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Sample records for interspecific crossing barriers

  1. Mechanisms and genetic control of interspecific crossing barriers in Lycopersicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mutschler, M.A. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)); McCormick, S. (Agricultural Research Service, Albany, CA (United States). Plant Gene Expression Center)

    1993-03-27

    This study employs Lycopersicon esculentum and L. pennellii as model systems to study the interspecific reproductive barriers unilateral incongruity (UI), hybrid breakdown and interspecific aberrant ratio syndrome (IARS).

  2. Evaluation of reproductive barriers contributes to the development of novel interspecific hybrids in the Kalanchoë genus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuligowska, Katarzyna; Lütken, Henrik Vlk; Christensen, Brian

    2015-01-01

    influencing the number of pollen tubes germinating in the stigma. In relation to post-fertilization barriers, endosperm degeneration was a probable barrier hampering production of interspecific hybrids. Moreover, our results demonstrate the relation of genetic distance estimated by AFLP marker analysis...... of hybridization partners with cross-compatibility of Kalancho? species. At the same time, differences in ploidy did not influence the success of interspecific crosses.ConclusionsOur study presents the first comprehensive analysis of hybridization barriers occurring within Kalancho? genus. Reproductive barriers...... were detected on both, pre- and post-fertilization levels. This new knowledge will contribute to further understanding of reproductive isolation of Kalancho? species and facilitate breeding of new cultivars. For the first time, interspecific hybrids between K. nyikae as maternal plant and K...

  3. Testing the SI × SC rule: Pollen-pistil interactions in interspecific crosses between members of the tomato clade (Solanum section Lycopersicon, Solanaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, You Soon; Covey, Paul A; Petersen, Jennifer J; Chetelat, Roger T; McClure, Bruce; Bedinger, Patricia A

    2015-02-01

    Interspecific reproductive barriers (IRBs) act to ensure species integrity by preventing hybridization. Previous studies on interspecific crosses in the tomato clade have focused on the success of fruit and seed set. The SI × SC rule (SI species × SC species crosses are incompatible, but the reciprocal crosses are compatible) often applies to interspecific crosses. Because SI systems in the Solanaceae affect pollen tube growth, we focused on this process in a comprehensive study of interspecific crosses in the tomato clade to test whether the SI × SC rule was always followed. Pollen tube growth was assessed in reciprocal crosses between all 13 species of the tomato clade using fluorescence microscopy. In crosses between SC and SI species, pollen tube growth follows the SI × SC rule: interspecific pollen tube rejection occurs when SI species are pollinated by SC species, but in the reciprocal crosses (SC × SI), pollen tubes reach ovaries. However, pollen tube rejection occurred in some crosses between pairs of SC species, demonstrating that a fully functional SI system is not necessary for pollen tube rejection in interspecific crosses. Further, gradations in the strength of both pistil and pollen IRBs were revealed in interspecific crosses using SC populations of generally SI species. The SI × SC rule explains many of the compatibility relations in the tomato clade, but exceptions occur with more recently evolved SC species and accessions, revealing differences in strength of both pistil and pollen IRBs. © 2015 Botanical Society of America, Inc.

  4. Climate as possible reproductive barrier in Pinus radiata (D. Don interspecific hybridisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannél Ham

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Historically, interspecific hybridisation with Pinus radiata D. Don had limited success. The effect of environmental conditions and position of pollination bags in the tree were investigated as possible hybridisation barriers. The study was conducted in a P. radiata seed orchard in the Southern Cape (South Africa. Field data were compared to the climatic conditions at natural and commercial provenances of seven Mesoamerican Pinus species identified as possible hybrid partners. In vitro pollen studies were used to confirm whether interspecific crosses with P. radiata might be feasible within predefined climatic parameters. The temperature ranges for both top and northern side of P. radiata pine trees in the seed orchard was similar to the natural distribution of P. radiata, P. elliottii Engelm. and P. taeda L. in the USA. Results suggested that pollen of P. elliottii and P. taeda might be more suited to result in the successful pollination of P. radiata than the other Mesoamerican pine species tested in this study.  Furthermore, the combination of minimum temperature and precipitation also showed a closer correlation to successful hybridisation with P. radiata for both P. elliotii and P. taeda. However, pollen tube elongation studies did not support these results, suggesting that mean temperature might not be the only determining factor of hybridisation success. Three circadian temperature models that mimic natural conditions were developed for Karatara and Sabie (Tweefontein, Witklip and Spitskop.  These models will be tested in future in vitro studies to further evaluate temperature fluctuations between day and night regimes as a possible reproductive barrier limiting hybridisation success between P. radiata and other Mesoamerican pine species.

  5. Crossing the Salt Barrier

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fry. RIVER. To cross the salt barrier is, therefore, an obligatory part of every amphihaline fish cycle. Figure 2a. Life Cycle of. Salmon. Adult salmon migrate from sea towards the river. After reaching their hatching ground, the eggs are laid in the gravel. The spawned fishes are called kelts. Alevin is a stage from hatching to fry.

  6. Barriers to gene flow in interspecific hybridization in Fuchsia L ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    combination and the number of pollen tubes at the base of the style was low. In these combinations, postzygotic barriers ranging through embryo abortion and a failure of endosperm development, nongermination of seeds to when germination occurred the plants were subviable. The per- centage of unfilled seeds ranged ...

  7. Hybrid incompatibilities in interspecific crosses between tetraploid wheat and its wild diploid relative Aegilops umbellulata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Moeko; Yoshida, Kentaro; Takumi, Shigeo

    2017-12-01

    Hybrid abnormalities, severe growth abortion and grass-clump dwarfism, were found in the tetraploid wheat/Aegilops umbellulata hybrids, and the gene expression changes were conserved in the hybrids with those in other wheat synthetic hexaploids. Aegilops umbellulata Zhuk., a diploid goatgrass species with a UU genome, has been utilized as a genetic resource for wheat breeding. Here, we examine the reproductive barriers between tetraploid wheat cultivar Langdon (Ldn) and various Ae. umbellulata accessions by conducting interspecific crossings. Through systematic cross experiments, three types of hybrid incompatibilities were found: seed production failure in crosses, hybrid growth abnormalities and sterility in the ABU hybrids. Hybrid incompatibilities were widely distributed over the entire range of the natural species, and in about 50% of the cross combinations between tetraploid Ldn and Ae. umbellulata accessions, ABU F 1 hybrids showed one of two abnormal growth phenotypes: severe growth abortion (SGA) or grass-clump dwarfism. Expression of the shoot meristem maintenance-related and cell cycle-related genes was markedly repressed in crown tissues of hybrids showing SGA, suggesting dysfunction of mitotic cell division in the shoot apices. The grass-clump dwarf phenotype may be explained by down-regulation of wheat APETALA1-like MADS box genes, which act as flowering promoters, and altered expression in crown tissues of the miR156/SPLs module, which controls tiller number and branching. These gene expression changes in growth abnormalities were well conserved between the Ldn/Ae. umbellulata plants and interspecific hybrids from crosses of Ldn and wheat D-genome progenitor Ae. tauschii.

  8. Segregation of Fusarium resistance in an interspecific cross between Lilium longiflorum and Lilium dauricum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Löffler, H.J.M.; Meijer, H.; Straathof, Th.P.; Tuyl, van J.M.

    1996-01-01

    Using interspecific hybridisation techniques, a resistant accession of L. dauricum (section Sinomartagon), was crossed with the susceptible L. longiflorum cultivars 'Gelria' and 'Flevo' (section Leucolirion). The progeny was tested for Fusarium resistance in a standardised scale-bulblet assay. Both

  9. Interspecific hybridization of flower bulbs: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuyl, van J.M.

    1997-01-01

    In order to introduce new characters such as resistances, flower shape and colour, from wild species into the cultivar assortment of lily it is necessary to overcome interspecific crossing barriers.. Several techniques have been used for wide interspecific lily crosses with species and cultivars

  10. Interspecific Hybridization within Ornamental Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuligowska, Katarzyna

    . Interspecific hybridization is one of the most important breeding strategies to increase the genetic variation. The main difficulty in obtaining interspecific hybrids is due to occurrence of reproductive barriers. In the study, the possibilities of developing novel interspecific hybrids were studied within two...... commercially important genera of ornamental plants: Kalanchoë and Hibiscus. The nature of hybridization barriers hampering hybrid production was investigated during pre- and post-fertilization stages. For each genus the interspecific crosses of Kalanchoë species and Hibiscus species, abnormal germination...... and growth of pollen tubes, as well as lower frequencies of pollen tubes were observed in specific cross-combinations. Post-fertilization barriers related to endosperm development and hybrid incompatibility were also observed in Kalanchoë and Hibiscus genus, respectively. Qualitative and quantitative...

  11. Crossing the Salt Barrier

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    All salmon (species belonging to the family salmonidae) breed in FW. Adult mature salmon migrate from the sea towards the river in shoal, cross the estuarine region ... energy for coping with the complete shift in osmoregulation along with the exertion involved in this anadromous movement especially,since they do not feed ...

  12. Interspecific lily hybrids: a promise for the future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuyl, van J.M.; Chi, H.S.; Kronenburg-van de Ven, van B.C.E.; Meijer, B.

    1997-01-01

    In order to introduce new characters such as resistances, flower shape and colour, from wild species into the cultivar assortment of lily it is necessary to overcome interspecific crossing barriers.. Several techniques have been used for wide interspecific lily crosses with species and cultivars

  13. Interspecific Hybridisation in Campanula

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Röper, Anna Catharina

    had an influence on the number of ovules and germination success in some cross combinations. In the second research part interspecific hybrids obtained from ovule culture were genotypically and phenotypically characterised by AFLP analysis, flow cytometry and biometrical parameters. Hybridity......In the present thesis, economically important Campanula species were selected for interspecific hybridisation to increase the genetic viability in plant breeding material. To reach this goal, ovule culture was established as an embryo rescue technique to overcome post-fertilisation barriers...... was confirmed for most of the interspecific hybrids. Intermediate phenotypes compared to the parental species were found for several interspecific hybrids. The results from this PhD study demonstrated that the genetic viability could be increased in Campanula and reveal valuable information for interspecific...

  14. Inheritance of anthocyanin pigmentation in interspecific cross of rice (Oryza sativa L. × O. rufipogon Griff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Pandey

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available An inheritance study of the anthocyanin pigmentation in the inter-specific cross of O. sativa × O. rufipogon was conducted in the greenhouse of the Institute of Agriculture and Animal Science (IAAS, Rampur, Chitwan, including the parents, F1 and subsequent F2 segregants in the rice growing season of the year 2012. The study was done in the segregating generation of the inter-specific cross of O. sativa cv. Pokhreli Palele × O. rufipogon. The inheritance of anthocyanin pigmentation pattern in the different plant parts was found to be complicated. The segregation of pigmented: non-pigmented for basal leaf sheath, stigma and leaf apex was digenic with complementary gene action (9: 7. Digenic inheritance of the pigmentation in the awn and lemma and palea was found with the segregation ratio of 11 pigmented: 5 non-pigmented. A tetragenic ratio with inhibitory gene action (81 pigmented: 175 non-pigmented was observed for the internode colour. A pleiotropic gene action of one of the basal leaf sheath pigmentation with that for the stigma and internode pigmentation was found.

  15. Evaluation of wheat genotypes originated from interspecific crossing and gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camargo, C.E.O.; Ferreira Filho, A.W.P.; Freitas, J.G.; Tulmann Neto, A.; Pettinelli Junior, A.; Castro, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    Twenty three inbred HEXAPLOID wheat lines were evaluated. They were originated by selections made in populations submitted to gamma radiation (27.5 krad), in the F 4 generation, from the interspecific hybrid between BH-1146 (triticum aestivum L.) and Anhinga S x Winged S (Triticum durum L.) and the cultivars BH-1146 and Yavaros S (T. durum L.) Nine trials were carried out with irrigation and in upland conditions. Several agronomic characteristics were assessed. Under laboratory conditions the genotypes were evaluated with respect to Al toxicity using nutrient solutions. Semi dwarf line 11 and 19, with moderate lodging resistance, medium cycle from emergence to flowering, tolerance to aluminum toxicity, were the most productive. Seven lines showed resistance to the causal agent of mildew, but all genotypes were susceptible to the causal agents of leaf spots. Some of the genotypes could be used in cross breeding as genetic sources for short plant, long head, large number of spikelets per head, large number of grains per head and per spikelet and heavy grains. BH-1146 and seven from the 23 lines were considered the most tolerant to aluminium toxicity, presenting good regrowth after treatment in nutrient solutions with 10 mg/liter of Al +3 . (author). 15 refs., 7 tabs

  16. Hypersensitive response-like reaction is associated with hybrid necrosis in interspecific crosses between tetraploid wheat and Aegilops tauschii coss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyuki Mizuno

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hybrid speciation is classified into homoploid and polyploid based on ploidy level. Common wheat is an allohexaploid species that originated from a naturally occurring interploidy cross between tetraploid wheat and diploid wild wheat Aegilops tauschii Coss. Aegilops tauschii provides wide naturally occurring genetic variation. Sometimes its triploid hybrids with tetraploid wheat show the following four types of hybrid growth abnormalities: types II and III hybrid necrosis, hybrid chlorosis, and severe growth abortion. The growth abnormalities in the triploid hybrids could act as postzygotic hybridization barriers to prevent formation of hexaploid wheat. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we report on the geographical and phylogenetic distribution of Ae. tauschii accessions inducing the hybrid growth abnormalities and showed that they are widely distributed across growth habitats in Ae. tauschii. Molecular and cytological characterization of the type III necrosis phenotype was performed. The hybrid abnormality causing accessions were widely distributed across growth habitats in Ae. tauschii. Transcriptome analysis showed that a number of defense-related genes such as pathogenesis-related genes were highly up-regulated in the type III necrosis lines. Transmission electron microscope observation revealed that cell death occurred accompanied by generation of reactive oxygen species in leaves undergoing type III necrosis. The reduction of photosynthetic activity occurred prior to the appearance of necrotic symptoms on the leaves exhibiting hybrid necrosis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taking these results together strongly suggests that an autoimmune response might be triggered by intergenomic incompatibility between the tetraploid wheat and Ae. tauschii genomes in type III necrosis, and that genetically programmed cell death could be regarded as a hypersensitive response-like cell death similar to that observed in Arabidopsis

  17. Hypersensitive response-like reaction is associated with hybrid necrosis in interspecific crosses between tetraploid wheat and Aegilops tauschii coss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Nobuyuki; Hosogi, Naoki; Park, Pyoyun; Takumi, Shigeo

    2010-06-25

    Hybrid speciation is classified into homoploid and polyploid based on ploidy level. Common wheat is an allohexaploid species that originated from a naturally occurring interploidy cross between tetraploid wheat and diploid wild wheat Aegilops tauschii Coss. Aegilops tauschii provides wide naturally occurring genetic variation. Sometimes its triploid hybrids with tetraploid wheat show the following four types of hybrid growth abnormalities: types II and III hybrid necrosis, hybrid chlorosis, and severe growth abortion. The growth abnormalities in the triploid hybrids could act as postzygotic hybridization barriers to prevent formation of hexaploid wheat. Here, we report on the geographical and phylogenetic distribution of Ae. tauschii accessions inducing the hybrid growth abnormalities and showed that they are widely distributed across growth habitats in Ae. tauschii. Molecular and cytological characterization of the type III necrosis phenotype was performed. The hybrid abnormality causing accessions were widely distributed across growth habitats in Ae. tauschii. Transcriptome analysis showed that a number of defense-related genes such as pathogenesis-related genes were highly up-regulated in the type III necrosis lines. Transmission electron microscope observation revealed that cell death occurred accompanied by generation of reactive oxygen species in leaves undergoing type III necrosis. The reduction of photosynthetic activity occurred prior to the appearance of necrotic symptoms on the leaves exhibiting hybrid necrosis. Taking these results together strongly suggests that an autoimmune response might be triggered by intergenomic incompatibility between the tetraploid wheat and Ae. tauschii genomes in type III necrosis, and that genetically programmed cell death could be regarded as a hypersensitive response-like cell death similar to that observed in Arabidopsis intraspecific and Nicotiana interspecific hybrids. Only Ae. tauschii accessions without such

  18. Mapping quantitative trait loci (QTLs for fatty acid composition in an interspecific cross of oil palm

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    Sharma Mukesh

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Marker Assisted Selection (MAS is well suited to a perennial crop like oil palm, in which the economic products are not produced until several years after planting. The use of DNA markers for selection in such crops can greatly reduce the number of breeding cycles needed. With the use of DNA markers, informed decisions can be made at the nursery stage, regarding which individuals should be retained as breeding stock, which are satisfactory for agricultural production, and which should be culled. The trait associated with oil quality, measured in terms of its fatty acid composition, is an important agronomic trait that can eventually be tracked using molecular markers. This will speed up the production of new and improved oil palm planting materials. Results A map was constructed using AFLP, RFLP and SSR markers for an interspecific cross involving a Colombian Elaeis oleifera (UP1026 and a Nigerian E. guinneensis (T128. A framework map was generated for the male parent, T128, using Joinmap ver. 4.0. In the paternal (E. guineensis map, 252 markers (199 AFLP, 38 RFLP and 15 SSR could be ordered in 21 linkage groups (1815 cM. Interval mapping and multiple-QTL model (MQM mapping (also known as composite interval mapping, CIM were used to detect quantitative trait loci (QTLs controlling oil quality (measured in terms of iodine value and fatty acid composition. At a 5% genome-wide significance threshold level, QTLs associated with iodine value (IV, myristic acid (C14:0, palmitic acid (C16:0, palmitoleic acid (C16:1, stearic acid (C18:0, oleic acid (C18:1 and linoleic acid (C18:2 content were detected. One genomic region on Group 1 appears to be influencing IV, C14:0, C16:0, C18:0 and C18:1 content. Significant QTL for C14:0, C16:1, C18:0 and C18:1 content was detected around the same locus on Group 15, thus revealing another major locus influencing fatty acid composition in oil palm. Additional QTL for C18:0 was detected on Group 3

  19. Comparison of the effects of artificial and natural barriers on large African carnivores: implications for interspecific relationships and connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzi, Gabriele; Broekhuis, Femke; McNutt, J Weldon; Schmid, Bernhard

    2013-05-01

    1. Physical barriers contribute to habitat fragmentation, influence species distribution and ranging behaviour, and impact long-term population viability. Barrier permeability varies among species and can potentially impact the competitive balance within animal communities by differentially affecting co-occurring species. The influence of barriers on the spatial distribution of species within whole communities has nonetheless received little attention. 2. During a 4-year period, we studied the influence of a fence and rivers, two landscape features that potentially act as barriers on space use and ranging behaviour of lions Panthera leo, spotted hyenas Crocuta crocuta, African wild dogs Lycaon pictus and cheetahs Acinonyx jubatus in Northern Botswana. We compared the tendencies of these species to cross the barriers using data generated from GPS-radio collars fitted to a total of 35 individuals. Barrier permeability was inferred by calculating the number of times animals crossed a barrier vs. the number of times they did not cross. Finally, based on our results, we produced a map of connectivity for the broader landscape system. 3. Permeability varied significantly between fence and rivers and among species. The fence represented an obstacle for lions (permeability = 7.2%), while it was considerably more permeable for hyenas (35.6%) and wild dogs and cheetahs (≥ 50%). In contrast, the rivers and associated floodplains were relatively permeable to lions (14.4%) while they represented a nearly impassable obstacle for the other species (habitat patch on one side of the fence, which might provide a potential refuge for other species. For instance, the competitively inferior wild dogs used this refuge significantly more intensively than the side of the fence with a high presence of lions. 5. We showed that the influence of a barrier on the distribution of animals could potentially result in a broad-scale modification of community structure and ecology within a guild

  20. Interspecific Hybridization within Ornamental Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuligowska, Katarzyna

    The economic importance of the ornamental plant industry requires constant development of novel and high quality varieties. Traits attractive for production of new ornamental plants may not be available within the commercial cultivars, but broad genetic variation is present within the plant genera...... commercially important genera of ornamental plants: Kalanchoë and Hibiscus. The nature of hybridization barriers hampering hybrid production was investigated during pre- and post-fertilization stages. For each genus the interspecific crosses of Kalanchoë species and Hibiscus species, abnormal germination...

  1. Inheritance of growth habit, awnnedness and spikelet shattering in interspecific cross of rice (Oryza sativa L. × O. rufipogon Griff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Pandey

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available An inheritance study in the inter-specific cross of O. sativa × O. rufipogon was conducted in the greenhouse of the Institute of Agriculture and Animal Science (IAAS, Rampur, Chitwan, including the parents, F1 and subsequent F2 segregants. In the parent as O. sativa a local landrace Pokhreli pahele was used. A dominant gene action was observed for the procumbent growth habit, awnedness, and higher spikelet shattering. Awnedness was found to be governed by three genes with the duplicate gene action (63:1.. Digenic complementary gene action was observed for culm angle (9 procumbent: 7 erect and digenic polymeric gene action for spikelet shattering (9 highly shattering: 6 intermediate shattering: 1 low shattering.

  2. Interspecific cross of the Bactrocera dorsalis Complex (Diptera: Tephritidae): How did it happen?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wee, Suk-Ling; Tan, Keng-Hong

    2000-01-01

    consumption, males of B. papayae and B. carambolae produce a common sex pheromonal component, coniferyl alcohol, CF (Nishida et al. 1988a, Nishida et al. 1988b, Tan and Nishida 1996). Therefore, is CF the sole factor that causes the interspecific attraction before copulation can take place? Secondly, will the acquisition of ME enhance the interspecific mating competitiveness? Lastly, do the females (of these species) show preference for their conspecific males or any males that have ingested ME in their diet and vice versa? The objective of the current investigation was to shed some light on these questions

  3. Overcoming interspecific incompatibility in the cross Brassica campestris ssp. japonica x Brassica oleracea var. botrytis using irradiated mentor pollen page

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarla, N.

    1988-01-01

    The cross B. campestris ssp. japonica x B. oleracea var. botrytis fails due to incompatibility barrier at the stigma. To realize this cross, irradiated compatible pollen (mentor pollen) was used before the incompatible pollination. The presence of mentor pollen stimulated the incompatible pollen to germinate and effect fertilization and seed set. One hybrid was thus obtained. Most of the seeds were inviable. Of the 5 plants raised one was a hybrid and 4 resembled the female parent. 1 tab., 7 refs

  4. Chromosomal rearrangements in interspecific hybrids between Nicotiana gossei Domin and N. tabacum L., obtained by crossing with pollen exposed to helium ion beams or gamma-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitamura, S. E-mail: kitamura@taka.jaeri.go.jp; Inoue, M.; Ohmido, N.; Fukui, K.; Tanaka, A

    2003-05-01

    It is very difficult to obtain interspecific hybrids between Nicotiana tabacum L. (2n=48) and N. gossei Domin (2n=36), because of strong cross incompatibility. We had already obtained interspecific hybrids between these two species, crossing N. gossei flower with N. tabacum pollen exposed to He ions or gamma-rays. Here, we analyze chromosome constitution of these hybrids by genomic in situ hybridization. In root tip cells of the two hybrids obtained with He ion exposure, most mitotic cells contained 18 chromosomes of N. gossei and 24 chromosomes of N. tabacum. However, in some cells, translocations and insertions between parental genomes were observed. On the other hand, in a hybrid obtained by gamma-ray irradiation, intergenomic rearrangements were not observed, although mitotic cells showed 19 hybridization signals with N. gossei DNA in 41 chromosomes. Such chromosomal changes in structure or constitution may be related to overcoming cross incompatibility between these two species.

  5. Chromosomal rearrangements in interspecific hybrids between Nicotiana gossei Domin and N. tabacum L., obtained by crossing with pollen exposed to helium ion beams or gamma-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, S.; Inoue, M.; Ohmido, N.; Fukui, K.; Tanaka, A.

    2003-01-01

    It is very difficult to obtain interspecific hybrids between Nicotiana tabacum L. (2n=48) and N. gossei Domin (2n=36), because of strong cross incompatibility. We had already obtained interspecific hybrids between these two species, crossing N. gossei flower with N. tabacum pollen exposed to He ions or gamma-rays. Here, we analyze chromosome constitution of these hybrids by genomic in situ hybridization. In root tip cells of the two hybrids obtained with He ion exposure, most mitotic cells contained 18 chromosomes of N. gossei and 24 chromosomes of N. tabacum. However, in some cells, translocations and insertions between parental genomes were observed. On the other hand, in a hybrid obtained by gamma-ray irradiation, intergenomic rearrangements were not observed, although mitotic cells showed 19 hybridization signals with N. gossei DNA in 41 chromosomes. Such chromosomal changes in structure or constitution may be related to overcoming cross incompatibility between these two species

  6. Unified Model of Dynamic Forced Barrier Crossing in Single Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friddle, R W

    2007-06-21

    Thermally activated barrier crossing in the presence of an increasing load can reveal kinetic rate constants and energy barrier parameters when repeated over a range of loading rates. Here we derive a model of the mean escape force for all relevant loading rates--the complete force spectrum. Two well-known approximations emerge as limiting cases; one of which confirms predictions that single-barrier spectra should converge to a phenomenological description in the slow loading limit.

  7. Detailed ordering of markers localizing to the Xq26-Xqter region of the human X chromosome by the use of an interspecific Mus spretus mouse cross

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avner, P.; Amar, L.; Arnaud, D.; Hanauer, A.; Cambrou, J.

    1987-01-01

    Five probes localizing to the Xq26-Xqter region of the human X chromosome have been genetically mapped on the mouse X chromosome using an interspecific cross involving Mus spretus to a contiguous region lying proximally to the Tabby (Ta) locus. Pedigree and recombinational analysis establish the marker order as being Hprt-FIX-c11-G6PD-St14-1. The size of this contiguous region is such that the X-linked muscular dystrophy (mdx) mouse mutation probably maps within this segment. This in turn suggests that it is highly improbable that the mouse mdx locus represents a model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). It is, however, compatible with the idea that this mutation may correspond in man to Emery Dreifuss muscular dystrophy. The high frequency of restriction fragment length polymorphisms found in this interspecific system for all the human cross-reacting probes examined up until now, using only a limited number of restriction enzymes, suggests that the Mus spretus mapping system may be of great potential value for establishing the linkage relationships existing in man when conserved chromosomal regions are concerned and human/mouse cross-reacting probes are available or can be obtained

  8. Hybrid Weakness Found In the Backcross Progeny of an Inter-Specific Cross of Oryza Sativa / O. Glumaepatula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobrizal; Yoshimura, A

    2009-01-01

    Hybrid breakdown expressed as sterility or weakness or both in F 2 or later generations is considered to be a reproductive barrier between two distantly related taxa. Hybrid breakdown that showed poor growth habit with fertile seeds was found in the backcross progenies (BC 4 F 2 ) which were derived from a cross between a cultivated rice Oryza sativa L. cv. Taichung 65 and a wild rice Oryza glumaepatula Steud (Acc. IRGC 105668) where Taichung 65 was used as a recurrent parent. Through segregation analysis of BC 4 F 2 population, a novel gene for weakness was identified, and this gene was designated as hwf1 (hybrid weakness f-1). RFLP (Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism) analysis was employed to determine the chromosomal location of hwf1 gene. The result revealed that hwf1 was located between G3006 and C933 RFLP markers, with map distances of 0.5 cM and 1.9 cM, respectively, and co-segregated with C708, C820, and R288 on the short arm of chromosome 4. Since both O. glumaepatula (Acc. IRGC 105668) and Taichung 65 that was used as parents showed normal growth habit, the weakness in this study was assumed to be controlled by a set of complementary recessive genes. One of the complementary genes is hwf1 from O. glumaepatula, and another gene should be from Taichung 65, because the genetic background of the BC 4 F 2 populations that were used for analysis is Taichung 65. The gene from Taichung 65 has not been identified yet, therefore, it is necessary to conduct the experiment for finding out the complement of hwf1 gene in near future. (author)

  9. Accelerated Senescence and Enhanced Disease Resistance in Hybrid Chlorosis Lines Derived from Interspecific Crosses between Tetraploid Wheat and Aegilops tauschii

    OpenAIRE

    Nakano, Hiroki; Mizuno, Nobuyuki; Tosa, Yukio; Yoshida, Kentaro; Park, Pyoyun; Takumi, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid chlorosis, a type of hybrid incompatibility, has frequently been reported in inter- and intraspecific crosses of allopolyploid wheat. In a previous study, we reported some types of growth abnormalities such as hybrid necrosis and observed hybrid chlorosis with mild or severe abnormalities in wheat triploids obtained in crosses between tetraploid wheat cultivar Langdon and four Ae. tauschii accessions and in their derived synthetic hexaploids. However, the molecular mechanisms underlyin...

  10. Molecular profiling of an interspecific rice population derived from a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NERICA rices are interspecific inbred progeny derived from crosses between Oryza sativa x O. glaberrima. In this study, we evaluated 70 BC2 interspecific lines, developed by crossing a tropical japonica variety (WAB 56-104) as the recurrent parent to an O. glaberrima variety (CG 14) as the donor parent, followed by the ...

  11. Crossing the entropy barrier of dynamical zeta functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aurich, R.; Bolte, J.; Matthies, C.; Sieber, M.; Steiner, F. (Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik)

    1992-01-01

    Dynamical zeta functions are an important tool to quantize chaotic dynamical systems. The basic quantization rules require the computation of the zeta functions on the real energy axis, where the Euler product representations running over the classical periodic orbits usually do not converge due to the existence of the so-called entropy barrier determined by the topological entropy of the classical system. We shown that the convergence properties of the dynamical zeta functions rewritten as Dirichlet series are governed not only by the well-known topological and metric entropy, but depend crucially on subtle statistical properties of the Maslow indices and of the multiplicities of the periodic orbits that are measured by a new parameter for which we introduce the notion of a third entropy. If and only if the third entropy is nonvanishing, one can cross the entropy barrier; if it exceeds a certain value, one can even compute the zeta function in the physical region by means of a convergent Dirichlet series. A simple statistical model is presented which allows to compute the third entropy. Four examples of chaotic systems are studied in detail to test the model numerically. (orig.).

  12. Crossing the entropy barrier of dynamical zeta functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aurich, R.; Bolte, J.; Matthies, C.; Sieber, M.; Steiner, F.

    1992-01-01

    Dynamical zeta functions are an important tool to quantize chaotic dynamical systems. The basic quantization rules require the computation of the zeta functions on the real energy axis, where the Euler product representations running over the classical periodic orbits usually do not converge due to the existence of the so-called entropy barrier determined by the topological entropy of the classical system. We shown that the convergence properties of the dynamical zeta functions rewritten as Dirichlet series are governed not only by the well-known topological and metric entropy, but depend crucially on subtle statistical properties of the Maslow indices and of the multiplicities of the periodic orbits that are measured by a new parameter for which we introduce the notion of a third entropy. If and only if the third entropy is nonvanishing, one can cross the entropy barrier; if it exceeds a certain value, one can even compute the zeta function in the physical region by means of a convergent Dirichlet series. A simple statistical model is presented which allows to compute the third entropy. Four examples of chaotic systems are studied in detail to test the model numerically. (orig.)

  13. Triploid Production from Interspecific Crosses of Two Diploid Perennial Helianthus with Diploid Cultivated Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhao; Seiler, Gerald J; Gulya, Thomas J; Feng, Jiuhuan; Rashid, Khalid Y; Cai, Xiwen; Jan, Chao-Chien

    2017-04-03

    Wild Helianthus species are a valuable genetic resource for the improvement of cultivated sunflower. We report the discovery and characterization of a unique high frequency production of triploids when cultivated sunflower was pollinated by specific accessions of diploid Helianthus nuttallii T. & G. and H. maximiliani Schr. Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) analyses indicated that the triploid F 1 s had two genomes from the wild pollen sources and one from the cultivated line. Mitotic chromosome analyses indicated that the frequency of triploid progenies from the crosses of cultivated lines × H. nuttallii accession 102 (N102) was significantly higher than those of unexpected polyploid progenies from the crosses of wild perennial species × N102, and no unexpected polyploids were obtained from the reverse crosses. Pollen stainability analysis suggested the existence of a low percentage of unreduced (2 n ) male gametes in some accessions, especially N102 and H. maximiliani accession 1113 (M1113), which were generated at the telophase II and tetrad stages of meiosis. The triploid F 1 s could be the results of preferred fertilization of the low frequency of 2 n male gametes with the female gametes of the cultivated sunflower, due to the dosage factors related to recognition and rejection of foreign pollen during fertilization. The triploids have been used to produce amphiploids and aneuploids. Future studies of the male gametes' fate from pollination through fertilization will further uncover the mechanism of this whole genome transmission. Studies of the genetic control of this trait will facilitate research on sunflower polyploidy speciation and evolution, and the utilization of this trait in sunflower breeding. Copyright © 2017 Liu et al.

  14. Accelerated senescence and enhanced disease resistance in hybrid chlorosis lines derived from interspecific crosses between tetraploid wheat and Aegilops tauschii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Nakano

    Full Text Available Hybrid chlorosis, a type of hybrid incompatibility, has frequently been reported in inter- and intraspecific crosses of allopolyploid wheat. In a previous study, we reported some types of growth abnormalities such as hybrid necrosis and observed hybrid chlorosis with mild or severe abnormalities in wheat triploids obtained in crosses between tetraploid wheat cultivar Langdon and four Ae. tauschii accessions and in their derived synthetic hexaploids. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying hybrid chlorosis are not well understood. Here, we compared cytology and gene expression in leaves to characterize the abnormal growth in wheat synthetics showing mild and severe chlorosis. In addition, we compared disease resistance to wheat blast fungus. In total 55 and 105 genes related to carbohydrate metabolism and 53 and 89 genes for defense responses were markedly up-regulated in the mild and severe chlorosis lines, respectively. Abnormal chloroplasts formed in the mesophyll cells before the leaves yellowed in the hybrid chlorosis lines. The plants with mild chlorosis showed increased resistance to wheat blast and powdery mildew fungi, although significant differences only in two, third internode length and maturation time, out of the examined agricultural traits were found between the wild type and plants showing mild chlorosis. These observations suggest that senescence might be accelerated in hybrid chlorosis lines of wheat synthetics. Moreover, in wheat synthetics showing mild chlorosis, the negative effects on biomass can be minimized, and they may show substantial fitness under pathogen-polluted conditions.

  15. Accelerated senescence and enhanced disease resistance in hybrid chlorosis lines derived from interspecific crosses between tetraploid wheat and Aegilops tauschii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Hiroki; Mizuno, Nobuyuki; Tosa, Yukio; Yoshida, Kentaro; Park, Pyoyun; Takumi, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid chlorosis, a type of hybrid incompatibility, has frequently been reported in inter- and intraspecific crosses of allopolyploid wheat. In a previous study, we reported some types of growth abnormalities such as hybrid necrosis and observed hybrid chlorosis with mild or severe abnormalities in wheat triploids obtained in crosses between tetraploid wheat cultivar Langdon and four Ae. tauschii accessions and in their derived synthetic hexaploids. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying hybrid chlorosis are not well understood. Here, we compared cytology and gene expression in leaves to characterize the abnormal growth in wheat synthetics showing mild and severe chlorosis. In addition, we compared disease resistance to wheat blast fungus. In total 55 and 105 genes related to carbohydrate metabolism and 53 and 89 genes for defense responses were markedly up-regulated in the mild and severe chlorosis lines, respectively. Abnormal chloroplasts formed in the mesophyll cells before the leaves yellowed in the hybrid chlorosis lines. The plants with mild chlorosis showed increased resistance to wheat blast and powdery mildew fungi, although significant differences only in two, third internode length and maturation time, out of the examined agricultural traits were found between the wild type and plants showing mild chlorosis. These observations suggest that senescence might be accelerated in hybrid chlorosis lines of wheat synthetics. Moreover, in wheat synthetics showing mild chlorosis, the negative effects on biomass can be minimized, and they may show substantial fitness under pathogen-polluted conditions.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of interspecific trigenomic hybrids ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Interspecific reciprocal crosses between three cultivated Brassica allotetraploids and one wild species Brassica fruticulosa (FF, 2n =16) were made and the trigenomic hybrids were produced only with embryo rescue. From the crosses with Brassica juncea (AABB, 2n = 36) and Brassica napus (AACC, 2n = 38), hybrids (F.AB ...

  17. Genetic relationships between interspecific lines derived from Oryza glaberrima and Oryza sativa crosses using microsatellites and agro-morphological markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moukoumbi, Y.D.; Kolade, O.; Drame, K.N.; Sie, M.; Ndjiondjo, M.N.

    2015-07-01

    New Rice(s) for Africa (NERICA) are high yielding rice varieties mostly cultivated in Sub-Saharan Africa and developed by the Africa Rice Center. This study is aimed at investigating the proportion of introgression of parental genomic contribution of 60 lowland NERICA varieties and establishment of molecular profiling. Agro-morphological data from 17 characteristics was recorded and significant (p<0.05) to high significant (p<0.0001) differences were obtained with leaf length and width, plant height at maturity, days to heading, maturity, primary and secondary branching of panicles, and grain width and grain thickness. A total of 114 microsatellite polymorphic markers covering 2183.13 cM of the rice genome showed the proportions of alleles introgressed from the donor parent (Oryza glaberrima) into 52 lowland NERICA lines (TOG5681 and IR64) as follows: 11% for BC2, 6.07% for BC3, and 7.55% for BC4. The introgression proportions for the eight remaining lowland NERICA lines derived from other crosses ranged from 5.5 to 11.3%. The proportion recorded with the recurrent parent was 83.99%. The highest introgression proportions of the O. glaberrima allele for all 60 lowland NERICA lines were found on chromosomes 2, 6 and 12 (TOG5681/IR64) and on chromosome 3 with NERIC-L-29 (TOG5681/IR1529-680-3-2). Multivariate analyses performed using an association of agro-morphological and molecular data revealed two major groups according to the distribution of the lowland NERICAs including the lowland NERICAs released were found in cluster 1 of the dendrogram. Genetic and genomic studies, QTL identification and analysis using agro-morphologically significant traits revealed should be used to develop mega-varieties adapted in rice growth conditions in Sub-Saharan Africa. (Author)

  18. Genetic Diversity and Phenotypic Variation in an Introgression Line Population Derived from an Interspecific Cross between Oryza glaberrima and Oryza sativa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassirou, Tondi Yacouba; Zhou, Wei; Yin, Yilong; Dong, Xilong; Rao, Quanqin; Shi, Han; Zhao, Wubin; Efisue, Andrew; Jin, Deming

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of closely related species genomic fragments is an effective way to enrich genetic diversity and creates new germplasms in crops. Here, we studied the genetic diversity of an introgression line (IL) population composed of 106 ILs derived from an interspecific tetra cross between O. glaberrima and O. sativa (RAM3/Jin23B//Jin23B///YuetaiB). The proportion of O. glaberrima genome (PGG) in the ILs ranged from 0.3% to 36.7%, with an average value of 12.32% which is close to the theoretically expected proportion. A total of 250 polymorphic alleles were amplified by 21 AFLP primer combinations with an average of 12 alleles per primer. Population structure analysis revealed that the IL population can be divided into four genetically distinct subpopulations. Both principal component analysis and neighbor-joining tree analysis showed that ILs with a higher PGG displayed greater genetic diversity. Canonical discriminant analysis identified six phenotypic traits (plant height, yield per plant, filled grain percentage, panicle length, panicle number and days to flowering) as the main discriminatory traits among the ILs and between the subpopulations and showed significant phenotypic distances between subpopulations. The effects of PGG on phenotypic traits in the ILs were estimated using a linear admixed model, which showed a significant positive effect on grain yield per plant (0.286±0.117), plant height (0.418 ± 0.132), panicle length (0.663 ± 0.107), and spikelet number per panicle (0.339 ± 0.128), and a significant negative effect on filled grain percentage (-0.267 ± 0.123) and days to flowering (-0.324 ± 0.075). We found that an intermediate range (10% − 20%) of PGG was more effective for producing ILs with favorable integrated agronomic traits. Our results confirm that construction of IL population carrying O. glaberrima genomic fragments could be an effective approach to increase the genetic diversity of O. sativa genome and an appropriate level

  19. Molecular markers unravel intraspecific and interspecific genetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2011). However, to develop efficient interspecific crosses it is essential to determine their phy- logenetic relationships. Although some workers have tried nuclear ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions for this purpose (Ronsted et al. 2002; Dhar et al. 2006), it would be worthwhile to use molecular markers,.

  20. The effect of pH on hydrolysis, cross-linking and barrier properties of starch barriers containing citric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Erik; Menzel, Carolin; Johansson, Caisa; Andersson, Roger; Koch, Kristine; Järnström, Lars

    2013-11-06

    Citric acid cross-linking of starch for e.g. food packaging applications has been intensely studied during the last decade as a method of producing water-insensitive renewable barrier coatings. We managed to improve a starch formulation containing citric acid as cross-linking agent for industrial paper coating applications by adjusting the pH of the starch solution. The described starch formulations exhibited both cross-linking of starch by citric acid as well as satisfactory barrier properties, e.g. fairly low OTR values at 50% RH that are comparable with EVOH. Furthermore, it has been shown that barrier properties of coated papers with different solution pH were correlated to molecular changes in starch showing both hydrolysis and cross-linking of starch molecules in the presence of citric acid. Hydrolysis was shown to be almost completely hindered at solution pH≥4 at curing temperatures≤105 °C and at pH≥5 at curing temperatures≤150 °C, whereas cross-linking still occurred to some extent at pH≤6.5 and drying temperatures as low as 70 °C. Coated papers showed a minimum in water vapor transmission rate at pH 4 of the starch coating solution, corresponding to the point where hydrolysis was effectively hindered but where a significant degree of cross-linking still occurred. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. 6,7Li + 28Si total reaction cross sections at near barrier energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pakou, A.; Musumarra, A.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Alamanos, N.; Assimakopoulos, P.A.; Divis, N.; Doukelis, G.; Gillibert, A.; Harissopulos, S.; Kalyva, G.; Kokkoris, M.; Lagoyannis, A.; Mertzimekis, T.J.; Nicolis, N.G.; Papachristodoulou, C.; Perdikakis, G.; Roubos, D.; Rusek, K.; Spyrou, S.; Zarkadas, Ch.

    2007-01-01

    Total reaction cross section measurements for the 6,7 Li + 28 Si systems have been performed at near-barrier energies. The results indicate that, with respect to the potential anomaly at barrier, 6 Li and 7 Li on light targets exhibit similar energy dependence on the imaginary potential. Comparisons are made with 6,7 Li cross sections on light and heavy targets, extracted via previous elastic scattering measurements and also with CDCC calculations. Energy dependent parametrisations are also obtained for total reaction cross sections of 6,7 Li on Si, as well as on any target, at near barrier energies

  2. Production of interspecific Campanula hybrids by ovule culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Röper, Anna Catharina; Lütken, Henrik Vlk; Christensen, B.

    2015-01-01

    The Campanula genus comprises several economically important ornamental plants species. Wide hybridisation is a method to increase phenotypic variability, but is limited due to interspecies hybridisation barriers. In this study we investigated whether ovule culture could be used to increase...... the success rate of interspecific hybridisation between C. portenschlagiana × C. poscharskyana and C. medium × C. formanekiana. The effect of different ovule isolation times on ovule germination in vitro was examined. In general, the number of collectible ovules and ovule germination was low. Interspecific....... With this study, a protocol for ovule culture was established and the usefulness of ovule culture to obtain interspecific hybrids of selected Campanula species was demonstrated....

  3. Reproductive characterization of interspecific hybrids among Capsicum species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo da Silva Monteiro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was the reproductive characterization of Capsicum accessions as well as of interspecifichybrids, based on pollen viability. Hybrids were obtained between Capsicum species. Pollen viability was high in most accessions,indicating that meiosis is normal, resulting in viable pollen grains. The pollen viability of species C. pubescens was the lowest (27%. The interspecific hybrids had varying degrees of pollen viability, from fertile combinations (C. chinense x C. frutescens and C.annuum x C. baccatum to male sterile combinations. Pollen viability also varied within the hybrid combination according toaccessions used in the cross. Results indicate that male sterility is one of the incompatibility barriers among Capsicum species sincehybrids can be established, but may be male sterile.

  4. Cross-cultural communication barriers in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Shena Parthab; Nicolle, Colette; Maguire, Martin

    To investigate healthcare professionals' perceptions of caring for people from ethnic minorities with poor or no English language skills when accessing health care. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with 34 healthcare professionals to identify their perception of barriers encountered by those with poor or no English language skills. Five main themes were identified in relation to barriers in accessing health care: language; low literacy; lack of understanding; attitudes, gender attitudes and health beliefs; and retention of information. It is essential that all individuals are able to interact effectively with healthcare services. New and innovative approaches are necessary to meet the needs of people from ethnic minorities accessing health care.

  5. Viscosity-Induced Crossing of the Phantom Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iver Brevik

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We show explicitly, by using astrophysical data plus reasonable assumptions for the bulk viscosity in the cosmic fluid, how the magnitude of this viscosity may be high enough to drive the fluid from its position in the quintessence region at present time t = 0 across the barrier w = −1 into the phantom region in the late universe. The phantom barrier is accordingly not a sharp mathematical divide, but rather a fuzzy concept. We also calculate the limiting forms of various thermodynamical quantities, including the rate of entropy production, for a dark energy fluid near the future Big Rip singularity.

  6. Fine-mapping and cross-validation of QTLs linked to fatty acid composition in multiple independent interspecific crosses of oil palm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Ngoot-Chin; Yaakub, Zulkifli; Kamaruddin, Katialisa; Mayes, Sean; Massawe, Festo; Sambanthamurthi, Ravigadevi; Jansen, Johannes; Low, Leslie Eng Ti; Ithnin, Maizura; Kushairi, Ahmad; Arulandoo, Xaviar; Rosli, Rozana; Chan, Kuang-Lim; Amiruddin, Nadzirah; Sritharan, Kandha; Lim, Chin Ching; Nookiah, Rajanaidu; Amiruddin, Mohd Din; Singh, Rajinder

    2016-04-14

    The commercial oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) produces a mesocarp oil (commonly called 'palm oil') with approximately equal proportions of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids (FAs). An increase in unsaturated FAs content or iodine value (IV) as a measure of the degree of unsaturation would help to open up new markets for the oil. One way to manipulate the fatty acid composition (FAC) in palm oil is through introgression of favourable alleles from the American oil palm, E. oleifera, which has a more unsaturated oil. In this study, a segregating E. oleifera x E. guineensis (OxG) hybrid population for FAC is used to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) linked to IV and various FAs. QTL analysis revealed 10 major and two putative QTLs for IV and six FAs, C14:0, C16:0, C16:1, C18:0, C18:1 and C18:2 distributed across six linkage groups (LGs), OT1, T2, T3, OT4, OT6 and T9. The major QTLs for IV and C16:0 on LGOT1 explained 60.0 - 69.0 % of the phenotypic trait variation and were validated in two independent BC2 populations. The genomic interval contains several key structural genes in the FA and oil biosynthesis pathways such as PATE/FATB, HIBCH, BASS2, LACS4 and DGAT1 and also a relevant transcription factor (TF), WRI1. The literature suggests that some of these genes can exhibit pleiotropic effects in the regulatory networks of these traits. Using the whole genome sequence data, markers tightly linked to the candidate genes were also developed. Clustering trait values according to the allelic forms of these candidate markers revealed significant differences in the IV and FAs of the palms in the mapping and validation crosses. The candidate gene approach described and exploited here is useful to identify the potential causal genes linked to FAC and can be adopted for marker-assisted selection (MAS) in oil palm.

  7. Does sumatriptan cross the blood-brain barrier in animals and man?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer

    2010-01-01

    Sumatriptan, a relatively hydrophilic triptan, based on several animal studies has been regarded to be unable to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In more recent animal studies there are strong indications that sumatriptan to some extent can cross the BBB. The CNS adverse events of sumatriptan...

