad-Iran. Doses received by thyroid, gonad, right and left hands of the study groups were measured. For this purpose T.L.D. were placed on and underneath of the lead apron adjacent to gonads and on the wrist of both hands. The results of this study imply that: a) For both groups left hands are subject to receiving the highest mean dose (0.18 mGy/P.T.C.A.) b) Thyroid mean dose per P.T.C.A. received by the T.L.D. chips on the shield is 0.72 mGy and is much higher than corresponding value for the T.L.D. placed underneath the shield. c) Gonads would receive the highest mean dose per P.T.C.A. (0.16 mGy), second to left hand, if lead apron is not worn, but lead apron reduces the dose by a factor of nearly six. d) General speaking assistants, mostly stood on the right side of cardiologists, receive smaller dose. e) P.T.C.A. induces a higher dose to all organs of both cardiologists and their assistants when compared with the corresponding doses arising from C.A. procedure. (authors)

  3. [Glycaemic management in type 1 and 2 diabetes patients undergoing interventional cardiology procedures. Heart and Diabetes Working Group. Sociedad Espan˜ola de Cardiologı´a. Sociedad Espan˜ola de Diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-García, Angeles; Moreno Gómez, Raúl; Miranda Guardiola, Faustino; Artola-Menéndez, Sara; Lisbona-Gil, Arturo

    2012-03-03

    Despite the growing number of therapeutic alternatives available as well as general reviews and treatment guidelines for the treatment of diabetes, physicians are often left without a clear pathway of therapy to follow in specific clinical contexts such as interventional cardiology. The present document proposes a consensus treatment algorithm, based both on a critical appraisal of evidence from recent clinical trials and on value judgements supported by the authors' collective clinical knowledge and experience, in an attempt to guide practitioners when choosing the most appropriate alternatives in the context of glycemic management in type 1 and 2 diabetic patients scheduled to undergo interventional cardiology procedures in a haemodynamic laboratory. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  4. Recent advances in pediatric interventional cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seong-Ho

    2017-08-01

    During the last 10 years, there have been major technological achievements in pediatric interventional cardiology. In addition, there have been several advances in cardiac imaging, especially in 3-dimensional imaging of echocardiography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and cineangiography. Therefore, more types of congenital heart diseases can be treated in the cardiac catheter laboratory today than ever before. Furthermore, lesions previously considered resistant to interventional therapies can now be managed with high success rates. The hybrid approach has enabled the overcoming of limitations inherent to percutaneous access, expanding the application of endovascular therapies as adjunct to surgical interventions to improve patient outcomes and minimize invasiveness. Percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation has become a successful alternative therapy. However, most of the current recommendations about pediatric cardiac interventions (including class I recommendations) refer to off-label use of devices, because it is difficult to study the safety and efficacy of catheterization and transcatheter therapy in pediatric cardiac patients. This difficulty arises from the challenge of identifying a control population and the relatively small number of pediatric patients with congenital heart disease. Nevertheless, the pediatric interventional cardiology community has continued to develop less invasive solutions for congenital heart defects to minimize the need for open heart surgery and optimize overall outcomes. In this review, various interventional procedures in patients with congenital heart disease are explored.

  5. Patient Dose Considerations in Interventional Cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciraj-Bjelac, O.; Rafajlovic, S.; Arandjic, D.; Kosutic, D.

    2011-01-01

    Interventional cardiology procedures are classified as high-dose procedures, owing to increased risk for radiation skin injuries and stochastic effects, such as cancer. European MED Directive 97/43 requires special consideration and dose evaluation for this kind of procedures . Dose received by a patient, in general, depends on the radiological equipment, examination protocol, the way it is implemented, the patient's body weight and nature of disease. Long-term fluoroscopy of certain parts of the body, a significant body mass, high-value dose intensity, continuous rather than pulsed fluoroscopy, small focus-skin distance and repeated procedure on the same patient, are among the factors that can lead to radiation skin injuries. A particular challenge is the fact that the radiation damage of the skin is difficult to detect and connect to the previously conducted cardiologic procedures. The fact that such injuries do not have immediate manifestation is very often reason that many of them remain undetected. The purpose of this work is to assess the level of radiation dose to patients in percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) and to investigate possibility for setting of a practical trigger value if dose quantities exceed certain levels in terms of dose descriptors available at display of interventional cardiology unit. Two dedicated interventional cardiology units in a large teaching cardiac centre (Clinical Centre of Serbia, Belgrade, Serbia) were included in the survey. Both rooms (D and F) were equipped with X-ray units of the identical model: Siemens Axiom Artis (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) with the flat panel detector and integrated ionization chamber to measure air kerma-area product (P K A) and air kerma in international reference point (K I RP). Patient doses were assessed in terms of P K A, K I RP and maximum-skin dose (MSD). P K A and K I RP were assessed using a built-in, in situ calibrated dosimeters, while MSD was estimated using radiochromic films

  6. Zoning and workstation analysis in interventional cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degrange, J.P.

    2009-01-01

    As interventional cardiology can induce high doses not only for patients but also for the personnel, the delimitation of regulated areas (or zoning) and workstation analysis (dosimetry) are very important in terms of radioprotection. This paper briefly recalls methods and tools for the different steps to perform zoning and workstation analysis. It outlines the peculiarities of interventional cardiology, presents methods and tools adapted to interventional cardiology, and then discusses the same issues but for workstation analysis. It also outlines specific problems which can be met, and their possible adapted solutions

  7. Interventional Cardiology for Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Damien

    2018-05-01

    Congenital heart interventions are now replacing surgical palliation and correction in an evolving number of congenital heart defects. Right ventricular outflow tract and ductus arteriosus stenting have demonstrated favorable outcomes compared to surgical systemic to pulmonary artery shunting, and it is likely surgical pulmonary valve replacement will become an uncommon procedure within the next decade, mirroring current practices in the treatment of atrial septal defects. Challenges remain, including the lack of device design focused on smaller infants and the inevitable consequences of somatic growth. Increasing parental and physician expectancy has inevitably lead to higher risk interventions on smaller infants and appreciation of the consequences of these interventions on departmental outcome data needs to be considered. Registry data evaluating congenital heart interventions remain less robust than surgical registries, leading to a lack of insight into the longer-term consequences of our interventions. Increasing collaboration with surgical colleagues has not been met with necessary development of dedicated equipment for hybrid interventions aimed at minimizing the longer-term consequences of scar to the heart. Therefore, great challenges remain to ensure children and adults with congenital heart disease continue to benefit from an exponential growth in minimally invasive interventions and technology. This can only be achieved through a concerted collaborative approach from physicians, industry, academia and regulatory bodies supporting great innovators to continue the philosophy of thinking beyond the limits that has been the foundation of our specialty for the past 50 years. Copyright © 2018. The Korean Society of Cardiology.

  8. Current practice of transradial approach for coronary procedures: A survey by the Italian Society of Interventional Cardiology (SICI-GISE) and the Italian Radial Club

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigattieri, Stefano; Valsecchi, Orazio; Sciahbasi, Alessandro; Tomassini, Francesco; Limbruno, Ugo; Marchese, Alfredo; La Manna, Alessio; Mauro, Ciro; Varbella, Ferdinando; Berti, Segio; Tarantino, Fabio F.; Musumeci, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Background: Transradial approach (TRA) for percutaneous coronary procedures is associated with improved patient outcome and is being increasingly adopted worldwide. We surveyed Italian interventional cardiologists in order to take a snapshot of the current practice of TRA. Methods: A web-based questionnaire was emailed to all members of the Italian Society of Interventional Cardiology. Results: The survey was taken by 508 respondents. Cardiogenic shock and chronic total occlusions represented the principal limitations to TRA. Right TRA was the default approach for 81% of respondents. Both diagnostic and interventional procedures were routinely performed through 6 Fr sheaths (83% and 93%, respectively); dedicated TRA curves were used in 11% of diagnostic and in about 3% of interventional procedures. Almost 70% of the operators did not assess dual hand circulation. In case of crossover, the contralateral radial artery was the preferred site (57%). Radial artery hemostasis was mostly achieved by pneumatic bracelet (64%) and patency of the radial artery during hemostasis was ensured in 60% of cases. Pre-discharge patency of the radial artery was routinely assessed by almost 60% of respondents. For diagnostic procedures, adequate heparin anticoagulation (5000 IU) was only given by 45% of operators. Most respondents believed that TRA is associated with greater radiation exposure for both the patient (82%) and the operator (98%) as compared to transfemoral approach. Conclusions: This survey provides contemporary data about the adoption of TRA in Italy and gives interesting insights about several technical and clinical issues related to the practice of this vascular approach for coronary procedures. - Highlights: • Transradial approach for coronary procedures is becoming increasingly popular. • We conducted a survey on the contemporary practice of transradial approach in Italy. • We appraised several clinical and technical issues related to transradial approach.

  9. Current practice of transradial approach for coronary procedures: A survey by the Italian Society of Interventional Cardiology (SICI-GISE) and the Italian Radial Club

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rigattieri, Stefano, E-mail: stefanorigattieri@yahoo.it [Interventional Cardiology Unit, Sandro Pertini Hospital, Roma (Italy); Valsecchi, Orazio [Cardiovascular Department, Papa Giovanni XXIII Hospital, Bergamo (Italy); Sciahbasi, Alessandro [Interventional Cardiology Unit, Sandro Pertini Hospital, Roma (Italy); Tomassini, Francesco [Cardiology Department, Ospedale degli Infermi, Rivoli (Italy); Limbruno, Ugo [Cardiology Unit, Azienda USL Toscana Sudest, Grosseto (Italy); Marchese, Alfredo [Interventional Cardiology Unit, Anthea Hospital, GVM Care & Research, Bari (Italy); La Manna, Alessio [Cardiovascular Department, Ferrarotto Hospital, University of Catania (Italy); Mauro, Ciro [Cardiovascular Department, Cardarelli Hospital, Napoli (Italy); Varbella, Ferdinando [Cardiology Department, Ospedale degli Infermi, Rivoli (Italy); Berti, Segio [Department of Cardiology, Fondazione Toscana “Gabriele Monasterio”, Ospedale del Cuore, Massa (Italy); Tarantino, Fabio F. [Cardiology Unit, Ospedale G.B. Morgagni-L. Pierantoni, Forlì (Italy); Musumeci, Giuseppe [Cardiovascular Department, Papa Giovanni XXIII Hospital, Bergamo (Italy)

    2017-04-15

    Background: Transradial approach (TRA) for percutaneous coronary procedures is associated with improved patient outcome and is being increasingly adopted worldwide. We surveyed Italian interventional cardiologists in order to take a snapshot of the current practice of TRA. Methods: A web-based questionnaire was emailed to all members of the Italian Society of Interventional Cardiology. Results: The survey was taken by 508 respondents. Cardiogenic shock and chronic total occlusions represented the principal limitations to TRA. Right TRA was the default approach for 81% of respondents. Both diagnostic and interventional procedures were routinely performed through 6 Fr sheaths (83% and 93%, respectively); dedicated TRA curves were used in 11% of diagnostic and in about 3% of interventional procedures. Almost 70% of the operators did not assess dual hand circulation. In case of crossover, the contralateral radial artery was the preferred site (57%). Radial artery hemostasis was mostly achieved by pneumatic bracelet (64%) and patency of the radial artery during hemostasis was ensured in 60% of cases. Pre-discharge patency of the radial artery was routinely assessed by almost 60% of respondents. For diagnostic procedures, adequate heparin anticoagulation (5000 IU) was only given by 45% of operators. Most respondents believed that TRA is associated with greater radiation exposure for both the patient (82%) and the operator (98%) as compared to transfemoral approach. Conclusions: This survey provides contemporary data about the adoption of TRA in Italy and gives interesting insights about several technical and clinical issues related to the practice of this vascular approach for coronary procedures. - Highlights: • Transradial approach for coronary procedures is becoming increasingly popular. • We conducted a survey on the contemporary practice of transradial approach in Italy. • We appraised several clinical and technical issues related to transradial approach.

  10. The contribution of interventional cardiology procedures to the population radiation dose in a ‘health-care level I’ representative region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peruzzo Cornetto, Andrea; Aimonetto, Stefania; Pisano, Francesco; Giudice, Marcello; Sicuro, Marco; Meloni, Teodoro; Tofani, Santi

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluates per-procedure, collective and per capita effective dose to the population by interventional cardiology (IC) procedures performed during 2002–11 at the main hospital of Aosta Valley Region that can be considered as representative of the health-care level I countries, as defined by the UNSCEAR, based on its socio-demographic characteristics. IC procedures investigated were often multiple procedures in patients older than 60 y. The median extreme dose-area product values of 300 and 22 908 cGycm2 were found for standard pacemaker implantation and coronary angioplasty, respectively, while the relative mean per-procedure effective dose ranged from 0.7 to 47 mSv. A 3-fold increase in frequency has been observed together with a correlated increase in the delivered per capita dose (0.05–0.27 mSv y−1) and the collective dose (5.8–35 man Sv y−1). Doses increased particularly from 2008 onwards mainly because of the introduction of coronary angioplasty procedures in the authors’ institution. IC practice contributed remarkably in terms of effective dose to the population, delivering ∼10 % of the total dose by medical ionising radiation examination categories. PMID:26012484

  11. Occupational dose measurement in interventional cardiology, dosimetry comparison study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, A.M.A.

    2008-05-01

    The number of cardiology interventional procedures has significantly increased recently. This is due to the reliability of the diagnostic equipment to diagnose many heart disease. In the procedures the x-ray used results in increasing radiation doses to the staff. The cardiologists and other staff members in interventional cardiology are usually working close to the area under examination and receive the dose primarily from scattered radiation from the patient. Therefore workers in interventional cardiology are expected to receive high doses. This study overviews the status of occupational exposure at the three cardiology centers at three different hospitals in Khartoum compared with that received by workers at other medical practices (radiotherapy, nuclear medicine and diagnostic radiology) in the Institute of Nuclear and Technology (INMO) at El Gezira. The TLD Harshaw 6600 reader was used in the assessment of effective dose for Hp (10). Two TLDs were used by each worker at the three cardiology centres, one worn under a protective apron and the other worn outside and above the apron as specified by the ICRP. Each worker at the other sections was facilitated with one dosimeter to be worn on the chest. The annual doses received by 14 cardiologists, 13 nurses and 9 technologists at the three cardiology centres were in the range: (0.84-4.77), (0.15-2.08), (0.32-1.10) mSv respectively. In the INMO the annual doses received by 7 doctors, 5 nurses and 14 technologists were in the range: (0.12-0.51), (0.11-0.65), (0.03-1.39) mSv respectively. The results showed that the annual doses received by the workers do not exceed 20 mSv. The study also indicated that doses received by workers in interventional cardiology, in particular the cardiologists are high compared to that received at the other medical sections.(Author)

  12. Women in interventional cardiology: The French experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vautrin, E; Marlière, S; Bellemain-Appaix, A; Gilard, M; Manzo-Silberman, S

    2016-12-01

    Exploring the discrepancy in sex-ratio among interventional cardiologists by analysing the population of the female interventionalist. Despite an increase number of women who graduate from medical school in France during the last generation today, women represent only 24% of all cardiologists and 3% are interventional cardiologists. To face this international gender-based issue of interventional cardiology, committees were established in US (WIN) and recently within the EAPCI: the Women EAPCI chaired by Drs Mehilli and Mauri. In France, the Intervention'Elles committee emerged in order to participate in this concern. As a first initiative, the Intervention'Elles group launched an e-survey to obtain information on the population of French female interventional cardiologists, focused on demography, work patterns, maternity and radiation exposure. Mean age is 40 years old (±7,4), 68% are working in large volume center, 28% have also structural interventional activity. Only 40% have left arm coverage. Despite 80% of French female interventional cardiologists wear personal dosimeters only 45% of them have a dosimetry feedback. Interestingly, even if 54% of women have children (mean: 1.9±1) 28% of them report that childbearing had interfered with their career plan. This questionnaire identifies for the first time the women population in interventional cardiology in France and highlights some of the issues encountered in more detail. This first descriptive step would help to develop strategies for attaining gender equality in interventional cardiology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Diagnostic procedures in cardiology: A clinician's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, J.V.; Lewis, R.P.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 31 papers. Some of the titles are: Cardiovascular radiology; Nuclear cardiology; echocardiography; The use and conduct of exercise tests; Lipid studies in cardiology; and The practice of cardiology in an era of high technology

  14. New devices and technology in interventional cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobis, Jonathan Marvin; Abudayyeh, Islam

    2015-01-01

    There have been substantial improvements made in the tools and techniques used since the advent of percutaneous coronary intervention. What was primarily developed as a treatment of coronary artery disease is now used to address a variety of structural heart disease problems. The outcomes have been remarkably successful with relatively low complication rates that rival the results of open-heart surgery. This article will review some of the new devices available for management of structural cardiac conditions including congenital defects and acquired valvular abnormalities. Transcatheter treatment offers advantages over surgical intervention in recovery time, improved patient satisfaction, lower procedural risk, and avoidance of cardio-pulmonary bypass especially in high-risk patients. We will discuss different medical conditions and introduce the devices used to treat these conditions. Each device or technique has benefits and risks, and familiarity with the devices along with patient selection will best optimize the outcome. Copyright © 2014 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Dose to patients and professionals in cardiology interventional: Progress of multicenter group Doccaci

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, R. M.; Vano, E.; Fernandez, J. M.; Goicolea Ruigomez, J.; Pifarre, X.; Escaned, J.; Rovira, J. J.; Garcia del Blanco, B.; Carrera, F.; Diaz, J. F.; Ordiales, J. M.; Nogales, J. M.; Hernandez, J.; Bosa, F.; Rosales, F.; Saez, J. R.; Soler, M. M.; Romero, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    The multidisciplinary group and multicenter DOCCACI (dosimetry and quality assurance in interventional cardiology), sponsored by the section of haemodynamics of the Spanish society of Cardiology, is intended to propose reference levels to doses received by patients in interventional cardiology procedures such as recommended by the International Commission on radiological protection It also investigates the doses received by professionals, in particular dose in Crystallyne whose recommended limit dose has been reduced recently from 150 to 20 mSv/year. (Author)

  16. Optimization of Patient Doses in Interventional Radiology and Cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikodemova, D.; Boehm, K.

    2011-01-01

    Interventional radiology and cardiology belongs to the imaging modalities connected with significantly higher radiation exposure of patients and medical staff, compared to the exposure during other diagnostic procedures. The objective of this presentation is to promote typical technical parameters and parameters related to the radiation policy, used during the most frequent endovascular and cardiology procedures, as well as the monitoring of the exposure of patients. The presented study reports the results of collecting the data of monitoring doses received by 318 patients undergoing interventional examinations in 3 various departments of the Slovak National Institute of Cardiology and Vascular Diseases. There were 9 different endovascular and cardiology procedures reviewed. The reported patient's radiation exposures were established by using the KAP values, directly shown on the display of the X-ray equipment. From the measured KAP values the entrance surface doses were calculated. Equivalent doses have been measured on hands, legs and other parts of medical staff body, by using electronic dosimeters or thermoluminescent dosimeters. The presented results have covered a wide range of the measured fluoroscopy time values, different number of acquisitions used in various interventional procedures, various cumulated KAP values and also a wide range of the cumulated entrance surface doses. The occupational doses of the operators, followed during dose measurements on their left hands, covered the range from 0.1 μSv to 1513 μSv for one examination performed. The important contribution of the presented results to the radiation protection policy in the Slovak Republic is the mapping of the current situation of the radiation exposure of patients undergoing the chosen interventional examinations and the professional radiation exposure level of interventional operators, providing the most significant interventional procedures in the Slovak interventional hospitals. The

  17. Radiological protection in interventional cardiology in Chile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, A.; Leyton, F.A.; Farias, E.; Silva, A.M.; Vano, E.; Oyarzun, C.; Gamarra, J.; Ortiz, P.

    2001-01-01

    In September 2000, an expert mission was assigned to Chile, under the regional project named 'International BBS in Medical Practices Radiation Protection and Quality Assurance In Interventional Radiology' (ARCAL XLIX). The objective of the mission was to evaluate the level of radiation protection (RP) and safety in interventional cardiology ( IC ) installations. A team of local cardiologists, medical physicists and technologists was created for this purpose and during one week, several cardiology laboratories were evaluated and some basic quality controls (QC) were carried out. A basic pilot training course in radiation protection was imparted at the Hospital of the University of Chile in Santiago de Chile and some of the key objectives for a future national quality assurance programme were presented during the national congress of IC. In addition, a national survey on radiation protection aspects was circulated and its results evaluated. These activities enabled the local team to become familiar with the methodology of assessment of the level of protection and the organization of a programme, which was illustrated with the examples of similar European programmes. As result of these actions, several proposals were made to both the local authorities and the IAEA. The most important were: a) to initiate a basic QC programme, b) to organize a training in RP for cardiologists in order to formalize their accreditation, c) to improve personal occupational dosimetry, d) to initiate a programme of patient dosimetry, e) to optimize the technical and clinical protocols, f) to create a national registry of incidents with skin injuries. (author)

  18. Optimisation of patient and staff exposure in interventional cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padovani, R.; Malisan, M.R.; Bernardi, G.; Vano, E.; Neofotistou, V.

    2001-01-01

    The Council Directive of the European Community 97/43/Euratom (MED) deals with the health protection of individuals against dangers of ionising radiation in relation to medical exposure, and also focuses attention on some special practices (Art. 9), including interventional radiology, a technique involving high doses to the patient. The paper presents the European approach to optimisation of exposure in interventional cardiology. The DIMOND research consortium (DIMOND: Digital Imaging: Measures for Optimising Radiological Information Content and Dose) is working to develop quality criteria for cineangiographic images, to develop procedures for the classification of complexity of therapeutic and diagnostic procedures and to derive reference levels, related also to procedure complexity. DIMOND project also includes aspects of equipment characteristics and performance and content of training in radiation protection of personnel working in interventional radiology field. (author)

  19. Investigation of radiation skin dose in interventional cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webster, C.M.; Horrocks, J.; Hayes, D.

    2001-01-01

    Background - The study investigated the radiation skin doses for interventional patients in cardiology; two procedures which have the highest radiation dose are Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation (RFCA) and Percutaneous Transluminal Coronary Angioplasty (PTCA). Methods and Results - 56 patients were randomly selected and investigated; 23 patients in the RFCA group and 33 in the PTCA group. Skin and effective dose were calculated from Dose Area Product (DAP). Thermoluminescent Dosimetry was the second method of dose measurement used. Patients were followed-up for a three month period to check for possible skin reactions resulting from the radiation dose during the procedure. Radiation skin doses in 14 patients were calculated to be more than 1 Gy, including three patients who received more than 2 Gy, the threshold dose for deterministic effects of radiation. 7 patients (12.5%) reported skin reactions as a result of the radiation received to their backs during the procedure. Mean DAP and estimated effective doses were 105 Gycm 2 and 22.5 mSv for RFCA, and 32 Gycm 2 and 6.2 mSv for PTCA procedures respectively. Conclusion - Complex procedures in Interventional Cardiology can exceed the threshold level for deterministic effects in the skin. (author)

  20. Cardiology

    OpenAIRE

    Fahey, Tom; Schroeder, Knut

    2004-01-01

    This article describes recent developments in cardiology and cardiovascular disease that are likely to be relevant to primary healthcare professionals and their patients. The following subject areas are covered: Primary prevention: recent developments in pharmacological interventions, drug interactions, and drugs that are likely to cause harm; cardiovascular risk estimation and shared decision making with patients; and new developments in 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring.Second...

  1. Analysis of the frequency of interventional cardiology in various European countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faulkner, K.; Werduch, A.

    2008-01-01

    The contribution of interventional cardiology procedures to the population dose in Europe is poorly known. The estimation of the population dose from these procedures requires knowledge of both the typical dose received by patients and an estimate of the number of procedures undertaken annually. Data on the number of cardiology procedures in various European countries are available on the internet for a number of countries. However, this data set is incomplete or out of date. This paper describes the statistical analysis undertaken to estimate the number of interventional cardiology procedures in a number of European countries for 2007. Estimates of the number of procedures are given. On average, the number of cardiac catheterizations per million population is 5346, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty is 1599 and 1214 stent procedures. In addition, there are an estimated 973 pacemaker insertions per million population. (authors)

  2. Radiation dose to the heart in paediatric interventional cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keiller, D A; Martin, C J

    2015-01-01

    Recent ICRP publications have reviewed evidence for induction of heart disease. Studies suggest the threshold dose to the heart may be as low as 500 mGy. Doses to the heart from paediatric interventional procedures performed in Glasgow between April 2012 and July 2013 to correct congenital heart defects were investigated to assess the level of potential risk of cardiovascular disease. For common procedures, doses were found to be typically less than 50 mGy, with the highest dose in the period for which data are available estimated to be 330 mGy. These results suggest that any increased risk due to paediatric interventional cardiology is likely to be small, but cumulative doses over a number of years could reach the threshold for effects. (paper)

  3. Dosimetric considerations and radiation protection of patients in interventional cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciraj-Bjelac, O.; Arandjic, D.; Kosutic, D.; Loncar, B.

    2009-01-01

    The paper summarizes results of measurements of relevant dosimetric quantities in interventional cardiology. Dosimetric data were collected for 117 coronary angiography (CA) procedures, 69 percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) and 41 combined procedures (CA+PCI), taking into account two quantities: air kerma area product (KAP) d air kerma in international reference point (K IRP ). Mean KAP values were 78 Gy·cm 2 , 113 Gy·cm 2 and 141 Gy·cm 2 for CA, PCI i CA+PCI, respectively. Corresponding mean K IRP values were 1.2 Gy, 1.8 Gy and 2.2 Gy. With respect to high dose values, risk for stochastic effects and tissue reactions, dose management methods were proposed. (author) [sr

  4. Ionizing radiation exposure in interventional cardiology: current radiation protection practice of invasive cardiology operators in Lithuania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valuckiene, Zivile; Jurenas, Martynas; Cibulskaite, Inga

    2016-09-01

    Ionizing radiation management is among the most important safety issues in interventional cardiology. Multiple radiation protection measures allow the minimization of x-ray exposure during interventional procedures. Our purpose was to assess the utilization and effectiveness of radiation protection and optimization techniques among interventional cardiologists in Lithuania. Interventional cardiologists of five cardiac centres were interviewed by anonymized questionnaire, addressing personal use of protective garments, shielding, table/detector positioning, frame rate (FR), resolution, field of view adjustment and collimation. Effective patient doses were compared between operators who work with and without x-ray optimization. Thirty one (68.9%) out of 45 Lithuanian interventional cardiologists participated in the survey. Protective aprons were universally used, but not the thyroid collars; 35.5% (n  =  11) operators use protective eyewear and 12.9% (n  =  4) wear radio-protective caps; 83.9% (n  =  26) use overhanging shields, 58.1% (n  =  18)-portable barriers; 12.9% (n  =  4)-abdominal patient's shielding; 35.5% (n  =  11) work at a high table position; 87.1% (n  =  27) keep an image intensifier/receiver close to the patient; 58.1% (n  =  18) reduce the fluoroscopy FR; 6.5% (n  =  2) reduce the fluoro image detail resolution; 83.9% (n  =  26) use a 'store fluoro' option; 41.9% (N  =  13) reduce magnification for catheter transit; 51.6% (n  =  16) limit image magnification; and 35.5% (n  =  11) use image collimation. Median effective patient doses were significantly lower with x-ray optimization techniques in both diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. Many of the ionizing radiation exposure reduction tools and techniques are underused by a considerable proportion of interventional cardiology operators. The application of basic radiation protection tools and

  5. Interventional cardiology audit report for 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, L

    2012-10-01

    In 2011 there were 658 percutaneous coronary intervention cases performed with more than 60% of the patients presenting to the hospital as an acute coronary syndrome. Most procedures consisted of balloon dilatation followed by stent deployment, and 93% of these stents were drug-eluting stents. Procedural success was achieved in 93.3% of cases and an overall major adverse cardiac events rate of 3.6%. This includes a mortality rate of (0.5%). In addition, there were 25 Core Valve procedures carried out. This is more than twice the amount of patients who had a transcatheter aortic valve implantation in 2010, reflecting the changing direction of the management of structural heart disease. © 2012 The Author; Internal Medicine Journal © 2012 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  6. A Decade of Information on the Use of Cardiac Implantable Electronic Devices and Interventional Electrophysiological Procedures in the European Society of Cardiology Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raatikainen, M J Pekka; Arnar, David O; Merkely, Bela

    2017-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this analysis was to provide comprehensive information on invasive cardiac arrhythmia therapies in the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) area over the past 10 years. Methods and results: The European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) has collected data on invasive arrhythmia...

  7. Patient skin dosimetry in interventional cardiology in the Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukupova, L.; Novak, L.; Kala, P.; Cervinka, P.; Stasek, J.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, skin dosimetry of patients undergoing interventional cardiology procedures is presented. Three hospitals were included. Two methods were used for skin dosimetry-radiochromic dosimetry films and reconstruction of skin dose distribution based on examination protocol. Maximum skin doses (MSD) obtained from both methods were compared for 175 patients. For patients for whom the film MSD was >1 Gy, the reconstruction MSD differed from the film MSD in the range of ± 50 % for 83 % of patients. For remaining patients, the difference was higher and it was caused by longer fluoroscopy time. For 59 patients for whom the cumulative dose was known, the cumulative dose was compared with the film MSD. Skin dosimetry with radiochromic films is more accurate than the reconstruction method, but films do not include X-ray fields from lateral projections whilst reconstructions do. (authors)

  8. Systemic inflammatory response syndromes in the era of interventional cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorla, Riccardo; Erbel, Raimund; Eagle, Kim A; Bossone, Eduardo

    2018-04-12

    Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), initially reported after cardiovascular surgery, has been described after various interventional cardiology procedures, including endovascular/thoracic aortic repair (EVAR/TEVAR), implantation of heart rhythm devices, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), electrophysiology procedures (EP), and transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). In these settings, a comprehensive understanding of the triggers, pathogenesis as well as a common diagnostic/therapeutic algorithm is lacking and will be discussed in this review. SIRS occurs in about 40% and 50% of patients undergoing TEVAR/EVAR and TAVI respectively; it affects 0.1% of patients undergoing implantation of heart rhythm devices. Prevalence is unknown after PCI or EP. Clinical presentation includes fever, dyspnoea/tachypnoea, tachycardia, weakness, chest pain and pericardial/pleural effusion. Several triggers can be identified, related to implanted devices, biomaterial, and procedural aspects (prolonged hypotension, aneurysm thrombus manipulation, active fixation atrial leads, coronary microembolization, balloon dilatation/stent implantantation, contrast medium, coronary/myocardial microperforation). Nonetheless, these triggers share three main pathogenic pathways leading to SIRS clinical manifestations: leucocytes activation, endothelial injury/activation, and myocardial/pericardial injury. Therapy consists of non-steroidal agents, with corticosteroids as second-line treatment in non-responders. Although a benign evolution is reported after implantation of heart rhythm devices, PCI and EP, major adverse events may occur after EVAR/TEVAR and TAVI at short- and mid-term follow up. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Occupational eye lens doses in interventional cardiology. A multicentric study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sánchez, R M; Vano, E; Fernández, J M; Pifarré, X; Ordiales, J M; Rovira, J J; Carrera, F; Goicolea, J; Fernández-Ortiz, A

    2016-01-01

    New European regulation regarding radiological protection of workers and more specifically the new occupational dose limit for the eye lens recently reduced to 20 mSv yr −1 may affect interventional cardiologists. This paper presents a set of measurements of occupational doses performed in five interventional cardiology centres and then compared with the new dose limit. The measurement of occupational doses was performed over the apron at chest level using electronic dosemeters recording H p (10). In one of the centres, scatter dose at goggles was also measured with optically stimulated luminescence dosemeters calibrated in terms of H p (0.07). An average H p (10) over the apron of 46 μSv/procedure was measured for cardiologists. Lower doses were noted in other professionals like second cardiologists, nurses or anaesthetists. Procedures for valvular and other structural heart diseases involved the highest occupational doses, averaging over 100 μSv/procedure. Important differences in occupational doses among centres may be indicative of different radiation protection habits. The new occupational dose limit for the eye lens is likely to be exceeded by those among the interventionalists who do not use protection tools (ceiling suspended screen and/or goggles) even with standard workloads. (paper)

  10. Cardiological-interventional therapy of coronary artery disease today

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynen, K.; Henssge, R.

    1999-01-01

    The current importance of the interventional therapy of coronary artery disease may be deduced from the exponential increase in procedures performed in Germany in the last decade - at least 125,840 in 1996. Today, by improved catheter and balloon materials as well as by growing experience of the cardiologists, even complex lesions may be treated. Limitations of balloon angioplasty include acute vessel closure and restenosis - newer angioplasty devices like directional or rotational atherectomy or excimer-laser angioplasty did not overcome these limitations; only by coronary stenting, acute vessel closure could be managed and the likelihood of restenosis - at least in particular groups of patients - could be reduced. For a few years, intracoronary brachytherapy of the segments dilated with beta- or gamma-emitters has been seeking to reduce restenosis rate; the department of cardiology of the Dresden Cardiovascular Institute is participating in such a multicentre study using the beta-emitter 188 renium. Further main topics of our department represent primary angioplasty in patients with acute myocardial infarction and invasive diagnostic or interventional procedures by the transradial approach. (orig.)

  11. Nuclear cardiology procedures to diagnose ischemia in coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kropp, J.

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear cardiology is equipped with a broad spectrum of diagnostic capabilities which allow the evaluation of ventricular performance, perfusion and metabolism of the heart. The principle of nuclear medicine procedures consists in the administration of free radioisotopes or radiopharmaceuticals to detect their spatial distribution within the body by detecting their y-rays from outside by gamma cameras. Myocardial perfusion scintigraphy is the most important procedure in nuclear cardiology and is performed on a routine basis with 201 Thallium-Chloride ( 201 Tl) since 1975. With the Single-Photon Emission Computerized Tomography (SPECT) technique it is possible to diagnose ischemia of the left ventricle on the basis of coronary artery disease with a sensitivity of 90-95% and a specificity of about 55%. Recently 99m Tc-tracers were developed for this purpose, which have many advantages due to their better physical properties, their easy handling and availability. The diagnostic accuracy is the same compared to ( 201 Tl). Free fatty acids labeled with 123 Iodine like 123 IPPA are alternative tracers to diagnose ischemia by the metabolic alteration and are pathognomonic tracers to diagnose the heart involvement in myopathies or metabolic defects related to fatty acid degradation which are the main fuel of the normal myocytes. Finally we should not forget the radionuclide ventriculography (RNVG) which is one of the oldest nuclear cardiology procedures providing us with very objective, reliable results of ventricular performance. (orig.)

  12. The value of independent specialty designation for interventional cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankenship, James C; Powell, Wayne A; Gray, Dawn R; Duffy, Peter L

    2017-01-01

    Interventional cardiology has finally completed, after 26 years of advocacy, a professional hat trick: independent board certification, membership as a unique specialty in the American Medical Association House of Delegates (AMA HOD), and recognition by the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS) as a separate medical specialty. This article points out how these distinctions for interventional cardiology and its professional society, the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI), have led to clear and definite benefits for interventional cardiologists and their patients. We focus on the least understood of these three-recognition by CMS and its implications for reimbursement and quality assessment for interventional cardiologists. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Evaluation of the technical and financial feasibility for the change of material of a platinum coil used in guidewires for interventional cardiology procedures in a company producing medical devices in Costa Rica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soto Guzman, Mariana

    2014-01-01

    An evaluation is made of the technical and financial feasibility for the change of material of a platinum coil used in guidewires for procedures of cardiological intervention in a company producing medical devices in Costa Rica. The proposed exchange rate on the product has already was marketed. A validation and verification of the design are performed again for the characteristics impacted, in addition to notify the regulatory bodies of the material change and have its prior approval commercialization of the modified product. A radiopacity study of the proposed materials is carried out to evaluate the materials as well as a consultation with suppliers approved by the company to verify the availability of candidate materials. The load of the palladium spring is evaluated with respect to the Platinum spring to three defined extensions and is determined. The project has proposed to save $663 897 for the Palladium coil and $739 175 for the 'A alloy' coil composed mainly of Palladium. The project can be developed according to the financial study, since the savings gains are greater than the investment made by the company for the execution of the product. Deeper radiopacity tests are recommended to perform. Comparison of the current spring with those proposed under fluoroscopy in the field of application. Suppliers' studies have shown that the percentage of visibility of palladium is decreased in the energetic environment in which medical interventions are carried out and the guidewires are used. (author) [es

  14. The establishment of local diagnostic reference levels for paediatric interventional cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFadden, S.; Hughes, C.; D'Helft, C.I.; McGee, A.; Rainford, L.; Brennan, P.C.; McCrum-Gardner, E.; Winder, R.J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is a paucity of information worldwide on radiation exposure in paediatric interventional cardiology. At present Nationally established Diagnostic Reference Levels exist for adult interventional cardiology procedures in the UK but little data is available for paediatrics. In addition, interventional cardiology has been identified as one the highest contributors to medical exposure to ionising radiation and children are more radiosensitive than adults. Objective: This study sought to determine current radiation dose levels in paediatric interventional cardiology (IC) with a view to establishing local diagnostic reference levels (LDRL). Methods: Radiation dose and examination details were recorded for 354 paediatric patients examined by IC in a specialised paediatric centre in Europe. Radiation doses were recorded using a Dose Area Product meter along with examination details. Procedures were categorised as either diagnostic (A) or therapeutic (B). Data was further sub-divided into five age ranges; (1) newborn <1 year (2) 1 <5 years (3) 5 <10 years (4) 10 <15 years (5) 15 years and over. Proposed LDRL were calculated from the mean dose area product readings. Results: The mean patient age was 2.6 years (range 0.0 days–16 years) and weight was 14.9 kg (range 2.4–112 kg). LDRL for the five age groupings were calculated as 190, 421, 582, 1289 and 1776 cGycm² respectively. Conclusion: Local dose reference levels have been proposed for paediatric IC and can be used as a benchmark for other hospitals to compare against their own radiation doses

  15. Staff lens doses in interventional urology. A comparison with interventional radiology, cardiology and vascular surgery values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vano, E; Fernandez, J M; Sanchez, R M; Resel, L E; Moreno, J

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate radiation doses to the lens of urologists during interventional procedures and to compare them with values measured during interventional radiology, cardiology and vascular surgery. The measurements were carried out in a surgical theatre using a mobile C-arm system and electronic occupational dosimeters (worn over the lead apron). Patient and staff dose measurements were collected in a sample of 34 urology interventions (nephrolithotomies). The same dosimetry system was used in other medical specialties for comparison purposes. Median and 3rd quartile values for urology procedures were: patient doses 30 and 40 Gy cm 2 ; personal dose equivalent Hp(10) over the apron (μSv/procedure): 393 and 848 (for urologists); 21 and 39 (for nurses). Median values of over apron dose per procedure for urologists resulted 18.7 times higher than those measured for radiologists and cardiologists working with proper protection (using ceiling suspended screens) in catheterisation laboratories, and 4.2 times higher than the values measured for vascular surgeons at the same hospital. Comparison with passive dosimeters worn near the eyes suggests that dosimeters worn over the apron could be a reasonable conservative estimate for ocular doses for interventional urology. Authors recommend that at least the main surgeon uses protective eyewear during interventional urology procedures. (paper)

  16. Occupational dose assessment in interventional cardiology in Serbia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaljevic, J.; Ciraj-Bjelac, O.; Stankovic, J.; Arandjic, D.; Bozovic, P.; Antic, V.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work is to assess the occupational dose in interventional cardiology in a large hospital in Belgrade, Serbia. A double-dosimetry method was applied for the estimation of whole-body dose, using thermoluminescent dosemeters, calibrated in terms of the personal dose equivalent H p (10). Besides the double-dosimetry method, eye dose was also estimated by means of measuring ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), and doses per procedure were reported. Doses were assessed for 13 physicians, 6 nurses and 10 radiographers, for 2 consequent years. The maximum annual effective dose assessed was 4.3, 2.1 and 1.3 mSv for physicians, nurses and radiographers, respectively. The maximum doses recorded by the dosemeter worn at the collar level (over the apron) were 16.8, 11.9 and 4.5 mSv, respectively. This value was used for the eye lens dose assessment. Estimated doses are in accordance with or higher than annual dose limits for the occupational exposure. (authors)

  17. Variation in radiographic protocols in paediatric interventional cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFadden, S L; Hughes, C M; Winder, R J

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work is to determine current radiographic protocols in paediatric interventional cardiology (IC) in the UK and Ireland. To do this we investigated which imaging parameters/protocols are commonly used in IC in different hospitals, to identify if a standard technique is used and illustrate any variation in practice. A questionnaire was sent to all hospitals in the UK and Ireland which perform paediatric IC to obtain information on techniques used in each clinical department and on the range of clinical examinations performed. Ethical and research governance approval was sought from the Office for Research Ethics Committees Northern Ireland and the individual trusts. A response rate of 79% was achieved, and a wide variation in technique was found between hospitals. The main differences in technique involved variations in the use of an anti-scatter grid and the use of additional filtration to the radiation beam, frame rates for digital acquisition and pre-programmed projections/paediatric specific programming in the equipment. We conclude that there is no standard protocol for carrying out paediatric IC in the UK or Ireland. Each hospital carries out the IC procedure according to its own local protocols resulting in a wide variation in radiation dose. (paper)

  18. Variation in radiographic protocols in paediatric interventional cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadden, S L; Hughes, C M; Winder, R J

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this work is to determine current radiographic protocols in paediatric interventional cardiology (IC) in the UK and Ireland. To do this we investigated which imaging parameters/protocols are commonly used in IC in different hospitals, to identify if a standard technique is used and illustrate any variation in practice. A questionnaire was sent to all hospitals in the UK and Ireland which perform paediatric IC to obtain information on techniques used in each clinical department and on the range of clinical examinations performed. Ethical and research governance approval was sought from the Office for Research Ethics Committees Northern Ireland and the individual trusts. A response rate of 79% was achieved, and a wide variation in technique was found between hospitals. The main differences in technique involved variations in the use of an anti-scatter grid and the use of additional filtration to the radiation beam, frame rates for digital acquisition and pre-programmed projections/paediatric specific programming in the equipment. We conclude that there is no standard protocol for carrying out paediatric IC in the UK or Ireland. Each hospital carries out the IC procedure according to its own local protocols resulting in a wide variation in radiation dose.

  19. Radiation dose and image quality for paediatric interventional cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vano, E.; Ubeda, C.; Leyton, F.; Miranda, P.

    2008-08-01

    Radiation dose and image quality for paediatric protocols in a biplane x-ray system used for interventional cardiology have been evaluated. Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) and image quality using a test object and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms have been measured for the typical paediatric patient thicknesses (4-20 cm of PMMA). Images from fluoroscopy (low, medium and high) and cine modes have been archived in digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) format. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), figure of merit (FOM), contrast (CO), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and high contrast spatial resolution (HCSR) have been computed from the images. Data on dose transferred to the DICOM header have been used to test the values of the dosimetric display at the interventional reference point. ESAK for fluoroscopy modes ranges from 0.15 to 36.60 µGy/frame when moving from 4 to 20 cm PMMA. For cine, these values range from 2.80 to 161.10 µGy/frame. SNR, FOM, CO, CNR and HCSR are improved for high fluoroscopy and cine modes and maintained roughly constant for the different thicknesses. Cumulative dose at the interventional reference point resulted 25-45% higher than the skin dose for the vertical C-arm (depending of the phantom thickness). ESAK and numerical image quality parameters allow the verification of the proper setting of the x-ray system. Knowing the increases in dose per frame when increasing phantom thicknesses together with the image quality parameters will help cardiologists in the good management of patient dose and allow them to select the best imaging acquisition mode during clinical procedures.

  20. Radiation dose and image quality for paediatric interventional cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vano, E [Radiology Department, Medicine School, Complutense University and San Carlos University Hospital, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Ubeda, C [Clinical Sciences Department, Faculty of the Science of Health, Tarapaca University, 18 de Septiembre 2222, Arica (Chile); Leyton, F [Institute of Public Health of Chile, Marathon 1000, Nunoa, Santiago (Chile); Miranda, P [Hemodynamic Department, Cardiovascular Service, Luis Calvo Mackenna Hospital, Avenida Antonio Varas 360, Providencia, Santiago (Chile)], E-mail: eliseov@med.ucm.es

    2008-08-07

    Radiation dose and image quality for paediatric protocols in a biplane x-ray system used for interventional cardiology have been evaluated. Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) and image quality using a test object and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms have been measured for the typical paediatric patient thicknesses (4-20 cm of PMMA). Images from fluoroscopy (low, medium and high) and cine modes have been archived in digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) format. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), figure of merit (FOM), contrast (CO), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and high contrast spatial resolution (HCSR) have been computed from the images. Data on dose transferred to the DICOM header have been used to test the values of the dosimetric display at the interventional reference point. ESAK for fluoroscopy modes ranges from 0.15 to 36.60 {mu}Gy/frame when moving from 4 to 20 cm PMMA. For cine, these values range from 2.80 to 161.10 {mu}Gy/frame. SNR, FOM, CO, CNR and HCSR are improved for high fluoroscopy and cine modes and maintained roughly constant for the different thicknesses. Cumulative dose at the interventional reference point resulted 25-45% higher than the skin dose for the vertical C-arm (depending of the phantom thickness). ESAK and numerical image quality parameters allow the verification of the proper setting of the x-ray system. Knowing the increases in dose per frame when increasing phantom thicknesses together with the image quality parameters will help cardiologists in the good management of patient dose and allow them to select the best imaging acquisition mode during clinical procedures.

  1. Advanced Imaging of Intracranial Atherosclerosis: Lessons from Interventional Cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davor Pavlin-Premrl

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial atherosclerosis is a major cause of ischemic stroke. Patients with a high degree of stenosis have a significant rate of stroke despite medical therapy. Two randomized trials of stenting have failed to show benefit. Improving periprocedural complication rates and patient selection may improve stenting outcomes. Fractional flow reserve (FFR, intravascular ultrasound (IVUS, and optical coherence tomography (OCT are intravascular imaging techniques employed to improve patient selection and stent placement in interventional cardiology. FFR has been shown to improve cardiovascular outcomes when used in patient selection for intervention. Studies of FFR in intracranial atherosclerosis show that the measure may predict which plaques lead to stroke. IVUS is used in cardiology to quantify stenosis and assist with stent placement. Comparisons with histology show that it can reliably characterize plaques. Several case reports of IVUS in intracranial arteries show the technique to be feasible and indicate it may improve stent placement. Plaque characteristics on IVUS may help identify vulnerable plaques. In interventional cardiology, OCT provides excellent visualization of vessel geometry and is useful periprocedurally. Images reliably identify thin-capped fibroatheromas and other plaque features. Case reports indicate that OCT is safe for use in intracranial arteries. OCT can be used to identify perforator vessels and so may be useful in avoiding perforator strokes, a common complication of stenting. Plaque characteristics on OCT may be useful in patient selection.

  2. Estimative of dose area product in interventional cardiology procedures: a literature review; Estimativa do produto dose-area em procedimentos de cardiologia intervencionista: uma revisao de literatura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Real, Jessica V.; Santos, Romulo R.; Luz, Renata M. da [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Hospital Sao Lucas. Servico de Fisica Medica; Friedrich, Barbara Q.; Silva, Ana Maria Marques da, E-mail: jessica.real@pucrs.br [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Faculdade de Fisica

    2014-08-15

    The aim of this work is to present a literature review of the values of dose area product (DAP) in coronary angiography (CA) and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA), achieved by papers pubMaria E. D.lished in the last ten years. The results shows that the average values of DAP decreased by 22.6% and 5.78% for CA and PTCA procedures, respectively, in comparison with the studies published in the last 5 and 10 years. It was found that these values are in accordance to the recommendations published by IAEA and NCRP Although there was a reduction along the years for the average values of DAP, the data highlight the need for further studies on reference levels, as large variability are observed. (author)

  3. The Information System on Occupational Exposure in Medicine, Industry and Research (ISEMIR): Interventional Cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-02-01

    In the last three decades, the use of image guided interventional procedures in cardiology has increased significantly, bringing great benefit to millions of patients around the world. As technology improves, the medical capabilities of these procedures continue to expand, adding further to the armamentarium for diagnosis and treatment of patients with cardiac problems. All of these procedures require health professionals (including interventional cardiologists, electrophysiologists, nurses and medical radiation technologists) to be present in the room and alongside the patient when radiation is being used, which may result in occupational exposure. While it has been long known that there is significant potential for health professionals in attendance during interventional cardiology to receive non-trivial occupational exposures, reported details have been typically limited to a few specific interventional cardiology facilities and situations. A more global perspective has been lacking, as is the availability of a systematic means for improving occupational radiation protection in interventional cardiology facilities throughout the world. In 2006, the IAEA published the Fundamental Safety Principles (IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SF-1), which sets out the fundamental safety objective and principles of protection and safety. In 2011, the IAEA published Radiation Protection and Safety of Sources: International Basic Safety Standards (IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GSR Part 3 (Interim Edition)), which sets out the requirements for meeting the fundamental safety objective and applying the principles specified in the Fundamental Safety Principles. The establishment of safety requirements and provision of guidance on occupational radiation protection is a major component of the support for radiation protection and safety provided by the IAEA to Member States. This publication was developed under the IAEA's statutory responsibility to facilitate worldwide application

  4. The current status of eye lens dose measurement in interventional cardiology personnel in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krisanachinda, Anchali; Srimahachota, Suphot; Matsubara, Kosuke

    2017-06-01

    Workers involved in interventional cardiology procedures receive high eye lens doses if radiation protection tools are not properly utilized. Currently, there is no suitable method for routine measurement of eye dose. In Thailand, the eye lens equivalent doses in terms of Hp(3) of the interventional cardiologists, nurses, and radiographers participating in interventional cardiology procedures have been measured at 12 centers since 2015 in the pilot study. The optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeter was used for measurement of the occupational exposure and the eye lens dose of 42 interventional cardiology personnel at King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital as one of the pilot centers. For all personnel, it is recommended that a first In Light OSL badge is placed at waist level and under the lead apron for determination of Hp(10); a second badge is placed at the collar for determination of Hp(0.07) and estimation of Hp(3). Nano Dots OSL dosimeter has been used as an eye lens dosimeter for 16 interventional cardiology personnel, both with and without lead-glass eyewear. The mean effective dose at the body, equivalent dose at the collar, and estimated eye lens dose were 0.801, 5.88, and 5.70 mSv per year, respectively. The mean eye lens dose measured by the Nano Dots dosimeter was 8.059 mSv per year on the left eye and 3.552 mSv per year on the right eye. Two of 16 interventional cardiologists received annual eye lens doses on the left side without lead glass that were higher than 20 mSv per year, the new eye lens dose limit as recommended by ICRP with the risk of eye lens opacity and cataract.

  5. OCCUPATIONAL DOSE DURING ADULT INTERVENTIONAL CARDIOLOGY: FIRST VALUES WITH PERSONAL ACTIVE DOSIMETERS IN CHILE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubeda, Carlos; Morales, Claudio; Gutiérrez, Diego; Oliveira, Marcus; Manterola, Carlos

    2018-05-11

    The objective of this article is to present initial occupational dose values using digital active personal dosimeters for medical staff during adult interventional cardiology procedures in a public hospital in Chile. Personal dose equivalent Hp(10) over the lead apron of physician, nurse and radiographer were measured during 59 procedures. Mean values of occupational dose Hp(10) per procedure were 47.6, 6.2 and 4.3 μSv for physician, nurse and radiographer, respectively. If no protective tools are used, physician dose can exceed the new eye lens dose limit.

  6. Characteristics of Highly Cited Articles in Interventional Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Shahzeb; Usman, Muhammad Shariq; Fatima, Kaneez; Hashmani, Nauman; Siddiqi, Tariq Jamal; Riaz, Haris; Khan, Abdur Rahman; Khosa, Faisal

    2017-12-01

    Citation classics have been published in many fields of medicine; however, none have focused on interventional cardiology. The goal of this study was to identify the top 100 articles in the field of interventional cardiology and highlight their important trends and characteristics. The Scopus database was used by 2 independent reviewers to extract the top 100 articles using a variety of keywords. We found articles published between 1953 and 2012. Majority (n = 78) of the top 100 articles were published between 1996 and 2010, and the United States was affiliated with the highest number of articles in our list (n = 68). Over half (n = 54) the articles were funded. Private funding was correlated with higher citations (p = 0.036). A third (n = 33) of the papers had authors with conflicts of interest; however, conflict of interest had no effect on citations (p = 0.837). Majority (n = 57) of the articles studied coronary angioplasty and stenting; followed by coronary angiography (n = 14). Women were underrepresented, with only 11 female first authors in the top 100 papers, and only 1 female in the list of top authors who had 5 or more publications. In conclusion, the following features define the typical highly cited article in interventional cardiology-a clinical trial conducted in the United States, which studies angioplasty, and has been published relatively recently in a high-impact journal by a male first author. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Protection against ionizing radiation by leaded glass googles during interventional cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zett-Lobos, Claudio; Vera Munoz, Felipe; Arriola Alvarez, Katerina; Diaz Ramos, Oscar; Gamarra, Jorge; Fernandez Palomo, Cristian; Merello, Lorenzo; Mora D, Alex; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Catalan Reyes, Monica; Ramos Avasola, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Background: It is not known whether leaded glass goggles with 0.25 mm Pb equivalency, used in interventional cardiology procedures, attenuate radiation below the levels established by the latest recommendation of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). Aim: To assess if the degree of attenuation of the secondary ionizing radiation achieved by the use of 0.25 mm Pb leaded glass goggles, in occupationally exposed workers in interventional cardiology procedures, meets the latest ICRP recommendations. Material and Methods : A prospective investigation was carried out to compare the eye exposure to secondary ionizing radiation received by occupationally exposed personnel in a 9 months period. A set of two thermo luminescent dosimeters was arranged in the front and back of leaded glass goggles in a cohort of seven members of an interventional cardiology service, exposed to 1057 consecutive procedures. Results:The monthly dose equivalent measurement performed in front of the goggles ranged between 1.1 and 6.5 mSv,for paramedics and interventional cardiologists. The radiation measured in the back of the glass varied between 0.66 and 2.75 mSv,respectively.The degree of attenuation of the dose at eye level ranged from 40% to 57.7%,respectively. The projected annual exposure would reach 33 mSv for the interventional cardiologist. Conclusions: With a similar load of work and wearing 0.25 mm Pb equivalent glass goggles, interventional cardiologists will exceed the crystalline equivalent dose limit recommended by the ICRP (20 mSv/year averaged over the past 5 years)

  8. Kerma rate evaluation in the air in a room interventional cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Real, Jessica V.; Luz, Renata M. da; Fröhlich, Bruna D.; Silva, Ana Maria Marques da

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the number of interventional cardiology procedures is increasing. However, due to the long time of fluoroscopy in these procedures, care teams can receive high doses of radiation. The radiation scattered by the patient is not uniform, and their assessment is of utmost importance. This study aimed to estimate and map the kerma rate in the air at the time of the gonads, in an interventional cardiology room, seeking to optimize the dose absorbed by individuals occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation. For data collection, the room was divided into quadrants of 1m 2 , totaling 40 collection points. The simulator was positioned so that its entry surface was located in the interventional reference point. Were chosen the conditions that simulate angiography and angioplasty procedures performed in the service. The data were obtained for height of 1 meter, gonad region. The results obtained for kerma rates in air, in quadrants, show that higher measured values was in the vicinity of the X-ray tube. Has been found that the medical staff are more exposed, because of its location during the procedure, around the table. The law of the inverse square distance of the farthest points of the X-ray tube were verified

  9. Automatic management system for dose parameters in interventional radiology and cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ten, J. I.; Fernandez, J. M.; Vano, E.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop an automatic management system to archive and analyse the major study parameters and patient doses for fluoroscopy guided procedures performed in cardiology and interventional radiology systems. The X-ray systems used for this trial have the capability to export at the end of the procedure and via e-mail the technical parameters of the study and the patient dose values. An application was developed to query and retrieve from a mail server, all study reports sent by the imaging modality and store them on a Microsoft SQL Server data base. The results from 3538 interventional study reports generated by 7 interventional systems were processed. In the case of some technical parameters and patient doses, alarms were added to receive malfunction alerts so as to immediately take appropriate corrective actions. (authors)

  10. Automatic management system for dose parameters in interventional radiology and cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten, J I; Fernandez, J M; Vaño, E

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop an automatic management system to archive and analyse the major study parameters and patient doses for fluoroscopy guided procedures performed in cardiology and interventional radiology systems. The X-ray systems used for this trial have the capability to export at the end of the procedure and via e-mail the technical parameters of the study and the patient dose values. An application was developed to query and retrieve from a mail server, all study reports sent by the imaging modality and store them on a Microsoft SQL Server data base. The results from 3538 interventional study reports generated by 7 interventional systems were processed. In the case of some technical parameters and patient doses, alarms were added to receive malfunction alerts so as to immediately take appropriate corrective actions.

  11. Doses received by organs in interventional cardiology; Les doses recues aux organes en cardiologie interventionnelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maccia, C. [Centre d' Assurance de qualite des Applications Technologiques dans le domaine de la Sante, (CAATS) - 43, Bd du Marechal Joffre, 92 - Bourg-La-Reine (France)

    2009-07-01

    After a discussion of several publications about patient dosimetry in interventional cardiology, the author recalls that the in vivo assessment of the dose received by some organs is uneasy because invasive. Therefore, the assessment requires the use of physical or mathematical dosimetric phantoms which simulate patient morphology as well as the incident photon attenuation phenomenon. He evokes some characteristics and applications of these phantoms. He outlines the different sources and origins of the dose received by the patient, and discusses results obtained by collecting data from 177 patients submitted to diagnosis or therapeutic procedures

  12. SFC/SFBMN guidelines update for nuclear cardiology procedures: stress testing in adults and children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manrique, A.; Marie, P.Y.; Maunoury, Ch.; Acar, Ph.; Agostini, D.

    2002-01-01

    The guidelines update for nuclear cardiology procedures are studied in this article. We find the minimum technique conditions for the stress testing practice, the recommendations for the different ischemia activation tests, the choice of the stress test. (N.C.)

  13. A study of the relationship between peak skin dose and cumulative air kerma in interventional neuroradiology and cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neil, S; Padgham, C; Martin, C J

    2010-01-01

    A study of peak skin doses (PSDs) during neuroradiology and cardiology interventional procedures has been carried out using Gafchromic XR-RV2 film. Use of mosaics made from squares held in cling film has allowed doses to the head to be mapped successfully. The displayed cumulative air kerma (CAK) has been calibrated in terms of cumulative entrance surface dose (CESD) and results indicate that this can provide a reliable indicator of the PSD in neuroradiology. Results linking PSD to CESD for interventional cardiology were variable, but CAK is still considered to provide the best option for use as an indicator of potential radiation-induced effects. A CESD exceeding 3 Gy is considered a suitable action level for triggering follow-up of patients in neuroradiology and cardiology for possible skin effects. Application of dose action levels defined in this way would affect 8% of neurological embolisation procedures and 5% of cardiology ablation and multiple stent procedures at the hospitals where the investigations were carried out. A close relationship was observed between CESD and dose-area product (DAP) for particular types of procedure, and DAPs of 200-300 Gy cm 2 could be used as trigger levels where CAK readings were not available. The DAP value would depend on the mean field size and would need to be determined for each application.

  14. Measurements of eye lens doses in interventional cardiology using OSL and electronic dosemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, R.M.; Vano, E.; Fernandez, J.M.; Ginjaume, M.; Duch, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to test the appropriateness of OSL and electronic dosemeters to estimate eye lens doses at interventional cardiology environment. Using TLD as reference detectors, personal dose equivalent was measured in phantoms and during clinical procedures. For phantom measurements, OSL dose values resulted in an average difference of 215 % vs. TLD. Tests carried out with other electronic dosemeters revealed differences up to ±20 % versus TLD. With dosemeters positioned outside the goggles and when TLD doses were >20 μSv, the average difference OSL vs. TLD was 29 %. Eye lens doses of almost 700 μSv per procedure were measured in two cases out of a sample of 33 measurements in individual clinical procedures, thus showing the risk of high exposure to the lenses of the eye when protection rules are not followed. The differences found between OSL and TLD are acceptable for the purpose and range of doses measured in the survey (authors)

  15. Evaluation of doses to staff involved in interventional cardiology in two Khartoum hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashir, M. K. A.

    2009-11-01

    In interventional cardiac procedures, staff operates near the patient in a non-uniformly scattered radiation field. Consequently, workers may receive, over a period of time, relatively high radiation doses. The measurement of individual doses to personnel becomes critical due to the use of protective devices and, as a consequence of the large number of methods proposed to assess the effective dose, In this study, staff doses were measured in two cardiac centers: Ahmed Gasim Hospital and Cardiac Center, Khartoum. The objective was to measure personal dose equivalent and accordingly estimate the effective dose which is received by staff in interventional cardiology. Measurements were performed using electronic personal dosimeters (EPDs) worn over lead apron during the examination and were read immediately following each examination. A total number of 40 radiation worker were monitored for a period of two weeks. The highest doses received by the cardiologist followed by nurses and then X-ray technicians. Staff received mean effective doses that ranged from 24 to 110 μSv estimated for four weeks. Recommendations on how to reduce staff doses in interventional cardiology are presented. (Author)

  16. Exposure of Medical Staff during Interventional Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osvay, M.; Turak, O.

    2013-01-01

    The medical staff during interventional procedures receives significant doses on their hands, or parts of their body not covered with protective shielding equipment, as they are close to X-rays field. It can be stated, that interventional radiology and cardiology have one of the highest doses among the X-ray diagnostic procedures. The radiologist use X-ray machine directly in the interventional procedures. The occupational dose is measured only by one Kodak film badge worn under the lead apron for the estimation of the effective dose in Hungary. Our lecture presents the results of dose measurements on eye lens, hands, knees using LiF thermoluminescent dosemeters on the medical staff of two Hungarian hospitals. Results suggest that wearing only one film badge (or other dosemeter system) under the lead apron does not provide proper information on the real occupational dose of medical staff.(author)

  17. Monitoring of doses to patients in interventional cardiology: first results from three Serbian hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciraj-Bjelac, Olivera; Arandjic, Danijela; Kosutic, Dushko

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work is to assess level of radiation dose to patients in interventional cardiology procedures in three large Serbian hospitals and to investigate possibility for setting of trigger levels if dose quantities exceed certain levels. Three dedicated interventional cardiology laboratories were included in the survey. Information on annual workload was estimated based on number of coronary angiography (CA) procedures and percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI). Patients doses were assessed in terms of air kerma area product (PKA) and air kerma in international reference point (KIRP). Results were compared with internationally proposed Diagnostic Reference Levels (DRL) and similar surveys results. Average total annual number of procedures was 820, 1100 and 2500 in three hospitals, respectively, while total number of dose measurements was 337. All three centers reported PKA values higher than 100 Gy·cm 2 and even values above 200 Gy·cm 2 , corresponding to 42% and 16% of all measurements. Measured KIRP value higher than 5 Gy was reported in one center, indicating that skin doses associated possibility of skin injuries were observed. PKA mean hospital values for CA ranged from 33 to 78 Gy·cm 2 and for PCI from 73 to 113 Gy·cm 2 , while associated vales for KIRP were: 0.45-1.2 Gy and 1.1-1.8 Gy, respectively. Comparison of obtained results with international DRL indicated that significant number of procedures is not optimally performed as in some centers more than a half of patients receive doses above DRL. The presented results are valuable input for dose optimization strategies and increased awareness related to importance of dose management. With respect to high dose values, risk for stochastic effects and tissue reactions, dose management methods were proposed. (Author)

  18. Occupational exposures from selected interventional radiological procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janeczek, J.; Beal, A.; James, D.