  8. Fine mapping of Hch1, the causal D-genome gene for hybrid chlorosis in interspecific crosses between tetraploid wheat and Aegilops tauschii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirao, Kana; Nishijima, Ryo; Sakaguchi, Kohei; Takumi, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid chlorosis, one of the reproductive barriers between tetraploid wheat and its D-genome progenitor, Aegilops tauschii, inhibits normal growth of synthetic wheat hexaploids. Hybrid chlorosis appears to be due to an epistatic interaction of two loci from the AB and D wheat genomes. Our previous study assigned the causal D-genome gene for hybrid chlorosis, Hch1, to the short arm of chromosome 7D. Here, we constructed a fine map of 7DS near Hch1 using 280 F2 individuals from a cross of two wheat synthetic lines, one showing normal growth and the other showing hybrid chlorosis. The hybrid chlorosis phenotype was controlled by a single dominant allele of the Hch1 locus in the synthetic hexaploids. Hch1 was closely linked to four new markers within 0.2 cM, and may be localized near or within the two Ae. tauschii scaffolds containing the linked markers on 7DS. Comparative analysis of the Hch1 chromosomal region for Ae. tauschii, barley and Brachypodium showed that a local inversion occurred in the region proximal to Hch1 during the divergence between barley and Ae. tauschii, and that the Hch1 region on wheat 7DS is syntenic to Brachypodium chromosome 1. These observations provide useful information for further studies toward map-based cloning of Hch1.

  9. Crossing the Barriers: An Analysis of Land Access Barriers to Geothermal Development and Potential Improvement Scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levine, Aaron L [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Young, Katherine R [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-10-04

    Developers have identified many non-technical barriers to geothermal power development, including access to land. Activities required for accessing land, such as environmental review and private and public leasing can take a considerable amount of time and can delay or prevent project development. This paper discusses the impacts to available geothermal resources and deployment caused by land access challenges, including tribal and cultural resources, environmentally sensitive areas, biological resources, land ownership, federal and state lease queues, and proximity to military installations. In this analysis, we identified challenges that have the potential to prevent development of identified and undiscovered hydrothermal geothermal resources. We found that an estimated 400 MW of identified geothermal resource potential and 4,000 MW of undiscovered geothermal resource potential were either unallowed for development or contained one or more significant barriers that could prevent development at the site. Potential improvement scenarios that could be employed to overcome these barriers include (1) providing continuous funding to the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) for processing geothermal leases and permit applications and (2) the creation of advanced environmental mitigation measures. The model results forecast that continuous funding to the USFS could result in deployment of an additional 80 MW of geothermal capacity by 2030 and 124 MW of geothermal capacity by 2050 when compared to the business-as-usual scenario. The creation of advanced environmental mitigation measures coupled with continuous funding to the USFS could result in deployment of an additional 97 MW of geothermal capacity by 2030 and 152 MW of geothermal capacity by 2050 when compared to the business-as-usual scenario. The small impact on potential deployment in these improvement scenarios suggests that these 4,400 MW have other barriers to development in addition to land access. In other words, simply

  10. Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR Genetic Linkage Map of D Genome Diploid Cotton Derived from an Interspecific Cross between Gossypium davidsonii and Gossypium klotzschianum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joy Nyangasi Kirungu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The challenge in tetraploid cotton cultivars is the narrow genetic base and therefore, the bottleneck is how to obtain interspecific hybrids and introduce the germplasm directly from wild cotton to elite cultivars. Construction of genetic maps has provided insight into understanding the genome structure, interrelationships between organisms in relation to evolution, and discovery of genes that carry important agronomic traits in plants. In this study, we generated an interspecific hybrid between two wild diploid cottons, Gossypium davidsonii and Gossypium klotzschianum, and genotyped 188 F2:3 populations in order to develop a genetic map. We screened 12,560 SWU Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR primers and obtained 1000 polymorphic markers which accounted for only 8%. A total of 928 polymorphic primers were successfully scored and only 728 were effectively linked across the 13 chromosomes, but with an asymmetrical distribution. The map length was 1480.23 cM, with an average length of 2.182 cM between adjacent markers. A high percentage of the markers on the map developed, and for the physical map of G. raimondii, exhibited highly significant collinearity, with two types of duplication. High level of segregation distortion was observed. A total of 27 key genes were identified with diverse roles in plant hormone signaling, development, and defense reactions. The achievement of developing the F2:3 population and its genetic map constructions may be a landmark in establishing a new tool for the genetic improvement of cultivars from wild plants in cotton. Our map had an increased recombination length compared to other maps developed from other D genome cotton species.

  11. Understanding the fusion cross section among light nuclei around the Coulomb barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Del Zoppo Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we investigate fusion induced by a radioactive 8Li projectile on a 4He gas target, at center-of-mass energies between 0.6 and 5 MeV. The main result is the tendency of the dimensionless fusion cross section σπλ2 to form well visible plateaus alternated to steep rises. This is likely to be the most genuine consequence of the discrete nature of the intervening angular momenta observed so far in fusion reactions right above the Coulomb barrier. A partial-wave analysis, exclusively based on a pure quantal penetration fusion model, identifies a remarkably low-height barrier. Indeed, these plateaus allow enhanced experimental sensitivity to the fusion barrier given that the most barrier-sensitive lowest partial waves are well separated. We expect that the present results for 8Li+4He will promote further investigations of the fusion reaction mechanism between very light ions at energies much below the interaction barrier. For the moment, we believe that understanding the plateau origin in the cross section above the barrier will almost certainly be useful to corroborate the extrapolation to the important astrophysical region below the Coulomb barrier, not only in the case of the 8Li+4He fusion but also for other systems, such as the 12C+12C.

  12. Understanding the fusion cross section among light nuclei around the Coulomb barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Zoppo, Antonio; La Cognata, Marco

    2017-11-01

    In this work we investigate fusion induced by a radioactive 8Li projectile on a 4He gas target, at center-of-mass energies between 0.6 and 5 MeV. The main result is the tendency of the dimensionless fusion cross section to form well visible plateaus alternated to steep rises. This is likely to be the most genuine consequence of the discrete nature of the intervening angular momenta observed so far in fusion reactions right above the Coulomb barrier. A partial-wave analysis, exclusively based on a pure quantal penetration fusion model, identifies a remarkably low-height barrier. Indeed, these plateaus allow enhanced experimental sensitivity to the fusion barrier given that the most barrier-sensitive lowest partial waves are well separated. We expect that the present results for 8Li+4He will promote further investigations of the fusion reaction mechanism between very light ions at energies much below the interaction barrier. For the moment, we believe that understanding the plateau origin in the cross section above the barrier will almost certainly be useful to corroborate the extrapolation to the important astrophysical region below the Coulomb barrier, not only in the case of the 8Li+4He fusion but also for other systems, such as the 12C+12C.

  13. Drug-loaded nanocarriers: passive targeting and crossing of biological barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabanel, J M; Aoun, V; Elkin, I; Mokhtar, M; Hildgen, P

    2012-01-01

    Poor bioavailability and poor pharmacokinetic characteristics are some of the leading causes of drug development failure. Therefore, poorly-soluble drugs, fragile proteins or nucleic acid products may benefit from their encapsulation in nanosized vehicles, providing enhanced solubilization, protection against degradation, and increased access to pathological compartments. A key element for the success of drug-loaded nanocarriers is their ability to either cross biological barriers themselves, or allow loaded drugs to traverse them to achieve optimal pharmacological action at pathological sites. Depending on the mode of administration, nanocarriers may have to cross different physiological barriers in their journey towards their target. In this review, the crossing of biological barriers by passive targeting strategies will be presented for intravenous delivery (vascular endothelial lining, particularly for tumor vasculature and blood brain barrier targeting), oral administration (gastrointestinal lining), and upper airway administration (pulmonary epithelium). For each specific barrier, background information will be provided on the structure and biology of the tissues involved as well as available pathways for nano-objects or loaded drugs (diffusion and convection through fenestration, transcytosis, tight junction crossing, etc.). The determinants of passive targeting - size, shape, surface chemistry, surface patterning of nanovectors - will be discussed in light of current results. Perspectives on each mode of administration will be presented. The focus will be on polymeric nanoparticles and dendrimers, although advances in liposome technology will be also reported as they represent the largest body in the drug delivery literature.

  14. Deformation effects on sub-barrier fusion cross sections in 16O+174,176Yb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajbongshi, Tapan; Kalita, K.; Nath, S.; Gehlot, J.; Banerjee, Tathagata; Mukul, Ish; Dubey, R.; Madhavan, N.; Lin, C. J.; Shamlath, A.; Laveen, P. V.; Shareef, M.; Kumar, Neeraj; Jisha, P.; Sharma, P.

    2016-05-01

    Background: Couplings with various reaction channels are known to enhance sub-barrier fusion cross sections by several orders in magnitude. However, a few open questions still remain. For example, the influence of higher order static deformations on sub-barrier fusion cross sections is yet to be comprehensively understood. Purpose: We study the role of hexadecapole nuclear deformation effect on sub-barrier fusion cross sections. Also, this work aims to extract hexadecapole deformation (β4) in nuclei in the lanthanide region. Method: The evaporation residue (ER) excitation functions for 16O+174,176Yb were measured at laboratory beam energies (Elab) in the range of 64.6-103.6 MeV. Measurements were carried out by employing the recoil mass spectrometer Heavy Ion Reaction Analyzer (HIRA) at IUAC, New Delhi. Fusion barrier distributions (BDs) were extracted from data. Results from the experiment were subjected to coupled-channels analysis, in which β4 was varied as a free parameter. Results: Experimental fusion cross sections at energies below the barrier expectedly showed strong enhancement compared to the predictions from the one-dimensional barrier penetration model. Data were satisfactorily reproduced after inclusion of negative β4 for both the targets in the coupled-channels calculation. Conclusions: The significant role of hexadecapole deformation was observed in the sub-barrier fusion of 16O+174,176Yb. The proposed value of β4 reproduced the measured fusion excitation function reasonably well. The BDs from these data were also extracted but no definitive conclusions could be drawn from them.

  15. A cross-cultural investigation into the dimensional structure and stability of the Barriers to Research and Utilization Scale (BARRIERS Scale).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brett; Brown, Ted; Costello, Shane

    2015-10-24

    It is important that scales exhibit strong measurement properties including those related to the investigation of issues that impact evidence-based practice. The validity of the Barriers to Research Utilization Scale (BARRIERS Scale) has recently been questioned in a systematic review. This study investigated the dimensional structure and stability of the 28 item BARRIERS Scale when completed by three groups of participants from three different cross-cultural environments. Data from the BARRIERS Scale completed by 696 occupational therapists from Australia (n = 137), Taiwan (n = 413), and the United Kingdom (n = 144) were analysed using principal components analysis, followed by Procrustes Transformation. Poorly fitting items were identified by low communalities, cross-loading, and theoretically inconsistent primary loadings, and were systematically removed until good fit was achieved. The cross-cultural stability of the component structure of the BARRIERS Scale was examined. A four component, 19 item version of the BARRIERS Scale emerged that demonstrated an improved dimensional fit and stability across the three participant groups. The resulting four components were consistent with the BARRIERS Scale as originally conceptualised. Findings from the study suggest that the four component, 19 item version of the BARRIERS Scale is a robust and valid measure for identifying barriers to research utilization for occupational therapists in paediatric health care settings across Australia, United Kingdom, and Taiwan. The four component 19 item version of the BARRIERS Scale exhibited good dimensional structure, internal consistency, and stability.

  16. Crossing the Barriers: An Analysis of Permitting Barriers to Geothermal Development and Potential Improvement Scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levine, Aaron L [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Young, Katherine R [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-10-04

    Developers have identified many non-technical barriers to geothermal power development, including permitting. Activities required for permitting, such as the associated environmental reviews, can take a considerable amount of time and delay project development. This paper discusses the impacts to geothermal development timelines due to the permitting challenges, including the regulatory framework, environmental review process, and ancillary permits. We identified barriers that have the potential to prevent geothermal development or delay timelines and defined improvement scenarios that could assist in expediting geothermal development and permitting timelines and lead to the deployment of additional geothermal resources by 2030 and 2050: (1) the creation of a centralized federal geothermal permitting office and utilization of state permit coordination offices as well as (2) an expansion of existing categorical exclusions applicable to geothermal development on Bureau of Land Management public lands to include the oil and gas categorical exclusions passed as part of the Energy Policy Act of 2005. We utilized the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) and the Geothermal Electricity Technology Evaluation Model (GETEM) to forecast baseline geothermal deployment based on previous analysis of geothermal project development and permitting timelines. The model results forecast that reductions in geothermal project timelines can have a significant impact on geothermal deployment. For example, using the ReEDS model, we estimated that reducing timelines by two years, perhaps due to the creation of a centralized federal geothermal permitting office and utilization of state permit coordination offices, could result in deployment of an additional 204 MW by 2030 and 768 MW by 2050 - a 13% improvement when compared to the business as usual scenario. The model results forecast that a timeline improvement of four years - for example with an expansion of existing categorical

  17. Ionically cross-linked hyaluronic acid: wetting, lubrication, and viscoelasticity of a modified adhesion barrier gel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Vorvolakos

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Katherine Vorvolakos1, Irada S Isayeva1, Hoan-My Do Luu1, Dinesh V Patwardhan1, Steven K Pollack21Division of Chemistry and Material Science, 2Office of Science and Engineering Laboratories, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MD, USAAbstract: Hyaluronic acid (HA, in linear or cross-linked form, is a common component of cosmetics, personal care products, combination medical products, and medical devices. In all cases, the ability of the HA solution or gel to wet surfaces and/or disrupt and lubricate interfaces is a limiting feature of its mechanism of action. We synthesized ferric ion–cross-linked networks of HA based on an adhesion barrier, varied the degree of cross-linking, and performed wetting goniometry, viscometry, and dynamic mechanical analysis. As cross-linking increases, so do contact angle, viscosity, storage modulus, and loss modulus; thus, wetting and lubrication are compromised. These findings have implications in medical device materials, such as adhesion barriers and mucosal drug delivery vehicles.Keywords: hyaluron, adhesion barrier, wetting, contact angle, viscosity, lubrication, elasticity, viscoelastic, hydrogel, ferric

  18. Discursive barriers and cross-scale forest governance in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caleb T. Gallemore

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Students of social-ecological systems have emphasized the need for effective cross-scale governance. We theorized that discursive barriers, particularly between technical and traditional practices, can act as a barrier to cross-scale collaboration. We analyzed the effects of discursive divides on collaboration on Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+ policy development in Central Kalimantan, an Indonesian province on the island of Borneo selected in 2010 to pilot subnational REDD+ policy. We argue that the complexities of bridging local land management practices and technical approaches to greenhouse gas emissions reduction and carbon offsetting create barriers to cross-scale collaboration. We tested these hypotheses using an exponential random graph model of collaboration among 36 organizations active in REDD+ policy in the province. We found that discursive divides were associated with a decreased probability of collaboration between organizations and that organizations headquartered outside the province were less likely to collaborate with organizations headquartered in the province. We conclude that bridging discursive communities presents a chicken-and-egg problem for cross-scale governance of social-ecological systems. In precisely the situations where it is most important, when bridging transnational standards with local knowledge and land management practices, it is the most difficult.

  19. Chromosome doubling to overcome the chrysanthemum cross barrier based on insight from transcriptomic and proteomic analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fengjiao; Hua, Lichun; Fei, Jiangsong; Wang, Fan; Liao, Yuan; Fang, Weimin; Chen, Fadi; Teng, Nianjun

    2016-08-09

    Cross breeding is the most commonly used method in chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum morifolium) breeding; however, cross barriers always exist in these combinations. Many studies have shown that paternal chromosome doubling can often overcome hybridization barriers during cross breeding, although the underlying mechanism has seldom been investigated. In this study, we performed two crosses: C. morifolium (pollen receptor) × diploid C. nankingense (pollen donor) and C. morifolium × tetraploid C. nankingense. Seeds were obtained only from the latter cross. RNA-Seq and isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) were used to investigate differentially expressed genes and proteins during key embryo development stages in the latter cross. A previously performed cross, C. morifolium × diploid C. nankingense, was compared to our results and revealed that transcription factors (i.e., the agamous-like MADS-box protein AGL80 and the leucine-rich repeat receptor protein kinase EXS), hormone-responsive genes (auxin-binding protein 1), genes and proteins related to metabolism (ATP-citrate synthase, citrate synthase and malate dehydrogenase) and other genes reported to contribute to embryo development (i.e., LEA, elongation factor and tubulin) had higher expression levels in the C. morifolium × tetraploid C. nankingense cross. In contrast, genes related to senescence and cell death were down-regulated in the C. morifolium × tetraploid C. nankingense cross. The data resources helped elucidate the gene and protein expression profiles and identify functional genes during different development stages. When the chromosomes from the male parent are doubled, the genes contributing to normal embryo developmentare more abundant. However, genes with negative functions were suppressed, suggesting that chromosome doubling may epigenetically inhibit the expression of these genes and allow the embryo to develop normally.

  20. Barrier effect and cross-border cooperation. The Sweden-Norway INTERREG–A territorial effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Medeiros

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Historic developments that occurred in the last centuries have affected the barrier effect of national borders in Europe and, consequently, the degree and the intensity of the cooperation between neighbouring countries. However, the establishment of the European Single Market, in the last three decades, has deepened the cross-border cooperation inside the EU Territory. In this respect, the INTERREG-A initiative has played a major role, since 1990. This article intends to shed some light on the progress of the cross-border cooperation in the Swedish-Norwegian border region, and the territorial effects of the INTERREG-A programme in the reduction of the barrier effect along the border in five dimensions (institutional-urban, accessibility, culture-social, environmental-heritage and economy-technology.

  1. Activated barrier crossing dynamics in the non-radiative decay of NADH and NADPH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacker, Thomas S.; Marsh, Richard J.; Duchen, Michael R.; Bain, Angus J.

    2013-08-01

    In live tissue, alterations in metabolism induce changes in the fluorescence decay of the biological coenzyme NAD(P)H, the mechanism of which is not well understood. In this work, the fluorescence and anisotropy decay dynamics of NADH and NADPH were investigated as a function of viscosity in a range of water-glycerol solutions. The viscosity dependence of the non-radiative decay is well described by Kramers and Kramers-Hubbard models of activated barrier crossing over a wide viscosity range. Our combined lifetime and anisotropy analysis indicates common mechanisms of non-radiative relaxation in the two emitting states (conformations) of both molecules. The low frequencies associated with barrier crossing suggest that non-radiative decay is mediated by small scale motion (e.g. puckering) of the nicotinamide ring. Variations in the fluorescence lifetimes of NADH and NADPH when bound to different enzymes may therefore be attributed to differing levels of conformational restriction upon binding.

  2. Universal trend for heavy-ion total reaction cross sections at energies above the Coulomb barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavares, O.A.P.; Medeiros, E.L., E-mail: emil@cbpf.b [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Morcelle, V. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    2010-06-15

    Heavy-ion total reaction cross section measurements for more than one thousand one hundred reaction cases covering 61 target nuclei in the range {sup 6}Li-{sup 238}U, and 158 projectile nuclei from {sup 2}H up to {sup 84}Kr (mostly exotic ones) have been analysed in a systematic way by using an empirical, three-parameter formula which is applicable to cases for projectile kinetic energies above the Coulomb barrier. The analysis has shown that the average total nuclear binding energy per nucleon of the interacting nuclei and their radii are the chief quantities which describe the cross section patterns. A great number of cross section data (87%) has been quite satisfactorily reproduced by the proposed formula, therefore total reaction cross section predictions for new, not yet experimentally investigated reaction cases can be obtained within 25 percent (or much less) of uncertainty (author)

  3. Some results of applied interspecific hybridization in sunflower breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsvetkova, F.

    1976-01-01

    Investigations on the interspecific hybridization in sunflower, aimed at developing a diversified initial selection material, were carried out Wild species of the diploid, tetraploid and hexaploid groups, varieties, hybrids, and selfed-lines of cultivated sunflower were used for crossings. To overcome incrossability between the species and sterility in the hybrids the method of f;cilitating of crossability by mutual gra'fting and gamma-rays treatment of seeds and pollen were applied. Results showed that: 1. By the method of interspecific hybridization forms might be produced resistant to more important diseases. 2. Interspecific hybridization in combination with other methods of selection might produce varieties and hybrids with a complex of valuable qualities. 3. Crossings between wild species and cultivated sunflower gave progenies with gene rale sterility. 4. The species H.tuberosus, H.scaberimus, H.arωphylus and H.lenticularis possess genes of full fertility restoration. (author)

  4. Fine mapping and genetic association analysis of Net2, the causative D-genome locus of low temperature-induced hybrid necrosis in interspecific crosses between tetraploid wheat and Aegilops tauschii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Kouhei; Nishijima, Ryo; Iehisa, Julio Cesar Masaru; Takumi, Shigeo

    2016-10-01

    Hybrid necrosis has been observed in many interspecific hybrids from crosses between tetraploid wheat and the wheat D-genome donor Aegilops tauschii. Type II necrosis is a kind of hybrid incompatibility that is specifically characterized by low-temperature induction and growth suppression. Two complementary genes, Net1 on the AB genome and Net2 on the D genome, putatively control type II necrosis in ABD triploids and synthetic hexaploid wheat. Toward map-based cloning of Net2, a fine map around the Net2 region on 2DS was constructed in this study. Using the draft genome sequence of Ae. tauschii and the physical map of the barley genome, the Net2 locus was mapped within a 0.6 cM interval between two closely linked markers. Although local chromosomal rearrangements were observed in the Net2-corresponding region between the barley/Brachypodium and Ae. tauschii genomes, the two closely linked markers were significantly associated with type II necrosis in Ae. tauschii. These results suggest that these markers will aid efficient selection of Net2 non-carrier individuals from the Ae. tauschii population and intraspecific progeny, and could help with introgression of agriculturally important genes from Ae. tauschii to common wheat.

  5. The effects of different pollination methods on overcoming distant cross barriers of the Lily 'cordelia' x Lilium dauricum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Li; Zhang Qixiang; Zhang Kezhong; Jia Yuehui; Wang Zhe

    2008-01-01

    The application of irradiated pollen assisting pollination, cross chemical assisting pollination and cut-style pollination in overcoming the cross barriers of lily 'cordelia' x Lilium dauricum were investigated. A number of fruits and plump seeds were produced by using the normal stigma pollination, which indicated that the cross was a compatible cross. The fact that the application of 1000 Gy or 2000 Gy irradiated pollen assisting pollination increased the fruitset and seedset obviously exhibited that this methods could overcome the cross barriers effectively. More hybrid seeds would have a positive effect on the future breeding selection. Application of cross chemical's assisting pollination raised the fruitset and seedset to some extent. The cut-style pollination method deduced the fruitset and seedset, which suggested that the method was not suitable for bypassing the cross barriers. (authors)

  6. Mapping QTLs for 100-seed weight in an interspecific soybean cross of Williams 82 (Glycine max) x PI 366121 (Glycine soja)

    Science.gov (United States)

    100-seed weight is a critical component for soybean quality and yield. The objective of the present study was to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for 100-seed weight using 169 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from the cross of Williams 82 x PI 366121. The parental lines and RILs were g...

  7. Genomic Characterization of Interspecific Hybrids and an Admixture Population Derived from Panicum amarum × P. virgatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Heffelfinger

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Switchgrass ( L. and its relatives are regarded as top bioenergy crop candidates; however, one critical barrier is the introduction of useful genetic diversity and the development of new cultivars and hybrids. Combining genomes from related cultivars and species provides an opportunity to introduce new traits. In switchgrass, a breeding advantage would be achieved by combining the genomes of intervarietal ecotypes or interspecific hybrids. The recovery of wide crosses, however, is often tedious and may involve complicated embryo rescue and numerous backcrosses. Here, we demonstrate a straightforward approach to wide crosses involving the use of a selectable transgene for recovery of interspecific [ cv. Alamo × Ell var or Atlantic Coastal Panicgrass (ACP] F hybrids followed by backcrossing to generate a nontransgenic admixture population. A nontransgenic herbicide-sensitive (HbS admixture population of 83 FBC progeny was analyzed by genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS to characterize local ancestry, parental contribution, and patterns of recombination. These results demonstrate a widely applicable breeding strategy that makes use of transgenic selectable resistance to identify and recover true hybrids.

  8. A cross-cultural survey of residents' perceived barriers in questioning/challenging authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, H; Pian-Smith, M; Sato, M; Sawa, R; Takeshita, T; Raemer, D

    2006-08-01

    To identify perceived barriers to residents' questioning or challenging their seniors, to determine how these barriers affect decisions, and to assess how these barriers differ across cultures. A written questionnaire was administered to residents in teaching hospitals in the US and Japan to assess factors affecting residents' willingness to question or challenge their superiors. The responses were analyzed for statistical significance of differences between the two cultures and to determine the importance of issues affecting decisions. Questionnaires were completed by 175 US and 65 Japanese residents, with an overall response rate of 71%. Trainees from both countries believe that questioning and challenging contribute to safety. The perceived importance of specific beliefs about the workplace differed across cultures in seven out of 22 questions. Residents' decisions to make a challenge were related to the relationships and perceived response of the superiors. There was no statistical difference between the US and Japanese residents in terms of the threshold for challenging their seniors. We have identified attributes of residents' beliefs of communication, including several cross-cultural differences in the importance of values and issues affecting one's decision to question or challenge. In contrast, there was no difference in the threshold for challenging seniors by the Japanese and US residents studied. Changes in organizational and professional culture may be as important, if not more so, than national culture to encourage "speaking up". Residents should be encouraged to overcome barriers to challenging, and training programs should foster improved relationships and communication between trainers and trainees.

  9. Interspecific hybridisation of Lathyrus sativus (Guaya) with wild ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Except for the reciprocal crosses of L. sativus and L. pseudo-cicera, others failed to develop viable seeds. In several of the interspecific hybrids, pod development was observed but embryos aborted during early stages of development. Embryo culture was attempted to rescue these immature embryos. The response of the ...

  10. Postpartum nurses' perceptions of barriers to screening for intimate partner violence: a cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillery Margaret E

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intimate partner violence (IPV is a human rights violation that is pervasive worldwide, and is particularly critical for women during the reproductive period. IPV includes physical, sexual and emotional abuse. Nurses on in-patient postpartum units are well-positioned to screen women for IPV, yet low screening rates suggest that barriers to screening exist. The purpose of this study was to (a identify the frequency of screening for IPV, (b the most important barriers to screening, (c the relationship between the barriers to screening and the frequency of screening for types of abuse, and (d to identify other factors that contribute to the frequency of screening for IPV. Methods In 2008, we conducted a cross-sectional survey of 96 nurses from postpartum inpatient units in three Canadian urban hospitals. The survey included the Barriers to Abuse Assessment Tool (BAAT, adapted for postpartum nurses (PPN. Ordinary least squares (OLS regression models were used to predict barriers to screening for each type of IPV. Results The frequency of screening varied by the type of abuse with highest screening rates found for physical and emotional abuse. According to the BAAT-PPN, lack of knowledge was the most important barrier to screening. The BAAT-PPN total score was negatively correlated with screening for physical, sexual, and emotional abuse. Using OLS regression models and after controlling for demographic characteristics, the BAAT-PPN explained 14%, 12%, and 11% of the variance in screening for physical, sexual and emotional abuse, respectively. Fluency in the language of the patient was negatively correlated with screening for each type of abuse. When added as Step 3 to OLS regression models, language fluency was associated with an additional decrease in the likelihood of screening for physical (beta coefficient = -.38, P P = .05, and emotional abuse (beta coefficient = -.48, P Conclusions Our findings support an inverse

  11. Crossing Language Barriers: Using Crossed Random Effects Modelling in Psycholinguistics Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robyn J. Carson

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief review of multilevel modelling (MLM, also called hierarchical linear modelling (HLM, and to present a step-by-step tutorial on how to perform a crossed random effects model (CREM analysis. The first part provides an overview of how hierarchical data have been analyzed in the past and how they are being analyzed presently. It then focuses on how these types of data have been dealt with in psycholinguistic research. It concludes with an overview of the steps involved in CREM, a form of MLM used for psycholinguistics data. The second part includes a tutorial demonstrating how to conduct a CREM analysis in SPSS, using the following steps: 1 clarify your research question, 2 determine if CREM is necessary, 3 choose an estimation method, 4 build your model, and 5 estimate the model’s effect size. A short example on how to report CREM results in a scholarly article is also included.

  12. Targeting Early Dementia: Using Lipid Cubic Phase Nanocarriers to Cross the Blood–Brain Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph S. D’Arrigo

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decades, a frequent co-morbidity of cerebrovascular pathology and Alzheimer’s disease has been observed. Numerous published studies indicate that the preservation of a healthy cerebrovascular endothelium can be an important therapeutic target. By incorporating the appropriate drug(s into biomimetic (lipid cubic phase nanocarriers, one obtains a multitasking combination therapeutic, which targets certain cell surface scavenger receptors, mainly class B type I (i.e., SR-BI, and crosses the blood–brain barrier. This targeting allows for various cell types related to Alzheimer’s to be simultaneously searched out for localized drug treatment in vivo.

  13. A stakeless yard long bean cultivar derived from an interspecific cross between cowpea Vigna unguiculata L. (Walp) and yard long bean Vigna sesquipedalis L. (Verdc.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: 'Yard long bean' is an important vegetable in the Thai diet, particularly in Northeast Thailand. However, growing 'yard long beans' requires stakes for supporting the twining stems and keeping the pod from touching the ground. Staking costs money, takes time and needs labour. An ideal cultivar would be a 'yard long bean' with erect plant type and under 80 cm in height that produces typical long bean pods and allows convenient picking during the harvest time. An attempt to breed such a cultivar was made by crossing cowpea Vigna unguiculata L. (Walp.) with' yard long bean' Vigna sesquipedalis L. (Verdc.) in 1984. This resulted in a new cultivar 'KKU 25'. This cultivar, having erect plant type, requires no staking for supporting the stem and produces long fresh pods with acceptable taste which can be harvested within 43 days. The average pod length is 48 cm, and pod diameter 1.43 cm. In a preliminary yield trial, an average fresh pod yield of 16 t/ha was obtained. (author)

  14. Mapping of quantitative trait locus (QTLs) that contribute to germination and early seedling drought tolerance in the interspecific cross Setaria italica×Setaria viridis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qie, Lufeng; Jia, Guanqing; Zhang, Wenying; Schnable, James; Shang, Zhonglin; Li, Wei; Liu, Binhui; Li, Mingzhe; Chai, Yang; Zhi, Hui; Diao, Xianmin

    2014-01-01

    Drought tolerance is an important breeding target for enhancing the yields of grain crop species in arid and semi-arid regions of the world. Two species of Setaria, domesticated foxtail millet (S. italica) and its wild ancestor green foxtail (S. viridis) are becoming widely adopted as models for functional genomics studies in the Panicoid grasses. In this study, the genomic regions controlling germination and early seedling drought tolerance in Setaria were identified using 190 F7 lines derived from a cross between Yugu1, a S. italica cultivar developed in China, and a wild S. viridis genotype collected from Uzbekistan. Quantitative trait loci were identified which contribute to a number of traits including promptness index, radical root length, coleoptile length and lateral root number at germinating stage and seedling survival rate was characterized by the ability of desiccated seedlings to revive after rehydration. A genetic map with 128 SSR markers which spans 1293.9 cM with an average of 14 markers per linkage group of the 9 linkage groups was constructed. A total of eighteen QTLs were detected which included nine that explained over 10% of the phenotypic variance for a given trait. Both the wild green foxtail genotype and the foxtail millet cultivar contributed the favorite alleles for traits detected in this trial, indicating that wild Setaria viridis populations may serve as a reservoir for novel stress tolerance alleles which could be employed in foxtail millet breeding.

  15. Path analyses of cross-sectional and longitudinal data suggest that variability in natural communities of blood-associated parasites is derived from host characteristics and not interspecific interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Carmit; Einav, Monica; Hawlena, Hadas

    2015-08-19

    The parasite composition of wild host individuals often impacts their behavior and physiology, and the transmission dynamics of pathogenic species thereby determines disease risk in natural communities. Yet, the determinants of parasite composition in natural communities are still obscure. In particular, three fundamental questions remain open: (1) what are the relative roles of host and environmental characteristics compared with direct interactions between parasites in determining the community composition of parasites? (2) do these determinants affect parasites belonging to the same guild and those belonging to different guilds in similar manners? and (3) can cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses work interchangeably in detecting community determinants? Our study was designed to answer these three questions in a natural community of rodents and their fleas, ticks, and two vector-borne bacteria. We sampled a natural population of Gerbillus andersoni rodents and their blood-associated parasites on two occasions. By combining path analysis and model selection approaches, we then explored multiple direct and indirect paths that connect (i) the environmental and host-related characteristics to the infection probability of a host by each of the four parasite species, and (ii) the infection probabilities of the four species by each other. Our results suggest that the majority of paths shaping the blood-associated communities are indirect, mostly determined by host characteristics and not by interspecific interactions or environmental conditions. The exact effects of host characteristics on infection probability by a given parasite depend on its life history and on the method of sampling, in which the cross-sectional and longitudinal methods are complementary. Despite the awareness of the need of ecological investigations into natural host-vector-parasite communities in light of the emergence and re-emergence of vector-borne diseases, we lack sampling methods that

  16. Interploidy interspecific hybridization in Fuchsia

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    School of Biological Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland Mail Centre,. Auckland 1142, New Zealand. [Talluri R. S. 2012 Interploidy interspecific hybridization in Fuchsia. J. Genet. 91, 71–74]. Introduction. In the past, many hypotheses were put forward to explain the failure of the endosperm in ...

  17. Interspecific Resource Competition in Antelopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, Herbert H.T.

    2016-01-01

    Intraspecific or interspecific competition is then fundamentally the same: scramble competition is a good example of this type of competition. Modern ecology increasingly is faced with the question whether the data or a paper provide evidence for the statement that is made or for testing the

  18. CHARACTERISATION OF Phaseolus coccineus INTERSPECIFIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    2018-02-20

    Feb 20, 2018 ... ACCESSIONS FOR DISEASE RESISTANCE, GRAIN MARKET CLASS AND. YIELD ... genetic base of this crop, especially for adaptation to extreme environments. The runner bean ( ..... Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) of reaction to field occurring diseases and yield performance of 186 interspecific lines at ...

  19. Bioinspired composites from cross-linked galactoglucomannan and microfibrillated cellulose: Thermal, mechanical and oxygen barrier properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oinonen, Petri; Krawczyk, Holger; Ek, Monica; Henriksson, Gunnar; Moriana, Rosana

    2016-01-20

    In this study, new wood-inspired films were developed from microfibrillated cellulose and galactoglucomannan-lignin networks isolated from chemothermomechanical pulping side streams and cross-linked using laccase enzymes. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that cross-linked galactoglucomannan-lignin networks have been used for the potential development of composite films inspired by woody-cell wall formation. Their capability as polymeric matrices was assessed based on thermal, structural, mechanical and oxygen permeability analyses. The addition of different amounts of microfibrillated cellulose as a reinforcing agent and glycerol as a plasticizer on the film performances was evaluated. In general, an increase in microfibrillated cellulose resulted in a film with better thermal, mechanical and oxygen barrier performance. However, the presence of glycerol decreased the thermal stability, stiffness and oxygen barrier properties of the films but improved their elongation. Therefore, depending on the application, the film properties can be tailored by adjusting the amounts of reinforcing agent and plasticizer in the film formulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Backcrosses in interspecific hybridization in sunflower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atlagić Jovanka

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available When incorporating desirable traits (resistance to causal agents of various diseases from the wild relatives into the cultivated sunflower, some undesirable ones are introduced too (branching, small head diameter, low oil content, etc. To overcome this problem, backcrosses (F1 interspecific hybrids x cultivated sunflower are used, although very often desirable traits are lost in the process. Cytological analysis (meiosis and pollen viability and molecular markers (RAPD were used to estimate what portion of the parental species genome was present in (be interspecific hybrids of the F1 and BC1F1 generations. The results showed that the percentage of irregularities at meiosis increased from F1 to BC1F1 gen. They also indicated the presence of aneuploids and sterility in the cross between the hexaploid species H.rigidus and cultivated sunflower. The genetic distance between the parents was 83%, that between H.rigidus and the F1 hybrid 54 61%, and that between H.annuus and F1 hybrid 70-76%. In the BC1F1 generation, the genetic distance from Hannuus decreased to 58-66% and that from H.rigidus increased to 69-76%.

  1. Controle genético da concentração de 2-Tridecanona e de 2-Undecanona em cruzamentos interespecíficos de tomateiro Genetic control of 2-Tridecanone and 2-Undecanone concentration in tomato interspecific cross

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NORMA ELIANE PEREIRA

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Estudou-se o controle genético da concentração das metil-cetonas 2-tridecanona (2-TD e 2-undecanona (2-UN no cruzamento de Lycopersicon esculentum cv IPA-6 x L. hirsutum f. glabratum PI 134418. Para tal, as gerações parentais F1 e F2 foram avaliadas em experimento de casa de vegetação, sendo a quantificação das metil-cetonas foliares realizada por cromatografia gasosa com coluna capilar. Os resultados revelaram alta correlação (0,97; P > 0,001 entre as concentrações de 2-TD e 2-UN, possivelmente devido à ocorrência de efeitos pleiotrópicos ou de ligação gênica. O grau médio de dominância revelou a ocorrência de dominância parcial para as menores concentrações de 2-TD e 2-UN, cujas herdabilidades foram 0,75 e 0,78 respectivamente. A análise de média de gerações mostrou não haver adequação dos dados de concentração de 2-TD e 2-UN ao modelo aditivo-dominante, devido, possivelmente, a problemas de incongruidade ou a efeitos epistáticos.Genetic control of methyl-ketones 2-tridecanone (2-TD and 2-undecanone (2-UN concentration was studied in a cross of Lycopersicon esculentum cv IPA-6 x L. hirsutum f. glabratum PI 134418. The progenitors F1 and F2 generations were evalueted in a green house experiment, and the level of methyl-ketones in the leaves were determined by capilar gas chromatography. The results indicate that there is high correlations between 2-TD and 2-UN concentrations (0.97; P > 0.001, indicating that pleiotropic or genic linkage effects may be occurring. The 2-TD and 2-UN showed complete dominance for low concentration and high heritability, 0.75 and 0.78, respectively. The generation means analysis showed that the results of 2-TD and 2-UN concentration can not be explained by the simple additive-dominant model, suggesting that the segregation distortion could be due to incongruity problems of interspecific crosses or epistatic gene action.

  2. Fission barrier theory and its application to the calculation of actinide neutron cross-sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynn, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    The lectures discuss the possibilities and realisations of applying nuclear fission theory to the calculation of unknown nuclear data required for applications, principally in the nuclear power field. A brief description of the fundamentals of fission theory, the nature of the potential energy surface in the deformation plane, and of the inertial tensor, is given, and the accuracy of the theoretical calculations is discussed. It is concluded that it is impracticable to obtain required quantities such as neutron cross-sections from such fundamental calculations at present. On the other hand the fundamental theory reveals a wealth of phenomenological aspects of the fission process which can be incorporated into nuclear reaction theory. It is then shown how reaction theory thus extended to take correct account of the structured (''double-humped'') fission barrier can be used to parametrise the barrier by analysis of experimental data, and subsequently to calculate new data. Descriptions of computer programmes and illustrations of the application of the methods to actual physical examples are included in this account. (author)

  3. Maternal exposure to carbamazepine at environmental concentrations can cross intestinal and placental barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaushik, Gaurav; Huber, David P.; Aho, Ken; Finney, Bruce; Bearden, Shawn; Zarbalis, Konstantinos S.; Thomas, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Psychoactive pharmaceuticals have been found as teratogens at clinical dosage during pregnancy. These pharmaceuticals have also been detected in minute (ppb) concentrations in drinking water in the US, and are environmental contaminants that may be complicit in triggering neurological disorders in genetically susceptible individuals. Previous studies have determined that psychoactive pharmaceuticals (fluoxetine, venlafaxine and carbamazepine) at environmentally relevant concentrations enriched sets of genes regulating development and function of the nervous system in fathead minnows. Altered gene sets were also associated with potential neurological disorders, including autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Subsequent in vitro studies indicated that psychoactive pharmaceuticals altered ASD-associated synaptic protein expression and gene expression in human neuronal cells. However, it is unknown if environmentally relevant concentrations of these pharmaceuticals are able to cross biological barriers from mother to fetus, thus potentially posing risks to nervous system development. The main objective of this study was to test whether psychoactive pharmaceuticals (fluoxetine, venlafaxine, and carbamazepine) administered through the drinking water at environmental concentrations to pregnant mice could reach the brain of the developing embryo by crossing intestinal and placental barriers. We addressed this question by adding 2 H-isotope labeled pharmaceuticals to the drinking water of female mice for 20 days (10 pre-and 10 post–conception days), and quantifying 2 H-isotope enrichment signals in the dam liver and brain of developing embryos using isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Significant levels of 2 H enrichment was detected in the brain of embryos and livers of carbamazepine-treated mice but not in those of control dams, or for fluoxetine or venlafaxine application. These results provide the first evidence that carbamazepine in drinking water and at typical

  4. Maternal exposure to carbamazepine at environmental concentrations can cross intestinal and placental barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaushik, Gaurav, E-mail: kausgaur@isu.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, Idaho State University, Stop 8007, 921 S 8th Ave, Pocatello, ID 83209-8007 (United States); Department of Medical Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of California at Davis, Davis, CA 95817 (United States); Institute for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Shriners Hospitals for Children, Northern California, 2425 Stockton Boulevard, Sacramento, CA 95817 (United States); Huber, David P., E-mail: hubedavi@isu.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, Idaho State University, Stop 8007, 921 S 8th Ave, Pocatello, ID 83209-8007 (United States); Aho, Ken, E-mail: ahoken@isu.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, Idaho State University, Stop 8007, 921 S 8th Ave, Pocatello, ID 83209-8007 (United States); Finney, Bruce, E-mail: finney@isu.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, Idaho State University, Stop 8007, 921 S 8th Ave, Pocatello, ID 83209-8007 (United States); Bearden, Shawn, E-mail: bearshaw@isu.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, Idaho State University, Stop 8007, 921 S 8th Ave, Pocatello, ID 83209-8007 (United States); Zarbalis, Konstantinos S., E-mail: kzarbalis@ucdavis.edu [Department of Medical Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of California at Davis, Davis, CA 95817 (United States); Institute for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Shriners Hospitals for Children, Northern California, 2425 Stockton Boulevard, Sacramento, CA 95817 (United States); Thomas, Michael A., E-mail: mthomas@isu.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, Idaho State University, Stop 8007, 921 S 8th Ave, Pocatello, ID 83209-8007 (United States)

    2016-05-27

    Psychoactive pharmaceuticals have been found as teratogens at clinical dosage during pregnancy. These pharmaceuticals have also been detected in minute (ppb) concentrations in drinking water in the US, and are environmental contaminants that may be complicit in triggering neurological disorders in genetically susceptible individuals. Previous studies have determined that psychoactive pharmaceuticals (fluoxetine, venlafaxine and carbamazepine) at environmentally relevant concentrations enriched sets of genes regulating development and function of the nervous system in fathead minnows. Altered gene sets were also associated with potential neurological disorders, including autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Subsequent in vitro studies indicated that psychoactive pharmaceuticals altered ASD-associated synaptic protein expression and gene expression in human neuronal cells. However, it is unknown if environmentally relevant concentrations of these pharmaceuticals are able to cross biological barriers from mother to fetus, thus potentially posing risks to nervous system development. The main objective of this study was to test whether psychoactive pharmaceuticals (fluoxetine, venlafaxine, and carbamazepine) administered through the drinking water at environmental concentrations to pregnant mice could reach the brain of the developing embryo by crossing intestinal and placental barriers. We addressed this question by adding {sup 2}H-isotope labeled pharmaceuticals to the drinking water of female mice for 20 days (10 pre-and 10 post–conception days), and quantifying {sup 2}H-isotope enrichment signals in the dam liver and brain of developing embryos using isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Significant levels of {sup 2}H enrichment was detected in the brain of embryos and livers of carbamazepine-treated mice but not in those of control dams, or for fluoxetine or venlafaxine application. These results provide the first evidence that carbamazepine in drinking water and at

  5. Herança de acilaçúcares em genótipos de tomateiro provenientes de cruzamento interespecífico Inheritance of tomato leaflet acylsugar contents in genotypes derived from an interspecific cross

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Donizete Gonçalves

    2007-05-01

    effects were tested. For the different presumed degrees of dominance (DD tested in an array between -0.7 and -0.4, the hypotheses of monogenic inheritance could not be rejected, indicating that high acylsugar contents are controlled by a recessive allele in a locus with incomplete dominance. Genetic models tested under the maximum likelihood function also confirmed the hypothesis of monogenic inheritance. Tomato plants with adequate levels of acylsugar-mediated resistance to arthropod pests can be efficiently obtained in backcross populations, derived from the interspecific cross L. esculentum x L. pennellii.

  6. Zika Virus Infects, Activates, and Crosses Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells, without Barrier Disruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle P. Papa

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV has been associated to central nervous system (CNS harm, and virus was detected in the brain and cerebrospinal fluids of microcephaly and meningoencephalitis cases. However, the mechanism by which the virus reaches the CNS is unclear. Here, we addressed the effects of ZIKV replication in human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs, as an in vitro model of blood brain barrier (BBB, and evaluated virus extravasation and BBB integrity in an in vivo mouse experimental model. HBMECs were productively infected by African and Brazilian ZIKV strains (ZIKVMR766 and ZIKVPE243, which induce increased production of type I and type III IFN, inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Infection with ZIKVMR766 promoted earlier cellular death, in comparison to ZIKVPE243, but infection with either strain did not result in enhanced endothelial permeability. Despite the maintenance of endothelial integrity, infectious virus particles crossed the monolayer by endocytosis/exocytosis-dependent replication pathway or by transcytosis. Remarkably, both viruses' strains infected IFNAR deficient mice, with high viral load being detected in the brains, without BBB disruption, which was only detected at later time points after infection. These data suggest that ZIKV infects and activates endothelial cells, and might reach the CNS through basolateral release, transcytosis or transinfection processes. These findings further improve the current knowledge regarding ZIKV dissemination pathways.

  7. Superresolution and Fluorescence Dynamics Evidence Reveal That Intact Liposomes Do Not Cross the Human Skin Barrier.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jes Dreier

    Full Text Available In this study we use the combination of super resolution optical microscopy and raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS to study the mechanism of action of liposomes as transdermal drug delivery systems in human skin. Two different compositions of liposomes were applied to newly excised human skin, a POPC liposome and a more flexible liposome containing the surfactant sodium cholate. Stimulated emission depletion microscopy (STED images of intact skin and cryo-sections of skin treated with labeled liposomes were recorded displaying an optical resolution low enough to resolve the 100 nm liposomes in the skin. The images revealed that virtually none of the liposomes remained intact beneath the skin surface. RICS two color cross correlation diffusion measurements of double labeled liposomes confirmed these observations. Our results suggest that the liposomes do not act as carriers that transport their cargo directly through the skin barrier, but mainly burst and fuse with the outer lipid layers of the stratum corneum. It was also found that the flexible liposomes showed a greater delivery of the fluorophore into the stratum corneum, indicating that they functioned as chemical permeability enhancers.

  8. Zika Virus Infects, Activates, and Crosses Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells, without Barrier Disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Michelle P.; Meuren, Lana M.; Coelho, Sharton V. A.; Lucas, Carolina G. de Oliveira; Mustafá, Yasmin M.; Lemos Matassoli, Flavio; Silveira, Paola P.; Frost, Paula S.; Pezzuto, Paula; Ribeiro, Milene R.; Tanuri, Amilcar; Nogueira, Mauricio L.; Campanati, Loraine; Bozza, Marcelo T.; Paula Neto, Heitor A.; Pimentel-Coelho, Pedro M.; Figueiredo, Claudia P.; de Aguiar, Renato S.; de Arruda, Luciana B.

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) has been associated to central nervous system (CNS) harm, and virus was detected in the brain and cerebrospinal fluids of microcephaly and meningoencephalitis cases. However, the mechanism by which the virus reaches the CNS is unclear. Here, we addressed the effects of ZIKV replication in human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs), as an in vitro model of blood brain barrier (BBB), and evaluated virus extravasation and BBB integrity in an in vivo mouse experimental model. HBMECs were productively infected by African and Brazilian ZIKV strains (ZIKVMR766 and ZIKVPE243), which induce increased production of type I and type III IFN, inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Infection with ZIKVMR766 promoted earlier cellular death, in comparison to ZIKVPE243, but infection with either strain did not result in enhanced endothelial permeability. Despite the maintenance of endothelial integrity, infectious virus particles crossed the monolayer by endocytosis/exocytosis-dependent replication pathway or by transcytosis. Remarkably, both viruses' strains infected IFNAR deficient mice, with high viral load being detected in the brains, without BBB disruption, which was only detected at later time points after infection. These data suggest that ZIKV infects and activates endothelial cells, and might reach the CNS through basolateral release, transcytosis or transinfection processes. These findings further improve the current knowledge regarding ZIKV dissemination pathways. PMID:29312238

  9. Interspecific hybridization between Crassostrea angulata and C. ariakensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Tuo; Zhang, Yuehuan; Yan, Xiwu; Wang, Zhaoping; Li, Dongchun; Su, Jiaqi; Yu, Ruihai

    2015-08-01

    Interspecific hybridization can generate heterosis, which is proven to be a useful tool in selective breeding programs for oyster culture. Crassostrea angulata and C. ariakensis are two important economic shellfish species in China. We conducted 2 × 2 reciprocal crosses to determine whether these two species can cross-fertilize and their hybrids can hatch, survive and perform heterosis. Fertilization was found symmetrical without delay. The rate of fertilization success of C. angulata ♀ × C. ariakensis ♂ was lower than that of C. ariakensis ♀ × C. angulata ♂, and the success rate of both hybridizations was lower than that of two intraspecific crosses each. During the planktonic period, survival rate of the progeny was lower in the hybrid crosses than in the intraspecific crosses. On day 360, mean shell height of the progeny of C. angulata ♀ × C. angulata ♂ was highest, which was followed by that of C. angulata ♀ × C. ariakensis ♂, C. ariakensis ♀ × C. ariakensis ♂ and C. ariakensis ♀ × C. angulata ♂ in a descending order. Morphology of adults produced by the hybrid crosses was similar to that of C. angulata. Both hybrids underwent normal gonad development and produced mature gametes in the mating season. This study provided new insights into the quantitative traits in interspecific crosses of Crassostrea species, thus being of guidance value for selective breeding of oyster.

  10. Translation, Cross-cultural Adaptation and Psychometric Validation of the Korean-Language Cardiac Rehabilitation Barriers Scale (CRBS-K).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Sora; Park, Hee-Won; Lee, Yookyung; Grace, Sherry L; Kim, Won-Seok

    2017-10-01

    To perform a translation and cross-cultural adaptation of the Cardiac Rehabilitation Barriers Scale (CRBS) for use in Korea, followed by psychometric validation. The CRBS was developed to assess patients' perception of the degree to which patient, provider and health system-level barriers affect their cardiac rehabilitation (CR) participation. The CRBS consists of 21 items (barriers to adherence) rated on a 5-point Likert scale. The first phase was to translate and cross-culturally adapt the CRBS to the Korean language. After back-translation, both versions were reviewed by a committee. The face validity was assessed in a sample of Korean patients (n=53) with history of acute myocardial infarction that did not participate in CR through semi-structured interviews. The second phase was to assess the construct and criterion validity of the Korean translation as well as internal reliability, through administration of the translated version in 104 patients, principle component analysis with varimax rotation and cross-referencing against CR use, respectively. The length, readability, and clarity of the questionnaire were rated well, demonstrating face validity. Analysis revealed a six-factor solution, demonstrating construct validity. Cronbach's alpha was greater than 0.65. Barriers rated highest included not knowing about CR and not being contacted by a program. The mean CRBS score was significantly higher among non-attendees (2.71±0.26) than CR attendees (2.51±0.18) (pbarriers to CR utilization in Korea.

  11. Medical barriers to emergency contraception: a cross-sectional survey of doctors in North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M E; Dixit, Anvita; Bhatnagar, Isha; Brady, Martha

    2014-05-01

    Some medical doctors in India have publicly expressed opposition to making emergency contraceptive pills (ECPs) easily accessible, even though ECPs are included in the method mix of the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare program and as an over-the-counter (OTC) product. Such opposition affects access to ECPs by influencing policy, procurement, and distribution, besides stigmatizing the ECP user. This study was conducted to assess ECP knowledge, attitudes, and practices of doctors in North India. A cross-sectional survey of 83 doctors who provide ECPs, randomly selected from 3 cities in the state of Uttar Pradesh, was conducted in 2011. The quantitative data were complemented by 19 in-depth interviews with purposively selected senior gynecologists and other opinion leaders. All surveyed physicians cited the correct dose and regimen for ECPs. However, the large majority of those surveyed believed that ECPs work by preventing implantation. (The best evidence currently indicates that ECPs do not work by preventing implantation.) Most doctors also believed incorrectly that ECPs have several contraindications and side effects. They also had strong reservations against OTC provision of ECPs by pharmacists and community health workers (CHWs) and negative attitudes toward ECP users, which serve as serious medical barriers to mainstreaming use of ECPs. Physicians and their professional associations exert a strong influence on the operationalization of national contraceptive policies. Evidence-based advocacy and educational campaigns targeting doctors are needed to address and resolve their reservations about ECPs, particularly about its provision as an OTC product and its distribution by CHWs. Partnerships with medical associations can help reduce doctors' negative attitudes and create a conducive environment for influencing clinical practices. Such changes are needed to increase the availability and use of ECPs as part of a package of a full range of contraceptive method

  12. Magnetic Nanoparticles Cross the Blood-Brain Barrier: When Physics Rises to a Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Antònia Busquets

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The blood-brain barrier is a physical and physiological barrier that protects the brain from toxic substances within the bloodstream and helps maintain brain homeostasis. It also represents the main obstacle in the treatment of many diseases of the central nervous system. Among the different approaches employed to overcome this barrier, the use of nanoparticles as a tool to enhance delivery of therapeutic molecules to the brain is particularly promising. There is special interest in the use of magnetic nanoparticles, as their physical characteristics endow them with additional potentially useful properties. Following systemic administration, a magnetic field applied externally can mediate the capacity of magnetic nanoparticles to permeate the blood-brain barrier. Meanwhile, thermal energy released by magnetic nanoparticles under the influence of radiofrequency radiation can modulate blood-brain barrier integrity, increasing its permeability. In this review, we present the strategies that use magnetic nanoparticles, specifically iron oxide nanoparticles, to enhance drug delivery to the brain.

  13. Triple-humped fission barrier model for a new 238U neutron cross-section evaluation and first validations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Jimenez, M.J.; Morillon, B.; Romain, P.

    2005-01-01

    A new neutron-induced cross-section evaluation of 238 U from 1 keV up to 200 MeV has been performed using only nuclear reactions models. A new fission penetrability model taking into account a triple humped barrier has been developed. A clear improvement has been observed for K-effective validation tests (up to 30 MeV) with this new evaluation. This improvement is mainly due to a better treatment of the inelastic exit channel

  14. A cross-sectional study of facilitators and barriers of Iranian nurses' participation in continuing education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzehgardeshi, Zeinab; Shahhosseini, Zohreh

    2013-12-27

    Continuing education is one of the modern strategies to maintain and elevate knowledge and professional skills of nurses which in turn elevate the health status of society. Since several factors affect nurses' participation in continuing education, it's essential to know promoters and obstacles in this issue and plan accordingly. In this cross-sectional study, 361 Iranian nurses who were recruited by convenience sampling method completed an anonymous, self-administered questionnaire from October 2012 to April 2013. Topics covered the participants' attitudes towards facilitators and barriers of their participation in continuing education. Mean and standard deviation of participants ' age were 37.14±7.58 years and 93.94% were female. The maximum score of facilitators and barriers to nurses' participation in continuing education were related to "Update my knowledge" and "Work commitments" respectively. The results showed among Iranian nurses, the mean score of personal and structural barriers was significantly higher than the mean score of interpersonal ones (F=2122.66, pcontinuing education programs by enforcement of facilitators and reducing barriers focusing on the personal and structural barriers.

  15. Changes in research on language barriers in health care since 2003: A cross-sectional review study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwei, Rebecca J; Del Pozo, Sam; Agger-Gupta, Niels; Alvarado-Little, Wilma; Bagchi, Ann; Chen, Alice Hm; Diamond, Lisa; Gany, Francesca; Wong, Doreena; Jacobs, Elizabeth A

    2016-02-01

    Understanding how to mitigate language barriers is becoming increasingly important for health care providers around the world. Language barriers adversely affect patients in their access to health services; comprehension and adherence; quality of care; and patient and provider satisfaction. In 2003, the United States (US) government made a major change in national policy guidance that significantly affected limited English proficient patients' ability to access language services. The objectives of this paper are to describe the state of the language barriers literature inside and outside the US since 2003 and to compare the research that was conducted before and after a national policy change occurred in the US. We hypothesize that language barrier research would increase inside and outside the US but that the increase in research would be larger inside the US in response to this national policy change. We reviewed the research literature on language barriers in health care and conducted a cross sectional analysis by tabulating frequencies for geographic location, language group, methodology, research focus and specialty and compared the literature before and after 2003. Our sample included 136 studies prior to 2003 and 426 studies from 2003 to 2010. In the 2003-2010 time period there was a new interest in studying the providers' perspective instead of or in addition to the patients' perspective. The methods remained similar between periods with greater than 60% of studies being descriptive and 12% being interventions. There was an increase in research on language barriers inside and outside the US and we believe this was larger due to the change in the national policy. We suggest that researchers worldwide should move away from simply documenting the existence of language barriers and should begin to focus their research on documenting how language concordant care influences patient outcomes, providing evidence for interventions that mitigate language barriers

  16. Barriers to cross--institutional health information exchange: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Ashley; Hollin, Ilene; Barry, Jeffrey; Kachnowski, Stan

    2010-01-01

    While the development of health information technology, particularly electronic health records (EHR), is a triumph for the advancement of healthcare, non-interoperable clinical data systems lead to fragmented communication and incomplete records. If interoperable HIT systems could be achieved integrated HIT could be leveraged to lessen medical errors, improve patient care and optimize epidemiological research. To understand the barriers to interoperability or health information exchange (HIE), we reviewed the literature on HIT and barriers to HIE. Our search yielded 492 articles, 25 meeting our inclusion criteria. In general, we found that the predominant barriers to HIE are need for standards, security concerns, economic loss to competitors, and federated systems. Research on interoperability is limited because most HIE programs are still in formative stages. More research is needed to fully understand interoperability of HIT, how to overcome the barriers to interoperability, and how to design HIT to better facilitate HIE.

  17. Interspecific Resource Competition Effects on Fisheres Revenue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolfshaar, van de K.E.; Schellekens, T.; Poos, J.J.; Kooten, van T.

    2012-01-01

    In many fisheries multiple species are simultaneously caught while stock assessments and fishing quota are defined at species level. Yet species caught together often share habitat and resources, resulting in interspecific resource competition. The consequences of resource competition on population

  18. Barriers to physical activity in older adults in Germany: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moschny Anna

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Data on barriers to physical activity in older adults in Germany are scarce. The aim of this study was to analyse barriers to physical activity in a cohort of older adults, allowing comparisons between men and women, and age groups. Methods 1,937 older adults with a median age of 77 (range 72-93 years (53.3% female took part in the 7-year follow-up telephone interviews of the getABI cohort. Participants who stated that they did not get enough physical activity were surveyed with respect to barriers to physical activity. Barriers were analysed for all respondents, as well as by sex and age group for cases with complete data. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate differences between sexes and age groups. The level of significance (alpha Results 1,607 (83.0% participants stated that they were sufficiently physically active. 286 participants rated their physical activity as insufficient and responded to questions on barriers to physical activity completely. The three most frequently cited barriers were poor health (57.7%, lack of company (43.0%, and lack of interest (36.7%. Lack of opportunities for sports or leisure activities (30.3% vs. 15.6%, and lack of transport (29.0% vs. 7.1% were more frequently stated by female respondents than male respondents. These differences between men and women were significant (p = .003; p Conclusions The present study provides relevant data on barriers to physical activity in older adults. By revealing appreciable differences between men and women, and age groups, this study has implications for efforts to increase older adults' physical activity. Promotion and intervention strategies should consider the barriers and tailor measures to the specific needs of older adults in order to reduce their constraints to physical activity.

  19. Optimal Magnetic Field for Crossing Super-Para-Magnetic Nanoparticles through the Brain Blood Barrier: A Computational Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maysam Z. Pedram

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper scrutinizes the magnetic field effect to deliver the superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SPMNs through the Blood Brain Barrier (BBB. Herein we study the interaction between the nanoparticle (NP and BBB membrane using Molecular Dynamic (MD techniques. The MD model is used to enhance our understanding of the dynamic behavior of SPMNs crossing the endothelial cells in the presence of a gradient magnetic field. Actuation of NPs under weak magnetic field offers the great advantage of a non-invasive drug delivery without the risk of causing injury to the brain. Furthermore, a weak magnetic portable stimulator can be developed using low complexity prototyping techniques. Based on MD simulation results in this paper, SPMNs can cross the cell membrane while experiencing very weak mechanical forces in the range of pN. This study also derives guidelines for the design of the SPMNs dedicated to crossing the BBB using external magnetic fields.

  20. DEVELOPMENT AND COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT OF BULBOUS FORMS OF INTERSPECIFIC HYBRIDS OF ONION ALLIUM CEPA x A. FISTULOSUM

    OpenAIRE

    V. S. Romanov; N. I. Timin

    2016-01-01

    One of the way of increasing of genetic variability of onion (Allium cepa L.) is the interspecific hybridization. Development of onion interspecific hybrids consists of the study of initial breeding forms, its heterogeneity, ways of crossing and pollination, overcoming of outbreeding problem, sterility and weak fertility of the hybrids of first and next generations, specifics of hybrid’s seeds development, identification and selection of recombinant forms with breeding valuable traits. The st...

  1. A qualitative assessment of implementing a cross-cultural survey on cancer wards in Denmark--a description of barriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Maria; Hassani, Amani; Krasnik, Allan

    2010-01-01

    Research into migration and health is often confronted with methodological challenges related to the identification of migrants in various settings. Furthermore, it is often difficult to reach an acceptable level of participation among migrant groups in quantitative research. The aim of this stud...... is to conduct a qualitative assessment of the barriers encountered during the implementation of a cross-cultural survey on cancer wards in Copenhagen, Denmark.......Research into migration and health is often confronted with methodological challenges related to the identification of migrants in various settings. Furthermore, it is often difficult to reach an acceptable level of participation among migrant groups in quantitative research. The aim of this study...

  2. Barriers faced by Ugandan university students in seeking medical care and sexual health counselling: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltena, Andualem Tadesse; Khan, Farhad Ali; Asamoah, Benedict O; Agardh, Anette

    2012-11-16

    Meeting the medical and sexual health care needs of young people is crucial for sustainable development. In Uganda, youth are faced with a number of challenges related to accessing medical care and sexual health counselling services. This study sought to investigate the barriers faced by Ugandan university students in seeking medical care and sexual health counselling. This study is part of a cross-sectional survey conducted in 2005 among 980 students at Mbarara University of Science and Technology. Data was collected by means of a self-administered 11-page questionnaire. The barriers encountered by respondents in seeking medical care and sexual health counselling were classified into three categories reflecting the acceptability, accessibility, or availability of services. Two out of five students reported unmet medical care needs, and one out of five reported unmet sexual health counselling needs. Acceptability of services was the main barrier faced by students for seeking medical care (70.4%) as well as for student in need of sexual health counselling (72.2%), regardless of age, gender, self-rated health, and rural/peri-urban or urban residence status. However, barriers differed within the various strata. There was a significant difference (p-value 0.01) in barriers faced by students originally from rural versus peri-urban/urban areas in seeking medical care (acceptability: 64.8%/74.5%, accessibility: 22.0% /12.6%, availability 13.2%/12.9%, respectively). Students who reported poor self-rated health encountered barriers in seeking both medical care and sexual health counselling that were significantly different from their other counterparts (p-value 0.001 and 0.007 respectively). Barriers faced by students in seeking medical and sexual health care should be reduced by interventions aimed at boosting confidence in health care services, encouraging young people to seek early treatment, and increasing awareness of where they can turn for services. The availability

  3. Barriers faced by Ugandan university students in seeking medical care and sexual health counselling: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boltena Andualem Tadesse

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Meeting the medical and sexual health care needs of young people is crucial for sustainable development. In Uganda, youth are faced with a number of challenges related to accessing medical care and sexual health counselling services. This study sought to investigate the barriers faced by Ugandan university students in seeking medical care and sexual health counselling. Methods This study is part of a cross-sectional survey conducted in 2005 among 980 students at Mbarara University of Science and Technology. Data was collected by means of a self-administered 11-page questionnaire. The barriers encountered by respondents in seeking medical care and sexual health counselling were classified into three categories reflecting the acceptability, accessibility, or availability of services. Results Two out of five students reported unmet medical care needs, and one out of five reported unmet sexual health counselling needs. Acceptability of services was the main barrier faced by students for seeking medical care (70.4% as well as for student in need of sexual health counselling (72.2%, regardless of age, gender, self-rated health, and rural/peri-urban or urban residence status. However, barriers differed within the various strata. There was a significant difference (p-value 0.01 in barriers faced by students originally from rural versus peri-urban/urban areas in seeking medical care (acceptability: 64.8%/74.5%, accessibility: 22.0% /12.6%, availability 13.2%/12.9%, respectively. Students who reported poor self-rated health encountered barriers in seeking both medical care and sexual health counselling that were significantly different from their other counterparts (p-value 0.001 and 0.007 respectively. Conclusions Barriers faced by students in seeking medical and sexual health care should be reduced by interventions aimed at boosting confidence in health care services, encouraging young people to seek early treatment, and increasing

  4. Barrier effects on vertebrate distribution caused by a motorway crossing through fragmented forest landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tellería, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We analysed the effects of a 25–year–old motorway on the distribution of five vertebrates inhabiting a fragmented forest landscape and differing in their ability to move across linear infrastructures. We found clear evidence of barrier effects on the distribution of the forest lizard Psammodromus algirus. The roe deer (Capreolus capreolus was also unequally distributed on both sides of the motorway, but this could also be due, at least in part, to fragmentation. The eyed lizard (Timon lepidus, that can move through open fields, showed no evidence of barrier effects. The distribution of two small birds (Erithacus rubecula and Phylloscopus bonelli was unaffected by the motorway. Our results show that a motorway may severely restrict the distribution of species which can withstand high levels of forest fragmentation but show limited dispersal ability, highlighting the role of linear infrastructures in shaping species’ ranges at regional scales.

  5. Effect of skin barrier disruption on immune responses to topically applied cross-reacting material, CRM(197), of diphtheria toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godefroy, S; Peyre, M; Garcia, N; Muller, S; Sesardic, D; Partidos, C D

    2005-08-01

    The high accessibility of the skin and the presence of immunocompetent cells in the epidermis makes this surface an attractive route for needle-free administration of vaccines. However, the lining of the skin by the stratum corneum is a major obstacle to vaccine delivery. In this study we examined the effect of skin barrier disruption on the immune responses to the cross-reacting material CRM(197), a nontoxic mutant of diphtheria toxin (DTx) that is considered as a vaccine candidate. Application of CRM(197), together with cholera toxin (CT), onto the tape-stripped skin of mice elicited antibody responses that had anti-DTx neutralizing activity. Vaccine delivery onto mildly ablated skin or intact skin did not elicit any detectable anti-CRM(197) antibodies. Mice immunized with CRM(197) alone onto the tape-stripped skin mounted a vigorous antigen-specific proliferative response. In contrast, the induction of cellular immunity after CRM(197) deposition onto mildly ablated or intact skin was adjuvant dependent. Furthermore, epidermal cells were activated and underwent apoptosis that was more pronounced when the stratum corneum was removed by tape stripping. Overall, these findings highlight the potential for transcutaneous delivery of CRM(197) and establish a correlation between the degree of barrier disruption and levels of antigen-specific immune responses. Moreover, these results provide the first evidence that the development of a transcutaneous immunization strategy for diphtheria, based on simple and practical methods to disrupt the skin barrier, is feasible.

  6. Exploration of barriers to breast-self examination among urban women in Shah Alam, Malaysia: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dubai, Sami Abdo Radman; Ganasegeran, Kurubaran; Alabsi, Aied M; Abdul Manaf, Mohd Rizal; Ijaz, Sharea; Kassim, Saba

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women in Malaysia. Barriers for practicing breast self examination (BSE) await exploration. To assess the practice of BSE and its correlated factors and particularly barriers amongst urban women in Malaysia. This cross-sectional study was conducted with 222 Malaysian women using a self-administered questionnaire. The mean (SD) age was 28.5 (±9.2) years, 59.0% were university graduates. Of the total, 81.1% were aware of breast cancer and 55% practiced BSE. Amongst 45% of respondents who did not practice BSE, 79.8% did not know how to do it, 60.6% feared being diagnosed with breast cancer, 59.6% were worried about detecting breast cancer, 22% reported that they should not touch their bodies, 44% and 28% reported BSE is embarrassing or unpleasant, 29% time consuming, 22% thought they would never have breast cancer or it is ineffective and finally 20% perceived BSE as unimportant. Logistic regression modeling showed that respondents aged ≥45 years, being Malay, married and having a high education level were more likely to practice BSE (pcultural, perception and environmental factors were identified as barriers. BSE practice was associated significantly with socio-demographic factors and socioeconomic status.

  7. Anti-transferrin receptor antibody and antibody-drug conjugates cross the blood-brain barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friden, P.M.; Walus, L.R.; Musso, G.F.; Taylor, M.A.; Malfroy, B.; Starzyk, R.M.

    1991-01-01

    Delivery of nonlipophilic drugs to the brain is hindered by the tightly apposed capillary endothelial cells that make up the blood-brain barrier. The authors have examined the ability of a monoclonal antibody (OX-26), which recognizes the rat transferrin receptor, to function as a carrier for the delivery of drugs across the blood-brain barrier. This antibody, which was previously shown to bind preferentially to capillary endothelial cells in the brain after intravenous administration, labels the entire cerebrovascular bed in a dose-dependent manner. The initially uniform labeling of brain capillaries becomes extremely punctate ∼ 4 hr after injection, suggesting a time-dependent sequestering of the antibody. Capillary-depletion experiments, in which the brain is separated into capillary and parenchymal fractions, show a time-dependent migration of radiolabeled antibody from the capillaries into the brain parenchyma, which is consistent with the transcytosis of compounds across the blood-brain barrier. Antibody-methotrexate conjugates were tested in vivo to assess the carrier ability of this antibody. Immunohistochemical staining for either component of an OX-26-methotrexate conjugate revealed patterns of cerebrovascular labeling identical to those observed with the unaltered antibody. Accumulation of radiolabeled methotrexate in the brain parenchyma is greatly enhanced when the drug is conjugated to OX-26

  8. Isotope-specific and amino acid-specific heavy atom substitutions alter barrier crossing in human purine nucleoside phosphorylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Javier; Schramm, Vern L

    2015-09-08

    Computational chemistry predicts that atomic motions on the femtosecond timescale are coupled to transition-state formation (barrier-crossing) in human purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP). The prediction is experimentally supported by slowed catalytic site chemistry in isotopically labeled PNP (13C, 15N, and 2H). However, other explanations are possible, including altered volume or bond polarization from carbon-deuterium bonds or propagation of the femtosecond bond motions into slower (nanoseconds to milliseconds) motions of the larger protein architecture to alter catalytic site chemistry. We address these possibilities by analysis of chemistry rates in isotope-specific labeled PNPs. Catalytic site chemistry was slowed for both [2H]PNP and [13C, 15N]PNP in proportion to their altered protein masses. Secondary effects emanating from carbon-deuterium bond properties can therefore be eliminated. Heavy-enzyme mass effects were probed for local or global contributions to catalytic site chemistry by generating [15N, 2H]His8-PNP. Of the eight His per subunit, three participate in contacts to the bound reactants and five are remote from the catalytic sites. [15N, 2H]His8-PNP had reduced catalytic site chemistry larger than proportional to the enzymatic mass difference. Altered barrier crossing when only His are heavy supports local catalytic site femtosecond perturbations coupled to transition-state formation. Isotope-specific and amino acid specific labels extend the use of heavy enzyme methods to distinguish global from local isotope effects.

  9. Breeding of lilies and tulips—Interspecific hybridization and genetic background—

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marasek-Ciolakowska, Agnieszka; Nishikawa, Tomotaro; Shea, Daniel J.; Okazaki, Keiichi

    2018-01-01

    Lilies and tulips (Liliaceae family) are economically very important ornamental bulbous plants. Here, we summarize major breeding goals, the role of an integrated method of cut-style pollination and fertilization followed by embryo rescue and mitotic and meiotic polyploidization involved in new assortment development. Both crops have been subjected to extensive interspecific hybridization followed by selection. Additionally, spontaneous polyploidization has played a role in their evolution. In lilies, there is a tendency to replace diploids with polyploid cultivars, whereas in tulip a majority of the cultivars that exist today are still diploid except for triploid Darwin hybrid tulips. The introduction of molecular cytogenetic techniques such as genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) permitted the detailed studies of genome composition in lily and tulip interspecific hybrids and to follow the chromosome inheritance in interspecific crosses. In addition, this review presents the latest information on phylogenetic relationship in lily and tulip and recent developments in molecular mapping using different DNA molecular techniques.

  10. Regulation of Copper Transport Crossing Brain Barrier Systems by Cu-ATPases: Effect of Manganese Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xue; Zhang, Yanshu; Jiang, Wendy; Monnot, Andrew Donald; Bates, Christopher Alexander; Zheng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of cellular copper (Cu) homeostasis involves Cu-transporting ATPases (Cu-ATPases), i.e., ATP7A and ATP7B. The question as to how these Cu-ATPases in brain barrier systems transport Cu, i.e., toward brain parenchyma, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), or blood, remained unanswered. This study was designed to characterize roles of Cu-ATPases in regulating Cu transport at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-CSF barrier (BCB) and to investigate how exposure to toxic manganese (Mn) altered the function of Cu-ATPases, thereby contributing to the etiology of Mn-induced parkinsonian disorder. Studies by quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qPCR), Western blot, and immunocytochemistry revealed that both Cu-ATPases expressed abundantly in BBB and BCB. Transport kinetic studies by in situ brain infusion and ventriculo-cisternal (VC) perfusion in Sprague Dawley rat suggested that the BBB was a major site for Cu entry into brain, whereas the BCB was a predominant route for Cu efflux from the CSF to blood. Confocal evidence showed that the presence of excess Cu or Mn in the choroid plexus cells led to ATP7A relocating toward the apical microvilli facing the CSF, but ATP7B toward the basolateral membrane facing blood. Mn exposure inhibited the production of both Cu-ATPases. Collectively, these data suggest that Cu is transported by the BBB from the blood to brain, which is mediated by ATP7A in brain capillary. By diffusion, Cu ions move from the interstitial fluid into the CSF, where they are taken up by the BCB. Within the choroidal epithelial cells, Cu ions are transported by ATP7B back to the blood. Mn exposure alters these processes, leading to Cu dyshomeostasis-associated neuronal injury. PMID:24614235

  11. Extreme endurance flights by landbirds crossing the Pacific Ocean: ecological corridor rather than barrier?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Robert E.; Tibbitts, T. Lee; Douglas, David C.; Handel, Colleen M.; Mulcahy, Daniel M.; Gottschalck, Jon C.; Warnock, Nils; McCaffery, Brian J.; Battley, Philip F.; Piersma, Theunis

    2008-01-01

    Mountain ranges, deserts, ice fields and oceans generally act as barriers to the movement of land-dependent animals, often profoundly shaping migration routes. We used satellite telemetry to track the southward flights of bar-tailed godwits (Limosa lapponica baueri), shorebirds whose breeding and non-breeding areas are separated by the vast central Pacific Ocean. Seven females with surgically implanted transmitters flew non-stop 8117–11 680 km (10 153±1043 s.d.) directly across the Pacific Ocean; two males with external transmitters flew non-stop along the same corridor for 7008–7390 km. Flight duration ranged from 6.0 to 9.4 days (7.8±1.3 s.d.) for birds with implants and 5.0 to 6.6 days for birds with externally attached transmitters. These extraordinary non-stop flights establish new extremes for avian flight performance, have profound implications for understanding the physiological capabilities of vertebrates and how birds navigate, and challenge current physiological paradigms on topics such as sleep, dehydration and phenotypic flexibility. Predicted changes in climatic systems may affect survival rates if weather conditions at their departure hub or along the migration corridor should change. We propose that this transoceanic route may function as an ecological corridor rather than a barrier, providing a wind-assisted passage relatively free of pathogens and predators. PMID:18974033

  12. Integration Strategies and Barriers to Co-Operation in Cross-Border Regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Povl Adler; Serin, Göran Folke

    2007-01-01

    Abstract: The purpose of the article is to analyze strategies for cross-border integration in the Øresund Region. The point of departure is that the development of strategies for cross-border integration is dependent on the development on both the general level in the EU and deregulation of economy...... and business on the global level. In this respect, the article points out the importance of market forces and their influence on institutional change. Recent economic crises have put growth center stage at both the national and regional level, and have called for regional development programs on both...

  13. Does self-compassion mitigate the relationship between burnout and barriers to compassion? A cross-sectional quantitative study of 799 nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dev, Vinayak; Fernando, Antonio T; Lim, Anecita Gigi; Consedine, Nathan S

    2018-02-21

    Burnout has numerous negative consequences for nurses, potentially impairing their ability to deliver compassionate patient care. However, the association between burnout and compassion and, more specifically, barriers to compassion in medicine is unclear. This article evaluates the associations between burnout and barriers to compassion and examines whether dispositional self-compassion might mitigate this association. Consistent with prior work, the authors expected greater burnout to predict greater barriers to compassion. We also expected self-compassion - the ability to be kind to the self during times of distress - to weaken the association between burnout and barriers to compassion among nurses. Registered nurses working in New Zealand medical contexts were recruited using non-random convenience sampling. Following consent, 799 valid participants completed a cross-sectional survey including the Copenhagen Burnout Inventory, the Barriers to Physician Compassion scale, and a measure of dispositional self-compassion. As expected, greater burnout predicted greater barriers to compassion while self-compassion predicted fewer barriers. However, self-compassion mitigated the association between burnout and burnout related barriers to compassion (but not other barriers). The interaction suggested that suggested that the association was stronger (rather than weaker) among those with greater self-compassion. Understanding the lack of compassion and the effects of burnout in patient care are priorities in health. This report extends evidence on the association between burnout and compassion-fatigue to show that burnout also predicts the experience of specific barriers to compassion. While self-compassion predicted lower burnout and barriers, it may not necessarily reduce the extent to which burnout contributes to the experience of barriers to compassion in medicine. Implications for understanding how burnout manifests in barriers to clinical compassion, interventions

  14. Barriers to reporting of adverse drugs reactions: a cross sectional study among community pharmacists in United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheema E

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs are a major public health problem. Prompt reporting of suspected ADRs is fundamental in the post-marketing surveillance of medicines and helps in ensuring medicine safety. However, fewer ADRs are reported in general and in particular by community pharmacists. There is limited knowledge about the factors which are preventing community pharmacists in the UK from reporting an ADR. Objectives: To identify the barriers to ADR reporting among community pharmacists practicing in the UK. Methods: A cross sectional study using a 25-items questionnaire (both online and paper based including 10 barriers to ADR reporting was conducted from 1st April 2012 to September 2012. Community pharmacists practicing in the West Midlands, UK, were approached for the participation in this study. Chi-Square and regression were applied to identify covariates for the barriers to ADR reporting. A significant value of 0.05 was assigned for analysis. Results: Of the 230 invited community pharmacists, 138 pharmacists responded (response rate 60%. The median age of respondents was 31 years. All pharmacists reported that they would report both serious and mild ADRs from drugs with black triangle among children as well as adults. About 95% (n=131 of the pharmacists were familiar with the paper based ADR reporting system. Store-based pharmacists were more likely to be more confident about which ADRs to report [0.680, 95% Confidence Interval 0.43-3.59]. Lack of time 46.4% (n=64, and pharmacists perception that ADR is not serious enough to report (65.2%; n=90 were identified as barriers to ADR reporting. Majority 63.0% (n=87 of the pharmacists identified training and information about what to report and access to Information Technology (IT (For example access to internet connection 61.6% (n=85 as facilitators to ADR reporting process. Conclusion: Lack of time and ADRs considered not serious enough by pharmacists to report were barriers to ADR

  15. Interspecific hybridization between Mauremys reevesii and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Turtle hybrids have been found in some taxa, but so far, studies on interspecific hybridization between Mauremy reevesii and Mauremy sinensis have not been reported. Recently, we obtained three specimens (Hy1, Hy2, Hy3)with unusual morphological characteristics from pet trade Market, which are suspected to be ...

  16. Synthesis and characterization of interspecific trigenomic hybrids ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-09-28

    Sep 28, 2011 ... interspecific hybrid between Brassica fruticulosa and B. rapa. Plant. Breed. 123: 497-498. Chopra VL, Kirti PB, Prakash S (1996). Accessing and exploiting genes of breeding value of distant relatives of crop brassicas. Genetica 97: 305-312. Ellis PR, Kift NB, Pink DAC, Jukes PL, Lynn J, Tatchell GM (2000).

  17. Volatiles in inter-specific bacterial interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tyc, Olaf; Zweers, H.; Boer, de W.; Garbeva, P.

    2015-01-01

    The importance of volatile organic compounds for functioning of microbes is receiving increased research attention. However, to date very little is known on how inter-specific bacterial interactions effect volatiles production as most studies have been focused on volatiles produced by monocultures

  18. Molecular markers unravel intraspecific and interspecific genetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Molecular markers unravel intraspecific and interspecific genetic variability in Plantago ovata and some of its wild allies. Shivanjali Kotwal, Manoj K. Dhar, Balbir Kour, Kuldeep Raj and Sanjana Kaul. J. Genet. 92, 293–298. Table 1. Jaccard's similarity matrix of AFLP analysis of Plantago species. P. coronopus P. lanceolata ...

  19. Asymmetric interspecific territorial competition over food resources ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The rock-dwelling cichlids in Lake Malawi comprise the most diverse freshwater fish community in the world. Individuals frequently interact with heterospecifics through feeding territoriality. Underwater observations and experiments were conducted to examine interspecific variation in the frequencies of territorial behaviour ...

  20. Novel Curcumin loaded nanoparticles engineered for Blood-Brain Barrier crossing and able to disrupt Abeta aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbara, Ruozi; Belletti, Daniela; Pederzoli, Francesca; Masoni, Martina; Keller, Johannes; Ballestrazzi, Antonio; Vandelli, Maria Angela; Tosi, Giovanni; Grabrucker, Andreas M

    2017-06-30

    The formation of extracellular aggregates built up by deposits of β-amyloid (Aβ) is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Curcumin has been reported to display anti-amyloidogenic activity, not only by inhibiting the formation of new Aβ aggregates, but also by disaggregating existing ones. However, the uptake of Curcumin into the brain is severely restricted by its low ability to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Therefore, novel strategies for a targeted delivery of Curcumin into the brain are highly desired. Here, we encapsulated Curcumin as active ingredient in PLGA (polylactide-co-glycolic-acid) nanoparticles (NPs), modified with g7 ligand for BBB crossing. We performed in depth analyses of possible toxicity of these NPs, uptake, and, foremost, their ability to influence Aβ pathology in vitro using primary hippocampal cell cultures. Our results show no apparent toxicity of the formulated NPs, but a significant decrease of Aβ aggregates in response to Curcumin loaded NPs. We thus conclude that brain delivery of Curcumin using BBB crossing NPs is a promising future approach in the treatment of AD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Carbenoxolone does not cross the blood brain barrier: an HPLC study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burnham William M

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carbenoxolone (CBX is a widely used gap junctional blocker. Considering several reports indicating that transient gap junctional blockade could be a favourable intervention following injuries to central nervous tissue, and some current enthusiasm in studies using systemic injections of CBX, it is imperative to consider the penetration of CBX into central nervous tissue after systemic administrations. So far, only very indirect evidence suggests that CBX penetrates into the central nervous system after systemic administrations. We thus determined the amounts of CBX present in the blood and the cerebrospinal fluid of rats after intraperitoneal administration, using high performance liquid chromatography Results CBX was found in the blood of the animals, up to 90 minutes post-injection. However, the cerebrospinal fluid concentration of CBX was negligible. Conclusion Thus, we conclude that, most likely, CBX does not penetrate the blood brain barrier and therefore recommend careful consideration in the manner of administration, when a central effect is desired.

  2. Fusion-evaporation cross-sections for {sup 48}Ca+{sup 154}Sm near the Coulomb barrier. Evidence for fusion enhancement and hindrance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanini, A.M.; Behera, B.R.; Corradi, L.; Fioretto, E.; Gadea, A.; Latina, A.; Szilner, S.; Wu, Y.W. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro (Padova) (Italy); Trotta, M. [Universita di Napoli, INFN - Sezione di Napoli and Dipartimento di Fisica (Italy); Beghini, S.; Montagnoli, G.; Scarlassara, F. [Universita di Padova and INFN, Sezione di Padova, Dipartimento di Fisica, Padova (Italy); Chizhov, A.Yu.; Itkis, I.M.; Kondratiev, N.A.; Pokrovskiy, I.V.; Sagaidak, R.N.; Kniajeva, G.N.; Kozulin, E.M.; Voskressensky, V.M. [JINR, Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, Dubna, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Courtin, S.; Haas, F.; Rowley, N.

    2005-03-01

    Measurements of fusion-evaporation cross-sections for the system {sup 48}Ca+{sup 154}Sm have been performed in the sub- and near-barrier energy range. Barrier-passing cross-sections have been obtained by adding recently measured capture-fission cross-sections at the same energies, and the barrier distribution for capture has been extracted. The data have been analyzed within a coupled-channel model, and a large subbarrier cross-section enhancement is observed, due to the ground-state prolate deformation of {sup 154}Sm. The {sup 48}Ca+{sup 154}Sm capture cross-sections are compared to existing data on {sup 16}O+{sup 186}W fusion, leading to the same CN, where a few higher-energy points have also been measured. The evaporation residue cross-sections for the two systems above the barrier indicate that complete fusion is inhibited for {sup 48}Ca+{sup 154}Sm by {approx}40% in that energy region, with respect to {sup 16}O+{sup 186}W. (orig.)

  3. Interspecific gene flow and maintenance of species integrity in oaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Gailing

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Oak species show a wide variation in morphological and physiological characters, and species boundaries between closely related species are often not clear-cut. Still, despite frequent interspecific gene flow, oaks maintain distinct morphological and physiological adaptations. In sympatric stands, spatial distribution of species with different ecological requirements is not random but constrained by soil and other microenvironmental factors. Pre-zygotic isolation (e.g. cross incompatibilities, asynchrony in flowering, pollen competition and post-zygotic isolation (divergent selection contribute to the maintenance of species integrity in sympatric oak stands. The antagonistic effects of interspecific gene flow and divergent selection are reflected in the low genetic differentiation between hybridizing oak species at most genomic regions interspersed by regions with signatures of divergent selection (outlier regions. In the near future, the availability of high-density genetic linkage maps anchored to scaffolds of a sequenced Q. robur genome will allow to characterize the underlying genes in these outlier regions and their putative role in reproductive isolation between species. Reciprocal transplant experiments of seedlings between parental environments can be used to characterize selection on outlier genes. High transferability of gene-based markers will enable comparative outlier screens in different oak species.

  4. Exploring leadership roles, goals, and barriers among Kansas registered nurses: a descriptive cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltzer, Jill N; Ford, Debra J; Shen, Qiuhua; Fischgrund, Avery; Teel, Cynthia S; Pierce, Janet; Jamison, Marian; Waldon, Trynn

    2015-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine's Future of Nursing report advocates for full nurse leader representation across multiple settings to address current challenges in our health care system. The purpose of this study was to examine nursing leadership development needs among Kansas registered nurses (RNs). Data were collected through an online survey and analyzed using quantitative and qualitative methods. Nearly 1,000 Kansas RNs participated. Most reported holding one or more leadership positions. Prevalent leadership goals were health care organization volunteer administrative roles. The most frequently identified barrier to developing leadership roles was time constraints. Many wanted to develop skills to serve on a board, 20% were interested in personal leadership development, and 19% in policy development. Based on the findings, the Kansas Action Coalition leadership team is developing programs to address the leadership needs of Kansas RNs. By building capacity in advanced leadership roles, RNs will be better prepared serve as full partners and lead efforts to promote the health of Kansans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Characterization of F1 interspecific hybrids between wild Helianthus annuus L. populations and cultivated sunflower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terzić Sreten

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Phenotype, chromosomes pairing and pollen vitality were compared between parental populations and F1 hybrids of interspecific cross between Helianthus annuus L. and cultivated sunflower. The investigation of the simple sequence repeats (SSR polymorphism was also used to test the hybrid nature of F1 populations. The phenotypic traits of F1 hybrid plants were either closer to the wild species or intermediate. Irregular chromosome pairing was found in only 0 to 10% of meiocytes in the meiosis of F1 hybrid plants. Interspecific crosses were confirmed with SSR markers in all hybrid combinations. Alleles that were not present in parental DNA were frequently observed in F1 hybrids. That is additional evidence that those hybrid combinations were not produced by self-fertilization. The results suggest that SSR markers can be efficiently used for the F1 hybrid characterization in crosses between closely related species, in which, the changes of phenotype, meiosis and pollen vitality are not always significant.

  6. Cruzamentos entre Arachis hypogaea e as espécies A. diogoi e A. spp (30006, 30035 Interspecific crosses between Arachis hypogaea and the species A. diogoi and A. spp (30006, 30035

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Sidney Pompeu

    1983-01-01

    Full Text Available Artificial crosses were made between A. hypogaea, using lines of 'Tatu', 'Roxo', Tatuí x Roxo 80-1 and the cultivar Tatuí as female parents and introduced plants of items 30001 and 30005 reported as belonging to A. diogoi and of 30006 and 30035 of A. spp, under greenhouse conditions. From the pollinated flowers of A. hypogaea x A. diogoi, 53.4 and 45.2% gave rise to pegs and fruits with normal seeds, respectively. The amount of viable pollen grains ranged from 4.8 to 13.4 with an average of 8.3% in this cross compared to 97.2 and 95.7% observed for A. hypogaea and A. diogoi. In the crosses A. hypogaea x A. sp. 30006 and A. hypogaea x A. sp. 30035, 13 and 9 normal fruits with 22 and 15 viable seeds were obtained, respectively. The pollen viability varied from 3.5 to 15 with mean of 10% in the former cross and was around 9.9% in the latter, compared with 97.8 and 98.2% noted for A. sp. 30006 and for A. sp. 30035. These results showed that plants previously classified as A. diogoi belong to another species. They also demonstrated the possibilities of using A. diogoi, A. sp. 30006 and A. sp. 30035 in the peanut genetic improvement.

  7. Superresolution and Fluorescence Dynamics Evidence Reveal That Intact Liposomes Do Not Cross the Human Skin Barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreier, Jes; Sørensen, Jens A; Brewer, Jonathan R

    2016-01-01

    In this study we use the combination of super resolution optical microscopy and raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) to study the mechanism of action of liposomes as transdermal drug delivery systems in human skin. Two different compositions of liposomes were applied to newly excised human...... skin, a POPC liposome and a more flexible liposome containing the surfactant sodium cholate. Stimulated emission depletion microscopy (STED) images of intact skin and cryo-sections of skin treated with labeled liposomes were recorded displaying an optical resolution low enough to resolve the 100 nm...... liposomes in the skin. The images revealed that virtually none of the liposomes remained intact beneath the skin surface. RICS two color cross correlation diffusion measurements of double labeled liposomes confirmed these observations. Our results suggest that the liposomes do not act as carriers...

  8. Eltrombopag, a thrombopoietin mimetic, crosses the blood-brain barrier and impairs iron-dependent hippocampal neuron dendrite development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastian, T W; Duck, K A; Michalopoulos, G C; Chen, M J; Liu, Z-J; Connor, J R; Lanier, L M; Sola-Visner, M C; Georgieff, M K

    2017-03-01

    Essentials Potential neurodevelopmental side effects of thrombopoietin mimetics need to be considered. The effects of eltrombopag (ELT) on neuronal iron status and dendrite development were assessed. ELT crosses the blood-brain barrier and causes iron deficiency in developing neurons. ELT blunts dendrite maturation, indicating a need for more safety studies before neonatal use. Background Thrombocytopenia is common in sick neonates. Thrombopoietin mimetics (e.g. eltrombopag [ELT]) might provide an alternative therapy for selected neonates with severe and prolonged thrombocytopenia, and for infants and young children with different varieties of thrombocytopenia. However, ELT chelates intracellular iron, which may adversely affect developing organs with high metabolic requirements. Iron deficiency (ID) is particularly deleterious during brain development, impairing neuronal myelination, dopamine signaling and dendritic maturation and ultimately impairing long-term neurological function (e.g. hippocampal-dependent learning and memory). Objective To determine whether ELT crosses the blood-brain barrier (BBB), causes neuronal ID and impairs hippocampal neuron dendrite maturation. Methods ELT transport across the BBB was assessed using primary bovine brain microvascular endothelial cells. Embryonic mouse primary hippocampal neuron cultures were treated with ELT or deferoxamine (DFO, an iron chelator) from 7 days in vitro (DIV) through 14 DIV and assessed for gene expression and neuronal dendrite complexity. Results ELT crossed the BBB in a time-dependent manner. 2 and 6 μm ELT increased Tfr1 and Slc11a2 (iron-responsive genes involved in neuronal iron uptake) mRNA levels, indicating neuronal ID. 6 μm ELT, but not 2 μm ELT, decreased BdnfVI, Camk2a and Vamp1 mRNA levels, suggesting impaired neuronal development and synaptic function. Dendrite branch number and length were reduced in 6 μm ELT-treated neurons, resulting in blunted dendritic arbor complexity that

  9. Barriers and facilitators for institutional delivery among poor Mesoamerican women: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Bernardo; Colombara, Danny V; Gagnier, Marielle C; Desai, Sima S; Haakenstad, Annie; Johanns, Casey; McNellan, Claire R; Nelson, Jennifer; Palmisano, Erin B; Ríos-Zertuche, Diego; Schaefer, Alexandra; Zúñiga-Brenes, Paola; Iriarte, Emma; Mokdad, Ali H

    2017-07-01

    Professional skilled care has shown to be one of the most promising strategies to reduce maternal mortality, and in-facility deliveries are a cost-effective way to ensure safe births. Countries in Mesoamerica have emphasized in-facility delivery care by professionally skilled attendants, but access to good-quality delivery care is still lacking for many women. We examined the characteristics of women who had a delivery in a health facility and determinants of the decision to bypass a closer facility and travel to a distant one. We used baseline information from the Salud Mesoamerica Initiative (SMI). Data were collected from a large household and facilities sample in the poorest quintile of the population in Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua. The analysis included 1592 deliveries. After controlling for characteristics of women and health facilities, being primiparous (RR = 1.15, 95% CI 1.10, 1.21), being literate (RR = 1.24, 95% CI 1.04, 1.48), having antenatal care (RR = 1.68, 95% CI 1.24, 2.27), being informed of the need for having a C-section (RR = 1.07, 95% CI 1.02, 1.11) and travel time to the closest facility totaling 1-2 h vs under 30 min (RR = 0.88, 95% CI 0.77, 0.99) were associated with in-health facility deliveries. In Guatemala, increased availability of medications and equipment at a distant facility was strongly associated with bypassing the closest facility in favor of a distant one for delivery (RR = 2.10, 95% CI 1.08, 4.07). Our study showed a strong correlation between well-equipped facilities and delivery attendance in poor areas of Mesoamerica. Indeed, women were more likely to travel to more distant facilities if the facilities were of higher level, which scored higher on our capacity score. Our findings call for improving the capacity of health facilities, quality of care and addressing cultural and accessibility barriers to increase institutional delivery among the poor population in Mesoamerica. © The Author

  10. A Qualitative study of language barriers between South African health care providers and cross-border migrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter-Adams, Jo; Rother, Hanna-Andrea

    2017-01-31

    Communication with health care providers represents an essential part of access to health care for the over 230 million cross-border migrants around the world. In this article, we explore the complexity of health communication from the perspective of cross-border migrants seeking antenatal care in Cape Town, South Africa in order to highlight the importance of high quality medical interpretation. As part of a broader study of migrant maternal and infant nutrition, we conducted a secondary data analysis of semi-structured in-depth interviews (N = 23) with Congolese (n = 7), Somali (n = 8) and Zimbabwean (n = 8) women living in Cape Town, as well as nine focus group discussions (including men: n = 3 and women: n = 6) were conducted with migrant Somalis, Congolese, and Zimbabweans (N = 48). We first used content analysis to gather all data related to language and communication. We then analysed this data thematically. Zimbabwean participants described how the inability to speak the local South African language (IsiXhosa) gave rise to labelling and stereotyping by healthcare staff. Congolese and Somali participants described medical procedures, including tubal ligation, which were performed without consent. Partners often tried to play the role of interpreter, which resulted in loss of income and non-professional medical interpretation. Participants' highlighted fears over unwanted procedures or being unable to access care. Challenges of communication without a common language (and without professional medical interpretation), rather than outright denial of care by healthcare professionals, mediated these encounters. Although there are several factors impeding cross-border migrants' access to health care, effective communication is a prerequisite for quality care. Free-to-patient professional medical interpretation would not only benefit migrant populations but would benefit the broader community where language and health literacy are

  11. Volatiles in Inter-Specific Bacterial Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyc, Olaf; Zweers, Hans; de Boer, Wietse; Garbeva, Paolina

    2015-01-01

    The importance of volatile organic compounds for functioning of microbes is receiving increased research attention. However, to date very little is known on how inter-specific bacterial interactions effect volatiles production as most studies have been focused on volatiles produced by monocultures of well-described bacterial genera. In this study we aimed to understand how inter-specific bacterial interactions affect the composition, production and activity of volatiles. Four phylogenetically different bacterial species namely: Chryseobacterium, Dyella, Janthinobacterium, and Tsukamurella were selected. Earlier results had shown that pairwise combinations of these bacteria induced antimicrobial activity in agar media whereas this was not the case for monocultures. In the current study, we examined if these observations were also reflected by the production of antimicrobial volatiles. Thus, the identity and antimicrobial activity of volatiles produced by the bacteria were determined in monoculture as well in pairwise combinations. Antimicrobial activity of the volatiles was assessed against fungal, oomycetal, and bacterial model organisms. Our results revealed that inter-specific bacterial interactions affected volatiles blend composition. Fungi and oomycetes showed high sensitivity to bacterial volatiles whereas the effect of volatiles on bacteria varied between no effects, growth inhibition to growth promotion depending on the volatile blend composition. In total 35 volatile compounds were detected most of which were sulfur-containing compounds. Two commonly produced sulfur-containing volatile compounds (dimethyl disulfide and dimethyl trisulfide) were tested for their effect on three target bacteria. Here, we display the importance of inter-specific interactions on bacterial volatiles production and their antimicrobial activities.