    2001-01-01

    The number of radiology and cardiology interventional procedures has significantly increased in recent years due to better diagnostic equipment resulting in an increase in radiation dose to the staff and patients. The assessment of staff doses was performed for cardiac catheterization and for three other non-cardiac procedures. The scattered radiation distribution resulting from the cardiac catheterization procedure was measured prior to the staff dose measurements. Staff dose measurements included those of the left shoulder, eye, thyroid and hand doses of the cardiologist. In non-cardiac procedures doses to the hands of the radiologist were measured for nephrostomy, fistulogram and percutaneous transluminal angioplasty procedures. Doses to the radiologist or cardiologist were found to be relatively high if correct protection was not observed. (author)

  19. Estimation of effective dose for children in interventional cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Sarycheva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is devoted to the estimation of effective dose for children undergoing interventional cardiology examinations. The conversion coefficients (CC from directly measured dose area product (DAP value to effective dose (ED were calculated within the approved effective dose assessment methodology (Guidelines 2.6.1. 2944-11. The CC, Ed K , [mSv / (Gy • cm2] for newborn infants and children of 1, 5, 10 and 15 years old (main(range were calculated as 2.5 (1.8-3.2; 1.1 (0.8-1.3; 0.6 (0.4-0.7; 0.4 (0.3-0.5; and 0,22 (0,18-0,30 respectively. A special Finnish computer program PCXMC 2.0 was used for calculating the dose CC. The series of calculations were made for different values of the physical and geometrical parameters based on their real-existing range of values. The value of CC from DAP to ED were calculated for all pediatric age groups. This work included 153 pediatric interventional studies carried out in two hospitals of the city of St. Petersburg for the period of one year from the summer of 2015. The dose CC dependency from the patient’s age and parameters of the examinations were under the study. The dependence from the beam quality (filtration and tube voltage and age of the patient were found. The younger is the patient, stronger is the filtration and higher is the voltage, the higher is the CC value. The CC in the younger (newborn and older (15 years age groups are different by the factor of 10. It was shown that the changes of the geometric parameters (in the scope of their real existing range have small effect on the value of the effective dose, not exceed 30-50% allowable for radiation protection purpose. The real values of effective doses of children undergoing cardiac interventions were estimated. In severe cases, the values of ED can reach several tens of mSv.

  20. Scatter radiation dose at height of the lens and image quality in interventional cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leguees, Fernando A. Leyton

    2016-01-01

    Cardiologist and other staff members receive high doses of scattered radiation. Cases of radiation-induced cataract among cardiology professionals have been reported in studies, estimates for the dose to eye lens ranged from 450 to 900 mSv per year (without ceiling suspended screen), over several years. Recent surveys regarding high prevalence of lens changes likely induced by radiation exposure suggest an urgent need for improved radiation safety and training, use of eye protection during catheterization procedures, and improved occupational dosimetry. In view of the evidence of radiation injuries, the ICRP recommends limiting the radiation dose to the lens to 20 mSv per year for occupational exposure. A system for optimizing the radiation exposure is the measurement of entrance surface air kerma (K a,e ) and kerma-area product (P KA ) for patient and scattered dose or dose rate at the position for the staff, under clinical working conditions using phantoms and defined technical factors. Correlating K a,e and P KA with the scatter dose, applying the attenuation factors protective devices can enable estimation of the lens doses for operators. The purpose of this work is: to study the possibility of establishing a procedure which is useful for scientific societies and the regulatory authority in the prevention and control of IOE dose and to control and improve the quality of procedures in interventional cardiology as an initiative to raise awareness and optimization of radiological protection. Measurements were taken in different cardiac laboratories. Clinical working conditions were reproduced during the experiments for the different hemodynamic angiographic projections and operating modes used in fluoroscopy and cine. A first K a,e rate reference proposal for the characterization of angiography for the different acquisition modes were 16; 35; 40 and 220 (mGy/min), respectively. Considering the typical PKA values to patient in interventional cardiology procedures

  1. Radiation doses to adult patients in interventional procedure: the first data for the Biobio region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ubeda, C.A.; Nocetti, D.A.; Robles, I.L.

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to estimate the levels of radiation to the patient in interventional cardiology procedures and neurological (diagnostic and therapeutic) in the main public hospital in Chile, in the region of Biobio

  2. Radiological protection optimization derived from radiation induced lesions in interventional cardiology finding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vano, E.; Arranz, L.; Sastre, J.M.; Ferrer, N.

    1997-01-01

    Interventional Cardiology is one of the specialties in which patients are submitted to the greatest radiation doses with x ray systems used for diagnostic purposes and then, it is also a specialty of high occupational radiation risk. In the last years, several cases of radiation induced lesions produced on patients derived of new complex interventional procedures have been described. As consequence, different rules for avoiding this kind of incidents have been recommended by International Organisations and regulatory Bodies. Nevertheless it has been devoted relatively few attention to the evaluation of the occupational risks that inevitably are also high in these facilities. In this work, some cases of radioinduced skin lesions produced on patients submitted to cardiac ablation procedures are described. Radiological protection considerations of interest for the regulatory Bodies are made, that permit to minimize the probability of these incidents, in what to the X-rays equipment is referred as well as to the operation procedures and level of radiation protection training of the medical specialists. (author)

  3. Analysis of occupational doses in interventional radiology and cardiology installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vano, E.; Gonzalez, L.; Ten, J.I.; Guibelalde, E.; Fernandez, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between patient dose (PD) and occupational dose (OD) is not easily predictable in interventional radiology installations due to a large number of factors which can modify the occupational risk (OR). In the present work an analysis is made of the four main aspects which influence OR, namely, x-ray beam used, radiation protection (RP) tools available (aprons, thyroid protectors, gloves, screens, etc) and their regular use, type and number of procedures performed (diagnostic or therapeutic, complexity level, etc), and RP training level of the specialists. High filtration x-ray beams can entail a decrease of 20% in OD. A regular use of ceiling mounted faceplates can involve dose savings up to 65%. Mean values of dose per procedure for interventional radiologists are something greater (about 15%) than those recorded for cardiologists, except for the dosimeters placed on left forearm and shoulder. The ratio between OD and PD range around 100 μSv/1,000 cGy.cm 2 . The influence of the staff RP training level on OD is difficult to assess. In the IC Service from the Madrid San Carlos University Hospital (SCUH), PD have been reduced in above 30% and OD in a factor of 3, after running some training programmes. (author)

  4. The foundation of NCVD PCI Registry: the Malaysia's first multi-centre interventional cardiology project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, H B; Rosli, M A; Wan Azman, W A; Robaayah, Z; Sim, K H

    2008-09-01

    The National Cardiovascular Database for Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (NCVD PCI) Registry is the first multicentre interventional cardiology project, involving the main cardiac centres in the country. The ultimate goal of NCVD PCI is to provide a contemporary appraisal of PCI in Malaysia. This article introduces the foundation, the aims, methodology, database collection and preliminary results of the first six-month database.

  5. Value of noninvasive diagnostic procedures in cardiology: typical findings in hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riebeling, V.; Bubenheimer, P.

    1984-01-01

    Routine chest X-ray often yields poor information for diagnosis of heart disease. The diagnostic value of invasive procedures in cardiology is generally accepted. The patient's as well as the physician's risk of the examination, however, has to be considered. A high number of heart diseases, e.g. hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) is mainly detected by noninvasive procedures such as auscultation, electrocardiography, phonomechanocardiography, echocardiography, physical manoeuvres, and pharmacological provocation tests. Typical findings in hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy are demonstrated. (orig.) [de

  6. Cardiac surgery or interventional cardiology? Why not both? Let's go hybrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papakonstantinou, Nikolaos A; Baikoussis, Nikolaos G; Dedeilias, Panagiotis; Argiriou, Michalis; Charitos, Christos

    2017-01-01

    A hybrid strategy, firstly performed in the 1990s, is a combination of tools available only in the catheterization laboratory with those available only in the operating room in order to minimize surgical morbidity and face with any cardiovascular lesion. The continuous evolution of stent technology along with the adoption of minimally invasive surgical approaches, make hybrid approaches an attractive alternative to standard surgical or transcatheter techniques for any given set of cardiovascular lesions. Examples include hybrid coronary revascularization, when an open surgical anastomosis of the left internal mammary artery to the left anterior descending coronary artery is performed along with stent implantation in non-left anterior descending coronary vessels, open heart valve surgery combined with percutaneous coronary interventions to coronary lesions, hybrid aortic arch debranching combined with endovascular grafting for thoracic aortic aneurysms, hybrid endocardial and epicardial atrial fibrillation procedures, and carotid artery stenting along with coronary artery bypass grafting. The cornerstone of success for all of these methods is the productive collaboration between cardiac surgeons and interventional cardiologists. The indications and patient selection of these procedures are still to be defined. However, high-risk patients have already been shown to benefit from hybrid approaches. Copyright © 2016 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Simulation based planning of surgical interventions in pediatric cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, Alison L.

    2013-10-01

    Hemodynamics plays an essential role in the progression and treatment of cardiovascular disease. However, while medical imaging provides increasingly detailed anatomical information, clinicians often have limited access to hemodynamic data that may be crucial to patient risk assessment and treatment planning. Computational simulations can now provide detailed hemodynamic data to augment clinical knowledge in both adult and pediatric applications. There is a particular need for simulation tools in pediatric cardiology, due to the wide variation in anatomy and physiology in congenital heart disease patients, necessitating individualized treatment plans. Despite great strides in medical imaging, enabling extraction of flow information from magnetic resonance and ultrasound imaging, simulations offer predictive capabilities that imaging alone cannot provide. Patient specific simulations can be used for in silico testing of new surgical designs, treatment planning, device testing, and patient risk stratification. Furthermore, simulations can be performed at no direct risk to the patient. In this paper, we outline the current state of the art in methods for cardiovascular blood flow simulation and virtual surgery. We then step through pressing challenges in the field, including multiscale modeling, boundary condition selection, optimization, and uncertainty quantification. Finally, we summarize simulation results of two representative examples from pediatric cardiology: single ventricle physiology, and coronary aneurysms caused by Kawasaki disease. These examples illustrate the potential impact of computational modeling tools in the clinical setting.

  8. Simulation-based planning of surgical interventions in pediatric cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, Alison

    2012-11-01

    Hemodynamics plays an essential role in the progression and treatment of cardiovascular disease. This is particularly true in pediatric cardiology, due to the wide variation in anatomy observed in congenital heart disease patients. While medical imaging provides increasingly detailed anatomical information, clinicians currently have limited knowledge of important fluid mechanical parameters. Treatment decisions are therefore often made using anatomical information alone, despite the known links between fluid mechanics and disease progression. Patient-specific simulations now offer the means to provide this missing information, and, more importantly, to perform in-silico testing of new surgical designs at no risk to the patient. In this talk, we will outline the current state of the art in methods for cardiovascular blood flow simulation and virtual surgery. We will then present new methodology for coupling optimization with simulation and uncertainty quantification to customize treatments for individual patients. Finally, we will present examples in pediatric cardiology that illustrate the potential impact of these tools in the clinical setting.

  9. Evaluating the importance of sham controlled trials in the investigation of medical devices in interventional cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Robert A; Capodanno, Davide; Mahfoud, Felix; Fajadet, Jean; Windecker, Stephan; Jüni, Peter; Baumbach, Andreas; Wijns, William; Haude, Michael

    2018-05-22

    Cardiovascular medicine is one of the specialties that has relied most heavily on evidence from randomized clinical trials in determining best practice for the management of common disease conditions. When comparing treatment approaches, trials incorporating random allocation are the most appropriate method for protecting against treatment allocation bias. In order to protect against performance and ascertainment bias, trial designs including placebo control are preferable where feasible. In contrast to testing of medicines, treatments based on procedures or use of medical devices are more challenging to assess, as sham procedures are necessary to facilitate blinding of participants. However, in many cases, ethical concerns exist, as individual patients allocated to sham procedure are exposed only to risk without potential for benefit. Accordingly, the potential benefits to the general patient population must be carefully weighed against the risks of the exposed individuals. For this reason, trial design and study conduct are critically important to ensure that the investigation has the best chance of answering the study question at hand. In the current manuscript, we aim to review issues relating to the conduct of sham-controlled trials and discuss a number of recent examples in the field of interventional cardiology.

  10. Radiation-induced eye lens changes and risk for cataract in interventional cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciraj-Bjelac, O; Rehani, M; Minamoto, A; Sim, K H; Liew, H B; Vano, E

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have reported a significant increase in eye lens opacities among staff in the cardiac catheterization laboratory but indicated further studies are needed to confirm the findings. To evaluate the prevalence of opacities in eyes of cardiologists, radiographers and nurses working in interventional cardiology. The eyes of 52 staff in interventional cardiology facilities and 34 age- and sex-matched unexposed controls were screened in a cardiology conference held in Kuala Lumpur by dilated slit-lamp examination, and posterior lens changes were graded. Individual cumulative lens X-ray exposures were calculated from responses to a questionnaire in terms of workload and working practice. The prevalence of posterior lens opacities among interventional cardiologists was 53%, while in nurses and radiographers it was 45%. Corresponding relative risks were 2.6 (95% CI: 1.2-5.4) and 2.2 (95% CI: 0.98-4.9), for interventional cardiologists and support staff, respectively. This study confirms a statistically significant increase in radiation-associated posterior lens changes in the eyes of interventional cardiology staff. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Comparative study between ultrasonography and optical coherence tomography in interventional cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanjul-Vélez, Félix; de la Torre-Hernández, José María; Ortega-Quijano, Noé; Zueco-Gil, José Javier; Arce-Diego, José Luis

    2009-07-01

    In this work, we present clinical images of IVUS and OCT in the evaluation of pharmacological stent endothelization. These preliminary imaging results are analyzed and compared in order to determine the ability of these technologies to visualize relevant intravascular features of interest in interventional cardiology. The results enable to compare the performance of both techniques and to evaluate their potential for clinical purposes.

  12. Benefits of an automatic patient dose registry system for interventional radiology and cardiology at five hospitals of the Madrid area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez-Soto, J.M.; Vano, E.; Sanchez, R.M.; Ten, J.I.; Espana, M.; Pifarre, X.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present the results of connecting the interventional radiology and cardiology laboratories of five university hospitals to a unique server using an automatic patient dose registry system (Dose On Line for Interventional Radiology, DOLIR) developed in-house, and to evaluate its feasibility more than a year after its introduction. The system receives and stores demographic and dosimetric parameters included in the MPPS DICOM objects sent by the modalities to a database. A web service provides a graphical interface to analyse the information received. During 2013, the system processed 10 788 procedures (6874 cardiac, 2906 vascular and 1008 neuro interventional). The percentages of patients requiring clinical follow-up due to potential tissue reactions before and after the use of DOLIR are presented. The system allowed users to verify in real-time, if diagnostic (or interventional) reference levels are fulfilled. (authors)

  13. Flat detector computed tomography in diagnostic and interventional pediatric cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moesler, J.; Dittrich, S.; Gloeckler, M.; Rompel, O.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: In this study the use of flat detector computed tomography (FD-CT) in the catheterization of patients with congenital heart disease was evaluated. Application reports were created for various issues based on the achieved image quality in diverse anatomical regions. Materials and Methods: FD-CT was applied in 176 cases during catheterization between January 2010 and April 2012. A five-point Likert scale ('essential' to 'misleading') was used to evaluate image quality. All cases were analyzed retrospectively and application reports for the visualization of the aorta, pulmonary arteries, pulmonary veins, semilunar valves, cavopulmonary connections and atrial baffles were generated. Contrast dye consumption and radiation dose were evaluated. Results: During the observation period FD-CT was applied in all 176 cases. The mean patient age was 7.0 years (0.01 - 42.53 years). The clinical value of FD-CT was rated superior to conventional angiography in 96.6 % of the cases and was never rated as 'misleading'. FD-CT was rated 'essential' in 3.4 % of all cases, 'very useful' in 77.3 % of all cases, 'useful' in 15.9 % of all cases and 'not useful' in 3.4 % of all cases. The mean dose-area product was 99 μGym 2 (19.3 - 1276.6 μGym 2 ), and the used contrast dye was 1.76 ml/kg (0.9 - 5 ml/kg). Application reports for the visualization of different anatomical regions are demonstrated. Conclusion: FD-CT is a new and auxiliary procedure in diagnostic and interventional catheterization of patients with congenital heart disease. Particularly extracardiac structures can be displayed in three-dimensional high resolution and be used for diagnosis, surgical planning and 3 D navigation. (orig.)

  14. Eye lens dosimetry in interventional cardiology: Results of staff dose measurements and link to patient dose levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antic, V.; Ciraj-Bjelac, O.; Rehani, M.; Aleksandric, S.; Arandjic, D.; Ostojic, M.

    2013-01-01

    Workers involved in interventional cardiology procedures receive high eye lens dose if protection is not used. Currently, there is no suitable method for routine use for the measurement of eye dose. Since most angiography machines are equipped with suitable patient dosemeters, deriving factors linking staff eye doses to the patient doses can be helpful. In this study the patient kerma-area product, cumulative dose at an interventional reference point and eye dose in terms of Hp(3) of the cardiologists, nurses and radiographers for interventional cardiology procedures have been measured. Correlations between the patient dose and the staff eye dose were obtained. The mean eye dose was 121 mSv for the first operator, 33 mSv for the second operator/nurse and 12 mSv for radiographer. Normalised eye lens doses per unit kerma-area product were 0.94 mSv Gy -1 cm -2 for the first operator, 0.33 mSv Gy -1 cm -2 for the second operator/nurse and 0.16 mSv Gy -1 cm -2 for radiographers. Statistical analysis indicated that there is a weak but significant (p < 0.01) correlation between the eye dose and the kerma-area product for all three staff categories. These values are based on a local practice and may provide useful reference for other studies for validation and for wider utilisation in assessing the eye dose using patient dose values. (authors)

  15. Interventional chest procedures in pregnancy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Morgan, Ross K

    2012-02-01

    Interventional pulmonology encompasses diagnostic and therapeutic bronchoscopic procedures, and pleural interventions. In the last 10 years older techniques have been refined and exciting new technologies have extended the reach and application of the instruments used. The main areas within pulmonary medicine for which these interventions have a role are malignant and nonmalignant airway disease, pleural effusion, pneumothorax, and artificial airways. There are no data from well-designed prospective trials to guide recommendations for interventional pulmonary procedures in pregnancy. The recommendations provided in this article are based on critical review of reported case series, opinion from recognized experts, and personal observations.

  16. Interventional chest procedures in pregnancy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Morgan, Ross K

    2011-03-01

    Interventional pulmonology encompasses diagnostic and therapeutic bronchoscopic procedures, and pleural interventions. In the last 10 years older techniques have been refined and exciting new technologies have extended the reach and application of the instruments used. The main areas within pulmonary medicine for which these interventions have a role are malignant and nonmalignant airway disease, pleural effusion, pneumothorax, and artificial airways. There are no data from well-designed prospective trials to guide recommendations for interventional pulmonary procedures in pregnancy. The recommendations provided in this article are based on critical review of reported case series, opinion from recognized experts, and personal observations.

  17. Estimated occupational dose in interventional procedures crystalline; Estimacion de la dosis ocupacional en el cristallino en procedimientos interveniconistas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portas Ferradas, B. C.; Chapel Gomez, M. L.; Jimenez Alarcon, J. I.

    2011-07-01

    This paper present the result of the estimated doses in the eyes of workers exposed for radiology procedures and interventional cardiology from measurements made with thermoluminescent dosimeter placed near the lens.

  18. MICROCIRCULATORY ISCHEMIA AND STATINS: LESSONS OF INTERVENTION CARDIOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An. A. Alexandrov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Review is devoted to the pathogenesis of microcirculatory ischemia. Microcirculatory dysfunction has been identified in different groups of patients including syndrome X, diabetes mellitus 2 type, coronary heart disease. In coronary patients after transluminal angioplasty microcirculatory dysfunction is the reason of phenomenon of “non-reflow”. In result the procedure of revascularization is less effective. Therapy by statins can be beneficial for patients with microcirculatory ischemia.

  19. Assessment of peak skin dose in interventional cardiology: A comparison between Gafchromic film and dosimetric software em.dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greffier, J; Van Ngoc Ty, C; Bonniaud, G; Moliner, G; Ledermann, B; Schmutz, L; Cornillet, L; Cayla, G; Beregi, J P; Pereira, F

    2017-06-01

    To compare the use of a dose mapping software to Gafchromic film measurement for a simplified peak skin dose (PSD) estimation in interventional cardiology procedure. The study was conducted on a total of 40 cardiac procedures (20 complex coronary angioplasty of chronic total occlusion (CTO) and 20 coronary angiography and coronary angioplasty (CA-PTCA)) conducted between January 2014 to December 2015. PSD measurement (PSD Film ) was obtained by placing XR-RV3 Gafchromic under the patient's back for each procedure. PSD (PSD em.dose ) was computed with the software em.dose©. The calculation was performed on the dose metrics collected from the private dose report of each procedure. Two calculation methods (method A: fluoroscopic kerma equally spread on cine acquisition and B: fluoroscopic kerma is added to one air Kerma cine acquisition that contributes to the PSD) were used to calculate the fluoroscopic dose contribution as fluoroscopic data were not recorded in our interventional room. Statistical analyses were carried out to compare PSD Film and PSD em.dose . The PSD Film median (1st quartile; 3rd quartile) was 0.251(0.190;0.336)Gy for CA-PTCA and 1.453(0.767;2.011)Gy for CTO. For method-A, the PSD em.dose was 0.248(0.182;0.369)Gy for CA-PTCA and 1.601(0.892;2.178)Gy for CTO, and 0.267(0.223;0.446)Gy and 1.75 (0.912;2.584)Gy for method-B, respectively. For the two methods, the correlation between PSD Film and PSD em.dose was strong. For all cardiology procedures investigated, the mean deviation between PSD Film and PSD em.dose was 3.4±21.1% for method-A and 17.3%±23.9% for method-B. The dose mapping software is convenient to calculate peak skin dose in interventional cardiology. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Intervention procedures for radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelstein, S.J.

    1991-01-01

    As in the case of smoking and lung cancer, for large radionuclide releases, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. On the other hand, we feel compelled to do something sensible after an accident even if the principal benefit of intervention may be to comfort the population at risk. Of course, for populations near the site of an accident, evacuation should be considered, but it is unreasonable to apply this measure to distant populations, e.g., large segments of the European community could not be moved about as we observe the shifting of a radioactive cloud in response to changing winds. If the radionuclides are delivered as particulates, bringing people indoors and employing primitive air filters can temporarily reduce exposures, but these stratagems are not very effective against gaseous or volatile elements. What, then, can be done for populations downwind of a radioactive release whose air, water, and/or food supply are, or are about to become contaminated? 5 refs

  1. Mapping intravascular ultrasound controversies in interventional cardiology practice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Maresca

    Full Text Available Intravascular ultrasound is a catheter-based imaging modality that was developed to investigate the condition of coronary arteries and assess the vulnerability of coronary atherosclerotic plaques in particular. Since its introduction in the clinic 20 years ago, use of intravascular ultrasound innovation has been relatively limited. Intravascular ultrasound remains a niche technology; its clinical practice did not vastly expand, except in Japan, where intravascular ultrasound is an appraised tool for guiding percutaneous coronary interventions. In this qualitative research study, we follow scholarship on the sociology of innovation in exploring both the current adoption practices and perspectives on the future of intravascular ultrasound. We conducted a survey of biomedical experts with experience in the technology, the practice, and the commercialization of intravascular ultrasound. The collected information enabled us to map intravascular ultrasound controversies as well as to outline the dynamics of the international network of experts that generates intravascular ultrasound innovations and uses intravascular ultrasound technologies. While the technology is praised for its capacity to measure coronary atherosclerotic plaque morphology and is steadily used in clinical research, the lack of demonstrated benefits of intravascular ultrasound guided coronary interventions emerges as the strongest factor that prevents its expansion. Furthermore, most of the controversies identified were external to intravascular ultrasound technology itself, meaning that decision making at the industrial, financial and regulatory levels are likely to determine the future of intravascular ultrasound. In light of opinions from the responding experts', a wider adoption of intravascular ultrasound as a stand-alone imaging modality seems rather uncertain, but the appeal for this technology may be renewed by improving image quality and through combination with

  2. A dedicated lab for interventional cardiology and hybrid surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, F. [KinderSpital Zurich (Switzerland). Department of Congenital Heart Disease/Pediatric Cardiology

    2004-07-01

    Pediatric interventionalists and surgeons treating congenital heart defects at the KinderSpital children's hospital in Zurich, Switzerland, use a ''hybrid'' approach to minimize the incidence and extent of open-heart surgery. The hybrid approach combines catheterization and surgical techniques in a single procedure, performed in the same lab. The combined cardiac cath lab/surgery suite is equipped with a Philips Integris Allura BH5000 9''/9'' biplane system, designed to meet all the requirements for pediatric applications, including the need to keep the quantity of contrast agent and the radiation dose to the minimum. Wherever possible, diagnostic X-ray examinations are supplemented by MR and Ultrasound. (orig.)

  3. Guidelines for radiation safety in interventional cardiology (JCS 2006)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagai, Ryozo; Awai, Kazuo; Iesaka, Yoshihito

    2006-01-01

    The guidelines are made for physicians in cardiovascular field who may be unfamiliar to radiation safety, to understand and know it easily. The introductory chapter describes the basic knowledge for management of radiation exposure and clinical feature of radiation-induced dermal damages like classification, clinical progress and case presentation. Following chapter is itemized, explained in a style of Q and A, and contains sections of; the fundamental knowledge's of radiation exposure management and of radiation skin damage, informed consent and measures for excessive exposure and skin damage crisis, factors influencing the exposure dose, contrivances to reduce the dose in patients, additional factors affecting the crisis of skin damage, contrivances to reduce the dose in medical personnel exposure, management of imaging instruments, methods to measure the exposure dose in patients, intervention in vessels other than the coronary artery, electro-physiological examinations and treatments, nuclear medical diagnoses, CT examinations, diagnosis and treatment of pregnant women, and present states in other countries. (T.I.)

  4. Eye lens radiation exposure in Greek interventional cardiology personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thrapsanioti, Zoi; Askounis, Panagiotis; Carinou, Eleftheria; Datseris, Ioannis; Diamanti, Ramza Anastasia; Papathanasiou, Miltiadis

    2017-01-01

    The lens of the eye is one of the radiosensitive tissues of the human body; if exposed to ionizing radiation can develop radiation-induced cataract at early ages. This study was held in Greece and included 44 Interventional Cardiologists (ICs) and an unexposed to radiation control group of 22 persons. Of the note, 26 ICs and the unexposed individuals underwent special eye examinations. The detected lens opacities were classified according to LOCS III protocol. Additionally, the lens doses of the ICs were measured using eye lens dosemeters. The mean dose to the lenses of the ICs per month was 0.83 ± 0.59 mSv for the left and 0.35 ± 0.38 mSv for the right eye, while the annual doses ranged between 0.7 and 11 mSv. Regarding the lens opacities, the two groups did not differ significantly in the prevalence of either nuclear or cortical lens opacities, whereas four ICs were detected with early stage subcapsular sclerosis. Though no statistically difference was observed in the cohort, the measured doses indicate that the eye doses received from the ICs can be significant. To minimize the radiation-induced risk at the eye lenses, the use of protective equipment and appropriate training on this issue is highly recommended. (authors)

  5. Local patient dose diagnostic reference levels in pediatric interventional cardiology in Chile using age bands and patient weight values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ubeda, Carlos, E-mail: cubeda@uta.cl [Medical Technology Department, Radiological Sciences Center, Health Sciences Faculty, Tarapaca University, Arica 1000000 (Chile); Miranda, Patricia [Hemodynamic Department, Cardiovascular Service, Luis Calvo Mackenna Hospital, Santiago 7500539 (Chile); Vano, Eliseo [Radiology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Complutense University and IdIS, San Carlos Hospital, Madrid 28040 (Spain)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: To present the results of a patient dose evaluation program in pediatric cardiology and propose local diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) for different types of procedure and age range, in addition to suggesting approaches to correlate patient dose values with patient weight. This study was the first conducted in Latin America for pediatric interventional cardiology under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency. Methods: Over three years, the following data regarding demographic and patient dose values were collected: age, gender, weight, height, number of cine series, total number of cine frames, fluoroscopy time (FT), and two dosimetric quantities, dose-area product (DAP) and cumulative dose (CD), at the patient entrance reference point. The third quartile values for FT, DAP, CD, number of cine series, and the DAP/body weight ratio were proposed as the set of quantities to use as local DRLs. Results: Five hundred and seventeen patients were divided into four age groups. Sample sizes by age group were 120 for <1 yr; 213 for 1 to <5 yr; 82 for 5 to <10 yr; and 102 for 10 to <16 yr. The third quartile values obtained for DAP by diagnostic and therapeutic procedures and age range were 1.17 and 1.11 Gy cm{sup 2} for <1 yr; 1.74 and 1.90 Gy cm{sup 2} for 1 to <5 yr; 2.83 and 3.22 Gy cm{sup 2} for 5 to <10 yr; and 7.34 and 8.68 Gy cm{sup 2} for 10 to <16 yr, respectively. The third quartile value obtained for the DAP/body weight ratio for the full sample of procedures was 0.17 (Gy cm{sup 2}/kg) for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Conclusions: The data presented in this paper are an initial attempt at establishing local DRLs in pediatric interventional cardiology, from a large sample of procedures for the standard age bands used in Europe, complemented with the values of the ratio between DAP and patient weight. This permits a rough estimate of DRLs for different patient weights and the refining of these values for the age bands when there

  6. Local patient dose diagnostic reference levels in pediatric interventional cardiology in Chile using age bands and patient weight values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ubeda, Carlos; Miranda, Patricia; Vano, Eliseo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To present the results of a patient dose evaluation program in pediatric cardiology and propose local diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) for different types of procedure and age range, in addition to suggesting approaches to correlate patient dose values with patient weight. This study was the first conducted in Latin America for pediatric interventional cardiology under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency. Methods: Over three years, the following data regarding demographic and patient dose values were collected: age, gender, weight, height, number of cine series, total number of cine frames, fluoroscopy time (FT), and two dosimetric quantities, dose-area product (DAP) and cumulative dose (CD), at the patient entrance reference point. The third quartile values for FT, DAP, CD, number of cine series, and the DAP/body weight ratio were proposed as the set of quantities to use as local DRLs. Results: Five hundred and seventeen patients were divided into four age groups. Sample sizes by age group were 120 for <1 yr; 213 for 1 to <5 yr; 82 for 5 to <10 yr; and 102 for 10 to <16 yr. The third quartile values obtained for DAP by diagnostic and therapeutic procedures and age range were 1.17 and 1.11 Gy cm 2 for <1 yr; 1.74 and 1.90 Gy cm 2 for 1 to <5 yr; 2.83 and 3.22 Gy cm 2 for 5 to <10 yr; and 7.34 and 8.68 Gy cm 2 for 10 to <16 yr, respectively. The third quartile value obtained for the DAP/body weight ratio for the full sample of procedures was 0.17 (Gy cm 2 /kg) for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Conclusions: The data presented in this paper are an initial attempt at establishing local DRLs in pediatric interventional cardiology, from a large sample of procedures for the standard age bands used in Europe, complemented with the values of the ratio between DAP and patient weight. This permits a rough estimate of DRLs for different patient weights and the refining of these values for the age bands when there may be large differences

  7. Prospective registry of percutaneous coronary interventions: Tyumen Cardiology Center’s experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В. А. Кузнецов

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI and to identify the factors impacting long-term prognosis.Methods. The register included 1018 patients who underwent PCI at Tyumen Cardiology Center from October 2012 to November 2013.Results. Hospital cardiovascular mortality rate was 0.8%, while that at 1-year follow-up amounted to 2%. Mortality was associated with age (OR = 1.005; 95% CI 1.003-1.103; p = 0.037, left ventricular ejection fraction (OR = 0.91; 95% CI 0.86-0.96; p = 0.001, left anterior descending artery lesions (OR = 4.73; 95% CI 1.06-21.04; p = 0.042, success of PCI (OR = 0.07; 95% CI 0.02-0.35; p = 0.001, hypodynamia (OR = 5.99; 95% CI 1.78-20.2; p = 0.004 and a low level of social support (OR = 0.41; 95% CI 0.20-0 82; p = 0.012. Main adverse cardio-cerebral events (MACCE were associated with the history of coronary artery bypass grafting (OR = 0.08; 95% CI 0.01-0.62; p = 0.016, PCI (OR = 1.66; 95 % CI 1.06-2.62; p = 0.028, SYNTAX score (OR = 1.07; 95% CI 1.04-1.09; p <0.001, success of PCI (OR = 0.33; 95% CI 0.13-0.82; p = 0.017.Conclusion. PCI is a safe and effective procedure for treatment of coronary heart disease, which results in low MACCE and mortality rates.

  8. Comparison of interventional cardiology in two European countries: a nationwide Internet based registry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudnason, T; Gudnadottir, G S; Lagerqvist, B; Eyjolfsson, K; Nilsson, T; Thorgeirsson, G; Thorgeirsson, G; Andersen, K; James, S

    2013-09-30

    The practice of interventional cardiology differs between countries and regions. In this study we report the results of the first nation-wide long-term comparison of interventional cardiology in two countries using a common web-based registry. The Swedish Coronary Angiography and Angioplasty Registry (SCAAR) was used to prospectively and continuously collect background-, quality-, and outcome parameters for all coronary angiographies (CA) and percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) performed in Iceland and Sweden during one year. The rate of CA per million inhabitants was higher in Iceland than in Sweden. A higher proportion of patients had CA for stable angina in Iceland than in Sweden, while the opposite was true for ST elevation myocardial infarction. Left main stem stenosis was more commonly found in Iceland than in Sweden. The PCI rate was similar in the two countries as was the general success rate of PCI, achievement of complete revascularisation and the overall stent use. Drug eluting stents were more commonly used in Iceland (23% vs. 19%). The use of fractional flow reserve (0.2% vs. 10%) and the radial approach (0.6% vs. 33%) was more frequent in Sweden than in Iceland. Serious complications and death were very rare in both countries. By prospectively comparing interventional cardiology in two countries, using a common web based registry online, we have discovered important differences in technique and indications. A discovery such as this can lead to a change in clinical practice and inspire prospective multinational randomised registry trials in unselected, real world populations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Occupational exposure to eye-lenses and extremities in interventional cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jankowski, Jerzy; Brodecki, Marcin; Kosmider, Maciej; Tylkowski, Michal

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Despite of very fast developments in the field of Interventional Cardiology, the level of doses received by medical staff is still substantial and therefore must be routinely controlled. The annual dose limits established by International Commission on Radiological Protection are monitored by the personal dosimeters worn under the lead apron. In this method the information about doses on uncovered body parts can be only approximated. Values obtained by means of ring or wrist dosimetry are also insufficient to provide basis for conclusions on the extremities doses received by medical staff. The main purpose of this study was to investigate radiation doses absorbed for eye-lenses and extremities to personnel participating in cardiac procedures. The doses were measured using highly sensitive thermoluminescent dosimeters (LiF: Mg, Cu, P), calibrated in Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory for X-ray beam typical of cardiac procedures. TLDs were placed in three locations: in a special band on eyebrow ridge, on a left ankle and on a left hand (finger's ring). Considerable amount of detectors used allowed determining the actual distribution of doses. Mean equivalent doses per procedure for Coronary Angiography (CAG) and Coronary Angiography with Percutaneous Transluminal Coronary Angioplasty (CAG+PTCA) were investigated. For CAG these values amounted to: on left eyebrow ridge from 80 μSv to 140 μSv, on right eyebrow ridge from 30 μSv to 75 μSv, on ankle from 80 μSv to 110 μSv and on hand from 190 μSv to 240 μSv, respectively. For CAG+PTCA the observed levels were: on left eyebrow ridge from 170 μSv to 240 μSv, on right eyebrow ridge from 60 μSv to 160 μSv, on ankle from 180 μSv to 270 μSv and on hand from 410 μSv to 590 μSv, respectively. The wild range of doses for both eyebrow ridges was especially visible and depend on operation position with respect to X-ray tube. The eye-lens doses will be measured using a Randoman anthropomorphic phantom

  10. Risk Aversion and Public Reporting. Part 1: Observations From Cardiac Surgery and Interventional Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahian, David M; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Badhwar, Vinay; D'Agostino, Richard S; Bavaria, Joseph E; Prager, Richard L

    2017-12-01

    Risk aversion is a potential unintended consequence of health care public reporting. In Part 1 of this review, four possible consequences of this phenomenon are discussed, including the denial of interventions to some high-risk patients, stifling of innovation, appropriate avoidance of futile interventions, and better matching of high-risk patients to more capable providers. We also summarize relevant observational clinical reports and survey results from cardiovascular medicine and surgery, the two specialties from which almost all risk aversion observations have been derived. Although these demonstrate that risk aversion does occur, the empirical data are much more consistent and compelling for interventional cardiology than for cardiac surgery. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. An audit of diagnostic reference levels in interventional cardiology and radiology: Are there differences between academic and non-academic centres?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samara, E. T.; Aroua, A.; De palma, R.; Stauffer, J. C.; Schmidt, S.; Trueb, P. R.; Stuessi, A.; Treier, R.; Bochud, F.; Verdun, F. R.

    2012-01-01

    A wide variation in patient exposure has been observed in interventional radiology and cardiology. The purpose of this study was to investigate the patient dose from fluoroscopy-guided procedures performed in non-academic centres when compared with academic centres. Four procedures (coronary angiography, percutaneous coronary intervention, angiography of the lower limbs and percutaneous transluminal angioplasty of the lower limbs) were evaluated. Data on the dose-area product, fluoroscopy time and number of images for 1000 procedures were obtained from 23 non-academic centres and compared with data from 5 academic centres. No differences were found for cardiology procedures performed in non-academic centres versus academic ones. However, significantly lower doses were delivered to patients for procedures of the lower limbs when they were performed in non-academic centres. This may be due to more complex procedures performed in the academic centres. Comparison between the centres showed a great variation in the patient dose for these lower limb procedures. (authors)

  12. Influence of Ceiling Suspended Screen Positioning to the Scatter Radiation Levels in Interventional Cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arandjic, D.; Bozovic, P.; Ciraj-Bjelac, O.; Antic, V.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to identify the effects of the ceiling suspended screen position to the scatter radiation levels in the interventional cardiology. The scatter radiation in terms of ambient dose equivalent H * (10) was measured for various positions of protective screen in the positions of the first operator, nurse and radiographer, at elevations 100-190 cm and in four different angulations of the x-ray tube. To assess the effectiveness of the protective screen, the scattered dose was also measured in the absence of any protection in all four angulations and elevations. To simulate real clinical situation the measurements were performed in the presence of 30 cm PMMA phantom using standard clinical protocol. The utility of protective screen varied for different positions and angulations. Scatter radiation levels varied in the range 70 - 3400 μSv/h for the first operator, 140 - 3200 μSv/h for the nurse and 50 - 560 μSv/h for radiographer. Ceiling suspended screens can provide a substantial level of protection (up to factor 18) in interventional cardiology, but they have to be properly managed and positioned to achieve sufficient level of protection. The guidance for optimal protection is provided in the paper.(author)

  13. Distribution of kerma rate in the air inside of hemodynamic room for typical projections of interventionist cardiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, Mirtha Elizabet Gamarra

    2008-01-01

    The evaluation of dose to physicians involved in Interventional Cardiology (IC) is an extreme important matter due to the high and non-uniform distribution of dose values. The radiation control during each procedure is complex and the reasons for the high exposures have many different causes. Many international recommendations have already been written aiming the radiation protection optimization in IC. In Brazil, there is not any special orientation for the protection of those occupational persons, nor a specific legislation. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the air kerma rate at critical anatomic regions of the occupationally exposed staff that carry out IC procedures, in representative incidences in order to give subsidies for individual monitoring procedures implementation and to give more information about their radiation protection. The air kerma rate has been measured in the often used condition in the two more common IC procedures namely angiography and coronary angioplasty, using an adult patient simulator irradiated under RAO, LAO and AP projections for fluoro and digital acquisition modes. The measurements have been made in 45 points around the examination table at 5 different representatives heights of: eyes lens, thorax, hands, gonads and knees. AP projection shows the smaller scattered radiation contributions and a more homogeneous exposure distribution. The digital acquisition mode gives air kerma rates about 4 times higher than fluoro mode for LAO projection in the position occupied by the interventionist doctor, the anesthetist and the nursing staff. The most critical anatomic regions are: knees and gonads (without protection). On the physician hands position, values as high as 5 mGy/h have been measured, which can overpass, depending on the number of procedures done, the individual occupational annual limit. Therefore, in IC it is necessary to implement additional protection tools, elaborate safety guides (based on international experiences

  14. Kerma rate evaluation in the air in a room interventional cardiology; Avaliacao da taxa de Kerma no ar em uma sala de cardiologia intervencionista

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Real, Jessica V.; Luz, Renata M. da, E-mail: jessica.real@pucrs.br, E-mail: renata.luz@pucrs.br [Hospital Sao Lucas (HSL/PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Fröhlich, Bruna D.; Silva, Ana Maria Marques da, E-mail: bruna.frohlich@acad.pucrs.br, E-mail: ana.marques@pucrs.br [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    In recent years, the number of interventional cardiology procedures is increasing. However, due to the long time of fluoroscopy in these procedures, care teams can receive high doses of radiation. The radiation scattered by the patient is not uniform, and their assessment is of utmost importance. This study aimed to estimate and map the kerma rate in the air at the time of the gonads, in an interventional cardiology room, seeking to optimize the dose absorbed by individuals occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation. For data collection, the room was divided into quadrants of 1m{sup 2}, totaling 40 collection points. The simulator was positioned so that its entry surface was located in the interventional reference point. Were chosen the conditions that simulate angiography and angioplasty procedures performed in the service. The data were obtained for height of 1 meter, gonad region. The results obtained for kerma rates in air, in quadrants, show that higher measured values was in the vicinity of the X-ray tube. Has been found that the medical staff are more exposed, because of its location during the procedure, around the table. The law of the inverse square distance of the farthest points of the X-ray tube were verified.

  15. Cardiological-interventional therapy of coronary artery disease today; Kardiologisch-interventionelle Therapie der koronaren Herzerkrankung heute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynen, K.; Henssge, R. [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Klinik fuer Kardiologie

    1999-07-01

    The current importance of the interventional therapy of coronary artery disease may be deduced from the exponential increase in procedures performed in Germany in the last decade - at least 125,840 in 1996. Today, by improved catheter and balloon materials as well as by growing experience of the cardiologists, even complex lesions may be treated. Limitations of balloon angioplasty include acute vessel closure and restenosis - newer angioplasty devices like directional or rotational atherectomy or excimer-laser angioplasty did not overcome these limitations; only by coronary stenting, acute vessel closure could be managed and the likelihood of restenosis - at least in particular groups of patients - could be reduced. For a few years, intracoronary brachytherapy of the segments dilated with beta- or gamma-emitters has been seeking to reduce restenosis rate; the department of cardiology of the Dresden Cardiovascular Institute is participating in such a multicentre study using the beta-emitter {sup 188}renium. Further main topics of our department represent primary angioplasty in patients with acute myocardial infarction and invasive diagnostic or interventional procedures by the transradial approach. (orig.)

  16. Paediatric interventional cardiology: flat detector versus image intensifier using a test object

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vano, E.; Ubeda, C.; Martinez, L. C.; Leyton, F.; Miranda, P.

    2010-12-01

    Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) values and image quality parameters were measured and compared for two biplane angiography x-ray systems dedicated to paediatric interventional cardiology, one equipped with image intensifiers (II) and the other one with dynamic flat detectors (FDs). Polymethyl methacrylate phantoms of different thicknesses, ranging from 8 to 16 cm, and a Leeds TOR 18-FG test object were used. The parameters of the image quality evaluated were noise, signal-difference-to-noise ratio (SdNR), high contrast spatial resolution (HCSR) and three figures of merit combining entrance doses and signal-to-noise ratios or HCSR. The comparisons showed a better behaviour of the II-based system in the low contrast region over the whole interval of thicknesses. The FD-based system showed a better performance in HCSR. The FD system evaluated would need around two times more dose than the II system evaluated to reach a given value of SdNR; moreover, a better spatial resolution was measured (and perceived in conventional monitors) for the system equipped with flat detectors. According to the results of this paper, the use of dynamic FD systems does not lead to an automatic reduction in ESAK or to an automatic improvement in image quality by comparison with II systems. Any improvement also depends on the setting of the x-ray systems and it should still be possible to refine these settings for some of the dynamic FDs used in paediatric cardiology.

  17. Paediatric interventional cardiology: flat detector versus image intensifier using a test object

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vano, E [Radiology Department, Medicine School, Complutense University and San Carlos University Hospital, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Ubeda, C [Clinical Sciences Department, Faculty of the Science of Health and CIHDE, Tarapaca University, 18 de Septiembre 2222, Arica (Chile); Martinez, L C [Medical Physics and Radiation Protection Service, 12 de Octubre University Hospital, Madrid (Spain); Leyton, F [Institute of Public Health of Chile, Marathon 1000, Nunoa, Santiago (Chile); Miranda, P, E-mail: eliseov@med.ucm.e [Hemodynamic Department, Cardiovascular Service, Luis Calvo Mackenna Hospital, Avenida Antonio Varaas 360, Providencia, Santiago (Chile)

    2010-12-07

    Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) values and image quality parameters were measured and compared for two biplane angiography x-ray systems dedicated to paediatric interventional cardiology, one equipped with image intensifiers (II) and the other one with dynamic flat detectors (FDs). Polymethyl methacrylate phantoms of different thicknesses, ranging from 8 to 16 cm, and a Leeds TOR 18-FG test object were used. The parameters of the image quality evaluated were noise, signal-difference-to-noise ratio (SdNR), high contrast spatial resolution (HCSR) and three figures of merit combining entrance doses and signal-to-noise ratios or HCSR. The comparisons showed a better behaviour of the II-based system in the low contrast region over the whole interval of thicknesses. The FD-based system showed a better performance in HCSR. The FD system evaluated would need around two times more dose than the II system evaluated to reach a given value of SdNR; moreover, a better spatial resolution was measured (and perceived in conventional monitors) for the system equipped with flat detectors. According to the results of this paper, the use of dynamic FD systems does not lead to an automatic reduction in ESAK or to an automatic improvement in image quality by comparison with II systems. Any improvement also depends on the setting of the x-ray systems and it should still be possible to refine these settings for some of the dynamic FDs used in paediatric cardiology.

  18. Measurements of eye lens doses in interventional radiology and cardiology: Final results of the ORAMED project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanhavere, F.; Carinou, E.; Domienik, J.; Donadille, L.; Ginjaume, M.; Gualdrini, G.; Koukorava, C.; Krim, S.; Nikodemova, D.; Ruiz-Lopez, N.; Sans-Merce, M.; Struelens, L.

    2011-01-01

    Within the ORAMED project (Optimization of Radiation Protection of Medical Staff) a coordinated measurement program for occupationally exposed medical staff was performed in different hospitals in Europe ( (www.oramed-fp7.eu)). The main objective was to obtain a set of standardized data on extremity and eye lens doses for staff involved in interventional radiology and cardiology and to optimize radiation protection. Special attention was given to the measurement of the doses to the eye lenses. In this paper an overview will be given of the measured eye lens doses and the main influence factors for these doses. The measured eye lens doses are extrapolated to annual doses. The extrapolations showed that monitoring of the eye lens should be performed on routine basis.

  19. First results of an eye lens dosimetry survey in an interventional cardiology department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, P; Mariotti, F; Campani, L; Castelluccio, D M; Pierotti, L; Pettinato, C; Golfieri, R; Marzocchi, A; De Palma, A

    2015-01-01

    The eye lens annual dose limit for exposed personnel to ionizing radiation has recently been revised by the ICRP—International Commission on Radiological Protection and the proposed new limit has been accepted by European legislation through the Council Directive 2013/59/EURATOM 2013.Among medical exposed personnel, the staff performing interventional cardiology are usually affected by relevant doses. For this reason a survey, employing dosemeters characterized in terms of H p (3), was performed in order to get the order of magnitude of the doses received by the eye lens, at least as a first guess.The survey showed that the annual dose limit can easily be reached if a proper radiation protection approach is not implemented. (practical matter)

  20. Local patient dose diagnostic reference levels in pediatric interventional cardiology in Chile using age bands and patient weight values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubeda, Carlos; Miranda, Patricia; Vano, Eliseo

    2015-02-01

    To present the results of a patient dose evaluation program in pediatric cardiology and propose local diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) for different types of procedure and age range, in addition to suggesting approaches to correlate patient dose values with patient weight. This study was the first conducted in Latin America for pediatric interventional cardiology under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency. Over three years, the following data regarding demographic and patient dose values were collected: age, gender, weight, height, number of cine series, total number of cine frames, fluoroscopy time (FT), and two dosimetric quantities, dose-area product (DAP) and cumulative dose (CD), at the patient entrance reference point. The third quartile values for FT, DAP, CD, number of cine series, and the DAP/body weight ratio were proposed as the set of quantities to use as local DRLs. Five hundred and seventeen patients were divided into four age groups. Sample sizes by age group were 120 for bands used in Europe, complemented with the values of the ratio between DAP and patient weight. This permits a rough estimate of DRLs for different patient weights and the refining of these values for the age bands when there may be large differences in child size. These DRLs were obtained at the largest pediatric hospital in Chile, with an active optimization program, and could be used by other hospitals in the Latin America region to compare their current patient dose values and determine whether corrective action is appropriate. © 2015 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  1. Maximum skin dose assessment in interventional cardiology: large area detectors and calculation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quail, E.; Petersol, A.

    2002-01-01

    Advances in imaging technology have facilitated the development of increasingly complex radiological procedures for interventional radiology. Such interventional procedures can involve significant patient exposure, although often represent alternatives to more hazardous surgery or are the sole method for treatment. Interventional radiology is already an established part of mainstream medicine and is likely to expand further with the continuing development and adoption of new procedures. Between all medical exposures, interventional radiology is first of the list of the more expansive radiological practice in terms of effective dose per examination with a mean value of 20 mSv. Currently interventional radiology contribute 4% to the annual collective dose, in spite of contributing to total annual frequency only 0.3% but considering the perspectives of this method can be expected a large expansion of this value. In IR procedures the potential for deterministic effects on the skin is a risk to be taken into account together with stochastic long term risk. Indeed, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in its publication No 85, affirms that the patient dose of priority concern is the absorbed dose in the area of skin that receives the maximum dose during an interventional procedure. For the mentioned reasons, in IR it is important to give to practitioners information on the dose received by the skin of the patient during the procedure. In this paper maximum local skin dose (MSD) is called the absorbed dose in the area of skin receiving the maximum dose during an interventional procedure

  2. Transradial access: lessons learned from cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snelling, Brian M; Sur, Samir; Shah, Sumedh Subodh; Marlow, Megan M; Cohen, Mauricio G; Peterson, Eric C

    2018-05-01

    Innovations in interventional cardiology historically predate those in neuro-intervention. As such, studying trends in interventional cardiology can be useful in exploring avenues to optimise neuro-interventional techniques. One such cardiology innovation has been the steady conversion of arterial puncture sites from transfemoral access (TFA) to transradial access (TRA), a paradigm shift supported by safety benefits for patients. While neuro-intervention has unique anatomical challenges, the access itself is identical. As such, examining the extensive cardiology literature on the radial approach has the potential to offer valuable lessons for the neuro-interventionalist audience who may be unfamiliar with this body of work. Therefore, we present here a report, particularly for neuro-interventionalists, regarding the best practices for TRA by reviewing the relevant cardiology literature. We focused our review on the data most relevant to our audience, namely that surrounding the access itself. By reviewing the cardiology literature on metrics such as safety profiles, cost and patient satisfaction differences between TFA and TRA, as well as examining the technical nuances of the procedure and post-procedural care, we hope to give physicians treating complex cerebrovascular disease a broader data-driven understanding of TRA. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  3. Present state of nuclear cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, T.; Moser, E.

    1994-01-01

    Unlike other techniques, nuclear cardiologic imaging enables evaluation of cardiac function employing radioactive tracers. This procedure can be used to assess myocardial blood flow, metabolism, viability, cardiac innervation and receptor status. Therefore, this noninvasive imaging modality can be regarded as supplementary to the screening methods in cardiology and also to angiography. General clinical use was not possible until the rapid development of nuclear medicine in the fifties began. With increasing wide-spread of positron emission tomography more detailed information on metabolic tissue characterization can be expected and will be of enormous relevance in clinical decision making and in selecting patients for interventions. (orig.) [de

  4. Simulation-based training for cardiology procedures: Are we any further forward in evidencing real-world benefits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Christopher M; Gosai, Jivendra N

    2017-04-01

    Simulation-based training as an educational tool for healthcare professionals continues to grow in sophistication, scope, and usage. There have been a number of studies demonstrating the utility of the technique, and it is gaining traction as part of the training curricula for the next generation of cardiologists. In this review, we focus on the recent literature for the efficacy of simulation for practical procedures specific to cardiology, focusing on transesophageal echocardiography, cardiac catheterization, coronary angioplasty, and electrophysiology. A number of studies demonstrated improved performance by those trained using SBT when compared to other methods, although evidence of this leading to an improvement in patient outcomes remains scarce. We discuss this evidence, and the implications for practice for training in cardiology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Extremity doses of medical staff involved in interventional radiology and cardiology: Correlations and annual doses (hands and legs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krim, S.; Brodecki, M.; Carinou, E.; Donadille, L.; Jankowski, J.; Koukorava, C.; Dominiek, J.; Nikodemova, D.; Ruiz-Lopez, N.; Sans-Merce, M.; Struelens, L.; Vanhavere, F.

    2011-01-01

    An intensive measurement campaign was launched in different hospitals in Europe within work package 1 of the ORAMED project (Optimization of RAdiation protection for MEDical staff). Its main objective was to obtain a set of standardized data on extremity and eye lens doses for staff in interventional radiology (IR) and cardiology (IC) and to optimize staff protection. The monitored procedures were divided in three main categories: cardiac, general angiography and endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography(ERCP) procedures. Using a common measurement protocol, information such as the protective equipment used (lead table curtain, transparent lead glass ceiling screen, patient shielding, whole body shielding or special cabin etc.) as well as Kerma Area Product (KAP) values and access of the catheter were recorded. This study was performed with a final database of more than 1300 procedures performed in 34 European hospitals. Its objectives were firstly to determine if the measured extremity doses could be correlated to the KAP values; secondly to check if the doses to the eyes could be linked to the doses to the hands (finger or wrist positions) and finally if the doses to the fingers could be estimated based on the doses to the wrists. General correlations were very difficult to find and their strength was mostly influenced by three main parameters: the X-ray tube configuration, the room collective radioprotective equipment and the access of the catheter. The KAP value can provide a simple mean to estimate the extremity doses of the operator given that it is assessed correctly for the operator when he is actually using the X-ray tube. Moreover, this study showed that the doses to the left finger are strongly correlated to the doses to the left wrist when no ceiling shield is used. It is also possible to estimate the doses to the eyes given the doses to the left finger or left wrist but the X-ray tube configuration and the access have to be considered. The annual

  6. Recommendations to reduce extremity and eye lens doses in interventional radiology and cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carinou, E.; Brodecki, M.; Domienik, J.; Donadille, L.; Koukorava, C.; Krim, S.; Nikodemová, D.; Ruiz-Lopez, N.; Sans-Merce, M.; Struelens, L.; Vanhavere, F.

    2011-01-01

    The main aim of the Work Package 1 (WP1) of the ORAMED project, Collaborative Project (2008–2011), supported by the European Commission within its 7th Framework Programme, was to obtain a set of standardized data on extremity and eye lens doses for staff in interventional radiology and cardiology (IR/IC) workplaces and to recommend a series of guidelines on radiation protection in order to both guarantee and optimize staff protection. Within the project, coordinated measurements were performed in 34 hospitals in 6 European countries. Furthermore, simulations of the most representative workplaces in IR and IC were performed to determine the main parameters that influence the extremity and eye lens doses. The work presented in this paper shows the recommendations that were formulated by the results obtained from both measurements and simulations. The presented guidelines are directed to operators, assistant personnel, radiation protection officers and medical physics experts. They concern radiation protection issues, such as the use of room protective equipment, as well as the positioning of the extremity and eye lens dosemeters for routine monitoring.

  7. Automated volume of interest delineation and rendering of cone beam CT images in interventional cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Cristian; Schäfer, Dirk; Eshuis, Peter; Carroll, John; Grass, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Interventional C-arm systems allow the efficient acquisition of 3D cone beam CT images. They can be used for intervention planning, navigation, and outcome assessment. We present a fast and completely automated volume of interest (VOI) delineation for cardiac interventions, covering the whole visceral cavity including mediastinum and lungs but leaving out rib-cage and spine. The problem is addressed in a model based approach. The procedure has been evaluated on 22 patient cases and achieves an average surface error below 2mm. The method is able to cope with varying image intensities, varying truncations due to the limited reconstruction volume, and partially with heavy metal and motion artifacts.

  8. Scatter radiation dose at height of the lens and image quality in interventional cardiology; Nivel de radiacao na altura do cristalino em cardiologia intervencionista

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leguees, Fernando A. Leyton

    2016-07-01

    Cardiologist and other staff members receive high doses of scattered radiation. Cases of radiation-induced cataract among cardiology professionals have been reported in studies, estimates for the dose to eye lens ranged from 450 to 900 mSv per year (without ceiling suspended screen), over several years. Recent surveys regarding high prevalence of lens changes likely induced by radiation exposure suggest an urgent need for improved radiation safety and training, use of eye protection during catheterization procedures, and improved occupational dosimetry. In view of the evidence of radiation injuries, the ICRP recommends limiting the radiation dose to the lens to 20 mSv per year for occupational exposure. A system for optimizing the radiation exposure is the measurement of entrance surface air kerma (K{sub a,e}) and kerma-area product (P{sub KA}) for patient and scattered dose or dose rate at the position for the staff, under clinical working conditions using phantoms and defined technical factors. Correlating K{sub a,e} and P{sub KA} with the scatter dose, applying the attenuation factors protective devices can enable estimation of the lens doses for operators. The purpose of this work is: to study the possibility of establishing a procedure which is useful for scientific societies and the regulatory authority in the prevention and control of IOE dose and to control and improve the quality of procedures in interventional cardiology as an initiative to raise awareness and optimization of radiological protection. Measurements were taken in different cardiac laboratories. Clinical working conditions were reproduced during the experiments for the different hemodynamic angiographic projections and operating modes used in fluoroscopy and cine. A first K{sub a,e} rate reference proposal for the characterization of angiography for the different acquisition modes were 16; 35; 40 and 220 (mGy/min), respectively. Considering the typical PKA values to patient in interventional

  9. Glove Perforations During Interventional Radiological Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leena, R. V.; Shyamkumar, N. K.

    2010-01-01

    Intact surgical gloves are essential to avoid contact with blood and other body fluids. The objective of this study was to estimate the incidence of glove perforations during interventional radiological procedures. In this study, a total of 758 gloves used in 94 interventional radiological procedures were examined for perforations. Eleven perforations were encountered, only one of which was of occult type. No significant difference in the frequency of glove perforation was found between the categories with varying time duration.

  10. Deterministic effects of interventional radiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shope, Thomas B.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe deterministic radiation injuries reported to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that resulted from therapeutic, interventional procedures performed under fluoroscopic guidance, and to investigate the procedure or equipment-related factors that may have contributed to the injury. Reports submitted to the FDA under both mandatory and voluntary reporting requirements which described radiation-induced skin injuries from fluoroscopy were investigated. Serious skin injuries, including moist desquamation and tissues necrosis, have occurred since 1992. These injuries have resulted from a variety of interventional procedures which have required extended periods of fluoroscopy compared to typical diagnostic procedures. Facilities conducting therapeutic interventional procedures need to be aware of the potential for patient radiation injury and take appropriate steps to limit the potential for injury. (author)

  11. Multimodality imaging to guide cardiac interventional procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tops, Laurens Franciscus

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, a number of new cardiac interventional procedures have been introduced. Catheter ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) have been refined and are now considered a good treatment option in patients with drug-refractory AF. In cardiac pacing, cardiac resynchronization

  12. Complex intravenous anesthesia in interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Zonggui; Hu Yuanming; Huang Yunlong; You Yong; Wu Juan; Huang Zengping; Li Jian

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the value and safety of Diprivan and Fentany intravenous administration of analgesia in interventional procedures. Methods: Diprivan with Fentany intravenous administration for analgesia was used in eighty interventional procedures of sixty-five patients, without tracheal tube insertion. Vital signs including HR, BP, arterial oxygen saturation (SpO 2 ) and patients' reaction to operating were recorded. Results: Intravenous anesthesia was cared out successfully in eighty interventional procedures, with patients under sleeping condition during the operation, together with no pain and no agony memory of the procedure. The amount of Diprivan was 500±100 mg and Fentany was 0.2±0.025 mg. Mean arterial pressure and SpO 2 were 11.4±2.2 kPa, 10.6±2.1 kPa and 98±1.0, 96±1.5 respectively before and after ten minutes of the operation, with no significant difference. Conclusions: Diprivan with Fentany intravenous administration for interventional procedure analgesia possess good safety, painless and no agony memory of the procedure; therefor ought to be recommended. (authors)

  13. Use of Intracardiac Echocardiography in Interventional Cardiology: Working With the Anatomy Rather Than Fighting It.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enriquez, Andres; Saenz, Luis C; Rosso, Raphael; Silvestry, Frank E; Callans, David; Marchlinski, Francis E; Garcia, Fermin

    2018-05-22

    The indications for catheter-based structural and electrophysiological procedures have recently expanded to more complex scenarios, in which an accurate definition of the variable individual cardiac anatomy is key to obtain optimal results. Intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) is a unique imaging modality able to provide high-resolution real-time visualization of cardiac structures, continuous monitoring of catheter location within the heart, and early recognition of procedural complications, such as pericardial effusion or thrombus formation. Additional benefits are excellent patient tolerance, reduction of fluoroscopy time, and lack of need for general anesthesia or a second operator. For these reasons, ICE has largely replaced transesophageal echocardiography as ideal imaging modality for guiding certain procedures, such as atrial septal defect closure and catheter ablation of cardiac arrhythmias, and has an emerging role in others, including mitral valvuloplasty, transcatheter aortic valve replacement, and left atrial appendage closure. In electrophysiology procedures, ICE allows integration of real-time images with electroanatomic maps; it has a role in assessment of arrhythmogenic substrate, and it is particularly useful for mapping structures that are not visualized by fluoroscopy, such as the interatrial or interventricular septum, papillary muscles, and intracavitary muscular ridges. Most recently, a three-dimensional (3D) volumetric ICE system has also been developed, with potential for greater anatomic information and a promising role in structural interventions. In this state-of-the-art review, we provide guidance on how to conduct a comprehensive ICE survey and summarize the main applications of ICE in a variety of structural and electrophysiology procedures. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Acute ischemic heart disease and interventional cardiology: a time for pause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brophy James M

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A major change has occurred in the last few years in the therapeutic approach to patients presenting with all forms of acute coronary syndromes. Whether or not these patients present initially to tertiary cardiac care centers, they are now routinely referred for early coronary angiography and increasingly undergo percutaneous revascularization. This practice is driven primarily by the angiographic image and technical feasibility. Concomitantly, there has been a decline in expectant or ischemia-guided medical management based on specific clinical presentation, response to initial treatment, and results of noninvasive stratification. This 'tertiarization' of acute coronary care has been fuelled by the increasing sophistication of the cardiac armamentarium, the peer-reviewed publication of clinical studies purporting to show the superiority of invasive cardiac interventions, and predominantly supporting (non-peer-reviewed editorials, newsletters, and opinion pieces. Discussion This review presents another perspective, based on a critical reexamination of the evidence. The topics addressed are: reperfusion treatment of ST-elevation myocardial infarction; the indications for invasive intervention following thrombolysis; the role of invasive management in non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction and unstable angina; and cost-effectiveness and real world considerations. A few cases encountered in recent practice in community and tertiary hospitals are presented for illustrative purposes The numerous and far-reaching scientific, economic, and philosophical implications that are a consequence of this marked change in clinical practice as well as healthcare, decisional and conflict of interest issues are explored. Summary The weight of evidence does not support the contemporary unfocused broad use of invasive interventional procedures across the spectrum of acute coronary clinical presentations. Excessive and unselective recourse to

  15. Nuclear cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuaron, A

    1993-12-31

    Today, nuclear medicine techniques are routinely used in cardiological practice. They include procedures for the atraumatic investigation of different physiological processes in the various structures included in the central circulation: pericardium, myocardium, myocardial adrenergic innervation, cardiac chambers and valves, coronary microcirculation, and great vessels. Beside these in-Vivo procedures, they also comprise of in-Vitro methods for the detection and measurement in blood of various biological molecules of significance in the management of cardiac diseases. A common feature in this collection of in-Vivo and in-Vitro techniques is their ability to provide helpful clinical information for the diagnosis, prognosis and management of cardiac diseases. Their simplicity and safety for the patient allow their repeated use in the follow up of the progress of disease and in the assessment of the efficacy of the therapeutic measures 15 figs, 14 tabs

  16. Nuclear cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuaron, A.

    1992-01-01

    Today, nuclear medicine techniques are routinely used in cardiological practice. They include procedures for the atraumatic investigation of different physiological processes in the various structures included in the central circulation: pericardium, myocardium, myocardial adrenergic innervation, cardiac chambers and valves, coronary microcirculation, and great vessels. Beside these in-Vivo procedures, they also comprise of in-Vitro methods for the detection and measurement in blood of various biological molecules of significance in the management of cardiac diseases. A common feature in this collection of in-Vivo and in-Vitro techniques is their ability to provide helpful clinical information for the diagnosis, prognosis and management of cardiac diseases. Their simplicity and safety for the patient allow their repeated use in the follow up of the progress of disease and in the assessment of the efficacy of the therapeutic measures

  17. What should a fellow-in-training expect at national cardiovascular conferences? The interventional cardiology fellows' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiramijyan, Sarkis; Didier, Romain; Koifman, Edward; Negi, Smita I

    It has become challenging for cardiovascular fellows-in-training (FIT) to determine which national cardiovascular conference (NCC) to attend given the broad range of meetings and the breadth of information offered. The aim of this study was to report our own experiences of the utility and individual strengths of the NCCs and to further understand the interventional cardiology (IC) FITs' viewpoint regarding the benefits of the individual NCCs. A survey was formulated with questions and scenarios regarding topics deemed to be of highest importance for an IC-FIT. The survey emphasized experiences regarding the utility and benefits of the NCCs, time management, optimization of acquired education, and specific interests in clinical and research topics. The completely anonymous survey was sent via an email format to a total of 234, majority of IC (fourth and fifth years) and a minority of general (third year), FITs. A completed survey response was received from 131 of the fellows (56%). The results demonstrated that the IC-FITs endorsed that the small, focused sub-specialty interventional meetings vs. the large society general meetings were more beneficial in regard to the didactic education offered. In addition, the IC-FITs indicated that pre-planning for the meetings is the most beneficial approach in optimizing one's education and that the caliber of expert faculty, case-based and live-case presentations are among the most important aspects of the meetings. Interventional cardiology FITs prefer the small sub-specialty interventional meetings over the large society general NCCs in regard to the benefits of didactic learning. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Study of the radio-exposure of the personnel in diagnostic and interventional radio-cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musnier, J.

    1998-01-01

    The renewal of radiological materials has contributed to reduce significantly the doses received by the personnel. The installations of low shutters and lead windows give an important potential of reduction of doses received by the physicians. For the medical and para medical personnel, a modification of working habits must lead to an important exposure reduction. To summarize, the medical and para medical personnel in cardiology has at one s disposal all the means allowing to reach the objective of dose constraints. The radiation protection optimization now depends on every concerned actor. (N.C.)

  19. Pilot program on patient dosimetry in pediatric interventional cardiology in Chile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ubeda, Carlos; Vano, Eliseo; Miranda, Patricia; Leyton, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to present the results of a pilot program on patient dosimetry carried out in Chile during the last 5 yr, using a biplane x-ray angiography system settled for pediatrics. This research was conducted in Latin America under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) supporting programs on radiological protection (RP) of patients. Methods: Patient age, gender, weight, height, number of cine series, total number of cine frames, fluoroscopy time, and two dosimetric quantities [air kerma-area product (P ka ) and cumulative dose (CD) at the patient entrance reference point] were recorded for each procedure. Results: The study includes 544 patients grouped into four age groups. The distributions by age group were 150 for ka and CD for the four age groups were 0.94, 1.46, 2.13, and 5.03 Gy cm 2 and 23.9, 26.8, 33.5, and 51.6 mGy, respectively. No significant statistical differences were found between diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. A moderate correlation (r = 0.64) was seen between P ka and patient weight. Conclusions: The dose values reported in this paper were lower than those published in the previous work for the same age groups as a result of the optimization actions carried out by cardiologists and medical physicists with the support of the IAEA. Methodology and results will be used as a starting point for a wider survey in Chile and Latin America with the goal to obtain regional diagnostic reference levels as recently recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection for interventional procedures.

  20. Pilot program on patient dosimetry in pediatric interventional cardiology in Chile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ubeda, Carlos; Vano, Eliseo; Miranda, Patricia; Leyton, Fernando [Clinical Sciences Department, Radiological Sciences Center, Health Sciences Faculty and CHIDE, Tarapaca University, Arica (Chile); Radiology Department, Complutense University and San Carlos Hospital, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Hemodynamic Department, Cardiovascular Service, Luis Calvo Mackenna Hospital, Santiago (Chile); Institute of Public Health of Chile, Marathon 1000, Nunoa, Santiago, Chile and Faculty of Medicine, Diego Portales University, Santiago (Chile)

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to present the results of a pilot program on patient dosimetry carried out in Chile during the last 5 yr, using a biplane x-ray angiography system settled for pediatrics. This research was conducted in Latin America under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) supporting programs on radiological protection (RP) of patients. Methods: Patient age, gender, weight, height, number of cine series, total number of cine frames, fluoroscopy time, and two dosimetric quantities [air kerma-area product (P{sub ka}) and cumulative dose (CD) at the patient entrance reference point] were recorded for each procedure. Results: The study includes 544 patients grouped into four age groups. The distributions by age group were 150 for <1 yr; 203 for 1 to <5 yr; 97 for 5 to <10 yr; and 94 for 10 to <16 yr. Median values of P{sub ka} and CD for the four age groups were 0.94, 1.46, 2.13, and 5.03 Gy cm{sup 2} and 23.9, 26.8, 33.5, and 51.6 mGy, respectively. No significant statistical differences were found between diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. A moderate correlation (r = 0.64) was seen between P{sub ka} and patient weight. Conclusions: The dose values reported in this paper were lower than those published in the previous work for the same age groups as a result of the optimization actions carried out by cardiologists and medical physicists with the support of the IAEA. Methodology and results will be used as a starting point for a wider survey in Chile and Latin America with the goal to obtain regional diagnostic reference levels as recently recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection for interventional procedures.

  1. Complications with Outpatient Angiography and Interventional Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, Noel; Chi, Ka-Kit; Ajaka, Joe; McKay, Lesa; O'Neill, Diane; Wong, Kai Ping

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively identify the complications, and rates of complication, in outpatient angiography and interventional procedures. Methods: There were 1050 consecutive patients, 646 men and 404 women, aged 17-89 years, with a total of 1239 procedures studied in a 2-year period, 1997 to 1999. Results: There were 560 cases of aorto-femoral angiography,resulting in 124 complications (22%), with pain or hematoma in 110.There were 206 cases of neck and cerebral angiography, resulting in 51 complications (25%), with pain and hematoma in 34, transient ischemic attack in 2 and cerebrovascular accident in 1. There were 197 interfentional procedures, with 177 being balloon dilatations, resulting in 68 complications (35%), with 2 having hematomas and 1 having hematoma/abscess requiring active treatment. There were 276 cases having various 'other' procedures (e.g., renal angiography),resulting in 65 complications (24%), with pain and hematoma in 61. No procedure-related death occurred. Eighteen cases (1.5%) had significant complications, with contrast allergy in eight. Conclusion: Outpatient angiography and intervention are relatively safe, with low significant complication rates

  2. The CRAC cohort model: A computerized low cost registry of interventional cardiology with daily update and long-term follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangé, G; Chassaing, S; Marcollet, P; Saint-Étienne, C; Dequenne, P; Goralski, M; Bardiére, P; Beverilli, F; Godillon, L; Sabine, B; Laure, C; Gautier, S; Hakim, R; Albert, F; Angoulvant, D; Grammatico-Guillon, L

    2018-05-01

    To assess the reliability and low cost of a computerized interventional cardiology (IC) registry to prospectively and systematically collect high-quality data for all consecutive coronary patients referred for coronary angiogram or/and coronary angioplasty. Rigorous clinical practice assessment is a key factor to improve prognosis in IC. A prospective and permanent registry could achieve this goal but, presumably, at high cost and low level of data quality. One multicentric IC registry (CRAC registry), fully integrated to usual coronary activity report software, started in the centre Val-de-Loire (CVL) French region in 2014. Quality assessment of CRAC registry was conducted on five IC CathLab of the CVL region, from January 1st to December 31st 2014. Quality of collected data was evaluated by measuring procedure exhaustivity (comparing with data from hospital information system), data completeness (quality controls) and data consistency (by checking complete medical charts as gold standard). Cost per procedure (global registry operating cost/number of collected procedures) was also estimated. CRAC model provided a high-quality level with 98.2% procedure completeness, 99.6% data completeness and 89% data consistency. The operating cost per procedure was €14.70 ($16.51) for data collection and quality control, including ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) preadmission information and one-year follow-up after angioplasty. This integrated computerized IC registry led to the construction of an exhaustive, reliable and costless database, including all coronary patients entering in participating IC centers in the CVL region. This solution will be developed in other French regions, setting up a national IC database for coronary patients in 2020: France PCI. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Radiation exposure of cardiologists eye lenses during interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treckova, V.; Nikodemova, D.; Salat, D.

    2014-01-01

    Recently published studies have indicated a lower threshold of eye lens doses for developing cataracts than previously used. These studies have shown that the latency period responsible for cataract development depends on the absorbed eye lens dose. The recommendations of the ICRP, the new BSS of IAEA and the 2013/59/EURATOM Directive revise the old occupational limit of equivalent dose (150 mSv) to the new lower value of 20 mSv per year. Probably this value will be exceeded mainly during specific interventional procedures. The main aim of the present study was to investigate the received eye lens doses by monitoring and assessment of radiation load of cardiologists in the particular Cardiologic Healthcare Facility in Slovakia. The measurements were realized by using TLD located on the both sides of the protective lead glasses of five cardiologists during CA/PTCA procedures, performed in the period of 1 month. Evaluation of the dosimeters was performed by HARSHAW TLD 3500. Collected parameters of each individual examination were expressed in the quantity personal dose equivalent Hp(0,07). The whole body doses during the CA/PTCA procedures were controlled by RaySafe i2 dosimetry system, allowing the collection of real time radiation exposure of medical staff. Values of personal dose equivalent Hp(0,07) on the left eye lens (where we observed higher dose values), were extrapolated to annual doses and compared with the new eye lens limit. The comparison of the results (calculating the average annual dose from the gathered annual workload of each cardiologist) indicates that the new proposed limit for eye lens doses (20 mSv/year) should be exceeded. Important information comes from the results of RaySafe measurements, which refer to the fact, that although the whole-body annual doses obtained by the followed cardiologists doses not exceed the annual limit of effective dose, the equivalent doses to the lens of the eye obtained from TLD, reached the overflow value

  4. Reduction of radiation exposure while maintaining high-quality fluoroscopic images during interventional cardiology using novel x-ray tube technology with extra beam filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Boer, A; de Feyter, P J; Hummel, W A; Keane, D; Roelandt, J R

    1994-06-01

    Radiographic technology plays an integral role in interventional cardiology. The number of interventions continues to increase, and the associated radiation exposure to patients and personnel is of major concern. This study was undertaken to determine whether a newly developed x-ray tube deploying grid-switched pulsed fluoroscopy and extra beam filtering can achieve a reduction in radiation exposure while maintaining fluoroscopic images of high quality. Three fluoroscopic techniques were compared: continuous fluoroscopy, pulsed fluoroscopy, and a newly developed high-output pulsed fluoroscopy with extra filtering. To ascertain differences in the quality of images and to determine differences in patient entrance and investigator radiation exposure, the radiated volume curve was measured to determine the required high voltage levels (kVpeak) for different object sizes for each fluoroscopic mode. The fluoroscopic data of 124 patient procedures were combined. The data were analyzed for radiographic projections, image intensifier field size, and x-ray tube kilovoltage levels (kVpeak). On the basis of this analysis, a reference procedure was constructed. The reference procedure was tested on a phantom or dummy patient by all three fluoroscopic modes. The phantom was so designed that the kilovoltage requirements for each projection were comparable to those needed for the average patient. Radiation exposure of the operator and patient was measured during each mode. The patient entrance dose was measured in air, and the operator dose was measured by 18 dosimeters on a dummy operator. Pulsed compared with continuous fluoroscopy could be performed with improved image quality at lower kilovoltages. The patient entrance dose was reduced by 21% and the operator dose by 54%. High-output pulsed fluoroscopy with extra beam filtering compared with continuous fluoroscopy improved the image quality, lowered the kilovoltage requirements, and reduced the patient entrance dose by 55% and

  5. Guidelines on the facilities required for minor surgical procedures and minimal access interventions.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Humphreys, H

    2012-02-01

    There have been many changes in healthcare provision in recent years, including the delivery of some surgical services in primary care or in day surgery centres, which were previously provided by acute hospitals. Developments in the fields of interventional radiology and cardiology have further expanded the range and complexity of procedures undertaken in these settings. In the face of these changes there is a need to define from an infection prevention and control perspective the basic physical requirements for facilities in which such surgical procedures may be carried out. Under the auspices of the Healthcare Infection Society, we have developed the following recommendations for those designing new facilities or upgrading existing facilities. These draw upon best practice, available evidence, other guidelines where appropriate, and expert consensus to provide sensible and feasible advice. An attempt is also made to define minimal access interventions and minor surgical procedures. For minimal access interventions, including interventional radiology, new facilities should be mechanically ventilated to achieve 15 air changes per hour but natural ventilation is satisfactory for minor procedures. All procedures should involve a checklist and operators should be appropriately trained. There is also a need for prospective surveillance to accurately determine the post-procedure infection rate. Finally, there is a requirement for appropriate applied research to develop the evidence base required to support subsequent iterations of this guidance.

  6. Occupational radiation doses during interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuraeni, N; Hiswara, E; Kartikasari, D; Waris, A; Haryanto, F

    2016-01-01

    Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is a type of fluoroscopy technique used in interventional radiology to clearly visualize blood vessels in a bony or dense soft tissue environment. The use of DSA procedures has been increased quite significantly in the Radiology departments in various cities in Indonesia. Various reports showed that both patients and medical staff received a noticeable radiation dose during the course of this procedure. A study had been carried out to measure these doses among interventionalist, nurse and radiographer. The results show that the interventionalist and the nurse, who stood quite close to the X-ray beams compared with the radiographer, received radiation higher than the others. The results also showed that the radiation dose received by medical staff were var depending upon the duration and their position against the X-ray beams. Compared tothe dose limits, however, the radiation dose received by all these three medical staff were still lower than the limits. (paper)

  7. Thrombus aspiration in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction: results of a national registry of interventional cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Hélder; Caldeira, Daniel; Teles, Rui Campante; Costa, Marco; da Silva, Pedro Canas; da Gama Ribeiro, Vasco; Brandão, Vítor; Martins, Dinis; Matias, Fernando; Pereira-Machado, Francisco; Baptista, José; Abreu, Pedro Farto E; Santos, Ricardo; Drummond, António; de Carvalho, Henrique Cyrne; Calisto, João; Silva, João Carlos; Pipa, João Luís; Marques, Jorge; Sousa, Paulino; Fernandes, Renato; Ferreira, Rui Cruz; Ramos, Sousa; Oliveira, Eduardo Infante; de Sousa Almeida, Manuel

    2018-04-24

    We aimed to evaluate the impact of thrombus aspiration (TA) during primary percutaneous coronary intervention (P-PCI) in 'real-world' settings. We performed a retrospective study, using data from the National Registry of Interventional Cardiology (RNCI 2006-2012, Portugal) with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients treated with P-PCI. The primary outcome, in-hospital mortality, was analysed through adjusted odds ratio (aOR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI). We assessed data for 9458 STEMI patients that undergone P-PCI (35% treated with TA). The risk of in-hospital mortality with TA (aOR 0.93, 95%CI:0.54-1.60) was not significantly decreased. After matching patients through the propensity score, TA reduced significantly the risk of in-hospital mortality (OR 0.58, 95%CI:0.35-0.98; 3500 patients). The whole cohort data does not support the routine use of TA in P-PCI, but the results of the propensity-score matched cohort suggests that the use of selective TA may improve the short-term risks of STEMI.

  8. Motivations for and barriers to choosing an interventional cardiology career path: results from the EAPCI Women Committee worldwide survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capranzano, Piera; Kunadian, Vijay; Mauri, Josepa; Petronio, Anna Sonia; Salvatella, Neus; Appelman, Yolande; Gilard, Martine; Mikhail, Ghada W; Schüpke, Stefanie; Radu, Maria D; Vaquerizo, Beatriz; Presbitero, Patrizia; Morice, Marie-Claude; Mehilli, Julinda

    2016-05-17

    Very few women become interventional cardiologists, although a substantial proportion of cardiologists and the majority of medical students are women. In accordance with the EAPCI Women Committee mission of attaining gender equality at the professional level, a worldwide survey was recently conducted aiming to understand better the motivations and the barriers for women in selecting interventional cardiology (IC) as a career path. A total of 1,787 individuals (60.7% women) responded to the survey. Women compared to men were less frequently married (women vs. men, 57.0% vs. 79.8%, pmen replying to why, in their opinion, women do not choose IC, on-calls and long working hours were the most frequent reasons (35.3%). Several barriers preclude women from choosing IC, including lack of opportunity, concerns regarding radiation exposure and the prejudices of their male colleagues. This highlights the need to develop new strategies for future training, education, and support of women in order to choose IC.

  9. Dual antiplatelet therapy with prasugrel or ticagrelor versus clopidogrel in interventional cardiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Peter; Dridi, Nadia Paarup; Holmvang, Lene

    2013-01-01

    For several years, clopidogrel plus aspirin has been the dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) of choice for patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with stent implantation. More recently, prasugrel and ticagrelor have demonstrated greater effica...

  10. Evaluating a Dutch cardiology primary care plus intervention on the Triple Aim outcomes: study design of a practice-based quantitative and qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quanjel, Tessa C C; Spreeuwenberg, Marieke D; Struijs, Jeroen N; Baan, Caroline A; Ruwaard, Dirk

    2017-09-06

    In an attempt to deal with the pressures on the health-care system and to guarantee sustainability, changes are needed. This study focuses on a cardiology primary care plus intervention. Primary care plus (PC+) is a new health-care delivery model focused on substitution of specialist care in the hospital setting with specialist care in the primary care setting. The intervention consists of a cardiology PC+ centre in which cardiologists, supported by other health-care professionals, provide consultations in a primary care setting. The PC+ centre aims to improve the health of the population and quality of care as experienced by patients, and reduce the number of referrals to hospital-based outpatient specialist care in order to reduce health-care costs. These aims reflect the Triple Aim principle. Hence, the objectives of the study are to evaluate the cardiology PC+ centre in terms of the Triple Aim outcomes and to evaluate the process of the introduction of PC+. The study is a practice-based, quantitative study with a longitudinal observational design, and an additional qualitative study to supplement, interpret and improve the quantitative study. The study population of the quantitative part will consist of adult patients (≥18 years) with non-acute and low-complexity cardiology-related health complaints, who will be referred to the cardiology PC+ centre (intervention group) or hospital-based outpatient cardiology care (control group). All eligible patients will be asked to complete questionnaires at three different time points consisting of questions about their demographics, health status and experience of care. Additionally, quantitative data will be collected about health-care utilization and related health-care costs at the PC+ centre and the hospital. The qualitative part, consisting of semi-structured interviews, focus groups, and observations, is designed to evaluate the process as well as to amplify, clarify and explain quantitative results. This study

  11. Interventional cardiology and diabetes mellitus: age of effective coronary heart disease treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Yur'evich Kalashnikov

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction into clinical practice of coronary angioplasty has provided new possibilities for treatment of coronary heart disease (CHD in patientswith diabetes mellitus. The indications for endovascular interventions and principles of coronary stenting in such patients are described in this article.

  12. Radiation protection in pediatric interventional cardiology. Current status and challenges in Chile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ubeda, Carlos; Miranda, Patricia; Vano, Eliseo; Nocetti, Diego

    2013-01-01

    Further actions to improve radiation safety in this medical practice are discussed. All the X-ray systems used in paediatric IC procedures in Chile have been characterized in terms of dose and image quality. In addition, dose rates of scattered radiation to the position of the eyes and ankles of cardiologists have been measured. In May 2010, in Santiago, Chile, a workshop organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) was the starting point for a pilot program on patient dosimetry and medical personnel for Latin America and the Caribbean, with participants from 11 countries. A pilot training course on Radiological Protection was given as part of the program. The first dose values reported for paediatric patients under the pilot program conducted by the IAEA in Latin America and the Caribbean included 70 procedures in Chile later extending to a total of 544 procedures. We think that a fundamental first step to improve IC radiation safety in Chile, would be to revise and update legislation on the use of ionizing radiation, including the implementation of quality assurance programs and training in radiation protection according to those involved in IC procedures

  13. [Current situation of the organisation, resources and activity in paediatric cardiology in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Ferrer, Francisco; Castro García, Francisco José; Pérez-Lescure Picarzo, Javier; Roses Noguer, Ferrán; Centeno Malfaz, Fernándo; Grima Murcia, María Dolores; Brotons, Dimpna Albert

    2018-04-26

    The results are presented on the «current situation of the organisation, resources and activity in paediatric cardiology in Spain». It was promoted by the Spanish Society of Paediatric Cardiology and Congenital Heart disease. An analysis was carried out on the results obtained from a specifically designed questionnaire, prepared by the Spanish Society of Paediatric Cardiology and Congenital Heart disease, that was sent to all hospitals around the country that offer the speciality of paediatric cardiology. A total of 86 questionnaires were obtained, including 14 hospitals that perform cardiac surgery on children. A total of 190 paediatric cardiology consultants, 40 cardiac surgeons, and 27 middle grade doctors performing their paediatric residency (MIR program) were identified. All hospitals had adequate equipment to perform an optimal initial evaluation of any child with a possible cardiac abnormality, but only tertiary centres could perform complex diagnostic procedures, interventional cardiology, and cardiac surgery. In almost all units around the country, paediatric cardiology consultants were responsible for outpatient clinics and hospital admissions, whereas foetal cardiology units were still mainly managed by obstetricians. The number of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures was similar to those reported in the first survey, except for a slight decrease in the total number of closed cardiac surgery procedures, and a proportional increase in the number of therapeutic catheterisations. Paediatric Cardiology in Spain is performed by paediatric cardiology consultants that were trained initially as general paediatricians, and then completed a paediatric cardiology training period. Almost all units have adequate means for diagnosis and treatment. Efforts should be directed to create a national registry that would not only allow a prospective quantification of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, but also focus on their clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2018

  14. A study of the dose distribution in the region of the eye lens and extremities for staff working in interventional cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domienik, J.; Brodecki, M.; Rusicka, D.

    2012-01-01

    The dose distributions at the region of eye lens and extremities of staff working in interventional cardiology were analyzed. The doses to physicians and nurses from three hospitals in Poland were measured with TL dosimeters (MCP-N) located on various places near eyebrows, on both fingers, wrists, knees and on the ankle. The procedures under investigation were coronary angiography (CA) and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), peacemaker and defibrillator implantations (PM/ICDs), cardiac resynchronization therapy with or without defibrillator implantations (CRT-D or CRT) and radiofrequency ablations (RFA). The study aimed at analyzing the distribution of radiation in selected anatomic regions, determining the typical locations of highest doses and estimating the dose ranges for selected types of procedures. The maximum registered doses per procedure to eye lens and ankle were 1.21 mSv and 1.46 mSv for CA PCI procedures, 0.02 mSv and 0.05 mSv for RFA and 0.13 mSv and 0.51 mSv for PM/ICDs, respectively. The maximum doses to fingers, wrists and knees were, accordingly, 2.11 mSv, 1.07 mSv and 0.77 mSv for CA PCI procedures, 0.38 mSv, 0.20 mSv and 0.04 mSv for RFA ones, 0.50 mSv, 0.25 mSv and 0.01 mSv for PM/ICDs procedures and 2.25 mSv, 1.12 mSv and 0.58 mSv for CRT and CRT-D ones. The factors which might influence the dose like utilized radiation, availability of additional protective equipment and position of the staff with respect to X-ray source were also analyzed. The annual doses for eye lens and extremities were estimated on the basis of individual annual workloads of the physicians participating in the study. The highest annual doses were revealed for physicians performing CA PCI procedures. Annual eye lens doses range up to 247 mSv indicating that the occupational limit for eye lens 150 mSv has been surpassed. In case of extremities the maximal estimated annual doses were 355 mSv, 136 mSv, 55 mSv and 328 mSv, for fingers, wrists, knees and for ankle

  15. Cardiology update 2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar Verma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the latter half of 2016, the important trials were ATMOSPHERE, INOVATE-HF, and IMPEDANCE-HF. The inclusion of angiotensin receptor–neprilysin inhibitor (valsartan/sacubitril and sinoatrial node modulator (ivabradine in the guidelines was a significant change. HOPE-3 was a major trial in 2016 expanding the dimension of statin use. ixCELL-DCM trial evaluated stem cells in dilated cardiomyopathy. Mobile-health and medication event monitoring system technology showed increasing use of technology in both prevention and treatment in cardiology. RIDDLE-non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI studied the immediate versus delayed intervention in NSTEMI. In STEMI, DANAMI 3-DEFER trial evaluated the concept of immediate stent implantation or deferred stent implantation 48 h after the index procedure with standard primary percutaneous coronary intervention. EARLY-BAMI tested intravenous metoprolol in acute STEMI with the use of magnetic resonance imaging. The utility of “Chest Pain Choice” tool demonstrated shared decision-making between physician and patients in the context of chest pain. Risk factors profile and demographic and angiographic features of aorto-ostial atherosclerotic coronary artery disease are evaluated extensively. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement results in comparison to surgery and its association with volume, and in-hospital outcomes are also analyzed. The VANISH trial addressed a very critical issue in post-MI ICMP. Factors associated with erosion related to Amplatzer septal occluder in atrial septal defect closure are described in detail.

  16. Evaluation of Kerma rate in the skin entrance in interventional procedures guided by fluoroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medeiros, Regina Bitelli; Alves, Fatima Faloppa Rodrigues; Ruberti Filha, Eny M.

    2005-01-01

    Interventional therapeutic procedures guided by fluoroscopy are responsible for delayed exposure to radiation of professionals and patients. The technology employed on generation of the pulsed fluoroscopy can be an important tool of protection used for reducing the exposure time. It generates constant width and varied frequency pulse or width pulse or varied frequency for a constant frequency. The typical doses into the skin and its relationship with the quality of the images in the various technical and operational conditions should be known by the professionals so that they can optimize them. Generated radiation doses were evaluated using the Toshiba Infinitix equipment used in invasive cardiology procedures and electrophysiological studies through the Kerma rate at the entrance of the patient's skin measured throughout the year of 2004. With these information shall be set out the criteria for the decision of the technical-operational conditions that allow minimizing of dose

  17. 2015 SCAI/ACC/HFSA/STS Clinical Expert Consensus Statement on the Use of Percutaneous Mechanical Circulatory Support Devices in Cardiovascular Care (Endorsed by the American Heart Association, the Cardiological Society of India, and Sociedad Latino Americana de Cardiología Intervencionista; Affirmation of Value by the Canadian Association of Interventional Cardiology-Association Canadienne de Cardiologie d'intervention).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rihal, Charanjit S; Naidu, Srihari S; Givertz, Michael M; Szeto, Wilson Y; Burke, James A; Kapur, Navin K; Kern, Morton; Garratt, Kirk N; Goldstein, James A; Dimas, Vivian; Tu, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    This article provides a brief summary of the relevant recommendations and references related to percutaneous mechanical circulatory support. The goal was to provide the clinician with concise, evidence-based contemporary recommendations, and the supporting documentation to encourage their application. The full text includes disclosure of all relevant relationships with industry for each writing committee member. A fundamental aspect of all expert consensus statements is that these carefully developed, evidence-based documents can neither encompass all clinical circumstances, nor replace the judgment of individual physicians in management of each patient. The science of medicine is rooted in evidence, and the art of medicine is based on the application of this evidence to the individual patient. This expert consensus statement has adhered to these principles for optimal management of patients requiring percutaneous mechanical circulatory support. © 2015 by The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, The American College of Cardiology Foundation, the Heart Failure Society of America, and The Society for Thoracic Surgery.

  18. Radiation doses in endoscopic interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsapaki, V.; Paraskeva, K.; Mathou, N.; Aggelogiannopoulou, P.; Triantopoulou, C.; Karagianis, J.; Giannakopoulos, A.; Paspatis, G.; Voudoukis, E.; Athanasopoulos, N.; Lydakis, I.; Scotiniotis, H.; Georgopoulos, P.; Finou, P.; Kadiloru, E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Extensive literature exists on patient radiation doses in various interventional procedures. This does not stand for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) where the literature is very limited. This study compares patient dose during ERCP procedures performed with different types of X-ray systems. Methods and Materials: Four hospitals participated in the study with the following X-ray systems: A) X-ray conventional system (X-ray tube over table), 137 pts, B) X-ray conventional system (X-ray tube under table), 114 pts, C) C-arm system, 79 pts, and D) angiography system, 57 pts. A single experienced endoscopist performed the ERCP in each hospital. Kerma Area Product (KAP), fluoroscopy time (T) and total number of X-ray films (F) were collected. Results: Median patient dose was 6.2 Gy.cm 2 (0.02-130.2 Gy.cm 2 ). Medium linear correlation between KAP and T (0.6) and F (0.4) were observed. Patient doses were 33 % higher than the reference value in UK (4.15 Gy.cm 2 with a sample of 6089 patients). Median KAP for each hospital was: A) 3.1, B) 9.2, C) 3.9 and D) 6.2 Gy.cm 2 . Median T was: A) 2.6, B) 4.1, C) 2.8 and D) 3.4 min. Median F was: A) 2, B) 7, C) 2 and D) 2 films. Conclusion: Patient radiation dose during ERCP depends on: a) fluoroscopy time and films taken, b) the type of the X-ray system used, with the C arm and the conventional over the couch systems carrying the lower patient radiation dose and the angiography system the higher. (authors)

  19. Hospital market concentration, pricing, and profitability in orthopedic surgery and interventional cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, James C

    2011-06-01

    To examine the association between hospital market concentration and pricing. Hospitals have been merging into systems that potentially wield bargaining power over private health insurers. Concern is growing among policy makers that these systems may respond to provisions of the 2010 health reform legislation by further increasing consolidation and prices. Multivariate statistical methods were used to evaluate the association between hospital market concentration, prices, and profits (contribution margins) for commercially insured patients admitted for any of 6 major cardiac and orthopedic surgery procedures, adjusting for characteristics of the patient (diagnoses, comorbidities,complications) and of the hospital (size, patient volume, teaching status). Data were obtained on 11,330 patients treated in 61 hospitals in 27 markets across 8 states in 2008. Hospital prices for patients in concentrated markets were higher than hospital prices for otherwise-comparable patients in competitive markets by 25.1% for coronary angioplasty, 13.0%for cardiac rhythm management (CRM) device insertion, 19.2% for total knee replacement, 24.1%for total hip replacement, 19.3% for lumbar spine fusion, and 22.7% for cervical spine fusion (P markets by $5259 for angioplasty, $3417 for CRM device insertion, $4123 for total knee replacement, $5889 for total hip replacement, $7931 for lumbar spine fusion, and $4663 for cervical spine fusion (P markets charge significantly higher prices and earn significantly higher margins from private insurers than do hospitals in competitive markets.

  20. Expert consensus (SBC/SBHCI) on the use of drug-eluting stents: recommendations of the Brazilian society of interventional cardiology/ Brazilian society of cardiology for the Brazilian public single healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Valter C; Mattos, Luiz Alberto P; Caramori, Paulo R A; Perin, Marco A; Mangione, José A; Machado, Bruno M; Coelho, Wilson M C; Bueno, Ronaldo R L

    2006-10-01

    The authors review percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) evolution and its growing application in myocardial revascularization for patients with coronary heart disease in Brazil and worldwide. PCI was introduced in 1977 using only the catheter balloon. Limitations of this method (acute occlusion and coronary restenosis) led to the adoption of coronary stents and more recently the advent of drug-eluting stents2, which were developed to drastically reduce restenosis rates. These developments allowed the exponential growth of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) procedures in Brazil which have replaced many bypass surgery procedures and have become the gold standard for the majority of symptomatic patients suffering from coronary artery disease. The preference for this procedure gained new dimensions in 2000 when the Brazilian Public Healthcare System (SUS) began reimbursing for stent procedures. This measure exemplified the importance of the Public Healthcare System's participation in incorporating medical advances and offering a high standard of cardiovascular treatment to a large portion of the Brazilian population. It is emphasized that prevention of in-stent restenosis is complex due to its unpredictable and ubiquitous occurrence. Control of this condition improves quality of life and reduces the recurrence of angina pectoris, the need to perform new revascularization procedures and hospital readmissions. The overall success of the drug-eluting stents has proven to be reliable and consistent in overcoming restenosis and has some beneficial impact for all clinical and angiographic conditions. This paper discusses the adoption and criteria for the use of drug-eluting stents in other countries as well as the recommendations established by the Brazilian Society of Interventional Cardiology for their reimbursement by SUS. The incorporation of new healthcare technology involves two distinct stages. During the first stage, the product is registered with the

  1. Intra-procedural continuous dialysis to facilitate interventional catheterization in pediatric patients with severe renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opina, Angeline D; Qureshi, Athar M; Brewer, Eileen; Elenberg, Ewa; Swartz, Sarah; Michael, Mini; Justino, Henri

    2017-11-01

    Interventional catheterization procedures may be needed for patients with severe renal failure who are dependent on dialysis. To avoid the risk of fluid overload and electrolyte derangement during complex procedures in this oliguric/anuric patient population, we performed intra-procedural dialysis, either continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) or continous cycling peritoneal dialysis (CCPD). We performed a retrospective review of a cohort of pediatric patients, ages 0-18 years, with dialysis-dependent renal failure who received CRRT or CCPD during catheterization procedures from January 2013 to March 2016. Eight patients underwent a total of nine interventional catheterization procedures while receiving intra-procedural dialysis. Median age was 4.5 years (range 8 months to 17 years) and weight, 11.6 kg (11.2-62.6 kg). Six patients had end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and two patients had acute kidney injury (AKI), one due to hepatorenal syndrome and one due to multifactorial causes associated with congenital heart disease. The most common reason for catheterization was occlusive venous thrombosis requiring recanalization. CRRT was used during five cases and CCPD during four cases. Median procedure time was 337 min (95-651 min) and median contrast dose 4.2 mL kg -1 (1.2-8.2 mL kg -1 ). Euvolemia was maintained based on pre- and post-catheterizations weights, and no significant electrolyte abnormalities occurred based on lab monitoring during and post-procedure. Intra-procedural dialysis using CRRT or CCPD enables even small pediatric patients with severe renal failure to undergo long and complex interventional catheterizations by reducing the risk of fluid overload and electrolyte abnormalities. Collaboration between nephrology, cardiology, and dialysis teams is necessary for successful management of this challenging patient population. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Cumulative ionizing radiation during coronary diagnostic and interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyarzun C, Carlos; Ramirez, Alfredo

    2001-01-01

    The diagnostic ability of ionizing radiation is well known and has led to the development of high speed, high resolution axial tomography, for which we must assume that the patient population is being exposed to ionizing radiation that could become great. In cardiology, especially, we attend patients that have to undergo two or three angio graph, diagnostic and other therapeutic procedures, accumulating radiation doses that are ignored and are not recorded. The skin doses are shown that were received by 18 patients in procedures that included coronary angiography and that were measured with cesium thermoluminescent detectors, varying from 54 to 877 mSv. per procedure. We propose that a personal register be set up in Chile to record the magnitude of the radiation received by a patient (CO)

  3. Nuclear cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashore, T.M.; Shaffer, P.B.

    1985-01-01

    The birth of nuclear cardiology has generally been attributed to a 1927 experiment during which a radium salt was injected in one arm vein and the circulation time calculated by recording the arrival of the radioactivity in the opposite arm. This simple experiment lead to the radiocardiogram in the late 1940s that was used to measure left ventricular function and, later, cardiac output. This chapter provides a brief overview of nuclear cardiology. Methodology is presented when it is important for the understanding of test results. The use of these studies in the diagnosis and evaluation of patients with suspected cardiovascular disease is emphasized

  4. [Percutaneous coronary intervention of unprotected left main coronary compared with coronary artery bypass grafting; 3 years of experience in the National Institute of Cardiology, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Aguilar, Carlos; Abundes-Velasco, Arturo; Eid-Lidt, Guering; Piña-Reyna, Yigal; Gaspar-Hernández, Jorge

    The best revascularisation method of the unprotected left main artery is a current and evolving topic. A total of 2439 percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) were registered during a 3-year period. The study included all the patients with PCI of the unprotected left main coronary (n=48) and matched with patients who underwent coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) (n=50). Major adverse cerebral and cardiac events (MACCE) were assessed within the hospital and in outpatients during a 16 month follow up. The cardiovascular risk was greater in the PCI group; logEuroSCORE 16±21 vs. 5±6, P=.001; clinical Syntax 77±74 vs 53±39, P=.04. On admission, the PCI group of patients had a higher frequency of ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and cardiogenic shock. The MACCE were similar in both groups (14% vs. 18%, P=.64). STEMI was less frequent in the PCI group (0% vs. 10%, P=.03). Cardiovascular events were lower in the PCI group (2.3% vs. 18%, P=.01), and there was a decrease in general and cardiac mortality (2.3% vs. 12%, P=.08 y 2.3% vs. 8%, P=.24), on excluding the patients with cardiogenic shock as a presentation. MACCE were similar in both groups in the out-patient phase (15% vs. 12%, P=.46). Survival without MACCE, general and cardiac death were comparable between groups (log rank, P=.38, P=.44 and P=.16, respectively). Even though the clinical and peri-procedural risk profile of the PCI patients were higher, the in-hospital and out-hospital efficacy and safety were comparable with CABG. Copyright © 2016 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  5. Cardiology Mannequin

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Education of medical students in cardiology requires access to patients having a variety of different forms of heart disease. But bringing together student, instructor and patient is a difficult and expensive process that does not benefit the patient. An alternate approach is substitution of a lifelike mannequin capable of simulating many conditions of heart disease. The mannequin pictured below, together with a related information display, is an advanced medical training system whose development benefited from NASA visual display technology and consultative input from NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The mannequin system represents more than 10 years of development effort by Dr. Michael S. Gordon, professor of cardiology at the University of Miami (Florida) School of Medicine.

  6. Patient exposure: description of cumulative irradiation of patients treated in interventional cardiology; Exposition des patients: description de l'irradiation cumulee des patients traites en cardiologie interventionnelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odile Bernier, M.O. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Laboratoire d ' Epidemiologie, 92 - Fontenay aux Roses (France)

    2009-07-01

    Despite its clinical benefits, interventional cardiology induces cumulative exposure to ionizing radiation and may entail an important irradiation of the patient at the cutaneous level as well as for organs at the vicinity of the heart. The author briefly reports a study performed on a sample of 1591 patients who have been submitted to at least one corono-graphy or one angioplasty during 2005. Based on clinical characteristics and dose-area-product measurements, the doses received by lung, oesophagus, bone medulla and breast have been computed

  7. Statistics on the use of cardiac electronic devices and electrophysiological procedures in the European Society of Cardiology countries: 2014 report from the European Heart Rhythm Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raatikainen, M J Pekka; Arnar, David O; Zeppenfeld, Katja; Merino, Jose Luis; Levya, Francisco; Hindriks, Gerhardt; Kuck, Karl-Heinz

    2015-01-01

    There has been large variations in the use of invasive electrophysiological therapies in the member countries of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). The aim of this analysis was to provide comprehensive information on cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) and catheter ablation therapy trends in the ESC countries over the last five years. The European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) has collected data on CIED and catheter ablation therapy since 2008. Last year 49 of the 56 ESC member countries provided data for the EHRA White Book. This analysis is based on the current and previous editions of the EHRA White Book. Data on procedure rates together with information on economic aspects, local reimbursement systems and training activities are presented for each ESC country and the five geographical ESC regions. In 2013, the electrophysiological procedure rates per million population were highest in Western Europe followed by the Southern and Northern European countries. The CIED implantation and catheter ablation rate was lowest in the Eastern European and in the non-European ESC countries, respectively. However, in some Eastern European countries with relative low gross domestic product procedure rates exceeded those of some wealthier Western countries, suggesting that economic resources are not the only driver for utilization of arrhythmia therapies. These statistics indicate that despite significant improvements, there still is considerable heterogeneity in the availability of arrhythmia therapies across the ESC area. Hopefully, these data will help identify areas for improvement and guide future activities in cardiac arrhythmia management. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Preliminary study of using imaging plates to map skin dose of patients in interventional radiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohuchi, H.; Satoh, T.; Eguchi, Y.; Mori, K.

    2005-01-01

    A method using europium-doped BaFBr imaging plates (IPs) has been studied for mapping entrance skin doses during interventional radiology (IR); the mapping is useful for detecting overlap between irradiation fields and determining the most exposed skin areas. IPs, which are two-dimensional radiation sensors made of photostimulated luminescence materials, have a linear dose response up to ∼100 Gy, can accurately measure doses from 1 μGy to 10 Gy and can be used repeatedly. Because the energy dependence of IPs is rather high, the IPs were characterised in this study and a sensitivity variation of ∼13% was observed for effective energies of 32.7 to 44.7 keV, which are used in IR procedures. Simulation of actual interventional cardiology procedures showed that the variation of sensitivity was within 5%, meaning that IPs are practical for measuring skin doses during IR. Moreover, the patient data can be stored online and easily called up when IR procedures must be repeated, helping to prevent radiation injuries. (authors)

  9. Assessment of radiation protection of patients and staff in interventional procedures in four Algerian hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khelassi-Toutaoui, N.; Toutaoui, A.; Merad, A.; Sakhri-Brahimi, Z.; Baggoura, B.; Mansouri, B.

    2016-01-01

    This study was aimed to assess patient dosimetry in interventional cardiology (IC) and radiology (IR) and radiation safety of the medical operating staff. For this purpose, four major Algerian hospitals were investigated. The data collected cover radiation protection tools assigned to the operating staff and measured radiation doses to some selected patient populations. The analysis revealed that lead aprons are systematically worn by the staff but not lead eye glasses, and only a single personal monitoring badge is assigned to the operating staff. Measured doses to patients exhibited large variations in the maximum skin dose (MSD) and in the dose area product (DAP). The mean MSD registered values are as follows: 0.20, 0.14 and 1.28 Gy in endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP), coronary angiography (CA) and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) procedures, respectively. In PTCA, doses to 3 out of 22 patients (13.6 %) had even reached the threshold value of 2 Gy. The mean DAP recorded values are as follows: 21.6, 60.1 and 126 Gy cm 2 in ERCP, CA and PTCA procedures, respectively. Mean fluoroscopic times are 2.5, 5 and 15 min in ERCP, CA and PTCA procedures, respectively. The correlation between DAP and MSD is fair in CA (r = 0.62) and poor in PTCA (r = 0.28). Fluoroscopic time was moderately correlated with DAP in CA (r = 0.55) and PTCA (r = 0.61) procedures. Local diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) in CA and PTCA procedures have been proposed. In conclusion, this study stresses the need for a continuous patient dose monitoring in interventional procedures with a special emphasis in IC procedures. Common strategies must be undertaken to substantially reduce radiation doses to both patients and medical staff. (authors)

  10. Sister chromatid exchange analysis and chromosoma aberration studies in interventional cardiology laboratory workers. One year follow up study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erol, M.K.; Oztas, S.; Bozkurt, E.; Karakelleoglu, S.

    2002-01-01

    Invasive cardiology laboratory workers are occupationally exposed to chronic ionizing radiation. It is known that ionizing radiation has a damaging effect on chromosomes. In present study, we investigated the frequency of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) and chromosomal aberrations in 11 invasive cardiology laboratory workers and 11 healthy controls. After a vacation period, we took blood samples for chromosome analysis in months 0, 4, 8 and 12 (last two month period was the nonradiation time). The SCE frequencies did not change significantly after exposure to ionizing radiation in any worker. Our study has revealed that non-specific structural chromosome aberrations such as gaps, isogaps, acentric chromosomes, chromatids and chromosome breakage could be in the 4th and 8th months after ionizing radiation exposure in the metaphase plaques. All abnormal chromosomal effects had disappeared by the end of the two month non-exposure period in each worker. In conclusion, the results suggest that SCE frequencies are not significantly affected in invasive cardiology laboratory workers who are exposed occupationally to ionizing radiation, although some degree of reversible chromosomal aberrations did appear. (author)

  11. Evaluation of medical radiation exposure in pediatric interventional radiology procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, Valeria Coelho Costa; Navarro, Marcus Vinicius Teixeira; Oliveira, Aline da Silva Pacheco, E-mail: vccnavarro@gmail.com [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia da Bahia (IFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil); Maia, Ana Figueiredo [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Aracaju, SE (Brazil); Oliveira, Adriano Dias Dourado [Sociedade Brasileira de Hemodinamica e Cardiologia Intervencionista, Salvador, BA (Brazil)

    2012-07-15

    Objective: To evaluate pediatric radiation exposure in procedures of interventional radiology in two hospitals in the Bahia state, aiming at contributing to delineate the scenario at the state and national levels. The knowledge of exposure levels will allow an evaluation of the necessity of doses optimization, considering that peculiarities of radiology and pediatrics become even more significant in interventional radiology procedures which involve exposure to higher radiation doses. Materials and Methods: A total of 32 procedures were evaluated in four rooms of the two main hospitals performing pediatric interventional radiology procedures in the Bahia state. Air kerma rate and kerma-area product were evaluated in 27 interventional cardiac and 5 interventional brain procedures. Results: Maximum values for air kerma rate and kerma-area product and air kerma obtained in cardiac procedures were, respectively, 129.9 Gy.cm{sup 2} and 947.0 mGy; and, for brain procedures were 83.3 Gy.cm{sup 2} and 961.0 mGy. Conclusion: The present study results showed exposure values up to 14 times higher than those found in other foreign studies, and approximating those found for procedures in adults. Such results demonstrate excessive exposure to radiation, indicating the need for constant procedures optimization and evaluation of exposure rates. (author)

  12. Assessing the cardiology community position on transradial intervention and the use of bivalirudin in patients with acute coronary syndrome undergoing invasive management: results of an EAPCI survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamo, Marianna; Byrne, Robert A; Baumbach, Andreas; Haude, Michael; Windecker, Stephan; Valgimigli, Marco

    2016-10-20

    Our aim was to report on a survey initiated by the European Association of Percutaneous Cardiovascular Interventions (EAPCI) collecting the opinion of the cardiology community on the invasive management of acute coronary syndrome (ACS), before and after the MATRIX trial presentation at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2015 Scientific Sessions. A web-based survey was distributed to all individuals registered on the EuroIntervention mailing list (n=15,200). A total of 572 and 763 physicians responded to the pre- and post-ACC survey, respectively. The radial approach emerged as the preferable access site for ACS patients undergoing invasive management with roughly every other responder interpreting the evidence for mortality benefit as definitive and calling for a guidelines upgrade to class I. The most frequently preferred anticoagulant in ACS patients remains unfractionated heparin (UFH), due to higher costs and greater perceived thrombotic risks associated with bivalirudin. However, more than a quarter of participants declared the use of bivalirudin would increase after MATRIX. The MATRIX trial reinforced the evidence for a causal association between bleeding and mortality and triggered consensus on the superiority of the radial versus femoral approach. The belief that bivalirudin mitigates bleeding risk is common, but UFH still remains the preferred anticoagulant based on lower costs and thrombotic risks.

  13. Progress in intervention procedure of achalasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Xinmei; Cheng Yingsheng

    2008-01-01

    Achalasia is a primary esophageal motility disorder, with the main symptom of dysphagia; and caused by the tonus increase and abnormal relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter(LES). The etiology remains unclear, the objective of the current treatment approaches for achalasia containing the reduction of the LES tone and obstruction to relieve the patients' symptoms; including pharmacologic treatment, botulinum toxin treatment, surgical myotomy, pneumatic dilatation and cardia stent dilatation. The temporary cardia stent dilatation possesses some better advantages and effects; and ought to be the first choice of minimal invasive interventional management for achalasia. (authors)

  14. [Cardiology update in 2015].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascale, Patrizio; Regamey, Julien; Iglesias, Juan F; Gabus, Vincent; Clair, Mathieu; Yerly, Patrick; Hullin, Roger; Müller, Olivier; Eeckhout, Éric; Vogt, Pierre

    2016-01-13

    The present review provides a selected choice of clinical trials and therapeutic advances in the field of cardiology in 2015. A new treatment option in heart failure will become available this year in Switzerland. In interventional cardiology, new trials have been published on the duration of dual antiplatelet therapy, the new stents with bioresorbable scaffold and the long-term results of TAVR in patients who are not surgical candidates or at high surgical risk. RegardingAF the BRIDGE trial provides new evidences to guide the management of patients during warfarin interruption for surgery. Recent publications are changing the paradigm of AF treatment by showing a major impact of the management of cardiometabolic risk factors. Finally, refined criteria for ECG interpretation in athletes have been recently proposed to reduce the burden of false-positive screening.

  15. A history of cardiology in Jamaica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denbow, C E

    2004-06-01

    The history of cardiology in Jamaica is conveniently considered in decades beginning in the 1950s. The decade of the 1950s was characterized by early descriptions of the pattern of cardiac disease in adults and children in Jamaica, the establishment of a cardiac clinic at the University Hospital of the West Indies and early cardiac surgical landmarks. Extensive preparatory experimental work in the canine laboratory with respect to cardiopulmonary bypass in the early to mid-1960s culminated in the successful completion of the first open heart surgical procedure in April, 1968. Cardiac catheterization was also increasingly developed in the decade of the 1960s. A highlight of the decade of the 1970s was the establishment of the Heart Foundation of Jamaica which began contributing greatly to preventive cardiology in Jamaica by providing a variety of programmes of prevention. In the decade of the 1980s, non-invasive cardiac diagnostic facilities in Jamaica were considerably enhanced by the introduction and development of echocardiography, treadmill exercise testing and ambulatory electrocardiography. In addition, the very important National Rheumatic Fever prevention programme was established. The cardiac catheterization laboratory was re-opened in the 1990s, thus allowing the performance of coronary arteriography in Jamaica for the first time, and interventional cardiology procedures soon followed. The Jamaica Foundation for Cardiac disease was also established in this decade. The vision for the new millennium of "A heart healthy Jamaica in the 21st century" is achievable, but will require appropriate emphasis on expanded preventive and curative cardiology programmes.

  16. A framework for the evaluation of new interventional procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenco, Tania; Grant, Adrian M; Burr, Jennifer M; Vale, Luke

    2012-03-01

    The introduction of new interventional procedures is less regulated than for other health technologies such as pharmaceuticals. Decisions are often taken on evidence of efficacy and short-term safety from small-scale usually observational studies. This reflects the particular challenges of evaluating interventional procedures - the extra facets of skill and training and the difficulty defining a 'new' technology. Currently, there is no framework to evaluate new interventional procedures before they become available in clinical practice as opposed to new pharmaceuticals. This paper proposes a framework to guide the evaluation of a new interventional procedure. A framework was developed consisting of a four-stage progressive evaluation for a new interventional procedure: Stage 1: Development; Stage 2: Efficacy and short-term safety; Stage 3: Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness; and Stage 4: Implementation. The framework also suggests the types of studies or data collection methods that can be used to satisfy each stage. This paper makes a first step on a framework for generating evidence on new interventional procedures. The difficulties and limitations of applying such a framework are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Distribution of kerma rate in the air inside of hemodynamic room for typical projections of interventionist cardiology procedures; Distribuicao da taxa de kerma no ar em uma sala de hemodinamica para projecoes tipicas de procedimentos de cardiologia intervencionista

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, Mirtha Elizabet Gamarra

    2008-07-01

    The evaluation of dose to physicians involved in Interventional Cardiology (IC) is an extreme important matter due to the high and non-uniform distribution of dose values. The radiation control during each procedure is complex and the reasons for the high exposures have many different causes. Many international recommendations have already been written aiming the radiation protection optimization in IC. In Brazil, there is not any special orientation for the protection of those occupational persons, nor a specific legislation. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the air kerma rate at critical anatomic regions of the occupationally exposed staff that carry out IC procedures, in representative incidences in order to give subsidies for individual monitoring procedures implementation and to give more information about their radiation protection. The air kerma rate has been measured in the often used condition in the two more common IC procedures namely angiography and coronary angioplasty, using an adult patient simulator irradiated under RAO, LAO and AP projections for fluoro and digital acquisition modes. The measurements have been made in 45 points around the examination table at 5 different representatives heights of: eyes lens, thorax, hands, gonads and knees. AP projection shows the smaller scattered radiation contributions and a more homogeneous exposure distribution. The digital acquisition mode gives air kerma rates about 4 times higher than fluoro mode for LAO projection in the position occupied by the interventionist doctor, the anesthetist and the nursing staff. The most critical anatomic regions are: knees and gonads (without protection). On the physician hands position, values as high as 5 mGy/h have been measured, which can overpass, depending on the number of procedures done, the individual occupational annual limit. Therefore, in IC it is necessary to implement additional protection tools, elaborate safety guides (based on international experiences

  18. Radiological interventional procedures for the acute abdomen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trumm, C.; Hoffmann, R.T.; Reiser, M.F.

    2010-01-01

    In patients with acute thrombo-embolic occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery, catheter-assisted thrombolytic therapy represents a procedure of increasing importance in addition to surgery and intensive care treatment. The thrombolytic drugs utilized for this purpose are urokinase, streptokinase and recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA). Therapeutic embolization is predominantly used in the treatment of arterial bleeding from the gastro-intestinal tract, the liver, the intestines (due to an aneurysm or vascular malformation) and in bleeding from intestinal anastomoses. Polyvinyl alcohol particles, embospheres, gelfoam and microcoils can be utilized as embolic agents. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiodrainage and stent implantation are applied in patients with biliary obstructions caused by inoperable tumors of the gall bladder or bile ducts, of the pancreatic head or duodenum and by metastases located in the liver parenchyma or hepatic hilum. Image-guided percutaneous drainage is a valuable option in the management of abscesses in the peritoneal cavity; less common indications are lymphoceles, biliomas, urinomas, hematomas, necrosis and pseudocysts. (orig.) [de

  19. Controlling radiation exposure during interventional procedures in childhood cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Racadio, John M.

    2009-01-01

    Many pediatric cancer patients undergo multiple diagnostic and therapeutic radiologic procedures over the course of their illnesses and are therefore at high risk for radiation exposure. There are a variety of measures that radiologists can employ to reduce this risk. These include limiting the use of radiation whenever possible, using specific strategies to reduce radiation exposure during interventional procedures, using quality assurance programs to ensure compliance, and maintaining continuing staff radiation safety educational programs. Some of the diagnostic and therapeutic interventional radiologic procedures that are performed in pediatric oncology patients are discussed here, along with specific tips for managing radiation exposure. (orig.)

  20. Interventional diagnostic breast procedures; Diagnostische Mammainterventionen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bick, U. [Inst. fuer Radiologie, Universitaetsklinikum Charite, Berlin (Germany); Dept. of Radiology, The Univ. of Chicago (United States); Diekmann, S.; Diekmann, F. [Inst. fuer Radiologie, Universitaetsklinikum Charite, Berlin (Germany)

    2001-09-01

    The comprehensive survey describes in great detail the indications, performance, and advantages and drawbacks of the various biopsy and localization techniques available today for interventional diagnostic evaluation of lesions of the breast. (orig./CB) [German] Die Feinnadelaspirationszytologie ist einfach und rasch durchfuehrbar, ist jedoch insbesondere in der Hand von unerfahrenen Untersuchern mit einer relativ hohen Rate von nicht auswertbaren und falsch-negativen Befunden verbunden. Das Verfahren wird am haeufigsten bei soliden oder zystischen Herdbefunden eingesetzt, die palpabel oder sonographisch nachweisbar sind. Bei inadaequatem Zellmaterial muss eine erneute Biopsie, ggf. mit einem anderen Verfahren, erfolgen. Die Nadelstanzbiopsie ist heutzutage das Verfahren der Wahl bei mammographisch oder sonographisch sichtbaren soliden Herdbefunden. Das Verfahren ist einfach und kostenguenstig durchfuehrbar und weist bei soliden Herdbefunden eine extrem hohe Sensitivitaet und Spezifitaet auf. Bei Mikroverkalkungen sollten immer ausreichend viele Stanzen (5 und mehr) entnommen werden. Bei Stanzbiopsien besteht grundsaetzlich die Gefahr einer Unterschaetzung des histologischen Befundes (ADH statt DCIS, in situ statt invasiv). Bei Diagnose ADH in der Stanzbiopsie sollte eine Exzision des Befundes erfolgen. Die vakuumassistierte Stanzbiopsie ist besonders beeignet zur Biopsie von unklaren Mikroverkalkungen, da durch die groessere entnommene Gewebemenge eine hoehere Spezifitaet und Sensitivitaet erreicht werden kann. Fuer MR-gesteuerte Biopsien hat dieses Verfahren den Vorteil, dass die Nadel nur einmal platziert werden muss. Die stereotaktische Exzisionsbiopsie ist ein relativ teures und invasives Verfahren, das insbesondere zur diagnostischen Abklaerung von unklaren Mikroverkalkungen eingesetzt wird. Hierbei steht das Verfahren in direkter Konkurrenz zur vakuumassistierten Stanzbiopsie. Inwieweit es fuer die stereotaktische Exzisionsbiopsie wirklich ein

  1. Eye dose to staff involved in interventional and procedural fluoroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLean, D; Hadaya, D; Tse, J

    2016-01-01

    In 2011 the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) lowered the occupational eye dose limit from 150 to 20 mSv/yr [1]. While international jurisdictions are in a process of adopting these substantial changes, medical physicists at the clinical level have been advising medical colleagues on specific situations based on dose measurements. Commissioned and calibrated TLDs mounted in commercially available holders designed to simulate the measurement of Hp(3), were applied to staff involved in x-ray procedures for a one month period. During this period clinical procedure data was concurrently collected and subject to audit. The use or not of eye personal protective equipment (PPE) was noted for all staff. Audits were conducted in the cardiac catheterisation laboratory, the interventional angiography rooms and the procedural room where endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) procedures are performed. Significant levels of occupational dose were recorded in the cardiac and interventional procedures, with maximum reading exceeding the new limit for some interventional radiologists. No significant eye doses were measured for staff performing ERCP procedures. One outcome of the studies was increased use of eye PPE for operators of interventional equipment with increased availability also to nursing staff, when standing in close proximity to the patient during procedures. (paper)

  2. An analysis of radiation dose reduction in paediatric interventional cardiology by altering frame rate and use of the anti-scatter grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFadden, S L; Hughes, C M; Winder, Robert J; Mooney, R B

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to investigate removal of the anti-scatter grid and alteration of the frame rate in paediatric interventional cardiology (IC) and assess the impact on radiation dose and image quality. Phantom based experimental studies were performed in a dedicated cardiac catheterisation suite to investigate variations in radiation dose and image quality, with various changes in imaging parameters. Phantom based experimental studies employing these variations in technique identified that radiation dose reductions of 28%–49% can be made to the patient with minimal loss of image quality in smaller sized patients. At present, there is no standard technique for carrying out paediatric IC in the UK or Ireland, resulting in the potential for a wide variation in radiation dose. Dose reductions to patients can be achieved with slight alterations to the imaging equipment with minimal compromise to the image quality. These simple modifications can be easily implemented in clinical practice in IC centres. (paper)

  3. Proposals for the type tests criteria and calibration conditions of passive eye lens dosemeters to be used in interventional cardiology and radiology workplaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordy, J.M.; Daures, J.; Denozière, M.; Gualdrini, G.; Ginjaume, M.; Carinou, E.; Vanhavere, F.

    2011-01-01

    The paper is aimed at making a proposal for the type test and calibration of eye lens passive dosemeters especially used in the interventional cardiology/radiology (IC/IR). Starting from the only existing standard dealing with eye lens dosimetry using TLDs (), parameters such as, detection threshold, energy and angle dependence of response criteria have been reviewed and it has been tried to harmonise them as much as possible with the IEC 62387 requirements, taking into account the particular use at IC/IR workplaces. Conversion coefficients from air kerma to dose equivalent at 3 mm depth for RQR and ISO radiation qualities, employed for type test and calibration purposes, have been calculated in a new phantom introduced within the ORAMED (Optimization of RAdiation protection for MEDical staff) project. This phantom is more representative of the head so that the estimation of H lens by H p (3) is more accurate.

  4. Nuclear cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vos, P.H.

    1982-01-01

    This thesis deals with two topics in nuclear cardiology. In the first, left ventricular wall motion assessment using Fourier transform of local left ventricular time-activity curves in gated blood pool studies is evaluated. In the second, the interpretation of myocardial perfusion scintigrams is assessed which are obtained with thallium-201 or with another radiopharmaceutical with different physical, but identical biological properties. In all these investigations data acquisition and analysis by computer played an essential role. In chapter 1 the desirable properties of a nuclear medicine computer system are given and the computer system used for this work is described. Wall motion analysis of the left ventricle using Fourier transform of local time-activity curves in the left ventricular region in gated blood pool studies is described in chapter 2. In chapter 3 detection of non-perfused lesions in myocardial perfusion scintigraphy with thallium-201 is described. Detection of partly perfused lesions and the influence of scatter and photon energy on myocardial perfusion scintigraphy is described in chapter 4. (Auth.)

  5. Performance of interventional procedures in a day-hospital system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Jae Ik; Park, Auh Whan; Cho, Hye Seon; Park, Eun Hee; Choi, Gap Suk; Lee, Seon Ju; Kim, Yong Woo; Juhn, Je Ryang

    2007-01-01

    We wanted to describe the practice and results of applying the day-hospital system in an interventional radiology clinic. From Oct. 2004 to Dec. 2005, the day-hospital system was applied to various interventional procedures with using a part of the recovery room of an angiography suite as a facility for hospital admission. The study included 91 cases in 73 patients. The source of the patient referral, the procedures, hospital courses and complications were analyzed and questionnaire surveys were conducted for the available 55 patients. Among the patients, 70% (n=64) were referred form other departments, 5% (n=5) from other hospitals, 5% (n=4) were new patients and 20% (n=18) were re-admissions. The procedures included gastrointestinal, biliary, urinary, hemodialysis related-and implantable port related interventions. 96% (n=87) of the patients were successfully discharged in a day and admission to the general ward was only 4% (n=4). Minor complications occurred after discharges in 3% (n=3). The questionnaire survey revealed that 96% (n=53) of the patients were satisfied with the service and they were not anxious after discharge. Most of common interventional procedures were safely done under the day-hospital system with the patients being highly satisfied. The day-hospital system can be a good tool for establishing admitting privileges for an interventional radiology clinic

  6. The practice of paediatric cardiology in Nigeria: A Review | Chinawa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The practice of Paediatric cardiology in Nigeria is at its early phase and it is being choked in an environment overwhelmed with economic, ethnic and political issues. Paediatric cardiology covers a broad area of medicine. This includes diagnosis, medical treatment, interventional cardiology, prenatal diagnosis ...

  7. Flat detector computed tomography in diagnostic and interventional pediatric cardiology; Flachdetektor-Computertomografie in der diagnostischen und interventionellen Kinderkardiologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moesler, J.; Dittrich, S.; Gloeckler, M. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Pediatric Cardiology; Rompel, O. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Radiology

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: In this study the use of flat detector computed tomography (FD-CT) in the catheterization of patients with congenital heart disease was evaluated. Application reports were created for various issues based on the achieved image quality in diverse anatomical regions. Materials and Methods: FD-CT was applied in 176 cases during catheterization between January 2010 and April 2012. A five-point Likert scale ('essential' to 'misleading') was used to evaluate image quality. All cases were analyzed retrospectively and application reports for the visualization of the aorta, pulmonary arteries, pulmonary veins, semilunar valves, cavopulmonary connections and atrial baffles were generated. Contrast dye consumption and radiation dose were evaluated. Results: During the observation period FD-CT was applied in all 176 cases. The mean patient age was 7.0 years (0.01 - 42.53 years). The clinical value of FD-CT was rated superior to conventional angiography in 96.6 % of the cases and was never rated as 'misleading'. FD-CT was rated 'essential' in 3.4 % of all cases, 'very useful' in 77.3 % of all cases, 'useful' in 15.9 % of all cases and 'not useful' in 3.4 % of all cases. The mean dose-area product was 99 {mu}Gym{sup 2} (19.3 - 1276.6 {mu}Gym{sup 2}), and the used contrast dye was 1.76 ml/kg (0.9 - 5 ml/kg). Application reports for the visualization of different anatomical regions are demonstrated. Conclusion: FD-CT is a new and auxiliary procedure in diagnostic and interventional catheterization of patients with congenital heart disease. Particularly extracardiac structures can be displayed in three-dimensional high resolution and be used for diagnosis, surgical planning and 3 D navigation. (orig.)