  12. Volatiles in inter-specific bacterial interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaf eTyc

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The importance of volatile organic compounds for functioning of microbes is receiving increased research attention. However, to date very little is known on how inter-specific bacterial interactions effect volatiles production as most studies have been focused on volatiles produced by monocultures of well described bacterial genera. In this study we aimed to understand how inter-specific bacterial interactions affect the composition, production and activity of volatiles. Four phylogenetically different bacterial species namely: Chryseobacterium, Dyella, Janthinobacterium and Tsukamurella were selected. Earlier results had shown that pairwise combinations of these bacteria induced antimicrobial activity in agar media whereas this was not the case for monocultures. In the current study, we examined if these observations were also reflected by the production of antimicrobial volatiles. Thus, the identity and antimicrobial activity of volatiles produced by the bacteria were determined in monoculture as well in pairwise combinations. Antimicrobial activity of the volatiles was assessed against fungal, oomycetal and bacterial model organisms. Our results revealed that inter-specific bacterial interactions affected volatiles blend composition. Fungi and oomycetes showed high sensitivity to bacterial volatiles whereas the effect of volatiles on bacteria varied between no effects, growth inhibition to growth promotion depending on the volatile blend composition. In total 35 volatile compounds were detected most of which were sulfur-containing compounds. Two commonly produced sulfur-containing volatile compounds (dimethyl disulfide and dimethyl trisulfide were tested for their effect on three target bacteria. Here we display the importance of inter-specific interactions on bacterial volatiles production and their antimicrobial activities.

  13. Eltrombopag, a thrombopoietin mimetic, crosses the blood-brain-barrier and impairs iron-dependent hippocampal neuron dendrite development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastian, Thomas W.; Duck, Kari A.; Michalopoulos, George C.; Chen, Michael J.; Liu, Zhi-Jian; Connor, James R.; Lanier, Lorene M.; Sola-Visner, Martha C.; Georgieff, Michael K.

    2017-01-01

    Background Thrombocytopenia is common in sick neonates. Thrombopoietin mimetics (e.g., eltrombopag (ELT)) might provide an alternative therapy for selected neonates with severe and prolonged thrombocytopenia, and for infants and young children with different varieties of thrombocytopenia. However, ELT chelates intracellular iron, which may adversely affect developing organs with high metabolic requirements. Iron deficiency (ID) is particularly deleterious during brain development, impairing neuronal myelination, dopamine signaling, and dendritic maturation and ultimately impairing long-term neurological function (e.g. hippocampal-dependent learning and memory). Objective Determine whether ELT crosses the blood-brain barrier (BBB), causes neuronal ID and impairs hippocampal neuron dendrite maturation. Methods ELT transport across the BBB was assessed using primary bovine brain microvascular endothelial cells. Embryonic mouse primary hippocampal neuron cultures were treated with ELT or deferoxamine (DFO, an iron chelator) from 7 days in vitro (DIV) through 14DIV and assessed for gene expression and neuronal dendrite complexity. Results ELT crossed the BBB in a time-dependent manner. 2 and 6 μM ELT increased Tfr1 and Slc11a2 (iron-responsive genes involved in neuronal iron uptake) mRNA levels, indicating neuronal ID. 6 μM ELT, but not 2 μM ELT, decreased BdnfVI, Camk2a, and Vamp1 mRNA levels, suggesting impaired neuronal development and synaptic function. Dendrite branch number and length was reduced in 6 μM ELT-treated neurons, resulting in blunted dendritic arbor complexity that was similar to DFO-treated neurons. Conclusions ELT treatment during development may impair neuronal structure due to neuronal ID. Pre-clinical in vivo studies are warranted to assess ELT safety during periods of rapid brain development. PMID:28005311

  14. Au-nanoparticle-embedded cross-linked gelatin films synthesized on aqueous solution in contact with dielectric barrier discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirafuji, Tatsuru; Nakamura, Yusuke; Azuma, Shiori; Sotoda, Naoya; Isshiki, Toshiyuki

    2018-01-01

    A wine-red free-standing thin film has been formed by irradiating dielectric barrier discharge plasma on an aqueous solution containing HAuCl4 and gelatin. The film has a fibrous structure with an inhomogeneous thickness profile and is composed of cross-linked gelatin, as confirmed by optical microscopy and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The film has embedded Au nanoparticles (GNPs), as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. In the region with a relatively small film thickness, the number density of GNPs is relatively low, and the sizes of GNPs range from 5.3 to 34.3 nm. In the region with a relatively large film thickness, on the other hand, GNPs are highly accumulated, and the sizes of GNPs range from 10.0 to 26.7 nm. The aqueous solution remains transparent even after the film growth process, which indicates that the plasma-induced processes involving GNP formation and film growth are confined near the surface of the aqueous solution. A possible film growth mechanism is discussed on the basis of the experimental results of this study.

  15. High genetic differentiation and cross-shelf patterns of genetic diversity among Great Barrier Reef populations of Symbiodinium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howells, E. J.; van Oppen, M. J. H.; Willis, B. L.

    2009-03-01

    The resilience of Symbiodinium harboured by corals is dependent on the genetic diversity and extent of connectivity among reef populations. This study presents genetic analyses of Great Barrier Reef (GBR) populations of clade C Symbiodinium hosted by the alcyonacean coral, Sinularia flexibilis. Allelic variation at four newly developed microsatellite loci demonstrated that Symbiodinium populations are genetically differentiated at all spatial scales from 16 to 1,360 km (pairwise ΦST = 0.01-0.47, mean = 0.22); the only exception being two neighbouring populations in the Cairns region separated by 17 km. This indicates that gene flow is restricted for Symbiodinium C hosted by S. flexibilis on the GBR. Patterns of population structure reflect longshore circulation patterns and limited cross-shelf mixing, suggesting that passive transport by currents is the primary mechanism of dispersal in Symbiodinium types that are acquired horizontally. There was no correlation between the genetic structure of Symbiodinium populations and their host S. flexibilis, most likely because different factors affect the dispersal and recruitment of each partner in the symbiosis. The genetic diversity of these Symbiodinium reef populations is on average 1.5 times lower on inshore reefs than on offshore reefs. Lower inshore diversity may reflect the impact of recent bleaching events on Sinularia assemblages, which have been more widespread and severe on inshore reefs, but may also have been shaped by historical sea level fluctuations or recent migration patterns.

  16. Plant Regeneration and Somatic Embryogenesis from Immature Embryos Derived through Interspecific Hybridization among Different Carica Species

    OpenAIRE

    Azad, Md. Abul; Rabbani, Md. Golam; Amin, Latifah

    2012-01-01

    Plant regeneration and somatic embryogenesis through interspecific hybridization among different Carica species were studied for the development of a papaya ringspot virus-resistant variety. The maximum fruit sets were recorded from the cross of the native variety C. papaya cv. Shahi with the wild species C. cauliflora. The highest hybrid embryos were recorded at 90 days after pollination and the embryos were aborted at 150 days after pollination. The immature hybrid embryos were used for pla...

  17. Mobile and cordless telephones, serum transthyretin and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlberg Michael

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whether low-intensity radiofrequency radiation damages the blood-brain barrier has long been debated, but little or no consideration has been given to the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier. In this cross-sectional study we tested whether long-term and/or short-term use of wireless telephones was associated with changes in the serum transthyretin level, indicating altered transthyretin concentration in the cerebrospinal fluid, possibly reflecting an effect of radiation. Methods One thousand subjects, 500 of each sex aged 18–65 years, were randomly recruited using the population registry. Data on wireless telephone use were assessed by a postal questionnaire and blood samples were analyzed for serum transthyretin concentrations determined by standard immunonephelometric techniques on a BN Prospec® instrument. Results The response rate was 31.4%. Logistic regression of dichotomized TTR serum levels with a cut-point of 0.31 g/l on wireless telephone use yielded increased odds ratios that were statistically not significant. Linear regression of time since first use overall and on the day that blood was withdrawn gave different results for males and females: for men significantly higher serum concentrations of TTR were seen the longer an analogue telephone or a mobile and cordless desktop telephone combined had been used, and in contrast, significantly lower serum levels were seen the longer an UMTS telephone had been used. Adjustment for fractions of use of the different telephone types did not modify the effect for cumulative use or years since first use for mobile telephone and DECT, combined. For women, linear regression gave a significant association for short-term use of mobile and cordless telephones combined, indicating that the sooner blood was withdrawn after the most recent telephone call, the higher the expected transthyretin concentration. Conclusion In this hypothesis-generating descriptive study time since first

  18. Interspecific hybridization among cultivars of hardy Hibiscus species section Muenchhusia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuligowska, Katarzyna; Lütken, Henrik Vlk; Christensen, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Rose mallows belong to the Muenchhusia section of the Hibiscus genus. They represent a small group of cold tolerant North American plants and are popular ornamentals mainly because of their abundant, large and colorful flowers. Due to their geographical origin they are well suited for garden use...... in temperate regions worldwide. The aim of the study was to investigate hybridization barriers in crosses among cultivars of Hibiscus species from the Muenchhusia section: H. coccineus, H. laevis and H. moscheutos. Crossing barriers were identified as both pre- and post-zygotic. The analysis of pollen tube...

  19. What is killing? People's knowledge about coronary heart disease, attitude towards prevention and main risk reduction barriers in Ismailia, Egypt (descriptive cross-sectional study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seef, Sameh; Jeppsson, Anders; Stafström, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are a public health concern everywhere, especially ischemic or coronary heart diseases (CHD) which are on top of causes list of mortality and morbidity in both genders globally. From which nearly 80% can be because of modifiable risks. In Egypt, there is a lack of studies on the knowledge of people about coronary heart diseases and its modifiable risks. So, this research reported here we designed to measure the dimensions of peoples knowledge about CHD and their attitude towards prevention, and to identify the main risk reduction barriers. By using comprehensive cross-sectional, descriptive research design, all adult individuals attending the family health clinic at Suez Canal University Hospital were eligible for inclusion with total number 125 participants. An interview questionnaire designed and used to collect data. The study revealed that (10.4%) of participants had a history of CHD, and (7.2%) had a family history of CHD. 79.2% Had a satisfactory total knowledge about CHD, and (94.4%) had a positive total attitude towards prevention. Risk reduction barriers as a medical setting barriers were (24%), patient related barriers were (22.4%). Community-societal barriers were almost the same as knowledge barriers which were around (16%). At last the systemic-organizational barriers were (9.6%). The findings settled that, total knowledge about CHD was satisfactory but lower than the level total of attitude. More effort the health system needs to improve the settings and engage patients in their plans and breaking related barriers, with development of health education programs based on needs assessment. Further studies we recommend to explore the reasons and follow up the changes.

  20. Modulation of long-term endothelial-barrier integrity is conditional to the cross-talk between Akt and Src signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fei; Sabbineni, Harika; Artham, Sandeep; Somanath, Payaningal R

    2017-10-01

    Although numerous studies have implicated Akt and Src kinases in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and Angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1)-induced endothelial-barrier regulation, a link between these two pathways has never been demonstrated. We determined the long-term effects of Akt inhibition on Src activity and vice versa, and in turn, on the human microvascular endothelial cell (HMEC) barrier integrity at the basal level, and in response to growth factors. Our data showed that Akt1 gene knockdown increases gap formation in HMEC monolayer at the basal level. Pharmacological inhibition of Akt, but not Src resulted in exacerbated VEGF-induced vascular leakage and impaired Ang-1-induced HMEC-barrier protection in vitro at 24 hr. Whereas inhibition of Akt had no effect on VEGF-induced HMEC gap formation in the short term, inhibition of Src blunted this process. In contrast, inhibition of Akt disrupted the VEGF and Ang-1 stabilized barrier integrity in the long-term while inhibition of Src did not. Interestingly, both long-term Akt inhibition and Akt1 gene knockdown in HMECs resulted in increased Tyr416 phosphorylation of Src. Treatment of HMECs with transforming growth factor-β1 (TGFβ1) that inhibited Akt Ser473 phosphorylation in the long-term, activated Src through increased Tyr416 phosphorylation and decreased HMEC-barrier resistance. The effect of TGFβ1 on endothelial-barrier breakdown was blunted in Akt1 deficient HMEC monolayers, where endothelial-barrier resistance was already impaired compared to the control. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating a direct cross-talk between Akt and Src in endothelial-barrier regulation. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Characterization of step-edge barrier crossing of para-sexiphenyl on the ZnO (101[combining macron]0) surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palczynski, Karol; Herrmann, Philipp; Heimel, Georg; Dzubiella, Joachim

    2016-09-14

    Mass transport processes of conjugated organic molecules (COMs) on inorganic surfaces are essential elements in thin film deposition for hybrid optoelectronic devices. Defects and in particular surface step-edges dictate the molecular nucleation and growth morphology, which itself determine many physical properties of the resulting hybrid interface. Here, we explore the detailed molecular kinetics and transport rates of a single physisorbed para-sexiphenyl (p-6P) molecule crossing a step-edge (a "hetero-Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier") on the inorganic ZnO (101[combining macron]0) surface by a combination of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations and passage time theory. We determine temperature- and charge-dependent (free) energy landscapes, position-dependent diffusion coefficients, and ultimately the mean first passage time over the step-edges. We find two completely different step-edge crossing mechanisms, the occurrence and rates of which simultaneously depend on both electrostatic and thermal molecule-surface coupling. In weakly coupled systems, the molecule crosses the step relatively quickly (in nanoseconds) by log-roll mechanisms while for strongly coupled systems, it crosses relatively slowly (in microseconds) in a strictly perpendicular fashion. In the latter process, "internal friction" from intramolecular bending and torsional degrees of freedom contribute a significant corrugation to the overall crossing barrier. Furthermore, we show that crossing pathways can also change qualitatively with step-edge height. The great complexity in hetero-barrier crossing of COMs (in contrast to simple atoms) revealed in this study has implications on the interpretation and possible control of nucleation and growth mechanisms at surface defects in hybrid systems.

  2. Barriers to Exercise in Younger and Older Non-Exercising Adult Women: A Cross Sectional Study in London, United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoff Lovell

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available A survey of 100 women in the south of London, United Kingdom (UK compared exercise barrier intensities between non-exercising younger (20-27 years and older (28-35 years adult women; and examined childcare duties as perceived barriers to exercise. Perceived barriers to exercise were examined using an Exercise Benefits/Barriers Scale (EBBS comprising four subscales (exercise milieu; time expenditure; physical exertion; family discouragement. Participants’ number of children was also noted. Non-exercising older women reported significantly higher total exercise barriers, as well as across three barrier subscales: exercise milieu, time expenditure, and family discouragement. For both age groups, significant correlation existed between number of children and women’s total exercise barrier scores. Number of children explained »25% and »30% of the variance of younger and older women’s total barrier scores respectively. For both women groups, the strongest correlation between exercise barrier and number of children was for the time expenditure subscale. Broad grouping of 20-35 year old non-exercising women does not reflect a homogenous sample. Age categories employing narrower age brackets are recommended. Issues surrounding family responsibilities e.g. childcare duties may be shared between these groups and require further research and policy attention.

  3. Comparative intra-and inter-specific sexual organ reciprocity in four distylous Primula species in the Himalaya-Hengduan Mountains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hai-Dong; Ren, Zong-Xin; Zhou, Wei; Bernhardt, Peter; Zhao, Yan-Hui; Wu, Zhi-Kun; Li, De-Zhu; Wang, Hong

    2018-04-23

    Distyly is a mechanism promoting cross-pollination within a balanced polymorphism. Numerous studies show that the degree of inter-morph sexual organ reciprocity (SOR) within species relates to its pollen-mediated gene flow. Similarly, a lower inter-specific SOR should promote inter-specific isolation when congeners are sympatric, co-blooming, and share pollinators. In this comparative study, we address the significance of SOR at both intra- and inter-specific levels. Seventeen allopatric and eight sympatric populations representing four Primula species (P. anisodora, P. beesiana, P. bulleyana and P. poissonii) native to the Himalaya-Hengduan Mountains were measured for eight floral traits in both long- and short-styled morphs. GLMM and spatial overlap methods were used to compare intra- and inter-specific SOR. While floral morphology differed among four Primula species. SOR within species was generally higher than between species, but species pairs P. poissonii / P. anisodora and P. beesiana / P. bulleyana, the SOR was high at both intra- and inter-specific levels. We didn't detect a significant variation in intra-specific SOR or inter-specific SOR when compare allopatric vs. sympatric populations for all species studied. As intra-specific SOR increased, disassortative mating may be promoted. As inter-specific SOR decreased, inter-specific isolation between co-flowering species pairs also may increase. Hybridization between congeners occurred when inter-specific SOR increased in sympatric populations was confirmed in two species pairs, P. poissonii / P. anisodora and P. beesiana / P. bulleyana. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Variation in the relative magnitude of intraspecific and interspecific ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    While there was considerable variation in the relative magnitude of intraspecific and interspecific competitive effects over generations, among both populations and environments, there was no clear evidence supporting the genetic feedback hypothesis. Intraspecific and interspecific competitive effects on population growth ...

  5. Sex-specific asymmetry in eye development in interspecific hybrids ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Banerjee P. and Singh B. N. 2012 Interspecific sexual isolation and phylogeny among different members of the Drosophila bipectinata species complex. Genetica 140, 75–81. Banerjee P. and Singh B. N. 2014 Pattern of mating preference of interspecific hybrid females and phylogeny in the Drosophila bipectinata species ...

  6. Perceived Barriers to Healthy Eating and Physical Activity among Adolescents in Seven Arab Countries: A Cross-Cultural Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrahman O. Musaiger

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To highlight the perceived personal, social, and environmental barriers to healthy eating and physical activity among Arab adolescents. Method. A multistage stratified sampling method was used to select 4698 students aged 15–18 years (2240 males and 2458 females from public schools. Seven Arab counties were included in the study, namely, Algeria, Jordan, Kuwait, Libya, Palestine, Syria, and the United Arab Emirates. Self-reported questionnaire was used to list the barriers to healthy eating and physical activity facing these adolescents. Results. It was found that lack of information on healthy eating, lack of motivation to eat a healthy diet, and not having time to prepare or eat healthy food were the main barriers to healthy eating among both genders. For physical activity, the main barriers selected were lack of motivation to do physical activity, less support from teachers, and lack of time to do physical activity. In general, females faced more barriers to physical activity than males in all countries included. There were significant differences between males and females within each country and among countries for most barriers. Conclusion. Intervention programmes to combat obesity and other chronic noncommunicable diseases in the Arab world should include solutions to overcome the barriers to weight maintenance, particularly the sociocultural barriers to practising physical activity.

  7. Quantifying interspecific coagulation efficiency of phytoplankton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J.L.S.; Kiørboe, Thomas

    1997-01-01

    Non-sticky latex beads and sticky diatoms were used as models to describe mutual coagulation between sticky and non-sticky particles. in mixed suspensions of beads and Thalassiosira nordenskjoeldii, both types of particles coagulated into mixed aggregates at specific rates, from which...... the interspecific coagulation efficiency could be calculated. Stickiness between beads and T. nordenskjoeldii was 50% of that of T. nordenskjoeldii in monospecific suspensions, and this ratio remained constant throughout 12 experiments covering 1 order of magnitude variation in the stickiness level of T....... nordenskjoeldii. Mutual coagulation between Skeletonema costatum and the non-sticky cel:ls of Ditylum brightwellii also proceeded with hall the efficiency of S. costatum alone. The latex beads were suitable to be used as 'standard particles' to quantify the ability of phytoplankton to prime aggregation...

  8. The Effect of Initiatives to Overcome Language Barriers and Improve Attendance: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of Adherence in an Inner City Chronic Pain Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreae, Michael H; White, Robert S; Chen, Kelly Yan; Nair, Singh; Hall, Charles; Shaparin, Naum

    2017-02-01

    Language barriers can prevent pain physicians and patients from forming meaningful rapport and drive health care disparities. Non-adherence with scheduled pain clinic appointments deprives patients with chronic pain of needed specialist care. We evaluated the benefit of comprehensive initiatives to overcome language barriers to improve patient adherence with initial scheduled chronic pain clinic appointments. After implementation of our initiative, we performed a retrospective cross-sectional analysis and fit logistic regression models to investigate the association between demographic factors and adherence. We collected retrospective data from an observational cohort with a scheduled appointment at the adult inner-city underserved outpatient Pain Center at Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York. Between March 2012 and March 2014, 14,459 appointments were scheduled; 3,035 of these appointments represented initial first visits; patients had a mean age of 53 years; 15% were predominantly Spanish-speaking, 65% were female. Our initiative to overcome language barriers in our pain clinic included appointment reminders in the patient’s preferred language, Spanish-speaking staff, and unified locations with equitable access. Our dependent variable was adherence with a first scheduled pain clinic appointment. We found that after implementation of our initiative, speaking Spanish was now statistically significantly associated with higher rates of adherence with appointments (Odds Ratio 1.32, 95% confidence interval [1.06–1.64]). We infer from our results that coordinated initiatives to overcome language barriers can be beneficial in improving appointment adherence and access to care by enhancing rapport and communication between pain physicians and their patients. The results of this retrospective cross-sectional analysis of patients’ adherence with scheduled appointments in an inner-city chronic pain clinic suggests that targeted initiatives including a pre

  9. Diet and cross-shelf distribution of rabbitfishes (f. Siganidae) on the northern Great Barrier Reef: implications for ecosystem function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoey, A. S.; Brandl, S. J.; Bellwood, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    Herbivorous fishes are a critical functional group on coral reefs, and there is a clear need to understand the role and relative importance of individual species in reef processes. While numerous studies have quantified the roles of parrotfishes and surgeonfishes on coral reefs, the rabbitfishes (f. Siganidae) have been largely overlooked. Consequently, they are typically viewed as a uniform group of grazing or browsing fishes. Here, we quantify the diet and distribution of rabbitfish assemblages on six reefs spanning the continental shelf in the northern Great Barrier Reef. Our results revealed marked variation in the diet and distribution of rabbitfish species. Analysis of stomach contents identified four distinct groups: browsers of leathery brown macroalgae ( Siganus canaliculatus, S. javus), croppers of red and green macroalgae ( S. argenteus, S. corallinus, S. doliatus, S. spinus) and mixed feeders of diverse algal material, cyanobacteria, detritus and sediment ( S. lineatus, S. punctatissimus, S. punctatus, S. vulpinus). Surprisingly, the diet of the fourth group ( S. puellus) contained very little algal material (22.5 %) and was instead dominated by sponges (69.1 %). Together with this variation in diet, the distribution of rabbitfishes displayed clear cross-shelf variation. Biomass was greatest on inner-shelf reefs (112.7 ± 18.2 kg.ha-1), decreasing markedly on mid- (37.8 ± 4.6 kg.ha-1) and outer-shelf reefs (9.7 ± 2.2 kg.ha-1). This pattern was largely driven by the browsing S. canaliculatus that accounted for 50 % of the biomass on inner-shelf reefs, but was absent in mid- and outer-shelf reefs. Mixed feeders, although primarily restricted to the reef slope and back reef habitats, also decreased in abundance and biomass from inshore to offshore, while algal cropping taxa were the dominant group on mid-shelf reefs. These results clearly demonstrate the extent to which diet and distribution vary within the Siganidae and emphasise the importance of

  10. Molecular phylogeny of the genus Asparagus (Asparagaceae) explains interspecific crossability between the garden asparagus (A. officinalis) and other Asparagus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Shosei; Konno, Itaru; Kanno, Akira

    2012-02-01

    The genus Asparagus comprises approximately 200 species, some of which are commercially cultivated, such as the garden asparagus (A. officinalis). Many Asparagus species, including A. officinalis, are dioecious and have been grouped into a subgenus distinct from that of hermaphroditic species. Although many interspecific crossings have been attempted to introduce useful traits into A. officinalis, only some of the dioecious species were found to be cross-compatible with A. officinalis. Here, molecular phylogenetic analyses were conducted to determine whether interspecific crossability is proportional to the genetic distance between the crossing pairs and to further clarify the evolutionary history of the Asparagus genus. A clade with all cross-compatible species and no cross-incompatible species was recovered in the phylogenetic tree based on analyses of non-coding cpDNA regions. In addition, a sex-linked marker developed for A. officinalis amplified a male-specific region in all cross-compatible species. The phylogenetic analyses also provided some insights about the evolutionary history of Asparagus; for example, by indicating that the genus had its origin in southern Africa, subsequently spreading throughout the old world through intensive speciation and dispersal. The results also suggest that dioecious species were derived from a single evolutionary transition from hermaphroditism in Asparagus. These findings not only contribute towards the understanding of the evolutionary history of the genus but may also facilitate future interspecific hybridization programs involving Asparagus species.

  11. Identification of pre-fertilization reproductive barriers and the underlying cytological mechanism in crosses among three petal-types of Jasminum sambac and their relevance to phylogenetic relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yanming; Sun, Xiaobo; Gu, Chunsun; Jia, Xinping; Liang, Lijian; Su, Jiale

    2017-01-01

    Crosses among single-, double- and multi-petal jasmine cultivars (Jasminum sambac Aiton) are unable to easily generate hybrids. To identify the reproductive barriers restricting hybrid set, dynamic changes in jasmine pollen viability and pistil receptivity were compared at different flowering stages. Pollen-pistil interactions in six reciprocal crosses were also investigated to characterize pollen-stigma compatibility. Additionally, paraffin sections of pollinated embryo sacs were prepared for subsequent analyses of developmental status. Furthermore, pistil cell ultrastructural characteristics were observed to reveal cytological mechanism regulating pistil receptivity and the pollen-pistil interactions. We observed that pollen viability and stigma receptivity varied depending on petal phenotype and flowering stage and were easily lost during flowering. Different reciprocal crosses exhibited varied pollen-stigma compatibilities according to the pollen germination rates. Although some pollen grains germinated normally on maternal stigmas, the pollen tubes were arrested in the pistils and were unable to reach the ovaries. Additionally, the embryo sacs remained unfertilized until degenerating. Therefore, jasmine crosses are affected by pre-fertilization reproductive barriers. Low pollen fertility and poor stigma receptivity are detrimental to pollen germination and pollen-pistil compatibility, indicating they are two factors affecting hybrid set. Ultrastructural observation of the pistil cells revealed that cell death occurred during flowering. Thus, the early and rapid senescence of pistils is likely responsible for the decreased pistil receptivity and inhibited pollen tube growth. These findings may be relevant for future jasmine hybridizations. They provide new insights for the development of methods to overcome reproductive barriers and may also be useful for clarifying the phylogenetic relationships among jasmine cultivars with differing petal phenotypes.

  12. Barriers to Research Utilization among Registered Nurses in Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospitals: A Cross-Sectional Survey in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fen Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. As there might be relevant differences with regard to research utilization in the general hospitals, we aimed to study research utilization among registered nurses working in traditional Chinese medicine hospitals. Methods. A total of 648 registered nurses from 4 tertiary-level hospitals in China were recruited for participation. A modified BARRIERS Scale and self-designed questionnaires were used for data collection. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics, t-tests, and one-way ANOVAs and Spearman correlation analysis. Results. Overall, items which belong to the subscale “Research” were identified as the most important barriers. Among the individual items, the lack of time on the job was ranked as the top barrier, followed by the lack of knowledgeable colleagues and by overwhelming research publications. Clinical experience, working pressure, job satisfaction, and research experience could be identified as associated factors for barriers to research utilization. Conclusions. Registered nurses in traditional Chinese medicine hospitals felt high barriers to research utilization. Reducing registered nurses’ working pressure, promoting their positive attitude to nursing, and improving research training might be helpful for increasing research utilization. Close cooperation between clinical and nursing schools or academic research centres might facilitate the necessary change in nursing education and routine.

  13. [Cross-cultural aspects of interaction and communication in mental health care. Barriers and recommendations for action].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penka, S; Schouler-Ocak, M; Heinz, A; Kluge, U

    2012-09-01

    Mental health care for migrants is often impaired by a lack of policies and provisions in the respective institutions. This article focuses on "communication barriers" in psychosocial and psychotherapeutic settings, where personal communication is of great importance. Barriers that prevent migrants from using health care institutions include translation problems but also more complex misunderstandings based on divergent explanations regarding the causes, course, and adequate treatment of different disorders. The widely recommended intercultural opening of medical and psychosocial institutions involves using interpreters as cultural experts, reflecting on and mediating between divergent explanatory models, and avoiding cultural and ethnic stereotyping as well as encouraging an open, curious, and reflective professional attitude. With respect to institutional settings, rules for the financing of interpreters are as important as tackling barriers that limit migrants' access to medical and psychosocial institutions.

  14. Crossing the Telemedicine Chasm: Have the U.S. Barriers to Widespread Adoption of Telemedicine Been Significantly Reduced?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia LeRouge

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Barriers have challenged widespread telemedicine adoption by health care organizations for 40 years. These barriers have been technological, financial, and legal and have also involved business strategy and human resources. The article canvasses recent trends—events and activities in each of these areas as well as US health reform activities that might help to break down these barriers. The key to telemedicine success in the future is to view it as an integral part of health care services and not as a stand-alone project. Telemedicine must move from experimental and separate to integrated and equivalent to other health services within health care organizations. Furthermore, telemedicine serves as vital connective tissue for expanding health care organization networks.

  15. Phenology of the oil palm interspecific hybrid Elaeis oleifera × Elaeis guineensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Hormaza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Oil palm is one of the most important oil crops in the world. Because of its high productivity and perennial nature, it has been expanding quickly. Commercial plantations consist mostly of the African palm E. guineensis Jacq. However, producers in Latin America are increasingly planting the O × G interspecific hybrid, a cross between African palm (E. guineensis and the American palm (E. oleifera (Kunth Cortés. This interspecific hybrid has emerged as a promising solution to diseases such as the bud rot of oil palm because of the apparent partial resistance of this genotype to the disease. This work studied and described the phenology of the O × G interspecific hybrid. The phenology stages were coded using the BBCH scale. The scale for the phenophases was defined using a three-digit code. Due to the nature of the palm, no descriptions were used for stage two (formation of side shoots/tillering and stage four (development of harvestable vegetative plant parts or vegetative reproductive organs because these stages do not apply to oil palm. The scale was constructed using germinating seeds, pre-nursery and nursery plants and five year-old palms. For the description of the stem elongation, different age palms of the same O × G hybrid were used. Observations were performed during an 18-month period. Additionally, the interval for the change from one phenology stage to another was determined both in days and degree-days (DD. The interspecific O × G hybrid required 6408 DD from when the spear leaf unfolds until the bunch was ripened and harvested, and 4427.6 DD from leaf unfolding to anthesis.

  16. Evolutionary and Ecological Consequences of Interspecific Hybridization in Cladocerans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwenk, K.; Spaak, P.

    1995-01-01

    The evolutionary process of interspecific hybridization in cladocerans is reviewed based on ecological and population genetic data. The evolutionary consequences of hybridization, biogeographic patterns and fitness comparisons are analyzed within the conceptual framework of theories on

  17. Targeting metastatic breast cancer with ANG1005, a novel peptide-paclitaxel conjugate that crosses the blood-brain-barrier (BBB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Li

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We devoted this short interview piece with Dr Shou-Ching Tang at Augusta University to feature some promising results from a clinical phase II trial on a novel brain-penetrating peptide-paclitaxel-conjugate, ANG1005, in treating brain metastatic breast cancer. These results were presented by Dr. Tang at the recent annual meeting of the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO 2016 Congress. This development heralds an important step forward towards the development of effective chemotherapeutic agents, which can cross the blood-brain-barrier and effectively treat and prevent the brain metastatic cancers.

  18. Unified theory of interspecific allometric scaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Jafferson K L da; Barbosa, Lauro A; Silva, Paulo Roberto

    2007-01-01

    A general simple theory for the interspecific allometric scaling is developed in the d + 1-dimensional space (d biological lengths and a physiological time) of metabolic states of organisms. It is assumed that natural selection shaped the metabolic states in such a way that the mass and energy d + 1-densities are size-invariant quantities (independent of body mass). The different metabolic states (basal and maximum) are described by considering that the biological lengths and the physiological time are related by different transport processes of energy and mass. In the basal metabolism, transportation occurs by ballistic and diffusion processes. In d = 3, the 3/4 law occurs if the ballistic movement is the dominant process, while the 2/3 law appears when both transport processes are equivalent. Accelerated movement during the biological time is related to the maximum aerobic sustained metabolism, which is characterized by the scaling exponent 2d/(2d + 1) (6/7 in d = 3). The results are in good agreement with empirical data and a verifiable empirical prediction about the aorta blood velocity in maximum metabolic rate conditions is made. (fast track communication)

  19. Interspecific aggression in hermatypic corals from Bermuda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, A.

    1984-11-01

    Interspecific aggression between hermatypic corals on Bermudian reefs has been investigated by aquarium and field studies, the latter involving induced interactions, observations from 30 m-2 transects and random SCUBA traverses. Resultant hierarchies, constructed by ranking the abilities of species to damage competitors, show close similarities with each other and with the Jamaican hierarchy at the family level, notwithstanding some differences in the ranking of some species. Only 11% of natural-occurring interactions depart from the aquarium-derived results; in terms of species-pair combinations, 30% show partial or complete inversions from aquarium to field, with most changes involving species close together in the field hierarchy. Circular (intransitive) interactions occur mostly within a network of weakly-aggressive species in both aquarium- and fieldderived hierarchies. While number of potential interactions m-2 varies directly with density, frequency of aggression is positively correlated with coral diversity (species richness), while frequency of “no reactions” and conspecific fusion (combined) shows a correspondingly negative correlation with diversity. Frequency of aggression does not appear to be depth related. Comparison of aquarium and field hierarchies suggest that digestion by mesenterial filaments is the most important mechanism of aggression under natural conditions. Sweeper tentacle activity is the most likely cause of field reversals involving Madracis mirabilis and Montastrea cavernosa. Other factors, such as stress caused by seasonal environmental extremes, may be responsible for reversals or inconsistent behaviour in other species.

  20. Introducing a New Breed of Wine Yeast: Interspecific Hybridisation between a Commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae Wine Yeast and Saccharomyces mikatae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellon, Jennifer R.; Schmid, Frank; Capone, Dimitra L.; Dunn, Barbara L.; Chambers, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Interspecific hybrids are commonplace in agriculture and horticulture; bread wheat and grapefruit are but two examples. The benefits derived from interspecific hybridisation include the potential of generating advantageous transgressive phenotypes. This paper describes the generation of a new breed of wine yeast by interspecific hybridisation between a commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast strain and Saccharomyces mikatae, a species hitherto not associated with industrial fermentation environs. While commercially available wine yeast strains provide consistent and reliable fermentations, wines produced using single inocula are thought to lack the sensory complexity and rounded palate structure obtained from spontaneous fermentations. In contrast, interspecific yeast hybrids have the potential to deliver increased complexity to wine sensory properties and alternative wine styles through the formation of novel, and wider ranging, yeast volatile fermentation metabolite profiles, whilst maintaining the robustness of the wine yeast parent. Screening of newly generated hybrids from a cross between a S. cerevisiae wine yeast and S. mikatae (closely-related but ecologically distant members of the Saccharomyces sensu stricto clade), has identified progeny with robust fermentation properties and winemaking potential. Chemical analysis showed that, relative to the S. cerevisiae wine yeast parent, hybrids produced wines with different concentrations of volatile metabolites that are known to contribute to wine flavour and aroma, including flavour compounds associated with non-Saccharomyces species. The new S. cerevisiae x S. mikatae hybrids have the potential to produce complex wines akin to products of spontaneous fermentation while giving winemakers the safeguard of an inoculated ferment. PMID:23614011

  1. Introducing a new breed of wine yeast: interspecific hybridisation between a commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast and Saccharomyces mikatae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer R Bellon

    Full Text Available Interspecific hybrids are commonplace in agriculture and horticulture; bread wheat and grapefruit are but two examples. The benefits derived from interspecific hybridisation include the potential of generating advantageous transgressive phenotypes. This paper describes the generation of a new breed of wine yeast by interspecific hybridisation between a commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast strain and Saccharomyces mikatae, a species hitherto not associated with industrial fermentation environs. While commercially available wine yeast strains provide consistent and reliable fermentations, wines produced using single inocula are thought to lack the sensory complexity and rounded palate structure obtained from spontaneous fermentations. In contrast, interspecific yeast hybrids have the potential to deliver increased complexity to wine sensory properties and alternative wine styles through the formation of novel, and wider ranging, yeast volatile fermentation metabolite profiles, whilst maintaining the robustness of the wine yeast parent. Screening of newly generated hybrids from a cross between a S. cerevisiae wine yeast and S. mikatae (closely-related but ecologically distant members of the Saccharomyces sensu stricto clade, has identified progeny with robust fermentation properties and winemaking potential. Chemical analysis showed that, relative to the S. cerevisiae wine yeast parent, hybrids produced wines with different concentrations of volatile metabolites that are known to contribute to wine flavour and aroma, including flavour compounds associated with non-Saccharomyces species. The new S. cerevisiae x S. mikatae hybrids have the potential to produce complex wines akin to products of spontaneous fermentation while giving winemakers the safeguard of an inoculated ferment.

  2. Stages of change, barriers, benefits, and preferences for exercise in RA patients: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henchoz, Y; Zufferey, P; So, A

    2013-01-01

    To determine the distribution of exercise stages of change in a rheumatoid arthritis (RA) cohort, and to examine patients' perceptions of exercise benefits, barriers, and their preferences for exercise. One hundred and twenty RA patients who attended the Rheumatology Unit of a University Hospital were asked to participate in the study. Those who agreed were administered a questionnaire to determine their exercise stage of change, their perceived benefits and barriers to exercise, and their preferences for various features of exercise. Eighty-nine (74%) patients were finally included in the analyses. Their mean age was 58.4 years, mean RA duration 10.1 years, and mean disease activity score 2.8. The distribution of exercise stages of change was as follows: precontemplation (n = 30, 34%), contemplation (n = 11, 13%), preparation (n = 5, 6%), action (n = 2, 2%), and maintenance (n = 39, 45%). Compared to patients in the maintenance stage of change, precontemplators exhibited different demographic and functional characteristics and reported less exercise benefits and more barriers to exercise. Most participants preferred exercising alone (40%), at home (29%), at a moderate intensity (64%), with advice provided by a rheumatologist (34%) or a specialist in exercise and RA (34%). Walking was by far the preferred type of exercise, in both the summer (86%) and the winter (51%). Our cohort of patients with RA was essentially distributed across the precontemplation and maintenance exercise stages of change. These subgroups of patients exhibit psychological and functional differences that make their needs different in terms of exercise counselling.

  3. Barriers to HIV and sexual and reproductive health care for female sex workers in Tete, Mozambique: results from a cross-sectional survey and focus group discussions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves Lafort

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the context of an operational research project in Tete, Mozambique, use of, and barriers to, HIV and sexual and reproductive health (HIV/SRH commodities and services for female sex workers (FSWs were assessed as part of a baseline situational analysis. Methods In a cross-sectional survey 311 FSWs were recruited using respondent driven sampling and interviewed face-to-face, and three focus group discussions were held with respectively 6 full-time Mozambican, 7 occasional Mozambican and 9 full-time Zimbabwean FSWs, to investigate use of, and barriers to, HIV/SRH care. Results The cross-sectional survey showed that 71 % of FSWs used non-barrier contraception, 78 % sought care for their last sexually transmitted infection episode, 51 % of HIV-negative FSWs was tested for HIV in the last 6 months, 83 % of HIV-positive FSWs were in HIV care, 55 % sought help at a health facility for their last unwanted pregnancy and 48 % after sexual assault, and none was ever screened for cervical cancer. Local public health facilities were by far the most common place where care was sought, followed by an NGO-operated clinic targeting FSWs, and places outside the Tete area. In the focus group discussions, FSWs expressed dissatisfaction with the public health services, as a result of being asked for bribes, being badly attended by some care providers, stigmatisation and breaches of confidentiality. The service most lacking was said to be termination of unwanted pregnancies. Conclusions The use of most HIV and SRH services is insufficient in this FSW population. The public health sector is the main provider, but access is hampered by several barriers. The reach of a FSW-specific NGO clinic is limited. Access to, and use of, HIV and SRH services should be improved by reducing barriers at public health facilities, broadening the range of services and expanding the reach of the targeted NGO clinic.

  4. Barriers and facilitators to the implementation of clinical practice guidelines: A cross-sectional survey among physicians in Estonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taba Pille

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In an era when an increasing amount of clinical information is available to health care professionals, the effective implementation of clinical practice guidelines requires the development of strategies to facilitate the use of these guidelines. The objective of this study was to assess attitudes towards clinical practice guidelines, as well as the barriers and facilitators to their use, among Estonian physicians. The study was conducted to inform the revision of the clinical practice guideline development process and can provide inspiration to other countries considering the increasing use of evidence-based medicine. Methods We conducted an online survey of physicians to assess resource, system, and attitudinal barriers. We also asked a set of questions related to improving the use of clinical practice guidelines and collected free-text comments. We hypothesized that attitudes concerning guidelines may differ by gender, years of experience and practice setting. The study population consisted of physicians from the database of the Department of Continuing Medical Education of the University of Tartu. Differences between groups were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis non-parametric test. Results 41% (497/1212 of physicians in the database completed the questionnaire, comprising more than 10% of physicians in the country. Most respondents (79% used treatment guidelines in their daily clinical practice. Lack of time was the barrier identified by the most physicians (42%, followed by lack of medical resources for implementation (32%. The majority of physicians disagreed with the statement that guidelines were not accessible (73% or too complicated (70%. Physicians practicing in outpatient settings or for more than 25 years were the most likely to experience difficulties in guideline use. 95% of respondents agreed that an easy-to-find online database of guidelines would facilitate use. Conclusions Use of updated evidence

  5. Interspecific aggression and character displacement in the damselfly Calopteryx splendens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tynkkynen, K; Rantala, M J; Suhonen, J

    2004-07-01

    Problems in species recognition are thought to affect the evolution of secondary sexual characters mainly through avoidance of maladaptive hybridization. Another, but much less studied avenue for the evolution of sexual characters due to species recognition problems is through interspecific aggression. In the damselfly, Calopteryx splendens, males have pigmented wing spots as a sexual character. Large-spotted males resemble males of another species, Calopteryx virgo, causing potential problems in species recognition. In this study, we investigate whether there is character displacement in wing spot size and whether interspecific aggression could cause this pattern. We found first that wing spot size of C. splendens in populations decreased with increasing relative abundance of C. virgo. Secondly, C. virgo males were more aggressive towards large- than small-spotted C. splendens males. Thirdly, in interspecific contests C. virgo males had better territory holding ability than C. splendens males. These results suggest that interspecific aggression may have caused character displacement in wing spot size of C. splendens, because the intensity of aggression towards large-spotted males is likely to increase with relative abundance of C. virgo males. Thus, interspecific aggression may be an evolutionarily significant force that is able to cause divergence in secondary sexual characters. Copyright 2004 Blackwell Publishing Ltd

  6. Interspecific aggression causes negative selection on sexual characters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tynkkynen, Katja; Kotiaho, Janne S; Luojumäki, Mari; Suhonen, Jukka

    2005-08-01

    Interspecific aggression originating from mistaken species recognition may cause selection on secondary sexual characters, but this hypothesis has remained untested. Here we report a field experiment designed to test directly whether interspecific aggression causes selection on secondary sexual characters, wing spots, in wild damselfly populations. Males of Calopteryx virgo are more aggressive toward males of C. splendens with large than with small wing spots. This differential interspecific aggression may cause negative selection on wing spot size. Indeed, our results show that directional survival selection on wing spot size of C. splendens males was changed by experimental removal of C. virgo males. Without removal, directional selection went from positive to negative with increasing relative abundance of C. virgo males. In populations where C. virgo males were removed, this relationship disappeared. These results verify that interspecific aggression can cause negative selection on sexual characters. Thus, interspecific aggression has the potential to cause divergence on these characters between two species offering an alternative explanation for reinforcement for generating character displacement in secondary sexual characters.

  7. Interspecific visual signalling in animals and plants: a functional classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caro, Tim; Allen, William L

    2017-07-05

    Organisms frequently gain advantages when they engage in signalling with individuals of other species. Here, we provide a functionally structured framework of the great variety of interspecific visual signals seen in nature, and then describe the different signalling mechanisms that have evolved in response to each of these functional requirements. We propose that interspecific visual signalling can be divided into six major functional categories: anti-predator, food acquisition, anti-parasite, host acquisition, reproductive and agonistic signalling, with each function enabled by several distinct mechanisms. We support our classification by reviewing the ecological and behavioural drivers of interspecific signalling in animals and plants, principally focusing on comparative studies that address large-scale patterns of diversity. Collating diverse examples of interspecific signalling into an organized set of functional and mechanistic categories places anachronistic behavioural and morphological labels in fresh context, clarifies terminology and redirects research effort towards understanding environmental influences driving interspecific signalling in nature.This article is part of the themed issue 'Animal coloration: production, perception, function and application'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  8. Identifying motivators and barriers to older community-dwelling people participating in resistance training: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Elissa; Lewin, Gill; Pettigrew, Simone; Hill, Anne-Marie; Bainbridge, Liz; Farrier, Kaela; Langdon, Trish; Airey, Phil; Hill, Keith D

    2017-08-01

    Participation rates of older people in resistance training (RT) are low despite increasing research showing many health benefits. To increase the number of older people participating in RT it is important to know what would motivate people to become involved, what motivates those who participate to continue, and the factors preventing many older people from commencing participation. To investigate these issues, a questionnaire was mailed to three groups of older people: (1) those receiving home care services, (2) members of a peak non-government seniors' organisation and (3) those participating in a specific gym-based RT programme. In total, 1327 questionnaires were returned (response rate = 42.5%). To feel good physically and mentally were the main reasons motivating participation among all three groups, and falls prevention was identified as an important motivator for the home care respondents. Pain, injury and illness were the main barriers to participating, or continuing to participate. However, medical advice was a factor influencing participation commencement. The results suggest organisations providing RT programmes for older people should tailor the promotion and delivery of programmes to address key motivators and barriers specific to each group to increase the proportion of older people initiating and continuing to engage in RT.