  8. Cardiology update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil K Verma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the year 2014, there were certain remarkable trials that have changed the practice of cardiology and beyond that these tried to explained some long awaited unanswered questions. Like SIMPLICITY HTN-3 trial clearly explained the uselessness of renal denervation therapy in systemic hypertension. PARADIGM-HF trial provided positive data that may be useful to enrich the basket of medical treatment with a new drug LCZ 696 after a long time. Another important meta-analysis in heart failure questioned the status of beta blockers as standard therapy to improve prognosis in patients with concomitant heart failure and atrial fibrillation . In myocardial infraction , CvLPRIT trial supported the concept of complete revascularization at the time of primary PCI and TASTE trials failed to show expected benefit of thrombus aspiration in acute MI. FFR got more strength from FAME 2 trial. Another important question that was addressed in SECURITY trial was optimal duration of DAPT after second generation DES implantation. One year follow-up results of ABSORB II suggested that bioresorbable scaffolds are currently facing problem of stent thrombosis that might be taken care in near future with improvement in strut technology. Successful use of "Heart in a box" machine provided a major thrust for cardiac transplantation. SEARCH-AF evaluated the efficacy of a novel mobile health technology in the real world to screen for atrial fibrillation (now called as life style disease. A Meta-analysis provided a more comprehensive picture of the new oral anticoagulants as a therapeutic option in atrial fibrillation. Positive results for trans catheter pm-VSD closure in paediatric population were also demonstrated by a randomized controlled trial. Role of corticosteroids in tubercular pericarditis also got the answer in a trial published in 2014.

  9. Assessing Competence in Pediatric Cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Apul E.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    In response to the need to assure physician competence, a rating scale was developed at the University of Minnesota Medical School for use in evaluating clinical competence in pediatric cardiology. It was tested on first- and second-year specialists. Development and testing procedures are described. (JT)

  10. 2015 SCAI/ACC/HFSA/STS Clinical Expert Consensus Statement on the Use of Percutaneous Mechanical Circulatory Support Devices in Cardiovascular Care: Endorsed by the American Heart Assocation, the Cardiological Society of India, and Sociedad Latino Americana de Cardiologia Intervencion; Affirmation of Value by the Canadian Association of Interventional Cardiology-Association Canadienne de Cardiologie d'intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rihal, Charanjit S; Naidu, Srihari S; Givertz, Michael M; Szeto, Wilson Y; Burke, James A; Kapur, Navin K; Kern, Morton; Garratt, Kirk N; Goldstein, James A; Dimas, Vivian; Tu, Thomas

    2015-05-19

    Although historically the intra-aortic balloon pump has been the only mechanical circulatory support device available to clinicians, a number of new devices have become commercially available and have entered clinical practice. These include axial flow pumps, such as Impella(®); left atrial to femoral artery bypass pumps, specifically the TandemHeart; and new devices for institution of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. These devices differ significantly in their hemodynamic effects, insertion, monitoring, and clinical applicability. This document reviews the physiologic impact on the circulation of these devices and their use in specific clinical situations. These situations include patients undergoing high-risk percutaneous coronary intervention, those presenting with cardiogenic shock, and acute decompensated heart failure. Specialized uses for right-sided support and in pediatric populations are discussed and the clinical utility of mechanical circulatory support devices is reviewed, as are the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association clinical practice guidelines. Copyright © 2015 The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, The American College of Cardiology Foundation, The Heart Failure Society of America, and The Society for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. 2015 SCAI/ACC/HFSA/STS Clinical Expert Consensus Statement on the Use of Percutaneous Mechanical Circulatory Support Devices in Cardiovascular Care (Endorsed by the American Heart Association, the Cardiological Society of India, and Sociedad Latino Americana de Cardiologia Intervencion; Affirmation of Value by the Canadian Association of Interventional Cardiology-Association Canadienne de Cardiologie D'intervention).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rihal, Charanjit S; Naidu, Srihari S; Givertz, Michael M; Szeto, Wilson Y; Burke, James A; Kapur, Navin K; Kern, Morton; Garratt, Kirk N; Goldstein, James A; Dimas, Vivian; Tu, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Although historically the intra-aortic balloon pump has been the only mechanical circulatory support device available to clinicians, a number of new devices have become commercially available and have entered clinical practice. These include axial flow pumps, such as Impella®; left atrial to femoral artery bypass pumps, specifically the TandemHeart; and new devices for institution of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. These devices differ significantly in their hemodynamic effects, insertion, monitoring, and clinical applicability. This document reviews the physiologic impact on the circulation of these devices and their use in specific clinical situations. These situations include patients undergoing high-risk percutaneous coronary intervention, those presenting with cardiogenic shock, and acute decompensated heart failure. Specialized uses for right-sided support and in pediatric populations are discussed and the clinical utility of mechanical circulatory support devices is reviewed, as are the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association clinical practice guidelines. © 2015 by The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, The American College of Cardiology Foundation, The Heart Failure Society of America, and The Society for Thoracic Surgery.

  12. ACC/AATS/AHA/ASE/ASNC/HRS/SCAI/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2017 Appropriate Use Criteria for Multimodality Imaging in Valvular Heart Disease: A Report of the American College of Cardiology Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, John U; Kort, Smadar; Mehran, Roxana; Schoenhagen, Paul; Soman, Prem; Dehmer, Greg J; Doherty, John U; Schoenhagen, Paul; Amin, Zahid; Bashore, Thomas M; Boyle, Andrew; Calnon, Dennis A; Carabello, Blase; Cerqueira, Manuel D; Conte, John; Desai, Milind; Edmundowicz, Daniel; Ferrari, Victor A; Ghoshhajra, Brian; Mehrotra, Praveen; Nazarian, Saman; Reece, T Brett; Tamarappoo, Balaji; Tzou, Wendy S; Wong, John B; Doherty, John U; Dehmer, Gregory J; Bailey, Steven R; Bhave, Nicole M; Brown, Alan S; Daugherty, Stacie L; Dean, Larry S; Desai, Milind Y; Duvernoy, Claire S; Gillam, Linda D; Hendel, Robert C; Kramer, Christopher M; Lindsay, Bruce D; Manning, Warren J; Mehrotra, Praveen; Patel, Manesh R; Sachdeva, Ritu; Wann, L Samuel; Winchester, David E; Wolk, Michael J; Allen, Joseph M

    2018-04-01

    This document is 1 of 2 companion appropriate use criteria (AUC) documents developed by the American College of Cardiology, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons. This document addresses the evaluation and use of multimodality imaging in the diagnosis and management of valvular heart disease, whereas the second, companion document addresses this topic with regard to structural heart disease. Although there is clinical overlap, the documents addressing valvular and structural heart disease are published separately, albeit with a common structure. The goal of the companion AUC documents is to provide a comprehensive resource for multimodality imaging in the context of valvular and structural heart disease, encompassing multiple imaging modalities. Using standardized methodology, the clinical scenarios (indications) were developed by a diverse writing group to represent patient presentations encountered in everyday practice and included common applications and anticipated uses. Where appropriate, the scenarios were developed on the basis of the most current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines. A separate, independent rating panel scored the 92 clinical scenarios in this document on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that a modality is considered appropriate for the clinical scenario presented. Midrange scores of 4 to 6 indicate that a modality may be appropriate for the clinical scenario, and scores of 1 to 3 indicate that a modality is considered rarely appropriate for the clinical scenario. The primary objective of the AUC is to provide a framework for the assessment of these scenarios by practices that will

  13. ACC/AATS/AHA/ASE/ASNC/HRS/SCAI/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2017 Appropriate Use Criteria for Multimodality Imaging in Valvular Heart Disease : A Report of the American College of Cardiology Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, John U; Kort, Smadar; Mehran, Roxana; Schoenhagen, Paul; Soman, Prem

    2017-12-01

    This document is 1 of 2 companion appropriate use criteria (AUC) documents developed by the American College of Cardiology, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons. This document addresses the evaluation and use of multimodality imaging in the diagnosis and management of valvular heart disease, whereas the second, companion document addresses this topic with regard to structural heart disease. Although there is clinical overlap, the documents addressing valvular and structural heart disease are published separately, albeit with a common structure. The goal of the companion AUC documents is to provide a comprehensive resource for multimodality imaging in the context of valvular and structural heart disease, encompassing multiple imaging modalities.Using standardized methodology, the clinical scenarios (indications) were developed by a diverse writing group to represent patient presentations encountered in everyday practice and included common applications and anticipated uses. Where appropriate, the scenarios were developed on the basis of the most current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines.A separate, independent rating panel scored the 92 clinical scenarios in this document on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that a modality is considered appropriate for the clinical scenario presented. Midrange scores of 4 to 6 indicate that a modality may be appropriate for the clinical scenario, and scores of 1 to 3 indicate that a modality is considered rarely appropriate for the clinical scenario.The primary objective of the AUC is to provide a framework for the assessment of these scenarios by practices that will

  14. ICRP Publication 139: Occupational Radiological Protection in Interventional Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, P Ortiz; Dauer, L T; Loose, R; Martin, C J; Miller, D L; Vañó, E; Doruff, M; Padovani, R; Massera, G; Yoder, C

    2018-03-01

    In recent publications, such as Publications 117 and 120, the Commission provided practical advice for physicians and other healthcare personnel on measures to protect their patients and themselves during interventional procedures. These measures can only be effective if they are encompassed by a framework of radiological protection elements, and by the availability of professionals with responsibilities in radiological protection. This framework includes a radiological protection programme with a strategy for exposure monitoring, protective garments, education and training, and quality assurance of the programme implementation. Professionals with responsibilities in occupational radiological protection for interventional procedures include: medical physicists; radiological protection specialists; personnel working in dosimetry services; clinical applications support personnel from the suppliers and maintenance companies; staff engaged in training, standardisation of equipment, and procedures; staff responsible for occupational health; hospital administrators responsible for providing financial support; and professional bodies and regulators. This publication addresses these elements and these audiences, and provides advice on specific issues, such as assessment of effective dose from dosimeter readings when an apron is worn, estimation of exposure of the lens of the eye (with and without protective eyewear), extremity monitoring, selection and testing of protective garments, and auditing the interventional procedures when occupational doses are unusually high or low (the latter meaning that the dosimeter may not have been worn).

  15. Monte Carlo calculations on extremity and eye lens dosimetry for medical staff at interventional radiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carinou, E.; Ferrari, P.; Koukorava, C.; Krim, S.; Struelens, L.

    2011-01-01

    There are many factors that can influence the extremity and eye lens doses of the medical staff during interventional radiology and cardiology procedures. Numerical simulations can play an important role in evaluating extremity and eye lens doses in correlation with many different parameters. In the present study, the first results of the ORAMED (Optimisation of Radiation protection of Medical staff) simulation campaign are presented. The parameters investigated for their influence on eye lens, hand, wrist and leg doses are: tube voltage, filtration, beam projection, field size and irradiated part of the patient's body. The tube voltage ranged from 60 to 110 kVp, filtration from 3 to 6 mm Al and from 0 to 0.9 mm Cu. For all projections, the results showed that doses received by the operator decreased with increasing tube voltage and filtration. The magnitude of the influence of the tube voltage and the filtration on the doses depends on the beam projection and the irradiated part of the patient's body. Finally, the influence of the field size is significant in decreasing the doses. (authors)

  16. Radiation exposure of operator during various interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, In Kyu; Chung, Jin Wook; Han, Joon Koo; Park, Jae Hyung; Kang, Wee Saing

    1994-01-01

    To investigate the levels of radiation exposure of an operator which may be influenced by the wearing an apron, type of procedure, duration of fluoroscopy and operator's skill during various interventional procedures. Radiation doses were measured both inside and outside the apron(0.5 mm lead equivalent) of the operator by a film badge monitoring method and the duration of fluoroscopy was measured in 96 procedures prospectively. The procedures were 30 transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE), 25 percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainages (PTBD), 16 stone removals (SR), 15 percutaneous needle aspirations (PNCA) and 10 percutaneous nephrostomies(PCN). To assess the difference of exposure by the operator's skill, the procedures of TAE and PTBD were done separately by groups of staffs and residents. Average protective effect of the apron was 72.8%. Average radiation exposure(unit: μ Sv/procedure was 23.3 in PTBD by residents, 10.0 in PTBD by staffs, 10.0 in SR, 8.7 in TAE by residents, 7.3 in TAE by staffs, 9.0 in PCN and 6.0 in PCNA. Average radiation exposure of residents were 1.9 times greater than those of staffs. Radiation exposure was not proportionally related to the duration of fluoroscopy, but influenced by wearing an apron, various types of procedure and operator's skills

  17. Patient radiation dose audits for fluoroscopically guided interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balter, Stephen; Rosenstein, Marvin; Miller, Donald L.; Schueler, Beth; Spelic, David

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Quality management for any use of medical x-ray imaging should include monitoring of radiation dose. Fluoroscopically guided interventional (FGI) procedures are inherently clinically variable and have the potential for inducing deterministic injuries in patients. The use of a conventional diagnostic reference level is not appropriate for FGI procedures. A similar but more detailed quality process for management of radiation dose in FGI procedures is described. Methods: A method that takes into account both the inherent variability of FGI procedures and the risk of deterministic injuries from these procedures is suggested. The substantial radiation dose level (SRDL) is an absolute action level (with regard to patient follow-up) below which skin injury is highly unlikely and above which skin injury is possible. The quality process for FGI procedures collects data from all instances of a given procedure from a number of facilities into an advisory data set (ADS). An individual facility collects a facility data set (FDS) comprised of all instances of the same procedure at that facility. The individual FDS is then compared to the multifacility ADS with regard to the overall shape of the dose distributions and the percent of instances in both the ADS and the FDS that exceed the SRDL. Results: Samples of an ADS and FDS for percutaneous coronary intervention, using the dose metric of reference air kerma (K a,r ) (i.e., the cumulative air kerma at the reference point), are used to illustrate the proposed quality process for FGI procedures. Investigation is warranted whenever the FDS is noticeably different from the ADS for the specific FGI procedure and particularly in two circumstances: (1) When the facility's local median K a,r exceeds the 75th percentile of the ADS and (2) when the percent of instances where K a,r exceeds the facility-selected SRDL is greater for the FDS than for the ADS. Conclusions: Analysis of the two data sets (ADS and FDS) and of the

  18. Interventional procedures of the isolated iliac arterial aneurysm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohm, Joon Young [The Catholic Univ. of Korea College of Medicine, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Byung Seok; Ahn, Moon Sang [Chungnam National Univ. Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Mi Hyun [Dankook Univ. Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ho Jun [Konyang Univ. Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    To report the results of treatment isolated iliac arterial aneurysms by interventional procedures. Over a period of 5 years, 7 isolated iliac artery aneurysms (4 in the common iliac artery, 3 in the internal iliac artery) in 7 patients (3 women, 4 men; mean age, 65.7 years) were treated using interventional procedures. The mean aneurysm size was 35 mm (range, 30-45 mm). The common iliac aneurysms were treated using a unilateral stent graft (2 balloon expandable, 2 self expandable) with coil embolization of the internal iliac artery (n = 3), except for 1 aneurysm that ruptured. Coil embolization alone was performed for aneurysms involving only the internal iliac artery (n = 3). All patients were treated successfully, except for 1 with an initial remnant of type 2 endoleak. There were no perioperative complications. No leakage or complication occurred at the mean follow up of 14 months (range 2-29 months). One patient with a ruptured aneurysm died of multi organ failure during the follow up period. Three aneurysms had decreased in size on follow up CT. Interventional procedures with stent grafting and coil embolization are safe and effective treatments for isolated iliac artery aneurysms.

  19. 2018 Canadian Cardiovascular Society/Canadian Association of Interventional Cardiology Focused Update of the Guidelines for the Use of Antiplatelet Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Shamir R; Bainey, Kevin R; Cantor, Warren J; Lordkipanidzé, Marie; Marquis-Gravel, Guillaume; Robinson, Simon D; Sibbald, Matthew; So, Derek Y; Wong, Graham C; Abunassar, Joseph G; Ackman, Margaret L; Bell, Alan D; Cartier, Raymond; Douketis, James D; Lawler, Patrick R; McMurtry, Michael S; Udell, Jacob A; van Diepen, Sean; Verma, Subodh; Mancini, G B John; Cairns, John A; Tanguay, Jean-François

    2018-03-01

    Antiplatelet therapy (APT) has become an important tool in the treatment and prevention of atherosclerotic events, particularly those associated with coronary artery disease. A large evidence base has evolved regarding the relationship between APT prescription in various clinical contexts and risk/benefit relationships. The Guidelines Committee of the Canadian Cardiovascular Society and Canadian Association of Interventional Cardiology publishes regular updates of its recommendations, taking into consideration the most recent clinical evidence. The present update to the 2011 and 2013 Canadian Cardiovascular Society APT guidelines incorporates new evidence on how to optimize APT use, particularly in situations in which few to no data were previously available. The recommendations update focuses on the following primary topics: (1) the duration of dual APT (DAPT) in patients who undergo percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for acute coronary syndrome and non-acute coronary syndrome indications; (2) management of DAPT in patients who undergo noncardiac surgery; (3) management of DAPT in patients who undergo elective and semiurgent coronary artery bypass graft surgery; (4) when and how to switch between different oral antiplatelet therapies; and (5) management of antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy in patients who undergo PCI. For PCI patients, we specifically analyze the particular considerations in patients with atrial fibrillation, mechanical or bioprosthetic valves (including transcatheter aortic valve replacement), venous thromboembolic disease, and established left ventricular thrombus or possible left ventricular thrombus with reduced ejection fraction after ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. In addition to specific recommendations, we provide values and preferences and practical tips to aid the practicing clinician in the day to day use of these important agents. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Medical interventional procedures--reducing the radiation risks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cousins, C. E-mail: claire.cousins@addenbrookes.nhs.uk; Sharp, C

    2004-06-01

    Over the last 40 years, the number of percutaneous interventional procedures using radiation has increased significantly, with many secondary care clinicians using fluoroscopically guided techniques. Many procedures can deliver high radiation doses to patients and staff, with the potential to cause immediate and delayed radiation effects. The challenge for interventionists is to maximize benefit, whilst minimizing radiation risk to patients and staff. Non-radiologist clinicians are often inadequately trained in radiation safety and radiobiology. However, clinical governance and legislation now requires a more rigorous approach to protecting patients and staff. Protection can be ensured, and risks can be controlled, by appropriate design, procurement and commissioning of equipment; quality assurance; and optimal operational technique, backed by audit. Interventionists need knowledge and skills to reduce the risks. Appropriate training should include awareness of the potential for radiation injury, equipment operational parameters, doses measurement and recording methods and dose reduction techniques. Clinical governance requires informed consent, appropriate patient counselling and follow-up.

  1. Medical interventional procedures--reducing the radiation risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cousins, C.; Sharp, C.

    2004-01-01

    Over the last 40 years, the number of percutaneous interventional procedures using radiation has increased significantly, with many secondary care clinicians using fluoroscopically guided techniques. Many procedures can deliver high radiation doses to patients and staff, with the potential to cause immediate and delayed radiation effects. The challenge for interventionists is to maximize benefit, whilst minimizing radiation risk to patients and staff. Non-radiologist clinicians are often inadequately trained in radiation safety and radiobiology. However, clinical governance and legislation now requires a more rigorous approach to protecting patients and staff. Protection can be ensured, and risks can be controlled, by appropriate design, procurement and commissioning of equipment; quality assurance; and optimal operational technique, backed by audit. Interventionists need knowledge and skills to reduce the risks. Appropriate training should include awareness of the potential for radiation injury, equipment operational parameters, doses measurement and recording methods and dose reduction techniques. Clinical governance requires informed consent, appropriate patient counselling and follow-up

  2. Entrance surface dose in cerebral interventional radiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrera-Rico, M.; López-Rendón, X.; Rivera-Ordóñez, C. E.; Gamboa-deBuen, I.

    2012-01-01

    At the Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía (INNN) diagnostic as well as therapeutic procedures of interventional radiology are carried out. Since the procedures can last from some minutes to several hours, the absorbed dose for the patient could increase dangerously. An investigation had begun in order to determine the entrance surface dose (ESD) using 25 thermoluminiscent dosimeters TLD-100 and 8 strips of 15 ×1 cm 2 of Gafchromic XR-QA2 film bound in a holder of 15×15 cm 2 in the posteroanterior (PA) and lateral (LAT) positions during all the procedure. The results show that maximum ESD could be from 0.9 to 2.9 Gy for the PA position and between 1.6 and 2.5 Gy for the lateral position. The average ESD was between 0.7 and 1.3 Gy for the PA position, and from 0.44 to 1.1 Gy for the lateral position in a therapeutic procedure.

  3. Entrance surface dose in cerebral interventional radiology procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrera-Rico, M.; Lopez-Rendon, X.; Rivera-Ordonez, C. E.; Gamboa-deBuen, I. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, 04510 DF (Mexico); Instituto Nacional de Neurologia y Neurocirugia Manuel Velasco Suarez, 14269 DF (Mexico); Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, 04510 DF (Mexico)

    2012-10-23

    At the Instituto Nacional de Neurologia y Neurocirugia (INNN) diagnostic as well as therapeutic procedures of interventional radiology are carried out. Since the procedures can last from some minutes to several hours, the absorbed dose for the patient could increase dangerously. An investigation had begun in order to determine the entrance surface dose (ESD) using 25 thermoluminiscent dosimeters TLD-100 and 8 strips of 15 Multiplication-Sign 1 cm{sup 2} of Gafchromic XR-QA2 film bound in a holder of 15 Multiplication-Sign 15 cm{sup 2} in the posteroanterior (PA) and lateral (LAT) positions during all the procedure. The results show that maximum ESD could be from 0.9 to 2.9 Gy for the PA position and between 1.6 and 2.5 Gy for the lateral position. The average ESD was between 0.7 and 1.3 Gy for the PA position, and from 0.44 to 1.1 Gy for the lateral position in a therapeutic procedure.

  4. Radiation safety among cardiology fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Candice; Vasaiwala, Samip; Haque, Faizul; Pratap, Kiran; Vidovich, Mladen I

    2010-07-01

    Cardiology fellows can be exposed to high radiation levels during procedures. Proper radiation training and implementation of safety procedures is of critical importance in lowering physician health risks associated with radiation exposure. Participants were cardiology fellows in the United States (n = 2,545) who were contacted by e-mail to complete an anonymous survey regarding the knowledge and practice of radiation protection during catheterization laboratory procedures. An on-line survey engine, SurveyMonkey, was used to distribute and collect the results of the 10-question survey. The response rate was 10.5%. Of the 267 respondents, 82% had undergone formal radiation safety training. Only 58% of the fellows were aware of their hospital's pregnancy radiation policy and 60% knew how to contact the hospital's radiation safety officer. Although 52% of the fellows always wore a dosimeter, 81% did not know their level of radiation exposure in the previous year and only 74% of fellows knew the safe levels of radiation exposure. The fellows who had received formal training were more likely to be aware of their pregnancy policy, to know the contact information of their radiation safety officer, to be aware of the safe levels of radiation exposure, to use dosimeters and RadPad consistently, and to know their own level of radiation exposure in the previous year. In conclusion, cardiology fellows have not been adequately educated about radiation safety. A concerted effort directed at physician safety in the workplace from the regulatory committees overseeing cardiology fellowships should be encouraged. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Organ doses in interventional radiology procedures: Evaluation of software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tort, I.; Ruiz-Cruces, R.; Perez-Martinez, M.; Carrera, F.; Ojeda, C.; Diez de los Rios, A.

    2001-01-01

    Interventional Radiology (IR) procedures require large fluoroscopy times and important number of radiological images, so the levels of radiation to patient are high, which leads us to calculate the organ doses. The objective of this work is to estimate and make a comparison of the results given by the different software that we have to do the calculation of organ doses in complex procedures of IR. To do this, 28 patients have been selected, distributed in the 3 procedures with highest doses. The determination of organ doses and effective doses has been made using the projections utilized and different software based on Monte Carlo Methods: Eff-dose, PCXMC and Diasoft. We have obtained very high dispersion in the average organ dose between the 3 programs. In many cases, it is higher than 25% and in some particular cases, it is greater than 100%. Dispersion obtained in effective doses is not so high, being under 20% in all cases. This shows that a better solution is needed to solve the problem of the organ doses calculation; a more accurate method is necessary that brings us to a trustworthy approach to reality, and, at the moment, that we do not dispose of it. (author)

  6. Paediatric cardiology programs in countries with limited resources: how to bridge the gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulafa, K M Ali

    2010-07-01

    Establishing paediatric cardiology service in a country with limited resources like Sudan is a challenging task. A paediatric cardiac team was formed then the services in different disciplines were gradually established. Echocardiography (echo) clinics were founded in tertiary and peripheral hospitals. Cardiac catheterization (cath) was established at the Sudan Heart Centre (SHC) in 2004 and over 400 procedures had been performed including interventional catheterization like pulmonary valve dilatation, patent ductus arteriosus and atrial septal defect device closure. Congenital heart surgery started in 2001, currently 200 cases are done each year including closed procedures as well as open heart procedures for patients weighing more than 8 kg. Cardiology-cardiac surgery as well as adult congenital heart disease meetings were held and contributed positively to the services. The cardiology-cardiac surgery scientific club meeting was founded as a forum for academic discussions. A fellowship program was established in 2004 and included seven candidates trained in paediatric cardiology and intensive care. Two training courses had been established: congenital heart disease echo and paediatric electrocardiogram interpretation. Links with regional and international cardiac centres had important roles in consolidating our program. Significant obstacles face our service due to the small number of trained personnel, high cost of procedures, the lack of regular supplies and lack of cardiac intensive care facilities for young infants. Bridging the huge gap needs extensive official as well as non-governmental efforts, training more staff, supporting families and collaboration with regional and international centres.

  7. Evaluation of Patient Radiation Dose during Cardiac Interventional Procedures: What Is the Most Effective Method?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chida, K.; Saito, H.; Ishibashi, T.; Zuguchi, M.; Kagaya, Y.; Takahashi, S.

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac interventional radiology has lower risks than surgical procedures. This is despite the fact that radiation doses from cardiac intervention procedures are the highest of any commonly performed general X-ray examination. Maximum radiation skin doses (MSDs) should be determined to avoid radiation-associated skin injuries in patients undergoing cardiac intervention procedures. However, real-time evaluation of MSD is unavailable for many cardiac intervention procedures. This review describes methods of determining MSD during cardiac intervention procedures. Currently, in most cardiac intervention procedures, real-time measuring of MSD is not feasible. Thus, we recommend that physicians record the patient's total entrance skin dose, such as the dose at the interventional reference point when it can be monitored, in order to estimate MSD in intervention procedures

  8. Dose estimation of interventional cardiologists in different body regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borba, Iana Q. de; Luz, Renata M. da; Capaverde, Alexandre S.; Silva, Ana M. Marques da; Caramori, Paulo Ricardo Avancini

    2015-01-01

    Interventional radiology is one of the medical specialties that provides the highest doses to professionals, widely used in cardiology, being called interventional cardiology. In order to contribute to the optimization of occupational radiation protection in interventional cardiology procedures, the aim of this study is to evaluate the dose estimation received in different body regions by physicians in interventional cardiology procedures. Two physicians were followed, named as A and B, during one month period, performing a total of 127 procedures (70 for A and 57 for B) of interventional cardiology. During the procedures, dosimeters in different body regions beyond the full-body dosimeter were positioned. The results showed the highest values for the estimated dose received by workers were in the right wrist and left side face regions, for the physician A, and in the left knee and left side face, for the physician B. Results demonstrate the importance of using individual protection equipment by physicians in interventional cardiology, including lead glasses, besides monitoring dosimeters for other body regions, such as wrist, face and knee. (author)

  9. Radiation exposure of cardiologists eye lenses during interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treckova, V.; Nikodemova, D.; Salat, D.

    2014-01-01

    Recently published studies have indicated a lower threshold of eye lens doses for developing cataracts than previously used. These studies have shown that the latency period responsible for cataract development depends on the absorbed eye lens dose. The recommendations of the ICRP, the new BSS of IAEA and the 2013/59/EURATOM Directive revise the old occupational limit of equivalent dose (150 mSv) to the new lower value of 20 mSv per year. Probably this value will be exceeded mainly during specific interventional procedures. The main aim of the present study was to investigate the received eye lens doses by monitoring and assessment of radiation load of cardiologists in the particular Cardio logic Healthcare Facility in Slovakia. The measurements were realized by using TLD located on the both sides of the protective lead glasses of five cardiologists during CA/PTCA procedures, performed in the period of 1 month. Evaluation of the dosimeters was performed by HARSHAW TLD 3500. Collected parameters of each individual examination were expressed in the quantity personal dose equivalent Hp(0,07). The whole body doses during the CA/PTCA procedures were controlled by RaySafe i2 dosimetry system, allowing the collection of real time radiation exposure of medical staff. Values of personal dose equivalent Hp(0,07) on the left eye lens (where we observed higher dose values), were extrapolated to annual doses and compared with the new eye lens limit. The comparison of the results (calculating the average annual dose from the gathered annual workload of each cardiologist) indicates that the new proposed limit for eye lens doses (20 mSv/year) should be exceeded. Important information comes from the results of RaySafe measurements, which refer to the fact, that although the whole-body annual doses obtained by the followed cardiologists doses not exceed the annual limit of effective dose, the equivalent doses to the lens of the eye obtained from TLD, reached the overflow value

  10. Pediatric nuclear cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelfand, M.J.; Hannon, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    Nuclear cardiology methods have had less impact upon pediatric cardiology than upon adult cardiology. Most pediatric heart disease results from congenital malformations of the heart and great vessels, which is usually discovered in infancy, and is most often treated definitively in infancy or early childhood. Unfortunately, nuclear medicine techniques are limited in their spatial resolution - structures that overlie each other are separated with difficulty. As a result, nuclear cardiology is usually of limited value in the anatomic characterization of the congenital heart abnormalities. Nevertheless, it has been useful in the detection and quantification of the pathophysiologic consequences of many congenital cardiac malformations. The authors review application of nuclear medicine in pediatric cardiology, and attempt to assess each in terms of its clinical utility

  11. Artificial Intelligence in Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kipp W; Torres Soto, Jessica; Glicksberg, Benjamin S; Shameer, Khader; Miotto, Riccardo; Ali, Mohsin; Ashley, Euan; Dudley, Joel T

    2018-06-12

    Artificial intelligence and machine learning are poised to influence nearly every aspect of the human condition, and cardiology is not an exception to this trend. This paper provides a guide for clinicians on relevant aspects of artificial intelligence and machine learning, reviews selected applications of these methods in cardiology to date, and identifies how cardiovascular medicine could incorporate artificial intelligence in the future. In particular, the paper first reviews predictive modeling concepts relevant to cardiology such as feature selection and frequent pitfalls such as improper dichotomization. Second, it discusses common algorithms used in supervised learning and reviews selected applications in cardiology and related disciplines. Third, it describes the advent of deep learning and related methods collectively called unsupervised learning, provides contextual examples both in general medicine and in cardiovascular medicine, and then explains how these methods could be applied to enable precision cardiology and improve patient outcomes. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Usefulness of a functional tracheobronchial phantom for interventional procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Hyung; Lim, Cheong Hwan; Kim, Jeong Koo

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate usefulness of a functional tracheobronchial phantom for interventional procedure. The functional phantom was made as a actual size with human normal anatomy used silicone and a paper clay mold. A tracheobronchial-shape clay mold was placed inside a square box and liquid silicone was poured. After the silicone was formed, the clay was removed. We measured film density and tracheobronchial angle at the human, animal and phantom respectively. The film density of trachea part were 0.76 (± 0.011) in human, 0.97 (± 0.015) in animal, 0.45 (± 0.016) in phantom. The tracheobronchial bifurcation part measured 0.51 (± 0.006) in human, 0.65 (± 0.005) in animal, 0.65 (± 0.008) in phantom. The right bronchus part measured 0.14 (± 0.008) in human, 0.59 (± 0.014) in animal and 0.04 (± 0.007) in phantom. The left bronchus were 0.54 (± 0.004) in human, 0.54 (± 0.008) in animal and 0.08 (± 0.008) in phantom. At the stent part were 0.54 (± 0.004) in human, 0.59 (± 0.011) in animal and 0.04 (± 0.007) in phantom, respectively. The tracheobronchial angle of the left bronchus site were 42.6 (± 2.07).deg. in human, 43.4 (± 2.40).deg. in animal and 35 (± 2.00).deg. in phantom, respectively. The right bronchus site were 32.8 (± 2.77).deg. in human, 34.6 (± 1.94).deg. in animal and 50.2 (± 1.30).deg. in phantom, respectively. The phantom was useful for in-vitro testing of tracheobronchial interventional procedure, since it was easy to reproduce

  13. A real-time haptic interface for interventional radiology procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moix, Thomas; Ilic, Dejan; Fracheboud, Blaise; Zoethout, Jurjen; Bleuler, Hannes

    2005-01-01

    Interventional Radiology (IR) is a minimally-invasive surgery technique (MIS) where guidewires and catheters are steered in the vascular system under X-ray imaging. In order to perform these procedures, a radiologist has to be correctly trained to master hand-eye coordination, instrument manipulation and procedure protocols. This paper proposes a computer-assisted training environment dedicated to IR. The system is composed of a virtual reality (VR) simulation of the anatomy of the patient linked to a robotic interface providing haptic force feedback.The paper focuses on the requirements, design and prototyping of a specific part of the haptic interface dedicated to catheters. Translational tracking and force feedback on the catheter is provided by two cylinders forming a friction drive arrangement. The whole friction can be set in rotation with an additional motor providing torque feedback. A force and a torque sensor are integrated in the cylinders for direct measurement on the catheter enabling disturbance cancellation with a close-loop force control strategy.

  14. Interventional procedures and future drug therapy for hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Melvin D.; Sobotka, Paul A.; Pathak, Atul

    2017-01-01

    Hypertension management poses a major challenge to clinicians globally once non-drug (lifestyle) measures have failed to control blood pressure (BP). Although drug treatment strategies to lower BP are well described, poor control rates of hypertension, even in the first world, suggest that more needs to be done to surmount the problem. A major issue is non-adherence to antihypertensive drugs, which is caused in part by drug intolerance due to side effects. More effective antihypertensive drugs are therefore required which have excellent tolerability and safety profiles in addition to being efficacious. For those patients who either do not tolerate or wish to take medication for hypertension or in whom BP control is not attained despite multiple antihypertensives, a novel class of interventional procedures to manage hypertension has emerged. While most of these target various aspects of the sympathetic nervous system regulation of BP, an additional procedure is now available, which addresses mechanical aspects of the circulation. Most of these new devices are supported by early and encouraging evidence for both safety and efficacy, although it is clear that more rigorous randomized controlled trial data will be essential before any of the technologies can be adopted as a standard of care. PMID:27406184

  15. Interventional radiology and undesirable effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benderitter, M.

    2009-01-01

    As some procedures of interventional radiology are complex and long, doses received by patients can be high and cause undesired effects, notably on the skin or in underlying tissues (particularly in the brain as far as interventional neuroradiology is concerned and in lungs in the case of interventional cardiology). The author briefly discusses some deterministic effects in interventional radiology (influence of dose level, delay of appearance of effects, number of accidents). He briefly comments the diagnosis and treatment of severe radiological burns

  16. Rhenium-188 - advantages and clinical potential for use of a readily available, cost effective therapeutic radioisotope for applications in nuclear medicine, oncology and interventional cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, F.F. jr.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Carrier-free rhenium-188 (Re-188) is readily available from the alumina-based tungsten-188/rhenium-188 generator system and has many attractive properties for a wide variety of therapeutic applications. The 16.9 h half-life, emission of the 2.2 MeV beta particle and versatile chemistry make Re-188 an important candidate for applications where high radiation penetration is required. In addition, emission of a gamma photon (155 KeV, 15 %) permits evaluation of biodistribution, pharmacokinetics and dosimetry estimates. The long physical half-life of the tungsten-188 (W-188) parent (t 1/2 69 days) and consistent generator performance - with high Re-188 yields and low W-188 parent breakthrough - result in an indefinite shelf-life of several months, dependent on the levels of Re-188 required. Post generator elution in-growth of 62 % of Re-188 after 24 hours in combination with high elution yields (75-85 %) result in 50 % daily yields of the maximal Re-188 available. In addition to research being conducted for the development of a wide variety of new therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals and devices, Re-188 is also being evaluated in physician-sponsored clinical trials in over 15 countries, with applications in nuclear medicine, oncology and interventional cardiology. One major current clinical application involves post-angiographic treatment of arterial segments following PTCA using Re-188 perrhenate or MAG3 liquid-filled balloons as an effective and cost-effective approach for inhibition of the hyperplastic response to vessel damage, which delivers uniform dose to the vessel wall. Re-188-HEDP is being used for palliation of metastatic bone pain palliation. This agent is readily prepared from a simple 'kit' and provides pain palliation as effective as other commercially available agents. The use of the Re-188-labeled Anti-NCA-95 antibody (BW 50/183; CD66 a,b,c,e) in conjunction which external beam irradiation and chemotherapy is an effective method for

  17. The radiation protective devices for interventional procedures using computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Hiroji; Chabatake, Mitsuhiro; Shimizu, Mitsuru; Tamura, Sakio

    2002-01-01

    A scattered dose and a surface dose from phantom measurements during interventional procedures with computed tomography (IVR-CT) were evaluated. To reduce the personnel exposure in IVR-CT, the new protective devices were developed and its effect evaluated. Two radiation protection devices were experimentally made using a lead vinyl sheet with lead equivalent 0.125 mmPb. The first device is a lead curtain which shields the space of CT-gantry and phantom for the CT examination. The second device is a lead drape which shields on the phantom surface adjacent to the scanning plane for the CT-fluoroscopy. Scattered dose and phantom surface dose were measured with an abdominal phantom during Cine-CT (130 kV, 150 mA, 5 seconds, 10 mm section thickness). They were measured by using ionization chamber dosimeter. They were measured with and without a lead curtain and a lead drape. Scattered dose rate was measured at distance of 50-150 cm from the scanning plane. And, surface dose was measured at distance of 4-21 cm from the scanning plane on the phantom. On operator's standing position, scattered dose rates were from 8.4 to 11.6 μGy/sec at CT examination. The lead curtain and the lead drape reduced scattered dose rate at distance of 50 cm from the scanning plane by 66% and 58.3% respectively. Surface dose rate were 118 μGy/sec at distance of 5 cm from the scanning plane at CT-fluoroscopy. The lead drape reduced the surface dose by 60.5%. High scattered exposure to personnel may occur during interventional procedures using CT. They were considerably reduced during CT-arteriography by attaching the lead curtain in CT equipment. And they were substantially reduced during CT-fluoroscopy by placing the lead drape adjacent to the scanning plane, in addition, operator's hand would be protected from unnecessary radiation scattered by phantom. It was suggested that the scattered exposure to personnel could be sufficiently reduced by using radiation protection devices in IVR-CT. The

  18. Dosimetry of the patient and occupational in interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andisco, D.; Bourel, V.; Schmidt, L.; Fernandez, N.

    2014-08-01

    The big necessity to estimate the entrance doses in skin that the patients receive when are exposed to interventional procedures and the personal dosimetry of the professionals that work in these procedures in operating room, has taken to the analysis of different possibilities that allow to carry out these estimates. The objective of this work was to analyze the possibility of using Optically Stimulated Luminescence dosimeters; comparing the results with ionizing cameras and electronic personal dosimeters. To carry out these estimates, we work with a X-ray equipment Phillips Allure, acrylic phantoms, a dosimetry system formed by ionization camera and dosimeter UNIDOS E, OSL (Nano dots) dosimeters and electronic lavalieres Aloka brand, PDM 117 models. To estimate the doses that the patients receive, entrance dose was measured in skin and in personal dosimetry inside places where the medical professionals are habitually located in different situations among 5 and 60 irradiation min. In the case of direct radiation, the OSL (Nano dots) present reliable readings and only were dispersed values for the measurements of secondary radiation. The measured values and the linking among them were also analyzed. The OSL (Nano dot) dosimetry behaves reliable way when is located in the ranges of more dose to 0,1 mGy, according to the maker indications and fundamentally for direct beams of the hemodynamics equipment being ideal for the measurement of entrance dose in skin. For the Nano dots use in personal dosimetry the results should be read carefully for values major to 0,1 mGy and being completely inappropriate for minor values. (Author)

  19. The Effect of the Extinction Procedure in Function-Based Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janney, Donna M.; Umbreit, John; Ferro, Jolenea B.; Liaupsin, Carl J.; Lane, Kathleen L.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we examined the contribution of the extinction procedure in function-based interventions implemented in the general education classrooms of three at-risk elementary-aged students. Function-based interventions included antecedent adjustments, reinforcement procedures, and function-matched extinction procedures. Using a combined ABC…

  20. Endoscopic procedure with a modified Reiki intervention: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulse, Rosalinda S; Stuart-Shor, Eileen M; Russo, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    This pilot study examined the use of Reiki prior to colonoscopy to reduce anxiety and minimize intraprocedure medications compared with usual care. A prospective, nonblinded, partially randomized patient preference design was employed using 21 subjects undergoing colonoscopy for the first time. Symptoms of anxiety and pain were assessed using a Likert-type scale. Between-group differences were assessed using chi-square analyses and analysis of variance. There were no differences between the control (n = 10) and experimental (n = 11) groups on age (mean = 58 years, SD = 8.5) and gender (53% women). The experimental group had higher anxiety (4.5 vs. 2.6, p = .03) and pain (0.8 vs. 0.2, p = .42) scores prior to colonoscopy. The Reiki intervention reduced mean heart rate (-9 beats/minute), systolic blood pressure (-10 mmHg), diastolic blood pressure (-4 mmHg), and respirations (-3 breaths/minute). There were no between-group differences on intraprocedure medication use or postprocedure physiologic measures. Although the experimental group patients had more symptoms, they did not require additional pain medication during the procedure, suggesting that (1) anxious people may benefit from an adjunctive therapy; (2) anxiety and pain are decreased by Reiki therapy for patients undergoing colonoscopy, and (3) additional intraprocedure pain medication may not be needed for colonoscopy patients receiving Reiki therapy. This pilot study provided important insights in preparation for a rigorous, randomized, controlled clinical trial.

  1. EFSUMB Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound (INVUS), Part III - Abdominal Treatment Procedures (Long Version)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, Christoph F; Lorentzen, T.; Appelbaum, L.

    2016-01-01

    The third part of the European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB) Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound (INVUS) assesses the evidence for ultrasound-guided and assisted interventions in abdominal treatment procedures. Recommendations for clinical practice ar...

  2. EFSUMB Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound (INVUS), Part III - Abdominal Treatment Procedures (Short Version)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, Christoph F; Lorentzen, T.; Appelbaum, L.

    2016-01-01

    The third part of the European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB) Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound assesses the evidence for ultrasound-guided and assisted interventions in abdominal treatment procedures. Recommendations for clinical practice are presen...

  3. Kazakhstan: coronary and structural heart interventions from 2010 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhov, Orazbek S; Kuzhukeyev, Murat E; Kodasbayev, Almat T; Egemberdiev, Tolegen Zh; Berkinbayev, Salim F; Zholdin, Bekbolat K; Alimbaev, Serik A; Zhangelova, Sholpan B; Rakhimov, Rustam A; Makhanov, Daniyar I; Sabitov, Yersyn T; Teleuov, Dauren A; Baisebenov, Ruslan K; Kuzhukeyev, Arystan M

    2017-05-15

    This paper presents data on the nascence and development of the interventional cardiology service in Kazakhstan. It provides details of the structure of the Kazakhstan interventional cardiology service, staff training, the number of coronary and structural heart interventions for the period of 2010-2015, as well as the peculiarities of the capitation payment method. The number of coronary interventions is increasing year by year, though the number of intracoronary imaging techniques and intracoronary flow/pressure techniques remains inadequate. Structural heart interventions are mostly performed at tertiary hospital level, with an ever increasing number of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) procedures.

  4. Nuclear cardiology in Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakavi, R.

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear cardiology is one of the most active branches of nuclear medicine and plays important role in diagnosis in treatment of CAD patients. Few nuclear cardiology surveys were published in the literature, mostly from developed countries. A nuclear cardiology survey in Iran and analysis of the findings in comparison with other countries may lead to better decision making and improve practice in our country. A questionnaire was sent by mail or e-mail to all nuclear medicine centers in Iran asking for details of nuclear cardiology practice. Also ownership of the centers, number of gamma cameras and number of cardiac studies in each week were recorded. Some centers were studied using telephone interview. From 79 nuclear medicine centers in Iran, 55 centers (69.6%) filled the questionnaire including 28 centers in Tehran and 27 centers in other cities. There was 69 Gamma cameras in these centers, 62.3% with SPECT capability. It is estimated that we may have 100 gamma cameras in Iran. This study showed that about 68287 cardiac studies were done in Iran each year with Myocardial perfusion scan accounting for about 99 2% of the studies. Considering population of the country nuclear cardiology activity will be about 1.05 study/1000/year. Regarding radiotracers used, about 13.5% of studies were done with T I-201, with some centers using only Tc- 99 m-M I B I

  5. Acurácia do relacionamento probabilístico na avaliação da alta complexidade em cardiologia Precisión de la relación probabilística en la evaluación de la alta complejidad en cardiología Accuracy of probabilistic record linkage in the assessment of high-complexity cardiology procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arn Migowski

    2011-04-01

    sometidos a cirugía de revascularización del miocardio, relacionados con todos los registros de óbito en Brasil en 2005. La precisión de la relación se basó en linkage probabilística de 99 registros de autorización de internación hospitalaria de pacientes sometidos a cirugías cardíacas en instituto de referencia en cardiología, con status vital conocido, con todos los registros de óbito del estado de Rio de Janeiro en 2005. El linkage fue realizado en cuatro etapas: estandarización de las bases, blocaje, pareamiento y clasificación de los pares. Se utilizó blocaje en cinco pasos, con claves de blocaje con combinación de variables como soundex del primero y último nombre, sexo y año de nacimiento. Las variables utilizadas en el pareamiento fueron "nombre completo", con la utilización de la distancia de Levenshtein y "fecha de nacimiento". RESULTADOS: El segundo y el quinto pasos de blocaje tuvieron los mayores números de pares formados y los mayores tiempos de procesamiento para el pareamiento. El cuarto paso demandó menor costo de procesamiento. En el estudio de precisión, posterior a cinco pasos de blocaje, la sensibilidad del linkage fue de 90,6% y la especificidad fue de 100%. CONCLUSIONES: La estrategia de relación probabilística utilizada presenta buena precisión y podrá ser utilizada en estudios sobre la efectividad de los procedimientos de alta complejidad y alto costo en cardiología.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the viability of a probabilistic record linkage strategy to identify patients who underwent complex cardiology procedures among the total deceased population. METHODS: The processing cost was estimated based on 1,672 records of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting that were compared with all death records in Brazil in 2005. The accuracy of the linkage strategy was based on the probabilistic linkage of 99 hospital admissions records of patients, with known vital status, who underwent cardiac surgery at a single cardiology

  6. Eye lens dose correlations with personal dose equivalent and patient exposure in paediatric interventional cardiology performed with a fluoroscopic biplane system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejo, L; Koren, C; Corredoira, E; Sánchez, F; Bayón, J; Serrada, A; Guibelalde, E

    2017-04-01

    To analyse the correlations between the eye lens dose estimates performed with dosimeters placed next to the eyes of paediatric interventional cardiologists working with a biplane system, the personal dose equivalent measured on the thorax and the patient dose. The eye lens dose was estimated in terms of H p (0.07) on a monthly basis, placing optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) on goggles. The H p (0.07) personal dose equivalent was measured over aprons with whole-body OSLDs. Data on patient dose as recorded by the kerma-area product (P KA ) were collected using an automatic dose management system. The 2 paediatric cardiologists working in the facility were involved in the study, and 222 interventions in a 1-year period were evaluated. The ceiling-suspended screen was often disregarded during interventions. The annual eye lens doses estimated on goggles were 4.13±0.93 and 4.98±1.28mSv. Over the aprons, the doses obtained were 10.83±0.99 and 11.97±1.44mSv. The correlation between the goggles and the apron dose was R 2 =0.89, with a ratio of 0.38. The correlation with the patient dose was R 2 =0.40, with a ratio of 1.79μSvGy -1 cm -2 . The dose per procedure obtained over the aprons was 102±16μSv, and on goggles 40±9μSv. The eye lens dose normalized to P KA was 2.21±0.58μSvGy -1 cm -2 . Measurements of personal dose equivalent over the paediatric cardiologist's apron are useful to estimate eye lens dose levels if no radiation protection devices are typically used. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A pilot study of radiation exposures arising from interventional radiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellet, S.; Giczi, F.; Gaspardy, G.; Temesi, A.; Ballay, L.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: In the past 25 years, considerable number of new therapeutic procedures have been worked out and adopted in radiology. These interventional procedures are mainly based on angiographic methods. During these procedures the exposure of patients and staff are usually greater than of conventional radiography and fluoroscopy as a consequence of longer fluoroscopy times and great number of cine-radiography. In the latest years radiation-induced skin injuries occurred in some patients. Injuries to physicians and staff performing interventional procedures have also been observed. In our days interventional procedures are widely used and more sophisticated procedures are worked out and adopted. Consequently, there is a need for the protection of the patient and the staff on a higher level. Radiation protection of intervention radiology deserves a distinguish attention. In Hungary interventional radiology were performed in 36 laboratories in 2003. According to statistical data the gross number of interventional radiological procedures were 19442. The most frequently performed procedures were the P.T.C.A., the coronary and ilio-femoral stent implantation and chemo-embolization. In 2004, the National Research Institute for Radiobiology and Radio-hygiene and the National Patient Dose Evaluation Program started a pilot study of radiation exposures arising from interventional radiology procedures. During the study the patient exposure were measured by D.A.P.-meters. The patient skin dose and the staff dose were performed by thermoluminescent chips. In their presentation the authors present the most important results of the study. (authors)

  8. Artificial intelligence in cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonderman, Diana

    2017-12-01

    Decision-making is complex in modern medicine and should ideally be based on available data, structured knowledge and proper interpretation in the context of an individual patient. Automated algorithms, also termed artificial intelligence that are able to extract meaningful patterns from data collections and build decisions upon identified patterns may be useful assistants in clinical decision-making processes. In this article, artificial intelligence-based studies in clinical cardiology are reviewed. The text also touches on the ethical issues and speculates on the future roles of automated algorithms versus clinicians in cardiology and medicine in general.

  9. [Cardiology update in 2016].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabus, Vincent; Tran, Van Nam; Regamey, Julien; Pascale, Patrizio; Monney, Pierre; Hullin, Roger; Vogt, Pierre

    2017-01-11

    In 2016 the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) published new guidelines. These documents update the knowledge in various fields such as atrial fibrillation, heart failure, cardiovascular prevention and dyslipidemia. Of course it is impossible to summarize these guidelines in detail. Nevertheless, we decided to highlight the major modifications, and to emphasize some key points that are especially useful for the primary care physician.

  10. Anterior celiac plexus block for interventional biliary procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benenati, J.F.; Widlus, D.M.; Venbrux, A.C.; Lynch-Nyhan, A.; Osterman, F.A.; Taylor, D.R.; Tewes, P.A.; Cassidy, F.P.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports temporary celiac ganglion block for pain relief during biliary procedures performed without complication in 65 patients. The block was given from an anterior approach, with 30 mL of bupivacaine injected over the right T-12 pedicle. Fluoroscopy was used to guide the needle 2 cm anterior to the spine. Patients were assigned to one of three groups based on degree of anesthesia. In group 1, there was no benefit (20%); in group 2, moderate regional anesthesia (22%); and in group 3, excellent anesthesia (58%). The procedure may be performed at the start of or any time during the examination and provides satisfactory regional anesthesia in 80% of patients

  11. Effective dose to patient during cardiac interventional procedures (Prague workplaces)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stisova, V.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess effective dose to a patient during cardiac procedures, such as coronary angiography (CA) and percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTCA). Measurements were performed on 185 patients in four catheterisation laboratories in three hospitals in Prague using the dose area product (DAP) meter. Calculations of surface and effective dose were performed with Monte-Carlo-based program PCXMC. The mean DAP value per procedure determined in all workplaces ranged between 25.0 and 54.5 Gy cm 2 for CA and 43.0-104.5 Gy cm 2 for PTCA. In three cases, the surface dose exceeded the 2 Gy level for occurrence of transient erythema. The mean effective dose per procedure in an workplaces was determined to be in the range of 2.7-8.8 mSv for CA and 5.7-15.3 mSv for CA + PTCA combined. The results presented are comparable with those published by other authors. (authors)

  12. Nuclear cardiology: Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, H.J.; Zaret, B.L.

    1981-01-01

    A review of recent developments and future directions in nuclear cardiology is presented. Myocardial perfusion imaging is discussed with special emphasis on thallium-201 methods. Infarct-avid imaging is also discussed with emphasis on technetium-99m labelled in diagnosis, and emission computed tomography is briefly reviewed. In addition, new biologically based radiotracers such as indium-111-labeled blood cells, gallium-67 citrate, and new positron- and gamma-emittng radiotracers are reviewed

  13. Computers in cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The present abstract book contains the abstracts of 90 lectures and 29 posters presented at the conference. They are dealing with the following themes: Echocardiography, databases, ECG interpretation, wall motion, arrhythmia processing systems, electrophysiological models, ECG-mapping, intensive care and hemodynamic monitoring, digital subtraction angiography, clinical electrophysiology, mechanical properties of the cardiovascular system, coronary artery measurements, arrythmia analysis, arrhytmia monitoring techniques, ECG waveform recognition and nuclear cardiology. (MG)

  14. Molecular imaging: a new approach to nuclear cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrucki, L.W.; Sinusas, A.J.

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear cardiology has historically played an important role in detection of cardiovascular disease as well as risk statification. With the growth of molecular biology have come new therapeutic interventions and the requirement for new diagnostic imaging approaches. Noninvasive targeted radiotracer based as well as transporter gene imaging strategies are evolving to meet these new needs, but require the development of an interdisciplinary approach which focuses on molecular processes, as well as the pathogenesis and progression of disease. This progress has been made possible with the availability of transgenic animal models along with many technological advances. Future adaptations of the developing experimental procedures and instrumentations will allow for the smooth translation and application to clinical practice. This review is intended as a brief overview on the subject molecular imaging. Basic concepts and historical perspective of molecular imaging will be reviewed first, followed by description of current technology, and concluding with current applications in cardiology. The emphasis will be on the use of both single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers, although other imaging modalities will be also briefly discussed. The specific approaches presented here will include receptor-based and reporter gene imaging of natural and therapeutical angiogenesis

  15. Evaluating the maximum patient radiation dose in cardiac interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, M.; Chida, K.; Sato, T.; Oosaka, H.; Tosa, T.; Kadowaki, K.

    2011-01-01

    Many of the X-ray systems that are used for cardiac interventional radiology provide no way to evaluate the patient maximum skin dose (MSD). The authors report a new method for evaluating the MSD by using the cumulative patient entrance skin dose (ESD), which includes a back-scatter factor and the number of cine-angiography frames during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Four hundred consecutive PCI patients (315 men and 85 women) were studied. The correlation between the cumulative ESD and number of cine-angiography frames was investigated. The irradiation and overlapping fields were verified using dose-mapping software. A good correlation was found between the cumulative ESD and the number of cine-angiography frames. The MSD could be estimated using the proportion of cine-angiography frames used for the main angle of view relative to the total number of cine-angiography frames and multiplying this by the cumulative ESD. The average MSD (3.0±1.9 Gy) was lower than the average cumulative ESD (4.6±2.6 Gy). This method is an easy way to estimate the MSD during PCI. (authors)

  16. Use of Ultrasound Contrast Agents in Relation to Percutaneous Interventional Procedures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nolsøe, Christian Pállson; Nolsøe, Alexander Bjørneboe; Klubien, Jeanett

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this article is to provide an inventory of the use of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in relation to percutaneous interventional procedures. The article is structured into a systematic literature review followed by a clinical part relating to percutaneous CEUS-guided procedures...

  17. Radiation field distribution within the room for three commonly-used interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Changcai; Zhang Lin; Min Nan; Lu Feng; Li Quantai; Deng Daping; Chen Yue; Zhu Jianguo

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To detect the radiation field distribution within the room for three commonly-used interventional procedures, in order to provide basic data for the radiation protection and safe operation of staff involved in interventional radiology. Methods: The thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) were placed in different points on the horizontal plane around the interventional table and the vertical plane where the staff often stayed. Based on the selected experimental conditions, the TLDs were grouped to be irradiated. After the experiment, the TLDs were measured in the laboratory to calculate the doses of radiation field. Results: Data obtained at the same position followed basically as cardiovascular intervention > cerebrovascular intervention > liver intervention. Intervention of same type at the same position followed as high-dose group > mid-dose group > low-dose group. These results were consistent with the useful beam doses, and proportional to the fluoroscopy time. A few data with exception were due to measurement error or experimental error. Conclusions: Cerebrovascular and liver interventional procedures resulted in the relatively low radiation doses. The radiation doses at the distance of more than 3 m can be negligible. For cardiovascular interventional procedure, with the decrease of the distance from the X-ray tube, the dose decreased. In the radiation field,the operator, the first assistant and second assistant would exposed to higher dose on the standing points while patients receive lower doses in the head and feet direction. (authors)

  18. The importance of employee participation and perceptions of changes in procedures in a teamworking intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Karina; Randall, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    The powerful positive results of implementing teamwork are not always achieved. It has been suggested that attempts to implement theories regarding teamwork do not always lead to those theories being put into practice, and as a result positive outcomes are not always found. The participation of employees in the development and implementation of an intervention may help to ensure that changes take place. In this longitudinal study (N = 583) of teamwork implementation in Denmark we examined the links between pre-intervention working conditions and well-being, levels of participation in planning and implementation, employees’ reports of changes in procedures, and intervention outcomes. Pre-intervention levels of autonomy and job satisfaction predicted the degree of employee participation in the planning and implementation of the intervention. Pre-intervention well-being and social support were linked directly to the degree to which employees reported changes in existing work practices concerning teamwork. In addition, participation and changes in work procedures were significantly associated with post-intervention autonomy, social support and well-being. The results indicate that employee participation in intervention processes is crucial in what appears to be an important association with perceived changes in procedures and, therefore, in intervention outcomes. PMID:22745519

  19. The importance of employee participation and perceptions of changes in procedures in a teamworking intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Karina; Randall, Raymond

    2012-04-01

    The powerful positive results of implementing teamwork are not always achieved. It has been suggested that attempts to implement theories regarding teamwork do not always lead to those theories being put into practice, and as a result positive outcomes are not always found. The participation of employees in the development and implementation of an intervention may help to ensure that changes take place. In this longitudinal study (N = 583) of teamwork implementation in Denmark we examined the links between pre-intervention working conditions and well-being, levels of participation in planning and implementation, employees' reports of changes in procedures, and intervention outcomes. Pre-intervention levels of autonomy and job satisfaction predicted the degree of employee participation in the planning and implementation of the intervention. Pre-intervention well-being and social support were linked directly to the degree to which employees reported changes in existing work practices concerning teamwork. In addition, participation and changes in work procedures were significantly associated with post-intervention autonomy, social support and well-being. The results indicate that employee participation in intervention processes is crucial in what appears to be an important association with perceived changes in procedures and, therefore, in intervention outcomes.

  20. Clinical use of intracoronary imaging. Part 1: guidance and optimization of coronary interventions. An expert consensus document of the European Association of Percutaneous Cardiovascular Interventions: Endorsed by the Chinese Society of Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Räber, Lorenz; Mintz, Gary S; Koskinas, Konstantinos C; Johnson, Thomas W; Holm, Niels R; Onuma, Yoshinubo; Radu, Maria D; Joner, Michael; Yu, Bo; Jia, Haibo; Menevau, Nicolas; de la Torre Hernandez, Jose M; Escaned, Javier; Hill, Jonathan; Prati, Francesco; Colombo, Antonio; di Mario, Carlo; Regar, Evelyn; Capodanno, Davide; Wijns, William; Byrne, Robert A; Guagliumi, Giulio

    2018-05-22

    This Consensus Document is the first of two reports summarizing the views of an expert panel organized by the European Association of Percutaneous Cardiovascular Interventions (EAPCI) on the clinical use of intracoronary imaging including intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). The first document appraises the role of intracoronary imaging to guide percutaneous coronary interventions (PCIs) in clinical practice. Current evidence regarding the impact of intracoronary imaging guidance on cardiovascular outcomes is summarized, and patients or lesions most likely to derive clinical benefit from an imaging-guided intervention are identified. The relevance of the use of IVUS or OCT prior to PCI for optimizing stent sizing (stent length and diameter) and planning the procedural strategy is discussed. Regarding post-implantation imaging, the consensus group recommends key parameters that characterize an optimal PCI result and provides cut-offs to guide corrective measures and optimize the stenting result. Moreover, routine performance of intracoronary imaging in patients with stent failure (restenosis or stent thrombosis) is recommended. Finally, strengths and limitations of IVUS and OCT for guiding PCI and assessing stent failures and areas that warrant further research are critically discussed.

  1. Renal carcinoma infiltrating inferior vena cava and combined valvular heart disease - one-stage uro-cardiological procedure: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zapala Lukasz

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Standard treatment of patients with coexisting cardiac and non-cardiac diseases includes two separate operations. We report a case of 55-year-old man with combined valvular heart disease and renal carcinoma infiltrating inferior caval vein, who underwent one-stage cardio-urologic procedure. In the first step, mitral and tricuspid valvuloplasty were performed by cardiac surgeons. Then, urologists performed radical nephrectomy and thrombectomy. The postoperative course was uneventful. In twelve months follow-up the patient shows no signs of reccurrence and he had no symptoms of cardiac disease. To the best of our knowledge such a case has never been reported before in the literature.

  2. Patient dose in interventional radiology: a multicentre study of the most frequent procedures in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etard, Cecile; Bigand, Emeline; Salvat, Cecile; Vidal, Vincent; Beregi, Jean Paul; Hornbeck, Amaury; Greffier, Joel

    2017-01-01

    A national retrospective survey on patient doses was performed by the French Society of Medical physicists to assess reference levels (RLs) in interventional radiology as required by the European Directive 2013/59/Euratom. Fifteen interventional procedures in neuroradiology, vascular radiology and osteoarticular procedures were analysed. Kerma area product (KAP), fluoroscopy time (FT), reference air kerma and number of images were recorded for 10 to 30 patients per procedure. RLs were calculated as the 3rd quartiles of the distributions. Results on 4600 procedures from 36 departments confirmed the large variability in patient dose for the same procedure. RLs were proposed for the four dosimetric estimators and the 15 procedures. RLs in terms of KAP and FT were 90 Gm.cm 2 and 11 mins for cerebral angiography, 35 Gy.cm 2 and 16 mins for biliary drainage, 75 Gy.cm 2 and 6 mins for lower limbs arteriography and 70 Gy.cm 2 and 11 mins for vertebroplasty. For these four procedures, RLs were defined according to the complexity of the procedure. For all the procedures, the results were lower than most of those already published. This study reports RLs in interventional radiology based on a national survey. Continual evolution of practices and technologies requires regular updates of RLs. (orig.)

  3. Patient dose in interventional radiology: a multicentre study of the most frequent procedures in France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etard, Cecile [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); French Society of Medical Physicists (SFPM), Paris (France); Bigand, Emeline [French Society of Medical Physicists (SFPM), Paris (France); La Timone University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Marseille Cedex (France); Salvat, Cecile [French Society of Medical Physicists (SFPM), Paris (France); Lariboisiere Hospital, Department of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection, Paris (France); Vidal, Vincent [La Timone University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Marseille Cedex (France); French Society of Radiology (SFR) - Interventional Radiology Federation (FRI), Paris (France); Beregi, Jean Paul [French Society of Radiology (SFR) - Interventional Radiology Federation (FRI), Paris (France); Nimes University Hospital, Medical Imaging Group Nimes, Department of Radiology, Nimes (France); Hornbeck, Amaury [French Society of Medical Physicists (SFPM), Paris (France); Trousseau University Hospital, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Paris (France); Greffier, Joel [French Society of Medical Physicists (SFPM), Paris (France); Nimes University Hospital, Medical Imaging Group Nimes, Department of Radiology, Nimes (France)

    2017-10-15

    A national retrospective survey on patient doses was performed by the French Society of Medical physicists to assess reference levels (RLs) in interventional radiology as required by the European Directive 2013/59/Euratom. Fifteen interventional procedures in neuroradiology, vascular radiology and osteoarticular procedures were analysed. Kerma area product (KAP), fluoroscopy time (FT), reference air kerma and number of images were recorded for 10 to 30 patients per procedure. RLs were calculated as the 3rd quartiles of the distributions. Results on 4600 procedures from 36 departments confirmed the large variability in patient dose for the same procedure. RLs were proposed for the four dosimetric estimators and the 15 procedures. RLs in terms of KAP and FT were 90 Gm.cm{sup 2} and 11 mins for cerebral angiography, 35 Gy.cm{sup 2} and 16 mins for biliary drainage, 75 Gy.cm{sup 2} and 6 mins for lower limbs arteriography and 70 Gy.cm{sup 2} and 11 mins for vertebroplasty. For these four procedures, RLs were defined according to the complexity of the procedure. For all the procedures, the results were lower than most of those already published. This study reports RLs in interventional radiology based on a national survey. Continual evolution of practices and technologies requires regular updates of RLs. (orig.)

  4. [Interventional radiology procedures for malignancies of the liver treatment: Intraarterial procedures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristina, V; Pracht, M; Lachenal, Y; Adib, S; Boubaker, A; Prior, J; Senys, A; Wagner, A D; Bize, P

    2014-05-21

    Intraarterial procedures such as chemoembolization and radioembolization aim for the palliative treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (stage BCLC B and C with tumoral portal thrombosis). The combination of hepatic intraarterial chemotherapy and systemic chemotherapy can increase the probability of curing colorectal cancer with hepatic metastases not immediately accessible to surgical treatment or percutaneous ablation.

  5. An observation study of radiation exposure to nurses during interventional radiology procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komemushi, Atsushi; Tanigawa, Noboru; Aoki, Atsuko

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively measure the level of radiation exposure among nursing staff during interventional radiology procedures. All interventional radiology procedures performed at our institution between April 20 and June 19, 2009 were included in this study. Radiation exposure was measured as the equivalent dose penetrating tissue to a depth of 10 mm using electronic personal dosimeters attached outside (Ha) and inside (Hb) lead aprons. Effective dose (HE) was estimated by calculating from Ha and Hb. In total, data from 68 procedures were included in this study. Four nurses performed 71 nursing cares. The mean Ha was 0.70±1.0 μSv, while the mean Hb was 0.06±0.2 μSv. The mean HE was 0.14±0.3 μSv. The present findings indicate that during interventional radiology procedures, nurses were exposed to very low levels of radiation. (author)

  6. Entrances skin dose distribution maps for interventional neuroradiological procedures: A preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rampado, O.; Ropolo, R.

    2005-01-01

    Does estimation in interventional neuroradiology can be useful to limit skin radiation injuries. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of entrance skin dose (ESD) maps in planning exposure condition optimisation. Thirteen cerebral angiography and five embolisation procedures were monitored, measuring ESD, dose-area product (DAP) and other operational parameters. A transmission ionisation chamber, simultaneously measuring air kerma and DAP, measured dose-related quantities. Data acquisition software collected dosimetric and geometrical data during the interventional procedure and provided a distribution map of ESD on a standard phantom digital image, with maximum value estimation. Values of 88-1710 mGy for maximum skin dose and 16.7-343 Gy cm 2 for DAP were found. These data confirm the possibility of deterministic effects during therapeutic interventional neuroradiological procedures like cerebral embolisation. ESD maps are useful to retrospectively study the exposure characteristics of a procedure and plan patient exposure optimisation. (authors)

  7. Evaluation of patient radiation doses using DAP meter in interventional radiology procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Byung Sam [Dept. of Radiological Technology. Shingu University, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Yong Su [Dept. of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu Univeristy, Kyushu (Japan)

    2017-03-15

    The author investigated interventional radiology patient doses in several other countries, assessed accuracy of DAP meters embedded in intervention equipment in domestic country, conducted measurement of patient doses for 13 major interventional procedures with use of Dose Area Product(DAP) meters from 23 hospitals in Korea, and referred to 8,415 cases of domestic data related to interventional procedures by radiation exposure after evaluation the actual effective of dose reduction variables through phantom test. Finally, dose reference level for major interventional procedures was suggested. In this study, guidelines for patient doses were 237.7 Gy·cm{sup 2} in TACE, 17.3 Gy·cm{sup 2} in AVF, 114.1 Gy·cm{sup 2} in LE PTA and STENT, 188.5 Gy·cm{sup 2} in TFCA, 383.5 Gy·cm{sup 2} in Aneurysm Coil, 64.6 Gy·cm{sup 2} in PTBD, 64.6 Gy·cm{sup 2} in Biliary Stent, 22.4 Gy·cm{sup 2} in PCN, 4.3 Gy·cm{sup 2} in Hickman, 2.8 Gy·cm{sup 2} in Chemo-port, 4.4 Gy·cm{sup 2} in Perm-Cather, 17.1 Gy·cm{sup 2} in PCD, and 357.9 Gy·cm{sup 2} in Vis, EMB. Dose reference level acquired in this study is considered to be able to use as minimal guidelines for reducing patient dose in the interventional radiology procedures. For the changes and advances of materials and development of equipment and procedures in the interventional radiology procedures, further studies and monitoring are needed on dose reference level Korean DAP dose conversion factor for the domestic procedures.

  8. Artificial intelligence in cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srishti Sharma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Artificial intelligence (AI provides machines with the ability to learn and respond the way humans do and is also referred to as machine learning. The step to building an AI system is to provide the data to learn from so that it can map relations between inputs and outputs and set up parameters such as “weights”/decision boundaries to predict responses for inputs in the future. Then, the model is tested on a second data set. This article outlines the promise this analytic approach has in medicine and cardiology.

  9. Nuclear Cardiology: An Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Nahhas, Adil

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear Cardiology has maintained a prominent position in the assessment of CAD and has become the end-point in Clinical Trials for the following reasons: Non-invasive assessment of CAD, Assessment of presence, localisation and severity, Widely available, feasible and reproducible, Visualisation of blood flow and pumping. The main areas of cardiology that are amenable to assessment with nuclear cardiology include: Stable and unstable CAD, Acute and post MI, Cardiomyopathy, Valvular disease and shunts, Cardiotoxicity, Aneurysms, Transplants The application of nuclear cardiology in these conditions will help in the management of patients by providing information relating to: Diagnosis and prognosis, Risk stratification, Medical Vs surgical treatment, Haemodynamic significance, Efficiency of management The main application in practical terms is in the assessment of CAD at variable stages: Before, during and after an incident: Before Incident: -Enhancing diagnosis and prognosis in patients with CAD, Providing functional data for changes on angiography. During Incident: -Assessing criteria for admission and further tests. After Incident: -Identifying hibernating myocardium, - Risk stratification. Risk Stratification highlights the outcome following nonfatal MI as the patients may be split into 2 categories: Low-risk group -Comprise 50-66% of patients, -Can be managed with medical treatment High-risk group, -Comprise (34-50%), -Prone to future complications within 3 months (Death, reinfarction, CCF and unstable angina). Viability: Is a spectrum of overlapping clinical states following an incident. Assessment is increasingly requested for evaluation of revascularisation vs cardiac transplant as the outcome will improve regional and global function, CCF symptoms and improve quality of life and survival Why assess viability? Persistent LVD have bad prognosis with EF 50% 10-year survival of 90% LVD due to viable tissue have worse prognosis than scars with annual

  10. Behavioral cardiology: current advances and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozanski, Alan

    2014-07-08

    Growing epidemiological evidence identifies key domains relevant to behavioral cardiology, including health behaviors, emotions, mental mindsets, stress management, social connectedness, and a sense of purpose. Each of these domains exists along a continuum, ranging from positive factors that promote health, to negative factors, which are pathophysiological. To date, there has been relatively little translation of this growing knowledge base into cardiology practice. Four initiatives are proposed to meet this challenge: 1) promulgating greater awareness of the potency of psychosocial risks factors; 2) overcoming a current "artificial divide" between conventional and psychosocial risk factors; 3) developing novel cost-effective interventions using Internet and mobile health applications, group-based counseling, and development of tiered-care behavioral management; and 4) in recognition that "one size does not fit all" with respect to behavioral interventions, developing specialists who can counsel patients in multidisciplinary fashion and use evidence-based approaches for promoting patient motivation and execution of health goals. Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Improving child protection: a systematic review of training and procedural interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Y H; Bannon, M J; Limbert, C; Docherty, A; Barlow, J

    2006-09-01

    To synthesise published evidence regarding the effectiveness of training and procedural interventions aimed at improving the identification and management of child abuse and neglect by health professionals. Systematic review for the period 1994 to 2005 of studies that evaluated child protection training and procedural interventions. Main outcome measures were learning achievement, attitudinal change, and clinical behaviour. Seven papers that examined the effectiveness of procedural interventions and 15 papers that evaluated training programmes met the inclusion criteria. Critical appraisal showed that evaluation of interventions was on the whole poor. It was found that certain procedural interventions (such as the use of checklists and structured forms) can result in improved recording of important clinical information and may also alert clinical staff to the possibility of abuse. While a variety of innovative training programmes were identified, there was an absence of rigorous evaluation of their impact. However a small number of one-group pre- and post-studies suggest improvements in a range of attitudes necessary for successful engagement in the child protection process. Current evidence supports the use of procedural changes that improve the documentation of suspected child maltreatment and that enhance professional awareness. The lack of an evidence based approach to the implementation of child protection training may restrict the ability of all health professionals to fulfil their role in the child protection process. Formal evaluation of a variety of models for the delivery of this training is urgently needed with subsequent dissemination of results that highlight those found to be most effective.

  12. Estimating effective dose to pediatric patients undergoing interventional radiology procedures using anthropomorphic phantoms and MOSFET dosimeters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miksys, Nelson; Gordon, Christopher L; Thomas, Karen; Connolly, Bairbre L

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the effective doses received by pediatric patients during interventional radiology procedures and to present those doses in "look-up tables" standardized according to minute of fluoroscopy and frame of digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Organ doses were measured with metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters inserted within three anthropomorphic phantoms, representing children at ages 1, 5, and 10 years, at locations corresponding to radiosensitive organs. The phantoms were exposed to mock interventional radiology procedures of the head, chest, and abdomen using posteroanterior and lateral geometries, varying magnification, and fluoroscopy or DSA exposures. Effective doses were calculated from organ doses recorded by the MOSFET dosimeters and are presented in look-up tables according to the different age groups. The largest effective dose burden for fluoroscopy was recorded for posteroanterior and lateral abdominal procedures (0.2-1.1 mSv/min of fluoroscopy), whereas procedures of the head resulted in the lowest effective doses (0.02-0.08 mSv/min of fluoroscopy). DSA exposures of the abdomen imparted higher doses (0.02-0.07 mSv/DSA frame) than did those involving the head and chest. Patient doses during interventional procedures vary significantly depending on the type of procedure. User-friendly look-up tables may provide a helpful tool for health care providers in estimating effective doses for an individual procedure.

  13. Nuclear cardiology - its current status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanna, C.M.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear cardiology has been an exciting new field of nuclear medicine. Few examples of the dynamism and excitement of nuclear medicine demonstrate this field's vitality in the way that nuclear cardiology does. Recent new developments in radiopharmaceuticals and instrumentation have established this field as an extremely useful clinical tool and provide a new dimension to the evaluation of a cardiac patient, more so being nonivasive in nature. An attempt has been made to focus the attention on some of the recent advances in nuclear cardiology with a special reference to its clinical application in the field of cardiology. Nuclear cardiology is the most important field of nuclear medicine which has shown most promising results and has opened a new horizon in the field of diagnostic noninvasive cardiac technique. Now it has come of age in concept, instrument development and clinical application. It is very rapidly growing into a subspeciality. (author)

  14. Avoidance of radiation injuries from medical interventional procedures, ICRP Publication 85

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentin, J.

    2000-01-01

    Interventional radiology (fluoroscopically-guided) techniques are being used by an increasing number of clinicians not adequately trained in radiation safety or radiobiology. Many of these interventionists are not aware of the potential for injury from these procedures or the simple methods for decreasing their incidence. Many patients are not being counselled on the radiation risks, nor followed up when radiation doses from difficult procedures may lead to injury. Some patients are suffering radiation-induced skin injuries and younger patients may face an increased risk of future cancer. Interventionists are having their practice limited or suffering injury, and are exposing their staff to high doses. In some interventional procedures, skin doses to patients approach those experienced in some cancer radiotherapy fractions. Radiation-induced skin injuries are occurring in patients due to the use of inappropriate equipment and, more often, poor operational technique. Injuries to physicians and staff performing interventional procedures have also been observed. Acute radiation doses (to patients) may cause erythema at 2 Gy, cataract at 2 Gy, permanent epilation at 7 Gy, and delayed skin necrosis at 12 Gy. Protracted (occupational) exposures to the eye may cause cataract at 4 Gy if the dose is received in less than 3 months, at 5.5 Gy if received over a period exceeding 3 months. Practical actions to control dose to the patient and to the staff are listed. The absorbed dose to the patient in the area of skin that receives the maximum dose is of priority concern. Each local clinical protocol should include, for each type of interventional procedure, a statement on the cumulative skin doses and skin sites associated with the various parts of the procedure. Interventionists should be trained to use information on skin dose and on practical techniques to control dose. Maximum cumulative absorbed doses that appear to approach or exceed 1 Gy (for procedures that may be

  15. Avoidance of radiation injuries from medical interventional procedures, ICRP Publication 85

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentin, J

    2000-06-01

    Interventional radiology (fluoroscopically-guided) techniques are being used by an increasing number of clinicians not adequately trained in radiation safety or radiobiology. Many of these interventionists are not aware of the potential for injury from these procedures or the simple methods for decreasing their incidence. Many patients are not being counselled on the radiation risks, nor followed up when radiation doses from difficult procedures may lead to injury. Some patients are suffering radiation-induced skin injuries and younger patients may face an increased risk of future cancer. Interventionists are having their practice limited or suffering injury, and are exposing their staff to high doses. In some interventional procedures, skin doses to patients approach those experienced in some cancer radiotherapy fractions. Radiation-induced skin injuries are occurring in patients due to the use of inappropriate equipment and, more often, poor operational technique. Injuries to physicians and staff performing interventional procedures have also been observed. Acute radiation doses (to patients) may cause erythema at 2 Gy, cataract at 2 Gy, permanent epilation at 7 Gy, and delayed skin necrosis at 12 Gy. Protracted (occupational) exposures to the eye may cause cataract at 4 Gy if the dose is received in less than 3 months, at 5.5 Gy if received over a period exceeding 3 months. Practical actions to control dose to the patient and to the staff are listed. The absorbed dose to the patient in the area of skin that receives the maximum dose is of priority concern. Each local clinical protocol should include, for each type of interventional procedure, a statement on the cumulative skin doses and skin sites associated with the various parts of the procedure. Interventionists should be trained to use information on skin dose and on practical techniques to control dose. Maximum cumulative absorbed doses that appear to approach or exceed 1 Gy (for procedures that may be

  16. [Management of NSTEMI in a hospital without interventional cardiology and without use of GRACE score: Does the clinician appreciation match the GRACE score calculated retrospectively for the coronarography delay?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouriche, F; Yvorra, S; Hassan, A; Paganelli, F; Bonello, L; Luigi, S; Attia, F

    2017-11-01

    The management of non-ST segment elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTEACS) remains an issue for mobidity, mortality, and an economic stake. The first aim of the study was to evaluate the additional value of the GRACE score for the compliance with the recommended times to coronary angiography in an hospital without interventional cardiology. We also analysed the in-hospital and 6-month mortality and the predictive factors of compliance for the coronarography delays. Retrospective monocenter cross-sectional study including consecutive patients with chest pain suggestive of a NSTEACS during 1 year. Data of the delay to coronarography were collected and GRACE score was calculated a posteriori. The time to perform coronary angiography was non-compliant in 49% of cases (27 patients out of 55). The calculation of the GRACE score would have allowed correcting the delay for two patients of our cohort. Clinical appreciation, troponin elevation, ECG modifications were associated with the delay compliance. Age <75 years predisposed to recommended delays. Renal failure and history of coronaropathy were significantly associated with non compliant delays. A non-compliant delay was significantly associated with higher mortality. In our experience, the knowledge of the GRACE score had little impact on the timing of coronary angiography. However, as a predictor of mid and long term mortality, GRACE score remains SCA ST+ useful to intensify surveillance of high-risk patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Cost analysis of radiological interventional procedures and reimbursement within a clinic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strotzer, M.; Voelk, M.; Lenhart, M.; Fruend, R.; Feuerbach, S.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Analysis of costs for vascular radiological interventions on a per patient basis and comparison with reimbursement based on GOAe(Gebuehrenordnung fuer Aerzte) and DKG-NT (Deutsche Krankenhausgesellschaft-Nebenkostentarif). Material and Methods: The ten procedures most frequently performed within 12 months were evaluated. Personnel costs were derived from precise costs per hour and estimated procedure time for each intervention. Costs for medical devices were included. Reimbursement based on GOAewas calculated using the official conversion factor of 0.114 DM for each specific relative value unit and a multiplication factor of 1.0. The corresponding conversion factor for DKG-NT, determined by the DKG, was 0.168 DM. Results: A total of 832 interventional procedures were included. Marked differences between calculated costs and reimbursement rates were found. Regarding the ten most frequently performed procedures, there was a deficit of 1.06 million DM according GOAedata (factor 1.0) and 0.787 million DM according DKG-NT. The percentage of reimbursement was only 34.2 (GOAe; factor 1.0) and 51.3 (DKG-NT), respectively. Conclusion: Reimbursement of radiological interventional procedures based on GOAeand DKG-NT data is of limited value for economic controlling purposes within a hospital. (orig.) [de

  18. Predictors and use of nonpharmacologic interventions for procedural pain associated with turning among hospitalized adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faigeles, Bonnie; Howie-Esquivel, Jill; Miaskowski, Christine; Stanik-Hutt, Julie; Thompson, Carol; White, Cheri; Wild, Lorie Rietman; Puntillo, Kathleen

    2013-06-01

    Many hospitalized adults cannot reposition themselves in their beds. Therefore, they are regularly turned by their nurses, primarily to prevent pressure ulcer formation. Earlier research indicates that turning is painful and that patients are rarely premedicated with analgesics. Nonpharmacologic interventions may be used to help with this painful procedure. However, no published research was found on the use of nonpharmacologic interventions for turning of hospitalized patients. The objectives of this study were: 1) to describe patient pain characteristics during turning and their association with patient demographic and clinical characteristics; 2) to determine the frequency of use of various nonpharmacologic interventions for hospitalized adult patients undergoing the painful procedure of turning; and 3) to identify factors that predict the use of specific nonpharmacologic interventions for pain associated with turning. Hospitalized adult patients who experienced turning, the nurses caring for them, and others who were present at the time of turning were asked if they used various nonpharmacologic interventions to manage pain during the turning. Out of 1,395 patients, 92.5% received at least one nonpharmacologic intervention. Most frequently used were calming voice (65.7%), information (60.6%), and deep breathing (37.9%). Critical-care patients were more likely to receive a calming voice (odds ratio [OR] 1.66, p patients. Those reporting higher pain were consistently more likely to receive each of the three interventions (OR 1.01, p turning procedure. The specific interventions used most often are ones that can be initiated spontaneously. Our data suggest that patients, nurses, and family members respond to patients' turning-related pain by using nonpharmacologic interventions. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Radioisotope evaluation in cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massardo V, Teresa; Gonzalez E, Patricio; Canessa G, Jose

    2002-01-01

    The current applications of nuclear cardiology techniques are reviewed. Coronary artery disease is the most important and prevalent cardiovascular problem in most developed countries and also in Chile. Different approaches can be employed for its diagnosis and prognosis, as well as for risk stratification and preoperative evaluation. Myocardial infarction assessment and ischemia recognition with radionuclide perfusion images are also reviewed, including new protocols applying functional parameters addition. Viability detection after myocardial infarction or in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy are discussed. Stress protocols with the use of exercise or pharmacological action for ischemia production, the diagnostic value of perfusion SPECT and the use of Thallium-201, Tc-99m-Sestamibi and metabolic images with Fluorine18-Fluordeoxyglucose are also mentioned (au)

  20. Nuclear medicine in cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torizuka, K.; Ishii, Y.; Yonekura, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Tamaki, N. (Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1981-02-01

    Nuclear medicine in cardiology was reviewed. Electrocardiogram is obtained from the ..gamma..-ray measurement of a tracer by a single detector, which enables a bedsidemonitoring. Resolution and sensitivity are high and nuclear stethoscope with a computer is applicable for a background treatment. Myocardium is imaged by /sup 201/Tl scintigraphy. Relative difference of the perfusion indicates the ischemia which gaives roughly the size and portion of myocardial infarction. For transient ischemia stress myocardial perfusion imaging (SMPI) is also used. sup(99m)Tc pyrophosphate provides a clear image for myocardial infarction. Angiocardiogram is obtained repeatedly, by a single administration, using an equilibrium method. An attempt of three-dimensional display by 7 pin hole collimator and positron CT are also discussed.

  1. The status of pediatric cardiology at a tertiary center in Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabi, Mariam; Majdalani, Marianne; El Hajj, Maria Atoui; Nemer, Georges; Sawaya, Fadi; Obeid, Mounir; Bitar, Fadi F

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac disease, both congenital and acquired, contributes significantly to morbidity and mortality in children. This article describes the status of pediatric cardiology at the Children's Heart Center in the American University of Beirut Medical Center. It addresses the available clinical services as well as the research and educational activities that are present at a tertiary center in Lebanon, a developing country with a population of 4 million. Lebanon has witnessed major developments in the field of pediatric cardiology over the past few years. About 650 babies are born with heart disease every year, with more than 425 needing treatment. Nearly all types of interventional catheterization procedures are currently being performed. About 300 open and closed pediatric cardiac surgeries are performed per year in Lebanon. In 2008, the in-hospital surgical mortality rate at our center was 2.6%, reflecting the good level of care in the treatment of children with congenital heart disease (CHD) in Lebanon. Basic research in the field of pediatric cardiology is emerging at our center. Our team has been studying the effect of chronic hypoxemia on the neonatal myocardium in an animal model of chronic hypoxia, as well as the study of molecular basis of CHD. Appropriate identification of cardiac disease, its epidemiology, and outcome is of utmost importance in guiding adequate care. Centralization of facilities is important to improve results and level of care.

  2. A Comparison of Math Cover, Copy, Compare Intervention Procedures for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Reeva C; Gadke, Daniel L

    2018-03-01

    Cover, Copy, Compare (CCC) and Copy, Cover, Compare (MCCC) procedures are effective interventions for improving math fluency. However, there is a gap in literature exploring the use of these interventions for children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The purpose of the current study was to compare the use of CCC and MCCC for children with ASD using a multi-component single-case experimental design. The results showed no notable difference between the interventions. Implications and limitations, particularly surrounding experimental control, are discussed in detail.

  3. Lifestyle and risk factor management in people at high risk of cardiovascular disease. A report from the European Society of Cardiology European Action on Secondary and Primary Prevention by Intervention to Reduce Events (EUROASPIRE) IV cross-sectional survey in 14 European regions

    OpenAIRE

    Kotseva, Kornelia; De Bacquer, Dirk; De Backer, Guy; Ryden, Lars; Jennings, Catriona; Gyberg, Viveca; Abreu, Ana; Aguiar, Carlos; Conde, Almudena C.; Davletov, Kairat; Dilic, Mirza; Dolzhenko, Maryna; Gaita, Dan; Georgiev, Borislav; Gotcheva, Nina

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: European Action on Secondary and Primary Prevention by Intervention to Reduce Events (EUROASPIRE) IV in primary care was a cross-sectional survey carried out by the European Society of Cardiology, EURObservational Research Programme in 2014-2015 in 71 centres from 14 European countries. The main objective was to determine whether the 2012 Joint European Societies' guidelines on cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention in people at high CVD risk have been followed in clinical practi...

  4. Percutaneous CT-guided interventional procedures in musculoskeletal system (our experience)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thanos, Loukas E-mail: loutharad@yahoo.com; Mylona, Sophia; Kalioras, Vasilios; Pomoni, Maria; Batakis, Nikolaos

    2004-06-01

    Percutaneous interventional procedures include a broad spectrum of minimal invasive techniques, which are a useful diagnostic and therapeutic tool. In this study we present our experience in CT-guided percutaneous musculoskeletal biopsies, drainages of musculoskeletal abscesses, facet and sacroiliac joint injection and radiofrequency thermal ablation of painful metastases or osteoid osteomas.

  5. Manual of extravascular minimally invasive interventional procedures of the liver and biliary tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda Mena, Shirley

    2011-01-01

    The use of interventional radiology and image-guided surgery has increased. Interventional radiologists are involved in patient treatment, well as in the diagnosis of the disease carrying his knowledge to the tumor treatment and procedures more invasive. Large amount of didactic material there are available, but the country lacks a manual to standardize interventional radiological techniques carried out. Also, those that could be instituted and adapted effectively in the management of hepatobiliary pathology of the Sistema de Salud Publica in Costa Rica, that covers the main procedures and adopt guidelines in a standardized way. A manual of procedures minimally invasive radiologic extravascular of the liver and biliary tract, is presented with broad bibliographic support that directs, standardizes and is adaptable to the needs and own resources of Costa Rica. Interventional radiology has been a non surgical alternative of a low index of complications, useful for the management of some health problems, avoids surgery and certainly lower costs. An alternative to surgical treatment of many conditions is offered, thereby reducing complications (morbidity) and can eliminate the need for hospitalization, in some cases. The development of new materials has allowed the most common working tools of the medical field are improved and become increasingly more efficient in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases, improving the training of radiologists in the interventional field. (author) [es

  6. Current Status and Future Perspective of Nuclear Cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, June Key

    2009-01-01

    Coronary artery disease is on the rise over the world. Myocardial perfusion SPECT is a well established technique to detect coronary artery disease and to assess left ventricular function. In addition, it has the unique ability to predict the prognosis of the patients. Moreover, the application of ECG-gated images provided the quantitative data and improved the accuracy. This approach has been proved to be cost-effective and suitable for the emerging economies as well as developed countries. However, the utilization of nuclear cardiology procedures vary widely considering the different countries and region of the world. Korea exits 2-3 times less utilization than Japan, and 20 times than the United States. Recently, with the emerging of new technology, namely cardiac CT, cardiac MR and stress echocardiography, the clinical usefulness of nuclear cardiology has been called in question and its role has been redefined. For the proper promotion of nuclear cardiology, special educations should be conducted since the nuclear cardiology has the contact points between nuclear medicine and cardiology. Several innovations are in horizon which will impact the diagnostic accuracy as well as imaging time and cost savings. Development of new tracers, gamma camera technology and hybrid systems will open the new avenue in cardiac imaging. The future of nuclear cardiology based on molecular imaging is very exciting. The newly defined biologic targets involving atherosclerosis and vascular vulnerability will allow the answers for the key clinical questions. Hybrid techniques including SPECT/CT indicate the direction in which clinical nuclear cardiology may be headed in the immediate future. To what extent nuclear cardiology will be passively absorbed by other modalities, or will actively incorporate other modalities, is up to the present and next generation of nuclear cardiologists

  7. Current Status and Future Perspective of Nuclear Cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, June Key [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    Coronary artery disease is on the rise over the world. Myocardial perfusion SPECT is a well established technique to detect coronary artery disease and to assess left ventricular function. In addition, it has the unique ability to predict the prognosis of the patients. Moreover, the application of ECG-gated images provided the quantitative data and improved the accuracy. This approach has been proved to be cost-effective and suitable for the emerging economies as well as developed countries. However, the utilization of nuclear cardiology procedures vary widely considering the different countries and region of the world. Korea exits 2-3 times less utilization than Japan, and 20 times than the United States. Recently, with the emerging of new technology, namely cardiac CT, cardiac MR and stress echocardiography, the clinical usefulness of nuclear cardiology has been called in question and its role has been redefined. For the proper promotion of nuclear cardiology, special educations should be conducted since the nuclear cardiology has the contact points between nuclear medicine and cardiology. Several innovations are in horizon which will impact the diagnostic accuracy as well as imaging time and cost savings. Development of new tracers, gamma camera technology and hybrid systems will open the new avenue in cardiac imaging. The future of nuclear cardiology based on molecular imaging is very exciting. The newly defined biologic targets involving atherosclerosis and vascular vulnerability will allow the answers for the key clinical questions. Hybrid techniques including SPECT/CT indicate the direction in which clinical nuclear cardiology may be headed in the immediate future. To what extent nuclear cardiology will be passively absorbed by other modalities, or will actively incorporate other modalities, is up to the present and next generation of nuclear cardiologists.

  8. Evaluating the benefits of nuclear cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maisey, M.

    1996-01-01

    This paper reviews the role of nuclear cardiology in the context of health care evaluation and resource utilisation. Nuclear cardiology procedures are used to detect disease, to define the extent of disease, to predict the outcome of therapy and to monitor the response to treatment. The evaluation of effectiveness will depend on the role for which the tests are being used. The evaluation of diagnostic tests most commonly follows the five level Fineberg classification. I) Technical capacity; II) diagnostic accuracy; III) diagnostic impact; IV) therapeutic impact; V) patient outcome. Tests may succeed or fail at each of these hierarchical levels. In addition to the clinical impact which is evaluated, the appropriate use of health care resources has to be considered , i.e. the cost effectiveness of the investigation. For this the costs of diagnosis and treatment in the resources used, together with the direct cost on the patient and patient carers needs to be considered. In addition to these direct costs to the community and to the patient and the carers the secondary downstream costs and opportunity costs have to be taken into account. The common methods for assessing the costs and benefits include cost minimization, cost effectiveness, cost utility, and cost benefit studies. The advantage and appropriate use of these methods are reviewed. There are seven clinical methods for evaluating diagnostics tests in nuclear cardiology which are: I) Case reports; II) consensus studies; III) databases; IV) management impact studies; V)modeling techniques; VI) management impact studies; VII) randomized control trial. Each of these has a role with advantages and disadvantages which are reviewed. It is no long sufficient to investigate the usefulness of a diagnostic test used in nuclear cardiology in isolation but it as to be within the context of the health care system and the resource used

  9. Risk of bleeding associated with interventional musculoskeletal radiology procedures. A comprehensive review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foremny, Gregory B.; Jose, Jean; Subhawong, Ty K. [University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, FL (United States); Pretell-Mazzini, Juan [University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery-Division of Musculoskeletal Oncology, Miami, FL (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This review compiles the current literature on the bleeding risks in common musculoskeletal interventional procedures and attempts to provide guidance for practicing radiologists in making decisions regarding the periprocedural management of patients on antithrombotic therapy. The practitioner must weigh the risk of bleeding if therapy is continued against the possibility a thromboembolic occurring if anticoagulation therapy is withheld or reversed. Unfortunately, there is little empirical data to guide evidence-based decisions for many musculoskeletal interventions. However, a review of the literature shows that for low-risk procedures, such as arthrograms/arthrocenteses or muscle/tendon sheath injections, bleeding risks are sufficiently small that anticoagulants and antiplatelet therapies need not be withheld. Additionally, relatively higher-risk procedures, such as needle biopsies of bone and soft tissue, may be safely performed without holding antithrombotic therapy, provided pre-procedural INR is within therapeutic range. Thus, while a patient's particular clinical circumstances should dictate optimal individualized management, anticoagulation alone is not a general contraindication to most interventional musculoskeletal radiology procedures. (orig.)

  10. Implementation of Treatment Integrity Procedures An Analysis of Outcome Studies of Youth Interventions Targeting Externalizing Behavioral Problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goense, Pauline; Boendermaker, Leonieke; van Yperen, Tom; Stams, Geert-Jan; van Laar, Jose

    2014-01-01

    This systematic review evaluates the implementation of treatment integrity procedures in outcome studies of youth interventions targeting behavioral problems. The Implementation of Treatment Integrity Procedures Scale (ITIPS), developed by Perepletchikova, Treat, and Kazdin (2007), was adapted

  11. Radionuclide methods in pediatric cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reich, O.; Ruth, C.; Samanek, M.

    1990-01-01

    The use of radionuclide methods in pediatric cardiology is discussed for non-invasive evaluation of myocardial function and perfusion, regional lung perfusion and ventilation, and for measuring central and peripheral hemodynamics. (H.W.). 16 refs

  12. Predisposing cardiac conditions, interventional procedures, and antibiotic prophylaxis among patients with infective endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirillo, Fabio; Faggiano, Pompilio; Cecconi, Moreno; Moreo, Antonella; Squeri, Angelo; Gaddi, Oscar; Cecchi, Enrico

    2016-09-01

    Efficacy and safety of antibiotic prophylaxis (AP) for prevention of infective endocarditis (IE) in patients with predisposing cardiac condition (PCC) undergoing invasive procedures is still debated. We sought to assess the prevalence of PCC, the type of interventional procedures preceding the onset of symptoms, and the usefulness of AP in a large cohort of consecutive patients with definite IE. We examined 677 (median age 65.34 years; male 492 [73%]) consecutive patients with IE enrolled from July 2007 through 2010 into the Italian Registry of Infective Endocarditis. Predisposing cardiac condition was present in 341 patients (50%).Thirty-two patients (4.7%) underwent dental procedures. Of 20 patients with PCC undergoing dental procedure, 13 had assumed AP. Viridans group streptococci were isolated from blood cultures in 8 of 20 patients with PCC and prior dental procedure. Nondental procedures preceded IE in 139 patients (21%). They were significantly older and had more comordibities compared with patients undergoing dental procedures. Predisposing cardiac condition was identified in 91 patients. Perioperative antimicrobial prophylaxis was administered to 67 patients. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequent causative agent. Cardiac surgery was necessary in 85 patients (20 with prior dental and 65 with nondental procedure). Surgical mortality (12% vs 0%, P = .03) and hospital mortality (23% vs 3%, P = .001) were significantly larger among patients with nondental procedures. In a large unselected cohort of patients with IE, the incidence of preceding dental procedures was minimal. The number of cases potentially preventable by means of AP was negligible. Nondental procedures were more frequent than dental procedures and were correlated with poorer prognosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Central venous catheterization: comparison between interventional radiological procedure and blind surgical reocedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Won Gyu; Jin, Gong Yong; Han, Young Min; Yu, He Chul

    2002-01-01

    To determine the usefulness and safety of radiological placement of a central venous catheter by prospectively comparing the results of interventional radiology and blind surgery. For placement of a central venous catheter, the blind surgical method was used in 78 cases (77 patients), and the interventional radiological method in 56 cases (54 patients). The male to female ratio was 66:68, and the patients' mean age was 48 (range, 18-80) years. A tunneled central venous catheter was used in 74 cases, and a chemoport in 60. We evaluated the success and duration of the procedures, the number of punctures required, and ensuing complications, comparing the results of the two methods. The success rates of the interventional radiological and the blind surgical procedure were 100% and 94.8%, respectively. The duration of central catheterization was 3-395 (mean, 120) day, that of chemoport was 160.9 days, and that of tunneled central venous catheter was 95.1 days. The mean number of punctures of the subclavian vein was 1.2 of interventional radiology, and 2.1 for blind surgery. The mean duration of the interventional radiology and the blind surgical procedure was, respectively, 30 and 40 minutes. The postprocedure complication rate was 27.6% (37 cases). Early complications occurred in nine cases (6.7%): where interventional radiology was used, there was one case of hematoma, and blind surgery gave rise to hematoma (n=2), pneumothorax (n=2), and early deviation of the catheter (n=4). Late complications occurred in 32 cases (23.9%). Interventional radiology involved infection (n=4), venous thrombosis (n=1), catheter displacement (n=2) and catheter obstruction (n=5), while the blind surgical procedure gave rise to infection (n=5), venous thrombosis (n=3), catheter displacement (n=4) and catheter obstruction (n=8). The success rate of interventional radiological placement of a central venous catheter was high and the complication rate was low. In comparison with the blind

  14. History of pediatric cardiology in India

    OpenAIRE

    Anita Saxena

    2015-01-01

    In India, the discipline of cardiology started in the late 1950s and at that time pediatric cardiology was practiced as a part of cardiology specialty. This article traces the history of pediatric cardiology in India. Dr. S. Padmawati and Dr. Kamala Vytilingam underwent training in pediatric cardiology at international centers in the early 1950s and early 1960s. Dr. N. Gopinath successfully closed a ventricular septal defect using a pump oxygenator at Christian Medical College, Vellore. Open ...

  15. Usefulness of DICOM headers in the analysis of two biplane X-ray systems setting (image intensifier and flat panel) used in pediatric interventional cardiology in Chile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ubeda, C.; Vergara, F.

    2009-01-01

    The setting of two biplane X ray systems were evaluated (image intensifier (II) and flat panel (PP)), through DICOM tags from 32 images created during the characterization of both systems. The technical parameters adjusted for systems were: 63,8 to 80,0 kV and 15,0 to 388,0 mA, for the system with II and 52,0 to 77,0 kV and 25,0 to 476,0 mA, for the system with PP detector. Both equipment presented a different mA adjustment, when moving from fluoroscopy modes low dose (FL), medium dose (FM) and high dose (FH) to cine mode (CI). Two dosimetric quantities were evaluated, the first one was the dose-area product (DAP) which gave as a result for FB mode, between 0,03 to 0,35 uGycm 2 /image (II) and from 0,05 a 0,69 uGycm 2 /image (PP), when the polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) thickness was incremented from 4 to 16 cm. In cine mode the DAP quantity showed, percentage values from 24 to -1 % for the same PMMA increment. Skin cumulative dose was the second quantity evaluated and showed an increment of incident air kerma (KAI)/image in factors from 17 to 35 (II) and 15 to 28 (PP) when used in CI mode instead of FB mode, to the different PMMA thicknesses used. This dose increment for CI mode must be considered by cardiologists, to use the fluoroscopic run as an alternative to document part of the procedures when there is no need to use a high quality image (author)

  16. Advances in Clinical Cardiology 2016: A Summary of the Key Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Alastair; McQuillan, Conor; Menown, Ian B A

    2017-07-01

    The findings of many new cardiology clinical trials over the last year have been published or presented at major international meetings. This paper aims to describe and place in context a summary of the key clinical trials in cardiology presented between January and December 2016. The authors reviewed clinical trials presented at major cardiology conferences during 2016 including the American College of Cardiology (ACC), European Association for Percutaneous Cardiovascular Interventions (EuroPCR), European Society of Cardiology (ESC), European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD), Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT), and the American Heart Association (AHA). Selection criteria were trials with a broad relevance to the cardiology community and those with potential to change current practice. A total of 57 key cardiology clinical trials were identified for inclusion. Here we describe and place in clinical context the key findings of new data relating to interventional and structural cardiology including delayed stenting following primary angioplasty, contrast-induced nephropathy, management of jailed wires, optimal duration of dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT), stenting vs bypass for left main disease, new generation stents (BioFreedom, Orsiro, Absorb), transcatheter aortic valve implantation (Edwards Sapien XT, transcatheter embolic protection), and closure devices (Watchman, Amplatzer). New preventative cardiology data include trials of bariatric surgery, empagliflozin, liraglutide, semaglutide, PCSK9 inhibitors (evolocumab and alirocumab), and inclisiran. Antiplatelet therapy trials include platelet function monitoring and ticagrelor vs clopidogrel for peripheral vascular disease. New data are also presented in fields of heart failure (sacubitril/valsartan, aliskiren, spironolactone), atrial fibrillation (rivaroxaban in patients undergoing coronary intervention, edoxaban in DC cardioversion), cardiac devices (implantable cardioverter

  17. Radiation doses to patients in haemodynamic procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canadillas-Perdomo, B; Catalan-Acosta, A; Hernandez-Armas, J [Servicio de Fisica Medica, Hospital Universitario de Canarias, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Perez-Martin, C [Servicio de Ingenieria Biomedica, Hospital Universitario de Canarias, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Armas-Trujillo, D de [Servicio de Cardiologia, Hospital Universitario de Canarias, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2001-03-01

    Interventional radio-cardiology gives high doses to patients due to high values of fluoroscopy times and large series of radiographic images. The main objective of the present work is the determination of de dose-area product (DAP) in patients of three different types of cardiology procedures with X-rays. The effective doses were estimated trough the organ doses values measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs-100), suitable calibrated, placed in a phantom type Rando which was submitted to the same radiological conditions corresponding to the procedures made on patients. The values for the effective doses in the procedures CAD Seldinger was 6.20 mSv on average and 1.85mSv for pacemaker implants. (author)

  18. Radiation doses to patients in haemodynamic procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canadillas-Perdomo, B.; Catalan-Acosta, A.; Hernandez-Armas, J.; Perez-Martin, C.; Armas-Trujillo, D. de

    2001-01-01

    Interventional radio-cardiology gives high doses to patients due to high values of fluoroscopy times and large series of radiographic images. The main objective of the present work is the determination of de dose-area product (DAP) in patients of three different types of cardiology procedures with X-rays. The effective doses were estimated trough the organ doses values measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs-100), suitable calibrated, placed in a phantom type Rando which was submitted to the same radiological conditions corresponding to the procedures made on patients. The values for the effective doses in the procedures CAD Seldinger was 6.20 mSv on average and 1.85mSv for pacemaker implants. (author)

  19. The establishment of enteral nutrition with minimally-invasive interventional procedure under endoscopic or imaging guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Feng; Cheng Yingsheng

    2010-01-01

    For patients unable to get the necessary nutrition orally, a variety of techniques,including surgical way, to make gastrostomy with tube placement have been employed. For recent years, gastrostomy and tube placement with the help of endoscopic guidance or percutaneous interventional management has been developed, which is superior to surgical procedure in minimizing injuries, decreasing cost and reducing complications. In certain clinical situations, both endoscopic method and interventional method can be employed. This paper aims to make a comprehensive review of the indications, techniques and skills, advantages and disadvantages of both the endoscopy-guided and the imaging-guided percutaneous gastrojejunostomy for the establishment of enteral nutrition. (authors)

  20. Education and training in radiological protection for diagnostic and interventional procedures ICRP 113 in brief

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salama, S.; Gomaa, M. A.; Alshoufi, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    The international commission on radiological protection (ICRP) is the primary body in protection against ionizing radiation. Among its latest publication is ICRP publication 113 e ducation and training in radiological protection for diagnostic and interventional procedures . This document introduces diagnostic and interventional medical procedures using ionizing radiations in deep details. The document is approved by the commission in October 2010 and translated into Arabic at December 2011. This work is a continuation of the efforts series to translate some of the most important of the radiological protection references into the Arabic; aiming to maximize the benefit. The previous translation include WHO handbook on indoor radon: a public health perspective, issued by world health organization 2009 and Radiation Protection in Medicine, ICRP Publication 105 2007 that translated into Arabic with support of Arab atomic energy authority at 2011.

  1. Blinding in trials of interventional procedures is possible and worthwhile [version 2; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Wartolowska

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we use evidence from our earlier review of surgical randomised controlled trials with a placebo arm to show that blinding in trials of interventional procedures is feasible. We give examples of ingenious strategies that have been used to simulate the active procedure and to make the placebo control indistinguishable from the active treatment. We discuss why it is important to blind of patients, assessors, and caregivers and what types of bias that may occur in interventional trials. Finally, we describe the benefits of blinding, from the obvious ones such as avoiding bias, as well as less evident benefits such as avoiding patient drop out in the control arm.

  2. Assessment of eye lens doses for workers during interventional radiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urboniene, A.; Sadzeviciene, E.; Ziliukas, J.

    2015-01-01

    The assessment of eye lens doses for workers during interventional radiology (IR) procedures was performed using a new eye lens dosemeter. In parallel, the results of routine individual monitoring were analysed and compared with the results obtained from measurements with a new eye lens dosemeter. The eye lens doses were assessed using H p (3) measured at the level of the eyes and were compared with H p (10) measured with the whole-body dosemeter above the lead collar. The information about use of protective measures, the number of performed interventional procedures per month and their fluoroscopy time was also collected. The assessment of doses to the lens of the eye was done for 50 IR workers at 9 Lithuanian hospitals for the period of 2012-2013. If the use of lead glasses is not taken into account, the estimated maximum annual dose equivalent to the lens of the eye was 82 mSv. (authors)

  3. A Pediatric Cardiology Fellowship Boot Camp improves trainee confidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Catherine K; Tannous, Paul; DeWitt, Elizabeth; Farias, Michael; Mansfield, Laura; Ronai, Christina; Schidlow, David; Sanders, Stephen P; Lock, James E; Newburger, Jane W; Brown, David W

    2016-12-01

    Introduction New paediatric cardiology trainees are required to rapidly assimilate knowledge and gain clinical skills to which they have limited or no exposure during residency. The Pediatric Cardiology Fellowship Boot Camp (PCBC) at Boston Children's Hospital was designed to provide incoming fellows with an intensive exposure to congenital cardiac pathology and a broad overview of major areas of paediatric cardiology practice. The PCBC curriculum was designed by core faculty in cardiac pathology, echocardiography, electrophysiology, interventional cardiology, exercise physiology, and cardiac intensive care. Individual faculty contributed learning objectives, which were refined by fellowship directors and used to build a programme of didactics, hands-on/simulation-based activities, and self-guided learning opportunities. A total of 16 incoming fellows participated in the 4-week boot camp, with no concurrent clinical responsibilities, over 2 years. On the basis of pre- and post-PCBC surveys, 80% of trainees strongly agreed that they felt more prepared for clinical responsibilities, and a similar percentage felt that PCBC should be offered to future incoming fellows. Fellows showed significant increase in their confidence in all specific knowledge and skills related to the learning objectives. Fellows rated hands-on learning experiences and simulation-based exercises most highly. We describe a novel 4-week-long boot camp designed to expose incoming paediatric cardiology fellows to the broad spectrum of knowledge and skills required for the practice of paediatric cardiology. The experience increased trainee confidence and sense of preparedness to begin fellowship-related responsibilities. Given that highly interactive activities were rated most highly, boot camps in paediatric cardiology should strongly emphasise these elements.

  4. A Review of CAM for Procedural Pain in Infancy: Part II. Other Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennie C. I. Tsao

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is the second in a two-part series reviewing the empirical evidence for complementary and alternative medicine (CAM approaches for the management of pain related to medical procedures in infants up to 6 weeks of age. Part I of this series investigated the effects of sucrose with or without non-nutritive sucking (NNS. The present article examines other CAM interventions for procedural pain including music-based interventions, olfactory stimulation, kangaroo care and swaddling. Computerized databases were searched for relevant studies including prior reviews and primary trials. Preliminary support was revealed for the analgesic effects of the CAM modalities reviewed. However, the overall quality of the evidence for these approaches remains relatively weak. Additional well-designed trials incorporating rigorous methodology are required. Such investigations will assist in the development of evidence-based guidelines on the use of CAM interventions either alone or in concert with conventional approaches to provide safe, reliable analgesia for infant procedural pain.

  5. Imaging guided interventional procedures in paediatric uroradiology--a case based overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riccabona, M. E-mail: michael.riccabona@kfunigraz.ac.at; Sorantin, E.; Hausegger, K

    2002-08-01

    Objective: To describe the potential and application of interventional image guided procedures in the paediatric urinary tract. Patients and methods: The different techniques are illustrated using case reports. The examples comprise established indications such as percutaneous nephrostomy for compromised kidneys in obstructive uropathy and infection, sonographic guided renal biopsy including monitoring or treatment of complications after biopsy, and evaluation and balloon dilatation of childhood renal artery stenosis. There are new applications such as treatment of stenosis in cutaneous ureterostomy or sonographically guided catheterism for deployment of therapeutic agents. Results: Generally, the procedures are safe and successful. However, complications may occur, and peri-/post-interventional monitoring is mandatory to insure early detection and adequate management. Sometimes additional treatment such as percutaneous embolisation of a symptomatic post biopsy arterio-venous fistula, or a second biopsy for recurrent disease may become necessary. Conclusion: Imaging guided interventional procedures are performed successfully in a variety of diseases of the paediatric urinary tract. They can be considered a valuable additional modality throughout infancy and childhood.

  6. Imaging guided interventional procedures in paediatric uroradiology--a case based overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riccabona, M.; Sorantin, E.; Hausegger, K.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To describe the potential and application of interventional image guided procedures in the paediatric urinary tract. Patients and methods: The different techniques are illustrated using case reports. The examples comprise established indications such as percutaneous nephrostomy for compromised kidneys in obstructive uropathy and infection, sonographic guided renal biopsy including monitoring or treatment of complications after biopsy, and evaluation and balloon dilatation of childhood renal artery stenosis. There are new applications such as treatment of stenosis in cutaneous ureterostomy or sonographically guided catheterism for deployment of therapeutic agents. Results: Generally, the procedures are safe and successful. However, complications may occur, and peri-/post-interventional monitoring is mandatory to insure early detection and adequate management. Sometimes additional treatment such as percutaneous embolisation of a symptomatic post biopsy arterio-venous fistula, or a second biopsy for recurrent disease may become necessary. Conclusion: Imaging guided interventional procedures are performed successfully in a variety of diseases of the paediatric urinary tract. They can be considered a valuable additional modality throughout infancy and childhood

  7. Evaluation of radiation protection in interventional orthopedic procedures in Khartoum state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, M. Y. A.

    2013-06-01

    In this study an evaluation of radiation safety and protection in interventional orthopedic procedures for the staff in three theatres in Khartoum state was conducted. To evaluate radiation protection program and staff knowledge with regard to radiation protection a questionnaire was designed and distributed among the staff there. Integrity check was conducted on the available radiation tools ( lead aprons) to ensure that they provide optimal protection when positioned appropriately. Also dose rate was measured around the theatre to evaluate the level of leakage radiation. Finally the absorbed dose to orthopedic specialists was measured during several procedures. The study showed the absence of most of the radiation protection and safety procedures that ensure the protection of of workers and lack of radiation protection program. The integrity check conducted on lead aprons showed uncapable crack in about 24% of the checked aprons. And in spite of this, there was no action taken to withdraw those faulty aprons or to replace them due to the acute shortage of the aprons available in the three centers and this will cause unjustified radiation exposure to the staff. The level of radiation around the theatres was found to fall within the acceptable limit according to the international commission of radiation protection (ICRP) recommendations that -if implemented -could improve the status of radiation protection in interventional orthopedic procedures. The improve. The important recommendations are to establish a single regulatory authority in Sudan independent from any user or promotion of radiation as well as to conduct periodically training courses for orthopedic staff on radiation protection in orthopedic interventional procedures.(Author)

  8. Geriatric Cardiology: An Emerging Discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodson, John A; Matlock, Daniel D; Forman, Daniel E

    2016-09-01

    Given changing demographics, patients with cardiovascular (CV) disease in developed countries are now older and more complex than even a decade ago. This trend is expected to continue into the foreseeable future; accordingly, cardiologists are encountering patients with a greater number of comorbid illnesses as well as "geriatric conditions," such as cognitive impairment and frailty, which complicate management and influence outcomes. Simultaneously, technological advances have widened the therapeutic options available for patients, including those with the most advanced CV disease. In the setting of these changes, geriatric cardiology has recently emerged as a discipline that aims to adapt principles from geriatric medicine to everyday cardiology practice. Accordingly, the tasks of a "geriatric cardiologist" may include both traditional evidence-based CV management plus comprehensive geriatric assessment, medication reduction, team-based coordination of care, and explicit incorporation of patient goals into management. Given that the field is still in its relative infancy, the training pathways and structure of clinical programs in geriatric cardiology are still being delineated. In this review, we highlight the rationale behind geriatric cardiology as a discipline, several current approaches by geriatric cardiology programs, and future directions for the field. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Assessment of Patients Radiation Dose During Interventional Radiological Procedure in PPUKM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Khalid Matori; Husaini Salleh; Muhammad Jamal Muhammad Isa

    2014-01-01

    Interventional Radiology (IR) is a relatively new subspecialty of radiology. It is subspecialty where minimally invasive procedures are performed under radiological guidance using X-ray. This procedure can deliver high radiation doses compared with other radiological method due to long screening time. Because of these it is important to determine radiation doses received by patients undergoing IR procedures. It is to ensure that the dose is within the range deemed to be saved. A total of 128 patients undergoing IR procedures in PPUKM between 2012 and 2013 were study retrospectively. Dose area product (DAP) meter were used to measure the integral dose for the whole procedures. Mean kerma-area products for abdomen, head, pelvis, and thorax were 243.1, 107.3, 39.05 and 45.7 Gycm 2 , respectively. This study may provide the useful information which can be use to establish baseline patient dose data for dose optimizing study and carried out a recommendation on effective method of patient dose reduction during IR procedures. A more detail results of this study are presented in this paper. (author)

  10. Radiation exposure of medical staff from interventional x-ray procedures: a multicentre study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeusler, Uwe; Brix, Gunnar; Czarwinski, Renate

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the radiation exposure of medical staff from interventional x-ray procedures. Partial-body dose measurements were performed with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) in 39 physicians and nine assistants conducting 73 interventional procedures of nine different types in 14 hospitals in Germany. Fluoroscopy time and the dose-area product (DAP) were recorded too. The median (maximum) equivalent body dose per procedure was 16 (2,500) μSv for an unshielded person; the partial-body dose per procedure was 2.8 (240) μSv to the eye lens, 4.1 (730) μSv to the thyroid, 44 (1,800) μSv to one of the feet and 75 (13,000) μSv to one of the hands. A weak correlation between fluoroscopy time or DAP and the mean TLD dose was observed. Generally, the doses were within an acceptable range from a radiation hygiene point of view. However, relatively high exposures were measured to the hand in some cases and could cause a partial-body dose above the annual dose limit of 500 mSv. Thus, the use of finger dosimeters is strongly recommended. (orig.)

  11. Measurement and estimation of maximum skin dose to the patient for different interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Yuxi; Liu Lantao; Wei Kedao; Yu Peng; Yan Shulin; Li Tianchang

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To determine the dose distribution and maximum skin dose to the patient for four interventional procedures: coronary angiography (CA), hepatic angiography (HA), radiofrequency ablation (RF) and cerebral angiography (CAG), and to estimate the definitive effect of radiation on skin. Methods: Skin dose was measured using LiF: Mg, Cu, P TLD chips. A total of 9 measuring points were chosen on the back of the patient with two TLDs placed at each point, for CA, HA and RF interventional procedures, whereas two TLDs were placed on one point each at the postero-anterior (PA) and lateral side (LAT) respectively, during the CAG procedure. Results: The results revealed that the maximum skin dose to the patient was 1683.91 mGy for the HA procedure with a mean value of 607.29 mGy. The maximum skin dose at the PA point was 959.3 mGy for the CAG with a mean value of 418.79 mGy; While the maximum and the mean doses at the LAT point were 704 mGy and 191.52 mGy, respectively. For the RF procedure the maximum dose was 853.82 mGy and the mean was 219.67 mGy. For the CA procedure the maximum dose was 456.1 mGy and the mean was 227.63 mGy. Conclusion: All the measured dose values in this study are estimated ones which could not provide the accurate maximum value because it is difficult to measure using a great deal of TLDs. On the other hand, the small area of skin exposed to high dose could be missed as the distribution of the dose is successive. (authors)

  12. Pediatric Cardiology Boot Camp: Description and Evaluation of a Novel Intensive Training Program for Pediatric Cardiology Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceresnak, Scott R; Axelrod, David M; Motonaga, Kara S; Johnson, Emily R; Krawczeski, Catherine D

    2016-06-01

    The transition from residency to subspecialty fellowship in a procedurally driven field such as pediatric cardiology is challenging for trainees. We describe and assess the educational value of a pediatric cardiology "boot camp" educational tool designed to help prepare trainees for cardiology fellowship. A two-day intensive training program was provided for pediatric cardiology fellows in July 2015 at a large fellowship training program. Hands-on experiences and simulations were provided in: anatomy, auscultation, echocardiography, catheterization, cardiovascular intensive care (CVICU), electrophysiology (EP), heart failure, and cardiac surgery. Knowledge-based exams as well as surveys were completed by each participant pre-training and post-training. Pre- and post-exam results were compared via paired t tests, and survey results were compared via Wilcoxon rank sum. A total of eight participants were included. After boot camp, there was a significant improvement between pre- and post-exam scores (PRE 54 ± 9 % vs. POST 85 ± 8 %; p ≤ 0.001). On pre-training survey, the most common concerns about starting fellowship included: CVICU emergencies, technical aspects of the catheterization/EP labs, using temporary and permanent pacemakers/implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICDs), and ECG interpretation. Comparing pre- and post-surveys, there was a statistically significant improvement in the participants comfort level in 33 of 36 (92 %) areas of assessment. All participants (8/8, 100 %) strongly agreed that the boot camp was a valuable learning experience and helped to alleviate anxieties about the start of fellowship. A pediatric cardiology boot camp experience at the start of cardiology fellowship can provide a strong foundation and serve as an educational springboard for pediatric cardiology fellows.

  13. Recent advances in nuclear cardiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutte, H.; Petersen, C. Leth; Kjaer, A.

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear cardiology is an essential part of functional, non-invasive, cardiac imaging. Significant advances have been made in nuclear cardiology since planar (201)thallium ((201)TI) scintigraphy was introduced for the evaluation of left ventricular (LV) perfusion nearly 40 years ago. The use...... of nuclear cardiology has been steadily increasing over the last 20 years with important steps being the introduction of (99m)technetium- ((99m)Tc)-labelled perfusion radiotracers, the change from only planar to now much more single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography...... (PET), electrocardiogram gating of nuclear perfusion imaging, and finally introducing nuclear hybrid imaging using either SPECT or PET together with either computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. The indications have extended from nearly only coronary artery diseases to several non...

  14. Monitoring Device Safety in Interventional Cardiology

    OpenAIRE

    Matheny, Michael E.; Ohno-Machado, Lucila; Resnic, Frederic S.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: A variety of postmarketing surveillance strategies to monitor the safety of medical devices have been supported by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, but there are few systems to automate surveillance. Our objective was to develop a system to perform real-time monitoring of safety data using a variety of process control techniques.

  15. Tailoring intervention procedures to routine primary health care practice; an ethnographic process evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruijnzeels Marc

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tailor-made approaches enable the uptake of interventions as they are seen as a way to overcome the incompatibility of general interventions with local knowledge about the organisation of routine medical practice and the relationship between the patients and the professionals in practice. Our case is the Quattro project which is a prevention programme for cardiovascular diseases in high-risk patients in primary health care centres in deprived neighbourhoods. This programme was implemented as a pragmatic trial and foresaw the importance of local knowledge in primary health care and internal, or locally made, guidelines. The aim of this paper is to show how this prevention programme, which could be tailored to routine care, was implemented in primary care. Methods An ethnographic design was used for this study. We observed and interviewed the researchers and the practice nurses. All the research documents, observations and transcribed interviews were analysed thematically. Results Our ethnographic process evaluation showed that the opportunity of tailoring intervention procedures to routine care in a pragmatic trial setting did not result in a well-organised and well-implemented prevention programme. In fact, the lack of standard protocols hindered the implementation of the intervention. Although it was not the purpose of this trial, a guideline was developed. Despite the fact that the developed guideline functioned as a tool, it did not result in the intervention being organised accordingly. However, the guideline did make tailoring the intervention possible. It provided the professionals with the key or the instructions needed to achieve organisational change and transform the existing interprofessional relations. Conclusion As tailor-made approaches are developed to enable the uptake of interventions in routine practice, they are facilitated by the brokering of tools such as guidelines. In our study, guidelines facilitated

  16. Potential and Limitations of Cochrane Reviews in Pediatric Cardiology: A Systematic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poryo, Martin; Khosrawikatoli, Sara; Abdul-Khaliq, Hashim; Meyer, Sascha

    2017-04-01

    Evidence-based medicine has contributed substantially to the quality of medical care in pediatric and adult cardiology. However, our impression from the bedside is that a substantial number of Cochrane reviews generate inconclusive data that are of limited clinical benefit. We performed a systematic synopsis of Cochrane reviews published between 2001 and 2015 in the field of pediatric cardiology. Main outcome parameters were the number and percentage of conclusive, partly conclusive, and inconclusive reviews as well as their recommendations and their development over three a priori defined intervals. In total, 69 reviews were analyzed. Most of them examined preterm and term neonates (36.2%), whereas 33.3% included also non-pediatric patients. Leading topics were pharmacological issues (71.0%) followed by interventional (10.1%) and operative procedures (2.9%). The majority of reviews were inconclusive (42.9%), while 36.2% were conclusive and 21.7% partly conclusive. Although the number of published reviews increased during the three a priori defined time intervals, reviews with "no specific recommendations" remained stable while "recommendations in favor of an intervention" clearly increased. Main reasons for missing recommendations were insufficient data (n = 41) as well as an insufficient number of trials (n = 22) or poor study quality (n = 19). There is still need for high-quality research, which will likely yield a greater number of Cochrane reviews with conclusive results.

  17. The interplay of ultrasound and computed tomography in the planning and execution of interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stafford, S.; Mueller, P.R.

    1987-01-01

    Even in large academic and private settings, where subspecialists abound and diagnostic and interventional radiologists are divided, both physically and philosophically, the interventionalist has emerged from the fluoroscopic suite to participate in the imaging workup of patients referred for precutaneous procedures. This expanded imaging role for the interventionalist is a natural outgrowth of several developments in radiology training. Computed tomography and ultrasound no longer are obscure techniques, understood only by an elite group of academic radiologists in large centers with access to equipment. All residents receive extensive education in these modalities, as imaging is a major part of general radiology. In addition, fellowship programs have been expanded to emphasize organ system training as opposed to ''modality'' training alone. Armed with imaging skills, the interventionalist is able to evaluate the cross-sectional diagnostic images better and to address specific findings and issues with respect to the planned procedure. These specific issues, elucidated by cross-sectional imaging, impact on the planning of interventional procedures addressed in this chapter

  18. Radiation injury of the skin following diagnostic and interventional fluoroscopic procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, T.R.; Wagner, L.K.; Mettler, F.A.