  9. Glass Barriers : Constraints to Women's Small-Scale Cross-Border Trade in Cambodia and Lao PDR

    OpenAIRE

    Seror, Marlon; Record, Richard; Clarke, Julian

    2017-01-01

    Trade facilitation projects often assume indirect benefits for small-scale, cross-border traders. Recent studies have shown the challenges faced in Africa by this population, especially women, but it remains unknown in Cambodia and the Lao People's Democratic Republic, despite large trade facilitation investments. This paper fills this gap, thanks to an innovative mix of original qualitati...

  10. Engaging with Cross-Cultural Communication Barriers in Globalized Higher Education: The Case of Research-Degree Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bash, Leslie

    2009-01-01

    Problematic aspects of intercultural communication are considered in the context of: an increasingly internationalized market for higher education; the globalization of knowledge; the compatibility of distinct national higher education cultures; and the capacity for successful cross-cultural cooperation. This is exemplified by reference to a…

  11. Cross-promotional alcohol discounting in Australia's grocery sector: a barrier to initiatives to curb excessive alcohol consumption?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardle, Jonathan L; Chang, Sungwon

    2015-04-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption is an increasing issue internationally. Pricing strategies, including discount restrictions, have been identified as one of the most effective policy means by which to reduce heavy alcohol consumption. In Australia, cross-promotional alcohol discounts are increasingly used by supermarket chains as a marketing tool. The purpose of the present study is to provide preliminary data on the nature and extent of cross-promotional alcohol discounting in the Australian grocery sector. A purposive sample of 34 supermarkets in Australia's three largest cities was selected and minor grocery purchases made to uncover the prevalence and level of cross-promotional alcohol discounting. Cross-promotional 'bundled' discounts were very common with 33 of the 34 supermarkets offering a 'two for one' discount on bottles of wine. Even with minor purchases (mean purchase $1.35), the mean value of discounts received was substantial ($16.23). These results appear to be consistent with claims that major supermarket chains are using alcohol discounts as loss leaders to entice new consumers. These strategies are antithetical to public health strategies aimed at reducing excessive alcohol consumption. Further examination of the impact of major retailers on public health initiatives is warranted, particularly in light of increasing retailer concentration. © 2014 Public Health Association of Australia.

  12. Cross-sector surveys assessing perceptions of key stakeholders towards barriers, concerns and facilitators to the appropriate use of adaptive designs in confirmatory trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimairo, Munyaradzi; Julious, Steven A; Todd, Susan; Nicholl, Jonathan P; Boote, Jonathan

    2015-12-23

    Appropriately conducted adaptive designs (ADs) offer many potential advantages over conventional trials. They make better use of accruing data, potentially saving time, trial participants, and limited resources compared to conventional, fixed sample size designs. However, one can argue that ADs are not implemented as often as they should be, particularly in publicly funded confirmatory trials. This study explored barriers, concerns, and potential facilitators to the appropriate use of ADs in confirmatory trials among key stakeholders. We conducted three cross-sectional, online parallel surveys between November 2014 and January 2015. The surveys were based upon findings drawn from in-depth interviews of key research stakeholders, predominantly in the UK, and targeted Clinical Trials Units (CTUs), public funders, and private sector organisations. Response rates were as follows: 30(55 %) UK CTUs, 17(68 %) private sector, and 86(41 %) public funders. A Rating Scale Model was used to rank barriers and concerns in order of perceived importance for prioritisation. Top-ranked barriers included the lack of bridge funding accessible to UK CTUs to support the design of ADs, limited practical implementation knowledge, preference for traditional mainstream designs, difficulties in marketing ADs to key stakeholders, time constraints to support ADs relative to competing priorities, lack of applied training, and insufficient access to case studies of undertaken ADs to facilitate practical learning and successful implementation. Associated practical complexities and inadequate data management infrastructure to support ADs were reported as more pronounced in the private sector. For funders of public research, the inadequate description of the rationale, scope, and decision-making criteria to guide the planned AD in grant proposals by researchers were all viewed as major obstacles. There are still persistent and important perceptions of individual and organisational obstacles

  13. Age of Barrier Canyon-style rock art constrained by cross-cutting relations and luminescence dating techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pederson, Joel L.; Chapot, Melissa S.; Simms, Steven R.

    2014-01-01

    , the type section of BCS art in Canyon-lands National Park, southeastern Utah. Alluvial chronostratigraphy constrains the burial and exhumation of the alcove containing the panel, and limits are also set by our related research dating both a rockfall that removed some figures and the rock's exposure......-1100 coincides better with the transition to and rise of the subsequent Fremont culture. This chronology is for the type locality only, and variability in the age of other sites is likely. Nevertheless, results suggest that BCS rock art represents an artistic tradition that spanned cultures and the transition......Rock art compels interest from both researchers and a broader public, inspiring many hypotheses about its cultural origin and meaning, but it is notoriously difficult to date numerically. Barrier Canyon-style (BCS) pictographs of the Colorado Plateau are among the most debated examples; hypotheses...

  14. IMPROVING WHEAT TRITICUM AESTIVUM L. BY INTERSPECIFIC AND INTERGENERIC HYBRIDIZATION WITH POACEAE FAMILY SPECIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Czaplicki A.Z.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The related species of the family Poaceae (Triticeae are the source of unprecedented new genes that allow the extension of genetic variation of common wheat Triticum aestivum L. These species have similar homoeologous chromosomes and rDNA sequences very similar to T. aestivum L. [1-3]. This allows the introgression of alien genes and their incorporation into the genomes A, B and D of wheat, where they can function permanently in the wheat genetic systems. Many of them have already been transferred to the varieties of T. aestivum L. [4].The experimental material consisted of 28 lines of winter wheat obtained using the interspecific and intergeneric hybridization of T. aestivum L. with alien species T. durum Desf., T. timopheevii Zhuk., Lolium perenne L. and Aegilops speltoides Taush. Among them, 15 lines were developed from the cross-combination with tetraploid species (AABB T. durum Desf., 4 lines from the combination with other tetraploid species of different genome composition (AAGG T. timopheevii Zhuk., 4 lines from cross with L. perenne L. and 5 lines were the double hybrids (three-generic derived with two related species, T. durum Desf. (AABB and Ae. speltoides Taush (BB.The anther culture method was used for obtaining DH lines from these interspecific and intergeneric hybrids. In in vitro culture 124 green plants were regenerated. The method of cluster analysis grouped hybrids in terms of comprehensive general similarity of the studied traits.

  15. Home Care Pharmacy Practice in Canada: A Cross-Sectional Survey of Services Provided, Remuneration, Barriers, and Facilitators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houle, Sherilyn; MacKeigan, Linda

    2017-01-01

    As the population ages, and individuals desire to remain in their homes as long as possible, the need for in-home care is expected to increase. However, pharmacists have rarely been included in studies of in-home care, and little is known about the prevalence or effectiveness of pharmacists' home-based services in Canada. To identify pharmacy practices in Canada that regularly provide in-home patient care and to identify specific services provided, remuneration obtained, and barriers and facilitators influencing the provision of home-based care. A link to a web-based survey was posted in e-newsletters of provincial, territorial, and national pharmacy associations in Canada. In addition, pharmacists known to the researchers as providing in-home clinical services were contacted directly. The survey was open from October to December 2015. Practices or organizations that performed at least one home visit per week for clinical purposes, with documentation of the services provided, were eligible to participate. One response per practice or organization was allowed. Seventeen practices meeting the inclusion criteria were identified, representing community, hospital, and clinic settings. Home visits were most commonly performed for individuals with complex medication regimens or nonadherence to medication therapy. The most common services were conducting medication reconciliation and reviews and counselling patients about medication adherence. No practices or organizations billed patients for these services, yet lack of remuneration was an important barrier identified by many respondents. Although 12 (71%) of the respondents collected data for evaluative purposes, collection of clinical or health system outcome data was rare. Few Canadian pharmacy practices that provide in-home patient care at least once a week could be identified. Data collection suitable to establish an evidence base for this service was infrequently performed by practices and organizations providing

  16. Workplace availability, risk group and perceived barriers predictive of 2016-17 influenza vaccine uptake in the United States: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Paula M; Johnson, Riley E; Brown, Heidi E

    2017-10-13

    Seasonal influenza, though mostly self-limited in the healthy adult, may lead to severe disease and/or complications in subpopulations. Annual influenza vaccination is available in many countries with coverage goals rarely being met. We conducted a cross-sectional study of influenza vaccine uptake and explored socio-demographic, economic, and psychological factors that explained vaccine uptake. The survey was administered via Amazon Mechanical Turk (MTurk) to United States residents in January 2017, using the Qualtrics platform. Using principal axis factor analysis, we reduced the 25 items theory-based psychological determinants into the primary constructs they measure if/when internal consistency was sufficient (Cronbach's alpha >0.60). Logistic regression models were used to quantify the association of socio-demographic, economic, and psychological factors with reported vaccine behavior in the 2016-17 flu season. 1007 participants completed the survey, sex distribution was even, 67% had 25-44years of age, and 61% annual household income of $30-99 thousand United States dollars. About 25% had the flu shot offered at their workplace and 20% reported belonging to a group for whom the flu shot is recommended. Vaccine uptake was 31.5%. Eight predictors remained in the final adjusted model (R 2 =0.489), having the vaccine offered at the workplace, belonging to a group for whom the vaccine is recommended, and higher perceived barriers were the strongest predictors of vaccine uptake, increasing (and decreasing in the case of barriers) the odds by >3-fold. Additionally, higher household income, higher perceived susceptibility and higher perceived benefits also independently predicted vaccine uptake. We found evidence that perceived barriers significantly impaired vaccine uptake to the same extent that having the vaccine offered at the workplace or belonging to a group for whom the vaccine is recommended facilitated uptake. Ideally, a better understanding of drivers of

  17. Barriers to treatment and control of hypertension among hypertensive participants: A community based cross-sectional mixed method study in municipalities of Kathmandu, Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surya Devkota

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIntroduction: Despite the established evidence on benefits of controlling raised blood pressure and development of several guidelines on detection and management of hypertension, people often have untreated or uncontrolled hypertension. In this context, we undertook this study to identify the barriers existing in hypertension treatment and control in the municipalities of Kathmandu district in Nepal. Methods: This was a community based, cross-sectional mixed method study conducted in the municipalities of Kathmandu district in Nepal between January and July 2015. Among 587 randomly selected participants, the aware hypertensive participants were further assessed for the treatment and control of hypertension. For qualitative component, 20 participants having uncontrolled hypertension took part in two focused group discussions and two cardiac physicians participated in in-depth interviews.Results: Out of 587 participants screened, 191 (32.5% were identified as hypertensive. Among 191 hypertensive participants, 118 (61.8% were aware of their problem. Of the 118 aware hypertensive participants, 93 (78.8% were taking medicines, and among those treated, 46 (49.6% had controlled hypertension. Proportions of participants taking anti-hypertensive medications varied significantly with age groups, ethnicity, occupation and income. Hypertension control was significantly associated with use of combination therapy, adherence to medication, follow-up care, counseling by healthcare providers and waiting time in hospital. Being worried that the medicine needs to be taken life-long, perceived side effects of drugs, non-adherence to medication, lost to follow-up, inadequate counseling from physician, and lack of national guidelines for hypertension treatment were the most commonly cited barriers for treatment and control of hypertension in qualitative component of the research.Conclusion: Large proportion of the hypertensive population has the untreated and

  18. Dopamine D2-receptor imaging with 123I-iodobenzamide SPECT in migraine patients abusing ergotamine: does ergotamine cross the blood brain barrier?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verhoeff, N.P.; Visser, W.H.; Ferrari, M.D.; Saxena, P.R.; Royen, E.A. van

    1993-01-01

    Two migraine patients were studied by in vivo SPECT using the dopamine D2-receptor specific radioligand 123 I-3-iodo-6-methoxybenzamide ( 123 I-IBZM) during ergotamine abuse and after withdrawal. Results were compared with 15 healthy controls. Striatum/cerebellum and striatum/occipital cortex ratios of count rate density were calculated as a semiquantitative measurement for striatal dopamine D2-receptor binding potential. No differences were found in striatal uptake of 123 I-IBZM between healthy controls and the patients when on or off ergotamine. Preliminary evidence suggests that ergotamine may not occupy striatal dopamine D2-receptors to a large extent and thus may not cross the blood brain barrier in large quantities. 23 refs., 3 figs

  19. Barriers to healthy eating by National Health Service (NHS hospital doctors in the hospital setting: results of a cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Sue

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With high levels of obesity and related illness, improving the health of the nation is a major public health concern. This study aimed to identify factors that prevent healthy eating among doctors, and that are associated with satisfaction with catering services. Findings Methods: Cross-sectional survey of 328 NHS doctors working in two NHS Trusts with on-site hospital canteen. Questionnaire to establish perceived barriers to healthy eating, weekly use and satisfaction with the hospital canteen, lifestyle and dietary habits, gender, age, height, weight, job details, and affect. Results: 70% of doctors reported using their hospital canteen each week, with 2 visits per week on average. Canteen opening times, lack of selection and lack of breaks were the most commonly perceived barriers to healthy eating. Availability of healthy options caused the most dissatisfaction. Only 12% felt the NHS was supportive of healthy eating. 74% did not feel their canteen advocated healthy eating. Canteen use is associated with younger age (r = -0.254, p Conclusion Interventions to encourage regular meal breaks, eating breakfast and drinking more water each day need developing. Improved canteen accessibility and availability of healthy options at evenings and weekends may be beneficial.

  20. Modified-chitosan/siRNA nanoparticles downregulate cellular CDX2 expression and cross the gastric mucus barrier.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Sadio

    Full Text Available Development of effective non-viral vectors is of crucial importance in the implementation of RNA interference in clinical routine. The localized delivery of siRNAs to the gastrointestinal mucosa is highly desired but faces specific problems such as the stability in gastric acidity conditions and the presence of the mucus barrier. CDX2 is a transcription factor critical for intestinal differentiation being involved in the initiation and maintenance of gastrointestinal diseases. Specifically, it is the trigger of gastric intestinal metaplasia which is a precursor lesion of gastric cancer. Its expression is also altered in colorectal cancer, where it may constitute a lineage-survival oncogene. Our main objective was to develop a nanoparticle-delivery system of siRNA targeting CDX2 using modified chitosan as a vector. CDX2 expression was assessed in gastric carcinoma cell lines and nanoparticles behaviour in gastrointestinal mucus was tested in mouse explants. We show that imidazole-modified chitosan and trimethylchitosan/siRNA nanoparticles are able to downregulate CDX2 expression and overpass the gastric mucus layer but not colonic mucus. This system might constitute a potential therapeutic approach to treat CDX2-dependent gastric lesions.

  1. On the phantom barrier crossing and the bounds on the speed of sound in non-minimal derivative coupling theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiros, Israel; Gonzalez, Tame; Nucamendi, Ulises; García-Salcedo, Ricardo; Horta-Rangel, Francisco Antonio; Saavedra, Joel

    2018-04-01

    In this paper we investigate the so-called ‘phantom barrier crossing’ issue in a cosmological model based on the scalar–tensor theory with non-minimal derivative coupling to the Einstein tensor. Special attention will be paid to the physical bounds on the squared sound speed. The numeric results are geometrically illustrated by means of a qualitative procedure of analysis that is based on the mapping of the orbits in the phase plane onto the surfaces that represent physical quantities in the extended phase space, that is: the phase plane complemented with an additional dimension relative to the given physical parameter. We find that the cosmological model based on the non-minimal derivative coupling theory—this includes both the quintessence and the pure derivative coupling cases—has serious causality problems related to superluminal propagation of the scalar and tensor perturbations. Even more disturbing is the finding that, despite the fact that the underlying theory is free of the Ostrogradsky instability, the corresponding cosmological model is plagued by the Laplacian (classical) instability related with negative squared sound speed. This instability leads to an uncontrollable growth of the energy density of the perturbations that is inversely proportional to their wavelength. We show that, independent of the self-interaction potential, for positive coupling the tensor perturbations propagate superluminally, while for negative coupling a Laplacian instability arises. This latter instability invalidates the possibility for the model to describe the primordial inflation.

  2. Visualization of barriers and obstacles to molecular diffusion in live cells by spatial pair-cross-correlation in two dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malacrida, Leonel; Hedde, Per Niklas; Ranjit, Suman; Cardarelli, Francesco; Gratton, Enrico

    2018-01-01

    Despite recent advances in optical super-resolution, we lack a method that can visualize the path followed by diffusing molecules in the cytoplasm or in the nucleus of cells. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) provides molecular dynamics at the single molecule level by averaging the behavior of many molecules over time at a single spot, thus achieving very good statistics but at only one point in the cell. Earlier image-based methods including raster-scan and spatiotemporal image correlation need spatial averaging over relatively large areas, thus compromising spatial resolution. Here, we use spatial pair-cross-correlation in two dimensions (2D-pCF) to obtain relatively high resolution images of molecular diffusion dynamics and transport in live cells. The 2D-pCF method measures the time for a particle to go from one location to another by cross-correlating the intensity fluctuations at specific points in an image. Hence, a visual map of the average path followed by molecules is created.

  3. Behavioral and neuropharmacological evidence that serotonin crosses the blood-brain barrier in Coturnix japonica (Galliformes; Aves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PA. Polo

    Full Text Available This study was carried out aiming to reach behavioral and neuropharmacological evidence of the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB to serotonin systemically administered in quails. Serotonin injected by a parenteral route (250-1000 µg.kg-1, sc elicited a sequence of behavioral events concerned with a sleeping-like state. Sleeping-like behaviors began with feather bristling, rapid oral movements, blinking and finally crouching and closure of the eyes. Previous administration of 5-HT2C antagonist, LY53857 (3 mg.kg-1, sc reduced the episodes of feather bristling and rapid oral movements significantly but without altering the frequency of blinking and closure of the eyes. Treatment with the 5-HT2A/2C antagonist, ketanserin (3 mg.kg-1, sc did not affect any of the responses evoked by the serotonin. Quipazine (5 mg.kg-1, sc a 5-HT2A/2C/3 agonist induced intense hypomotility, long periods of yawning-like and sleeping-like states. Previous ketanserin suppressed gaping responses and reduced hypomotility, rapid oral movements and bristling but was ineffective for remaining responses induced by quipazine. Results showed that unlike mammals, serotonin permeates the BBB and activates hypnogenic mechanisms in quails. Studies using serotoninergic agonist and antagonists have disclosed that among the actions of the serotonin, feather bristling, rapid oral movements and yawning-like state originated from activation of 5-HT2 receptors while blinking and closure of the eyes possibly require other subtypes of receptors.

  4. Optically enhanced blood-brain-barrier crossing of plasmonic-active nanoparticles in preclinical brain tumor animal models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hsiangkuo; Wilson, Christy M.; Li, Shuqin; Fales, Andrew M.; Liu, Yang; Grant, Gerald; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2014-02-01

    Nanotechnology provides tremendous biomedical opportunities for cancer diagnosis, imaging, and therapy. In contrast to conventional chemotherapeutic agents where their actual target delivery cannot be easily imaged, integrating imaging and therapeutic properties into one platform facilitates the understanding of pharmacokinetic profiles, and enables monitoring of the therapeutic process in each individual. Such a concept dubbed "theranostics" potentiates translational research and improves precision medicine. One particular challenging application of theranostics involves imaging and controlled delivery of nanoplatforms across blood-brain-barrier (BBB) into brain tissues. Typically, the BBB hinders paracellular flux of drug molecules into brain parenchyma. BBB disrupting agents (e.g. mannitol, focused ultrasound), however, suffer from poor spatial confinement. It has been a challenge to design a nanoplatform not only acts as a contrast agent but also improves the BBB permeation. In this study, we demonstrated the feasibility of plasmonic gold nanoparticles as both high-resolution optical contrast agent and focalized tumor BBB permeation-inducing agent. We specifically examined the microscopic distribution of nanoparticles in tumor brain animal models. We observed that most nanoparticles accumulated at the tumor periphery or perivascular spaces. Nanoparticles were present in both endothelial cells and interstitial matrices. This study also demonstrated a novel photothermal-induced BBB permeation. Fine-tuning the irradiating energy induced gentle disruption of the vascular integrity, causing short-term extravasation of nanomaterials but without hemorrhage. We conclude that our gold nanoparticles are a powerful biocompatible contrast agent capable of inducing focal BBB permeation, and therefore envision a strong potential of plasmonic gold nanoparticle in future brain tumor imaging and therapy.

  5. Sex-specific asymmetry in eye development in interspecific hybrids ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 94; Issue 3. Sex-specific asymmetry in eye development in interspecific hybrids in the Drosophila bipectinata species complex. Bashisth N. Singh Parul Banerjee. Research Note Volume 94 Issue 3 September 2015 pp 493-495 ...

  6. Evaluation of interspecific DNA variability in poplars using AFLP and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this paper was to examine interspecific DNA variation in poplars using AFLP and SSR markers. The AFLP and SSR markers polymorphism and its power of discrimination were determined within 13 genotypes of different genetic background (clones, cultivars, hybrids) of two sections (Aigeiros and ...

  7. Chronobiology of interspecific interactions in a changing world

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kronfeld-Schor, Noga; Visser, Marcel E.; Salis, Lucia; van Gils, Jan A.

    2017-01-01

    Animals should time activities, such as foraging, migration and reproduction, as well as seasonal physiological adaptation, in a way that maximizes fitness. The fitness outcome of such activities depends largely on their interspecific interactions; the temporal overlap with other species determines

  8. Genetic Identification of Hyalodaphnia Species and Interspecific Hybrids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Billiones, R.; Brehm, G.M.; Klee, J.; Schwenk, K.

    2004-01-01

    Species of the genus Daphnia, in particular the subgenus Hyalodaphnia, represent a taxonomically problematic group due to their phenotypic plasticity, local races and the formation of interspecific hybrids and backcrosses. In this study, we present a genetic approach utilising nuclear DNA to

  9. Interspecific and interploidal gene flow in Central European Arabidopsis (Brassicaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jørgensen Marte H

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Effects of polyploidisation on gene flow between natural populations are little known. Central European diploid and tetraploid populations of Arabidopsis arenosa and A. lyrata are here used to study interspecific and interploidal gene flow, using a combination of nuclear and plastid markers. Results Ploidal levels were confirmed by flow cytometry. Network analyses clearly separated diploids according to species. Tetraploids and diploids were highly intermingled within species, and some tetraploids intermingled with the other species, as well. Isolation with migration analyses suggested interspecific introgression from tetraploid A. arenosa to tetraploid A. lyrata and vice versa, and some interploidal gene flow, which was unidirectional from diploid to tetraploid in A. arenosa and bidirectional in A. lyrata. Conclusions Interspecific genetic isolation at diploid level combined with introgression at tetraploid level indicates that polyploidy may buffer against negative consequences of interspecific hybridisation. The role of introgression in polyploid systems may, however, differ between plant species, and even within the small genus Arabidopsis, we find very different evolutionary fates when it comes to introgression.

  10. Evolution of invading forest pathogens via interspecific hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clive Brasier

    2003-01-01

    Traditional morphologically-based fungal species concepts have tended to go hand in-hand with a perception that fungal species are genetically 'firewalled' units between which almost no gene flow occurs. Also, prior to 1990, known examples of interspecific hybridization in fungi were very rare. However, observations on the internationally invading Dutch elm...

  11. Variation in the relative magnitude of intraspecific and interspecific ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Models of competitor coevolution, especially the genetic feedback hypothesis, suggest that a negative correlation be- tween intraspecific and interspecific competitive effects may be important in sustaining competitor coexistence, and can give rise to oscillatory dynamics with repeated reversals of competitive superiority.

  12. Selection of Gossypium hirsutum genotypes for interspecific ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ovule culture is one of the techniques currently used to introgress desirable traits from Gossypium arboreum germplasm into G. hirsutum cultivars. Twenty-six (26) G. hirsutum breeding lines were used as female parents in crosses with five G. arboreum accessions to determine if the G. hirsutum parent influenced the ...

  13. Sexual imprinting misguides species recognition in a facultative interspecific brood parasite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorenson, Michael D; Hauber, Mark E; Derrickson, Scott R

    2010-10-22

    Sexual reproduction relies on the recognition of conspecifics for breeding. Most experiments in birds have implicated a critical role for early social learning in directing subsequent courtship behaviours and mating decisions. This classical view of avian sexual imprinting is challenged, however, by studies of megapodes and obligate brood parasites, species in which reliable recognition is achieved despite the lack of early experience with conspecifics. By rearing males with either conspecific or heterospecific brood mates, we experimentally tested the effect of early social experience on the association preferences and courtship behaviours of two sympatrically breeding ducks. We predicted that redheads (Aythya americana), which are facultative interspecific brood parasites, would show a diminished effect of early social environment on subsequent courtship preferences when compared with their host and congener, the canvasback (Aythya valisineria). Contrary to expectations, cross-fostered males of both species courted heterospecific females and preferred them in spatial association tests, whereas control males courted and associated with conspecific females. These results imply that ontogenetic constraints on species recognition may be a general impediment to the initial evolution of interspecific brood parasitism in birds. Under more natural conditions, a variety of mechanisms may mitigate or counteract the effects of early imprinting for redheads reared in canvasback broods.

  14. Barriers in accessing care services for physically disabled in a hospital setting in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkawai, Fatimah MohammedAli; Alowayyed, Abdullah Saad

    2017-03-01

    Objective : The aim of this study was to identify the significant difficulties in access to health care services experienced by patients with physical disabilities. Method : A cross-sectional study at King Abdul Aziz Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia on 235 persons with physical disability, from 1 January to 30 June 2014. Results : A total of 88% of the people with disability reported having the need for someone to accompany them. Over 52% were unsatisfied with parking, 49.8% with the waiting area, 51.3% with wheel-chair services, and nearly 45% were unsatisfied with toilet facilities for the physically disabled. Those who were wheel-chair bound had statistically significant lower mean score for satisfaction with services and facilities related to parking area, reception, and appointment, elevator, and physiotherapy.The majority were satisfied with the attitude of the clinical staff. Conclusion : The majority of patients with physical disability require assistance and cannot move around independently in the healthcare facilities. Nearly half of these patients face several challenges in accessing health care services and are unsatisfied with the services received. Patients with physical disability who are wheel-chair bound have a lesser degree of satisfaction than those who are not wheel-chair bound.

  15. Activation measurements of 13C+12C fusion cross section at deep sub-barrier energies in IFIN-HH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudor, D.; Chilug, A. I.; Stefanescu, I. C.; Straticiuc, M.; Burducea, I.; Trache, L.; Focsa, I. M.; Ghita, D. G.; Margineanu, R.; Pantelica, A.; Gomoiu, C.; Zhang, N. T.; Tang, X.; Chen, H.

    2017-06-01

    Heavy-ion fusion reactions between light nuclei such as carbon and oxygen isotopes have been studied because of their significance for a wide variety of stellar burning scenarios [1]. One important stellar reaction is 12C+12C, but it is difficult to measure in the Gamow window because of very low cross sections and several resonances occurring [2]. Hints can be obtained from the study of 13C+12C reaction. We studied 13C+12C fusion trough an activation method for energies from Ec.m.= 2.2 MeV, which is the lowest energy ever reached for this reaction (down into Gamow window), up to 5.3 MeV, using 13C beams from the Bucharest 3 MV Tandetron on thick graphite targets. Thick target yield for the 12C(13C, p)24Na reaction was determined through the measurement of the gamma ray yield following the beta decay of 24Na (T1/2=15 h) in our low and ultralow background laboratories, the latter located in a salt mine about 100 km north of Bucharest. Results of the experiments are shown.

  16. Interleukin 7 from maternal milk crosses the intestinal barrier and modulates T-cell development in offspring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Aspinall

    Full Text Available Breastfeeding protects against illnesses and death in hazardous environments, an effect partly mediated by improved immune function. One hypothesis suggests that factors within milk supplement the inadequate immune response of the offspring, but this has not been able to account for a series of observations showing that factors within maternally derived milk may supplement the development of the immune system through a direct effect on the primary lymphoid organs. In a previous human study we reported evidence suggesting a link between IL-7 in breast milk and the thymic output of infants. Here we report evidence in mice of direct action of maternally-derived IL-7 on T cell development in the offspring.We have used recombinant IL-7 labelled with a fluorescent dye to trace the movement in live mice of IL-7 from the stomach across the gut and into the lymphoid tissues. To validate the functional ability of maternally derived IL-7 we cross fostered IL-7 knock-out mice onto normal wild type mothers. Subsets of thymocytes and populations of peripheral T cells were significantly higher than those found in knock-out mice receiving milk from IL-7 knock-out mothers.Our study provides direct evidence that interleukin 7, a factor which is critical in the development of T lymphocytes, when maternally derived can transfer across the intestine of the offspring, increase T cell production in the thymus and support the survival of T cells in the peripheral secondary lymphoid tissue.

  17. Prions efficiently cross the intestinal barrier after oral administration: Study of the bioavailability, and cellular and tissue distribution in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urayama, Akihiko; Concha-Marambio, Luis; Khan, Uffaf; Bravo-Alegria, Javiera; Kharat, Vineetkumar; Soto, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Natural forms of prion diseases frequently originate by oral (p.o.) infection. However, quantitative information on the gastro-intestinal (GI) absorption of prions (i.e. the bioavailability and subsequent biodistribution) is mostly unknown. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the fate of prions after oral administration, using highly purified radiolabeled PrPSc. The results showed a bi-phasic reduction of PrPSc with time in the GI, except for the ileum and colon which showed sustained increases peaking at 3–6 hr, respectively. Plasma and whole blood 125I-PrPSc reached maximal levels by 30 min and 3 hr, respectively, and blood levels were constantly higher than plasma. Upon crossing the GI-tract 125I-PrPSc became associated to blood cells, suggesting that binding to cells decreased the biological clearance of the agent. Size-exclusion chromatography revealed that oligomeric 125I-PrPSc were transported from the intestinal tract, and protein misfolding cyclic amplification showed that PrPSc in organs and blood retained the typical prion self-replicating ability. Pharmacokinetic analysis found the oral bioavailability of 125I-PrPSc to be 33.6%. Interestingly, 125I-PrPSc reached the brain in a quantity equivalent to the minimum amount needed to initiate prion disease. Our findings provide a comprehensive and quantitative study of the fate of prions upon oral infection. PMID:27573341

  18. A cross-sectional analysis of the relationship between diabetes and health access barriers in an urban First Nations population in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, Michael; Firestone, Michelle A; McKnight, Constance D; Smylie, Janet; Rotondi, Michael A

    2018-01-21

    This study explores the relationship between health access barriers and diabetes in an urban First Nations population in Canada. Data from a self-identified urban First Nations population were collected using respondent-driven sampling (RDS). As no clear approach for regression modelling of RDS data is available, two logistic regression modelling approaches, including survey-based logistic and generalised linear mixed models, were used to explore the relationship between diabetes and health barriers of interest, including access to healthcare, food, housing and socioeconomic factors. Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. This cross-sectional study used data collected from the Our Health Counts study, in partnership with the De dwa da dehs nye>s Aboriginal Health Centre, which recruited 554 First Nations adults living in Hamilton using RDS. After adjusting for covariates, multivariable regression techniques showed a statistically significant relationship between a self-reported diagnosis of diabetes and a lack of culturally appropriate care among urban First Nations peoples (OR: 12.70, 95% CI 2.52 to 57.91). There was also a trend towards a relationship between diabetes and not having a doctor available in the area, feeling that healthcare provided was inadequate and a lack of available healthcare services in the area. Urban First Nations peoples who felt the health service they received was not culturally appropriate were more likely to have diabetes, compared with those who did not feel the service they received was culturally inappropriate. Establishing more healthcare services that integrate First Nations cultures and traditions could improve access to care and the course of treatment for urban First Nations peoples living with diabetes. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  19. A national cross sectional survey of heads of midwifery services of uptake, benefits and barriers to use of obstetric early warning systems (EWS) by midwives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bick, Debra E; Sandall, Jane; Furuta, Marie; Wee, Michael Y K; Isaacs, Richard; Smith, Gary B; Beake, Sarah

    2014-11-01

    to identify the extent to which Early Warning Systems (EWS) are used by midwives in the United Kingdom (UK), the maternity settings they are used in, physiological parameters used to 'trigger' referral, training provision, barriers to implementation and role in preventing maternal morbidity. cross-sectional survey of heads of midwifery services. An email questionnaire was sent in September 2012. UK NHS secondary care organisations providing maternity care. heads of midwifery from 107 (68%) of 157 NHS organisations responded, with 108 questionnaires returned as two organisations had recently merged. All organisations, apart from one which only had a free-standing midwifery unit, had introduced EWS. Nearly all respondents (99%) reported EWS were used by midwives antenatally, 76% in labour and 100% on the postnatal ward. All EWS charts included body temperature, heart rate, respiratory rate, systolic blood pressure and oxygen saturation although parameters for escalation varied widely. Barriers to use of EWS by midwives included overlap with the partogram in labour, and staff shortages and delays obtaining clinical review when referral was triggered. Two-thirds considered EWS prevented maternal morbidity although few could provide supporting evidence, for example, audit findings. Training for midwives in use of EWS was available in 83% of organisations. most UK midwives are using EWS, with the highest use in obstetric units. The heterogeneity of EWS currently used potentially limits collation of evidence to inform appropriate system level responses. Research is needed to evaluate the role of EWS to prevent maternal morbidity during and after pregnancy in different maternity settings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Barriers to self-monitoring of blood glucose among adults with diabetes in an HMO: A cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barton Mary B

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies suggest that patients at greatest risk for diabetes complications are least likely to self-monitor blood glucose. However, these studies rely on self-reports of monitoring, an unreliable measure of actual behavior. The purpose of the current study was to examine the relationship between patient characteristics and self-monitoring in a large health maintenance organization (HMO using test strips as objective measures of self-monitoring practice. Methods This cross-sectional study included 4,565 continuously enrolled adult managed care patients in eastern Massachusetts with diabetes. Any self-monitoring was defined as filling at least one prescription for self-monitoring test strips during the study period (10/1/92–9/30/93. Regular SMBG among test strip users was defined as testing an average of once per day for those using insulin and every other day for those using oral sulfonylureas only. Measures of health status, demographic data, and neighborhood socioeconomic status were obtained from automated medical records and 1990 census tract data. Results In multivariate analyses, lower neighborhood socioeconomic status, older age, fewer HbA1c tests, and fewer physician visits were associated with lower rates of self-monitoring. Obesity and fewer comorbidities were also associated with lower rates of self-monitoring among insulin-managed patients, while black race and high glycemic level (HbA1c>10 were associated with less frequent monitoring. For patients taking oral sulfonylureas, higher dose of diabetes medications was associated with initiation of self-monitoring and HbA1c lab testing was associated with more frequent testing. Conclusions Managed care organizations may face the greatest challenges in changing the self-monitoring behavior of patients at greatest risk for poor health outcomes (i.e., the elderly, minorities, and people living in low socioeconomic status neighborhoods.

  1. Sialylation of prion protein controls the rate of prion amplification, the cross-species barrier, the ratio of PrPSc glycoform and prion infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katorcha, Elizaveta; Makarava, Natallia; Savtchenko, Regina; D'Azzo, Alessandra; Baskakov, Ilia V

    2014-09-01

    The central event underlying prion diseases involves conformational change of the cellular form of the prion protein (PrP(C)) into the disease-associated, transmissible form (PrP(Sc)). Pr(PC) is a sialoglycoprotein that contains two conserved N-glycosylation sites. Among the key parameters that control prion replication identified over the years are amino acid sequence of host PrP(C) and the strain-specific structure of PrPSc. The current work highlights the previously unappreciated role of sialylation of PrP(C) glycans in prion pathogenesis, including its role in controlling prion replication rate, infectivity, cross-species barrier and PrP(Sc) glycoform ratio. The current study demonstrates that undersialylated PrP(C) is selected during prion amplification in Protein Misfolding Cyclic Amplification (PMCAb) at the expense of oversialylated PrP(C). As a result, PMCAb-derived PrP(Sc) was less sialylated than brain-derived PrP(Sc). A decrease in PrPSc sialylation correlated with a drop in infectivity of PMCAb-derived material. Nevertheless, enzymatic de-sialylation of PrP(C) using sialidase was found to increase the rate of PrP(Sc) amplification in PMCAb from 10- to 10,000-fold in a strain-dependent manner. Moreover, de-sialylation of PrP(C) reduced or eliminated a species barrier of for prion amplification in PMCAb. These results suggest that the negative charge of sialic acid controls the energy barrier of homologous and heterologous prion replication. Surprisingly, the sialylation status of PrP(C) was also found to control PrP(Sc) glycoform ratio. A decrease in Pr(PC) sialylation levels resulted in a higher percentage of the diglycosylated glycoform in PrP(Sc). 2D analysis of charge distribution revealed that the sialylation status of brain-derived PrP(C) differed from that of spleen-derived PrP(C). Knocking out lysosomal sialidase Neu1 did not change the sialylation status of brain-derived PrP(C), suggesting that Neu1 is not responsible for desialylation of Pr

  2. Sialylation of prion protein controls the rate of prion amplification, the cross-species barrier, the ratio of PrPSc glycoform and prion infectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizaveta Katorcha

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The central event underlying prion diseases involves conformational change of the cellular form of the prion protein (PrP(C into the disease-associated, transmissible form (PrP(Sc. Pr(PC is a sialoglycoprotein that contains two conserved N-glycosylation sites. Among the key parameters that control prion replication identified over the years are amino acid sequence of host PrP(C and the strain-specific structure of PrPSc. The current work highlights the previously unappreciated role of sialylation of PrP(C glycans in prion pathogenesis, including its role in controlling prion replication rate, infectivity, cross-species barrier and PrP(Sc glycoform ratio. The current study demonstrates that undersialylated PrP(C is selected during prion amplification in Protein Misfolding Cyclic Amplification (PMCAb at the expense of oversialylated PrP(C. As a result, PMCAb-derived PrP(Sc was less sialylated than brain-derived PrP(Sc. A decrease in PrPSc sialylation correlated with a drop in infectivity of PMCAb-derived material. Nevertheless, enzymatic de-sialylation of PrP(C using sialidase was found to increase the rate of PrP(Sc amplification in PMCAb from 10- to 10,000-fold in a strain-dependent manner. Moreover, de-sialylation of PrP(C reduced or eliminated a species barrier of for prion amplification in PMCAb. These results suggest that the negative charge of sialic acid controls the energy barrier of homologous and heterologous prion replication. Surprisingly, the sialylation status of PrP(C was also found to control PrP(Sc glycoform ratio. A decrease in Pr(PC sialylation levels resulted in a higher percentage of the diglycosylated glycoform in PrP(Sc. 2D analysis of charge distribution revealed that the sialylation status of brain-derived PrP(C differed from that of spleen-derived PrP(C. Knocking out lysosomal sialidase Neu1 did not change the sialylation status of brain-derived PrP(C, suggesting that Neu1 is not responsible for desialylation of Pr

  3. The mitochondrial genome impacts respiration but not fermentation in interspecific Saccharomyces hybrids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren Albertin

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA has high rate of nucleotide substitution leading to different mitochondrial haplotypes called mitotypes. However, the impact of mitochondrial genetic variant on phenotypic variation has been poorly considered in microorganisms because mtDNA encodes very few genes compared to nuclear DNA, and also because mitochondrial inheritance is not uniparental. Here we propose original material to unravel mitotype impact on phenotype: we produced interspecific hybrids between S. cerevisiae and S. uvarum species, using fully homozygous diploid parental strains. For two different interspecific crosses involving different parental strains, we recovered 10 independent hybrids per cross, and allowed mtDNA fixation after around 80 generations. We developed PCR-based markers for the rapid discrimination of S. cerevisiae and S. uvarum mitochondrial DNA. For both crosses, we were able to isolate fully isogenic hybrids at the nuclear level, yet possessing either S. cerevisiae mtDNA (Sc-mtDNA or S. uvarum mtDNA (Su-mtDNA. Under fermentative conditions, the mitotype has no phenotypic impact on fermentation kinetics and products, which was expected since mtDNA are not necessary for fermentative metabolism. Alternatively, under respiratory conditions, hybrids with Sc-mtDNA have higher population growth performance, associated with higher respiratory rate. Indeed, far from the hypothesis that mtDNA variation is neutral, our work shows that mitochondrial polymorphism can have a strong impact on fitness components and hence on the evolutionary fate of the yeast populations. We hypothesize that under fermentative conditions, hybrids may fix stochastically one or the other mt-DNA, while respiratory environments may increase the probability to fix Sc-mtDNA.

  4. Donepezil loaded PLGA-b-PEG nanoparticles: their ability to induce destabilization of amyloid fibrils and to cross blood brain barrier in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baysal, Ipek; Ucar, Gulberk; Gultekinoglu, Merve; Ulubayram, Kezban; Yabanoglu-Ciftci, Samiye

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive and irreversible neurodegenerative disease. Cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEIs) are commonly used for symptomatic treatment of neural transmission improvement in AD. Donepezil is a reversible and non-competitive ChEI which is clinically used for palliative treatment of AD. The aim of the present study was to investigate the destabilizing effect of donepezil loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-block-poly (ethylene glycol) [PLGA-b-PEG] nanoparticles on fibril formation in vitro and the ability of these nanoparticles to cross blood brain barrier (BBB) using in vitro BBB model and the neuroprotective effects of free donepezil and donepezil loaded PLGA-b-PEG nanoparticles. Donepezil loaded PLGA-b-PEG nanoparticles were prepared with double emulsion method. Destabilizing effect of these donepezil loaded particles on the amyloid-beta fibril (Aβ 1-40 and Aβ 1-42 ) formation was determined in vitro. Nanoparticles were found to have small particle size and have destabilizing effect on fibril formation. In vitro BBB model was successfully prepared. Nanoparticles showed the ability to cross the BBB and showed a controlled release profile in this system. IL-1β, IL-6, GM-CSF, TGF-β, MCP-1 and TNF-α levels were found to be increased in both gene and protein expression levels in astrocytes incubated with amyloid fibrils in in vitro BBB model suggesting an increased inflammation. Free donepezil and donepezil loaded nanoparticle administration caused a significant dose-dependent decrease in both gene and protein expression levels of IL-1β, IL-6, GM-CSF and TNF-α. No significant changes were observed for TGF-β and MCP-1.

  5. Aggregation Behaviour and Interspecific Responses in Three Species of Triatominae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Figueiras Alicia N

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The response to intra- and interspecific assembling signals was tested in three species of Chagas' disease vectors. As previously described for Triatoma infestans, larvae of both species, T. sordida and T. guasayana, aggregated on papers impregnated with their own excrement. Moreover, bugs belonging to each of the three species also aggregated on papers contaminated with faeces from the other two, with the only exception of the larvae of T. guasayana, which did not assemble on faeces of T. sordida. In all cases, the response to interspecific excrement was as strong as that to the intraspecific one. The non-specificity of the signal is discussed in the context of the ecological association of the three species and their role as vectors of Chagas' disease

  6. Impact of sea-level rise on cross-shore sediment transport on fetch-limited barrier reef island beaches under modal and cyclonic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldock, T E; Golshani, A; Atkinson, A; Shimamoto, T; Wu, S; Callaghan, D P; Mumby, P J

    2015-08-15

    A one-dimensional wave model is combined with an analytical sediment transport model to investigate the likely influence of sea-level rise on net cross-shore sediment transport on fetch-limited barrier reef and lagoon island beaches. The modelling considers if changes in the nearshore wave height and wave period in the lagoon induced by different water levels over the reef flat are likely to lead to net offshore or onshore movement of sediment. The results indicate that the effects of SLR on net sediment movement are highly variable and controlled by the bathymetry of the reef and lagoon. A significant range of reef-lagoon bathymetry, and notably shallow and narrow reefs, appears to lead hydrodynamic conditions and beaches that are likely to be stable or even accrete under SLR. Loss of reef structural complexity, particularly on the reef flat, increases the chance of sediment transport away from beaches and offshore. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Method for evaluating the potential of 14C labeled plant polyphenols to cross the blood-brain barrier using accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janle, Elsa M.; Lila, Mary Ann; Grannan, Michael; Wood, Lauren; Higgins, Aine; Yousef, Gad G.; Rogers, Randy B.; Kim, Helen; Jackson, George S.; Weaver, Connie M.

    2010-01-01

    Bioactive compounds in botanicals may be beneficial in preventing age-related neurodegenerative diseases, but for many compounds conventional methods may be inadequate to detect if these compounds cross the blood-brain barrier or to track the pharmacokinetics in the brain. By combining a number of unique technologies it has been possible to utilize the power of AMS to study the pharmacokinetics of bioactive compounds in the brain at very low concentrations. 14 C labeled compounds can be biosynthesized by plant cell suspension cultures co-incubated with radioisotopically-labeled sucrose and isolated and separated into a series of bioactive fractions. To study the pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of 14 C labeled plant polyphenols, rats were implanted with jugular catheters, subcutaneous ultrafiltration probes and brain microdialysis probes. Labeled fractions were dosed orally. Interstitial fluid (ISF) and brain microdialysate samples were taken in tandem with blood samples. It was often possible to determine 14 C in blood and ISF with a β-counter. However, brain microdialysate samples 14 C levels on the order of 10 7 atoms/sample required AMS technology. The Brain Microdialysate AUC /Serum AUC ranged from .021- to .029, with the higher values for the glycoside fractions. By using AMS in combination with traditional methods, it is possible to study uptake by blood, distribution to ISF and determine the amount of a dose which can reach the brain and follow the pharmacokinetics in the brain.

  8. Interspecific Larval Competition Differentially Impacts Adult Survival in Dengue Vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alto, Barry W; Bettinardi, David J; Ortiz, Sara

    2015-03-01

    Mosquitoes often experience intraspecific and interspecific competition among larvae attributable to high densities and nutrient limitation, especially container mosquitoes including Aedes aegypti (L.) and Aedes albopictus (Skuse). Density-dependent effects on larvae impact adult production and adult traits that influence transmission of arboviruses. To improve our understanding of the mechanisms by which density-dependence influences transmission and identify species-specific traits, we tested the hypotheses: 1) Competitive asymmetry in favor of Ae. albopictus over Ae. aegypti translates to altered adult female survival, and 2) Ae. aegypti adult females are more resistant to life-shortening effects of low-humidity conditions than Ae. albopictus. We gauged the relative impact of inter- and intraspecific larval competition on adult survival in high- and low-humidity regimes (77 and 44% relative humidity, respectively). For Ae. albopictus, intraspecific but not interspecific competition usually reduced adult survival under both humidity regimes. For Ae. aegypti, both intraspecific and interspecific competition reduced adult survival. Ae. albopictus adult survival was minimally influenced by interspecific competition with Ae. aegypti, consistent with observations that Ae. albopictus is the superior competitor. A species comparison indicated that Ae. aegypti exhibited a survival advantage relative to Ae. albopictus under both low- and high-humidity conditions. However, similar survival of these Aedes species was observed in some cases depending on conditions experienced in both the aquatic and terrestrial environments. These results demonstrate plasticity in survival rates of dengue and chikungunya vectors and the significance of considering the influence of biological interactions during the immature stages and abiotic conditions during the adult stage. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights

  9. Chronobiology of interspecific interactions in a changing world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronfeld-Schor, Noga; Visser, Marcel E; Salis, Lucia; van Gils, Jan A

    2017-11-19

    Animals should time activities, such as foraging, migration and reproduction, as well as seasonal physiological adaptation, in a way that maximizes fitness. The fitness outcome of such activities depends largely on their interspecific interactions; the temporal overlap with other species determines when they should be active in order to maximize their encounters with food and to minimize their encounters with predators, competitors and parasites. To cope with the constantly changing, but predictable structure of the environment, organisms have evolved internal biological clocks, which are synchronized mainly by light, the most predictable and reliable environmental cue (but which can be masked by other variables), which enable them to anticipate and prepare for predicted changes in the timing of the species they interact with, on top of responding to them directly. Here, we review examples where the internal timing system is used to predict interspecific interactions, and how these interactions affect the internal timing system and activity patterns. We then ask how plastic these mechanisms are, how this plasticity differs between and within species and how this variability in plasticity affects interspecific interactions in a changing world, in which light, the major synchronizer of the biological clock, is no longer a reliable cue owing to the rapidly changing climate, the use of artificial light and urbanization.This article is part of the themed issue 'Wild clocks: integrating chronobiology and ecology to understand timekeeping in free-living animals'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  10. Interspecific Plastome Recombination Reflects Ancient Reticulate Evolution in Picea (Pinaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Alexis R; Schiffthaler, Bastian; Thompson, Stacey Lee; Street, Nathaniel R; Wang, Xiao-Ru

    2017-07-01

    Plastid sequences are a cornerstone in plant systematic studies and key aspects of their evolution, such as uniparental inheritance and absent recombination, are often treated as axioms. While exceptions to these assumptions can profoundly influence evolutionary inference, detecting them can require extensive sampling, abundant sequence data, and detailed testing. Using advancements in high-throughput sequencing, we analyzed the whole plastomes of 65 accessions of Picea, a genus of ∼35 coniferous forest tree species, to test for deviations from canonical plastome evolution. Using complementary hypothesis and data-driven tests, we found evidence for chimeric plastomes generated by interspecific hybridization and recombination in the clade comprising Norway spruce (P. abies) and 10 other species. Support for interspecific recombination remained after controlling for sequence saturation, positive selection, and potential alignment artifacts. These results reconcile previous conflicting plastid-based phylogenies and strengthen the mounting evidence of reticulate evolution in Picea. Given the relatively high frequency of hybridization and biparental plastid inheritance in plants, we suggest interspecific plastome recombination may be more widespread than currently appreciated and could underlie reported cases of discordant plastid phylogenies. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  11. Identification of interspecific hybrids between loquat (eriobotrya japonica lindl.) and bengal loquat (e. bengalensis hook.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.; Deng, Q.; Zeng, J.; Zhang, J.

    2017-01-01

    Loquat (Eriobotrya japonica Lindl.) is an important subtropical fruit; however, loquat fruitlets are vulnerable to cold injury in winter, which significantly decreases loquat yield in most production regions. In the present study, two loquat cultivars ('Dawuxing' and '4-1-5') and one wild loquat (E. bengalensis Hook., Bengal loquat), were used for interspecific hybridization to produce hybrids with characteristics of spring blooming to avoid cold injury of fruitlets. Hybrid seedlings were derived from direct cross (loquat as female parent and Bengal loquat as male parent) and reciprocal cross. The authenticity of 47 hybrid seedlings was confirmed using inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) molecular markers; and leaf morphological characteristics of the hybrid offspring and parents were preliminarily studied and compared. The results suggested that 23 true direct cross hybrids and 12 true reciprocal cross hybrids were obtained, with hybrid authenticity rates of 100 and 50.0%, respectively. Thus, a novel method of distant hybridization for loquat breeding was developed, and with their various genetic and morphological characteristics these hybrids could be valuable germplasms for horticultural use. (author)

  12. Barriers and facilitators for the implementation of an online clinical health community in addition to usual fertility care: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarts, Johanna W M; Faber, Marjan J; den Boogert, Anne G; Cohlen, Ben J; van der Linden, Paul J Q; Kremer, Jan A M; Nelen, Willianne L D M

    2013-08-30

    Online health communities are becoming more popular in health care. Patients and professionals can communicate with one another online, patients can find peer support, and professionals can use it as an additional information channel to their patients. However, the implementation of online health communities into daily practice is challenging. These challenges relate to the fact that patients need to be activated to (1) become a member (ie, subscription) and (2) participate actively within the community before any effect can be expected. Therefore, we aimed at answering 2 research questions: (1) what factors are associated with subscription to an online health community, and (2) which are associated with becoming an active participant within an online health community. To identify barriers and facilitators as perceived by patients for the implementation of an online health community. We performed a cross-sectional study. Three Dutch fertility clinics (2 IVF-licensed) offered their patients a secure online clinical health community through which clinicians can provide online information and patients can ask questions to the medical team or share experiences and find support from peers. We randomly selected and invited 278 men and women suffering from infertility and attending 1 of the participating clinics. Participants filled out a questionnaire about their background characteristics and current use of the online community. Possible barriers and facilitators were divided into 2 parts: (1) those for subscription to the community, and (2) those for active participation in the community. We performed 2 multivariate logistic regression analyses to calculate determinants for both subscription and active participation. Subscription appeared to be associated with patients' background characteristics (eg, gender, treatment phase), intervention-related facilitators (odds ratio [OR] 2.45, 95% CI 1.14-5.27), and patient-related barriers (OR 0.20, 95% CI 0.08-0.54), such as

  13. Multiple barriers against successful care provision for depressed patients in general internal medicine in a Japanese rural hospital: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saitoh Akiyoshi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A general internist has an important role in primary care, especially for the elderly in rural areas of Japan. Although effective intervention models for depressed patients in general practice and primary care settings have been developed in the US and UK medical systems, there is little information regarding even the recognition rate and prescription rate of psychotropic medication by general internists in Japan. The present study surveyed these data cross-sectionally in a general internal medicine outpatient clinic of a Japanese rural hospital. Methods Patients were consecutively recruited and evaluated for major depressive disorder or any mood disorder using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ. Physicians who were blinded to the results of the PHQ were asked to diagnose whether the patients had any mental disorders, and if so, whether they had mood disorders or not. Data regarding prescription of psychotropic medicines were collected from medical records. Results Among 312 patients, 27 (8.7% and 52 (16.7% were identified with major depressive disorder and any mood disorder using the PHQ, respectively. Among those with major depressive disorder, 21 (77.8% were recognized by physicians as having a mental disorder, but only three (11.1% were diagnosed as having a mood disorder. Only two patients with major depressive disorder (7.4% had been prescribed antidepressants. Even among those (n = 15 whom physicians diagnosed with a mood disorder irrespective of the PHQ results, only four (26.7% were prescribed an antidepressant. Conclusions Despite a high prevalence of depression, physicians did not often recognize depression in patients. In addition, most patients who were diagnosed by physicians as having a mood disorder were not prescribed antidepressants. Multiple barriers to providing appropriate care for depressed patients exist, such as recognizing depression, prescribing appropriate medications, and appropriately referring

  14. Induction of Tetraploid Male Sterile Tagetes erecta by Colchicine Treatment and Its Application for Interspecific Hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhong He

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Tagetes erecta is an annual multifunctional plant which can be cultivated under a broad range of climatic conditions. Polyploidization and interspecific hybridization are applied to facilitate breeding cultivars of T. erecta with improved ornamental qualities. Colchicine treatment to the germinating seeds was proved to be a useful tool for chromosome doubling of the male sterile two-type line ‘M525AB’, with the resulting frequency of polyploid seedlings ranging from 88.89% (following 0.05% w/v colchicine applied for a 3–6 h exposure period to a maximum of 100.00% (following 0.1% for 3–6 h, or 0.2% for 3 h. Morphological observation, stomatal size and density analysis, flow cytometric analysis and chromosome counting were conducted to identify the tetraploid plants. Distinctive morphological changes were observed in a notable proportion of polyploid plants. The colchicine-treated polyploid T. erecta plants showed dwarfed and more robust growth, thicker, larger and greener leaves, larger inflorescences and florets. The mutant plants identified through morphological observation all aligned as polyploid plants, thus morphological observation could be an effective method for the detection of polyploidy. The polyploid plants had significant larger stomata size over the abaxial leaf surface, whereas the density of stomata distribution was remarkably reduced. The survival rate of tetraploid cuttings (i.e. 38% was greatly reduced compared to that of diploid plants. The fertility of tetraploid plants was also decreased, as shown by cross-pollination yields. Interspecific hybridizations between colchicine-induced tetraploid plants of a male sterile T. erecta line and the naturally tetraploid fully fertile Tagetes patula species resulted in hybrid progeny. Most of these hybrids displayed the dwarfed growth stature and compact, larger-flower morphology which is the typical ideotype of herbaceous flowers. Thus, polyploidization may be employed

  15. Knowledge and exercise of human rights, and barriers and facilitators to claiming rights: a cross-sectional study of female sex workers and high-risk men who have sex with men in Andhra Pradesh, India

    OpenAIRE

    Ganju, Deepika; Patel, Sangram Kishor; Prabhakar, Parimi; Adhikary, Rajatashurva

    2016-01-01

    Background HIV prevention interventions recognize the need to protect the rights of key populations and support them to claim their rights as a vulnerability reduction strategy. This study explores knowledge of human rights, and barriers and facilitators to claiming rights, among female sex workers (FSWs) and high-risk men who have sex with men (HR-MSM) who are beneficiaries of a community mobilization intervention in Andhra Pradesh, India. Methods Data are drawn from a cross-sectional survey...

  16. Interspecific variation of ontogeny and skull shape among porpoises (Phocoenidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galatius, Anders; Berta, Annalisa; Frandsen, Marie Schou; Goodall, R Natalie P

    2011-02-01

    All extant members of Phocoenidae (porpoises) have been characterized as pedomorphic based on skeletal characters. To investigate the ontogenetic background for pedomorphosis and assess interspecific differences in ontogeny among phocoenids, samples of the six extant species were compared in terms of development of both epiphyseal and cranial suture fusion. Across all species, full maturity of the vertebral column was rare. Vertebral epiphyseal development did not progress so far in most Phocoena phocoena as in Phocoenoides dalli and Phocoena dioptrica. P. phocoena, Phocoena spinipinnis, Ph. dalli, and P. dioptrica, for which large series were available, were further compared in terms of ontogeny of cranial shape by three-dimensional geometric morphometrics. Ph. dalli and P. dioptrica generally showed further development of cranial sutures than the other species. Postnatal skull shape development was similar for all species studied; the majority of interspecific shape differences are present at parturition. Smaller species had a higher rate of shape development relative to growth in size than Ph. dalli and P. dioptrica, but they still showed less allometric development due to less postnatal growth. Interspecific shape differences indicate phylogenetic relationships similar to that proposed based on morphology or convergent evolution of the two pelagic species, Ph. dalli and P. dioptrica, under the scenarios suggested by recent molecular studies. A shape trend coinciding with habitat preference was detected; in species with pelagic preference the position and orientation of the foramen magnum aligned the skull with the vertebral column; the rostrum showed less ventral inclination, and the facial region was larger and more concave in lateral aspect. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. An autosomal locus controls sex reversal in interspecific XY hybrids of the medaka fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, M; Takehana, Y; Fukuda, Y; Naruse, K; Sakaizumi, M; Hamaguchi, S

    2011-12-01

    Although the two medaka species Oryzias latipes and O. curvinotus share the sex-determining gene Dmy, XY sex reversal occurs in interspecific hybridization between O. latipes females of the Hd-rR inbred strain and O. curvinotus males. In this Hd-rR-curvinotus mating, all XX and XY hybrids developed as females. In this study, we used another O. latipes inbred strain (HNI) for the mating, and found that 23% of XY hybrids developed as males, although all XX and the remaining XY hybrids developed as females. Linkage analysis using 236 XY hybrid males obtained from (Hd-rR × HNI) F(1) females showed that a single major locus, Hybrid maleless (Hml), on autosomal linkage group 17, contributed to the strain difference in the XY sex reversal. Furthermore, we found that crossing females of a different O. latipes inbred strain, HO4C, did not cause XY sex reversal in the interspecific hybrids, and that the XY hybrids from (Hd-rR × HO4C) F(1) females showed a 1:1 sex ratio. XY hybrid males had the HO4C allele at sequence-tagged site loci around the Hml locus whereas XY females had the Hd-rR allele, confirming the strong contribution of this locus to XY sex reversal. Reverse transcriptase PCR analysis showed a reduced expression of Dmy(curvinotus) in XY fry of the Hd-rR-curvinotus hybrids at hatching. These results suggest that the Hd-rR allele at the Hml locus interfere with the function of Dmy(curvinotus) on a hybrid background, thus resulting in XY sex reversal.

  18. Interspecific variation of ontogeny and skull shape among porpoises (Phocoenidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galatius-Jørgensen, Anders; Berta, Annalisa; Frandsen, Marie Michele Schou

    2011-01-01

    was detected; in species with pelagic preference the position and orientation of the foramen magnum aligned the skull with the vertebral column; the rostrum showed less ventral inclination, and the facial region was larger and more concave in lateral aspect. J. Morphol., 2011. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc........ Interspecific shape differences indicate phylogenetic relationships similar to that proposed based on morphology or convergent evolution of the two pelagic species, Ph. dalli and P. dioptrica, under the scenarios suggested by recent molecular studies. A shape trend coinciding with habitat preference...

  19. Adaptation of bacteriophages to new hosts through overcoming the interspecific barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Е. N. Andriychuk

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Four wild type phage isolates were tested on P. syringae isolated from potato tuber samples collected in the Kiev and Cherkasy regions of Ukraine. The isolated phages formed clear plaques and had a virion size of 2 to 12 nm. Electron microscopy showed that the phages were of similar size and structure and consisted of isometric particles with long tails characteristic of the Podoviridae family. The effectiveness of phage culturing on bacteria different from the original host was also studied on two phytopathogenic strains of Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. рhaseolicola 4013 and P. syringae pv. tabaci 223. However, no stable isolates could be extracted from P. savastanoi pv. phaseolicola as the plages became inactive after a few passages on the bacterial culture. In order to overcome this, the phages were first cultured on P. syringae pv. tabaci before being transferred to P. savastanoi pv. рhaseolicola. The titers obtained were compared with phage titers from the original host bacteria. Thus, it was determined that the changes occuring in phages after their transfer to the Pseudomonas strain 4013 were irreversible. The changes were evaluated by comparing the effectiveness of phage culturing after a cycle of passages on strains 4013 and 223 where the phages were adapted to strain 4013 after being cultured on strain 223. Additionally, the effectiveness of phage culturing on strain 223 was also determined. The change in the effectiveness of phage culturing for the entire phage range suggests the presence of a defensive system in bacteria when the phages were transferred from strain 223 to strain 4013. The irreversibility of the changes occuring in phages was also tested and it was determined that phages 223/4 and 7591/2 adapt to original hosts and swiftly restore their original titers. Phage 7591/1, however, showed titers that were lower than the ones obtained from the original host culture. The testing of the irreversibility of changes in phages after culturing on P. savastanoi pv. phaseolicola was then tested and the results showed that three phage isolates adapted to their original hosts quickly, but not isolate 7591/1. A possible explanation in this case could be a gradual adaptation of the phages to bacteria through a large number of reproductive cycles.

  20. Building barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turksen, Kursad

    2017-10-02

    Formation of tissue barriers starts in early development where it is critical for normal cell fate selection, differentiation and organogenesis. Barrier maintenance is critical to the ongoing function of organs during adulthood and aging. Dysfunctional tissue barrier formation and function at any stage of the organismal life cycle underlies many disease states.

  1. Implementing visual cervical cancer screening in Senegal: a cross-sectional study of risk factors and prevalence highlighting service utilization barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykens, J Andrew; Linn, Annē M; Irwin, Tracy; Peters, Karen E; Pyra, Maria; Traoré, Fatoumata; Touré Diarra, Mariama; Hasnain, Memoona; Wallner, Katie; Linn, Patrick; Ndiaye, Youssoupha

    2017-01-01

    Senegal ranks 15th in the world in incidence of cervical cancer, the number one cause of cancer mortality among women in this country. The estimated participation rate for cervical cancer screening throughout Senegal is very low (6.9% of women 18-69 years old), especially in rural areas and among older age groups (only 1.9% of women above the age of 40 years). There are no reliable estimates of the prevalence of cervical dysplasia or risk factors for cervical dysplasia specific to rural Senegal. The goals of this study were to estimate the prevalence of cervical dysplasia in a rural region using visual inspection of the cervix with acetic acid (VIA) and to assess risk factors for cervical cancer control. We conducted a cross-sectional study in which we randomly selected 38 villages across the Kédougou region using a three-stage clustering process. Between October 2013 and March 2014, we collected VIA screening results for women aged 30-50 years and cervical cancer risk factors linked to the screening result. We screened 509 women; 5.6% of the estimated target population (9,041) in the region. The point prevalence of cervical dysplasia (positive VIA test) was 2.10% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.99-3.21). Moreover, 287 women completed the cervical cancer risk factor survey (56.4% response rate) and only 38% stated awareness of cervical cancer; 75.9% of the screened women were less than 40 years of age. The overall prevalence of dysplasia in this sample was lower than anticipated. Despite both overall awareness and screening uptake being less than expected, our study highlights the need to address challenges in future prevalence estimates. Principally, we identified that the highest-risk women are the ones least likely to seek screening services, thus illustrating a need to fully understand demand-side barriers to accessing health services in this population. Targeted efforts to educate and motivate older women to seek screenings are needed to sustain an effective

  2. Origin of a new Phytophthora pathogen through interspecific hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasier, C M; Cooke, D E; Duncan, J M

    1999-05-11

    Plant disease epidemics resulting from introductions of exotic fungal plant pathogens are a well known phenomenon. An associated risk-that accelerated pathogen evolution may be occurring as a consequence of genetic exchange between introduced, or introduced and resident, fungal pathogens-is largely unrecognized. This is, in part, because examples of natural, interspecific hybridization in fungi are very rare. Potential evolutionary developments range from the acquisition of new host specificities to emergence of entirely new pathogen taxa. We present evidence from cytological behavior, additive nucleotide bases in repetitive internal transcribed spacer regions of the rRNA-encoding DNA (rDNA), and amplified fragment length polymorphisms of total DNA that a new, aggressive Phytophthora pathogen of alder trees in Europe comprises a range of heteroploid-interspecific hybrids involving a Phytophthora cambivora-like species and an unknown taxon similar to Phytophthora fragariae. The hybrids' marked developmental instabilities, unusual morphological variability, and evidence for recombination in their internal transcribed spacer profiles indicates that they are of recent origin and that their evolution is continuing. The likelihood of such evolutionary events may be increasing as world trade in plants intensifies. However, routine diagnostic procedures currently in use are insufficiently sensitive to allow their detection.

  3. Snake co-occurrence patterns are best explained by habitat and hypothesized effects of interspecific interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    David A. Steen; Christopher J. W. McClure; Jean C. Brock; D. Craig Rudolph; Josh B. Pierce; James R. Lee; W. Jeffrey Humphries; Beau B. Gregory; William B. Sutton; Lora L. Smith; Danna L. Baxley; Dirk J. Stevenson; Craig Guyer

    2014-01-01

    1. Snakes often occur in species-rich assemblages, and sympatry is thought to be facilitated primarily by low diet overlap, not interspecific interactions. 2. We selected, a priori, three species pairs consisting of species that are morphologically and taxonomically similar and may therefore be likely to engage in interspecific, consumptive competition. We then...

  4. Using DNA to describe and quantify interspecific killing of fishers in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greta M. Wengert; Mourad W. Gabriel; Sean M. Matthews; J. Mark Higley; Rick A. Sweitzer; Craig. M. Thompson; Kathryn L. Purcell; Reginald H. Barrett; Leslie W. Woods; Rebecca E. Green; Stefan M. Keller; Patricia M. Gaffney; Megan Jones; Benjamin N. Sacks

    2014-01-01

    Interspecific killing is common among carnivores and can have population-level effects on imperiled species. The fisher (Pekania [Martes] pennant) is a rare forest carnivore in western North America and a candidate for listing under the United States Endangered Species Act. Interspecific killing and...

  5. Interspecific competition of early successional plant species in ex-arable fields as influenced by plant–soil feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jing, Y.; Bezemer, T.M.; Putten, van der W.H.

    2015-01-01

    Plant–soil feedback can affect plants that belong to the same (intraspecific feedback) or different species (interspecific feedback). However, little is known about how intra- and interspecific plant–soil feedbacks influence interspecific plant competition. Here, we used plants and soil from

  6. Plant regeneration and somatic embryogenesis from immature embryos derived through interspecific hybridization among different Carica species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Md Abul Kalam; Rabbani, Md Golam; Amin, Latifah

    2012-12-12

    Plant regeneration and somatic embryogenesis through interspecific hybridization among different Carica species were studied for the development of a papaya ringspot virus-resistant variety. The maximum fruit sets were recorded from the cross of the native variety C. papaya cv. Shahi with the wild species C. cauliflora. The highest hybrid embryos were recorded at 90 days after pollination and the embryos were aborted at 150 days after pollination. The immature hybrid embryos were used for plant regeneration and somatic embryogenesis. The 90-day-old hybrid embryos from the cross of C. papaya cv. Shahi × C. cauliflora showed the highest percentage of germination, as well as plant regeneration on growth regulators free culture medium after 7 days pre-incubation on half-strength MS medium supplemented with 0.2 mg/L BAP, 0.5 mg/L NAA and 60 g/L sucrose. The 90-day-old hybrid embryos from the cross of C. papaya cv. Shahi × C. cauliflora produced maximum callus, as well as somatic embryos when cultured on half-strength MS medium containing 5 mg/L 2,4-D, 100 mg/L glutamine, 100 mg/L casein hydrolysate and 60 g/L sucrose. The somatic embryos were transferred into half-strength MS medium containing 0.5 mg/L BAP and 0.2 mg/L NAA and 60 g/L sucrose for maturation. The highest number of regenerated plants per hybrid embryo (10.33) was recorded from the cross of C. papaya cv. Shahi × C. cauliflora. Isoenzyme and dendrogram cluster analysis using UPGMA of the regenerated F(1) plantlets confirmed the presence of the hybrid plantlets.

  7. Wood Quality and Growth Characterization across Intra- and Inter-Specific Hybrid Aspen Clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawn D. Mansfield

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx. is one of the most abundant poplar species in North America; it is native, displays substantial breadth in distribution inhabiting several geographical and climatic ecoregions, is notable for its rapid growth, and is ecologically and economically important. As the demand for raw material continues to increase rapidly, there is a pressing need to improve both tree quality and growth rates via breeding efforts. Hybridization is considered one of the most promising options to simultaneously accelerate these tree characteristics, as it takes advantage of heterosis. Two aspen species showing particular promise for hybridization with trembling aspen are European aspen (P. tremula and Chinese aspen (P. davidiana because their native climates are similar to that of P. tremuloides and are also very easy to hybridize. In 2003, aspen clones were planted in Athabasca, Alberta from the following species crosses: open pollinated (OP P. tremuloides (NN, OP P. davidiana (CC, P. tremula × P. tremula (EE, P. tremula × P. tremuloides (EN, and P. tremuloides × P. davidiana (CN. In November 2010, growth measurements and core samples were taken from seven-year field grown clones. Comparisons of the mean growth and cell wall traits were made between crosses using generalized linear model least squares means tests for stem volume, fiber length, fiber width, coarseness, wood density, microfibril angle, total cell wall carbohydrate and lignin content, and lignin composition. The results clearly indicated that the inter-specific crosses offer a means to breed for more desirable wood characteristics than the intra-specific Populus spp. crosses.

  8. Plant Regeneration and Somatic Embryogenesis from Immature Embryos Derived through Interspecific Hybridization among Different Carica Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latifah Amin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Plant regeneration and somatic embryogenesis through interspecific hybridization among different Carica species were studied for the development of a papaya ringspot virus-resistant variety. The maximum fruit sets were recorded from the cross of the native variety C. papaya cv. Shahi with the wild species C. cauliflora. The highest hybrid embryos were recorded at 90 days after pollination and the embryos were aborted at 150 days after pollination. The immature hybrid embryos were used for plant regeneration and somatic embryogenesis. The 90-day-old hybrid embryos from the cross of C. papaya cv. Shahi × C. cauliflora showed the highest percentage of germination, as well as plant regeneration on growth regulators free culture medium after 7 days pre-incubation on half-strength MS medium supplemented with 0.2 mg/L BAP, 0.5 mg/L NAA and 60 g/L sucrose. The 90-day-old hybrid embryos from the cross of C. papaya cv. Shahi × C. cauliflora produced maximum callus, as well as somatic embryos when cultured on half-strength MS medium containing 5 mg/L 2,4-D, 100 mg/L glutamine, 100 mg/L casein hydrolysate and 60 g/L sucrose. The somatic embryos were transferred into half-strength MS medium containing 0.5 mg/L BAP and 0.2 mg/L NAA and 60 g/L sucrose for maturation. The highest number of regenerated plants per hybrid embryo (10.33 was recorded from the cross of C. papaya cv. Shahi × C. cauliflora. Isoenzyme and dendrogram cluster analysis using UPGMA of the regenerated F1 plantlets confirmed the presence of the hybrid plantlets.

  9. Interspecific androgenetic restoration of rosy barb using cadaveric sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirankumar, S; Pandian, T J

    2004-02-01

    Interspecific androgenetic rosy barb (Puntius conchonius) was generated using its cadaveric (-20 degrees C) or fresh sperm to activate nuclear genome inactivated oocytes of gray tiger barb (Puntius tetrazona). UV irradiation was used to inactivate nuclear genome of tiger barb oocytes. Thermal shock restored diploidy of rosy barb in the oocytes of tiger barb. Survival of androgenotes was 14% or 7% when fresh or cadaveric sperm was used. The diploid or haploid nuclear genome of rosy barb, individually or jointly with that of tiger barb, regulated the time sequence of embryonic development in an alien cytoplasm of tiger barb oocytes. Androgenetic males (Y2Y2) attained sexual maturity earlier and had significantly higher gonadosomatic index and sperm concentration, albeit suffering a slight decrease in fertilizing ability. Conversely, androgenetic females (X2X2) suffered extended interspawning period, reduced fecundity, and poor hatchability of their progenies. These results are discussed with respect to their significance for conservation biology.

  10. Implementing visual cervical cancer screening in Senegal: a cross-sectional study of risk factors and prevalence highlighting service utilization barriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dykens JA

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available J Andrew Dykens,1–4 Annē M Linn,5,6 Tracy Irwin,7 Karen E Peters,8 Maria Pyra,8 Fatoumata Traoré,9 Mariama Touré Diarra,9,☪ Memoona Hasnain,1,10 Katie Wallner,11 Patrick Linn,11 Youssoupha Ndiaye12 1Department of Family Medicine, College of Medicine, 2Center for Global Health, 3Institute for Health Research and Policy, 4Cancer Center, Hospital and Health Sciences System, University of Illinois at Chicago, IL, USA; 5Master’s International Graduate School Program, Peace Corps, Dakar, Senegal; 6Rutgers School of Nursing, Newark, NJ, 7Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 8School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago, IL, USA; 9Regional Ministry of Health and Social Affairs, Kédougou, Senegal; 10Foundation for Advancement of International Medical Education and Research, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 11Peace Corps, Dakar, 12Regional Ministry of Health and Social Affairs, Sédhiou, Senegal ☪Mariama Touré Diarra passed away on March 21, 2015 Background: Senegal ranks 15th in the world in incidence of cervical cancer, the number one cause of cancer mortality among women in this country. The estimated participation rate for cervical cancer screening throughout Senegal is very low (6.9% of women 18–69 years old, especially in rural areas and among older age groups (only 1.9% of women above the age of 40 years. There are no reliable estimates of the prevalence of cervical dysplasia or risk factors for cervical dysplasia specific to rural Senegal. The goals of this study were to estimate the prevalence of cervical dysplasia in a rural region using visual inspection of the cervix with acetic acid (VIA and to assess risk factors for cervical cancer control. Patients and methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study in which we randomly selected 38 villages across the Kédougou region using a three-stage clustering process. Between October 2013 and March 2014, we collected VIA screening results for women aged 30–50 years and

  11. Coupled-channel calculation for cross section of fusion and barrier distribution of {}^{16,17,18}O + {}^{16}O reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fereidonnejad, R.; Sadeghi, H.; Ghambari, M.

    2018-03-01

    In this work, the effect of multi-phonon excitation on heavy-ion fusion reactions has been studied and fusion barrier distributions of energy intervals near and below the Coulomb barrier have been studied for 16,17,18O + 16O reactions. The structure and deformation of nuclear projectiles have been studied. Given the adaptation of computations to experimental data, our calculations predict the behavior of reactions in intervals of energy in which experimental measurements are not available. In addition the S-factor for these reactions has been calculated. The results showed that the structure and deformation of a nuclear projectile are important factors. The S-factor, obtained in the coupled-channel calculations for the {}^{16}O + {}^{16}O, {}^{17}O +{}^{16}O and {}^{18}O +{}^{16}O reactions, showed good agreement with the experimental data and had a maximum value at an energy near 5, 4.5 and 4 MeV, respectively.

  12. The role of mating preferences in shaping interspecific divergence in mating signals in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptacek

    2000-10-05

    Vertebrates represent one of the best-studied groups in terms of the role that mating preferences have played in the evolution of exaggerated secondary sexual characters and mating behaviours within species. Vertebrate species however, also exhibit enormous interspecific diversity in features of mating signals that has potentially led to reproductive isolation and speciation in many groups. The role that sexual selection has played in interspecific divergence in mating signals has been less fully explored. This review summarizes our current knowledge of how mating preferences within species have shaped interspecific divergence in mate recognition signals among the major vertebrate groups. Certain signal modalities appear to characterize mating signal diversification among different vertebrate taxa. Acoustic signals play an important role in mating decisions in anuran amphibians and birds. Here, different properties of the signal may convey information regarding individual, neighbor and species recognition. Mating preferences for particular features of the acoustic signal have led to interspecific divergence in calls and songs. Divergence in morphological traits such as colouration or ornamentation appears to be important in interspecific diversity in certain groups of fishes and birds. Pheromonal signals serve as the primary basis for species-specific mating cues in many salamander species, most mammals and even some fishes. The evolution of interspecific divergence in elaborate courtship displays may have played an important role in speciation of lizards, and particular groups of fishes, salamanders, birds and mammals. While much research has focused on the importance of mating preferences in shaping the evolution of these types of mating signals within species, the link between intraspecific preferences and interspecific divergence and speciation remains to be more fully tested. Future studies should focus on identifying how variation in mating preferences within

  13. Trade Barriers in a Global Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Raihan, Selim

    2004-01-01

    This article develops an index of trade barrier for 119 countries by using the tariff and the import data from TRAINS database of UNCTAD at 6-digit level of HS classifications. Bivariate as well as multivariate econometric models have been estimated to explain cross-country variations in the constructed trade barrier indices. The results show that cross-country variations in trade barrier indices are much influenced by variations in per capita income, population and literacy rate. This articl...

  14. Interspecific studies of circadian genes period and timeless in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noreen, Shumaila; Pegoraro, Mirko; Nouroz, Faisal; Tauber, Eran; Kyriacou, Charalambos P

    2018-03-30

    The level of rescue of clock function in genetically arrhythmic Drosophila melanogaster hosts using interspecific clock gene transformation was used to study the putative intermolecular coevolution between interacting clock proteins. Among them PER and TIM are the two important negative regulators of the circadian clock feedback loop. We transformed either the D. pseudoobscura per or tim transgenes into the corresponding arrhythmic D. melanogaster mutant (per01 or tim01) and observed >50% rhythmicity but the period of activity rhythm was either longer (D. pseudoobscura-per) or shorter than 24 h (D. pseudoobscura-tim) compared to controls. By introducing both transgenes simultaneously into double mutants, we observed that the period of the activity rhythm was rescued by the pair of hemizygous transgenes (~24 h). These flies also showed a more optimal level of temperature compensation for the period. Under LD 12:12 these flies have a D. pseudoobscura like activity profile with the absence of morning anticipation as well as a very prominent earlier evening peak of activity rhythm. These observation are consistent with the view that TIM and PER form a heterospecific coevolved module at least for the circadian period of activity rhythms. However the strength of rhythmicity was reduced by having both transgenes present, so while evidence for a coevolution between PER and TIM is observed for some characters it is not for others. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Interspecific parasite exchange in a mixed colony of birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valera, Francisco; Casas-Crivillé, Alejandro; Hoi, Herbert

    2003-04-01

    Studies of avian host-parasite interactions rarely include consequences of relationships among hosts for either the host or parasite species. In this study, we examine the ectoparasitic burden of adult and nestling European bee-eaters (Merops apiaster) and rock sparrows (Petronia petronia) in a mixed colony. We found that (1) each bird species had its own species of lice; (2) hematophagous mites parasitized both adults and nestlings of both bird species; (3) Carnus hemapterus, a common parasite of nestling bee-eaters, also infested rock sparrow nestlings, a species not previously described as a host for this dipteran; and (4) whereas C. hemapterus did not show high host specificity within the colony, the emergence of adult flies was synchronized with the start of hatching in bee-eater nests. We suggest that coexistence of these 2 bird species results in parasite exchange, bee-eaters obtaining mites from sparrows and sparrows becoming infested by C. hemapterus. Differences in the detrimental effects of parasite transfer for each host species may result in a process of apparent competition mediated by shared parasites. Interspecific parasite exchange is an important aspect of host-parasite relationships in mixed colonies, which requires further attention.

  16. Interspecific variation for thermal dependence of glutathione reductase in sainfoin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidambi, S P; Mahan, J R; Matches, A G

    1990-05-01

    Understanding the biochemical and physiological consequences of species variation would expedite improvement in agronomically useful genotypes of sainfoin (Onobrychis spp.) Information on variation among sainfoin species is lacking on thermal dependence of glutathione reductase (B.C. 1.6.4.2.), which plays an important role in the protection of plants from both high and low temperature stresses by preventing harmful oxidation of enzymes and membranes. Our objective was to investigate the interspecific variation for thermal dependency of glutathione reductase in sainfoin. Large variation among species was found for: (i) the minimum apparent Km (0.4-2.5 μM NADPH), (ii) the temperature at which the minimum apparent Km was observed (15°-5°C), and (iii) the thermal kinetic windows (2°-30°C width) over a 15°-45°C temperature gradient. In general, tetraploid species had narrower (≤17°C) thermal kinetic windows than did diploid species (∼30°C), with one exception among the diploids. Within the tetraploid species, the cultivars of O. viciifolia had a broader thermal kinetic window (≥7°C) than the plant introduction (PI 212241, >2 °C) itself.

  17. Interspecific social networks promote information transmission in wild songbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farine, Damien R; Aplin, Lucy M; Sheldon, Ben C; Hoppitt, William

    2015-03-22

    Understanding the functional links between social structure and population processes is a central aim of evolutionary ecology. Multiple types of interactions can be represented by networks drawn for the same population, such as kinship, dominance or affiliative networks, but the relative importance of alternative networks in modulating population processes may not be clear. We illustrate this problem, and a solution, by developing a framework for testing the importance of different types of association in facilitating the transmission of information. We apply this framework to experimental data from wild songbirds that form mixed-species flocks, recording the arrival (patch discovery) of individuals to novel foraging sites. We tested whether intraspecific and interspecific social networks predicted the spread of information about novel food sites, and found that both contributed to transmission. The likelihood of acquiring information per unit of connection to knowledgeable individuals increased 22-fold for conspecifics, and 12-fold for heterospecifics. We also found that species varied in how much information they produced, suggesting that some species play a keystone role in winter foraging flocks. More generally, these analyses demonstrate that this method provides a powerful approach, using social networks to quantify the relative transmission rates across different social relationships.

  18. Coexistence facilitates interspecific biofilm formation in complex microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Jonas S; Røder, Henriette L; Russel, Jakob; Sørensen, Helle; Burmølle, Mette; Sørensen, Søren J

    2016-09-01

    Social interactions in which bacteria respond to one another by modifying their phenotype are central determinants of microbial communities. It is known that interspecific interactions influence the biofilm phenotype of bacteria; a phenotype that is central to the fitness of bacteria. However, the underlying role of fundamental ecological factors, specifically coexistence and phylogenetic history, in biofilm formation remains unclear. This study examines how social interactions affect biofilm formation in multi-species co-cultures from five diverse environments. We found prevalence of increased biofilm formation among co-cultured bacteria that have coexisted in their original environment. Conversely, when randomly co-culturing bacteria across these five consortia, we found less biofilm induction and a prevalence of biofilm reduction. Reduction in biofilm formation was even more predominant when co-culturing bacteria from environments where long-term coexistence was unlikely to have occurred. Phylogenetic diversity was not found to be a strong underlying factor but a relation between biofilm induction and phylogenetic history was found. The data indicates that biofilm reduction is typically correlated with an increase in planktonic cell numbers, thus implying a behavioral response rather than mere growth competition. Our findings suggest that an increase in biofilm formation is a common adaptive response to long-term coexistence. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Interspecific differences revealed with in Drosophila Photometric Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoenigsberg H. F.

    1964-12-01

    Full Text Available The above refer to experiments present a new method which permits the study of philogenesis in the genus Drosophila. There are several types of results: a close kinship among the various geographical races of  D. melanogaster in the neo-tropics coincides with their spectrophotometric similarities; b the interspecific differences are also identified with the photometric analysis; c finally there are optical density affinities among the various species which belong to the same taxonomic groups.  Acknowledgment. The authors want to express their gratitude to Professor Everet of the physico-chemical laboratory of the National University for the use of his Beckman DU spectrophotometer and for his generous advice. This research is supported by the American Agricultural Research Service grant F. G. Co 107. For technical assistance we are indebted to Miss B. I. Cortés and to Mr. L. Castro.

  20. Support or Barrier?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanden, Guro Refsum; Lønsmann, Dorte

    employees use to cross language boundaries in their everyday work, and, secondly, how these practices relate to top-down language management in the case companies. Our findings show that employees are often dependent on ad hoc and informal solutions in cross- language situations, which leads us......This study offers a critical look at how corporate-level language management influences front-line language practices among employees in three multinational corporations (MNCs) headquartered in Scandinavia. Based on interview and document data, we examine, firstly, what front-line practices...... to a discussion of how a company’s language policy may be seen as both support and a barrier....

  1. Chiropractors` experience and readiness to work in Indigenous Australian Communities: a preliminary cross-sectional survey to explore preparedness, perceived barriers and facilitators for chiropractors practising cross-culturally

    OpenAIRE

    Vindigni, Dein; Polus, Barbara I.; Cleary, Sonja; Doyle, Aunty Kerrie

    2017-01-01

    Background Indigenous people make up approximately 3% of the total Australian population and score poorer on all health indices, including back pain. Chiropractors are well placed to alleviate back pain, yet there is no research that considers chiropractors? readiness to treat Indigenous patients. This study explores chiropractors` experience working with Indigenous Australians, describes perceived barriers and facilitators to chiropractors? participation in Indigenous Healthcare and their wi...

  2. Interspecific nest parasitism by chukar on greater sage-grouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearon, Michelle L.; Coates, Peter S.

    2014-01-01

    Nest parasitism occurs when a female bird lays eggs in the nest of another and the host incubates the eggs and may provide some form of parental care for the offspring (Lyon and Eadie 1991). Precocial birds (e.g., Galliformes and Anseriformes) are typically facultative nest parasites of both their own and other species (Lyon and Eadie 1991). This behavior increases a female’s reproductive success when she parasitizes other nests while simultaneously raising her own offspring. Both interspecific and conspecific nest parasitism have been well documented in several families of the order Galliformes, particularly the Phasianidae (Lyon and Eadie 1991, Geffen and Yom-Tov 2001, Krakauer and Kimball 2009). The Chukar (Alectoris chukar) has been widely introduced as a game bird to western North America from Eurasia and is now well established within the Great Basin from northeastern California east to Utah and north to Idaho and Oregon (Christensen 1996). Over much of this range the Chukar occurs with other phasianids, including the native Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus), within sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) steppe (Christensen 1996, Schroeder et al. 1999, Connelly et al. 2000). Chukar typically exploit a broader range of habitats than do sage-grouse, but both species use the same species of sagebrush and other shrubs for nesting cover (Christensen 1996, Schroeder et al. 1999). Chukar are known to parasitize nests of other individuals of their own species (Geffen and Yom-Tov 2001), but we are unaware of reported evidence that Chukar may parasitize nests of sage-grouse. Here we describe a case of a Chukar parasitizing a sage-grouse nest in the sagebrush steppe of western Nevada.

  3. Barrier Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heteren, S. van

    2015-01-01

    Barrier-system dynamics are a function of antecedent topography and substrate lithology, Relative sea-level (RSL) changes, sediment availability and type, climate, vegetation type and cover, and various aero- and hydrodynamic processes during fair-weather conditions and extreme events. Global change

  4. Penetration through the Skin Barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Bo; Benfeldt, Eva; Holmgaard, Rikke

    2016-01-01

    -through diffusion cells) as well as in vivo methods (microdialysis and microperfusion). Then follows a discussion with examples of how different characteristics of the skin (age, site and integrity) and of the penetrants (size, solubility, ionization, logPow and vehicles) affect the kinetics of percutaneous......The skin is a strong and flexible organ with barrier properties essential for maintaining homeostasis and thereby human life. Characterizing this barrier is the ability to prevent some chemicals from crossing the barrier while allowing others, including medicinal products, to pass at varying rates...

  5. A LOOK AT CULTURAL BARRIERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen A. VRÂNCEANU

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays the global market allows each individual to work in foreign countries. This fact is a great opportunity for business development, but also puts into light the problem of cultural barriers. Ineffective cross-cultural communication and collaboration can harm employees, customers, and other stakeholders. A company with employees from different cultures must acknowledge and understand these barriers in order to overcome them and to obtain the desired performance. The present study aims to expose the cultural barriers encountered by foreigners in a multinational company from Romania.

  6. Knowledge, attitude, practice and barriers on vaccination against human papillomavirus infection: a cross-sectional study among primary care physicians in Hong Kong.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin C S Wong

    Full Text Available This study explored the knowledge, attitude, practice and barriers to prescribe human papillomavirus (HPV vaccines among private primary care physicians in Hong Kong. A self-administered questionnaire survey was conducted by sending letters to doctors who had joined a vaccination program for school girls. From 720 surveys sent, 444 (61.7% completed questionnaires were returned and analyzed. For knowledge, few responded to questions accurately on the prevalence of cervical HPV (27.9% and genital wart infection (13.1% among sexually active young women in Hong Kong, and only 44.4% correctly answered the percentage of cervical cancers caused by HPV. For attitude, most agreed that HPV vaccination should be fully paid by the Government (68.3% as an important public health strategy. Vaccination against HPV was perceived as more important than those for genital herpes (52.2% and Chlamydia (50.1% for adolescent health, and the majority selected adolescents aged 12-14 years as the ideal group for vaccination. Gardasil(® (30.9% and Cervarix(® (28.0% were almost equally preferred. For practice, the factors influencing the choice of vaccine included strength of vaccine protection (61.1%, long-lasting immunity (56.8% and good antibody response (55.6%. The most significant barriers to prescribe HPV vaccines consisted of parental refusal due to safety concerns (48.2%, and their practice of advising vaccination was mostly affected by local Governmental recommendations (78.7%. A substantial proportion of physicians had recommended HPV vaccines for their female clients/patients aged 18-26 years for protection of cervical cancer (83.8% or both cervical cancer and genital warts (85.5%. The knowledge on HPV infection was low among physicians in Hong Kong. Prescription of HPV vaccine was hindered by the perceived parental concerns and was mostly relied on Governmental recommendations. Educational initiatives should be targeted towards both physicians and parents

  7. Knowledge, attitude, practice and barriers on vaccination against human papillomavirus infection: a cross-sectional study among primary care physicians in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Martin C S; Lee, Albert; Ngai, Karry L K; Chor, Josette C Y; Chan, Paul K S

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the knowledge, attitude, practice and barriers to prescribe human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines among private primary care physicians in Hong Kong. A self-administered questionnaire survey was conducted by sending letters to doctors who had joined a vaccination program for school girls. From 720 surveys sent, 444 (61.7%) completed questionnaires were returned and analyzed. For knowledge, few responded to questions accurately on the prevalence of cervical HPV (27.9%) and genital wart infection (13.1%) among sexually active young women in Hong Kong, and only 44.4% correctly answered the percentage of cervical cancers caused by HPV. For attitude, most agreed that HPV vaccination should be fully paid by the Government (68.3%) as an important public health strategy. Vaccination against HPV was perceived as more important than those for genital herpes (52.2%) and Chlamydia (50.1%) for adolescent health, and the majority selected adolescents aged 12-14 years as the ideal group for vaccination. Gardasil(®) (30.9%) and Cervarix(®) (28.0%) were almost equally preferred. For practice, the factors influencing the choice of vaccine included strength of vaccine protection (61.1%), long-lasting immunity (56.8%) and good antibody response (55.6%). The most significant barriers to prescribe HPV vaccines consisted of parental refusal due to safety concerns (48.2%), and their practice of advising vaccination was mostly affected by local Governmental recommendations (78.7%). A substantial proportion of physicians had recommended HPV vaccines for their female clients/patients aged 18-26 years for protection of cervical cancer (83.8%) or both cervical cancer and genital warts (85.5%). The knowledge on HPV infection was low among physicians in Hong Kong. Prescription of HPV vaccine was hindered by the perceived parental concerns and was mostly relied on Governmental recommendations. Educational initiatives should be targeted towards both physicians and parents, and

  8. Effective treatment of glioblastoma requires crossing the blood–brain barrier and targeting tumors including cancer stem cells: The promise of nanomedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Soo; Harford, Joe B.; Pirollo, Kathleen F.; Chang, Esther H.