    2001-01-01

    Many radiation injuries to the skin, resulting from diagnostic and interventional fluoroscopic procedures, have been reported in recent years. In some cases skin damage was severe and debilitating. We analyzed 72 reports of skin injuries for progression and location of injury, type and number of procedures, and contributing patient and operator factors. Most cases (46) were related to coronary angiography and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA). A smaller number was documented after cardiac radiofrequency catheter ablation (12), transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) placement (7), neuroradiological interventions (3) and other procedures (4). Important factors leading to skin injuries were long exposure times over the same skin area, use of high dose rates, irradiation through thick tissue masses, hypersensitivity to radiation, and positioning of arms or breasts into the radiation entrance beam. Physicians were frequently unaware of the high radiation doses involved and did not recognize the injuries as radiation induced. Based on these findings, recommendations to reduce dose and improve patient care are provided. (author)

  19. Current trends in Nuclear Cardiology. Cuban scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peix González, Amalia

    2016-01-01

    The study concludes with the following recommendations. Nuclear Cardiology extend to the entire country. Conduct cost-effectiveness studies comparing different imaging techniques in cardiology. Develop metabolic studies and coronary flow by PET. Introducing the study of adrenergic innervation. Develop hybrid imaging in cardiology. Establish committees of experts to analyze the value of different imaging techniques in Cardiology According to our possibilities and resources, toward implementation of a medicine individualized for our patients

  20. Radiologic intervention: patient anxiety, fear of pain, understanding of the procedure and satisfaction with the medication-a prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Hoon

    2006-01-01

    I wanted to prospectively assess patients' anxiety, their understanding of the procedure being performed, the perception of the pain level and the satisfaction with the administered medication for interventional procedures. I investigated 78 patients before and after they underwent 93 interventional procedures. The patients responded to a series of questions by using a visual analogue scale (VAS). Two different procedures were performed on 15 patients at different times. Based on the patient's body weight, a combination of sedative and analgesic was intravenously administered. The mean anxiety VAS score for the interventional procedures was about 5.3. The mean anxiety score of the experienced patients was about 3.8 and that of the inexperienced patients was about 5.5 (ρ < .001). The mean score for the understanding of the procedure, which was recorded both before and after the procedure, was about 4.1 and 7.1, respectively. The mean scores for the understanding of the procedure were about 7.0 in the experienced patients and about 3.6 in the inexperienced patients (ρ < .001). The anticipated level of pain recorded before the procedure was about 5.2 and the level of pain during the procedure was 2.9, and the latter was recorded after the procedure (ρ < .001). The level of satisfaction with the medication provided during the procedure was about 8.0 on the VAS score. The patients had a moderate amount of anxiety about the interventional procedures. Most patients had a high level of satisfaction with the medication despite the amount of pain they experienced during the procedure. The patients who were experienced with a procedure tended to have less anxiety and anticipated pain, and they had a greater understanding of the procedure

  1. Reporting nuclear cardiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trägårdh, Elin; Hesse, Birger; Knuuti, Juhani

    2015-01-01

    The report of an imaging procedure is a critical component of an examination, being the final and often the only communication from the interpreting physician to the referring or treating physician. Very limited evidence and few recommendations or guidelines on reporting imaging studies are avail...

  2. Physician Requirements-1990. For Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Octavious; Birchette-Pierce, Cheryl

    Professional requirements for physicians specializing in cardiology were estimated to assist policymakers in developing guidelines for graduate medical education. The determination of physician requirements was based on an adjusted needs rather than a demand or utilization model. For each illness, manpower requirements were modified by the…

  3. Quantitative Nuclear Cardiology: How objective?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawley, J.C.W.; Raval, U.; Soman, P.; Lahiri, A.

    1997-01-01

    The object of this study was to establish the accuracy required from the operator in indicating the centre and axis the left ventricle, and in placing regions of interest (ROIs), whilst using the MYO TOMO and MYO QUANT software to analyze tomographic data from nuclear cardiology

  4. Recent advances in nuclear cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Won Woo

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear cardiology is one of the major fields of nuclear medicine practice. Myocardial perfusion studies using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) have played a crucial role in the management of coronary artery diseases. Positron emission tomography (PET) has also been considered an important tool for the assessment of myocardial viability and perfusion. However, the recent development of computed tomography (CT)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technologies and growing concerns about the radiation exposure of patients remain serious challenges for nuclear cardiology. In response to these challenges, remarkable achievements and improvements are currently in progress in the field of myocardial perfusion imaging regarding the applicable software and hardware. Additionally, myocardial perfusion positron emission tomography (PET) is receiving increasing attention owing to its unique capability of absolute myocardial blood flow estimation. An F-18-labeled perfusion agent for PET is under clinical trial with promising interim results. The applications of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and F-18 sodium fluoride (NaF) to cardiovascular diseases have revealed details on the basic pathophysiology of ischemic heart diseases. PET/MRI seems to be particularly promising for nuclear cardiology in the future. Restrictive diseases, such as cardiac sarcoidosis and amyloidosis, are effectively evaluated using a variety of nuclear imaging tools. Considering these advances, the current challenges of nuclear cardiology will become opportunities if more collaborative efforts are devoted to this exciting field of nuclear medicine

  5. Radiation load of the extremities and eye lenses of the staff during selected interventional radiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikodemova, Denisa; Trosanova, Dominika

    2010-01-01

    The Slovak Medical University in Bratislava is involved in the ORAMED (Optimization of Radiation Protection for Medical Staff) research project, aimed at developing a unified methodology for a more accurate assessment of professional exposure of interventional radiology staff, with focus on extremity and eye lens dosimetry in selected procedures. Three cardiac procedures and 5 angiography examinations were selected: all technical parameters were monitored and the dose equivalent levels were measured by TL dosimetry at 9 anatomic sites of the body. Preliminary results were obtained for the radiation burden of the eyes and extremities during digital subtraction angiography of the lower limbs, collected from 7 hospital departments in partner EU states. Correlations between the evaluated data and the influence of some parameters are shown

  6. An assessment of methods for monitoring entrance surface dose in fluoroscopically guided interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waite, J.C.; Fitzgerald, M.

    2001-01-01

    In the light of a growing awareness of the risks of inducing skin injuries as a consequence of fluoroscopically guided interventional procedures (FGIPs), this paper compares three methods of monitoring entrance surface dose (ESD). It also reports measurements of ESDs made during the period August 1998 to June 1999 on 137 patients undergoing cardiac, neurological and general FGIPs. Although the sample is small, the results reinforce the need for routine assessments to be made of ESDs in FGIPs. At present, the most reliable and accurate form of ESD measurement would seem to be arrays of TLDs. However, transducer based methods, although likely to be less accurate, have considerable advantages in relation to a continuous monitoring programme. It is also suggested that there may be the potential locally for threshold dose area product (DAP) values to be set for specific procedures. These could be used to provide early warning of the potential for skin injuries. (author)

  7. Retrograde Tibiopedal Access as a Bail-Out Procedure for Endovascular Intervention Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Amro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Retrograde pedal access has been well described in the literature as a secondary approach for limb salvage in critical limb ischemia (CLI patients. In this manuscript we are presenting a case where retrograde tibiopedal access has been used as a bail-out procedure for the management of superficial femoral artery (SFA intervention complications. Procedure/Technique. After development of a perforation while trying to cross the totally occluded mid SFA using the conventional CFA access, we were able to cross the mid SFA lesion after accessing the posterior tibial artery in a retrograde fashion and delivered a self-expanding stent which created a flap that sealed the perforation without the need for covered stent. Conclusion. Retrograde tibiopedal access is a safe and effective approach for delivery of stents from the distal approach and so can be used as a bail-out technique for SFA perforation.

  8. Usefulness of non-lead aprons in radiation protection for physicians performing interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuguchi, M.; Chida, K.; Taura, M.; Inaba, Y.; Ebata, A.; Yamada, S.

    2008-01-01

    At present, interventional radiology (IVR) tends to involve long procedures (long radiation duration), and physicians are near to the source of scattered radiation. Hence, shielding is critical in protecting physicians from radiation. Protective aprons and additional lead-shielding devices, such as table-side lead drapes, are important means of protecting the physician from scattered radiation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether non-lead aprons are effective in protecting physicians from radiation during IVR procedures. In this study, the radiation protection effects of commercially available protective lead and non-lead aprons, when exposed to diagnostic X rays, are compared. The performance of these non-lead and lead aprons was similar for scattered X rays at tube voltages of 60-120 kV. Properly designed non-lead aprons are thus more suitable for physicians because they weigh ∼20% less than the lead aprons, and are non-toxic. (authors)

  9. Increased prevalence of preeclampsia among women undergoing procedural intervention for renal artery fibromuscular dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, Chardonnay J; Taylor, Robert N; Craven, Timothy E; Edwards, Matthew S; Corriere, Matthew A

    2015-08-01

    Renal artery fibromuscular dysplasia (RA-FMD) has a higher prevalence among women and a presumed hormonal etiology. Although preeclampsia has a clinical presentation similar to symptomatic RA-FMD and occurs exclusively in women, associations between these 2 diseases have not been characterized. To explore epidemiologic associations between RA-FMD and preeclampsia, we administered a validated screening instrument for preeclampsia to a cohort of women with a history of pregnancy who had previously been treated with procedural intervention for symptomatic RA stenosis. Women with a history of pregnancy who had previously undergone procedural intervention (including angioplasty and/or bypass) for symptomatic RA stenosis were identified from a prospectively maintained operative registry and screened for remote history of preeclampsia using a validated survey instrument. Univariable associations between RA-FMD and preeclampsia among participants with a history of pregnancy were evaluated using t-tests for continuous factors and chi-squared tests for dichotomous factors. Multivariable associations were evaluated using logistic regression models. A total of 144 women were identified who met the study inclusion criteria, including 94 with atherosclerotic RA stenosis and 50 with RA-FMD. Sixty-nine patients were contacted, 59 consented to participate, and 52 had a history of pregnancy (and therefore were at risk for preeclampsia). Participants completed the survey instrument at a mean of 7.1 ± 3.1 vs. 6.9 ± 3.6 years after RA procedural intervention, respectively. Survey responses indicated a history of preeclampsia in 19/52 (36.5%) of participants overall, including 14/27 (51.9%) with RA-FMD versus 5/20 (20.0%) with RA atherosclerosis (P = 0.02). Preeclampsia remained associated with FMD in a multivariable model adjusting for smoking status, age at time of surgery, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (odds ratio [OR] 9.51, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.49-60.6, P = 0

  10. PET/CT-guided interventional procedures: rationale, justification, initial study, and research plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, K.; Rahill, J.; Cleary, K. [Computer Aided Interventions and Medical Robotics (CAIMR), Imaging Science and Information Systems (ISIS) Center, Georgetown Univ. Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States); Petrillo, S.; Earl-Graef, D. [Dept. of Radiology, Georgetown Univ. Hospital, MedStar Health, Washington, DC (United States); Banovac, F.; Levy, E. [Computer Aided Interventions and Medical Robotics (CAIMR), Imaging Science and Information Systems (ISIS) Center, Georgetown Univ. Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States); Dept. of Radiology, Georgetown Univ. Hospital, MedStar Health, Washington, DC (United States); Shekhar, R. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2007-06-15

    Positron-emission tomography (PET) and PET/CT (computed tomography) are becoming increasingly important for diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Clinically relevant changes can sometimes be seen on PET that are not seen on other imaging modalities. However, PET is not suitable for guiding biopsy as the images are not obtained in real-time. Therefore, our research group has begun developing a concept for PET/CT-guided interventional procedures. This paper presents the rationale for this concept, outlines our research plan, and includes an initial study to evaluate the relative sensitivity of CT and PET/CT in detecting suspicious lesions. (orig.)

  11. Mobile apps in cardiology: review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Pérez, Borja; de la Torre-Díez, Isabel; López-Coronado, Miguel; Herreros-González, Jesús

    2013-07-24

    Cardiovascular diseases are the deadliest diseases worldwide, with 17.3 million deaths in 2008 alone. Among them, heart-related deaths are of the utmost relevance; a fact easily proven by the 7.25 million deaths caused by ischemic heart disease alone in that year. The latest advances in smartphones and mHealth have been used in the creation of thousands of medical apps related to cardiology, which can help to reduce these mortality rates. The aim of this paper is to study the literature on mobile systems and applications currently available, as well as the existing apps related to cardiology from the leading app stores and to then classify the results to see what is available and what is missing, focusing particularly on commercial apps. Two reviews have been developed. One is a literature review of mobile systems and applications, retrieved from several databases and systems such as Scopus, PubMed, IEEE Xplore, and Web of Knowledge. The other is a review of mobile apps in the leading app stores, Google play for Android and Apple's App Store for iOS. Search queries up to May 2013 located 406 papers and 710 apps related to cardiology and heart disease. The most researched section in the literature associated with cardiology is related to mobile heart (and vital signs) monitoring systems and the methods involved in the classification of heart signs in order to detect abnormal functions. Other systems with a significant number of papers are mobile cardiac rehabilitation systems, blood pressure measurement, and systems for the detection of heart failure. The majority of apps for cardiology are heart monitors and medical calculators. Other categories with a high number of apps are those for ECG education and interpretation, cardiology news and journals, blood pressure tracking, heart rate monitoring using an external device, and CPR instruction. There are very few guides on cardiac rehabilitation and apps for the management of the cardiac condition, and there were no

  12. Pre-procedural fasting for coronary interventions: is it time to change practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, Tahir; Aleem, Qaiser; Lau, Yeecheng; Singh, Ravi; McDonald, John; Macdonald, John E; Sastry, Sanjay; Arya, Sanjay; Bainbridge, Anthony; Mudawi, Telal; Balachandran, Kanarath

    2014-04-01

    Traditionally, patients are kept nil-per-os/nil-by-mouth (NPO/NBM) prior to invasive cardiac procedures, yet there exists neither evidence nor clear guidance about the benefits of this practice. To demonstrate that percutaneous cardiac catheterisation does not require prior fasting. The data source is a retrospective analysis of data registry of consecutive patients who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and stable angina at two district general hospitals in the UK with no on-site cardiac surgery services. A total of 1916 PCI procedures were performed over a 3-year period. None of the patients were kept NPO/NBM prior to their coronary procedures. The mean age was 67±16 years. 1349 (70%) were men; 38.5% (738/1916) had chronic stable angina, while the rest had ACS. 21% (398/1916) were diabetics while 53% (1017/1916) were hypertensive. PCI was technically successful in 95% (1821/1916) patients. 88.5% (1697/1916) had transradial approach. 77% (570/738) of elective PCI patients were discharged within 6 h postprocedure. No patients required emergency endotracheal intubation and there were no occurrences of intraprocedural or postprocedural aspiration pneumonia. Our observational study demonstrates that patients undergoing PCI do not need to be fasted prior to their procedures.

  13. Accurate diagnosis of CHD by Paediatricians with Expertise in Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Hannah C; Massey, Hannah; Yates, Robert W M; Kelsall, A Wilfred

    2017-08-01

    Introduction Paediatricians with Expertise in Cardiology assess children with a full history, examination, and often perform an echocardiogram. A minority are then referred to an outreach clinic run jointly with a visiting paediatric cardiologist. The accuracy of the echocardiography diagnosis made by the Paediatrician with Expertise in Cardiology is unknown. Materials and methods We conducted a retrospective review of clinic letters for children seen in the outreach clinic for the first time between March, 2004 and March, 2011. Children with CHD diagnosed antenatally or elsewhere were excluded. We recorded the echocardiography diagnosis made by the paediatric cardiologist and previously by the Paediatrician with Expertise in Cardiology. The Paediatrician with Expertise in Cardiology referred 317/3145 (10%) children seen in the local cardiac clinics to the outreach clinic over this period, and among them 296 were eligible for inclusion. Their median age was 1.5 years (range 1 month-15.1 years). For 244 (82%) children, there was complete diagnostic agreement between the Paediatrician with Expertise in Cardiology and the paediatric cardiologist. For 29 (10%) children, the main diagnosis was identical with additional findings made by the paediatric cardiologist. The abnormality had resolved in 17 (6%) cases by the time of clinic attendance. In six (2%) patients, the paediatric cardiologist made a different diagnosis. In total, 138 (47%) patients underwent a surgical or catheter intervention. Discussion Paediatricians with Expertise in Cardiology can make accurate diagnoses of CHD in children referred to their clinics. This can allow effective triage of children attending the outreach clinic, making best use of limited specialist resources.

  14. Measurement of spatial dose distribution for evaluation operator dose during nero-interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Su Chul; Hong, Dong Hee

    2016-01-01

    The spatial dose distribution was measured with ionization chamber as preliminary study to evaluate operator dose and to study dose reduction during neuro-interventional procedures. The zone of operators was divided into four area (45, 135, 225, and 315 degree).We supposed that operator exist on the four area and indicated location of critical organs(eyes, breast, gonad). The spatial doses were measured depending on distance( 80, 100, 120, and 140 cm) and location of critical organs. The spatial doses of area of 225 degree were 114.5 mR/h (eyes location), 143.1 mR/h (breast location) and 147 mR/h (gonad location) in 80 cm. When changed location of x-ray generator, spatial dose increased in 18.1±10.5%, averagely. We certified spatial dose in the operator locations, Using the results of this study, It is feasible to protect operator from radiation in neuro-interventional procedures

  15. Long-term follow-up of two interventional procedures for achalasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Yingsheng; Li Minghua; Shang Kezhong

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To observed the long-term follow-up of the two types of interventional procedure for achalasia. Methods: The study cohort was comprised of 140 patients of achalasia including 70 patients treated under fluoroscopy with pneumatic dilation (group A) and 70 with temporary partially covered metal stent dilation (group B). Results: One hundred and forty dilations were performed on the 70 patients of group A with complications of chest pain (n=35), reflux (n=18), and bleeding (n=8); 38 patients of relapsing dysphagia during a 12-month follow-up, and 50 patients out of 60 of recurrent dysphagia during a 36-month follow-up. Seventy partially covered expandable metal stents were temporarily placed in the 70 patients of group B and withdrawn after 3-7 days via gastroscopy with complications of chest pain (n=28), reflux (n=15), and bleeding (n=9); 7 patients out of 70 exhibited dysphagia relapse during a 12-month followup, and 9 out of 58 patients exhibited dysphagia relapse during a 36-month follow-up. All the stents were inserted and withdrawn successfully. The follow-up in groups A-B lasted for 12-96 months. Conclusion: Temporary partially covered metal stent dilation is one of the best methods of interventional procedure for achalasia in long-term follow-up. (authors)

  16. Measurement of spatial dose distribution for evaluation operator dose during nero-interventional procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Su Chul [Division of Medical Radiation Equipment, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Dong Hee [Dept. of Radiology Science, Far East University, Eumseong (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    The spatial dose distribution was measured with ionization chamber as preliminary study to evaluate operator dose and to study dose reduction during neuro-interventional procedures. The zone of operators was divided into four area (45, 135, 225, and 315 degree).We supposed that operator exist on the four area and indicated location of critical organs(eyes, breast, gonad). The spatial doses were measured depending on distance( 80, 100, 120, and 140 cm) and location of critical organs. The spatial doses of area of 225 degree were 114.5 mR/h (eyes location), 143.1 mR/h (breast location) and 147 mR/h (gonad location) in 80 cm. When changed location of x-ray generator, spatial dose increased in 18.1±10.5%, averagely. We certified spatial dose in the operator locations, Using the results of this study, It is feasible to protect operator from radiation in neuro-interventional procedures.

  17. How to Practice Sports Cardiology: A Cardiology Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawless, Christine E

    2015-07-01

    The rigorous cardiovascular (CV) demands of sport, combined with training-related cardiac adaptations, render the athlete a truly unique CV patient and sports cardiology a truly unique discipline. Cardiologists are advised to adopt a systematic approach to the CV evaluation of athletes, taking into consideration the individual sports culture, sports-specific CV demands, CV adaptations and their appearance on cardiac testing, any existing or potential interaction of the heart with the internal and external sports environment, short- and long-term CV risks, and potential effect of performance-enhancing agents and antidoping regulations. This article outlines the systematic approach, provides a detailed example, and outlines contemporary sports cardiology core competencies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Double dosimetry procedures for the determination of occupational effective dose in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaervinen, H.; Buls, N.; Clerinx, P.; Miljanic, S.; Ranogajec-Komor, M.; Nikodemova, D.; D'Errico, F.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: In interventional radiology, for an accurate determination of occupational effective dose, measurements with two dosemeters ('double dosimetry', DD) have been recommended, one dosemeter located above and one under the protective apron. In this paper, based on an extensive literature search, the most recent algorithms developed for the determination of effective dose from the dosimeter readings have been compared for a few practical interventional procedures. Recommendations on the practices and algorithms are given on the basis of the results. For the comparison of algorithms, dosemeter readings and the effective dose were obtained both experimentally and by calculation. Further, data from published Monte Carlo calculations have been applied. The literature review has indicated that very few regulations for DD exist and the DD practices have not been harmonized. There is no firm consensus on the most suitable calculation algorithms. Single dosemeter (SD) measurements are still mostly used for the calculation of effective dose. Most DD and SD algorithms overestimate effective dose significantly, sometimes by over ten times. However, SD algorithms can significantly underestimate effective dose in certain interventional radiology conditions. Due to the possibility of underestimating effective dose, DD is generally recommended. The results suggest that there might not be a single DD algorithm which would be optimum for all interventional radiology procedures. However, the selection of a precise DD algorithm for each individual condition is not practical and compromises must be made. For accurate personnel dosimetry, the accuracy of the algorithm selected should be tested for typical local interventional radiology condition. Personnel dosemeters should be used in the recommended positions. The dosemeter above the apron should be on a collar and its reading also used to assess the risk of lens injuries. The dosemeter under the apron can be on the chest or

  19. Characterization of a MOSkin detector for in vivo skin dose measurements during interventional radiology procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safari, M. J.; Wong, J. H. D.; Ng, K. H., E-mail: ngkh@um.edu.my [Department of Biomedical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603, Malaysia and University of Malaya Research Imaging Centre, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Jong, W. L. [Clinical Oncology Unit, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Cutajar, D. L.; Rosenfeld, A. B. [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: The MOSkin is a MOSFET detector designed especially for skin dose measurements. This detector has been characterized for various factors affecting its response for megavoltage photon beams and has been used for patient dose measurements during radiotherapy procedures. However, the characteristics of this detector in kilovoltage photon beams and low dose ranges have not been studied. The purpose of this study was to characterize the MOSkin detector to determine its suitability for in vivo entrance skin dose measurements during interventional radiology procedures. Methods: The calibration and reproducibility of the MOSkin detector and its dependency on different radiation beam qualities were carried out using RQR standard radiation qualities in free-in-air geometry. Studies of the other characterization parameters, such as the dose linearity and dependency on exposure angle, field size, frame rate, depth-dose, and source-to-surface distance (SSD), were carried out using a solid water phantom under a clinical x-ray unit. Results: The MOSkin detector showed good reproducibility (94%) and dose linearity (99%) for the dose range of 2 to 213 cGy. The sensitivity did not significantly change with the variation of SSD (±1%), field size (±1%), frame rate (±3%), or beam energy (±5%). The detector angular dependence was within ±5% over 360° and the dose recorded by the MOSkin detector in different depths of a solid water phantom was in good agreement with the Markus parallel plate ionization chamber to within ±3%. Conclusions: The MOSkin detector proved to be reliable when exposed to different field sizes, SSDs, depths in solid water, dose rates, frame rates, and radiation incident angles within a clinical x-ray beam. The MOSkin detector with water equivalent depth equal to 0.07 mm is a suitable detector for in vivo skin dosimetry during interventional radiology procedures.

  20. 32 CFR Appendix A to Part 57 - Procedures for the Provision of Early Intervention Services for Infants and Toddlers With...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... developmental areas: (i) Cognitive development. (ii) Physical development, including vision and hearing. (iii... Intervention Services for Infants and Toddlers With Disabilities and Their Families A Appendix A to Part 57... Appendix A to Part 57—Procedures for the Provision of Early Intervention Services for Infants and Toddlers...

  1. Fusion Imaging for Procedural Guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Brandon M; Eleid, Mackram F; Thaden, Jeremy J

    2018-05-01

    The field of percutaneous structural heart interventions has grown tremendously in recent years. This growth has fueled the development of new imaging protocols and technologies in parallel to help facilitate these minimally-invasive procedures. Fusion imaging is an exciting new technology that combines the strength of 2 imaging modalities and has the potential to improve procedural planning and the safety of many commonly performed transcatheter procedures. In this review we discuss the basic concepts of fusion imaging along with the relative strengths and weaknesses of static vs dynamic fusion imaging modalities. This review will focus primarily on echocardiographic-fluoroscopic fusion imaging and its application in commonly performed transcatheter structural heart procedures. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Application of Contrast Echocardiography in Invasive Cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Bulut

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Contrast echocardiography by rendering better imaging of the borders of cardiac chambers is a useful tool for evaluating cardiac function, mass, myocardial vascularization, microvascular structure (small vessel vasculature and viability. Contrast was first started to be used for patients with suboptimal image quality. It can be used in detecting defects in myocardial blood supply in patients with chest pain and determining the success of interventionalprocedures. It can also be of help in demonstrating myocardial viability after reperfusion treatment in patients who had myocardial infarction. It is expected to be used more widely in invasive cardiology for decision making, guiding and determining the success of the procedures. Advances in imaging techniques , development of contrast materials for evaluation of left system, contrast echocardiography may become a routine clinical practice.

  3. Cardiology update 2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar Verma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the latter half of 2016, the Danish study evaluated the need of automatic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator in nonischemic cardiomyopathies group of heart failure population. HOPE-3 in 2016 expanded the dimension of statin use. Novel age, biomarker, and clinical history stroke risk score for atrial fibrillation was validated. Success of Phase 2b clinical trial for CSL112 was one more step to reduce the ischemic events in the postmyocardial infarction period. On the one hand, NORSTENT study compared the bare-metal stents with drug-eluting stent, and on the other hand, 3-year follow-up data of ABSORB II trail discussed the performance of bioresorbable scaffolds. NOBLE and EXCEL trials evaluated the coronary intervention with coronary artery bypass graft in the left main coronary artery disease. Reduction of major adverse cardiac event with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol <50 mg/dl was analyzed with alirocumab. Fractional flow reserve was tested as a tool to decide treatment modality in patients with stable coronary artery disease. Natural history of rheumatic heart disease in the current era was described in REMEDY study. A few technological advancements in cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillator technology were also approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Birth prevalence and pattern of congenital heart disease in North India were presented.

  4. History of Cardiology in India

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Mrinal Kanti; Kumar, Soumitra; Deb, Pradip Kumar; Mishra, Sundeep

    2015-01-01

    History as a science revolves around memories, travellers' tales, fables and chroniclers' stories, gossip and trans-telephonic conversations. Medicine itself as per the puritan's definition is a non-exact science because of the probability-predictability-sensitivity-specificity factors. Howsoever, the chronicles of Cardiology in India is quite interesting and intriguing. Heart and circulation was known to humankind from pre-Vedic era. Various therapeutics measures including the role of Yoga a...

  5. Patient Dose Optimization in Fluoroscopically Guided Interventional Procedures. Final Report of a Coordinated Research Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, many surgical procedures have increasingly been replaced by interventional procedures that guide catheters into the arteries under X ray fluoroscopic guidance to perform a variety of operations such as ballooning, embolization, implantation of stents etc. The radiation exposure to patients and staff in such procedures is much higher than in simple radiographic examinations like X ray of chest or abdomen such that radiation induced skin injuries to patients and eye lens opacities among workers have been reported in the 1990's and after. Interventional procedures have grown both in frequency and importance during the last decade. This Coordinated Research Project (CRP) and TECDOC were developed within the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) framework of statutory responsibility to provide for the worldwide application of the standards for the protection of people against exposure to ionizing radiation. The CRP took place between 2003 and 2005 in six countries, with a view of optimizing the radiation protection of patients undergoing interventional procedures. The Fundamental Safety Principles and the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation (BSS) issued by the IAEA and co-sponsored by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the International Labour Organization (ILO), the World Health Organization (WHO), the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) and the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), among others, require the radiation protection of patients undergoing medical exposures through justification of the procedures involved and through optimization. In keeping with its responsibility on the application of standards, the IAEA programme on Radiological Protection of Patients encourages the reduction of patient doses. To facilitate this, it has issued specific advice on the application of the BSS in the field of radiology in Safety Reports Series No. 39 and the three volumes on Radiation

  6. MO-F-CAMPUS-I-02: Occupational Conceptus Doses From Fluoroscopically-Guided Interventional Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damilakis, J; Perisinakis, K; Solomou, G [University of Crete (Greece); Stratakis, J [University of Crete, Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this method was to provide dosimetric data on conceptus dose for the pregnant employee who participates in fluoroscopically-guided interventional procedures. Methods: Scattered air-kerma dose rates were obtained for 17 fluoroscopic projections involved in interventional procedures. These projections were simulated on an anthropomorphic phantom placed on the examination table supine. The operating theater was divided into two grids relative to the long table sides. Each grid consisted of 33 cells spaced 0.50 m apart. During the simulated exposures, at each cell, scatter air-kerma rate was measured at 110 cm from the floor i.e. at the height of the waist of the pregnant worker. Air-kerma rates were divided by the dose area product (DAP) rate of each exposure to obtain normalized data. For each projection, measurements were performed for 3 kVp and 3 filtration values i.e. for 9 different x-ray spectra. All measurements were performed by using a modern C-arm angiographic system (Siemens Axiom Artis, Siemens, Germany) and a radiation meter equipped with an ionization chamber. Results: The results consist of 153 iso-dose maps, which show the spatial distribution of DAP-normalized scattered air-kerma doses at the waist level of a pregnant worker. Conceptus dose estimation is possible using air-kerma to embryo/fetal dose conversion coefficients published in a previous study (J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol, Vol. 16, pp. 1–8, July 2005). Using these maps, occupationally exposed pregnant personnel may select a working position for a certain projection that keeps abdominal dose as low as reasonably achievable. Taking into consideration the regulatory conceptus dose limit for occupational exposure, determination of the maximum workload allowed for the pregnant personnel is also possible. Conclusion: Data produced in this work allow for the anticipation of conceptus dose and the determination of the maximum workload for a pregnant worker from any

  7. MO-F-CAMPUS-I-02: Occupational Conceptus Doses From Fluoroscopically-Guided Interventional Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damilakis, J; Perisinakis, K; Solomou, G; Stratakis, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this method was to provide dosimetric data on conceptus dose for the pregnant employee who participates in fluoroscopically-guided interventional procedures. Methods: Scattered air-kerma dose rates were obtained for 17 fluoroscopic projections involved in interventional procedures. These projections were simulated on an anthropomorphic phantom placed on the examination table supine. The operating theater was divided into two grids relative to the long table sides. Each grid consisted of 33 cells spaced 0.50 m apart. During the simulated exposures, at each cell, scatter air-kerma rate was measured at 110 cm from the floor i.e. at the height of the waist of the pregnant worker. Air-kerma rates were divided by the dose area product (DAP) rate of each exposure to obtain normalized data. For each projection, measurements were performed for 3 kVp and 3 filtration values i.e. for 9 different x-ray spectra. All measurements were performed by using a modern C-arm angiographic system (Siemens Axiom Artis, Siemens, Germany) and a radiation meter equipped with an ionization chamber. Results: The results consist of 153 iso-dose maps, which show the spatial distribution of DAP-normalized scattered air-kerma doses at the waist level of a pregnant worker. Conceptus dose estimation is possible using air-kerma to embryo/fetal dose conversion coefficients published in a previous study (J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol, Vol. 16, pp. 1–8, July 2005). Using these maps, occupationally exposed pregnant personnel may select a working position for a certain projection that keeps abdominal dose as low as reasonably achievable. Taking into consideration the regulatory conceptus dose limit for occupational exposure, determination of the maximum workload allowed for the pregnant personnel is also possible. Conclusion: Data produced in this work allow for the anticipation of conceptus dose and the determination of the maximum workload for a pregnant worker from any

  8. ACC/AATS/AHA/ASE/ASNC/SCAI/SCCT/STS 2017 Appropriate Use Criteria for Coronary Revascularization in Patients With Stable Ischemic Heart Disease : A Report of the American College of Cardiology Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manesh R; Calhoon, John H; Dehmer, Gregory J; Grantham, James Aaron; Maddox, Thomas M; Maron, David J; Smith, Peter K

    2017-10-01

    The American College of Cardiology, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and American Association for Thoracic Surgery, along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, have completed a 2-part revision of the appropriate use criteria (AUC) for coronary revascularization. In prior coronary revascularization AUC documents, indications for revascularization in acute coronary syndromes and stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD) were combined into 1 document. To address the expanding clinical indications for coronary revascularization, and to align the subject matter with the most current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines, the new AUC for coronary artery revascularization were separated into 2 documents addressing SIHD and acute coronary syndromes individually. This document presents the AUC for SIHD.Clinical scenarios were developed to mimic patient presentations encountered in everyday practice. These scenarios included information on symptom status; risk level as assessed by noninvasive testing; coronary disease burden; and, in some scenarios, fractional flow reserve testing, presence or absence of diabetes, and SYNTAX score. This update provides a reassessment of clinical scenarios that the writing group felt were affected by significant changes in the medical literature or gaps from prior criteria. The methodology used in this update is similar to the initial document but employs the recent modifications in the methods for developing AUC, most notably, alterations in the nomenclature for appropriate use categorization.A separate, independent rating panel scored the clinical scenarios on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that revascularization is considered appropriate for the clinical scenario presented. Scores of 1 to 3 indicate that revascularization is considered rarely appropriate for the clinical scenario, whereas scores in the mid-range of 4 to 6 indicate that

  9. ACC/AATS/AHA/ASE/ASNC/SCAI/SCCT/STS 2016 Appropriate Use Criteria for Coronary Revascularization in Patients With Acute Coronary Syndromes : A Report of the American College of Cardiology Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manesh R; Calhoon, John H; Dehmer, Gregory J; Grantham, James Aaron; Maddox, Thomas M; Maron, David J; Smith, Peter K

    2017-04-01

    The American College of Cardiology, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and American Association for Thoracic Surgery, along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, have completed a 2-part revision of the appropriate use criteria (AUC) for coronary revascularization. In prior coronary revascularization AUC documents, indications for revascularization in acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and stable ischemic heart disease were combined into 1 document. To address the expanding clinical indications for coronary revascularization, and in an effort to align the subject matter with the most current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines, the new AUC for coronary artery revascularization were separated into 2 documents addressing ACS and stable ischemic heart disease individually. This document presents the AUC for ACS. Clinical scenarios were developed to mimic patient presentations encountered in everyday practice and included information on symptom status, presence of clinical instability or ongoing ischemic symptoms, prior reperfusion therapy, risk level as assessed by noninvasive testing, fractional flow reserve testing, and coronary anatomy. This update provides a reassessment of clinical scenarios that the writing group felt to be affected by significant changes in the medical literature or gaps from prior criteria. The methodology used in this update is similar to the initial document but employs the recent modifications in the methods for developing AUC, most notably, alterations in the nomenclature for appropriate use categorization. A separate, independent rating panel scored the clinical scenarios on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that revascularization is considered appropriate for the clinical scenario presented. Scores of 1 to 3 indicate that revascularization is considered rarely appropriate for the clinical scenario, whereas scores in the mid-range (4 to 6

  10. History of Cardiology in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Mrinal Kanti; Kumar, Soumitra; Deb, Pradip Kumar; Mishra, Sundeep

    2015-01-01

    History as a science revolves around memories, travellers' tales, fables and chroniclers' stories, gossip and trans-telephonic conversations. Medicine itself as per the puritan's definition is a non-exact science because of the probability-predictability-sensitivity-specificity factors. Howsoever, the chronicles of Cardiology in India is quite interesting and intriguing. Heart and circulation was known to humankind from pre-Vedic era. Various therapeutics measures including the role of Yoga and transcendental meditation in curing cardiovascular diseases were known in India. Only recently there has been resurgence of the same globally. There have been very few innovations in Cardiology in India. The cause of this paucity possibly lie in the limited resources. This has a vicious effect on the research mentality of the population who are busy in meeting their daily requirements. This socio-scientific aspect needs a thorough study and is beyond the scope of the present documentation. Present is the future of past and so one must not forget the history which is essentially past that give the present generation the necessary fulcrum to stand in good stead. The present article essentially aims to pay tribute to all the workers and pioneers in the field of Cardiology in India, who in spite of limited resources ventured in an unchartered arena. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. History of Cardiology in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrinal Kanti Das

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available History as a science revolves around memories, travellers' tales, fables and chroniclers' stories, gossip and trans-telephonic conversations. Medicine itself as per the puritan's definition is a non-exact science because of the probability-predictability-sensitivity-specificity factors. Howsoever, the chronicles of Cardiology in India is quite interesting and intriguing. Heart and circulation was known to humankind from pre-Vedic era. Various therapeutics measures including the role of Yoga and transcendental meditation in curing cardiovascular diseases were known in India. Only recently there has been resurgence of the same globally. There have been very few innovations in Cardiology in India. The cause of this paucity possibly lie in the limited resources. This has a vicious effect on the research mentality of the population who are busy in meeting their daily requirements. This socio-scientific aspect needs a thorough study and is beyond the scope of the present documentation. Present is the future of past and so one must not forget the history which is essentially past that give the present generation the necessary fulcrum to stand in good stead. The present article essentially aims to pay tribute to all the workers and pioneers in the field of Cardiology in India, who in spite of limited resources ventured in an unchartered arena.

  12. Consenso de especialistas (SBC/SBHCI sobre o uso de stents farmacológicos: recomendações da sociedade brasileira de cardiologia/sociedade brasileira de hemodinâmica e cardiologia intervencionista ao sistema único de saúde Expert consensus (SBC/SBHCI on the use of drug-eluting stents: recommendations of the Brazilian society of interventional cardiology/ Brazilian society of cardiology for the Brazilian public single healthcare system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valter C. Lima

    2006-10-01

    perform new revascularization procedures and hospital readmissions. The overall success of the drug-eluting stents has proven to be reliable and consistent in overcoming restenosis and has some beneficial impact for all clinical and angiographic conditions. This paper discusses the adoption and criteria for the use of drug-eluting stents in other countries as well as the recommendations established by the Brazilian Society of Interventional Cardiology for their reimbursement by SUS. The incorporation of new healthcare technology involves two distinct stages. During the first stage, the product is registered with the National Health Surveillance Agency (ANVISA. During this stage the interested company submits to the regulatory agency, results from clinical studies that demonstrate the efficacy and safety of the new device or pharmaceutical product. Frequently, in addition to clinical studies, approval records for clinical use from the regulatory agencies of other countries, mainly the United States of America and the European Community are also submitted. The successful completion of this stage means that the medication or device may be prescribed or used by the physicians in Brazil. The second stage in the incorporation of new healthcare technology involves the reimbursement or financing of the treatment that was approved in the previous stage based on its efficacy and safety. This stage can be more complex than the first one since the new technology, whether a substitution for established treatment methods or the introduction of a new treatment concept, are usually more expensive. The incorporation of new technology requires a cost-effectiveness analysis so that fund administrators can make decisions based on the universal scenario of limited resources to finance healthcare with treatments that are more and more burdensome. The difficulties of funding management are aggravated by medical and social ethical implications that arise when a treatment is approved based on its

  13. Operator dependency of the radiation exposure in cardiac interventions: feasibility of ultra low dose levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emre Ozpelit, Mehmet; Ercan, Ertugrul; Pekel, Nihat; Tengiz, Istemihan; Yilmaz, Akar; Ozpelit, Ebru; Ozyurtlu, Ferhat

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Mean radiation exposure in invasive cardiology varies greatly between different centres and interventionists. The International Commission on Radiological Protection and the EURATOM Council stipulate that, despite reference values, 'All medical exposure for radiodiagnostic purposes shall be kept as low as reasonably achievable' (ALARA). The purpose of this study is to establish the effects of the routine application of ALARA principles and to determine operator and procedure impact on radiation exposure in interventional cardiology. Materials and methods: A total of 240 consecutive cardiac interventional procedures were analysed. Five operators performed the procedures, two of whom were working in accordance with ALARA principles (Group 1 operators) with the remaining three working in a standard manner (Group 2 operators). Radiation exposure levels of these two groups were compared. Results: Total fluoroscopy time and the number of radiographic runs were similar between groups. However, dose area product and cumulative dose were significantly lower in Group 1 when compared with Group 2. Radiation levels of Group 1 were far below even the reference levels in the literature, thus representing an ultra-low-dose radiation exposure in interventional cardiology. Conclusion: By use of simple radiation reducing techniques, ultra-low-dose radiation exposure is feasible in interventional cardiology. Achievability of such levels depends greatly on operator awareness, desire, knowledge and experience of radiation protection. (authors)

  14. European Society of Cardiology Congress 2017 (August 26-30, 2017 - Barcelona, Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klischies, S

    2017-12-01

    The annual congress of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) is the largest medical congress in Europe for this area of research and took place this year in Barcelona, Spain. The ESC Congress 2017 gathered more than 30,000 registered participants from over 140 countries together to share their knowledge in all cardiovascular fields, from basic science to management and prevention of cardiovascular diseases. The congress comprised 5 days of science and education with over 11,000 abstracts submitted, 500 expert sessions and over 200 exhibiting companies, making it the prime meeting platform for the profession. This year's ESC Congress Spotlight was "40 years of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI)." PCI is a nonsurgical procedure used to treat narrowing of the coronary arteries of the heart found in coronary artery disease.

  15. Study of dose and relative risk of occupationally exposed individuals in interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silveira Filho, Jose A.M.; Reis, Charlene O.; Taniguti, Lana T.; Pacifico, Leonardo C.; SaintYves, Thalis L.A.; Mecca, Fernando A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper estimates the occupational effective dose and the relative risk of leukemia and cancers of the digestive tract mortality through dose study of the most radiosensitive anatomical regions (lens, thyroid, chest and gonads) of the professionals involved in interventional gonad procedures. It was considered a cumulative exposure time of 10,000 hours, which is the occupational exposure time of an IOE in throughout his professional life. It was also considered that they always use Personal Protective Equipment (PPE). Mathematical models derived from epidemiological data contained in the BEIR V and in the IAEA’s TECDOC 870 are used to estimate the relative risk. The results show a significant increase in mortality risk for these types of cancer for individuals occupationally exposed to three different distances from the x-ray beam, and reinforces that radiation protection measures are essential. (author)

  16. Patient and staff doses in fluoroscopically guided invasive diagnostic and interventional urology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanova, D.; Hristova-Popova, J.; Avramova-Cholakova, S.; Deyanova, Ts.; Dobrikov, R.

    2015-01-01

    Full text: The aim of this study is to evaluate patient and staff doses in fluoroscopically guided invasive diagnostic and interventional urology procedures. All the data were collected in the Emergency Hospital 'N. I. Pirogov'. While recording data for the patients, a real time dosimetry measurement of the medical staff was made. Air kerma-area product (KAP) was recorded for intravenous pyelogram (IVP), percutaneous nephrostomy (PN) and ureteral 'double-J' stenting. Patient data sex, age and weight were also taken. Staff doses were estimated with the system RaySafe i2. It contains four dosimeters, with a wireless connection to a real time display. The dosimeters were worn on the unprotected upper part of the body and measured the personal dose equivalent Hp(10). The mean KAP values for the procedures are: 3.21 Gy.cm 2 for IVP, 10.37 Gy.cm 2 for PN and 4.15 Gy.cm 2 for 'double-J' respectively. The highest staff dose for PN and 'double-J' is received by the urologist (160 μSv and 47.3 μSv, respectively), while for the IVP the radiographer has the highest exposure (20 μSv). Each member of the medical staff was on a different position in respect to the X-ray tube and the patient, which is the main reason for the differences in the staff doses. The variations in the mean patient and staff doses are mostly due to the interventions themselves, their complexity and the individual treatment of every patient. RaySafe i2 is very useful as guideline for making a choice of a better position and in the decreasing of radiation exposure to the staff

  17. Radiation dose and cancer risk among pediatric patients undergoing interventional neuroradiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thierry-Chef, Isabelle; Simon, Steven L.; Miller, Donald L.

    2006-01-01

    During interventional neuroradiology procedures, patients can be exposed to moderate to high levels of radiation. Special considerations are required to protect children, who are generally more sensitive to the short- and long-term detrimental effects of radiation exposure. Estimates of dose to the skin of children from certain interventional procedures have been published elsewhere, but we are not aware of data on dose to the brain or on the long-term risk of cancer from brain radiation. Our goals were to estimate radiation doses to the brain in 50 pediatric patients who had undergone cerebral embolization and to assess their lifetime risks of developing radiation-related brain cancer. Entrance-peak skin dose and various assumptions on conditions of exposure were used as input for dosimetric calculations to estimate the spatial pattern of dose within the brain and the average dose to the whole brain for each child. The average dose and the age of the child at time of exposure were used to estimate the lifetime risk of developing radiation-related brain cancer. Among the 50 patients, average radiation doses to the brain were estimated to vary from 100 mGy to 1,300 mGy if exposed to non-collimated fields and from 20 mGy to 160 mGy for collimated, moving fields. The lifetime risk of developing brain cancer was estimated to be increased by 2% to 80% as a result of the exposure. Given the very small lifetime background risk of brain tumor, the excess number of cases will be small even though the relative increase might be as high as 80%. ALARA principles of collimation and dose optimization are the most effective means to minimize the risk of future radiation-related cancer. (orig.)

  18. Evaluation of additional lead shielding in protecting the physician from radiation during cardiac interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chida, Koichi; Zuguchi, Masayuki; Morishima, Yoshiaki; Katahira, Yoshiaki; Chiba, Hiroo

    2005-01-01

    Since cardiac interventional procedures deliver high doses of radiation to the physician, radiation protection for the physician in cardiac catheterization laboratories is very important. One of the most important means of protecting the physician from scatter radiation is to use additional lead shielding devices, such as tableside lead drapes and ceiling-mounted lead acrylic protection. During cardiac interventional procedures (cardiac IVR), however, it is not clear how much lead shielding reduces the physician dose. This study compared the physician dose [effective dose equivalent (EDE) and dose equivalent (DE)] with and without additional shielding during cardiac IVR. Fluoroscopy scatter radiation was measured using a human phantom, with an ionization chamber survey meter, with and without additional shielding. With the additional shielding, fluoroscopy scatter radiation measured with the human phantom was reduced by up to 98%, as compared with that without. The mean EDE (whole body, mean±SD) dose to the operator, determined using a Luxel badge, was 2.55±1.65 and 4.65±1.21 mSv/year with and without the additional shielding, respectively (p=0.086). Similarly, the mean DE (lens of the eye) to the operator was 15.0±9.3 and 25.73±5.28 mSv/year, respectively (p=0.092). In conclusion, although tableside drapes and lead acrylic shields suspended from the ceiling provided extra protection to the physician during cardiac IVR, the reduction in the estimated physician dose (EDE and DE) during cardiac catheterization with additional shielding was lower than we expected. Therefore, there is a need to develop more ergonomically useful protection devices for cardiac IVR. (author)

  19. Shielding effect of lead glasses on radiologists' eye lens exposure in interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Panpan; Kong, Yan; Chen, Bo; Liu, Qianqian; Zhuo, Weihai; Liu, Haikuan

    2017-01-01

    To study the shielding effect of radiologists' eye lens with lead glasses of different equivalent thicknesses and sizes in interventional radiology procedures. Using the human voxel phantom with a more accurate model of the eye and MCNPX software, eye lens doses of the radiologists who wearing different kinds of lead glasses were simulated, different beam projections were taken into consideration during the simulation. Measurements were also performed with the physical model to verify simulation results. Simulation results showed that the eye lens doses were reduced by a factor from 3 to 9 when wearing a 20 cm"2-sized lead glasses with the equivalent thickness ranging from 0.1 to 1.0 mm Pb. The increase of dose reduction factor (DRF) was not significant whenever increase the lead equivalent of glasses of which larger than 0.35 mm. Furthermore, the DRF was proportional to the size of glass lens from 6 to 30 cm"2 with the same lead equivalent. The simulation results were in well agreements with the measured ones. For more reasonable and effective protection of the eye lens of interventional radiologists, a pair of glasses with a lead equivalent of 0.5 mm Pb and large-sized (at least 27 cm"2 per glass) lens are recommended (authors)

  20. Shielding Effect of Lead Glasses on Radiologists' Eye Lens Exposure in Interventional Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Panpan; Kong, Yan; Chen, Bo; Liu, Qianqian; Zhuo, Weihai; Liu, Haikuan

    2017-04-20

    To study the shielding effect of radiologists' eye lens with lead glasses of different equivalent thicknesses and sizes in interventional radiology procedures. Using the human voxel phantom with a more accurate model of the eye and MCNPX software, eye lens doses of the radiologists who wearing different kinds of lead glasses were simulated, different beam projections were taken into consideration during the simulation. Measurements were also performed with the physical model to verify simulation results. Simulation results showed that the eye lens doses were reduced by a factor from 3 to 9 when wearing a 20 cm2-sized lead glasses with the equivalent thickness ranging from 0.1 to 1.0 mm Pb. The increase of dose reduction factor (DRF) was not significant whenever increase the lead equivalent of glasses of which larger than 0.35 mm. Furthermore, the DRF was proportional to the size of glass lens from 6 to 30 cm2 with the same lead equivalent. The simulation results were in well agreements with the measured ones. For more reasonable and effective protection of the eye lens of interventional radiologists, a pair of glasses with a lead equivalent of 0.5 mm Pb and large-sized (at least 27 cm2 per glass) lens are recommended. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Comparison of patient doses in interventional radiology procedures performed in two large hospitals in Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papageorgiou, E.; Tsapaki, V.; Tsalafoutas, I. A.; Maurikou, E.; Kottou, S.; Orfanos, A.; Karidas, G.; Fidanis, T.; Zafiriadou, E.; Neofotistou, V.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose of the study was to determine patient doses in the most common interventional radiology (IR) procedures performed in two large Greek hospitals. A total of 164 patients who underwent 4 types of IR procedures were studied. Fluoroscopy time, total exposure time, number of frames, number of runs, radiation field size, and cumulative dose-area product (DAP) were recorded. The median DAP values for carotid arteriography and lower limb arteriography were 66 and 123 Gy cm 2 for hospital 'A' and 21 and 49 Gy cm 2 for hospital 'B'. For the cerebral arteriographies performed in hospital 'A', the median DAP was 116 Gy cm 2 while for the hepatic embolizations performed in hospital 'B', it was 104 Gy cm 2 . The DAP values observed in hospital 'A' for carotid arteriography and lower limb arteriography were almost three times than those of hospital 'B'. From the data analysis, it is evident that dose optimization in hospital 'A' should be pursued through revision of the techniques used. (authors)

  2. Impact of a Video Intervention for Rural Peruvian Women With Cervical Neoplasia Before Loop Excisional Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Daron G; Condorhuaman, Wendy Shulay Guevara; Waller, Jennifer; Lilienthal, Anneliese

    2015-07-01

    Indigenous Peruvian women have very high rates of cervical cancer. This study assessed the impact of an educational video on impoverished rural Peruvian women seeking loop excision surgery. Women completed baseline, postvideo and postsurgery questionnaires that assessed knowledge and attitudes about the procedure. Differences between groups were examined using repeated measures analysis of variance. Women who watched the video were significantly more calm (2.6, 2.6, and 2.3, respectively; P = 0.04), relaxed (2.5, 2.5, and 2.1, respectively; P = 0.02), and content (3.4, 3.4, and 2.4, respectively, P < 0.01) at postvideo and postsurgery assessments compared with mean results at the baseline assessment. The same women were also significantly more tense (2.5, 2.0, and 2.0, respectively; P = 0.01), upset (1.6, 1.1, and 1.1, respectively; P = 0.01), and worried (3.0, 2.0, and 2.0, respectively; P = 0.01) at baseline compared with postvideo and postsurgery results. Approximately 93% of women believed that other women scheduled to have loop excision surgery should also watch the video. Dissemination of culturally sensitive video information minimizes adverse emotional responses associated with loop excision procedures before surgery. Such an intervention quickly improves the psychological well-being of women eventually subjected to surgical management of cervical neoplasia.

  3. Calculation of entrance exposed area from recorded images in cardiac diagnostic and interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibbo, G.; Balman, D.

    2000-01-01

    With increasing number of interventional radiological procedures performed on patients of all ages, it is important to determine the skin entrance dose of patients to limit the side effects of radiation. In most cases the skin dose is measured using thermoluminescent detectors (TLD). However, these detectors need to be placed in the radiation field on the skin of the patient, which may interfere with the procedure. Also, not all radiological practices are equipped with TLD readers which are expensive or have staff with the appropriate knowledge and expertise to be able to make use of TLD. The alternative to TLD is to use the dose area product (DAP) measured with a diamentor fitted to the angiography x-ray equipment. The difficulties in using DAP to calculate skin dose is that the irradiated area of the skin is not known. The area could change in size and location during the procedure as the radiologist/medical specialist varies the collimation and region of interest. For angiography equipment the distance between the anode and image intensifier is variable, as is the height of the examination table. The only point of reference is the isocentre. With recorded images it is possible to determine the irradiated area of the patient at the isocentre plane using the stenosis algorithm. The recorded image is calibrated such that it corresponds to the physical size in the plane of the isocentre. For non-recorded images, it may be necessary to assume that collimation has not changed and that the irradiated area is the same as that shown on the recorded images. The Women's and Children's Hospital has a Toshiba DFP2000 Biplane Digital Imaging system used for all cardiac and general angiography and interventional procedures. With this system the exposure factors (kVp, mA, field sizes) are recorded with the images. The source to image distance (SID), magnification factor (calibration factor of the recorded images) and angle of rotation are displayed on the Display Panel of the

  4. History of pediatric cardiology in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Saxena

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In India, the discipline of cardiology started in the late 1950s and at that time pediatric cardiology was practiced as a part of cardiology specialty. This article traces the history of pediatric cardiology in India. Dr. S. Padmawati and Dr. Kamala Vytilingam underwent training in pediatric cardiology at international centers in the early 1950s and early 1960s. Dr. N. Gopinath successfully closed a ventricular septal defect using a pump oxygenator at Christian Medical College, Vellore. Open heart surgery program kicked off in the 1960s with the tireless efforts of many other surgeons. Dr. Rajendra Tandon, trained for 2 years at Boston Children Hospital under Dr. Alexander Nadas, joined the Department of Cardiology at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi in 1963. This and many other stories are described.

  5. Evaluation of protocolized angiography in performing the interventional procedure for hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Jianqiang; Shi Haibin; Liu Sheng; Yang Zhengqiang; Zhou Chungao; Zhou Weizhong

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess the clinical value of protocolized angiography,including the superior mesenteric artery (SMA), the celiac artery and the common hepatic artery angiography, in detecting the atypical tumor feeding arteries of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) during transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) procedure. Methods: The clinical data of all patients who received the initial TACE for HCC during the period of January 2005-December 2009 were collected and were retrospectively analyzed. Both the angiograms and procedure reports were reviewed. According to the angiography protocols used in interventional procedure the patients were divided into two groups. Group A included 526 patients who received the protocolized angiography, including the SMA, the celiac artery and the common hepatic artery, while Group B composed of 850 patients who underwent the routine angiography of the common hepatic artery. For all patients in both groups the atypical tumor feeding arteries were searched for when the tumor staining was incomplete. The anatomic variations of tumor feeding arteries were classified and were statistically analyzed. Results: The detection rate of tumor supply from the branches of SMA, left gastric artery, phrenic artery and celiac artery was 14.1%, 6.7%, 4.6% and 0.5% respectively in group A, while it was 8.9%, 3.3%, 2.6% and 0% respectively in group B. Significant difference in all above four detection rates existed between two groups (P 0.05). Conclusion: Compared with the conventional common hepatic arteriography during TACE, the diagnostic protocolized angiography, including the SMA, the celiac artery and the common hepatic artery, can markedly improve the detection rates of atypical tumor feeders of HCC, such as the accessory hepatic artery, which means that the tumor will be occluded more completely and be controlled more promptly. (authors)

  6. Big Data for cardiology: novel discovery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer-Schönberger, Viktor

    2016-03-21

    Big Data promises to change cardiology through a massive increase in the data gathered and analysed; but its impact goes beyond improving incrementally existing methods. The potential of comprehensive data sets for scientific discovery is examined, and its impact on the scientific method generally and cardiology in particular is posited, together with likely consequences for research and practice. Big Data in cardiology changes how new insights are being discovered. For it to flourish, significant modifications in the methods, structures, and institutions of the profession are necessary. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Advance of nuclear cardiology in clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Hongcheng

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear cardiology has make a little bit progress in the past year. Both nuclear cardiology and other cardiac imaging have its own advantage and disadvantage in the diagnostic of coronary artery disease. And the relationship of them is complementary but not instead of each other. Nuclear cardiology provides a one-stop shop for diagnosis, risk stratification, and management of coronary artery disease. Nuclear cardiology plays a very important role in the diagnostic of coronary artery disease in early stage in the special group of people. (authors)

  8. Gender Differences in Radiation Dose from Nuclear Cardiology Studies Across the World: Findings from the International Atomic Energy Agency Nuclear Cardiology Protocols Study (INCAPS) Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lynn; Dorbala, Sharmila; Paez, Diana; Shaw, Leslee J.; Zukotynski, Katherine A.; Pascual, Thomas N. B.; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Vitola, João V.; Better, Nathan; Bokhari, Nadia; Rehani, Madan M.; Kashyap, Ravi; Dondi, Maurizio; Mercuri, Mathew; Einstein, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The aim of this study was to investigate gender-based differences in nuclear cardiology practice, globally, with particular focus on laboratory volume, radiation dose, protocols, and best practices. BACKGROUND It is unclear if gender-based differences exist in radiation exposure for nuclear cardiology procedures. METHODS In a large multicenter observational cross-sectional study encompassing 7911 patients in 65 countries, radiation effective dose was estimated for each examination. Patient-level best practices relating to radiation exposure were compared between genders. Analysis of covariance was utilized to determine any difference in radiation exposure according to gender, region, and the interaction between gender and region. Linear, logistic, and hierarchical regression models were developed to evaluate gender-based differences in radiation exposure and laboratory adherence to best practices. We also included the United Nations’ gender inequality and human development indices as covariates in multivariable models. RESULTS The proportion of MPI studies performed in women varied between countries, however there was no significant correlation with gender inequality index. Globally, mean effective dose for nuclear cardiology procedures was only slightly lower in women (9.6±4.5 mSv) than in men (10.3±4.5 mSv men, pnuclear cardiology procedures, only small differences were observed between genders worldwide. Regional variations noted in MPI use and radiation dose offer potential opportunities to address gender-related differences in delivery of nuclear cardiology care. PMID:27056156

  9. Nuclear Medicine in Pediatric Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanesi, Ornella; Stellin, Giovanni; Zucchetta, Pietro

    2017-03-01

    Accurate cardiovascular imaging is essential for the successful management of patients with congenital heart disease (CHD). Echocardiography and angiography have been for long time the most important imaging modalities in pediatric cardiology, but nuclear medicine has contributed in many situations to the comprehension of physiological consequences of CHD, quantifying pulmonary blood flow symmetry or right-to-left shunting. In recent times, remarkable improvements in imaging equipments, particularly in multidetector computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, have led to the progressive integration of high resolution modalities in the clinical workup of children affected by CHD, reducing the role of diagnostic angiography. Technology has seen a parallel evolution in the field of nuclear medicine, with the advent of hybrid machines, as SPECT/CT and PET/CT scanners. Improved detectors, hugely increased computing power, and new reconstruction algorithms allow for a significant reduction of the injected dose, with a parallel relevant decrease in radiation exposure. Nuclear medicine retains its distinctive capability of exploring at the tissue level many functional aspects of CHD in a safe and reproducible way. The lack of invasiveness, the limited need for sedation, the low radiation burden, and the insensitivity to body habitus variations make nuclear medicine an ideal complement of echocardiography. This is particularly true during the follow-up of patients with CHD, whose increasing survival represent a great medical success and a challenge for the health system in the next decades. Metabolic imaging using 18 FDG PET/CT has expanded its role in the management of infection and inflammation in adult patients, particularly in cardiology. The same expansion is observed in pediatric cardiology, with an increasing rate of studies on the use of FDG PET for the evaluation of children with vasculitis, suspected valvular infection or infected prosthetic devices. The

  10. Follow-up study and evaluation of benign stricture of upper gastrointestinal tract with interventional procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Yingsheng; Li Minghua; Zhuang Qixin; Shang Kezhong; Chen Weixiong; Chen Niwei

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To make follow-up study and evaluation of benign stricture of upper gastrointestinal tract (UGIT) with interventional procedure. Methods: There were 85 cases of benign stricture of UGIT with interventional procedure. There were 35 cases with pneumatic dilation (group A), 25 cases with permanent (group B) placement, and 25 cases with temporary (group C) placement of expandable metallic stent, respectively. All cases were completed under fluoroscopy. 35 cases of group A had 67 times dilations (mean 1.9 times). Fifteen partial covered and 10 uncovered expandable metallic stents were permanently placed in the 25 cases of group B. 25 partial covered expandable metallic stents were temporarily placed in the 25 cases of group C, and the stents were drawn out via gastroscopy 3-7 days later. All stents placement and drawing were technically successful. The most strictured diameters of UGIT were 0.7-8.5 mm before dilations and 5.1-20.0 mm after dilations. Dysphagia scores of all cases were from grade 2 to 4 before dilations, and from grade 0 to 1 after dilations. Follow-up time of all cases was from 6 months to 36 months (mean 19.1 months). Results: Complications in group A included chest pain (n =10), reflux (n = 8), and bleeding (n = 3). Seven (20%) in 35 cases of group A had dysphagia relapse during follow-up over 6 months; 32 (91%) in 35 cases of group A had dysphagia relapse during follow-up over 12 months; 19(95%) in 20 cases of group A had dysphagia relapse during follow-up over 36 months. Complications in group B included chest pain (n = 10), reflux (n = 15), bleeding (n = 3), and stent migration (n = 4). Five (20%) in 25 cases of group B had dysphagia relapse during follow-up over 6 months; 3(25%) in 12 cases of group B had dysphagia relapse during follow-up over 12 months; 3 (60%) in 5 cases of group B had dysphagia relapse during follow-up over 36 months. Complications in group C included chest pain (n = 10), reflux (n = 3), and bleeding (n = 4). 3

  11. Specialty Payment Model Opportunities and Assessment: Gastroenterology and Cardiology Model Design Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulcahy, Andrew W; Chan, Chris; Hirshman, Samuel; Huckfeldt, Peter J; Kofner, Aaron; Liu, Jodi L; Lovejoy, Susan L; Popescu, Ioana; Timbie, Justin W; Hussey, Peter S

    2015-07-15

    Gastroenterology and cardiology services are common and costly among Medicare beneficiaries. Episode-based payment, which aims to create incentives for high-quality, low-cost care, has been identified as a promising alternative payment model. This article describes research related to the design of episode-based payment models for ambulatory gastroenterology and cardiology services for possible testing by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). The authors analyzed Medicare claims data to describe the frequency and characteristics of gastroenterology and cardiology index procedures, the practices that delivered index procedures, and the patients that received index procedures. The results of these analyses can help inform CMS decisions about the definition of episodes in an episode-based payment model; payment adjustments for service setting, multiple procedures, or other factors; and eligibility for the payment model.

  12. Preliminary assessment of the dose to the interventional radiologist in fluoro-CT-guided procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, M. F.; Alves, J. G.; Sarmento, S.; Santos, J. A. M.; Sousa, M. J.; Gouvea, M.; Oliveira, A. D.; Cardoso, J. V.; Santos, L. M.

    2011-01-01

    A preliminary assessment of the occupational dose to the intervention radiologist received in fluoroscopy computerised tomography (CT) used to guide the collection of lung and bone biopsies is presented. The main aim of this work was to evaluate the capability of the reading system as well as of the available whole-body (WB) and extremity dosemeters used in routine monthly monitoring periods to measure per procedure dose values. The intervention radiologist was allocated 10 WB detectors (LiF: Mg, Ti, TLD-100) placed at chest and abdomen levels above and below the lead apron, and at both right and left arms, knees and feet. A special glove was developed with casings for the insertion of 11 extremity detectors (LiF:Mg, Cu, P, TLD-100H) for the identification of the most highly exposed fingers. The H p (10) dose values received above the lead apron (ranged 0.20-0.02 mSv) depend mainly on the duration of the examination and on the placement of physician relative to the beam, while values below the apron are relatively low. The left arm seems to receive a higher dose value. H p (0.07) values to the hand (ranged 36.30-0.06 mSv) show that the index, middle and ring fingers are the most highly exposed. In this study, the wrist dose was negligible compared with the finger dose. These results are preliminary and further studies are needed to better characterise the dose assessment in CT fluoroscopy. (authors)

  13. Post-procedural Care in Interventional Radiology: What Every Interventional Radiologist Should Know—Part I: Standard Post-procedural Instructions and Follow-Up Care

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taslakian, Bedros, E-mail: Bedros.Taslakian@nyumc.org; Sridhar, Divya [NYU Langone Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Interventional Radiology Section (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Interventional radiology (IR) has evolved into a full-fledged clinical specialty with attendant patient care responsibilities. Success in IR now requires development of a full clinical practice, including consultations, inpatient admitting privileges, and an outpatient clinic. In addition to technical excellence and innovation, maintaining a comprehensive practice is imperative for interventional radiologists to compete successfully for patients and referral bases. A structured approach to periprocedural care, including routine follow-up and early identification and management of complications, facilitates efficient and thorough management with an emphasis on quality and patient safety.