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive and lethal type of brain tumor. Both therapeutic resistance and restricted permeation of drugs across the blood–brain barrier (BBB) play a major role in the poor prognosis of GBM patients. Accumulated evidence suggests that in many human cancers, including GBM, therapeutic resistance can be attributed to a small fraction of cancer cells known as cancer stem cells (CSCs). CSCs have been shown to have stem cell-like properties that enable them to evade traditional cytotoxic therapies, and so new CSC-directed anti-cancer therapies are needed. Nanoparticles have been designed to selectively deliver payloads to relevant target cells in the body, and there is considerable interest in the use of nanoparticles for CSC-directed anti-cancer therapies. Recent advances in the field of nanomedicine offer new possibilities for overcoming CSC-mediated therapeutic resistance and thus significantly improving management of GBM. In this review, we will examine the current nanomedicine approaches for targeting CSCs and their therapeutic implications. The inhibitory effect of various nanoparticle-based drug delivery system towards CSCs in GBM tumors is the primary focus of this review. PMID:26116770

  9. Organizational barriers associated with the implementation of national essential medicines policy: A cross-sectional study of township hospitals in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lianping; Liu, Chaojie; Ferrier, J Adamm; Zhang, Xinping

    2015-11-01

    This study identifies potential organizational barriers associated with the implementation of the Chinese National Essential Medicines Policy (NEMP) in rural primary health care institutions. We used a multistage sampling strategy to select 90 township hospitals from six provinces, two from each of eastern, middle, and western China. Data relating to eight core NEMP indicators and institutional characteristics were collected from January to September 2011, using a questionnaire. Prescription-associated indicators were calculated from 9000 outpatient prescriptions selected at random. We categorized the eight NEMP indicators using an exploratory factor analysis, and performed linear regressions to determine the association between the factor scores and institution-level characteristics. The results identified three main factors. Overall, low levels of expenditure of medicines (F1) and poor performance in rational use of medicines (F2) were evident. The availability of medicines (F3) varied significantly across both hospitals and regions. Factor scores had no significant relationship with hospital size (in terms of number of beds and health workers); however, they were associated with revenue and structure of the hospital, patient service load, and support for health workers. Regression analyses showed that public finance per health worker was negatively associated with the availability of medicines (p finance from local governments may reduce medicine stock lines of township hospitals and lead them to seek alternative sources of income, jeopardizing their capacity to meet the needs of local consumers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effective treatment of glioblastoma requires crossing the blood-brain barrier and targeting tumors including cancer stem cells: The promise of nanomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Soo; Harford, Joe B; Pirollo, Kathleen F; Chang, Esther H

    2015-12-18

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive and lethal type of brain tumor. Both therapeutic resistance and restricted permeation of drugs across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) play a major role in the poor prognosis of GBM patients. Accumulated evidence suggests that in many human cancers, including GBM, therapeutic resistance can be attributed to a small fraction of cancer cells known as cancer stem cells (CSCs). CSCs have been shown to have stem cell-like properties that enable them to evade traditional cytotoxic therapies, and so new CSC-directed anti-cancer therapies are needed. Nanoparticles have been designed to selectively deliver payloads to relevant target cells in the body, and there is considerable interest in the use of nanoparticles for CSC-directed anti-cancer therapies. Recent advances in the field of nanomedicine offer new possibilities for overcoming CSC-mediated therapeutic resistance and thus significantly improving management of GBM. In this review, we will examine the current nanomedicine approaches for targeting CSCs and their therapeutic implications. The inhibitory effect of various nanoparticle-based drug delivery system towards CSCs in GBM tumors is the primary focus of this review. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Designing and creating Saccharomyces interspecific hybrids for improved, industry relevant, phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellon, Jennifer R; Yang, Fei; Day, Martin P; Inglis, Debra L; Chambers, Paul J

    2015-10-01

    To remain competitive in increasingly overcrowded markets, yeast strain development programmes are crucial for fermentation-based food and beverage industries. In a winemaking context, there are many yeast phenotypes that stand to be improved. For example, winemakers endeavouring to produce sweet dessert wines wrestle with fermentation challenges particular to fermenting high-sugar juices, which can lead to elevated volatile acidity levels and extended fermentation times. In the current study, we used natural yeast breeding techniques to generate Saccharomyces spp. interspecific hybrids as a non-genetically modified (GM) strategy to introduce targeted improvements in important, wine-relevant traits. The hybrids were generated by mating a robust wine strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with a wine isolate of Saccharomyces bayanus, a species previously reported to produce wines with low concentrations of acetic acid. Two hybrids generated from the cross showed robust fermentation properties in high-sugar grape juice and produced botrytised Riesling wines with much lower concentrations of acetic acid relative to the industrial wine yeast parent. The hybrids also displayed suitability for icewine production when bench-marked against an industry standard icewine yeast, by delivering icewines with lower levels of acetic acid. Additionally, the hybrid yeast produced wines with novel aroma and flavour profiles and established that choice of yeast strain impacts on wine colour. These new hybrid yeasts display the desired targeted fermentation phenotypes from both parents, robust fermentation in high-sugar juice and the production of wines with low volatile acidity, thus establishing their suitability for wine styles that are traditionally troubled by excessive volatile acidity levels.

  12. Tiger, Bengal and Domestic Cat Embryos Produced by Homospecific and Interspecific Zona-Free Nuclear Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, L N; Jarazo, J; Buemo, C; Hiriart, M I; Sestelo, A; Salamone, D F

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate three different cloning strategies in the domestic cat (Felis silvestris) and to use the most efficient to generate wild felid embryos by interspecific cloning (iSCNT) using Bengal (a hybrid formed by the cross of Felis silvestris and Prionailurus bengalensis) and tiger (Panthera tigris) donor cells. In experiment 1, zona-free (ZP-free) cloning resulted in higher fusion and expanded blastocyst rates with respect to zona included cloning techniques that involved fusion or injection of the donor cell. In experiment 2, ZP-free iSCNT and embryo aggregation (2X) were assessed. Division velocity and blastocyst rates were increased by embryo aggregation in the three species. Despite fewer tiger embryos than Bengal and cat embryos reached the blastocyst stage, Tiger 2X group increased the percentage of blastocysts with respect to Tiger 1X group (3.2% vs 12.1%, respectively). Moreover, blastocyst cell number was almost duplicated in aggregated embryos with respect to non-aggregated ones within Bengal and tiger groups (278.3 ± 61.9 vs 516.8 ± 103.6 for Bengal 1X and Bengal 2X groups, respectively; 41 vs 220 ± 60 for Tiger 1X and Tiger 2X groups, respectively). OCT4 analysis also revealed that tiger blastocysts had higher proportion of OCT4-positive cells with respect to Bengal blastocysts and cat intracytoplasmic sperm injection blastocysts. In conclusion, ZP-free cloning has improved the quality of cat embryos with respect to the other cloning techniques evaluated and was successfully applied in iSCNT complemented with embryo aggregation. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  13. Preparation and characterization of cross-linked poly (vinyl alcohol)-graphene oxide nanocomposites as an interlayer for Schottky barrier diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badrinezhad, Lida; Bilkan, Çigdem; Azizian-Kalandaragh, Yashar; Nematollahzadeh, Ali; Orak, Ikram; Altindal, Şemsettin

    2018-01-01

    Cross-linked polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) graphene oxide (GO) nanocomposites were prepared by simple solution-mixing route and characterized by Raman, UV-visible and fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. The XRD pattern and SEM analysis showed significant changes in the nanocomposite structures, and the FT-IR spectroscopy results confirmed the chemical interaction between the GO filler and the PVA matrix. After these morphological characterizations, PVA-GO-based diodes were fabricated and their electrical properties were characterized using current-voltage (I-V) and impedance-voltage-frequency (Z-V-f) measurements at room temperature. Semilogarithmic I-V characteristics of diode showed a good rectifier behavior. The values of C and G/ω increased with decreasing frequency due to the surface/interface states (Nss) which depend on the relaxation time and the frequency of the signal. The voltage, dependent profiles of Nss and series resistance (Rs) were obtained from the methods of high-low frequency capacitance and Nicollian and Brews, respectively. The obtained values of Nss and Rs were attributed to the use of cross-linked PVA-GO interlayer at the Au/n-Si interface.

  14. Market and Policy Barriers to Energy Storage Deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatnagar, Dhruv [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Currier, Aileen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hernandez, Jacquelynne [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ma, Ookie [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy; Kirby, Brendan [Consultant

    2013-09-01

    Electric energy storage technologies can provide numerous grid services; there are a number of factors that restrict their current deployment. The most significant barrier to deployment is high capital costs, though several recent deployments indicate that capital costs are decreasing and energy storage may be the preferred economic alternative in certain situations. However, a number of other market and regulatory barriers persist, limiting further deployment. These barriers can be categorized into regulatory barriers, market (economic) barriers, utility and developer business model barriers, cross-cutting barriers and technology barriers.

  15. Acceptance and barriers to access of occupational e-mental health: cross-sectional findings from a health-risk population of employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennemann, Severin; Witthöft, Michael; Bethge, Matthias; Spanier, Katja; Beutel, Manfred E; Zwerenz, Rüdiger

    2018-04-01

    Occupational e-mental-health (OEMH) may extend existing instruments for preservation or restoration of health and work ability. As a key precondition to efficient implementation, this study examined acceptance and person-centered barriers to potential uptake of OEMH for work-related distress in employees with an elevated risk of early retirement. Within the framework of the "Third German Sociomedical Panel of Employees", 1829 employees with prior sickness absence payments filled out a self-administered questionnaire. Participants had a mean age of 49.93 years (SD = 4.06). 6.2% indicated prior use of eHealth interventions. Potential predictors of acceptance of OEMH were examined based on the "Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology" (UTAUT) extended by work ability, mental health, eHealth literacy and demographic characteristics. 89.1% (n = 1579) showed low to moderate acceptance (M = 2.20, SD = 1.05, range 1-5). A path analysis revealed significant, positive direct effects of UTAUT predictors on acceptance (performance expectancy: 0.48, SE = 0.02, p fit was good [χ 2 (7) = 12.91, p = 0.07, RMSEA = 0.02, CFI = 1.00, TLI = 0.99, SRMR = 0.01]. Attitudes towards OEMH are rather disadvantageous in the studied risk group. Implementation of OEMH, therefore, requires a-priori education including promotion of awareness, favorable attitudes regarding efficacy and usability in a collaborative approach.

  16. Current treatment status and barriers for patients with chronic HCV infection in mainland China: A national multicenter cross-sectional survey in 56 hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Dan-Dan; Zhou, Hai-Yang; Liu, Shuang; Liu, Mei; Duan, Carol; Zhang, Jin-Yan; Jiang, Ying-Ying; Wang, Ting; Chen, Yu; Wang, Zhao; Zheng, Su-Jun; Duan, Zhong-Ping

    2017-08-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a serious public health problem worldwide. China, as the country with the largest number of HCV infections in the world, plays a significant role in eliminating hepatitis C. Due to different financial situations and education background, hepatitis C patients take different actions for their disease treatment and management. Therefore, antiviral treatment status should be attached great importance to learn the medical demand of patients. A nationwide, multicenter survey was conducted from July 2015 to June 2016. Of 1798 inpatients and outpatients with chronic HCV from 56 hospitals participated in the survey. Each patient completed the questionnaire with questions about his/her antiviral therapy status, perception of treatment barriers, and expectations for future treatment. In total 1622 patients, including 1241 with chronic hepatitis C, 344 with cirrhosis, and 37 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma, fulfilled data collection requirements and finally were included in analysis. Overall, up to 30.7% of the patients had not or currently does not intend to receive antiviral therapy. The main reason was expecting more potent and well-tolerance medication (31.5%), followed by the fear of interferon related side effects (27.5%). Multiple regression analysis showed that the patient's annual income, the severity of HCV, and comorbidity were independent predictors of not receiving antiviral therapy. The whole patients were expecting more potent and well tolerance medication available soon. In summary, Peg-IFN/RBV treatment regimen cannot meet the need of patients well, and safe and efficient direct-acting antivirals are urgently needed in mainland China.

  17. Mapping quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for fatty acid composition in an interspecific cross of oil palm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singh, R.; Tan, S.G.; Panandam, L.M.; Rahman, R.A.; Ooi, L.C.L.; Low, E.T.L.; Sharma, M.; Jansen, J.; Cheah, S.C.

    2009-01-01

    Marker Assisted Selection (MAS) is well suited to a perennial crop like oil palm, in which the economic products are not produced until several years after planting. The use of DNA markers for selection in such crops can greatly reduce the number of breeding cycles needed. With the use of DNA

  18. Triploid production from interspecific crosses of two diploid perennial Helianthus with cultivated sunflower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild Helianthus species are a valuable genetic source for the improvement of cultivated sunflower. We report the discovery and characterization of a unique high frequency production of triploids when cultivated sunflower was pollinated by specific accessions of diploid Helianthus nuttallii T. &. G. ...

  19. Molecular mapping of resistance to blight in an interspecific cross in the genus Castanea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas L. Kubisiak; F.V. Hebard; C. Dana Nelson; Jiansu Zhang; R. Bernatzky; H. Huang; S.L. Anagnostakis; R.L. Doudrick

    1997-01-01

    A three-generation American chestnut x Chinese chestnut pedigree was used to construct a genetic linkage map for chestnut and to investigate the control of resistance to Endothia parasitica (chestnut blight fungus). DNA genotypes for 241 polymorphic markers (eight isozymes, 17 restriction fragment length polymorphisms [RFLPs], and 216 random...

  20. Targeted delivery of rosmarinic acid across the blood-brain barrier for neuronal rescue using polyacrylamide-chitosan-poly(lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles with surface cross-reacting material 197 and apolipoprotein E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yung-Chih; Rajesh, Rajendiran

    2017-08-07

    Rosmarinic acid-loaded polyacrylamide-chitosan-poly(lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles (RA-PAAM-CH-PLGA NPs) were grafted with cross-reacting material 197 (CRM197) and apolipoprotein E (ApoE) for targeting of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and rescuing degenerated neurons. The polymeric nanocarriers were prepared by microemulsion, solvent diffusion, grafting, and surface modification, and CRM197-ApoE-RA-PAAM-CH-PLGA NPs were used to treat human brain-microvascular endothelial cells, RWA264.7 cells, and Aβ-insulted SK-N-MC cells. Experimental results revealed that an increase in the weight percentage of PAAM decreased the particle size, zeta potential, and grafting efficiency of CRM197 and ApoE. In addition, surface DSPE-PEG(2000) could protect CRM197-ApoE-RA-PAAM-CH-PLGA NPs against uptake by RWA264.7 cells. An increase in the concentration of CRM197 and ApoE decreased the transendothelial electrical resistance and increased the ability of propidium iodide and RA to cross the BBB. The order in the viability of apoptotic SK-N-MC cells was CRM197-ApoE-RA-PAAM-CH-PLGA NPs > CRM197-RA-PAAM-CH-PLGA NPs > RA. Thus, CRM197-ApoE-RA-PAAM-CH-PLGA NPs can be a promising formulation to deliver RA to Aβ-insulted neurons in the pharmacotherapy of Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Combining Ascochyta blight and Botrytis grey mould resistance in chickpea through interspecific hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livinder KAUR

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Ascochyta blight (AB caused by Ascochyta rabiei (Pass. Labr. and Botrytis grey mould (BGM caused by Botrytis cinerea (Pers. ex Fr. are important diseases of the aerial plant parts of chickpea in most chickpea growing areas of the world. Although conventional approaches have contributed to reducing disease, the use of new technologies is expected to further reduce losses through these biotic stresses. Reliable screening techniques were developed: ‘field screening technique’ for adult plant screening, ‘cloth chamber technique’ and ‘growth chamber technique’ for the study of races of the pathogen and for segregating generations. Furthermore, the ‘cut twig technique’ for interspecific population for AB and BGM resistance was developed. For introgression of high levels of AB and BGM resistance in cultivated chickpea from wild relatives, accessions of seven annual wild Cicer spp. were evaluated and identified: C. judaicum accessions 185, ILWC 95 and ILWC 61, C. pinnatifidum accessions 188, 199 and ILWC 212 as potential donors. C. pinnatifidum accession188 was crossed with ICCV 96030 and 62 F9 lines resistant to AB and BGM were derived. Of the derived lines, several are being evaluated for agronomic traits and yield parameters while four lines, GL 29029, GL29206, GL29212, GL29081 possessing high degree of resistance were crossed with susceptible high yielding cultivars BG 256 to improve resistance and to undertake molecular studies. Genotyping of F2 populations with SSR markers from the chickpea genome was done to identify markers potentially linked with AB and BGM resistance genes. In preliminary studies, of 120 SSR markers used, six (Ta 2, Ta 110, Ta 139, CaSTMS 7, CaSTMS 24 and Tr 29 were identified with polymorphic bands between resistant derivative lines and the susceptible parent. The study shows that wild species of Cicer are the valuable gene pools of resistance to AB and BGM. The resistant derivative lines generated here can

  2. Measuring Motivation for Appetitive Behaviour: Food-Restricted Broiler Breeder Chickens Cross a Water Barrier to Forage in an Area of Wood Shavings without Food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Laura M.; Brocklehurst, Sarah; Sandilands, Vicky; Bateson, Melissa; Tolkamp, Bert J.; D'Eath, Rick B.

    2014-01-01

    Broiler breeders (parents of meat chickens) are selected for fast growth and become obese if fed ad libitum. To avoid this and maintain good health and reproductive ability, they are feed restricted to about 1/3 of what they would eat ad libitum. As a result, they experience chronic hunger and exhibit abnormal behaviour patterns that may indicate stress and frustration. One approach to measuring hunger is to observe how much birds will work, such as pecking a key, for access to more or different types of food. However, the sight, smell, and feedback from consumption of the feed reward changes the context and may artificially raise feeding motivation. To avoid this, we tested broiler breeders in an apparatus in which they could work for access to a wooden platform covered in wood shavings by crossing a water runway which increased in length and depth in 8 successive tests. In the wood shavings area, they could perform exploratory and foraging behaviour (the appetitive phase of feeding) but were never rewarded with feed. Sixty birds were divided into three feed quantity treatments: commercial restriction (R), and twice (2R) or three times (3R) this amount. Overall, birds fed R worked harder to reach the wood shavings area (reached it in a larger number of tests) than 2R and 3R birds (P2R>3R). This indicates that restricted-fed birds were hungry and willing to work for the opportunity to forage even though food was never provided, suggesting that their motivation to perform the appetitive component of feeding behaviour (foraging/food searching) was sufficient to sustain their response. Thus food restriction in broiler breeders is a welfare concern. However these methods could be used to test alternative feeding regimes to attempt to find ways of alleviating hunger while still maintaining healthy growth and reproduction in these birds. PMID:25068283

  3. Indicaxanthin from Opuntia ficus-indica Crosses the Blood-Brain Barrier and Modulates Neuronal Bioelectric Activity in Rat Hippocampus at Dietary-Consistent Amounts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegra, Mario; Carletti, Fabio; Gambino, Giuditta; Tutone, Marco; Attanzio, Alessandro; Tesoriere, Luisa; Ferraro, Giuseppe; Sardo, Pierangelo; Almerico, Anna Maria; Livrea, Maria Antonia

    2015-08-26

    Indicaxanthin is a bioactive and bioavailable betalain pigment from the Opuntia ficus-indica fruits. In this in vivo study, kinetic measurements showed that indicaxanthin is revealed in the rat brain within 1 h from oral administration of 2 μmol/kg, an amount compatible with a dietary consumption of cactus pear fruits in humans. A peak (20 ± 2.4 ng of indicaxanthin per whole brain) was measured after 2.5 h; thereafter the molecule disappeared with first order kinetics within 4 h. The potential of indicaxanthin to affect neural activities was in vivo investigated by a microiontophoretic approach. Indicaxanthin, administered in a range between 0.085 ng and 0.34 ng per neuron, dose-dependently modulated the rate of discharge of spontaneously active neurons of the hippocampus, with reduction of the discharge and related changes of latency and duration of the effect. Indicaxanthin (0.34 ng/neuron) showed inhibitory effects on glutamate-induced excitation, indicating activity at the level of glutamatergic synapses. A molecular target of indicaxanthin is suggested by in silico molecular modeling of indicaxanthin with N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), the most represented of the glutamate receptor family in hippocampus. Therefore, at nutritionally compatible amounts indicaxanthin (i) crosses the rat BBB and accumulates in brain; (ii) can affect the bioelectric activity of hippocampal neurons locally treated with amounts comparable with those measured in the brain; and (iii) modulates glutamate-induced neuronal excitation. The potential of dietary indicaxanthin as a natural neuromodulatory agent deserves further mechanistic and neurophysiologic investigation.

  4. Oro-facial pain perception and barriers to assess oral health care among the children with intellectual disability: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Radha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dental caries is one of the most prevalent diseases affecting children invariably across the world; a toothache is one of the common outcomes found to be associated with dental caries as pain perception is a subjective phenomenon reporting of pain may vary among different individuals. The aim of this study was to assess the difference in oral health status and pain perception related to oral health status among the children with intellectual disability (ID and their normal counterparts. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 100 school children of 9-14 years with or without ID in Bangalore City, ethical clearance and informed consent were obtained. The study involved 50 children with ID and 50 children with non-ID (NID, of age group 9-14 years. A self-administered questionnaire was used to assess participant′s demographic profile, self-assessed medical and dental conditions. Clinical assessment was done for recording dental caries and gingival status. Dental pain was measured using the "Dental Discomfort Questionnaire +" given by Versloot et al. Results: It was found that children with ID had a higher score for D(T, and M(T compared to NID control. This difference was statistically significant. Children with ID showed higher discomfort due to pain. Except for chewing on one side all other questions showed a significant difference between the groups. Conclusion: It was found that children with ID had a higher caries experience compared to NID control and showed significantly higher pain experience than children with NID.

  5. Knowledge and exercise of human rights, and barriers and facilitators to claiming rights: a cross-sectional study of female sex workers and high-risk men who have sex with men in Andhra Pradesh, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganju, Deepika; Patel, Sangram Kishor; Prabhakar, Parimi; Adhikary, Rajatashurva

    2016-11-17

    HIV prevention interventions recognize the need to protect the rights of key populations and support them to claim their rights as a vulnerability reduction strategy. This study explores knowledge of human rights, and barriers and facilitators to claiming rights, among female sex workers (FSWs) and high-risk men who have sex with men (HR-MSM) who are beneficiaries of a community mobilization intervention in Andhra Pradesh, India. Data are drawn from a cross-sectional survey (2014) among 2400 FSWs and 1200 HR-MSM. Human rights awareness was assessed by asking respondents if they had heard of human rights (yes/no); those reporting awareness of rights were asked to spontaneously name specific rights from the following five pre-defined categories: right to health; dignity/equality; education; property; and freedom from discrimination. Respondents were classified into two groups: more knowledgeable (could identify two or more rights) and less knowledgeable (could identify one or no right). Univariate and bivariate analyses and chi-square tests were used. Data were analyzed using STATA 11.2. Overall 17% FSWs and 8% HR-MSM were not aware of their rights. Among those aware, 62% and 31% respectively were aware of just one or no right (less knowledgeable); only around half (54% vs 57%) were aware of health rights, and fewer (20% vs 16%) aware of their right to freedom from discrimination. Notably, 27% and 17% respectively had not exercised their rights. Barriers to claiming rights among FSWs and HR-MSM were neighbors (35% vs 37%), lack of knowledge (15% vs 14%), stigma (13% vs 22%) and spouse (19% FSWs). Community organizations (COs) were by far the leading facilitator in claiming rights (57% vs 72%). The study findings show that awareness of human rights is limited among FSWs and HR-MSM, and a large proportion have not claimed their rights, elevating their HIV vulnerability. For a sustained HIV response, community mobilization efforts must focus on building key populations

  6. genetic evaluation of seed traits from intraspecific crossing

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    2016-05-16

    May 16, 2016 ... Global production of watermelon is about 90 million metric tonnes per annum, making it among the top five most consumed fresh fruits. ... populations, and determine heritability of traits of watermelon. Interspecific crosses ..... Correlation matrix between traits and axes at Manfla (Abidjan). Traits. Factor 1.

  7. Embryo rescue of crosses between diploid and tetraploid grape ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-12-19

    Dec 19, 2011 ... embryo rescue from interspecific hybridization between diploid and tetraploid grape species. Wakana et al. (2003) and Motosugi et al. (2003) studied the formation and developments of hybrid seeds from cross between diploid and tetraploid, and then obtained triploid progenies through embryo rescue.

  8. Interspecific competition and protistan grazing affect the coexistence of freshwater betaproteobacterial strains.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Salcher, Michaela M.; Ewert, C.; Šimek, Karel; Kasalický, Vojtěch; Posch, T.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 92, č. 2 (2016), fiv156 ISSN 0168-6496 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-00243S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : betaproteobacteria * chemostat * co-cultivation * flagellate-selective bacterivory * interspecific competition * synergistic cooperation Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.720, year: 2016

  9. Interspecific competition influences fitness benefits of assortative mating for territorial aggression in eastern bluebirds (Sialia sialis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan R Harris

    Full Text Available Territorial aggression influences fitness and, in monogamous pairs, the behavior of both individuals could impact reproductive success. Moreover, territorial aggression is particularly important in the context of interspecific competition. Tree swallows and eastern bluebirds are highly aggressive, secondary cavity-nesting birds that compete for limited nesting sites. We studied eastern bluebirds at a field site in the southern Appalachian Mountains that has been recently colonized (<40 yr by tree swallows undergoing a natural range expansion. The field site is composed of distinct areas where bluebirds compete regularly with tree swallows and areas where there is little interaction between the two species. Once birds had settled, we measured how interspecific competition affects the relationship between assortative mating (paired individuals that behave similarly and reproductive success in eastern bluebirds. We found a strong tendency toward assortative mating throughout the field site. In areas of high interspecific competition, pairs that behaved the most similarly and displayed either extremely aggressive or extremely non-aggressive phenotypes experienced higher reproductive success. Our data suggest that interspecific competition with tree swallows may select for bluebirds that express similar behavior to that of their mate. Furthermore, animal personality may be an important factor influencing the outcome of interactions between native and aggressive, invasive species.

  10. High prevalence of biofilm synergy among bacterial soil isolates in cocultures indicates bacterial interspecific cooperation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Dawei; Madsen, Jonas Stenløkke; Sørensen, Søren Johannes

    2015-01-01

    of single-species biofilms, indicating that all the individual strains benefit from inclusion in the multispecies community. Our results show a high prevalence of synergy in biofilm formation in multispecies consortia isolated from a natural bacterial habitat and suggest that interspecific cooperation...

  11. Aroma chemistry of African Oryza glaberrima and Oryza sativa rice and their interspecific hybrids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cho, S.; Nuijten, H.A.C.P.; Shewfelt, R.L.; Kays, S.J.

    2014-01-01

    BackgroundTo increase rice production in Africa, considerable research has focused on creating interspecific hybrids between African (Oryza glaberrima Steud.) and Asian (O. sativa L.) rice in an attempt to obtain the positive attributes of each in new cultivars. Since flavor is a key criterion in

  12. Using Crossmatch tests for serological compatibility assessment intra- and interspecific at dogs and cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergiu Adrian Muntean

    2016-11-01

    Conclusions: The intraspecific evaluations revealed a high level of blood compatibility in the case of dogs unsensitivized through previous blood transfusions, yet without excluding the possibility of some atypical sensitivization for clinical interest. Having all the interspecific tests exclusively highly positive, we can not sustain a probable xenotransfusion.

  13. Hydrological Conditions Affect the Interspecific Interaction between Two Emergent Wetland Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Zhou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrological conditions determine the distribution of plant species in wetlands, where conditions such as water depth and hydrological fluctuations are expected to affect the interspecific interactions among emergent wetland species. To test such effects, we conducted a greenhouse experiment with three treatment categories, interspecific interaction (mixed culture or monoculture, water depth (10 or 30 cm depth, and hydrological fluctuation (static or fluctuating water level, and two common emergent wetland plant species, Scirpus planiculumis Fr. (Cyperaceae and Phragmites australis var. baiyangdiansis (Gramineae. An increase in the water depth significantly restrained the growth of both S. planiculumis and P. australis, while hydrological fluctuations did not obviously alter the growth of either species. In addition, both water depth and hydrological fluctuations significantly affected the interspecific interaction between these two wetland species. P. australis benefited from interspecific interaction under increasing water depth and hydrological fluctuations, and the RII values were clearly positive for plants grown at a water depth that fluctuated around 30 cm. The results may have some implications for understanding how S. planiculumis and P. australis, as well as wetland communities, respond to the natural variation or human modification of hydrological conditions.

  14. Another account of interspecific aggression involving a Hoary Bat (Lasiurus cinereus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyson F Brokaw; Jeff Clerc; Ted Weller

    2016-01-01

    We observed an incident of interspecific aggression between a male Hoary Bat (Lasiurus cinereus) and a male Silver-haired Bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans). The Silver-haired Bat suffered few external injuries, the most conspicuous of which were a missing lower right canine and small...

  15. Habitat fragmentation and interspecific competition: Implications for lynx conservation [Chapter 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven W. Buskirk

    2000-01-01

    Habitat fragmentation and interspecific competition are two important forces that potentially affect lynx populations. Fragmentation operates by various mechanisms, including direct habitat loss, vehicle collisions and behavioral disturbance from roads, and changes in landscape features such as edges. Competition takes two forms: Exploitation competition involves...

  16. Effects of intra- and interspecific competition on the sensitivity of aquatic macroinvertebrates to carbendazim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Arco, Ana Isabel; Parra, Gema; Rico, Andreu; Van den Brink, Paul J

    2015-10-01

    The Ecological Risk Assessment of pesticides and other potentially toxic chemicals is generally based on toxicity data obtained from single-species laboratory experiments. In the field, however, contaminant effects are ubiquitously co-occurring with ecological interactions such as species competition and predation, which might influence the sensitivity of the individuals exposed to toxicants. The present experimental study investigated how intra- and interspecific competition influence the response of sensitive aquatic organisms to a pesticide. For this, the effects of the fungicide carbendazim were assessed on the mortality and growth of the snail Bithynia tentaculata and the crustacean Gammarus pulex under different levels of intraspecific and interspecific competition for a food resource. Interspecific competition was created by adding individuals of Radix peregra and Asellus aquaticus, respectively. The interaction of competition and carbendazim exposure significantly influenced B. tentaculata growth, however, combined effects on survival and immobility were considered transient and were less easily demonstrated. Positive influence of competition on G. pulex survival was observed under low-medium carbendazim concentrations and under medium-high density pressures, being partly related to cannibalistic and predation compensatory mechanisms, enhanced under food limiting conditions. This study shows that intra- and interspecific competition pressure may influence the response of sensitive aquatic organisms in a more complex way (positive, non-significant and negative effects were observed) than just increasing the sensitivity of the studied species, as has generally been hypothesized. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Pattern of mating preference of interspecific hybrid females and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    7-day-aged flies, in food vials. Virgin hybrid daughters of reciprocal crosses were collected and aged for 7 days. Meanwhile parental males were also collected and aged for. 7 days. Mating preference of hybrid daughters was tested with parental males by following the male choice technique, in which a male of one of the ...

  18. Molecular profiling of interspecific lowland rice populations derived ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Several lowland NERICAs (New Rice for Africa) were derived from crosses between IR64 (an Oryza sativa subsp. indica variety) and Tog5681 (an Oryza glaberrima variety) that possess useful traits adapted to lowland conditions in West Africa. The proportion of parental genomic contribution and extent of genetic ...

  19. Field Reactions of Segregating Populations of Interspecific Hybrids ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The progenies arising from crosses between cultivated tomatoes and a wild relative were screened with their parents for resistance to bacterial leaf spot disease. The aim is to develop a tolerant variety that is well adapted to humid forest ecology where the disease is endemic. The results obtained showed that the cultivated ...

  20. Field reactions of interspecific hybrids of tomato ( Solanum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Crosses were made on four selected parent plants in a diallel fashion in 2011. Seedlings of the parent plants and their resulting hybrids were ... The hybrids, W x P and wild x insulata could be selected as they had less leaf spot disease severity and high fruit yield. Keywords: disease incidence, disease severity, heterosis, ...

  1. Intraspecific and interspecific competition induces density-dependent habitat niche shifts in an endangered steppe bird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarjuelo, Rocío; Morales, Manuel B; Arroyo, Beatriz; Mañosa, Santiago; Bota, Gerard; Casas, Fabián; Traba, Juan

    2017-11-01

    Interspecific competition is a dominant force in animal communities that induces niche shifts in ecological and evolutionary time. If competition occurs, niche expansion can be expected when the competitor disappears because resources previously inaccessible due to competitive constraints can then be exploited (i.e., ecological release). Here, we aimed to determine the potential effects of interspecific competition between the little bustard ( Tetrax tetrax ) and the great bustard ( Otis tarda ) using a multidimensional niche approach with habitat distribution data. We explored whether the degree of niche overlap between the species was a density-dependent function of interspecific competition. We then looked for evidences of ecological release by comparing measures of niche breadth and position of the little bustard between allopatric and sympatric situations. Furthermore, we evaluated whether niche shifts could depend not only on the presence of great bustard but also on the density of little and great bustards. The habitat niches of these bustard species partially overlapped when co-occurring, but we found no relationship between degree of overlap and great bustard density. In the presence of the competitor, little bustard's niche was displaced toward increased use of the species' primary habitat. Little bustard's niche breadth decreased proportionally with great bustard density in sympatric sites, in consistence with theory. Overall, our results suggest that density-dependent variation in little bustard's niche is the outcome of interspecific competition with the great bustard. The use of computational tools like kernel density estimators to obtain multidimensional niches should bring novel insights on how species' ecological niches behave under the effects of interspecific competition in ecological communities.

  2. Adiabatic heavy-ion fusion potentials for fusion at deep sub-barrier ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The recently reported unusual behaviour of fusion cross-sections at extreme sub-barrier energies has been examined. The adiabatic limit of fusion barriers has been determined from experimental data using the barrier penetration model. These adia- batic barriers are consistent with the adiabatic fusion barriers ...

  3. Interspecific chromosomal rearrangements in monosomic addition lines of Allium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthes, L; Ricroch, A

    2001-10-01

    Monosomic alien addition lines (MAALs) are useful for assigning linkage groups to chromosomes. We examined whether the chromosomal rearrangements following the introduction of a single onion (Allium cepa) chromosome into the Allium fistulosum genome were produced by homeologous crossing over or by a nonreciprocal conversion event. Among the monosomic lines available, 17 were studied by fluorescent genomic in situ hybridisation, using total A. cepa genomic DNA as the probe and total A. fistulosum genomic DNA as the competitor. In this way, rearrangements such as chromosomal translocations between A. cepa and A. fistulosum were identified as terminal regions consisting of tandem DNA repeats. Homeologous crossing over between the two closely related genomes occurred in 4 of the 17 lines, suggesting that such events are not rare. On the basis of a detailed molecular cytogenetic characterisation, we identified true monosomic alien addition lines for A. cepa chromosomes 3, 4, 5, 7, and 8 that can reliably be used in genetic studies.

  4. CABLE MEDIAN BARRIER FAILURE ANALYSIS AND REMEDIATION, PHASE II

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-20

    On divided roadways, cross-median fatalities are disproportionately overrepresented in fatal and serious injury crashes. Many state DOTs sought to mitigate cross-median crash risk by installing cable median barriers. Despite increased crash rates, st...

  5. Interspecific Hybridization between Sesamum indicum L. and Ceratotheca sesamoides Endl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falusi, OA.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Sesamum indicum L. (2n = 26 and Ceratotheca sesamoides Endl. (2n = 32 were crossed to investigate their genomic relations and feasibility of gene exchange. Results showed that crossability between the two species was low. Pollen viability was drastically reduced in the F1 hybrids. This was attributed to meiotic abnormalities such as univalent and multivalent associations, non-disjunction bridges, and presence of fragments and micronuclei. Findings from this study also imply that gene exchange between Sesamum indicum L. and Ceratotheca sesamoides Endl. is possible. The implications of these results in the species evolution are discussed.

  6. What stage are low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs) at with patient safety curriculum implementation and what are the barriers to implementation? A two-stage cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsburg, Liane R; Dhingra-Kumar, Neelam; Donaldson, Liam J

    2017-06-15

    The improvement of safety in healthcare worldwide depends in part on the knowledge, skills and attitudes of staff providing care. Greater patient safety content in health professional education and training programmes has been advocated internationally. While WHO Patient Safety Curriculum Guides (for Medical Schools and Multi-Professional Curricula) have been widely disseminated in low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs) over the last several years, little is known about patient safety curriculum implementation beyond high-income countries. The present study examines patient safety curriculum implementation in LMICs. Two cross-sectional surveys were carried out. First, 88 technical officers in Ministries of Health and WHO country offices were surveyed to identify the pattern of patient safety curricula at country level. A second survey followed that gathered information from 71 people in a position to provide institution-level perspectives on patient safety curriculum implementation. The majority, 69% (30/44), of the countries were either considering whether to implement a patient safety curriculum or actively planning, rather than actually implementing, or embedding one. Most organisations recognised the need for patient safety education and training and felt a safety curriculum was compatible with the values of their organisation; however, important faculty-level barriers to patient safety curriculum implementation were identified. Key structural markers, such as dedicated financial resources and relevant assessment tools to evaluate trainees' patient safety knowledge and skills, were in place in fewer than half of organisations studied. Greater attention to patient safety curriculum implementation is needed. The barriers to patient safety curriculum implementation we identified in LMICs are not unique to these regions. We propose a framework to act as a global standard for patient safety curriculum implementation. Educating leaders through the system in

  7. BIOCHEMICAL AND PHYSIOLOGICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF OIL PALM INTERSPECIFIC HYBRIDS (Elaeis oleifera x Elaeis guineensis GROWN IN HYDROPONICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurany Dayana Rivera

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The interspecific hybrid, Elaeis oleifera x Elaeis guineensis (OxG is an alternative for improving the competitiveness and sustainability of the Latin American oil palm agro-industry, because of its partial resistance to some lethal diseases and also because of the high quality of its oil. A comparative characterization was conducted of the physiological and biochemical performance of seedlings of six OxG hybrids grown in hydroponics. Gas exchange, vegetative growth, protein, sugar and photosynthetic pigment content, and antioxidant system activity were determined. With the exception of gas exchange, the other variables showed significant differences between materials. The ‘U1273’ and ‘U1737’ materials showed greater vegetative growth with no expression of biochemical traits, while the ‘U1914’and ‘U1990’ materials showed high levels of reducing and total sugars, photosynthetic pigments, and antioxidant system activities, characteristics that could confer them adaptation to stress conditions. With the standardized hydroponics technique, the optimal conditions for the growth of seedlings were ensured, the differences between materials and hybrid crosses were established, so those with promising features from the physiological and biochemical standpoint were identified. Finally, it could be used to study in a simple, fast, clean and inexpensive way, the effect of levels and sources of mineral nutrients on the growth and development of oil palm.

  8. Interspecific comparison of the performance of soaring migrants in relation to morphology, meteorological conditions and migration strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugo Mellone

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Performance of migrating birds can be affected by a number of intrinsic and extrinsic factors like morphology, meteorological conditions and migration strategies. We compared travel speeds of four raptor species during their crossing of the Sahara desert. Focusing the analyses on this region allows us to compare different species under equivalent conditions in order to disentangle which factors affect migratory performance. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: We tracked raptors using GPS satellite transmitters from Sweden, Spain and Italy, and evaluated their migratory performance at both an hourly and a daily scale. Hourly data (flight speed and altitude for intervals of two hours were analyzed in relation to time of day, species and season, and daily data (distance between roosting sites in relation to species, season, day length and tailwind support. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Despite a clear variation in morphology, interspecific differences were generally very small, and did only arise in spring, with long-distance migrants (>5000 km: osprey and Western marsh-harrier being faster than species that migrate shorter distances (Egyptian vulture and short-toed eagle. Our results suggest that the most important factor explaining hourly variation in flight speed is time of day, while at a daily scale, tailwind support is the most important factor explaining variation in daily distance, raising new questions about the consequences of possible future changes in worldwide wind patterns.

  9. Sapogenin content variation in Medicago inter-specific hybrid derivatives highlights some aspects of saponin synthesis and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carelli, Maria; Biazzi, Elisa; Tava, Aldo; Losini, Ilaria; Abbruscato, Pamela; Depedro, Claudia; Scotti, Carla

    2015-04-01

    In the Medicago genus, saponins are a complex mixture of triterpene glycosides showing a broad spectrum of biological properties. Here we analyzed the variation in the sapogenin content and composition of inter-specific hybrid Medicago sativa × Medicago arborea derivatives to highlight the pattern of this variation in plant organs (leaves/roots) and the possible mechanisms underlying it. In Sativa Arborea Cross (SAC) leaves and roots, saponins and sapogenins were evaluated using chromatographic methods. Phenotypic correlations between sapogenin content and bio-agronomic traits were examined. Expression studies on β-amyrin synthase and four cytochromes P450 (CYPs) involved in sapogenin biosynthesis and sequence analysis of the key gene of the hemolytic sapogenin pathway (CYP716A12) were performed. Chromatographic analyses revealed a different pattern of among-family variation for hemolytic and nonhemolytic sapogenins and saponins and for the two organs/tissues. Different correlation patterns of gene expression in roots and leaves were found. Diachronic analysis revealed a relationship between sapogenin content and gene transcriptional levels in the early stages of the productive cycle. The results suggest that there are different control mechanisms acting on sapogenin biosynthesis for leaves and roots, which are discussed. A key role for medicagenic acid in the control of sapogenin content in both the tissues is proposed and discussed. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  10. Saddle point avoidance in barrier crossing problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talkner, P.; Drozdov, A.N. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    The long-time behavior of the stochastic dynamics of a two-dimensional system having two metastable states is investigated by means of the low-lying part of the corresponding two-dimensional Smoluchowski operator. In particular, its dependence on three parameters describing the strength of the noise, the coupling of the degrees of freedom and a ratio of relaxation-times is considered. Further information characterizing the transition process between the metastable states is gained from the corresponding eigenfunctions. (author) 9 refs.

  11. Inter-specific differences in numerical abilities among teleost fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrillo, Christian; Miletto Petrazzini, Maria Elena; Tagliapietra, Christian; Bisazza, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    Adults, infants and non-human primates are thought to possess similar non-verbal numerical systems, but there is considerable debate regarding whether all vertebrates share the same numerical abilities. Despite an abundance of studies, cross-species comparison remains difficult because the methodology employed and the context of species examination vary considerably across studies. To fill this gap, we used the same procedure, stimuli, and numerical contrasts to compare quantity abilities of five teleost fish: redtail splitfin, guppies, zebrafish, Siamese fighting fish, and angelfish. Subjects were trained to discriminate between two sets of geometrical figures using a food reward. Fish initially were trained on an easy numerical ratio (5 vs. 10 and 6 vs. 12). Once they reached the learning criterion, they were subjected to non-reinforced probe trials in which the set size was constant but numerical ratios varied (8 vs. 12 and 9 vs. 12). They also were subjected to probe trials in which the ratio was constant, but the total set size was increased (25 vs. 50) or decreased (2 vs. 4). Overall, fish generalized to numerosities with a 0.67 ratio, but failed with a 0.75 ratio; they generalized to a smaller set size, but not to a larger one. Only minor differences were observed among the five species. However, in one species, zebrafish, the proportion of individuals reaching the learning criterion was much smaller than in the others. In a control experiment, zebrafish showed a similar lower performance in shape discrimination, suggesting that the observed difference resulted from the zebrafish's difficulty in learning this procedure rather than from a cross-species variation in the numerical domain.

  12. Inter-specific differences in numerical abilities among teleost fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eAgrillo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Adults, infants and non-human primates are thought to possess similar non-verbal numerical systems, but there is considerable debate regarding whether all vertebrates share the same numerical abilities. Despite an abundance of studies, cross-species comparison remains difficult because the methodology employed and the context of species examination vary considerably across studies. To fill this gap, we used the same procedure, stimuli and numerical contrasts to compare quantity abilities of five teleost fish: redtail splitfin, guppies, zebrafish, Siamese fighting fish, and angelfish. Subjects were trained to discriminate between two sets of geometrical figures using a food reward. Fish initially were trained on an easy numerical ratio (5 vs. 10 and 6 vs. 12. Once they reached the learning criterion, they were subjected to non-reinforced probe trials in which the set size was constant but numerical ratios varied (8 vs. 12 and 9 vs. 12. They also were subjected to probe trials in which the ratio was constant, but the total set size was increased (25 vs. 50 or decreased (2 vs. 4. Overall, fish generalized to numerosities with a 0.67 ratio, but failed with a 0.75 ratio; they generalized to a smaller set size, but not to a larger one. Only minor differences were observed among the five species. However, in one species, zebrafish, the proportion of individuals reaching the learning criterion was much smaller than in the others. In a control experiment, zebrafish showed a similar lower performance in shape discrimination, suggesting that the observed difference resulted from the zebrafish’s difficulty in learning this procedure rather than from a cross-species variation in the numerical domain.

  13. Species interactions and chemical stress combined effects of intraspecific and interspecific interactions and pyrene n Daphnia magna populations dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Viaene, K.P.J.; Laender, de F.; Rico, A.; Brink, van den P.J.; Guardo, Di A.; Morselli, M.; Janssen, C.R.

    2015-01-01

    Species interactions are often suggested as an important factor when assessing the effects of chemicals on higher levels of biological organization. Nevertheless, the contribution of intraspecific and interspecific interactions to chemical effects on populations is often overlooked. In the present

  14. Evaluation of cheetah and leopard spermatozoa developmental capability after interspecific ICSI with domestic cat oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, L N; Sestelo, A J; Salamone, D F

    2014-08-01

    The ICSI procedure is potentially of great value for felids, and it has not been extensively studied in these species. The objectives of this work were to determine the best conditions for ICSI in the domestic cat (DC) to generate interspecific embryos by injecting cheetah (Ch) and leopard (Leo) spermatozoa. Firstly, DC oocytes were matured with insulin-transferrin-selenium (ITS) or without it (MM) and cultured using atmospheric (21%) or low (5%) oxygen tension after ICSI. The group ITS-5%O2 showed the highest blastocyst rate (p cheetah and leopard spermatozoa were able to generate blastocysts without artificial activation, which suggests that developmental capacity of wild felid spermatozoa can be evaluated by interspecific ICSI. This technique should be used to assist wild felid reproduction. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  15. Species coexistence under resource competition with intraspecific and interspecific direct competition in a chemostat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yasuhisa; Miki, Takeshi

    2010-11-01

    Competition theory has developed separately for direct competition and for exploitative competition. However, the combined effects of the two types of competition on species coexistence remain unclear. To examine how intraspecific and interspecific direct competition contributes to the coexistence of species competing for a single resource, we constructed a chemostat-type resource competition model. With general functions for intraspecific and interspecific direct competition, we derived necessary and sufficient conditions (except for a critical case that rarely occurs in a biological sense) that determine the number of stably coexisting species. From these conditions, we found that the number of coexisting species is determined just by the invasibility of each species into subcommunities with a smaller number of species. In addition, using a combination of rigorous mathematical theory and a simple graphical method, we can demonstrate how the stronger intraspecific direct competition facilitates species invasion, leading to a larger number of coexisting species. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Does interspecific competition have a moderating effect on Taenia solium transmission dynamics in Southeast Asia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlan, James V; Vongxay, Khamphouth; Fenwick, Stanley; Blacksell, Stuart D; Thompson, R C Andrew

    2009-09-01

    It is well understood that sociocultural practices strongly influence Taenia solium transmission; however, the extent to which interspecific parasite competition moderates Taenia transmission has yet to be determined. This is certainly the case in Southeast Asia where T. solium faces competition in both the definitive host (people) and the intermediate host (pigs). In people, adult worms of T. solium, T. saginata and T. asiatica compete through density-dependent crowding mechanisms. In pigs, metacestodes of T. solium, T. hydatigena and T. asiatica compete through density-dependent immune-mediated interactions. Here, we describe the biological and epidemiological implications of Taenia competition and propose that interspecific competition has a moderating effect on the transmission dynamics of T. solium in the region. Furthermore, we argue that this competitive ecological scenario should be considered in future research and surveillance activities examining T. solium cysticercosis and taeniasis in Southeast Asia.

  17. A new Epichloe species with interspecific hybrid origins from Poa pratensis ssp. pratensis in Liyang, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Kang; Yanling, Ji; Kunran, Zhu; Hui, Wang; Huimin, Miao; Zhiwei, Wang

    2011-01-01

    We describe a new Epichloë species found in symbiosis with Poa pratensis ssp. pratensis in Liyang, China. Stromata characteristic of Epichloë spp. were present on some of the reproductive tillers of individual host grasses. Only three of the 98 stromata observed on field plants became orange and produced perithecia. Phylogenetic analyses based on sequences of tubB and tefA indicated that this Epichloë sp. was an interspecific hybrid related to both E. yangzii and members in the E. typhina complex clade (ETC). Allele-1 of tefA and tubB grouped in the E. bromicola/E. yangzii clade; allele-2 of these two genes clustered in a distinct subclade in the ETC. This is the first report of an Epichloë species that has interspecific hybrid origins. We propose the name Epichloë liyangensis Z. Wang, Y. Kang et H. Miao, sp. nov. for this species.

  18. Plant-mediated interspecific horizontal transmission of an intracellular symbiont in insects

    KAUST Repository

    Gonella, Elena

    2015-11-13

    Intracellular reproductive manipulators, such as Candidatus Cardinium and Wolbachia are vertically transmitted to progeny but rarely show co-speciation with the host. In sap-feeding insects, plant tissues have been proposed as alternative horizontal routes of interspecific transmission, but experimental evidence is limited. Here we report results from experiments that show that Cardinium is horizontally transmitted between different phloem sap-feeding insect species through plants. Quantitative PCR and in situ hybridization experiments indicated that the leafhopper Scaphoideus titanus releases Cardinium from its salivary glands during feeding on both artificial media and grapevine leaves. Successional time-course feeding experiments with S. titanus initially fed sugar solutions or small areas of grapevine leaves followed by feeding by the phytoplasma vector Macrosteles quadripunctulatus or the grapevine feeder Empoasca vitis revealed that the symbionts were transmitted to both species. Explaining interspecific horizontal transmission through plants improves our understanding of how symbionts spread, their lifestyle and the symbiont-host intermixed evolutionary pattern.