  14. SU-F-P-44: A Direct Estimate of Peak Skin Dose for Interventional Fluoroscopy Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weir, V; Zhang, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: There is an increasing demand for medical physicist to calculate peak skin dose (PSD) for interventional fluoroscopy procedures. The dose information (Dose-Area-Product and Air Kerma) displayed in the console cannot directly be used for this purpose. Our clinical experience shows that the use of the existing methods may overestimate or underestimate PSD. This study attempts to develop a direct estimate of PSD from the displayed dose metrics. Methods: An anthropomorphic torso phantom was used for dose measurements for a common fluoroscopic procedure. Entrance skin doses were measured with a Piranha solid state point detector placed on the table surface below the torso phantom. An initial “reference dose rate” (RE) measurement was conducted by comparing the displayed dose rate (mGy/min) to the dose rate measured. The distance from table top to focal spot was taken as the reference distance (RD at the RE. Table height was then adjusted. The displayed air kerma and DAP were recorded and sent to three physicists to estimate PSD. An inverse square correction was applied to correct displayed air kerma at various table heights. The PSD estimated by physicists and the PSD by the proposed method were then compared with the measurements. The estimated DAPs were compared to displayed DAP readings (mGycm2). Results: The difference between estimated PSD by the proposed method and direct measurements was less than 5%. For the same set of data, the estimated PSD by each of three physicists is different from measurements by ±52%. The DAP calculated by the proposed method and displayed DAP readings in the console is less than 20% at various table heights. Conclusion: PSD may be simply estimated from displayed air kerma or DAP if the distance between table top and tube focal spot or if x-ray beam area on table top is available.

  15. SU-F-P-44: A Direct Estimate of Peak Skin Dose for Interventional Fluoroscopy Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weir, V [Baylor Scott and White Healthcare System, Dallas, TX (United States); Zhang, J [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: There is an increasing demand for medical physicist to calculate peak skin dose (PSD) for interventional fluoroscopy procedures. The dose information (Dose-Area-Product and Air Kerma) displayed in the console cannot directly be used for this purpose. Our clinical experience shows that the use of the existing methods may overestimate or underestimate PSD. This study attempts to develop a direct estimate of PSD from the displayed dose metrics. Methods: An anthropomorphic torso phantom was used for dose measurements for a common fluoroscopic procedure. Entrance skin doses were measured with a Piranha solid state point detector placed on the table surface below the torso phantom. An initial “reference dose rate” (RE) measurement was conducted by comparing the displayed dose rate (mGy/min) to the dose rate measured. The distance from table top to focal spot was taken as the reference distance (RD at the RE. Table height was then adjusted. The displayed air kerma and DAP were recorded and sent to three physicists to estimate PSD. An inverse square correction was applied to correct displayed air kerma at various table heights. The PSD estimated by physicists and the PSD by the proposed method were then compared with the measurements. The estimated DAPs were compared to displayed DAP readings (mGycm2). Results: The difference between estimated PSD by the proposed method and direct measurements was less than 5%. For the same set of data, the estimated PSD by each of three physicists is different from measurements by ±52%. The DAP calculated by the proposed method and displayed DAP readings in the console is less than 20% at various table heights. Conclusion: PSD may be simply estimated from displayed air kerma or DAP if the distance between table top and tube focal spot or if x-ray beam area on table top is available.

  16. Efficacy of the RADPAD protective drape during real world complex percutaneous coronary intervention procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, John C; Darragh, Karen; Walsh, Simon J; Hanratty, Colm G

    2011-11-15

    The RADPAD is a lead-free surgical drape containing bismuth and barium that has been demonstrated to reduce scatter radiation exposure to primary operators during fluoroscopic procedures. It is not known to what degree the RADPAD reduces radiation exposure in operators who perform highly complex percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) requiring prolonged fluoroscopic screening times. Sixty consecutive patients due to undergo elective complex PCI involving rotational atherectomy, multivessel PCI, or chronic total occlusions were randomized in a 1:1 pattern to have their procedures performed with and without the RADPAD drape in situ. Dosimetry was performed on the left arm of the primary operator. There were 40 cases of chronic total occlusion, including 28 with contralateral injections; 15 cases involving rotational atherectomy; and 5 cases of multivessel PCI. There was no significant difference in screening times or dose-area products between the 2 patient groups. Primary operator radiation dose relative to screening time (RADPAD: slope = 1.44, R² = 0.25; no RADPAD: slope = 4.60, R² = 0.26; analysis of covariance F = 4.81, p = 0.032) and dose-area product (RADPAD: slope = 0.003, R² = 0.26; no RADPAD: slope = 0.011, R² = 0.52; analysis of covariance F = 12.54, p = 0.008) was significantly smaller in the RADPAD cohort compared to the no-RADPAD group. In conclusion, the RADPAD significantly reduces radiation exposure to primary operators during prolonged, complex PCI cases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of using different U/S probe Standoff materials in image geometry for interventional procedures: the example of prostate

    OpenAIRE

    Dimos Baltas; George Sakas; Pawel Zogal; Vasiliki Kefala; Zaira Katsilieri; Saeed Butt; Natasa Milickovic; Stefanos Diamantopoulos

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This study investigates the distortion of geometry of catheters and anatomy in acquired U/S images, caused by utilizing various stand-off materials for covering a transrectal bi-planar ultrasound probe in HDR and LDR prostate brachytherapy, biopsy and other interventional procedures. Furthermore, an evaluation of currently established water-bath based quality assurance (QA) procedures is presented. Material and methods Image acquisitions of an ultrasound QA setup were carried out at 5...

  18. Predictors and use of non-pharmacologic interventions for procedural pain associated with turning among hospitalized adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faigeles, Bonnie; Howie-Esquivel, Jill; Miaskowski, Christine; Stanik - Hutt, Julie; Thompson, Carol; White, Cheri; Wild, Lorie Rietman; Puntillo, Kathleen

    2010-01-01

    Background Many hospitalized adults cannot reposition themselves in their beds. Therefore, they are regularly turned by their nurses, primarily to prevent pressure ulcer formation. Previous research indicates that turning is painful and that patients are rarely pre-medicated with analgesics. Non-pharmacologic interventions may be used to help with this painful procedure. However, no published research was found on the use of non-pharmacologic interventions for turning of hospitalized patients. Objectives 1) to describe patient pain characteristics during turning and their association with patient demographic and clinical characteristics; 2) to determine the frequency of use of various non-pharmacologic interventions for hospitalized adult patients undergoing the painful procedure of turning; and 3) to identify factors that predict the use of specific non-pharmacologic interventions for pain associated with turning. Methods Hospitalized adult patients who experienced turning, the nurses caring for them, and others who were present at the time of turning were asked if they used various non-pharmacologic interventions to manage pain during the turning. Results Of 1395 patients, 92.5% received at least one non-pharmacologic intervention. Most frequently used were calming voice (65.7%), information (60.6%), and deep breathing (37.9%). Critical care patients were more likely to receive a calming voice (OR= 1.66, ppatients. Those reporting higher pain were consistently more likely to receive each of the three interventions (OR=1.01, pturning procedure. The specific interventions used most often are ones that can be initiated spontaneously. These data suggest that patients, nurses, and family members respond to patients’ turning-related pain by using non-pharmacologic interventions. PMID:23688362

  19. Nobel Prizes: Contributions to Cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Marchese, Luana de Decco; Dias, Danielle Warol; Barbeito, Andressa Brasil; Gomes, Jonathan Costa; Muradas, Maria Clara Soares; Lanzieri, Pedro Gemal; Gismondi, Ronaldo Altenburg

    2015-01-01

    The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize’s history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15%) studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16%) laureates, and two (6%) were women. Fourteen (42%) were American, 15 (45%) Europeans and four (13%) were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male

  20. Nobel Prizes: Contributions to Cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Marchese, Luana de Decco; Dias, Danielle Warol; Barbeito, Andressa Brasil; Gomes, Jonathan Costa; Muradas, Maria Clara Soares; Lanzieri, Pedro Gemal; Gismondi, Ronaldo Altenburg, E-mail: ronaldo@floralia.com.br [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-08-15

    The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize’s history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15%) studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16%) laureates, and two (6%) were women. Fourteen (42%) were American, 15 (45%) Europeans and four (13%) were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male.

  1. Filter's importance in nuclear cardiology imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jesus, Maria C. de; Lima, Ana L.S.; Santos, Joyra A. dos; Megueriam, Berdj A.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear Medicine is a medical speciality which employs tomography procedures for the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of diseases. One of the most commonly used apparatus is the Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT). To perform exams, a very small amount of a radiopharmaceutical must be given to the patient. Then, a gamma camera is placed in convenient positions to perform the photon counting, which is used to reconstruct a full 3 dimensional distribution of the radionuclide inside the body or organ. This reconstruction provides a 3-dimensional image in spatial coordinates, of the body or organ under study, allowing the physician to give the diagnostic. Image reconstruction is usually worked in the frequency domain, due to a great simplification introduced by the Fourier decomposition of image spectra. After the reconstruction, an inverse Fourier transform must be applied to trace back the image into spatial coordinates. To optimize this reconstruction procedure, digital filters are used to remove undesirable components of frequency, which can 'shadow' relevant physical signatures of diseases. Unfortunately, the efficiency of the applied filter is strongly dependent on its own mathematical parameters. In this work we demonstrate how filters interfere on image quality in cardiology examinations with SPECT, concerning perfusion and myocardial viability and the importance of the medical physicist in the choice of the right filters avoiding some serious problems that could occur in the inadequate processing of an image damaging the medical diagnosis. (author)

  2. Effective dose to staff from interventional procedures: Estimations from single and double dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuipers, G.; Velders, X. L.

    2009-01-01

    The exposure of 11 physicians performing interventional procedures was measured by means of two personal dosemeters. One personal dosemeter was worn outside the lead apron and an additional under the lead apron. The study was set up in order to determine the added value of a dosemeter worn under the lead apron. With the doses measured, the effective doses of the physicians were estimated using an algorithm for single dosimetry and two algorithms for double dosimetry. The effective doses calculated with the single dosimetry algorithm ranged from 0.11 to 0.85 mSv in 4 weeks. With the double dosimetry algorithms, the effective doses ranged from 0.02 mSv to 0.47 mSv. The statistical analysis revealed no significant differences in the accuracy of the effective doses calculated with single or double dosimetry algorithms. It was concluded that the effective dose cannot be considered a more accurate estimate when two dosemeters are used instead of one. (authors)

  3. Occupational exposures during abdominal fluoroscopically guided interventional procedures for different patient sizes - A Monte Carlo approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, William S; Belinato, Walmir; Perini, Ana P; Caldas, Linda V E; Galeano, Diego C; Santos, Carla J; Neves, Lucio P

    2018-01-01

    In this study we evaluated the occupational exposures during an abdominal fluoroscopically guided interventional radiology procedure. We investigated the relation between the Body Mass Index (BMI), of the patient, and the conversion coefficient values (CC) for a set of dosimetric quantities, used to assess the exposure risks of medical radiation workers. The study was performed using a set of male and female virtual anthropomorphic phantoms, of different body weights and sizes. In addition to these phantoms, a female and a male phantom, named FASH3 and MASH3 (reference virtual anthropomorphic phantoms), were also used to represent the medical radiation workers. The CC values, obtained as a function of the dose area product, were calculated for 87 exposure scenarios. In each exposure scenario, three phantoms, implemented in the MCNPX 2.7.0 code, were simultaneously used. These phantoms were utilized to represent a patient and medical radiation workers. The results showed that increasing the BMI of the patient, adjusted for each patient protocol, the CC values for medical radiation workers decrease. It is important to note that these results were obtained with fixed exposure parameters. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Investigation and analysis of interventional procedures being carried out in the primary hospital in Yunnan province of China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Rong; Huang Ming; Zhou Jinmei; Yang Yinshan; Zhao Ling; Wu Hao; Wu Qijie

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate and analyze the interventional techniques being employed or being anticipated to be adopted in the primary hospitals in Yunnan province of China in order to further promote the interventional procedures in clinical practice. Methods: A total of 52 Yunnan provincial state hospitals and county hospitals were enrolled in this investigation. During the period from Sep. 2009 to Dec. 2012, questionnaires were used to find out the interventional techniques being employed or being anticipated to be adopted in these 52 hospitals, and the results were analyzed. The common clinical issues were discussed and the improvement measures were suggested. Results: The number of effective questionnaire was 38 (38/52). Four county hospitals did not have basic condition to carry out the interventional technique, 41.70-/o of hospitals expected that they would be able to develop the technique of inferior vena cava filter, 35.3% of hospitals anticipated to employ 125 I seed implantation with stenting for liver cancer, and 32.3% of hospitals wanted to use digestive tract stent implantation. The difficulties to hinder the development of interventional techniques included the shortage of necessary interventional equipment and the irrational orderly system of professional succession. Conclusion: The interventional procedures being carried out nowadays in the primary hospitals in Yunnan province of China are quite few. The difference in the interventional techniques being anticipated to be carried out between the municipal hospitals and county hospitals is not significant. With the increasing demand of interventional treatment, the primary hospitals will have broad prospects in developing interventional treatment. (authors)

  5. Navigation of guidewires and catheters in the body during intervention procedures : A review of computer-based models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharei Amarghan, H.; Alderliesten, Tanja; van den Dobbelsteen, J.J.; Dankelman, J.

    2018-01-01

    Guidewires and catheters are used during minimally invasive interventional procedures to traverse in vascular system and access the desired position. Computer models are increasingly being used to predict the behavior of these instruments. This information can be used to choose the right

  6. Interventions for Echolalic Behaviour for Children with Autism: A Review of Verbal Prompts and the Cues Pause Point Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavon, Nicole M.; McLaughlin, T. F.

    1995-01-01

    This paper examines behavior interventions for echolalic behavior in children with autism, including verbal prompting (focusing on the echolalic behavior itself) and the cues-pause-point procedure (which employs the child's prerequisite skills to teach correct verbal responses). A review of the literature indicated that both techniques were…

  7. Clinical use of femoral artery hemostasis sticking after interventional procedure via femoral artery access

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Zhongsheng; Chen Shaoliang; Ye Fei; Zhang Junjie; Zhou Jie; Tian Nailiang; Lin Song; Liu Zhizhong; Xiao Pingxi; Qu Hong

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To observe the clinical effect of the use of femoral artery hemostasis sticking V+PAD after the interventional procedure via femoral artery access. Methods: By using random permutation list 80 patients, who decided to receive coronary angiography and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, were randomly selected. Of the 80 patients, hemostasis sticking V + PAD was employed in 40 patients with even numbers (trial group), only manual compression was adopted to stop bleeding in another 40 patients with odd numbers (control group). All the patients were informed about this trial and had to sign a consent letter. The pressure time, the treatment method of access site after hemostasis, the posture in bed, the immobilization time, the comfort degree of patients, the complications of access site prior to discharge, etc. were observed and the results were compared between two groups. Results: There was no significant difference between two groups as respect to age, gender ratios,activated clotting time (ACT) value and blood pressure. However, significantly difference in the compression time and bed rest time existed between the two groups. The compression time in trial group and control group was (7.9 ± 0.5) min and (19.8 ± 5.1) min respectively (P<0.01), while the bed rest time in trial group and control group was (6.1 ± 5.0) hours and (23.9 ± 0.2) hours respectively (P<0.01). All patients in trial group was supine in bed with the head side of the bed raised at 30 degree immediately after the procedure, and the head side of the bed was further raised to 90 degree one hour later. The puncture site was bandaged with conventional compression and immobilization was not employed. Patients could lie in bed with free posture and the patient's comfort degree was greatly improved. During hospitalization no complications related to puncture site occurred in all patients except one obese woman in trial group who developed pseudoaneurysm. Conclusion: Femoral

  8. [Cardiology: is the smartphone era?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandoli, Giulia Elena; D'Ascenzi, Flavio; Cameli, Matteo; Mondillo, Sergio

    2017-12-01

    The worldwide spread of smartphones has radically changed the habits of human life, allowing a 24/7 connection with other people. These changes have involved also Medicine with smartphones being able to simplify the clinical practice of physicians. The development of new external devices that can be connected to smartphones has further increased their use with mobile phones converted in portable electrocardiogram or echocardiogram machines. This extraordinary technological improvement seems to be partly in conflict with the classical tools available for the cardiologist, such as the "old" stethoscope that in 2016 had its 200th anniversary. This article focuses on the smartphone as a new tool available for the physicians, describing the most important potential uses and reporting an analysis of pros and cons of the smart-cardiology.

  9. Career Preferences and Perceptions of Cardiology Among US Internal Medicine Trainees: Factors Influencing Cardiology Career Choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Pamela S; Rzeszut, Anne K; Bairey Merz, C Noel; Duvernoy, Claire S; Lewis, Sandra J; Walsh, Mary Norine; Gillam, Linda

    2018-05-30

    Few data exist on internal medicine trainees' selection of cardiology training, although this is important for meeting future cardiology workforce needs. To discover trainees' professional development preferences and perceptions of cardiology, and their relationship to trainees' career choice. We surveyed trainees to discover their professional development preferences and perceptions of cardiology and the influence of those perceptions and preferences on the trainees' career choices. Participants rated 38 professional development needs and 19 perceptions of cardiology. Data collection took place from February 2009, through January 2010. Data analysis was conducted from May 2017 to December 2017. Multivariable models were used to determine the association of demographics and survey responses with prospective career choice. A total of 4850 trainees were contacted, and 1123 trainees (of whom 625 [55.7%] were men) in 198 residency programs completed surveys (23.1% response; mean [SD] age, 29.4 [3.5] years). Principal component analysis of survey responses resulted in 8-factor and 6-factor models. Professional development preferences in descending order of significance were stable hours, family friendliness, female friendliness, the availability of positive role models, financial benefits, professional challenges, patient focus, and the opportunity to have a stimulating career. The top perceptions of cardiology in descending order of significance were adverse job conditions, interference with family life, and a lack of diversity. Women and future noncardiologists valued work-life balance more highly and had more negative perceptions of cardiology than men or future cardiologists, who emphasized the professional advantages available in cardiology. Professional development factors and cardiology perceptions were strongly associated with a decision to pursue or avoid a career in cardiology in both men and women. Alignment of cardiology culture with trainees' preferences

  10. Application of Real-Time 3D Navigation System in CT-Guided Percutaneous Interventional Procedures: A Feasibility Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Bhattacharji

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. To evaluate the accuracy of a quantitative 3D navigation system for CT-guided interventional procedures in a two-part study. Materials and Methods. Twenty-two procedures were performed in abdominal and thoracic phantoms. Accuracies of the 3D anatomy map registration and navigation were evaluated. Time used for the navigated procedures was recorded. In the IRB approved clinical evaluation, 21 patients scheduled for CT-guided thoracic and hepatic biopsy and ablations were recruited. CT-guided procedures were performed without following the 3D navigation display. Accuracy of navigation as well as workflow fitness of the system was evaluated. Results. In phantoms, the average 3D anatomy map registration error was 1.79 mm. The average navigated needle placement accuracy for one-pass and two-pass procedures, respectively, was 2.0±0.7 mm and 2.8±1.1 mm in the liver and 2.7±1.7 mm and 3.0±1.4 mm in the lung. The average accuracy of the 3D navigation system in human subjects was 4.6 mm ± 3.1 for all procedures. The system fits the existing workflow of CT-guided interventions with minimum impact. Conclusion. A 3D navigation system can be performed along the existing workflow and has the potential to navigate precision needle placement in CT-guided interventional procedures.

  11. Pharmacological stress agents in nuclear cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buscombe, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    Treadmill test combined with myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) is a commonly used technique in the assessment of coronary artery disease. However there are a group of patients who may not be able to undergo treadmill tests. Patients with underlying conditions like neuromuscular disease, musculoskeletal disorder, heart failure and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on renal dialysis would find it difficult to perform exercise on a treadmill or bicycle ergometer. These conditions prevent them from performing adequate exercise. Such patients would benefit from pharmacological stress procedures combined with MPS. Nuclear medicine departments use various pharmacological agents while performing stress tests on cardiac patients. The most commonly used pharmacological agents for cardiac stress are coronary vasodilators and catecholamines. In addition to these agents, adjuvant use of nitrates and atropine is also a common practice in nuclear cardiology. This review addresses various physiological and pharmacological properties of the commonly used pharmacological stress agents in MPS and critically analyses their advantages and disadvantages, as well as their safety and efficacy. (author)

  12. Healthy lifestyle interventions to combat noncommunicable disease-a novel nonhierarchical connectivity model for key stakeholders: a policy statement from the American Heart Association, European Society of Cardiology, European Association for Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation, and American College of Preventive Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, Ross; Guazzi, Marco; Lianov, Liana; Whitsel, Laurie; Berra, Kathy; Lavie, Carl J; Kaminsky, Leonard; Williams, Mark; Hivert, Marie-France; Cherie Franklin, Nina; Myers, Jonathan; Dengel, Donald; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M; Pinto, Fausto J; Cosentino, Francesco; Halle, Martin; Gielen, Stephan; Dendale, Paul; Niebauer, Josef; Pelliccia, Antonio; Giannuzzi, Pantaleo; Corra, Ugo; Piepoli, Massimo F; Guthrie, George; Shurney, Dexter; Arena, Ross; Berra, Kathy; Dengel, Donald; Franklin, Nina Cherie; Hivert, Marie-France; Kaminsky, Leonard; Lavie, Carl J; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M; Myers, Jonathan; Whitsel, Laurie; Williams, Mark; Corra, Ugo; Cosentino, Francesco; Dendale, Paul; Giannuzzi, Pantaleo; Gielen, Stephan; Guazzi, Marco; Halle, Martin; Niebauer, Josef; Pelliccia, Antonio; Piepoli, Massimo F; Pinto, Fausto J; Guthrie, George; Lianov, Liana; Shurney, Dexter

    2015-08-14

    citing this article. [1] Arena R, Guazzi M, Lianov L, Whitsel L, Berra K, Lavie CJ, Kaminsky L, Williams M, Hivert M-F, Franklin NC, Myers J, Dengel D, Lloyd-Jones DM, Pinto FJ, Cosentino F, Halle M, Gielen S, Dendale P, Niebauer J, Pelliccia A, Giannuzzi P, Corra U, Piepoli MF, Guthrie G, Shurney D. Healthy Lifestyle Interventions to Combat Noncommunicable Diseased - A Novel Nonhierarchical Connectivity Model for Key Stakeholders: A Policy Statement From the American Heart Association, European Society of Cardiology, European Association for Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation, and American College of Preventive Medicine. Mayo Clinic Proceedings 2015; DOI: 10.1016/j.mayocp.2015.05.001 [In Press].

  13. Single-session versus staged procedures for elective multivessel percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Toshiaki; Morimoto, Takeshi; Shiomi, Hiroki; Yamaji, Kyohei; Ando, Kenji; Ono, Koh; Shizuta, Satoshi; Saito, Naritatsu; Kato, Takao; Kaji, Shuichiro; Furukawa, Yutaka; Nakagawa, Yoshihisa; Kadota, Kazushige; Horie, Minoru; Kimura, Takeshi

    2018-06-01

    To clarify the effect of single-session multivessel percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) strategy relative to the staged multivessel strategy on clinical outcomes in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) or non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome. In the Coronary REvascularisation Demonstrating Outcome Study in Kyoto PCI/coronary artery bypass grafting registry cohort-2, there were 2018 patients who underwent elective multivessel PCI. Primary outcome measure was composite of all-cause death, myocardial infarction and stroke at 5-year follow-up. Single-session multivessel PCI and staged multivessel PCI were performed in 707 patients (35.0%) and 1311 patients (65.0%), respectively. The cumulative 5-year incidence of and adjusted risk for the primary outcome measure were not significantly different between the single-session and staged groups (26.7% vs 23.0%, p=0.45; HR 0.91, 95% CI 0.72 to 1.16, p=0.47). The 30-day incidence of all-cause death was significantly higher in the single-session group than in the staged group (1.1% vs 0.2%, p=0.009). However, the causes of death in 11 patients who died within 30 days were generally not related to the procedural complications, but related to the serious clinical status before PCI. For the subgroup analyses including age, gender, extent of CAD, severe chronic kidney disease and heart failure, there was no significant interaction between the subgroup factors and the effect of the single-session strategy relative to the staged strategy for the primary outcome measure. The single-session multivessel PCI strategy was associated with at least comparable 5-year clinical outcomes compared with the staged multivessel PCI, although the prevalence of the single-session strategy was low in the present study. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  14. Cognitive-Behavioral and Pharmacologic Interventions for Children's Distress during Painful Medical Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay, Susan M.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Evaluated efficacy of cognitive-behavioral intervention package and low-risk pharmacologic intervention (oral Valium) as compared with minimal treatment-attention control condition, in reducing children leukemia patients' distress during bone marrow aspirations. The cognitive-behavioral therapy reduced behavioral distress, pain ratings and pulse…

  15. A importância do controle de qualidade em serviços de hemodinâmica e cardiologia intervencionista The relevance of quality control in services of hemodynamics and interventional cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eara de Souza Luz

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar o desempenho de um equipamento de raios X utilizado em radiologia intervencionista e a qualidade de imagem produzida, aplicando alguns testes de controle de qualidade. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: O equipamento de raios X testado foi da marca Philips (Integris H3000, do serviço de hemodinâmica de um hospital do Rio de Janeiro. Foram utilizados objetos de teste de Leeds para avaliar a qualidade da imagem, e um sistema Radcal 9015 para medições dosimétricas. RESULTADOS: Nos modos high e normal, os valores medidos das taxas de kerma no ar foram diferentes dos esperados. Em alguns casos, os valores das taxas medidas não foram afetados pelo uso de diferentes modos de magnificação. A avaliação da qualidade da imagem apresentou resultados diferentes dos valores recomendados pelas normas. Isto pode levar à obtenção de imagens de menor qualidade e ao aumento da exposição à radiação de pacientes e profissionais. CONCLUSÃO: Os resultados mostraram a importância da aplicação periódica de testes de controle de qualidade, que permitem monitorar o desempenho do equipamento e estimar a exposição dos pacientes e trabalhadores. Os resultados obtidos sugerem a necessidade de uma revisão no sistema de aquisição de imagens do equipamento.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the performance and quality of images of a x-ray equipment utilized in interventional radiology, by means of some tests of quality control. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Measurements have been performed on a Philips Integris H3000 x-ray equipment dedicated to interventional procedures in the hemodynamics laboratory of a hospital in Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil. Leeds test objects have been used to evaluate the image quality. Dosimetric measurements have been developed with a Radcal 9015 dosimetric system. RESULTS: In high and normal modes, the air kerma rates have been different from the expected results. In some cases, values have not been affected by the use of different

  16. The unique contribution of the nursing intervention pain management on length of stay in older patients undergoing hip procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Peg; Shever, Leah; Titler, Marita G; Qin, Rui; Kim, Taikyoung; Picone, Debra M

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the unique contribution of the nursing intervention pain management on length of stay (LOS) for 568 older patients hospitalized for hip procedures. Propensity-score-adjusted analysis was used to determine the effect of pain management on LOS. The LOS for hospitalizations that received pain management was 0.78 day longer than that for hospitalizations that did not receive pain management. Other variables that were predictors of LOS included several context-of-care variables (e.g., time spent in the intensive care unit, registered nurse skill mix, etc.), number of medical procedures and unique medications, and several other nursing interventions. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, H.

    1985-01-01

    During the last years, since short physical mean life radionuclides have started to be used, radionuclide scanning has been experienced with remarkable culmination. There are detector devices, which jointly with computation equipments, allow to obtain multiple images per second as properly rapid gammagraphic series, in order to obtain whole hemodynamic data or to generate functional images no representing an anatomical structure but reporting about cardiac dynamics at regional level. In these techniques, employed in Nuclear Cardiology, the following radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals are used: radiolabeled albumin 99m Tc red blood cells, 113m In-transferrin, very short physical mean life radionuclides, such as 195m Au, 178 Ta, 191 Ir. In addition, 113 Xe for coronary flow measurements; radiolabeled microspheres and macroparticles for angiogammagraphy; 129 Cs, 43 K, 81 Rb, 82 Rb and 201 Ti, the most largerly used, for myocardial gammagraphy. It is pointed out that fatty acids are the newest, basically if are radioiodate, and some 99m Tc labeled long chain hydrocarbons. It is expressed that 99m Tc-Sn-pyrophosphate has been used for myocardial infarction. Working on the development of new radiopharmaceuticals, basically fatty acids and 99m Tc chelating agents, for the improvement of these techniques is carried out. (author)

  18. [Nuclear cardiology with new radiopharmaceuticals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunko, H

    1994-08-01

    In the field of nuclear cardiology, 99mTc labeled myocardial perfusion agents such as MIBI, Tetrofosmin and Teboroxime, 111In-antimyosin for imaging of myocardial necrosis, 123I-betamethyl-iodophenylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) for imaging of myocardial fatty acid metabolism and 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) for imaging of myocardial adrenergic function are introduced recently in Japan. Improved image quality and simultaneous evaluation of myocardial perfusion, function and wall motion can be obtained with use of 99mTc labeled myocardial perfusion agents. 111In-antimyosin enables specific imaging of myocardial necrosis which leads to the use for wide variety of heart diseases. Discrepancy of the myocardial perfusion and metabolism in case of stunned myocardium or cardiomyopathy can be evaluated by 123I-BMIPP in conjunction with perfusion agent. Recently wide variety of diseases which may have cardiac adrenergic abnormality are targeted for 123I-MIBG imaging. These new radiopharmaceuticals are expected to be powerful tool for evaluation of the pathophysiology including severity and prognosis and evaluation of the etiology of the various heart diseases.

  19. The Paediatric Cardiology Hall of Fame – Donald Nixon Ross.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somerville, Jane

    2015-10-01

    Donald Nixon Ross, FRCS (4 October 1922 to 7 July 2014) was a South African-born British cardiothoracic surgeon, who developed the pulmonary autograft, known as the Ross procedure, for the treatment of aortic valve disease, and also performed the first heart transplant in the United Kingdom in 1968. This paper, written by Jane Somerville, Professor of Cardiology [Retired], Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom, provides the personal recollections about Donald Ross from Jane Somerville, and thus provides a unique snapshot of cardiac surgical history.

  20. A method to reduce patient's eye lens dose in neuro-interventional radiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safari, M.J.; Wong, J.H.D.; Kadir, K.A.A.; Sani, F.M.; Ng, K.H.

    2016-01-01

    Complex and prolonged neuro-interventional radiology procedures using the biplane angiography system increase the patient's risk of radiation-induced cataract. Physical collimation is the most effective way of reducing the radiation dose to the patient's eye lens, but in instances where collimation is not possible, an attenuator may be useful in protecting the eyes. In this study, an eye lens protector was designed and fabricated to reduce the radiation dose to the patients’ eye lens during neuro-interventional procedures. The eye protector was characterised before being tested on its effectiveness in a simulated aneurysm procedure on an anthropomorphic phantom. Effects on the automatic dose rate control (ADRC) and image quality are also evaluated. The eye protector reduced the radiation dose by up to 62.1% at the eye lens. The eye protector is faintly visible in the fluoroscopy images and increased the tube current by a maximum of 3.7%. It is completely invisible in the acquisition mode and does not interfere with the clinical procedure. The eye protector placed within the radiation field of view was able to reduce the radiation dose to the eye lens by direct radiation beam of the lateral x-ray tube with minimal effect on the ADRC system. - Highlights: • The eye protector can considerably reduce the patient's eye lens dose during neuro-interventional procedures. • This protector does not significantly perturb the fluoroscopy image and was completely invisible on the acquisition image due to image subtraction. • The eye protector does not significantly change the exposure parameters (kV and mAs).

  1. The value of peri-interventional procedure serum bile acid (TBA) detection in patients with primary liver cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Chen; Liu Yizhi

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical value of peri-interventional procedure serum bile acid (TBA) detection in patients with primary liver cancer. Methods: The serum TBA was examined peri-operatively in 160 patients with primary liver cancer for testing the correlations between TBA, liver function, the degree of hepatocirrhosis, interventional therapy method and hepatic failure. Results: The preoperative mean value of serum TBA increased significantly in comparing with that of the control group (P<0.01). The preoperative value of serum TBA in different Child grading patients with primary liver cancer were different significantly (P<0.01), Child A< Child B< Child C, the increased degree of serum TBA corresponded with Child grading of the liver function and the cirrhotic degree of liver. In patients with liver function of Child B and C, the postoperative mean values of serum TBA in different interventional therapy methods were different significantly (P<0.01). Comparing with that of the patients without hepatic failure, the postoperative value of serum TBA in the patients with hepatic failure increased significantly (P<0.01). Conclusions: The value of serum TBA can sensitively and accurately reflect liver reserve ability and damage degree of peri-interventional procedure liver function. Hepatic failure can be detected in time and the prognosis of the patients with primary liver cancer can be predicted by testing the value of serum TBA continually. (authors)

  2. Virtual Reality as a Distraction Intervention to Relieve Pain and Distress During Medical Procedures: A Comprehensive Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indovina, Paola; Barone, Daniela; Gallo, Luigi; Chirico, Andrea; De Pietro, Giuseppe; Antonio, Giordano

    2018-02-26

    This review aims to provide a framework for evaluating the utility of virtual reality (VR) as a distraction intervention to alleviate pain and distress during medical procedures. We firstly describe the theoretical bases underlying the VR analgesic and anxiolytic effects and define the main factors contributing to its efficacy, which largely emerged from studies on healthy volunteers. Then, we provide a comprehensive overview of the clinical trials using VR distraction during different medical procedures, such as burn injury treatments, chemotherapy, surgery, dental treatment, and other diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. A broad literature search was performed using as main terms "virtual reality", "distraction" and "pain". No date limit was applied and all the retrieved studies on immersive VR distraction during medical procedures were selected. VR has proven to be effective in reducing procedural pain, as almost invariably observed even in patients subjected to extremely painful procedures, such as patients with burn injuries undergoing wound care and physical therapy. Moreover, VR seemed to decrease cancer-related symptoms in different settings, including during chemotherapy. Only mild and infrequent side effects were observed. Despite these promising results, future long-term randomized controlled trials with larger sample sizes and evaluating not only self-report measures but also physiological variables are needed. Further studies are also required both to establish predictive factors to select patients who can benefit from VR distraction and to design hardware/software systems tailored to the specific needs of different patients and able to provide the greatest distraction at the lowest cost.

  3. Nuclear cardiology for developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinendegen, L.E.

    1986-01-01

    The role of nuclear medicine in developing countries must be oriented to the local needs for clinical practice, the health care of large populations and the demands for research with sometimes extremely limited resources. To help define the locally differing needs, it is stressed that nuclear medicine provides the unique opportunity to observe the body at the molecular level of organization and thus makes the body biochemically transparent. Depending on the particular diagnostic demands, complex imaging with gamma scintigraphy or emission tomography may be the only method to choose in some instances, but for others it may be an unnecessary luxury. Nuclear cardiology, with the purpose of non-invasively assessing cardiac function, myocardial perfusion and myocardial metabolism, is a particular challenge in both respects for developing countries. Given such requirements, single-probe devices with multipurpose application are less expensive than gamma cameras and promise advanced diagnostic uses. In one examination, left ventricular function, global cardio-pulmonary circulation and the general circulatory adaptation to exercise can be investigated by non-gated simultaneous blood pool measurements over four lung regions, the heart and the liver. In addition, such devices have the advantages of compactness, robustness and electronic stability. Despite enormous difficulties regarding funding, infrastructure, equipment and maintenance, developing countries should be encouraged to participate in the evolution of nuclear medicine by responding and adapting to defined needs and perhaps by maintaining at least one national centre of excellence with capacities for research and training. Funds are best secured by providing an indispensable service in co-operation with the various clinical disciplines. (author)

  4. Significant complications occurred in the perioperative period of peripheral vascular interventions:an analysis of 1620 consecutive procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Zicai; Liu Li; Zhang Haibo; Wang Ning; Li Yu; Yan Ying

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To categorize the significant complications occurred in the perioperative period of peripheral vascular interventions and to analyze their causes, outcomes and managements in order to make a further understanding of the cause of occurrence and to improve the handling ability. Methods: Over the past five years a total of 1620 consecutive peripheral vascular interventions were carried out in our institute. Significant complications, which occurred in the perioperative period, and the clinical data were carefully examined. The occurrence, treatment, consequence and final outcome of each complication were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Of 1620 consecutive peripheral interventional procedures, significant complication which developed during the operation or within one week after the treatment was seen in 76 (4.69%). The significant complications could be classified into twelve kinds. After proper management most complications were cured without leaving any sequelae. Nevertheless, in some patients permanent damages such as paraplegia, lower limb paralysis, necrosis of gluteus, etc. were left over. Death occurred in six patients. Of the six patients, four died of concomitant hepatic failure and agranulocytosis, one of retroperitoneal hematoma and hemoperitoneum, and another one of pulmonary embolism. Conclusion: (1) Significant complications may occur in most peripheral vascular interventional therapies, which, in most cases, are mainly related to the insufficient understanding of the disease and improper manipulation. (2) A comprehensive and solid fundamental knowledge of the disease, strictly following the indications and careful handling the operation are the key points to reduce the occurrence of severe complications in the perioperative period of peripheral vascular interventions. (authors)

  5. Clinical pathways and management of antithrombotic therapy in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS): a Consensus Document from the Italian Association of Hospital Cardiologists (ANMCO), Italian Society of Cardiology (SIC), Italian Society of Emergency Medicine (SIMEU) and Italian Society of Interventional Cardiology (SICI-GISE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colivicchi, Furio; Gulizia, Michele Massimo; Pugliese, Francesco Rocco; Ruggieri, Maria Pia; Musumeci, Giuseppe; Cibinel, Gian Alfonso; Romeo, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Antiplatelet therapy is the cornerstone of the pharmacologic management of patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Over the last years, several studies have evaluated old and new oral or intravenous antiplatelet agents in ACS patients. In particular, research was focused on assessing superiority of two novel platelet ADP P2Y12 receptor antagonists (i.e., prasugrel and ticagrelor) over clopidogrel. Several large randomized controlled trials have been undertaken in this setting and a wide variety of prespecified and post-hoc analyses are available that evaluated the potential benefits of novel antiplatelet therapies in different subsets of patients with ACS. The aim of this document is to review recent data on the use of current antiplatelet agents for in-hospital treatment of ACS patients. In addition, in order to overcome increasing clinical challenges and implement effective therapeutic interventions, this document identifies all potential specific care pathway for ACS patients and accordingly proposes individualized therapeutic options. PMID:28751840

  6. Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology Specialist Heart Failure Curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McDonagh, Theresa A; Gardner, Roy S; Lainscak, Mitja

    2014-01-01

    Training Curricula. In addition, European Society of Cardiology (ESC) subspecialty curricula exist for Interventional Cardiology and Heart Rhythm Management. The purpose of this heart failure curriculum is to provide a framework which can be used as a blueprint for training across Europe. This blueprint...... mirrors other ESC curricula. Each section has three components: the knowledge required, the skills which are necessary, and the professionalism (attitudes and behaviours) which should be attained. The programme is designed to last 2 years. The first year is devoted to the specialist heart failure module...

  7. Pediatric cardiology. Clinical and practical experiences with heart diseases of children, juveniles and young adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, Nikolaus A.

    2011-01-01

    The book on pediatric cardiology covers the following chapters: (I) Fundamentals and diagnostics: pediatric cardiologic anamnesis, electrocardiograms, thorax X-radiography, MRT and CT of the heart, nuclear medical diagnostics, exercise tests, heart catheter examination, electrophysiological tests. (II) Leading symptoms: Cyanosis, cardiac murmur, thorax pain, palpitation, syncopes. (III) Disease pictures: congenital heart defects, acquired heart defects, cardiomyopathies, heart rhythm disturbances, heart insufficiency, arterial hypertension, pulmonary hypertension, other heart involving syndromes. (IV) Therapy: Catheter interventional therapy, post-surgical pediatric cardiac therapy, surgery involving the life-support machine, mechanical cardiovascular support systems, initial treatment of newborns with critical heart defects, heart transplantation, vaccination of children with heart diseases, medicinal therapy.

  8. Overview of double dosimetry procedures for the determination of the effective dose to the interventional radiology staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaervinen, H.; Buls, N.; Clerinx, P.; Jansen, J.; Miljanic, S.; Nikodemova, D.; Ranogajec-Komor, M.; D'Errico, F.

    2008-01-01

    In interventional radiology, for an accurate determination of effective dose to the staff, measurements with two dosemeters have been recommended, one located above and one under the protective apron. Such 'double dosimetry' practices and the algorithms used for the determination of effective dose were reviewed in this study by circulating a questionnaire and by an extensive literature search. The results indicated that regulations for double dosimetry almost do not exist and there is no firm consensus on the most suitable calculation algorithms. The calculation of effective dose is mainly based on the single dosemeter measurements, in which either personal dose equivalent, directly, (dosemeter below the apron) or a fraction of personal dose equivalent (dosemeter above the apron) is taken as an assessment of effective dose. The most recent studies suggest that there might not be just one double dosimetry algorithm that would be optimum for all interventional radiology procedures. Further investigations in several critical configurations of interventional radiology procedures are needed to assess the suitability of the proposed algorithms. (authors)

  9. Nuclear cardiology in Cuba present and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peix González, Amalia

    2016-01-01

    Heart Diseases represent the first cause of death worldwide (WHO, 2011); 80% of these deaths in developing countries (WHO, 2011); Coronary Heart Disease is responsible of 69% of all cardiovascular deaths. In Cuba, National programs have been developed to control the most important associated coronary risk factors; Research projects have been also carried out as part of the Ministry of Public Health’s program on non-transmissible chronic diseases; Strengthening of Nuclear Cardiology in Cuba, as well as its adequate integration in a diagnosis algorithm, focusing on improving the quality of medical care, in accordance with the principles of evidence-based medicine. Recommendations: Extend Nuclear Cardiology throughout the country; Conduct cost-effectiveness studies comparing different imaging techniques in cardiology; Develop coronary flow and metabolic studies with PET; Introducing studying adrenergic innervation; Develop hybrid imaging in cardiology; Set up committees of experts to analyze the value of different imaging techniques in cardiology in accordance with the possibilities and resources of Cuba, aimed at the implementation of a medicine individualized for patients. (author)

  10. Methods Used to Document Procedural Fidelity in School-Based Intervention Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, David; Hawkins, Renee; McCoy, Dacia; Wahl, Elaine; Shier, Ashley; Denune, Hilary; Kimener, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    There has been a paucity of guidance on the methodological details needed for measuring and sampling the independent variable or actual intervention occurrences in research and practice. Furthermore, the planning and support necessary to document the independent variable in both circumstances may be considerable. The current study extends prior…

  11. Interventional spinal procedures guided and controlled by a 3D rotational angiographic unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedicelli, Alessandro; Verdolotti, Tommaso; Pompucci, Angelo; Desiderio, Flora; D'Argento, Francesco; Colosimo, Cesare; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the usefulness of 2D multiplanar reformatting images (MPR) obtained from rotational acquisitions with cone-beam computed tomography technology during percutaneous extra-vascular spinal procedures performed in the angiography suite. We used a 3D rotational angiographic unit with a flat panel detector. MPR images were obtained from a rotational acquisition of 8 s (240 images at 30 fps), tube rotation of 180° and after post-processing of 5 s by a local work-station. Multislice CT (MSCT) is the best guidance system for spinal approaches permitting direct tomographic visualization of each spinal structure. Many operators, however, are trained with fluoroscopy, it is less expensive, allows real-time guidance, and in many centers the angiography suite is more frequently available for percutaneous procedures. We present our 6-year experience in fluoroscopy-guided spinal procedures, which were performed under different conditions using MPR images. We illustrate cases of vertebroplasty, epidural injections, selective foraminal nerve root block, facet block, percutaneous treatment of disc herniation and spine biopsy, all performed with the help of MPR images for guidance and control in the event of difficult or anatomically complex access. The integrated use of "CT-like" MPR images allows the execution of spinal procedures under fluoroscopy guidance alone in all cases of dorso-lumbar access, with evident limitation of risks and complications, and without need for recourse to MSCT guidance, thus eliminating CT-room time (often bearing high diagnostic charges), and avoiding organizational problems for procedures that need, for example, combined use of a C-arm in the CT room.

  12. Interventional spinal procedures guided and controlled by a 3D rotational angiographic unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedicelli, Alessandro; Verdolotti, Tommaso; Desiderio, Flora; D'Argento, Francesco; Colosimo, Cesare; Bonomo, Lorenzo; Pompucci, Angelo

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the usefulness of 2D multiplanar reformatting images (MPR) obtained from rotational acquisitions with cone-beam computed tomography technology during percutaneous extra-vascular spinal procedures performed in the angiography suite. We used a 3D rotational angiographic unit with a flat panel detector. MPR images were obtained from a rotational acquisition of 8 s (240 images at 30 fps), tube rotation of 180 and after post-processing of 5 s by a local work-station. Multislice CT (MSCT) is the best guidance system for spinal approaches permitting direct tomographic visualization of each spinal structure. Many operators, however, are trained with fluoroscopy, it is less expensive, allows real-time guidance, and in many centers the angiography suite is more frequently available for percutaneous procedures. We present our 6-year experience in fluoroscopy-guided spinal procedures, which were performed under different conditions using MPR images. We illustrate cases of vertebroplasty, epidural injections, selective foraminal nerve root block, facet block, percutaneous treatment of disc herniation and spine biopsy, all performed with the help of MPR images for guidance and control in the event of difficult or anatomically complex access. The integrated use of ''CT-like'' MPR images allows the execution of spinal procedures under fluoroscopy guidance alone in all cases of dorso-lumbar access, with evident limitation of risks and complications, and without need for recourse to MSCT guidance, thus eliminating CT-room time (often bearing high diagnostic charges), and avoiding organizational problems for procedures that need, for example, combined use of a C-arm in the CT room. (orig.)

  13. Interventional spinal procedures guided and controlled by a 3D rotational angiographic unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedicelli, Alessandro; Verdolotti, Tommaso; Desiderio, Flora; D' Argento, Francesco; Colosimo, Cesare; Bonomo, Lorenzo [Catholic University of Rome, A. Gemelli Hospital, Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Rome (Italy); Pompucci, Angelo [Catholic University of Rome, A. Gemelli Hospital, Department of Neurotraumatology, Rome (Italy)

    2011-12-15

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the usefulness of 2D multiplanar reformatting images (MPR) obtained from rotational acquisitions with cone-beam computed tomography technology during percutaneous extra-vascular spinal procedures performed in the angiography suite. We used a 3D rotational angiographic unit with a flat panel detector. MPR images were obtained from a rotational acquisition of 8 s (240 images at 30 fps), tube rotation of 180 and after post-processing of 5 s by a local work-station. Multislice CT (MSCT) is the best guidance system for spinal approaches permitting direct tomographic visualization of each spinal structure. Many operators, however, are trained with fluoroscopy, it is less expensive, allows real-time guidance, and in many centers the angiography suite is more frequently available for percutaneous procedures. We present our 6-year experience in fluoroscopy-guided spinal procedures, which were performed under different conditions using MPR images. We illustrate cases of vertebroplasty, epidural injections, selective foraminal nerve root block, facet block, percutaneous treatment of disc herniation and spine biopsy, all performed with the help of MPR images for guidance and control in the event of difficult or anatomically complex access. The integrated use of ''CT-like'' MPR images allows the execution of spinal procedures under fluoroscopy guidance alone in all cases of dorso-lumbar access, with evident limitation of risks and complications, and without need for recourse to MSCT guidance, thus eliminating CT-room time (often bearing high diagnostic charges), and avoiding organizational problems for procedures that need, for example, combined use of a C-arm in the CT room. (orig.)

  14. Cone-Beam CT with Flat-Panel-Detector Digital Angiography System: Early Experience in Abdominal Interventional Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirota, Shozo; Nakao, Norio; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Maeda, Hiroaki; Ishikura, Reiichi; Miura, Koui; Sakamoto, Kiyoshi; Ueda, Ken; Baba, Rika

    2006-01-01

    We developed a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) system equipped with a large flat-panel detector. Data obtained by 200 o rotation imaging are reconstructed by means of CBCT to generate three-dimensional images. We report the use of CBCT angiography using CBCT in 10 patients with 8 liver malignancies and 2 hypersplenisms during abdominal interventional procedures. CBCT was very useful for interventional radiologists to confirm a perfusion area of the artery catheter wedged on CT by injection of contrast media through the catheter tip, although the image quality was slightly degraded, scoring as 2.60 on average by streak artifacts. CBCT is space-saving because it does not require a CT system with a gantry, and it is also time-saving because it does not require the transfer of patients

  15. International medical graduates and the cardiology workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostis, John B; Ahmad, Busharat

    2004-09-15

    Recent publications have expressed the view that there is a shortage of cardiologists and it is growing worse. Both an increasing demand and a diminishing supply of cardiologists have been projected. An increase in the number of international medical graduates (IMGs) who enter cardiology practice has been proposed as a remedy for a projected shortage. The IMGs have to overcome challenges including clinical practice, language proficiency, and cultural differences before they are incorporated into the fabric of U.S. cardiology. With hard work, perseverance, excellence,compassionate care and support and mentoring, many have contributed to scientific and clinical cardiology in the U.S. Whether in the absence of a present crisis the projected shortage of cardiologists necessitates change in U.S. immigration policy is an open question.

  16. [The QuIK-Registry of the German Society of Cardiologists in private practice: countrywide and benchmarking quality assurance in invasive cardiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, A; Levenson, B; Göhring, S; Haerer, W; Reifart, N; Ringwald, G; Troger, B

    2009-10-01

    QuIK is the German acronym for QUality Assurance in Invasive Cardiology. It describes the continuous project of an electronic data collection in Cardiac catheterization laboratories all over Germany. Mainly members of the German Society of Cardiologists in Private Practice (BNK) participate in this computer based project. Since 1996 data of diagnostic and interventional procedures are collected and send to a registry-center where a regular benchmarking analysis of the results is performed. Part of the project is a yearly auditing process including an on-site visit to the cath lab to guarantee for the reliability of information collected. Since 1996 about one million procedures have been documented. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart , New York.

  17. Patient radiation dose in diagnostic and interventional procedures for intracranial aneurysms: Experience at a single center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Chang Woo; Kim, Bum Soo; Lee, Cheol Hyoun; Ihn, Yon Kwon; Shin, Yong Sam

    2014-01-01

    To assess patient radiation doses during cerebral angiography and embolization of intracranial aneurysms in a large sample size from a single center. We studied a sample of 439 diagnostic and 149 therapeutic procedures for intracranial aneurysms in 480 patients (331 females, 149 males; median age, 57 years; range, 21-88 years), which were performed in 2012 with a biplane unit. Parameters including fluoroscopic time, dose-area product (DAP), and total angiographic image frames were obtained and analyzed. Mean fluoroscopic time, total mean DAP, and total image frames were 12.6 minutes, 136.6 +/- 44.8 Gy-cm 2 , and 251 +/- 49 frames for diagnostic procedures, 52.9 minutes, 226.0 +/- 129.2 Gy-cm 2 , and 241 frames for therapeutic procedures, and 52.2 minutes, 334.5 +/- 184.6 Gy-cm 2 , and 408 frames for when both procedures were performed during the same session. The third quartiles for diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) were 14.0, 61.1, and 66.1 minutes for fluoroscopy time, 154.2, 272.8, and 393.8 Gy-cm 2 for DAP, and 272, 276, and 535 for numbers of image frames in diagnostic, therapeutic, and both procedures in the same session, respectively. The proportions of fluoroscopy in DAP for the procedures were 11.4%, 50.5%, and 36.1%, respectively, for the three groups. The mean DAP for each 3-dimensional rotational angiographic acquisition was 19.2 +/- 3.2 Gy-cm 2 . On average, rotational angiography was used 1.4 +/- 0.6 times/session (range, 1-4; n = 580). Radiation dose in our study as measured by DAP, fluoroscopy time and image frames did not differ significantly from other reported DRL studies for cerebral angiography, and DAP was lower with fewer angiographic image frames for embolization. A national registry of radiation-dose data is a necessary next step to refine the dose reference level.

  18. Estimation of absorbed dose and its biological effects in subjects undergoing neuro interventional radiological procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basheerudeen, Safa Abdul Syed; Subramanian, Vinodhini; Venkatachalam, Perumal; Joseph, Santosh; Selvam, Paneer; Jose, M.T.; Annalakshmi, O.

    2016-01-01

    Radiological imaging has many applications due to its non-invasiveness, rapid diagnosis of life threatening diseases, and shorter hospital stay which benefit patients of all age groups. However, these procedures are complicated and time consuming, which use repeated imaging views and radiation, thereby increasing patient dose, and collective effective dose to the background at low doses. The effects of high dose radiation are well established. However, the effects of low dose exposure remain to be determined. Therefore, investigating the effect on medically exposed individuals is an alternative source to understand the low dose effects of radiation. The ESD (Entrance Surface Dose) was recorded using Lithium borate based TL dosimeters to measure the doses received by the head, neck and shoulder of the study subjects (n = 70) who underwent procedures like cerebral angiography, coiling, stenting and embolization

  19. Ischemic Conditioning as a Hemostatic Intervention in Surgery and Cardiac Procedures: A Systematic Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, Andreas Engel; Hvas, Anne-Mette

    2017-01-01

    did not increase operative bleeding. In conclusion, ischemic conditioning reduced platelet activity without increasing the risk of bleeding in patients undergoing surgery or cardiac procedures. Limited evidence supports the proposal that ischemic conditioning reduces the incidence of arterial......Ischemic conditioning induced by nonlethal cycles of tissue ischemia and reperfusion attenuates ischemia–reperfusion injury. The objective of this study is to systematically review the effects of local and remote ischemic conditioning on laboratory parameters of hemostasis and the clinical outcomes......, thromboembolism, and bleeding were extracted for qualitative synthesis. In total, 69 studies were included; of these, 53 were randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and 11 were meta-analyses. Local and remote ischemic conditioning reduced platelet activation in patients undergoing cardiac procedures. Local ischemic...

  20. Assessment of exposure Lo scattered radiation in interventional procedures using special proLecLive bismuth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soto Bua, M.; Medina Jimenez, E.; Vazquez Vazquez, R.; Santamaria Vazquez, F.; Otero Martinez, C.; Lobato Busto, R.; Luna Vega, V.; Mosquera Suero, J.; Sanchez Garcia, M.; Pombar Camean, M.

    2011-01-01

    There are currenLly marketed specific producta aimed aL reducing personnel exposure Lo radiation scatLered in cardiac catheLerization procedures, intervenLional radiology or elecLrophysiology. Our service has been proposed Lo study Lhe aLLenuation characLeristics of Lhe producL ''Drape Armour'' manufactured by Lhe company ''MicroLek'' IL ja flexible devices consLructed from an alloy of bismuth and sLeriliLy characLeristics and infection conLrol and fluid makes Lhem particularly suiLable for incorporaLing into Lhe operative field of the patient. To sLudy their behavior, Lhere have been staff dose measurementa representaLive of Lhe moaL common siLuaLions of exposure to scattered radiaLion in a typical procedure of intervenLion.

  1. Hippocrates, cardiology, Confucius and the Yellow Emperor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, T O

    2001-12-01

    Although Hippocrates (460-c.375 BC) has been traditionally recognized as the Father of Medicine, the fact that he was seminal in the development of cardiology is much less well known. Evidence is presented to support the notion that Hippocrates could also be considered the Father of Cardiology. Hippocrates also had many of the teachings and practices in common with Confucius (c.551-c.479 BC) and the Yellow Emperor of China (2695-2589 BC). Whereas Confucius was not a physician, the Yellow Emperor was an ancient Chinese physician whose Huang Di Neijing, the Yellow Emperor's Canon of Internal Medicine, is the oldest known treatise of medicine in existence.

  2. [Methods of investigation in clinical cardiology. VIII. Socioeconomic evaluation of clinical cardiology practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lázaro de Mercado, P

    1997-06-01

    Health services are systems whose mission is to improve the health status of both individuals and society in general. In recent decades, these systems have faced challenges such as their increasing complexity, limited resources, rapid innovation and diffusion of medical technologies, pressures on demand from society and professionals, and the lack of knowledge of the effects of these factors on costs and society's health. In addition, health care expenditures have grown twice as fast as wealth in industrialized countries during the last 25 years. These problems have prompted cost containment as a key issue in health policy and, at the same time, have promoted the development of socioeconomic evaluation as a scientific activity in the frame of health services research. Socioeconomic evaluation tries to determine if the sacrifice made by society, which devotes part of its limited resources to health care, maximizes the outcomes for population. This article describes basic concepts and methods of economic appraisal in health services which are illustrated with examples of clinical practice in cardiology. Common methods of evaluation are described; the relation between the clinical outcome of a procedure and its associated costs is emphasized in explaining the types of efficiency analysis (cost-efficacy, cost-effectiveness, cost-utility, and cost-benefit); and finally a guide for socioeconomic evaluation is provided.

  3. The National Cardiac Societies of the European Society of Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atar, Dan

    2015-06-01

    The National Cardiac Societies are one of the Constituent Bodies of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). They are the backbone of the ESC and together form the "Cardiology of Europe" in 56 European and Mediterranean countries.

  4. Measures of Knowledge and Attitude Toward Preventive Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allred, Charlene A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The development and validation of an inventory of preventive cardiology at the University of Virginia is described. The inventory contains two instruments designed to measure medical students' preinstructional and postinstructional knowledge of and attitude toward preventive cardiology. (Author/MLW)

  5. Acute coronary syndrome patients admitted to a cardiology vs non-cardiology service: variations in treatment & outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Deirdre E; Southern, Danielle A; Norris, Colleen M; O'Neill, Blair J; Curran, Helen J; Graham, Michelle M

    2017-05-16

    Specialized cardiology services have contributed to reduced mortality in acute coronary syndromes (ACS).  We sought to evaluate the outcomes of ACS patients admitted to non-cardiology services in Southern Alberta. Retrospective chart review performed on all troponin-positive patients in the Calgary Health Region identified those diagnosed with ACS by their attending team. Patients admitted to non-cardiology and cardiology services were compared, using linked data from the Alberta Provincial Project for Outcomes Assessment in Coronary Heart Disease (APPROACH) registry and the Strategic Clinical Network for Cardiovascular Health and Stroke. From January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2008, 2105 ACS patients were identified, with 1636 (77.7%) admitted to cardiology and 469 (22.3%) to non-cardiology services. Patients admitted to non-cardiology services were older, had more comorbidities, and rarely received cardiology consultation (5.1%). Cardiac catheterization was underutilized (5.1% vs 86.4% in cardiology patients (p cardiology vs. cardiology services (49.1% vs. 11.0% respectively at 4-years, p cardiology services. These patients had worse outcomes, despite adjustment for baseline risk factor differences. Although many patients were appropriately admitted to non-cardiology services, the low use of investigations and secondary prevention medications may contribute to poorer patient outcome. Further research is required to identify process of care strategies to improve outcomes and lessen the burden of illness for patients and the health care system.

  6. Interventional diagnostic procedures on the thorax and mediastinum under CT control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoyanov, K.; Zakhariev, A.; Kalev, D.; Balev, B.; Dimov, D.; Mitishev, I.; Radkov, I.; Yanchev, Ya.

    1991-01-01

    Results are reported of 70 transthoracic aspiration biopsies (TTAB) made under ultrasound, X-ray and computed tomographic (CT) control. The technique of performing the manipulation is described. Special attention is paid on the preliminary preparation of the patient and its realization by a crew consisting in an interventional X-ray physician, a terapeutist, a cytopatologist and a surgical nurse. The most frequently observed complication is pneumothorax, so that very important is the preparedness of the crew for catether decompression if necessary. Advantages of TTAB made under CT control are pointed out. 12 refs., 3 figs

  7. Extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy as an adjunct to biliary interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeman, R.K.; Garra, B.S.; Matsumoto, A.H.; Teitelbaum, G.P.; Barth, K.H.; Cattau, E.L.; Davros, W.J.; McClennan, B.L.; Picus, D.; Paushter, D.M.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reviews the records of nine patients undergoing extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) of bile duct stones as an adjunct to other biliary intervention. Lithotripsy was successful in producing fragmentation in seven of nine patients. Keeping the duct mildly distended with contrast medium, distributing the shock waves over the stone(s) by taking advantage of respiratory excursion, and pinning stone fragments with balloon catheters facilitated fragmentation. Six patients underwent duct manipulation (stricture dilation, fragment extraction) within 24 hours of ESWL, suggesting that immediate instrumentation is safe in conjunction with lithotripsy

  8. Identifying complications of interventional procedures from UK routine healthcare databases: a systematic search for methods using clinical codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keltie, Kim; Cole, Helen; Arber, Mick; Patrick, Hannah; Powell, John; Campbell, Bruce; Sims, Andrew

    2014-11-28

    Several authors have developed and applied methods to routine data sets to identify the nature and rate of complications following interventional procedures. But, to date, there has been no systematic search for such methods. The objective of this article was to find, classify and appraise published methods, based on analysis of clinical codes, which used routine healthcare databases in a United Kingdom setting to identify complications resulting from interventional procedures. A literature search strategy was developed to identify published studies that referred, in the title or abstract, to the name or acronym of a known routine healthcare database and to complications from procedures or devices. The following data sources were searched in February and March 2013: Cochrane Methods Register, Conference Proceedings Citation Index - Science, Econlit, EMBASE, Health Management Information Consortium, Health Technology Assessment database, MathSciNet, MEDLINE, MEDLINE in-process, OAIster, OpenGrey, Science Citation Index Expanded and ScienceDirect. Of the eligible papers, those which reported methods using clinical coding were classified and summarised in tabular form using the following headings: routine healthcare database; medical speciality; method for identifying complications; length of follow-up; method of recording comorbidity. The benefits and limitations of each approach were assessed. From 3688 papers identified from the literature search, 44 reported the use of clinical codes to identify complications, from which four distinct methods were identified: 1) searching the index admission for specified clinical codes, 2) searching a sequence of admissions for specified clinical codes, 3) searching for specified clinical codes for complications from procedures and devices within the International Classification of Diseases 10th revision (ICD-10) coding scheme which is the methodology recommended by NHS Classification Service, and 4) conducting manual clinical

  9. Peri-procedural ST segment resolution during Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PPCI) for acute myocardial infarction: predictors and clinical consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamasis, Grigoris V; Russhard, Paul; Al Janabi, Firas; Parker, Michael; Davies, John R; Keeble, Thomas R; Clesham, Gerald J

    ECG ST segment resolution (STR) has been used to assess myocardial perfusion in STEMI patients undergoing PPCI. However, in most of the studies ECGs recorded at different time points after the actual procedure have been used, limiting the options of therapeutic interventions while the patient is still in the catheterisation laboratory. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence and clinical consequences of intra-procedural STR during PPCI. We analysed 12 lead ECGs recorded at the onset and the end of the PPCI procedure, measuring STR in the lead with maximum ST elevation on the initial recording. STR was defined as good when > 50% compared to baseline. Pre and immediately post PPCI ECGs were recorded in 467 STEMI cases whilst the patient was on the catheter lab table. Mean patient age was 63 (+/- 12) years old and 75% were men. Mean duration of symptoms to admission was 3.8 (+/- 3.4) hours and 51% of infarcts were anterior. Good ST resolution at the end of the procedure was seen in 46.5% of patients and was observed more commonly in inferior compared to anterior infarcts (60.1% vs. 32.6%, pST resolution had a shorter mean hospital length of stay (3.8 vs. 4.5 days, p=0.009) and a higher left ventricular ejection fraction (49.9% vs. 44.2%, pST resolution was seen in less than half of STEMI patients undergoing PPCI. There were important clinical consequences of good ST resolution. Identification of suboptimal peri-procedural ST resolution could help identify patients who may benefit from new treatments aimed at protecting the microcirculation, whilst the patients are still in the angiography laboratory. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Review on Factors Influencing Physician Guideline Adherence in Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoorn, C J G M; Crijns, H J G M; Dierick-van Daele, A T M; Dekker, L R C

    2018-04-09

    Cardiovascular disease is the most common cause of death in Western countries. Physician adherence to guidelines is often suboptimal, resulting in impaired patient outcome and prognosis. Multiple studies have been conducted to evaluate patterns and the influencing factors of patient adherence, but little is known about factors influencing physician guideline adherence. This review aims to identify factors influencing physician guideline adherence relevant to cardiology and to provide insights and suggestions for future improvement. Physician adherence was measured as adherence to standard local medical practice and applicable guidelines. Female gender and older age had a negative effect on physician guideline adherence. In addition, independent of the type of heart disease, physicians without cardiologic specialization were linked to physician noncompliance. Also, guideline adherence in primary care centers was at a lower level compared to secondary or tertiary care centers. The importance of guideline adherence increases as patients age, and complex diseases and comorbidity arise. Appropriate resources and interventions, taking important factors for nonadherence in account, are necessary to improve guideline adoption and adherence in every level of the chain. This in turn should improve patient outcome.

  11. An Evaluation of a Clerkship In Cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edson, John N.; and others

    1969-01-01

    Evaluation of the clinical clerkship in Cardiology for general practitioners proves there is an urgent need for continuing post graduate medical education for general practitioners. Clerkship was offered jointly by the Long Island College Hospital and the State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York. (IR)

  12. Evaluation of Cardiology Training and Manpower Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Forrest H., Ed.; Mendenhall, Robert C., Ed.

    Begun in June, 1971 and completed in October 1973, the study had the following specific goals: to define the cardiologist's role; to determine cardiology training program objectives; to determine manpower needs for cardiologists; and to determine the educational needs of cardiologists. The major information was sought from all active cardiologists…

  13. Direct dose measurement on patient during percutaneous coronary intervention procedures using radiophotoluminescence glass dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Mamoru; Chida, Koichi; Moritake, Takashi; Sato, Tadaya; Oosaka, Hajime; Toyoshima, Hideto; Zuguchi, Masayuki; Abe, Yoshihisa

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to measure accurate patient entrance skin dose and maximum skin absorbed dose (MSD) to prevent radiation skin injuries in percutaneous coronary interventions (PCIs). We directly measured the MSD on 50 PCIs by using multiple radiophotoluminescence glass dosimeters and a modified dosimetry gown. Also, we analysed the correlation between the MSD and indirect measurement parameters, such as fluoroscopic time (FT), dose-area product (DAP) and cumulative air kerma (C-AK). There were very strong correlations between MSD and FT, DAP and C-AK, with the correlation between MSD and C-AK being the strongest (r = 0.938). In conclusion, the regression lines using MSD as an outcome value (y) and C-AK as predictor variables (x) were y = 1.12x (R"2 = 0.880). From the linear regression equation, MSD is estimated to be ∼1.12 times that of C-AK in real time. (authors)

  14. Multicenter study on evaluation of the entrance skin dose by a direct measurement method in cardiac interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Mamoru; Chida, Koichi; Moritake, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Deterministic effects have been reported in cardiac interventional procedures. To prevent radiation skin injuries in percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), it is necessary to measure accurate patient entrance skin dose (ESD) and maximum skin absorbed dose (MSD). We measured the MSD on 62 patients in four facilities by using the Chest-RADIREC system. The correlation between MSD and fluoroscopic time, dose area product (DAP), and cumulative air kerma (AK) showed good results, with the correlation between MSD and AK being the strongest. The regression lines using MSD as an outcome value (y) and AK as predictor variables (x) was y=1.18x (R 2 =0.787). From the linear regression equation, MSD is estimated to be about 1.18 times that of AK in real time. The Japan diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) 2015 for IVR was established by the use of dose rates using acrylic plates (20 cm thick) at the interventional reference point. Preliminary reference levels proposed by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) were provided using DAP. In this study, AK showed good correlation most of all. Hence we think that Japanese DRLs for IVR should reconsider by clinical patients' exposure dose such as AK. (author)

  15. Verifying the buildingEXODUS through an emergency response procedure (ERP) exercise at an underground intervention shaft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajedi, Noor Aqilah A.; Sukor, Nur Sabahiah A.; Ismail, Mohd Ashraf M.; Shamsudin, Shahrul A.

    2017-10-01

    An Emergency Response Plan (ERP) is an essential safety procedure that needs to be taken into account for railway operations, especially for underground railway networks. Several parameters need to be taken into consideration in planning an ERP such as the design of tunnels and intervention shafts, and operation procedures for underground transportation systems. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to observe and analyse the Emergency Response Procedure (ERP) exercise for the underground train network at the LRT Kelana Jaya Line. The exercise was conducted at one of the underground intervention shaft exits, where the height of the staircase from the bottom floor to the upper floor was 24.59 metres. Four cameras were located at selected levels of the shaft, and 71 participants were assigned for the evacuation exercise. The participants were tagged with a number at the front and back of their safety vests. Ten respondents were randomly selected to give details of their height and weight and, at the same time, they had to self-record the time taken for them to evacuate from the bottom to the top of the shaft. The video footages that were taken during the ERP were analysed, and the data were used for the verification process on the buildingEXODUS simulation software. It was found that the results of the ERP experiment were significantly similar to the simulation results, thereby successfully verifying the simulation. This verification process was important to ensure that the results of the simulation were in accordance with the real situation. Therefore, a further evacuation analysis made use of the results from this verification.

  16. Nuclear cardiology in Iran in 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakavi, S. R.

    2004-01-01

    Aim: few nuclear cardiology surveys, were published in the literature, mostly from developed countries. the aim of this study is to perform a nuclear cardiology survey in iran. This may lead to better decision making and programming. Methods and materials: a questionnaire was sent by mail or e- mail to all nuclear medicine centers in iran asking for details of nuclear cardiology practice in year 2002. Also ownership of the center were studied using telephone interviews. Results: from 79 nuclear medicine centers in Iran, 55 centers (69.6%) filled the questionnaire including 28 centers in Tehran and 27 centers in other cities. Among them, 27 centers were private clinics. There was 69 gamma cameras in these centers, 62.3 % with SPECT capabilities. it is estimated that we may have 100 gamma cameras in Iran. About 85.5 % of centers perform cardiac studies routinely. Tc-99m-MIBI is used in more than 85.7% of the studies and some centers do not use Tl-201. Pharmacological stress with infusion of Dipyridamole is used in 56.7% of the studies and treadmill is the main type of physical exercise (40.2%). SPECT technique was used in 93% of studies including 2.5% of gated SPECT. About 64.3% of centers used two day protocol for imaging.Our study showed that about 65594 cardiac studies were done in Iran each year with myocardial perfusion scan accounting for about 99.2% of the studies. Considering population of the country(about 65 millions) nuclear cardiology activity will be about 1.01 study/1000/year. For viability assessment, Tl-201 with rest redistribution technique is used in 10.7 % of cases while re-injection is used in 29.8% of cases and TNG augmented Tc-99m-MIBI injection at rest in 59.5%. Discussion: Activity of nuclear cardiology is about 15 studies/1000 population/year is USA and 2.2 studies/1000/year in Europe. Although it is not uniformly practiced in different countries of Europe, however the numbers indicate that nuclear cardiology is under utilized in Iran ( less

  17. The 2017 Seventh World Congress of Pediatric Cardiology & Cardiac Surgery: week in review - ambulatory pediatric cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Devyani

    2017-12-01

    The Seventh World Congress of Pediatric Cardiology was held in Barcelona in July, 2017. The central philosophy of the congress was "bridging together" all major specialties in the field. This article summarises the highlights of the meeting as it relates to ambulatory paediatric cardiology. There is a now a more unified approach to children with CHD, including assessment of neuro-developmental outcomes. The new World Heart Foundation criteria for the diagnosis of rheumatic fever remain controversial.

  18. Discharge Processes and 30-Day Readmission Rates of Patients Hospitalized for Heart Failure on General Medicine and Cardiology Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salata, Brian M; Sterling, Madeline R; Beecy, Ashley N; Ullal, Ajayram V; Jones, Erica C; Horn, Evelyn M; Goyal, Parag

    2018-05-01

    Given high rates of heart failure (HF) hospitalizations and widespread adoption of the hospitalist model, patients with HF are often cared for on General Medicine (GM) services. Differences in discharge processes and 30-day readmission rates between patients on GM and those on Cardiology during the contemporary hospitalist era are unknown. The present study compared discharge processes and 30-day readmission rates of patients with HF admitted on GM services and those on Cardiology services. We retrospectively studied 926 patients discharged home after HF hospitalization. The primary outcome was 30-day all-cause readmission after discharge from index hospitalization. Although 60% of patients with HF were admitted to Cardiology services, 40% were admitted to GM services. Prevalence of cardiovascular and noncardiovascular co-morbidities were similar between patients admitted to GM services and Cardiology services. Discharge summaries for patients on GM services were less likely to have reassessments of ejection fraction, new study results, weights, discharge vital signs, discharge physical examinations, and scheduled follow-up cardiologist appointments. In a multivariable regression analysis, patients on GM services were more likely to experience 30-day readmissions compared with those on Cardiology services (odds ratio 1.43 95% confidence interval [1.05 to 1.96], p = 0.02). In conclusion, outcomes are better among those admitted to Cardiology services, signaling the need for studies and interventions focusing on noncardiology hospital providers that care for patients with HF. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Procedural pain management for neonates using nonpharmacological strategies: part 2: mother-driven interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell-Yeo, Marsha; Fernandes, Ananda; Johnston, Celeste

    2011-10-01

    This is the second of a 2-part series to provide an overview of our current level of knowledge related to nonpharmacological strategies to diminish the pain associated with commonly performed procedures in the NICU. In our first article we discussed the prevalence of repeated pain exposure in the NICU and the importance of nonpharmacological strategies specifically containment or facilitated tucking, swaddling, positioning, nonnutritive sucking, and sweet solutions. These strategies are generally nurse-driven and we believe their importance has been underutilized. In this article we will emphasize the importance of maternal presence as a mediator for pain relief. The efficacy of breastfeeding, maternal skin-to-skin care (often referred to as kangaroo care), and multisensorial stimulation such as auditory and olfactory recognition will be the primary focus of our discussion. In addition, although primarily mother-driven, these strategies are ultimately nurse-enabled, thus the importance of this connection cannot be under appreciated with respect to successful implementation in the NICU.

  20. Nuclear cardiology practice and associated radiation doses in Europe: results of the IAEA Nuclear Cardiology Protocols Study (INCAPS) for the 27 European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Oliver; Pascual, Thomas N B; Mercuri, Mathew; Acampa, Wanda; Burchert, Wolfgang; Flotats, Albert; Kaufmann, Philipp A; Kitsiou, Anastasia; Knuuti, Juhani; Underwood, S Richard; Vitola, João V; Mahmarian, John J; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Better, Nathan; Rehani, Madan M; Kashyap, Ravi; Dondi, Maurizio; Paez, Diana; Einstein, Andrew J

    2016-04-01

    Nuclear cardiology is widely used to diagnose coronary artery disease and to guide patient management, but data on current practices, radiation dose-related best practices, and radiation doses are scarce. To address these issues, the IAEA conducted a worldwide study of nuclear cardiology practice. We present the European subanalysis. In March 2013, the IAEA invited laboratories across the world to document all SPECT and PET studies performed in one week. The data included age, gender, weight, radiopharmaceuticals, injected activities, camera type, positioning, hardware and software. Radiation effective dose was calculated for each patient. A quality score was defined for each laboratory as the number followed of eight predefined best practices with a bearing on radiation exposure (range of quality score 0 - 8). The participating European countries were assigned to regions (North, East, South, and West). Comparisons were performed between the four European regions and between Europe and the rest-of-the-world (RoW). Data on 2,381 European patients undergoing nuclear cardiology procedures in 102 laboratories in 27 countries were collected. A cardiac SPECT study was performed in 97.9 % of the patients, and a PET study in 2.1 %. The average effective dose of SPECT was 8.0 ± 3.4 mSv (RoW 11.4 ± 4.3 mSv; P cardiology is lower and the average quality score is higher than in the RoW. There is regional variation in effective dose in relation to the best practice quality score. A possible reason for the differences between Europe and the RoW could be the safety culture fostered by actions under the Euratom directives and the implementation of diagnostic reference levels. Stress-only imaging and weight-adjusted activity might be targets for optimization of European nuclear cardiology practice.

  1. Radiological interventional procedures for the acute abdomen; Radiologisch-interventionelle Massnahmen beim akuten Abdomen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trumm, C.; Hoffmann, R.T.; Reiser, M.F. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Campus Grosshadern, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany)

    2010-03-15

    In patients with acute thrombo-embolic occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery, catheter-assisted thrombolytic therapy represents a procedure of increasing importance in addition to surgery and intensive care treatment. The thrombolytic drugs utilized for this purpose are urokinase, streptokinase and recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA). Therapeutic embolization is predominantly used in the treatment of arterial bleeding from the gastro-intestinal tract, the liver, the intestines (due to an aneurysm or vascular malformation) and in bleeding from intestinal anastomoses. Polyvinyl alcohol particles, embospheres, gelfoam and microcoils can be utilized as embolic agents. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiodrainage and stent implantation are applied in patients with biliary obstructions caused by inoperable tumors of the gall bladder or bile ducts, of the pancreatic head or duodenum and by metastases located in the liver parenchyma or hepatic hilum. Image-guided percutaneous drainage is a valuable option in the management of abscesses in the peritoneal cavity; less common indications are lymphoceles, biliomas, urinomas, hematomas, necrosis and pseudocysts. (orig.) [German] Die kathetergestuetzte thrombolytische Therapie stellt im Kontext einer chirurgischen und intensivmedizinischen Versorgung von Patienten mit thrombembolisch bedingter mesenterialer Ischaemie ein unterstuetzendes Behandlungsverfahren von zunehmender Bedeutung dar. Als thrombolytische Agenzien werden Urokinase, Streptokinase und der rekombinante Gewebeplasminogenaktivator (rtPA) verwendet. Die therapeutische Embolisation kommt neben der endoskopischen und chirurgischen Blutungsstillung bei arteriellen Blutungen im Gastrointestinaltrakt, aus der Leber, im Darm (als Folge eines Aneurysmas oder einer vaskulaeren Malformation) sowie bei blutenden intestinalen Anastomosen zum Einsatz. Zur Embolisation koennen Polyvinylalkoholpartikel, Embosphaeren, Gelfoam oder Mikrocoils verwendet werden. Die

  2. MO-F-304-01: Applying PDSA to a Practical Clinical Problem: Variation in Procedural Doses Among Interventional Radiologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, A. [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)

    2015-06-15

    With the current Maintenance of Certification (MOC) requirement for a practice quality improvement (PQI) project every 3 years, we all (well, most of us) find ourselves searching for projects that are both manageable and likely to have a positive impact on our clinical practice. In this session we will walk through the use of the Plan, Do, Study, Act (PDSA) cycle to address a common finding in practices where fluoroscopically guided interventions (FGI) are performed: variation in procedural doses among physicians. We will also examine strategies to secure physician support using carrots, not sticks. Learning Objectives: Review the PDSA cycle and its application to PQI. Discuss strategies for action in the example presented. Examine strategies for successful group PQI projects. A. Kyle Jones: Owner, FluoroSafety Joseph R. Steele: Consultant, FluoroSafety.

  3. MO-F-304-01: Applying PDSA to a Practical Clinical Problem: Variation in Procedural Doses Among Interventional Radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, A.

    2015-01-01

    With the current Maintenance of Certification (MOC) requirement for a practice quality improvement (PQI) project every 3 years, we all (well, most of us) find ourselves searching for projects that are both manageable and likely to have a positive impact on our clinical practice. In this session we will walk through the use of the Plan, Do, Study, Act (PDSA) cycle to address a common finding in practices where fluoroscopically guided interventions (FGI) are performed: variation in procedural doses among physicians. We will also examine strategies to secure physician support using carrots, not sticks. Learning Objectives: Review the PDSA cycle and its application to PQI. Discuss strategies for action in the example presented. Examine strategies for successful group PQI projects. A. Kyle Jones: Owner, FluoroSafety Joseph R. Steele: Consultant, FluoroSafety

  4. Conscious sedation for endoscopic and non-endoscopic interventional gastrointestinal procedures: meeting patients' expectations, missing the standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marriott, P.; Laasch, H.-U.; Wilbraham, L.; Marriott, A.; England, R.E.; Martin, D.F. E-mail: derrick.martin@smtr.nhs.uk

    2004-02-01

    AIM: To assess the level of sedation, patient satisfaction and frequency of unplanned events with conscious sedation for interventional procedures. MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred and seventeen patients were assessed prospectively before, during and after procedures. Blood pressure, pulse, oxygen saturation and sedation level were monitored and patients followed up after 24 h. Sedation was scored after drugs were given in accordance with an established protocol. Doses were recorded, as were patients' weight, age and ASA grade and any unplanned events and their management. RESULTS: Seventy-six of the 117 patients (65%) had no unplanned event, 20 (17.1%) became agitated, 15 (12.8%) hypotensive, three (2.6%) hypoxic and three (2.6%) had more than one response. Twelve patients required active management. Fifty-two (44.4%) had a sedation level of {<=}3 (responsive to verbal commands), but 39 (33.3%) reached level 6. Median doses were midazolam 6 mg (1-20 mg) and pethidine 50 mg (12.5-100 mg). Ninety-three percent were satisfied with their sedation. No adverse effects were observed after 24 h. CONCLUSION: Despite using a sedation protocol, unplanned events occurred in 35% (95% CI=27-44%) of patients, although not all required active management. The sedation levels reached in some exceeded guidelines. Unplanned events were commoner with increased sedation level. Patient satisfaction was high and no permanent damage was observed.

  5. Conscious sedation for endoscopic and non-endoscopic interventional gastrointestinal procedures: meeting patients' expectations, missing the standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marriott, P.; Laasch, H.-U.; Wilbraham, L.; Marriott, A.; England, R.E.; Martin, D.F.

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To assess the level of sedation, patient satisfaction and frequency of unplanned events with conscious sedation for interventional procedures. MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred and seventeen patients were assessed prospectively before, during and after procedures. Blood pressure, pulse, oxygen saturation and sedation level were monitored and patients followed up after 24 h. Sedation was scored after drugs were given in accordance with an established protocol. Doses were recorded, as were patients' weight, age and ASA grade and any unplanned events and their management. RESULTS: Seventy-six of the 117 patients (65%) had no unplanned event, 20 (17.1%) became agitated, 15 (12.8%) hypotensive, three (2.6%) hypoxic and three (2.6%) had more than one response. Twelve patients required active management. Fifty-two (44.4%) had a sedation level of ≤3 (responsive to verbal commands), but 39 (33.3%) reached level 6. Median doses were midazolam 6 mg (1-20 mg) and pethidine 50 mg (12.5-100 mg). Ninety-three percent were satisfied with their sedation. No adverse effects were observed after 24 h. CONCLUSION: Despite using a sedation protocol, unplanned events occurred in 35% (95% CI=27-44%) of patients, although not all required active management. The sedation levels reached in some exceeded guidelines. Unplanned events were commoner with increased sedation level. Patient satisfaction was high and no permanent damage was observed

  6. Optimizing Travel Time to Outpatient Interventional Radiology Procedures in a Multi-Site Hospital System Using a Google Maps Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Jacob E; Morel-Ovalle, Louis; Boas, Franz E; Ziv, Etay; Yarmohammadi, Hooman; Deipolyi, Amy; Mohabir, Heeralall R; Erinjeri, Joseph P

    2018-02-20

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether a custom Google Maps application can optimize site selection when scheduling outpatient interventional radiology (IR) procedures within a multi-site hospital system. The Google Maps for Business Application Programming Interface (API) was used to develop an internal web application that uses real-time traffic data to determine estimated travel time (ETT; minutes) and estimated travel distance (ETD; miles) from a patient's home to each a nearby IR facility in our hospital system. Hypothetical patient home addresses based on the 33 cities comprising our institution's catchment area were used to determine the optimal IR site for hypothetical patients traveling from each city based on real-time traffic conditions. For 10/33 (30%) cities, there was discordance between the optimal IR site based on ETT and the optimal IR site based on ETD at non-rush hour time or rush hour time. By choosing to travel to an IR site based on ETT rather than ETD, patients from discordant cities were predicted to save an average of 7.29 min during non-rush hour (p = 0.03), and 28.80 min during rush hour (p travel time when more than one location providing IR procedures is available within the same hospital system.

  7. Evaluation of F/E·DOI method as an approximate estimate of skin dose during percutaneous coronary intervention procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahara, Makoto; Yoshino, Akira; Kitano, K.; Yamaguchi, M.; Morone, Takayuki; Tani, K.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of fluoroscopy time/total exposure times exposure times · in direction of interest (F/E·DOI) method as an approximate estimate of skin dose during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) procedure. Up to March 10, 2004, fifty-seven patients (male: 46 cases, female: 11 cases, age range 38-85 years; mean age 67±11 years) had undergone PCI and 157 directions of exposure was measured using X-ray films (KONICA MINOLTA SR-DUP) placed under the back of each patient during the procedure. The fluoroscopy time (minutes), the times of exposure in each direction during the procedure, and the thickness of chest (cm) was recorded. The relation of the skin dose to fluoroscopic time, exposure times in direction of interest, and F/E·DOI was assessed. The relationship between fluoroscopy time and skin dose was shown as y=0.02x+0.22 (r=0.54, p<0.0001, m.e=0.00±0.71 Gy, e.a=-2.19∼l.53 Gy). In addition, the relation of skin dose to exposure times in the direction of interest was y=0.07x+0.27 (r=0.77, p<0.0001, m.e=-0.00±0.53 Gy, e.a=-2.45∼1.76 Gy). The relationship between skin dose and F/E·DOI was y=0.06x+0.30 (r=0.85, p<0.0001, m.e=-0.00±0.44 Gy, e.a=-1.28∼1.06 Gy). Moreover, the relationship between skin dose and (F/E·DOI x 0.06+0.30) x coefficient of direction x coefficient in thickness of chest was y=0.99x-0.02 (r=0.89, p<0.0001, m.e=0.00±0.38 Gy, e.a=-1.12∼l.27 Gy). The calculated results corresponded to the skin dose during the procedure. F/E·DOI method was simple and effective, moreover, that enabled us to inform the skin dose during the PCI procedure to the interventionalist easily. (authors)

  8. Clinical and economic outcomes assessment in nuclear cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, L.J.; Miller, D.D.; Berman, D.S.; Hachamovitch, R.

    2000-01-01

    The future of nuclear medicine procedures, as understood within our current economic climate, depends upon its ability to provide relevant clinical information at similar or lower comparative costs. With an ever-increasing emphasis on cost containment, outcome assessment forms the basis of preserving the quality of patient care. Today, outcomes assessment encompasses a wide array of subjects including clinical, economic, and humanistic (i.e., quality of life) outcomes. For nuclear cardiology, evidence-based medicine would require a threshold level of evidence in order to justify the added cost of any test in a patient's work-up. This evidence would include large multicenter, observational series as well as randomized trial data in sufficiently large and diverse patient populations. The new movement in evidence-based medicine is also being applied to the introduction of new technologies, in particular when comparative modalities exist. In the past 5 years, it has seen a dramatic shift in the quality of outcomes data published in nuclear cardiology. This includes the use of statistically rigorous risk-adjusted techniques as well as large populations (i.e., >500 patients) representing multiple diverse medical care settings. This has been the direct result of the development of multiple outcomes databases that have now amassed thousands of patients worth of data. One of the benefits of examining outcomes in large patient datasets is the ability to assess individual endpoints (e.g., cardiac death) as compared with smaller datasets that often assess combined endpoints (e.g., death, myocardial infarction, or unstable angina). New technologies for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease have contributed to the rising costs of care. In the United States and in Europe, costs of care have risen dramatically, consuming an ever-increasing amount of available resources. The overuse of diagnostic angiography often leads to unnecessary revascularization that does not lead to

  9. Screening for mental disorders in cardiology outpatients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birket-Smith, M.; Rasmussen, A.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the study was to compare the frequency of mental disorders in cardiology outpatients to the number of patients with psychological problems identified by cardiologists. In a cardiology outpatient service, 103 consecutive patients were asked to participate in the study. Of these 86...... were included and screened for mental disorder with the Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders (PRIME-MD), Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID) psychosis screening, the Clock Drawing Test, and the WHO-5 Well-being Index. The cardiologists were asked to rate the severity of somatic...... and mental problems in each patient on visual analogue scales (VAS-som and VAS-men). The current treatments, including psychiatric and psychological treatments, were noted, and the survival was followed for 3 years. Of the 86 patients included, 34 (40%) had a diagnosis of mental disorder. Eleven (12.8%) had...

  10. Use of smartphone technology in cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hoang H; Silva, Jennifer N A

    2016-05-01

    Smartphone-based technologies along with broadband connectivity are changing the way modern cardiology is practiced. The ever broadening connectivity and increasing capabilities of smartphone-based technologies can better monitor, diagnose, and prevent cardiovascular diseases. Researchers can leverage the ubiquitous use of smartphone-based technologies and their constant stream of biometric data to establish large community-based clinical research studies. Patient engagement is enhanced with constant and on-demand access to physicians, daily self-monitoring, and expanding social networks. On the other hand, the exponential growth of smartphone-based technologies invariably disrupts the traditional healthcare model and leaves a vacuum in the infrastructure, medico-legal apparatus, and reimbursement systems that need to be addressed. In this review, we present a comprehensive discussion of the various applications utilizing smartphone-based technologies in cardiology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of using different U/S probe Standoff materials in image geometry for interventional procedures: the example of prostate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimos Baltas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study investigates the distortion of geometry of catheters and anatomy in acquired U/S images, caused by utilizing various stand-off materials for covering a transrectal bi-planar ultrasound probe in HDR and LDR prostatebrachytherapy, biopsy and other interventional procedures. Furthermore, an evaluation of currently established waterbathbased quality assurance (QA procedures is presented. Material and methods: Image acquisitions of an ultrasound QA setup were carried out at 5 MHz and 7 MHz. The U/Sprobe was covered by EA 4015 Silicone Standoff kit, or UA0059 Endocavity balloon filled either with water or one ofthe following: 40 ml of Endosgel®, Instillagel®, Ultraschall gel or Space OAR™ gel. The differences between imageswere recorded. Consequently, the dosimetric impact of the observed image distortion was investigated, using a tissueequivalent ultrasound prostate phantom – Model number 053 (CIRS Inc., Norfolk, VA, USA. Results: By using the EA 4015 Silicone Standoff kit in normal water with sound speed of 1525 m/s, a 3 mm needleshift was observed. The expansion of objects appeared in radial direction. The shift deforms also the PTV (prostate inour case and other organs at risk (OARs in the same way leading to overestimation of volume and underestimationof the dose. On the other hand, Instillagel® and Space OAR™ “shrinks” objects in an ultrasound image for 0.65 mm and0.40 mm, respectively. Conclusions: The use of EA 4015 Silicone Standoff kit for image acquisition, leads to erroneous contouring of PTVand OARs and reconstruction and placement of catheters, which results to incorrect dose calculation during prostatebrachytherapy. Moreover, the reliability of QA procedures lies mostly in the right temperature of the water used foraccurate simulation of real conditions of transrectal ultrasound imaging.

  12. Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Ian A.; Sanina, Cristina; Balkan, Wayne; Hare, Joshua M.

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) accounts for more deaths globally than any other single disease. There are on average 1.5 million episodes of myocardial infarction (heart attack) each year in the United States alone with roughly one third resulting in death. There is therefore a major need for developing new and effective strategies to promote cardiac repair. Intramyocardial transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has emerged as a leading contender in the pursuit of clinical intervention and therapy. MSCs are potent mediators of cardiac repair and are therefore an attractive tool in the development of pre-clinical and clinical trials. MSCs are capable of secreting a large array of soluble factors, which have had demonstrated effects on pathogenic cardiac remolding, fibrosis, immune activation and cardiac stem cell proliferation within the damaged heart. MSCs are also capable of differentiation into cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, although the relative contribution of trilineage differentiation and paracrine effectors on cardiac repair remains the subject of active investigation. PMID:27236666

  13. Update for 2014 on clinical cardiology, geriatric cardiology, and heart failure and transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barón-Esquivias, Gonzalo; Manito, Nicolás; López Díaz, Javier; Martín Santana, Antonio; García Pinilla, José Manuel; Gómez Doblas, Juan José; Gómez Bueno, Manuel; Barrios Alonso, Vivencio; Lambert, José Luis

    2015-04-01

    In the present article, we review publications from the previous year in the following 3 areas: clinical cardiology, geriatric cardiology, and heart failure and transplantation. Among the new developments in clinical cardiology are several contributions from Spanish groups on tricuspid and aortic regurgitation, developments in atrial fibrillation, syncope, and the clinical characteristics of heart disease, as well as various studies on familial heart disease and chronic ischemic heart disease. In geriatric cardiology, the most relevant studies published in 2014 involve heart failure, degenerative aortic stenosis, and data on atrial fibrillation in the geriatric population. In heart failure and transplantation, the most noteworthy developments concern the importance of multidisciplinary units and patients with preserved systolic function. Other notable publications were those related to iron deficiency, new drugs, and new devices and biomarkers. Finally, we review studies on acute heart failure and transplantation, such as inotropic drugs and ventricular assist devices. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Post procedural complications of cardiac implants done in a resource limited setting under 'C' arm: A single centre experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayachandra, A; Aggarwal, Vivek; Kumar, Sandeep; Nagesh, I V

    2018-04-01

    Cardiology interventions in peripheral hospitals is a challenging task where cardiologist have to fight against time and limited resources. Most of the sudden cardiac deaths occur due to arrhythmia and heart blocks/sinus node dysfunction. Our study is a single peripheral center experience of cardiac devices implantation using a 'C' Arm. The aim of this study was to post procedural complications of cardiac implants done in aresource limited setting under 'C' arm. This study is done at a peripheral cardiology center with no cardiac catheterization laboratory (CCL) facilities. Consecutive patients reporting to cardiology center, between Jan 2015 and Oct 2016, with a definite indication for cardiac device implant were included in the study. All the procedure of implantation was done in the operation theatre under 'C' arm under local anesthesia with continuous cardiac monitoring and critical care back up. Total 58 device implantations were done from Jan 2015 to Oct 2016. The mean age of the patients was 67.15 ± 10.85 years. Males constituted almost two third (68.9%) of patients. The commonest indication for device implantation was sinus node dysfunction in 60.34% followed by complete heart block in 25.86% and ventricular tachycardia in 12.06%. No post procedure infection was observed in our study. Device implantation constitute a major group of life saving interventions in cardiology practice. Our study has emphasised that when appropriate aseptic measures are taken during device implantation at peripheral centres, the complications rate are comparable to interventions done at advance cardiac centres.

  15. Data Sharing and Cardiology: Platforms and Possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Pranammya; Ross, Joseph S; Ritchie, Jessica D; Desai, Nihar R; Bhavnani, Sanjeev P; Krumholz, Harlan M

    2017-12-19

    Sharing deidentified patient-level research data presents immense opportunities to all stakeholders involved in cardiology research and practice. Sharing data encourages the use of existing data for knowledge generation to improve practice, while also allowing for validation of disseminated research. In this review, we discuss key initiatives and platforms that have helped to accelerate progress toward greater sharing of data. These efforts are being prompted by government, universities, philanthropic sponsors of research, major industry players, and collaborations among some of these entities. As data sharing becomes a more common expectation, policy changes will be required to encourage and assist data generators with the process of sharing the data they create. Patients also will need access to their own data and to be empowered to share those data with researchers. Although medicine still lags behind other fields in achieving data sharing's full potential, cardiology research has the potential to lead the way. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Robotics in percutaneous cardiovascular interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourdjabbar, Ali; Ang, Lawrence; Behnamfar, Omid; Patel, Mitul P; Reeves, Ryan R; Campbell, Paul T; Madder, Ryan D; Mahmud, Ehtisham

    2017-11-01

    The fundamental technique of performing percutaneous cardiovascular (CV) interventions has remained unchanged and requires operators to wear heavy lead aprons to minimize exposure to ionizing radiation. Robotic technology is now being utilized in interventional cardiology partially as a direct result of the increasing appreciation of the long-term occupational hazards of the field. This review was undertaken to report the clinical outcomes of percutaneous robotic coronary and peripheral vascular interventions. Areas covered: A systematic literature review of percutaneous robotic CV interventions was undertaken. The safety and feasibility of percutaneous robotically-assisted CV interventions has been validated in simple to complex coronary disease, and iliofemoral disease. Studies have shown that robotically-assisted PCI significantly reduces operator exposure to harmful ionizing radiation without compromising procedural success or clinical efficacy. In addition to the operator benefits, robotically-assisted intervention has the potential for patient advantages by allowing more accurate lesion length measurement, precise stent placement and lower patient radiation exposure. However, further investigation is required to fully elucidate these potential benefits. Expert commentary: Incremental improvement in robotic technology and telecommunications would enable treatment of an even broader patient population, and potentially provide remote robotic PCI.

  17. Dose study in pediatric patients undergoing cardiac procedures in a digital system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordonez Marquez, J.; Huertas Martinez, C.; Luquero Llopis, N.; Vano Carruana, E.; Corredoira, S.; Huerga Cabrerizo, C.; Plaza Aparicio, R.; Tellez-Cepeda Ruiz, M.

    2011-01-01

    In La Paz Hospital in Madrid has recently installed a biplane x-ray equipment in the Department of Pediatric Cardiology. It is a digital system equipped with two amorphous silicon detectors. There has been a characterization of the equipment prior to commissioning for clinical use. It was later followed up on the dose delivered to pediatric patients undergoing various diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Yet the absence of reference values for interventional cardiology child dose, the values obtained were used to establish baseline dose by age group that will serve as initial references and allow our radiation dose compared with those of other centers and check that the skin dose are in most cases below the thresholds for deterministic effects.

  18. Impact of a Child Life and Music Therapy Procedural Support Intervention on Parental Perception of Their Child's Distress During Intravenous Placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Gabriela S; OʼConnor, Todd; Carey, Jessa; Vella, Adam; Paul, Audrey; Rode, Diane; Weinberg, Alan

    2017-02-21

    Child life specialists and music therapists have a unique and integral role in providing psychosocial care to pediatric patients and families. These professionals are trained to provide clinical interventions that support coping and adjustment and reduce the risk of psychological trauma related to hospital visits and health care encounters. The researchers devised a multimodal approach using a combined child life and music therapy intervention to address procedure-related distress in patients receiving intravenous (IV) placement in the pediatric emergency department. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of this collaborative intervention by evaluating parental perception of their child's distress. This study was a prospective analysis investigating the impact of a child life and music therapy intervention on children aged 4 to 11 years old receiving an IV placement in the pediatric emergency department. Efficacy was evaluated by comparing scores between a 4-question pretest and subsequent 4-question posttest that asked the child's parent to evaluate how they anticipated their child would respond to the procedure, and then to evaluate how they perceived their child to have responded after the procedure. Qualitative data were collected in the form of open-ended comments, which were accommodated at the end of the posttest. Data were analyzed by the Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel method for testing repeated ordinal responses and the PROC GENMOD procedure in the SAS system software. A total of 41 participants were enrolled in this study. Results of the statistical analysis revealed significant differences between all pre- and posttest scores (P music therapy intervention. Improvement was demonstrated across all 4 questions, suggesting that the child life and music therapy intervention supported healthy, adaptive coping and helped to minimize distress experienced by patients during IV placement. These results underscore the importance and potential clinical

  19. Method selection and evaluation of midtrimester and long-term therapeutic efficiency of achalasia with three methods of interventional procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Yingsheng; Yang Renjie; Li Minghua; Chen Weixiong; Shang Kezhong; Zhuang Qixin; Xu Jianrong; Chen Niwei; Zhu Yude

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To study method selection and evaluation of midtrimester and long-term therapeutic efficiency of achalasia with three methods of interventional procedure. Method: 50 cases achalasia with 30 cases performing with balloon dilation (group A) and 5 cases with permanent metallic internal stent dilation (group B) and 15 cases with temporary metallic internal stent dilation (group C) under fluoroscopy. Results: 30 cases of group A had 56 times of dilations (mean 1.9 times). The mean diameter of cardia was (2.4 +- 1.2) mm before dilation and (9.7 +- 3.0) mm after dilation. The mean dysphagia scores were 2.4 +- 1.2 grades before dilation and 1.0 +- 0.3 grades after dilation. Complications in 30 cases included chest pain (n = 9), reflux (n = 8) and bleeding (n = 3). 18(60%) of 30 cases showed dysphagia relapse during follow-up over 6 months, 18(90%) of 20 cases showed dysphagia relapse during follow-up over 12 months. 5 uncovered expandable metal stents were permanently placed in 5 cases of group B. The mean diameter of cardia was (3.2 +- 2.0) mm before dilation and (18.4 +- 1.7) mm after dilation. The mean dysphagia scores were (2.4 +- 1.1) grade before dilation and (0.4 +- 0.2) grade after dilation. Complications in 5 cases included chest pain (n = 3), reflux (n = 4), bleeding (n = 1) and hyperplasia of granulation tissue (n 2). 3(60%) in 5 cases showed dysphagia relapse during follow-up over 6 months, 1(50%) in 2 cases were dysphagia relapse during follow-up over 12 months. 15 covered expandable metal stents were temporarily placed in 15 cases of group C and drawn out at the 3-7 days via gastroscopy. The mean diameter of cardia was (3.4 +- 2.9) mm before dilation and (14.7 +- 2.9) mm after dilation. The mean dysphagia scores were (2.5 +- 1.1) grades before dilation and (0.6 +- 0.3) grades after dilation. Complications in 15 cases included chest pain (n = 3), reflux (n = 3) and bleeding (n = 2). 3(20%) in 15 cases showed dysphagia relapse during follow-up over 6

  20. Validity of the European society of cardiology's psychosocial screening interview in patients with coronary artery disease : The THORESCI study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Montfort, E.M.J.; Denollet, J.; Widdershoven, J.W.M.G.; Kupper, N.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study was to examine the validity of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) psychosocial screening instrument. Methods: A total of 508 acute (67%) or elective (33%) percutaneous coronary intervention patients (mean [standard deviation]age = 63 [10] years, 81% male)

  1. Dose evaluation in medical staff during diagnostics procedures in interventional radiology; Avaliacao da dose na equipe medica durante procedimentos diagnoticos de radiologia intervencionista

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacchim Neto, Fernando A.; Alves, Allan F.F.; Rosa, Maria E.D.; Miranda, Jose R.A. [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Biociencias. Departamento de Fisica e Biofisica; Moura, Regina [Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Cirurgia e Ortopedia; Pina, Diana R., E-mail: bacchim@ibb.unesp.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Departamento de Doencas Tropicais e Diagnostico por Imagem

    2014-08-15

    Studies show that personal dosimeters may underestimate the dose values in interventional physicians, especially in extremities and crystalline. The objective of this work was to study the radiation exposure levels of medical staff in diagnostic interventional radiology procedures. For this purpose LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) dosimeters were placed in different regions of the physician body. When comparing with reference dose levels, the maximum numbers of annual procedures were found. This information is essential to ensure the radiological protection of those professionals. (author)

  2. Assessment of exposure to scattered radiation in interventional procedures using special protective bismuth; Evaluacion de la exposicion a radiacion dispersa en procedimientos intervencionistas usando protectores especiales de bismuto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto Bua, M.; Medina Jimenez, E.; Vazquez Vazquez, R.; Santamaria Vazquez, F.; Otero Martinez, C.; Lobato Busto, R.; Luna Vega, V.; Mosquera Suero, J.; Sanchez Garcia, M.; Pombar Camean, M.

    2011-07-01

    There are currently marketed specific producta aimed at reducing personnel exposure to radiation scattered in cardiac catheterization procedures, interventional radiology or electrophysiology. Our service has been proposed to study the attenuation characteristics of the product Drape Armour manufactured by the company Microtek. Is a flexible devices constructed from an alloy of bismuth and sterility characteristics and infection control and fluid makes them particularly suitable for incorporating into the operative field of the patient. To study their behavior, there have been staff dose measurements representative of the moaL common situations of exposure to scattered radiation in a typical procedure of intervention.

  3. Interventional spine procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelekis, A.D. [Attikon University Hospital, 2nd Radiology Department, University of Athens, Rimini 1, 124 61 Athens (Greece)]. E-mail: akelekis@cc.uoa.gr; Somon, T. [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology, 24, Rue Micheli-du-Crest, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Yilmaz, H. [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology, 24, Rue Micheli-du-Crest, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Bize, P. [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology, 24, Rue Micheli-du-Crest, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Brountzos, E.N. [Attikon University Hospital, 2nd Radiology Department, University of Athens, Rimini 1, 124 61 Athens (Greece); Lovblad, K. [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology, 24, Rue Micheli-du-Crest, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Ruefenacht, D. [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology, 24, Rue Micheli-du-Crest, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Martin, J.B. [Clinique Generale Beaulieu 12 chemin Beau Soleil 1206 Geneva (Switzerland)]. E-mail: jbmartin@beaulieu.ch

    2005-09-01

    Minimally invasive techniques for the treatment of some spinal diseases are percutaneous treatments, proposed before classic surgery. By using imaging guidance, one can significantly increase accuracy and decrease complication rates. This review report physiopathology and discusses indications, methods, complications and results of performing these techniques on the spine, including different level (cervical, thoracic, lumbar and sacroiliac) and different kind of treatments (nerve block, disc treatment and bone treatment). Finally the present article also reviews current literature on the controversial issues involved.

  4. Usefulness and Limitation of Manual Aspiration Immediately After Pneumothorax Complicating Interventional Radiological Procedures with the Transthoracic Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagami, Takuji; Kato, Takeharu; Hirota, Tatsuya; Yoshimatsu, Rika; Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of simple aspiration of air from the pleural space to prevent increased pneumothorax and avoid chest tube placement in cases of pneumothorax following interventional radiological procedures performed under computed tomography fluoroscopic guidance with the transthoracic percutaneous approach. While still on the scanner table, 102 cases underwent percutaneous manual aspiration of a moderate or large pneumothorax that had developed during mediastinal, lung, and transthoracic liver biopsies and ablations of lung and hepatic tumors (independent of symptoms). Air was aspirated from the pleural space by an 18- or 20-gauge intravenous catheter attached to a three-way stopcock and 20- or 50-mL syringe. We evaluated the management of each such case during and after manual aspiration. In 87 of the 102 patients (85.3%), the pneumothorax had resolved completely on follow-up chest radiographs without chest tube placement, but chest tube placement was required in 15 patients. Requirement of chest tube insertion significantly increased in parallel with the increased volume of aspirated air. When receiver-operating characteristic curves were applied retrospectively, the optimal cutoff level of aspirated air on which to base a decision to abandon manual aspiration alone and resort to chest tube placement was 670 mL. Percutaneous manual aspiration of the pneumothorax performed immediately after the procedure might prevent progressive pneumothorax and eliminate the need for chest tube placement. However, when the amount of aspirated air is large (such as more than 670 mL), chest tube placement should be considered

  5. Dosimetry of the patient and occupational in interventional procedures; Dosimetria del paciente y ocupacional en procedimientos intervencionistas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andisco, D. [Universidad de Buenos Aires, Facultad de Medicina, Paraguay 2155, C1121AAA Buenos Aires (Argentina); Bourel, V.; Schmidt, L.; Fernandez, N., E-mail: dandisco@fmed.uba.ar [Universidad Favaloro, Facultad de Ciencias e Ingenieria, Solis 453, C1078AAI, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2014-08-15

    The big necessity to estimate the entrance doses in skin that the patients receive when are exposed to interventional procedures and the personal dosimetry of the professionals that work in these procedures in operating room, has taken to the analysis of different possibilities that allow to carry out these estimates. The objective of this work was to analyze the possibility of using Optically Stimulated Luminescence dosimeters; comparing the results with ionizing cameras and electronic personal dosimeters. To carry out these estimates, we work with a X-ray equipment Phillips Allure, acrylic phantoms, a dosimetry system formed by ionization camera and dosimeter UNIDOS E, OSL (Nano dots) dosimeters and electronic lavalieres Aloka brand, PDM 117 models. To estimate the doses that the patients receive, entrance dose was measured in skin and in personal dosimetry inside places where the medical professionals are habitually located in different situations among 5 and 60 irradiation min. In the case of direct radiation, the OSL (Nano dots) present reliable readings and only were dispersed values for the measurements of secondary radiation. The measured values and the linking among them were also analyzed. The OSL (Nano dot) dosimetry behaves reliable way when is located in the ranges of more dose to 0,1 mGy, according to the maker indications and fundamentally for direct beams of the hemodynamics equipment being ideal for the measurement of entrance dose in skin. For the Nano dots use in personal dosimetry the results should be read carefully for values major to 0,1 mGy and being completely inappropriate for minor values. (Author)

  6. Radiation dose to patients from the coronary angiography and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty in interventional radiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Jun-Zheng; Bai, Mei; Liu, Bin

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Objective: To survey and assess radiation dose to patients from coronary angiography (CA) and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) in Beijing Xuanwu Hospital of Capital University of Medical Sciences. Methods: The dose-area product (DAP) values to the patient and cumulative dose (CD) were recorded from 84 coronary angiographies and 51 percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty. A Monte-Carlo based program PCXMC was used to calculate the effective dose from DAP values for each patient. Organ doses were also measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) using a human-shaped phantom to compare the calculated organ dose from DAP. Results: The difference between the organ doses measured by TLDs and those from PCXMC software (P>0.05) were tolerable. The DAP value ranged from 7611∼60538 mGy·cm 2 for CA and 16423∼161973 mGy·cm 2 for PTCA. The effective dose for all procedures was determined to be in the range of 1.1∼6.9 mSv for CA and 2.3∼20.1 mSv for PTCA. CD ranged from 120.0 to 1016.0 mGy for CA and 287 to 2883 mGy for PTCA. Conversion factors between effective dose and DAP were 0.114∼0.139 mSv·Gy - 1·cm -2 for CA and 0.124∼0.142 mSv·Gy -1 ·cm -2 for PTCA; Conversion factors between organ dose and CD were derived for CA and PTCA, respectively. Conclusions: DAP and CD can be used as the dose indicator to calculate the organ dose and effective dose of patient based on Monte Carlo simulation. Using this method can provide important information of patient absorbed dose and enhance the radiation protection of patient in interventional radiology procedures. (author)

  7. Estimation of dose in skin through the use of radiochromic and radiographic films in patients subjected to interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos Garcia, Juan Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Radiation doses in skin of patients subjected to interventional procedures is estimated from the utilization and analysis of GAFCHROMIC® XR-RV2 radiochromic films and KODAK® X-Omat films with aid of the ImageJ software. The distribution of the radiation fields in the films is generated to obtain the distribution of dose in skin and to find peaks of dose by isodose curves using ImageJ software. The calibration curves are realized from GAFCHROMIC® XR-RV2 radiochromic films, through the use of a densitometer and two types of scanners (reflection scanner and transmission scanner). The reflection scanner has digitalized color images of 48 bit in TIFF format. The scanner transmission has digitalized in grayscale images to 16 bit in TIFF format. Each method has determined the points with maximum dose in skin. The images of the areas of regions with maximum doses are obtained of the scanner. The quantified doses are compared in the radiochromic films with the band of doses supplied by the manufacturer. The methodologies for the estimation of the doses obtained are compared of the radiochromic films with those obtained with the KODAK® X-Omat films. The procedure of obtaining of the doses is validated in patients with KODAK® X-Omat films. The doses obtained have covered a range from the 0,1Gy to 9 Gy. Radiographic films have allowed an assessment of the doses to 900 cGy due to the saturation thereof, the doses found in that range have been consistent with the doses in radiochromic films [es

  8. Training residents/fellows in paediatric cardiology: the Emory experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Robert M

    2016-12-01

    Pediatric cardiology fellowship is a very busy time, with new responsibilities, new knowledge, new technology and fast pace. Above and beyond the science and art of pediatric cardiology, we emphasize that our cardiology fellows are in the middle of the "people business", with additional roles and responsibilities as they serve their patients and communities. This manuscript provides insight into these opportunities for our pediatric cardiac professionals.

  9. Qualification guideline of the German X-ray association (DRG) und the German association for interventional radiology and minimal invasive therapy (DeGIR) for the performance of interventional-radiological minimal invasive procedures on arteries and veins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buecker, A.; Gross-Fengels, W.; Haage, P.; Huppert, P.; Landwehr, P.; Loose, R.; Reimer, P.; Tacke, J.; Vorwerk, D.; Fischer, J.

    2012-01-01

    The topics covered in the qualification guideline of the German X-ray association (DRG) und the German association for interventional radiology and minimal invasive therapy (DeGIR) for the performance of interventional-radiological minimal invasive procedures on arteries and veins are the following: Practical qualification: aorta iliac vessels and vessels in the upper and lower extremities, kidney and visceral arteries, head and neck arteries, dialysis shunts, veins and pulmonary arteries, aorta aneurysms and peripheral artery aneurysms. Knowledge acquisition concerning radiation protection: legal fundamentals, education and training, knowledge actualization and quality control, definition of the user and the procedure, competence preservation.

  10. Medical simulation in interventional cardiology: "More research is needed".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajti, Peter; Brilakis, Emmanouil S

    2018-05-01

    Medical simulation is being used for training fellows to perform coronary angiography. Medical simulation training was associated with 2 min less fluoroscopy time per case after adjustment. Whether medical simulation really works needs to be evaluated in additional, well-designed and executed clinical studies. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Mapping Intravascular Ultrasound Controversies in Interventional Cardiology Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maresca, D.; Adams, S.; Maresca, B.; Van der Steen, A.F.W.

    2014-01-01

    Intravascular ultrasound is a catheter-based imaging modality that was developed to investigate the condition of coronary arteries and assess the vulnerability of coronary atherosclerotic plaques in particular. Since its introduction in the clinic 20 years ago, use of intravascular ultrasound

  12. Psychosocial risk factors and personality disorders in outpatient cardiology setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Suárez-Bagnasco

    2015-01-01

    Psychological risk factors and personality disorders comorbidities are more frequent than psychological risk factors only or personality disorders only in outpatient cardiology setting without cardiovascular diseases.

  13. Utility of adjunctive modalities in Coronary chronic total occlusion intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemal Bhatt

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Coronary chronic total occlusion (CTO intervention remains one of the most challenging domains in interventional cardiology. Due to the technical challenges involved and potential procedural complications, CTO percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI attempt and success rates remain less than standard PCI. However, the use of several adjunctive tools such as intravascular ultrasound, optical coherence tomography, rotational atherectomy, orbital atherectomy, excimer laser coronary atherectomy and percutaneous left ventricular assist device may contribute to improved CTO PCI success rates or provide better hemodynamic assessment of CTO lesion (i.e., using fractional flow reserve. In this review we present the current literature describing the utility and efficacy of these adjunctive modalities in CTO intervention.

  14. Provision of services for the diagnosis and treatment of heart disease. Fourth report of a Joint Cardiology Committee of the Royal College of Physicians of London and the Royal College of Surgeons of England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The principal conclusions of the fourth report of the Joint Cardiology Committee are: 1 Cardiovascular disease remains a major cause of death and morbidity in the population and of utilisation of medical services. 2 Reduction in the risk of cardiovascular disease is feasible, and better co-ordination is required of strategies most likely to be effective. 3 Pre-hospital care of cardiac emergencies, in particular the provision of facilities for defibrillation, should continue to be developed. 4 There remains a large shortfall in provision of cardiological services with almost one in five district hospitals in England and Wales having no physician with the appropriate training. Few of the larger districts have two cardiologists to meet the recommendation for populations of over 250,000. One hundred and fifty extra consultant posts (in both district and regional centres) together with adequate supporting staff and facilities are urgently needed to provide modest cover for existing requirements. 5 The provision of coronary bypass grafting has expanded since 1985, but few regions have fulfilled the unambitious objectives stated in the Third Joint Cardiology Report. 6 The development of coronary angioplasty has been slow and haphazard. All regional centres should have at least two cardiologists trained in coronary angioplasty and there should be a designated budget. Surgical cover is still required for most procedures and is best provided on site. 7 Advances in the management of arrhythmias, including the use of specialised pacemakers, implantable defibrillators, and percutaneous or surgical ablation of parts of the cardiac conducting system have resulted in great benefit to patients. Planned development of the emerging sub-specialty of arrhythmology is required. 8 Strategies must be developed to limit the increased exposure of cardiologists to ionising radiation which will result from the expansion and increasing complexity of interventional procedures. 9 Supra

  15. Clinical cardiology consultation at non-cardiology departments: stepchild of patient care?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellings, D.A.; Symersky, T.; Ottervanger, J.P.; Ramdat Misier, A.R.; Boer, M.J. de

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although patient care in cardiology departments may be of high quality, patients with cardiac disease in other departments tend to receive less attention from cardiologists. Driven by the shorter duration of admission nowadays and the fact that consultations are often performed in

  16. A case study of technology transfer: Cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, G.

    1974-01-01

    Research advancements in cardiology instrumentation and techniques are summarized. Emphasis is placed upon the following techniques: (1) development of electrodes which show good skin compatibility and wearer comfort; (2) contourography - a real time display system for showing the results of EKGs; (3) detection of arteriosclerosis by digital computer processing of X-ray photos; (4) automated, noninvasive systems for blood pressure measurement; (5) ultrasonoscope - a noninvasive device for use in diagnosis of aortic, mitral, and tricuspid valve disease; and (6) rechargable cardiac pacemakers. The formation of a biomedical applications team which is an interdisciplinary team to bridge the gap between the developers and users of technology is described.

  17. Teddy and I Get a Check-Up: A Pilot Educational Intervention Teaching Children Coping Strategies for Managing Procedure-Related Pain and Fear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalley, Jessica S; McMurtry, C Meghan

    2016-01-01

    Background. Pediatric medical information provision literature focuses on hospitalization and surgical procedures, but children would also benefit from an educational program regarding more commonly experienced medical procedures (e.g., needles, general check-up). Objective. To determine whether an evidence-based educational program reduced children's ratings of fear of and expected pain from medical stimuli and increased their knowledge of procedural coping strategies. Methods. An educational, interactive, developmentally appropriate Teddy Bear Clinic Tour was developed and delivered at a veterinary clinic. During this tour, 71 5-10-year-old children (Mage = 6.62 years, SD = 1.19) were taught about medical equipment, procedures, and coping strategies through modelling and rehearsal. In a single-group, pretest posttest design, participants reported their fear of and expected pain from medical and nonmedical stimuli. Children were also asked to report strategies they would use to cope with procedural fear. Results. Children's ratings for expected pain during a needle procedure were reduced following the intervention. No significant change occurred in children's fear of needles. Children reported more intervention-taught coping strategies at Time 2. Conclusions. The results of this study suggest that an evidence-based, interactive educational program can reduce young children's expectations of needle pain and may help teach them procedural coping strategies.

  18. Review of interventional procedures in the very low birth-weight infant (<1.5 kg): complications, lessons learned and current practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laffan, Eoghan E. [Children' s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Ottawa, ON (Canada); McNamara, Patrick J.; Whyte, Hilary; L' Herault, Johanne [The Hospital for Sick Children, Division of Neonatology, Toronto, ON (Canada); Amaral, Joao; Temple, Michael; John, Philip; Connolly, Bairbre L. [The Hospital for Sick Children, The Image-Guided Therapy Unit, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2009-08-15

    Interventional radiology (IR) procedures in very low birth-weight (VLBW) infants (<1.5 kg) are challenging due to size, immaturity, comorbidities and lack of devices of suitable size. Infants are moved from the neonatal intensive care unit to the IR suite, further exposing them to risk. Our purpose was to review our experience of interventional procedures in VLBW infants, specifically complications and potential risks. VLBW infants referred for image-guided therapy between 1998 and 2005 were identified and medical records reviewed. ''Complications'' were divided into: major or minor, periprocedural or postprocedural, and intervention-/device-related, patient-related or equipment-related. Transport risk index of physiological stability (TRIPS) scores were calculated. A total of 116 infants (68 male, 48 female) underwent 176 procedures (159 vascular access-related and 17 nonvascular). Of 158 complications identified, 116 were major and 42 were minor. Major complications included hypothermia (n=33), line manipulations/removals (n=25), bleeding (n=12), thrombosis (n=4), cardiac arrest (n=3), tamponade (n=2), and multiorgan failure (n=1). Of the complications, 119 were categorized as intervention-/device-related, 32 patient-related and 7 equipment-related. There were no significant differences between pre- and postprocedural TRIPS scores. Successful completion of IR procedures in the VLBW infant is possible, but complications still occur in these fragile infants. (orig.)

  19. Fundamental study on the characteristics of a radiophotoluminescence glass dosemeter with no energy compensation filter for measuring patient entrance doses in cardiac interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Mamoru; Chida, Koichi; Moritake, Takashi; Koguchi, Yasuhiro; Sato, Tadaya; Kadowaki, Ken; Oosaka, Hajime; Tosa, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac interventional procedures have been increasing year by year. However, radiation skin injuries have been still reported. There is a necessity to measure the patient entrance skin dose (ESD), but an accurate dose measurement method has not been established. To measure the ESD, a lot of radiophotoluminescence dosemeters (RPLDs) provide an accurate measurement of the direct actual ESD at the points they are arrayed. The purpose of this study was to examine the characteristics of RPLD to measure the ESD. As a result, X-ray permeable RPLD (with no tin filter) did not interfere with the percutaneous coronary intervention procedure. The RPLD also had good fundamental performance characteristics. Although the RPLD had a little energy dependence, it showed excellent dose and dose-rate linearity, and good angular dependence. In conclusion, by calibrating the energy dependence, RPLDs are useful dosemeter to measure the ESD in cardiac intervention. (authors)

  20. Speculative Considerations about Some Cardiology Enigmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evora, Paulo Roberto Barbosa; Schmidt, Andre; Arcêncio, Livia; Marin-Neto, José Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Enigmas often lead to hypotheses and speculations. For this reason, especially for the sake of the reader's motivation, we opted for the plain discussion of some cardiology enigmas. The present text was aimed to discuss speculatively some cardiology enigmas. Text was freely designed in the context of coronary artery and heart valve diseases. The results were presented as the combination enigma/hypothesis. 1) The absence of arteriosclerosis in intramyocardial coronary arteries/ endothelium-myocardial interaction (crosstalk); 2) The unique and always confirmed superior evolution of the internal thoracic artery as coronary graft/ higher NO basal release 3) The prophylactic left internal thoracic artery graft in mildlystenosed coronary lesions/need of more accurate functional imaging techniques; 4) The high incidence of perioperative atrial fibrillation in patients with coronary artery disease/atrial ischemia associated to left circumflex coronary lesions; 5) The handling of disease-free saphenous vein grafts at the time of reoperation/biological serendipity with graft vein segments; 6) The possible aortic stenosis protection against coronary artery disease/ endothelium-myocardium interaction (crosstalk) improving NO release. The discussed topics associated with their respective speculative hypothesis remain as enigmas, but would become motivations for investigations. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  1. The use of MR in cardiological diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Hans-Joergen

    2004-01-01

    Image diagnostics is playing an important role in cardiology, and magnetic resonance tomography (MR) is one of many methods used in examinations of the heart. Based on studies of the literature and his own experience the author surveys the potential of MR in today's and tomorrow's diagnostics of heart diseases. Among the image diagnostic methods MR is the one that can give the most extensive information about the heart's anatomy and function. In a non-invasive way and without the use of ionizing radiation, MR can represent the anatomy in selectable planes, visualize and quantify the heart's pumping function and functioning of the cardiac valves, and give detailed information about the regional contractility, blood flow and viability of myocard. MR is capable of giving important and to some extent unique contributions to heart diseases, both congenital and contracted heart disease. Because of failing availability and competence MR is still little used in cardiological diagnostics, but the method undoubtedly has the potential to play a very important role in the future

  2. Cardiological aspects of carbon monoxide poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchewka, Jakub; Gawlik, Iwona; Dębski, Grzegorz; Popiołek, Lech; Marchewka, Wojciech; Hydzik, Piotr

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess cardiological manifestations of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning. Background/introduction: Carbon monoxide intoxication is one of the most important toxicological causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Early clinical manifestation of CO poisoning is cardiotoxicity. We enrolled 75 patients (34 males and 41 females, mean age 37.6 ± 17.7 y/o) hospitalized due to CO poisoning. Laboratory tests including troponin I, blood pressure measurements, HR and electrocardiograms (ECG) were collected. Pach's scale scoring and grading system was used to establish severity of poisoning. Grade of poisoning is positively correlated with troponin I levels and systolic blood pressure. Moreover, troponin levels are significantly correlated with exposition time, lactates and are higher in tachycardiac, hypertensive and positive ECG subpopulations. COHb levels are indicative of exposure but do not correlate with grade of poisoning. The main cause of CO poisoning were bathroom heaters - 83%, only 11% of examined intoxicated population were equipped with CO detectors. Complex cardiological screening covering troponin levels, ECG, blood pressure and heart rate measurements as well as complete blood count with particular attention to platelet parameters should be performed in each case where CO intoxication is suspected. More emphasis on education on CO poisoning is needed.

  3. Two-dimensional mapping of needle visibility with linear and curved array for ultrasound-guided interventional procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susanti, Hesty; Suprijanto, Kurniadi, Deddy

    2018-02-01

    Needle visibility in ultrasound-guided technique has been a crucial factor for successful interventional procedure. It has been affected by several factors, i.e. puncture depth, insertion angle, needle size and material, and imaging technology. The influences of those factors made the needle not always well visible. 20 G needles of 15 cm length (Nano Line, facet) were inserted into water bath with variation of insertion angles and depths. Ultrasound measurements are performed with BK-Medical Flex Focus 800 using 12 MHz linear array and 5 MHz curved array in Ultrasound Guided Regional Anesthesia mode. We propose 3 criteria to evaluate needle visibility, i.e. maximum intensity, mean intensity, and the ratio between minimum and maximum intensity. Those criteria were then depicted into representative maps for practical purpose. The best criterion candidate for representing the needle visibility was criterion 1. Generally, the appearance pattern of the needle from this criterion was relatively consistent, i.e. for linear array, it was relatively poor visibility in the middle part of the shaft, while for curved array, it is relatively better visible toward the end of the shaft. With further investigations, for example with the use of tissue-mimicking phantom, the representative maps can be built for future practical purpose, i.e. as a tool for clinicians to ensure better needle placement in clinical application. It will help them to avoid the "dead" area where the needle is not well visible, so it can reduce the risks of vital structures traversing and the number of required insertion, resulting in less patient morbidity. Those simple criteria and representative maps can be utilized to evaluate general visibility patterns of the needle in vast range of needle types and sizes in different insertion media. This information is also important as an early investigation for future research of needle visibility improvement, i.e. the development of beamforming strategies and

  4. Knowledge discovery in cardiology: A systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadi, I; Idri, A; Fernandez-Aleman, J L

    2017-01-01

    Data mining (DM) provides the methodology and technology needed to transform huge amounts of data into useful information for decision making. It is a powerful process employed to extract knowledge and discover new patterns embedded in large data sets. Data mining has been increasingly used in medicine, particularly in cardiology. In fact, DM applications can greatly benefit all those involved in cardiology, such as patients, cardiologists and nurses. The purpose of this paper is to review papers concerning the application of DM techniques in cardiology so as to summarize and analyze evidence regarding: (1) the DM techniques most frequently used in cardiology; (2) the performance of DM models in cardiology; (3) comparisons of the performance of different DM models in cardiology. We performed a systematic literature review of empirical studies on the application of DM techniques in cardiology published in the period between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2015. A total of 149 articles published between 2000 and 2015 were selected, studied and analyzed according to the following criteria: DM techniques and performance of the approaches developed. The results obtained showed that a significant number of the studies selected used classification and prediction techniques when developing DM models. Neural networks, decision trees and support vector machines were identified as being the techniques most frequently employed when developing DM models in cardiology. Moreover, neural networks and support vector machines achieved the highest accuracy rates and were proved to be more efficient than other techniques. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Practical application of natriuretic peptides in paediatric cardiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Julie; Goetze, Jens Peter; B. Andersen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    It is still uncertain if cardiac natriuretic peptides are useful biomarkers in paediatric cardiology. In this review we identify four clinical scenarios in paediatric cardiology, where clinical decision-making can be difficult, and where we feel the paediatric cardiologists need additional...

  6. Radionuclide investigations in clinical cardiology - 10 years of cooperation in Frankfurt/FRG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klepzig, H. Jr.; Kaltenbach, M.

    1989-01-01

    Radionuclide investigations today are an important tool in cardiology. They close the diagnostic gap in cases where non-invasive procedures of cardiological diagnosis such as ecg, exercise-ecg, echocardiography and chest-x-ray remains unrevealing. Further, they are helpful when an exact quantitation of the disease or a precise follow-up is required. Radionuclide techniques are very useful to detect myocardial ischemia in patients with coronary heart disease and to judge myocardial function in patients with aortic or mitral regurgitation. Follow-up investigations after therapy (aortocoronary bypass, PTCA, valve replacement) permit conclusions regarding the benefit of these measures.