  19. Molecular Cytogenetic Analysis of Spontaneous Interspecific Hybrid Between Oryza sativa and Oryza minuta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan-deng YI

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH is a powerful tool to characterize parental chromosomes in interspecific hybrids, including the behaviour of autosynapsis and chromosome pairing. It was used to distinguish the chromosomes of Oryza sativa from wild species in a spontaneous interspecific hybrid and to investigate the chromosome pairing at metaphase I in meiosis of the hybrid in this study. The hybrid was a triploid with 36 chromosomes according to the chromosome number investigated in mitosis of root tips. During metaphase I of meiosis in the hybrid, less chromosome pairing was observed and most of the chromosomes existed as univalent. Based on GISH and FISH (Fluorescent in situ hybridization analyses, the chromosomes of the hybrid were composed of genomes A, B and C. Thus, it was believed that the hybrid was the result of natural hybridization between cultivated rice and wild species O. minuta which was planted in experimental fields.

  20. Using maize as a model to study pollen tube growth and guidance, cross-incompatibility and sperm delivery in grasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dresselhaus, Thomas; Lausser, Andreas; Márton, Mihaela L

    2011-09-01

    In contrast to animals and lower plants such as mosses and ferns, sperm cells of flowering plants (angiosperms) are immobile and require transportation to the female gametes via the vegetative pollen tube cell to achieve double fertilization. The path of the pollen tube towards the female gametophyte (embryo sac) has been intensively studied in many intra- and interspecific crossing experiments with the aim of increasing the gene pool of crop plants for greater yield, improved biotic and abiotic stress resistance, and for introducing new agronomic traits. Many attempts to hybridize different species or genotypes failed due to the difficulty for the pollen tubes in reaching the female gametophyte. Detailed studies showed that these processes are controlled by various self-incompatible (intraspecific) and cross-incompatible (interspecific) hybridization mechanisms. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of crossing barriers is therefore of great interest in plant reproduction, evolution and breeding research. In particular, pre-zygotic hybridization barriers related to pollen tube germination, growth, guidance and sperm delivery, which are considered the major hybridization controls in nature and thus also contribute to species isolation and speciation, have been intensively investigated. Despite this general interest, surprisingly little is known about these processes in the most important agronomic plant family, the Gramineae, Poaceae or grasses. Small polymorphic proteins and their receptors, degradation of sterility locus proteins and general compounds such as calcium, γ-aminobutyric acid or nitric oxide have been shown to be involved in progamic pollen germination, adhesion, tube growth and guidance, as well as sperm release. Most advances have been made in the Brassicaceae, Papaveraceae, Linderniaceae and Solanaceae families including their well-understood self-incompatibility (SI) systems. Grass species evolved similar mechanisms to control the penetration

  1. Using maize as a model to study pollen tube growth and guidance, cross-incompatibility and sperm delivery in grasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dresselhaus, Thomas; Lausser, Andreas; Márton, Mihaela L.

    2011-01-01

    Background In contrast to animals and lower plants such as mosses and ferns, sperm cells of flowering plants (angiosperms) are immobile and require transportation to the female gametes via the vegetative pollen tube cell to achieve double fertilization. The path of the pollen tube towards the female gametophyte (embryo sac) has been intensively studied in many intra- and interspecific crossing experiments with the aim of increasing the gene pool of crop plants for greater yield, improved biotic and abiotic stress resistance, and for introducing new agronomic traits. Many attempts to hybridize different species or genotypes failed due to the difficulty for the pollen tubes in reaching the female gametophyte. Detailed studies showed that these processes are controlled by various self-incompatible (intraspecific) and cross-incompatible (interspecific) hybridization mechanisms. Scope Understanding the molecular mechanisms of crossing barriers is therefore of great interest in plant reproduction, evolution and breeding research. In particular, pre-zygotic hybridization barriers related to pollen tube germination, growth, guidance and sperm delivery, which are considered the major hybridization controls in nature and thus also contribute to species isolation and speciation, have been intensively investigated. Despite this general interest, surprisingly little is known about these processes in the most important agronomic plant family, the Gramineae, Poaceae or grasses. Small polymorphic proteins and their receptors, degradation of sterility locus proteins and general compounds such as calcium, γ-aminobutyric acid or nitric oxide have been shown to be involved in progamic pollen germination, adhesion, tube growth and guidance, as well as sperm release. Most advances have been made in the Brassicaceae, Papaveraceae, Linderniaceae and Solanaceae families including their well-understood self-incompatibility (SI) systems. Grass species evolved similar mechanisms to control

  2. Interspecific interactions between wild felids vary across scales and levels of urbanization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jesse S; Bailey, Larissa L; VandeWoude, Sue; Crooks, Kevin R

    2015-12-01

    Ongoing global landscape change resulting from urbanization is increasingly linked to changes in species distributions and community interactions. However, relatively little is known about how urbanization influences competitive interactions among mammalian carnivores, particularly related to wild felids. We evaluated interspecific interactions between medium- and large-sized carnivores across a gradient of urbanization and multiple scales. Specifically, we investigated spatial and temporal interactions of bobcats and pumas by evaluating circadian activity patterns, broad-scale seasonal interactions, and fine-scale daily interactions in wildland-urban interface (WUI), exurban residential development, and wildland habitats. Across levels of urbanization, interspecific interactions were evaluated using two-species and single-species occupancy models with data from motion-activated cameras. As predicted, urbanization increased the opportunity for interspecific interactions between wild felids. Although pumas did not exclude bobcats from areas at broad spatial or temporal scales, bobcats responded behaviorally to the presence of pumas at finer scales, but patterns varied across levels of urbanization. In wildland habitat, bobcats avoided using areas for short temporal periods after a puma visited an area. In contrast, bobcats did not appear to avoid areas that pumas recently visited in landscapes influenced by urbanization (exurban development and WUI habitat). In addition, overlap in circadian activity patterns between bobcats and pumas increased in exurban development compared to wildland habitat. Across study areas, bobcats used sites less frequently as the number of puma photographs increased at a site. Overall, bobcats appear to shape their behavior at fine spatial and temporal scales to reduce encounters with pumas, but residential development can potentially alter these strategies and increase interaction opportunities. We explore three hypotheses to explain our

  3. Snake co-occurrence patterns are best explained by habitat and hypothesized effects of interspecific interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, David A; McClure, Christopher J W; Brock, Jean C; Craig Rudolph, D; Pierce, Josh B; Lee, James R; Jeffrey Humphries, W; Gregory, Beau B; Sutton, William B; Smith, Lora L; Baxley, Danna L; Stevenson, Dirk J; Guyer, Craig

    2014-01-01

    Snakes often occur in species-rich assemblages, and sympatry is thought to be facilitated primarily by low diet overlap, not interspecific interactions. We selected, a priori, three species pairs consisting of species that are morphologically and taxonomically similar and may therefore be likely to engage in interspecific, consumptive competition. We then examined a large-scale database of snake detection/nondetection data and used occupancy modelling to determine whether these species occur together more or less frequently than expected by chance while accounting for variation in detection probability among species and incorporating important habitat categories in the models. For some snakes, we obtained evidence that the probabilities that habitat patches are used are influenced by the presence of potentially competing congeneric species. Specifically, timber rattlesnakes (Crotalus horridus) were less likely than expected by chance to use areas that also contained eastern diamond-backed rattlesnakes (Crotalus adamanteus) when the proportion of evergreen forest was relatively high. Otherwise, they occurred together more often than expected by chance. Complex relationships were revealed between habitat use, detection probabilities and occupancy probabilities of North American racers (Coluber constrictor) and coachwhips (Coluber flagellum) that indicated the probability of competitive exclusion increased with increasing area of grassland habitat, although there was some model uncertainty. Cornsnakes (Pantherophis guttatus or Pantherophis slowinskii) and ratsnakes (Pantherophis alleghaniensis, Pantherophis spiloides, or Pantherophis obsoletus) exhibited differences in habitat selection, but we obtained no evidence that patterns of use for this species pair were influenced by current interspecific interactions. Overall, our results are consistent with the hypothesis that competitive interactions influence snake assemblage composition; the strength of these effects was

  4. Interspecific somatic hybrids between Solanum khasianum and S. aculeatissimum produced by electrofusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stattmann, M; Gerick, E; Wenzel, G

    1994-01-01

    Mesophyll derived protoplasts of Solanum khasianum Clarke and S. aculeatissimum Jacq. were fused by electrofusion and resulted in interspecific hybrids. In total, 249 calluses were obtained from which more than 65% produced shoots. From the regenerated plantlets 45% could be identified as hybrids by chromosome counts (4x = 48) and esterase isozyme pattern. Most hybrids showing intermediate phenotypic characteristics, had a normal flower morphology with fertile pollen and produced fertile berries. More than 80% of the seeds germinated.

  5. Aroma chemistry of African Oryza glaberrima and Oryza sativa rice and their interspecific hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sungeun; Nuijten, Edwin; Shewfelt, Robert L; Kays, Stanley J

    2014-03-15

    To increase rice production in Africa, considerable research has focused on creating interspecific hybrids between African (Oryza glaberrima Steud.) and Asian (O. sativa L.) rice in an attempt to obtain the positive attributes of each in new cultivars. Since flavor is a key criterion in consumer acceptance of rice, as an initial inquiry we characterized and compared the aroma chemistry of selected cultivars of African O. sativa ssp. japonica, O. sativa ssp. indica, O. glaberrima, and their interspecific hybrids grown in West Africa, using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, gas chromatography-olfactometry and descriptive sensory analysis. Of 41 volatiles identified across seven representative rice cultivars grown in West Africa, 3,5,5-trimethyl-2-cyclopenten-1-one, styrene, eucalyptol, linalool, myrtenal and L-α-terpineol had not been previously reported in rice. Thirty-three odor-active compounds were characterized. 4-Ethylphenol and (E,E)-2,4-heptadienal were unique to O. glaberrima, and pyridine, eucalyptol and myrtenal were described only in an interspecific hybrid. Descriptive sensory analysis indicated 'cooked grain', 'barny' and 'earthy' attributes were statistically different among the cultivars. The aroma chemistry data suggest that it should be possible to separate African cultivars into distinct flavor types thereby facilitating selection of new cultivars with superior flavor in African rice breeding programs. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Mapping three new interspecific hybrid sterile loci between Oryza sativa and O. glaberrima

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Peng; Zhou, Jiawu; Li, Jing; Hu, Fengyi; Deng, Xianneng; Feng, Sufeng; Ren, Guangyun; Zhang, Zhi; Deng, Wei; Tao, Dayun

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid sterility hinders the transfer of useful traits between Oryza sativa and O. glaberrima. In order to further understand the nature of interspecific hybrid sterility between these two species, a strategy of multi-donors was used to elucidate the range of interspecific hybrid sterility in this study. Fifty-nine accessions of O. glaberrima were used as female parents for hybridization with japonica cultivar Dianjingyou 1, after several backcrossings using Dianjingyou 1 as the recurrent parent and 135 BC6F1 sterile plants were selected for genotyping and deducing hybrid sterility QTLs. BC6F1 plants containing heterozygous target markers were selected and used to raise BC7F1 mapping populations for QTL confirmation and as a result, one locus for gamete elimination on chromosome 1 and two loci for pollen sterility on chromosome 4 and 12, which were distinguished from previous reports, were confirmed and designated as S37(t), S38(t) and S39(t), respectively. These results will be valuable for understanding the range of interspecific hybrid sterility, cloning these genes and improving rice breeding through gene introgression. PMID:24757387

  7. A large set of newly created interspecific Saccharomyces hybrids increases aromatic diversity in lager beers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, Stijn; Steensels, Jan; Saels, Veerle; De Rouck, Gert; Aerts, Guido; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2015-12-01

    Lager beer is the most consumed alcoholic beverage in the world. Its production process is marked by a fermentation conducted at low (8 to 15°C) temperatures and by the use of Saccharomyces pastorianus, an interspecific hybrid between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the cold-tolerant Saccharomyces eubayanus. Recent whole-genome-sequencing efforts revealed that the currently available lager yeasts belong to one of only two archetypes, "Saaz" and "Frohberg." This limited genetic variation likely reflects that all lager yeasts descend from only two separate interspecific hybridization events, which may also explain the relatively limited aromatic diversity between the available lager beer yeasts compared to, for example, wine and ale beer yeasts. In this study, 31 novel interspecific yeast hybrids were developed, resulting from large-scale robot-assisted selection and breeding between carefully selected strains of S. cerevisiae (six strains) and S. eubayanus (two strains). Interestingly, many of the resulting hybrids showed a broader temperature tolerance than their parental strains and reference S. pastorianus yeasts. Moreover, they combined a high fermentation capacity with a desirable aroma profile in laboratory-scale lager beer fermentations, thereby successfully enriching the currently available lager yeast biodiversity. Pilot-scale trials further confirmed the industrial potential of these hybrids and identified one strain, hybrid H29, which combines a fast fermentation, high attenuation, and the production of a complex, desirable fruity aroma. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Larval salivary glue protein heterosis and dosage compensation among the interspecific F1 hybrids of Drosophila nasuta nasuta and Drosophila nasuta albomicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghavan Prithi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Reciprocal cross effects with respect to larval salivary secretory protein levels were studied in the interspecific fertile reciprocal hybrids by crossing Drosophila nasuta nasuta, and Drosophila nasuta albomicans. These proteins are produced copiously during the third larval instar stage and are believed to play a role in the attachment of pupa to the substratum prior to pupariation as well as in insect immunity. Quantitative variations were encountered among the reciprocal hybrids. Significant heterosis was observed between D. n. nasuta and the F1 hybrid female of a cross between D. n. albomicans female and D. n. nasuta male (21.39% while the F1 hybrids of a cross between D. n. nasuta female and D. n. albomicans male showed a marginal increase (4.24% from the mid parent level. The glue secretions were correlated to total cell number but independent of gland size. SDS PAGE revealed a considerable heterosis with respect to X-linked protein fractions. Here we report sex specific biochemical heterosis. However the X-linked fractions undergo dosage compensation in both parents and hybrids indicating strict regulatory control.

  9. Barriers and facilitators to enrollment and re-enrollment into the community health funds/Tiba Kwa Kadi (CHF/TIKA) in Tanzania: a cross-sectional inquiry on the effects of socio-demographic factors and social marketing strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapologwe, Ntuli A; Kagaruki, Gibson B; Kalolo, Albino; Ally, Mariam; Shao, Amani; Meshack, Manoris; Stoermer, Manfred; Briet, Amena; Wiedenmayer, Karin; Hoffman, Axel

    2017-04-27

    Introduction of a health insurance scheme is one of the ways to enhance access to health care services and to protect individuals from catastrophic health expenditures. Little is known on the influence of socio-demographic and social marketing strategies on enrollment and re-enrollment in the Community Health Fund/Tiba Kwa Kadi (CHF/TIKA) in Tanzania. This cross-sectional study employed quantitative methods for data collection between November 2014 and March 2015 in Singida and Shinyanga regions. Relationship between variables was obtained through Chi-square test and multivariate logistic regression. We recruited 496 participants in the study. Majority (92.7%) of participants consented to participate, with 229 (49.8%) and 231 (50.2%) members and non members of CHF/TIKA respectively. Majority (90.9%) were aware of CHF/TIKA. Majority of CHF/TIKA members and non-members (90% and 68.3% respectively) reported health facility-based sensitization as the most common social marketing approach employed to market the CHF/TIKA. The most popular marketing strategies in the country including traditional dances, football games, radio, television, news papers, and mosques/church were reported by few CHF and non CHF members. Multivariate Logistic regression models revealed no significant association between social marketing strategies and enrollment, but only socio-demographics; including marital status (AOR = 2.0, 95% CI 1.1-3.8) and family size (household with ≥ 6 members) (AOR = 1.5, 95% CI 1.0-2.5), were significant factors associated with enrollment/re-enrollment rate. This study indicated that low level of utilization of available social marketing strategies and socio-demographic factors are the barriers for attracting members to join the schemes. There is a need for applying various social marketing strategies and considering different facilitating and impending socio-demographic factors for the growth and sustainability of the scheme as we move towards

  10. Smart parking barrier

    KAUST Repository

    Alharbi, Abdulrazaq M.

    2016-05-06

    Various methods and systems are provided for smart parking barriers. In one example, among others, a smart parking barrier system includes a movable parking barrier located at one end of a parking space, a barrier drive configured to control positioning of the movable parking barrier, and a parking controller configured to initiate movement of the parking barrier, via the barrier drive. The movable parking barrier can be positioned between a first position that restricts access to the parking space and a second position that allows access to the parking space. The parking controller can initiate movement of the movable parking barrier in response to a positive identification of an individual allowed to use the parking space. The parking controller can identify the individual through, e.g., a RFID tag, a mobile device (e.g., a remote control, smartphone, tablet, etc.), an access card, biometric information, or other appropriate identifier.

  11. Interspecific competition between entomopathogenic nematodes (Steinernema is modified by their bacterial symbionts (Xenorhabdus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pages Sylvie

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Symbioses between invertebrates and prokaryotes are biological systems of particular interest in order to study the evolution of mutualism. The symbioses between the entomopathogenic nematodes Steinernema and their bacterial symbiont Xenorhabdus are very tractable model systems. Previous studies demonstrated (i a highly specialized relationship between each strain of nematodes and its naturally associated bacterial strain and (ii that mutualism plays a role in several important life history traits of each partner such as access to insect host resources, dispersal and protection against various biotic and abiotic factors. The goal of the present study was to address the question of the impact of Xenorhabdus symbionts on the progression and outcome of interspecific competition between individuals belonging to different Steinernema species. For this, we monitored experimental interspecific competition between (i two nematode species: S. carpocapsae and S. scapterisci and (ii their respective symbionts: X. nematophila and X. innexi within an experimental insect-host (Galleria mellonella. Three conditions of competition between nematodes were tested: (i infection of insects with aposymbiotic IJs (i.e. without symbiont of both species (ii infection of insects with aposymbiotic IJs of both species in presence of variable proportion of their two Xenorhabdus symbionts and (iii infection of insects with symbiotic IJs (i.e. naturally associated with their symbionts of both species. Results We found that both the progression and the outcome of interspecific competition between entomopathogenic nematodes were influenced by their bacterial symbionts. Thus, the results obtained with aposymbiotic nematodes were totally opposite to those obtained with symbiotic nematodes. Moreover, the experimental introduction of different ratios of Xenorhabdus symbionts in the insect-host during competition between Steinernema modified the proportion of

  12. Upscaling the niche variation hypothesis from the intra- to the inter-specific level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bison, Marjorie; Ibanez, Sébastien; Redjadj, Claire; Boyer, Frédéric; Coissac, Eric; Miquel, Christian; Rioux, Delphine; Said, Sonia; Maillard, Daniel; Taberlet, Pierre; Yoccoz, Nigel Gilles; Loison, Anne

    2015-11-01

    The "niche variation hypothesis" (NVH) predicts that populations with wider niches should display higher among-individual variability. This prediction originally stated at the intra-specific level may be extended to the inter-specific level: individuals of generalist species may differ to a greater extent than individuals of a specialist species. We tested the NVH at intra- and inter-specific levels based on a large diet database of three large herbivore feces collected in the field and analyzed using DNA metabarcoding. The three herbivores (roe deer Capreolus capreolus, chamois Rupicapra rupicapra and mouflon Ovis musimon) are highly contrasted in terms of sociality (solitary to highly gregarious) and diet. The NVH at the intraspecific level was tested by relating, for the same population, diet breadth and inter-individual variation across the four seasons. Compared to null models, our data supported the NVH both at the intra- and inter-specific levels. Inter-individual variation of the diet of solitary species was not larger than in social species, although social individuals feed together and could therefore have more similar diets. Hence, the NVH better explained diet breadth than other factors such as sociality. The expansion of the population niche of the three species was driven by resource availability, and achieved by an increase in inter-individual variation, and the level of inter-individual variability was larger in the generalist species (mouflon) than in the specialist one (roe deer). This mechanism at the base of the NVH appears at play at different levels of biological organization, from populations to communities.

  13. An RNA-seq transcriptome analysis of floral buds of an interspecific Brassica hybrid between B. carinata and B. napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Pu; Liu, Huijuan; Yang, Qing; Wang, Yankun; Yan, Guixia; Guan, Rongzhan

    2014-12-01

    Interspecific hybridizations promote gene transfer between species and play an important role in plant speciation and crop improvement. However, hybrid sterility that commonly found in the first generation of hybrids hinders the utilization of interspecific hybridization. The combination of divergent parental genomes can create extensive transcriptome variations, and to determine these gene expression alterations and their effects on hybrids, an interspecific Brassica hybrid of B. carinata × B. napus was generated. Scanning electron microscopy analysis indicated that some of the hybrid pollen grains were irregular in shape and exhibited abnormal exine patterns compared with those from the parents. Using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform, 39,598, 32,403 and 42,208 genes were identified in flower buds of B. carinata cv. W29, B. napus cv. Zhongshuang 11 and their hybrids, respectively. The differentially expressed genes were significantly enriched in pollen wall assembly, pollen exine formation, pollen development, pollen tube growth, pollination, gene transcription, macromolecule methylation and translation, which might be associated with impaired fertility in the F1 hybrid. These results will shed light on the mechanisms underlying the low fertility of the interspecific hybrids and expand our knowledge of interspecific hybridization.

  14. Use of electrical barriers to deter movement of round goby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savino, Jacqueline F.; Jude, David J.; Kostich, Melissa J.; Coutant, Charles C.

    2001-01-01

    An electrical barrier was chosen as a possible means to deter movement of round goby Neogobius melanostomus. Feasibility studies in a 2.1-m donut-shaped tank determined the electrical parameters necessary to inhibit round goby from crossing the 1-m stretch of the benthic, electrical barrier. Increasing electrical pulse duration and voltage increased effectiveness of the barrier in deterring round goby movement through the barrier. Differences in activity of round goby during daytime and nocturnal tests did not change the effectiveness of the barrier. In field verification studies, an electrical barrier was placed between two blocking nets in the Shiawassee River, Michigan. The barrier consisted of a 6-m wide canvas on which were laid four cables carrying the electrical current. Seven experiments were conducted, wherein 25 latex paint-marked round goby were introduced upstream of the electrical barrier and recovered 24 h later upstream, on, and downstream of the barrier. During control studies, round goby moved across the barrier within 20 min from release upstream. With the barrier on and using the prescribed electrical settings shown to inhibit passage in the laboratory, the only marked round goby found below the barrier were dead. At reduced pulse durations, a few round goby (mean one/test) were found alive, but debilitated, below the barrier. The electrical barrier could be incorporated as part of a program in reducing movement of adult round goby through artificial connections between watersheds.

  15. Species delimitation and interspecific relationships of the genus Orychophragmus (Brassicaceae inferred from whole chloroplast genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Hu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionIt is rather difficult to delimit recently diverged species and construct their interspecific relationships because of insufficient informative variations of sampled DNA fragments (Schluter, 2000; Arnold, 2006. The genome-scale sequence variations were found to increase the phylogenetic resolutions of both high- and low-taxonomic groups (e.g., Yoder et al., 2013; Lamichhaney et al., 2015. It is still expensive to collect nuclear genome variations between species for most none-model genera without the reference genome. However, chloroplast genomes (plastome are relatively easy to be assembled to examine interspecific relationships for phylogenetic analyses, especially in addressing unresolved relationship at low taxonomic levels (Wu et al., 2010; Nock et al., 2011; Yang et al., 2013; Huang et al., 2014; Carbonell-Caballero et al., 2015. Plastomes are haploid with maternal inheritance in most angiosperms (Corriveau and Coleman, 1988; Zhang and Liu, 2003; Hagemann, 2004 and are highly conservative in gene order and genome structure with rare recombinations (Jansen et al., 2007; Moore et al., 2010. In this study, we aimed to examine species delimitation and interspecific relationships in Orychophragmus through assembling chloroplast genomes of multiple individuals of tentatively delimited species (Hu et al., 2015a. Orychophragmus is a small genus in the mustard family (Brassicaceae, Cruciferae distributed in northern, central, and southeastern China (Zhou et al., 2001. Its plants have been widely cultivated as ornamentals, vegetables, or source of seed oil (Sun et al., 2011. Despite controversial species delimitations in the genus (Zhou et al., 1987; Tan et al., 1998; Wu and Zhao, 2003; Al-Shehbaz and Yang, 2000; Zhou et al., 2001; Sun et al., 2012, our recent study based on nuclear (nr ITS sequence variations suggested the recognition of seven species (Hu et al., 2015a. Orychophragmus is sister to Sinalliaria, which is a genus endemic

  16. Permeability Barrier Generation in the Martian Lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schools, Joe; Montési, Laurent

    2015-11-01

    Permeability barriers develop when a magma produced in the interior of a planet rises into the cooler lithosphere and crystallizes more rapidly than the lithosphere can deform (Sparks and Parmentier, 1991). Crystallization products may then clog the porous network in which melt is propagating, reducing the permeability to almost zero, i.e., forming a permeability barrier. Subsequent melts cannot cross the barrier. Permeability barriers have been useful to explain variations in crustal thickness at mid-ocean ridges on Earth (Magde et al., 1997; Hebert and Montési, 2011; Montési et al., 2011). We explore here under what conditions permeability barriers may form on Mars.We use the MELTS thermodynamic calculator (Ghiorso and Sack, 1995; Ghiorso et al., 2002; Asimow et al., 2004) in conjunction with estimated Martian mantle compositions (Morgan and Anders, 1979; Wänke and Dreibus, 1994; Lodders and Fegley, 1997; Sanloup et al., 1999; Taylor 2013) to model the formation of permeability barriers in the lithosphere of Mars. In order to represent potential past and present conditions of Mars, we vary the lithospheric thickness, mantle potential temperature (heat flux), oxygen fugacity, and water content.Our results show that permeability layers can develop in the thermal boundary layer of the simulated Martian lithosphere if the mantle potential temperature is higher than ~1500°C. The various Martian mantle compositions yield barriers in the same locations, under matching variable conditions. There is no significant difference in barrier location over the range of accepted Martian oxygen fugacity values. Water content is the most significant influence on barrier development as it reduces the temperature of crystallization, allowing melt to rise further into the lithosphere. Our lower temperature and thicker lithosphere model runs, which are likely the most similar to modern Mars, show no permeability barrier generation. Losing the possibility of having a permeability

  17. An extreme breaching of a barrier spit: insights on large breach formation and its impact on barrier dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iulian Zăinescu, Florin; Vespremeanu-Stroe, Alfred; Tătui, Florin

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we document a case of exceptionally large natural breaching of a sandy spit (Sacalin barrier, Danube delta) using Lidar data and satellite imagery, annual (and seasonal) surveys of topography and bathymetry on successive cross-barrier profiles, and hourly datasets of wind and waves. The breach morphology and dynamics was monitored and described from its inception to closure, together with its impact on the adjoining features (upper shoreface, back-barrier lagoon, downdrift coast) and on the local sediment budgets. Breaching is first observed to occur on a beach-length of 0.5 km in April 2012 and two years later reached 3.5 km (May 2014). The barrier translates to a recovery stage dominated by continuous back-barrier deposition through subaqueous cross-breach sediment transport. Soon, the barrier widening triggers a negative feedback which limits the back-barrier sediment transfer. As a result, back-barrier deposition decreases whilst the barrier aggradation through overwash becomes more frequent. The event was found to be a natural experiment which switched the barrier's decadal evolution from low cross-shore transport to high cross-shore transport over the barrier. Although previously considered as constant, the cross-shore transport recorded during the large breach lifespan is an order of magnitude larger than in the non-breach period. 3 x 106 m3 of sediment were deposited in three years which is equivalent to the modelled longshore transport in the region. Nevertheless, the sediment circuits are more complex involving exchanges with the upper shoreface, as indicated by the extensive erosion down to -4m. In the absence of tides, the Sacalin breach closed naturally in 3 years and brings a valuable contribution on how breaches may evolve, as only limited data has been internationally reported until now. The very high deposition rate of sediment in the breach is a testimony of the high sediment volumes supplied by the longshore transport and the high

  18. Safety-barrier diagrams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duijm, Nijs Jan

    2007-01-01

    are discussed. A simple method for quantification of safety-barrier diagrams is proposed, including situations where safety barriers depend on shared common elements. It is concluded that safety-barrier diagrams provide a useful framework for an electronic data structure that integrates information from risk...

  19. Ecological, morphological and phylogenetic correlates of interspecific variation in plasma carotenoid concentration in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tella, J L; Figuerola, J; Negro, J J; Blanco, G; Rodríguez-Estrella, R; Forero, M G; Blázquez, M C; Green, A J; Hiraldo, F

    2004-01-01

    Carotenoids are important as pigments for bright coloration of animals, and as physiologically active compounds with a wide array of health-related benefits. However, the causes of variation in carotenoid acquisition and physiology among species are poorly known. We measured the concentration of carotenoids in the blood of 80 wild bird species differing in diet, body size and the extent of carotenoid-based traits. Preliminary analyses showed that diet significantly explains interspecific variability in plasma carotenoids. However, dietary influences were apparently overridden by phylogenetic relationships among species, which explained most (65%) of this variability. This phylogenetic effect could be due partly to its covariation with diet, but may also be caused by interspecific differences in carotenoid absorption from food to the blood stream, mediated, for example by endothelial carriers or gut parasites. Carotenoid concentrations also decreased with body size (which may be explained by the allometric relationship between ingestion rate and body mass), and correlated positively with the extent of carotenoid-dependent coloration of plumage and bare parts. Therefore, the acquisition of carotenoids from the diet and their use for both health and display functions seem to be constrained by ecological and physiological aspects linked to the phylogeny and size of the species.

  20. Social phenotype extended to communities: expanded multilevel social selection analysis reveals fitness consequences of interspecific interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campobello, Daniela; Hare, James F; Sarà, Maurizio

    2015-04-01

    In social species, fitness consequences are associated with both individual and social phenotypes. Social selection analysis has quantified the contribution of conspecific social traits to individual fitness. There has been no attempt, however, to apply a social selection approach to quantify the fitness implications of heterospecific social phenotypes. Here, we propose a novel social selection based approach integrating the role of all social interactions at the community level. We extended multilevel selection analysis by including a term accounting for the group phenotype of heterospecifics. We analyzed nest activity as a model social trait common to two species, the lesser kestrel (Falco naumanni) and jackdaw (Corvus monedula), nesting in either single- or mixed-species colonies. By recording reproductive outcome as a measure of relative fitness, our results reveal an asymmetric system wherein only jackdaw breeding performance was affected by the activity phenotypes of both conspecific and heterospecific neighbors. Our model incorporating heterospecific social phenotypes is applicable to animal communities where interacting species share a common social trait, thus allowing an assessment of the selection pressure imposed by interspecific interactions in nature. Finally, we discuss the potential role of ecological limitations accounting for random or preferential assortments among interspecific social phenotypes, and the implications of such processes to community evolution. © 2015 The Author(s).

  1. Interspecific introgression in cetaceans: DNA markers reveal post-F1 status of a pilot whale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Miralles

    Full Text Available Visual species identification of cetacean strandings is difficult, especially when dead specimens are degraded and/or species are morphologically similar. The two recognised pilot whale species (Globicephala melas and Globicephala macrorhynchus are sympatric in the North Atlantic Ocean. These species are very similar in external appearance and their morphometric characteristics partially overlap; thus visual identification is not always reliable. Genetic species identification ensures correct identification of specimens. Here we have employed one mitochondrial (D-Loop region and eight nuclear loci (microsatellites as genetic markers to identify six stranded pilot whales found in Galicia (Northwest Spain, one of them of ambiguous phenotype. DNA analyses yielded positive amplification of all loci and enabled species identification. Nuclear microsatellite DNA genotypes revealed mixed ancestry for one individual, identified as a post-F1 interspecific hybrid employing two different Bayesian methods. From the mitochondrial sequence the maternal species was Globicephala melas. This is the first hybrid documented between Globicephala melas and G. macrorhynchus, and the first post-F1 hybrid genetically identified between cetaceans, revealing interspecific genetic introgression in marine mammals. We propose to add nuclear loci to genetic databases for cetacean species identification in order to detect hybrid individuals.

  2. Genetic evidence for intra- and interspecific slavery in honey ants (genus Myrmecocystus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronauer, D J C; Gadau, J; Hölldobler, B

    2003-04-22

    The New World honey ant species Myrmecocystus mimicus is well known for its highly stereotyped territorial tournaments, and for the raids on conspecific nests that can lead to intraspecific slavery. Our results from mitochondrial and nuclear markers show that the raided brood emerges in the raiding colony and is subsequently incorporated into the colony's worker force. We also found enslaved conspecifics in a second honey ant species, M. depilis, the sister taxon of M. mimicus, which occurs in sympatry with M. mimicus at the study site. Colonies of this species furthermore contained raided M. mimicus workers. Both species have an effective mating frequency that is not significantly different from 1. This study provides genetic evidence for facultative intra- and interspecific slavery in the genus Myrmecocystus. Slavery in ants has evolved repeatedly and supposedly by different means. We propose that, in honey ants, secondary contact between two closely related species that both exhibit intraspecific slavery gave rise to an early form of facultative interspecific slavery.

  3. Interspecific competition, hybridization, and reproductive isolation in secondary contact: missing perspectives on males and females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipshutz, Sara E

    2018-02-01

    Research on sexual selection and hybridization has focused on female mate choice and male-male competition. While the evolutionary outcomes of interspecific female preference have been well explored, we are now gaining a better understanding of the processes by which male-male competition between species in secondary contact promotes reproductive isolation versus hybridization. What is relatively unexplored is the interaction between female choice and male competition, as they can oppose one another or align with similar outcomes for reproductive isolation. The role of female-female competition in hybridization is also not well understood, but could operate similarly to male-male competition in polyandrous and other systems where costs to heterospecific mating are low for females. Reproductive competition between either sex of sympatric species can cause the divergence and/or convergence of sexual signals and recognition, which in turn influences the likelihood for interspecific mating. Future work on species interactions in secondary contact should test the relative influences of both mate choice and competition for mates on hybridization outcomes, and should not ignore the possibilities that females can compete over mating resources, and males can exercise mate choice.

  4. Interspecific variation in egg testosterone levels: implications for the evolution of bird song.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garamszegi, L Z; Biard, C; Eens, M; Møller, A P; Saino, N

    2007-05-01

    Although interspecific variation in maternal effects via testosterone levels can be mediated by natural selection, little is known about the evolutionary consequences of egg testosterone for sexual selection. However, two nonexclusive evolutionary hypotheses predict an interspecific relationship between egg testosterone levels and the elaboration of sexual traits. First, maternal investment may be particularly enhanced in sexually selected species, which should generate a positive relationship. Secondly, high prenatal testosterone levels may constrain the development of sexual characters, which should result in a negative relationship. Here we investigated these hypotheses by exploring the relationship between yolk testosterone levels and features of song in a phylogenetic study of 36 passerine species. We found that song duration and syllable repertoire size were significantly negatively related to testosterone levels in the egg, even if potentially confounding factors were held constant. These relationships imply that high testosterone levels during early development of songs may be detrimental, thus supporting the developmental constraints hypothesis. By contrast, we found significant evidence that song-post exposure relative to the height of the vegetation is positively related to egg testosterone levels. These results support the hypothesis that high levels of maternal testosterone have evolved in species with intense sexual selection acting on the location of song-posts. We found nonsignificant effects for intersong interval and song type repertoire size, which may suggest that none of the above hypothesis apply to these traits, or they act simultaneously and have opposing effects.

  5. Can we predict diatoms herbicide sensitivities with phylogeny? Influence of intraspecific and interspecific variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, Sara M; Keck, François; Almeida, Salomé F P; Figueira, Etelvina; Bouchez, Agnès; Rimet, Frédéric

    2017-10-01

    Diatoms are used as indicators of freshwater ecosystems integrity. Developing diatom-based tools to assess impact of herbicide pollution is expected by water managers. But, defining sensitivities of all species to multiple herbicides would be unattainable. The existence of a phylogenetic signal of herbicide sensitivity was shown among diatoms and should enable prediction of new species sensitivity. However, diatoms present a cryptic diversity that may lead to variation in their sensitivity to herbicides that would need to be taken into account. Using bioassays, the sensitivity to four herbicides (Atrazine, Terbutryn, Diuron, Isoproturon) was evaluated for 11 freshwater diatom taxa and intraspecific variability was assessed for two of them (Nitzschia palea and Achnanthidium spp.). Intraspecific variability of herbicide sensitivity was always smaller than interspecific variability, but intraspecific variability was more important in N. palea than in Achnanthidium spp. Indeed, one species showed no intraspecific phylogenetic signal (N. palea) whereas the other did (Achnanthidium spp.). On one hand, species boundaries are not set properly for Achnanthidium spp. which encompass several taxa. On the other hand, there is a higher phenotypic plasticity for N. palea. Finally, a phylogenetic signal of herbicide sensitivity was measured at the interspecific level, opening up prospects for setting up reliable biomonitoring tools based on sensitivity prediction, insofar as species boundaries are correctly defined.

  6. Evolutionary stability of mutualism: interspecific population regulation as an evolutionarily stable strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, J. Nathaniel; DeAngelis, Donald L.; Schultz, Stewart T.

    2004-01-01

    Interspecific mutualisms are often vulnerable to instability because low benefit : cost ratios can rapidly lead to extinction or to the conversion of mutualism to parasite–host or predator–prey interactions. We hypothesize that the evolutionary stability of mutualism can depend on how benefits and costs to one mutualist vary with the population density of its partner, and that stability can be maintained if a mutualist can influence demographic rates and regulate the population density of its partner. We test this hypothesis in a model of mutualism with key features of senita cactus (Pachycereus schottii) – senita moth (Upiga virescens) interactions, in which benefits of pollination and costs of larval seed consumption to plant fitness depend on pollinator density. We show that plants can maximize their fitness by allocating resources to the production of excess flowers at the expense of fruit. Fruit abortion resulting from excess flower production reduces pre–adult survival of the pollinating seed–consumer, and maintains its density beneath a threshold that would destabilize the mutualism. Such a strategy of excess flower production and fruit abortion is convergent and evolutionarily stable against invasion by cheater plants that produce few flowers and abort few to no fruit. This novel mechanism of achieving evolutionarily stable mutualism, namely interspecific population regulation, is qualitatively different from other mechanisms invoking partner choice or selective rewards, and may be a general process that helps to preserve mutualistic interactions in nature.

  7. Skin barrier function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    barrier integrity, factors influencing the penetration of the skin, influence of wet work, and guidance for prevention and saving the barrier. Distinguished researchers have contributed to this book, providing a comprehensive and thorough overview of the skin barrier function. Researchers in the field...... on the subject. It covers new basic research on skin markers, including results on filaggrin and on methods for the assessment of the barrier function. Biological variation and aspects of skin barrier function restoration are discussed as well. Further sections are dedicated to clinical implications of skin...

  8. Safety- barrier diagrams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duijm, Nijs Jan

    2008-01-01

    trees and Bayesian networks is discussed. A simple method for quantification of safety-barrier diagrams is proposed. It is concluded that safety-barrier diagrams provide a useful framework for an electronic data structure that integrates information from risk analysis with operational safety management.......Safety-barrier diagrams and the related so-called 'bow-tie' diagrams have become popular methods in risk analysis. This paper describes the syntax and principles for constructing consistent and valid safety-barrier diagrams. The relation of safety-barrier diagrams to other methods such as fault...

  9. Safety-barrier diagrams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duijm, Nijs Jan

    2007-01-01

    Safety-barrier diagrams and the related so-called "bow-tie" diagrams have become popular methods in risk analysis. This paper describes the syntax and principles for constructing consistent and valid safety-barrier diagrams. The relation with other methods such as fault trees and Bayesian network...... analysis with operational safety management.......Safety-barrier diagrams and the related so-called "bow-tie" diagrams have become popular methods in risk analysis. This paper describes the syntax and principles for constructing consistent and valid safety-barrier diagrams. The relation with other methods such as fault trees and Bayesian networks...... are discussed. A simple method for quantification of safety-barrier diagrams is proposed, including situations where safety barriers depend on shared common elements. It is concluded that safety-barrier diagrams provide a useful framework for an electronic data structure that integrates information from risk...

  10. Use of eggs derived from the interspecific charr hybrids to induce androgenetic development of the brook charr (Salvelinus fontinalis Mitchill 1814).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalik, O; Dobosz, S; Wójcik, I; Zalewski, T; Ocalewicz, K

    2014-04-01

    Although, brook charr (Salvelinus fontinalis Mitchill 1814) and Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus Linnaeus 1758) are able to cross and give fertile offspring, their androgenetic nucleocytoplasmic hybrids are not viable. To overcome incompatibility between the egg cytoplasm of one charr species and the sperm nucleus of another charr species, application of F1 interspecific hybrids as egg donors for the purpose of androgenesis has been proposed. Here, androgenetic development of the brook charr was successfully induced in the brook charr eggs and the eggs derived from the reciprocal brook charr × Arctic charr F1 hybrids. A working androgenesis protocol included inactivation of the maternal nuclear DNA achieved by irradiation of the eggs with 420 Gy of X-rays, insemination of such treated eggs with the haploid sperm cells and exposition of the haploid androgenetic zygotes to the high hydrostatic pressure shock (51.711 MPa for 4 min) applied 420 min after insemination. Androgenetic larvae that hatched from the brook charr and the hybrid eggs were shown to be homozygous brook charr individuals. Androgenetic individuals exhibited 84 chromosomes and 100 chromosome arms (FN), values characteristic for the brook charr diploid cells. Strategy hybridize first than induce androgenesis should be tested in order to provide androgenetic offspring in other salmonids that are able to cross and produce fertile offspring. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  11. A microfluidic device with a diffusion barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    with a common junction via micro channels. To enable amplification of DNA, e.g. by MDA, the device comprises a diffusion barrier at each inlet configured to increase the pressure threshold for a reagent to cross the resistor. The invention further provides a method of mixing liquid reagents by use of the device...

  12. Sub-barrier capture with quantum diffusion approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheid W.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available With the quantum diffusion approach the behavior of capture cross sections and mean-square angular momenta of captured systems are revealed in the reactions with deformed and spherical nuclei at sub-barrier energies. With decreasing bombarding energy under the barrier the external turning point of the nucleus-nucleus potential leaves the region of short-range nuclear interaction and action of friction. Because of this change of the regime of interaction, an unexpected enhancement of the capture cross section is found at bombarding energies far below the Coulomb barrier. This effect is shown its worth in the dependence of mean-square angular momentum on the bombarding energy. From the comparison of calculated capture cross sections and experimental capture or fusion cross sections the importance of quasifission near the entrance channel is demonstrated for the actinidebased reactions and reactions with medium-heavy nuclei at extreme sub-barrier energies.

  13. Development of guidelines for cable median barrier systems in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    Since 2003, the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) has embarked on an aggressive campaign to install : median barriers to prevent cross-median crashes on freeway facilities statewide. In the few years prior to 2003, : virtually all fatalities...

  14. Performance evaluation of cable median barrier systems in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    Since 2003, the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) has embarked on an aggressive campaign to install : median barriers to prevent cross-median crashes on freeway facilities statewide. In the few years prior to 2003, : virtually all fatalities...

  15. 7Li breakup polarization potential at near barrier energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubian, J. . E-mail lubian@if.uff.br; Correa, T.; Paes, B.; Figueira, J.M.; Abriola, D.; Fernandez Niello, J.O.; Arazi, A.; Capurro, O.A.; de Barbara, E.; Marti, G.V.; Martinez Heinmann, D.; Negri, A.E.; Pacheco, A.J.; Padron, I.; Gomes, P.R.S.

    2007-01-01

    Inelastic and one neutron transfer cross sections at energies around the Coulomb barrier were used to derive dynamic polarization potential (DPP) for the 7 Li + 27 Al system. The DPP due to breakup, obtained in a simple way, indicates that its real part is repulsive at near barrier energies

  16. Multilayer moisture barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankow, Joel W; Jorgensen, Gary J; Terwilliger, Kent M; Glick, Stephen H; Isomaki, Nora; Harkonen, Kari; Turkulainen, Tommy

    2015-04-21

    A moisture barrier, device or product having a moisture barrier or a method of fabricating a moisture barrier having at least a polymer layer, and interfacial layer, and a barrier layer. The polymer layer may be fabricated from any suitable polymer including, but not limited to, fluoropolymers such as polyethylene terephthalate (PET) or polyethylene naphthalate (PEN), or ethylene-tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE). The interfacial layer may be formed by atomic layer deposition (ALD). In embodiments featuring an ALD interfacial layer, the deposited interfacial substance may be, but is not limited to, Al.sub.2O.sub.3, AlSiO.sub.x, TiO.sub.2, and an Al.sub.2O.sub.3/TiO.sub.2 laminate. The barrier layer associated with the interfacial layer may be deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The barrier layer may be a SiO.sub.xN.sub.y film.

  17. Volatiles emitted from single flower buds of the lilium longiflorum × L. callosum interspecific hybrid and its parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    This research was initiated to analyze the volatiles emitted from a single flower bud of Lilium longiflorum Thunb., L. callosum Sieb. et Zucc., and interspecific hybrids of L. longiflorum × L. callosum (L. longi × L. cal IH). Volatiles, collected automatically every 6-hour intervals at 20oC before ...

  18. Pheromone Production, Attraction, and Interspecific Inhibition among Four Species of Ips Bark Beetles in the Southeastern USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Göran Birgersson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hindgut volatiles from attacking, unmated males of Ips avulsus, I. calligraphus, I. grandicollis, and I. pini were analyzed by combined gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Based on the quantitative identifications of hindguts and subsequent individual aerations, baits were formulated and a combined species-specific subtractive field bioassay was set up for the four bark beetle species. The bioassays were subtractive for the compounds identified in the hindgut analysis of each species, and volatiles identified in sympatric species were added as potential inhibitors alone and in combination. The trap catches from this bioassay revealed strong interspecific inhibition. The subtractive assays showed that I. grandicollis and I. calligraphus share (–-(4S-cis-verbenol as one pheromone component, while their second, synergistic pheromone component, (–-(S-ipsenol in I. grandicollis and (±-ipsdienol in I. calligraphus, acts as an interspecific inhibitor to the other species. I. avulsus and I. pini were found to have very similar production of hindgut volatiles, and both use ipsdienol and lanierone as synergistic pheromone components. No beetle-produced interspecific inhibitor was identified between these two species. Lanierone was found to be an interspecific inhibitor for both I. calligraphus and I. grandicollis.

  19. Interspecific hybridisation and interaction with cultivars affect the genetic variation of Ulmus minor and U. glabra in Flanders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cox, K.; Broek, vanden A.; Mijnsbrugge, vander K.; Buiteveld, J.; Collin, R.W.J.; Heybroek, H.; Mergeay, J.

    2014-01-01

    Interspecific hybridisation and gene flow from cultivated plants may have profound effects on the evolution of wild species. Considering the cultural history and past use of Ulmus minor and Ulmus glabra trees in Flanders (northern Belgium), we investigated the extent of human impact on the genetic

  20. Carotenoid accumulation and carotenogenic gene expression during fruit development in novel interspecific inbred squash lines and their parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakkanong, Korakot; Yang, Jing Hua; Zhang, Ming Fang

    2012-06-13

    Carotenoid levels and composition during squash fruit development were compared in Cucurbita moschata , Cucurbita maxima , and two lines of their interspecific inbred lines, namely, Maxchata1 and Maxchata2. Eight genes associated with carotenoid biosynthesis were analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR. The two squash species and their interspecific inbred lines exhibited different qualitative and quantitative carotenoid profiles and regulatory mechanisms. C. moschata had the lowest total carotenoid content and mainly accumulated α-carotene and β-carotene, as expected in a fruit with pale-orange flesh. Low carotenoid content in this species was probably due to the comparatively low expression of all genes investigated, especially PSY1 gene, compared to the other squashes. The predominant carotenoids in C. maxima were violaxanthin and lutein, which produced a corresponding yellow flesh color in mature fruit. The relationship between the expression of the CHYB and ZEP genes may result in almost equal concentrations of violaxanthin and lutein in C. maxima at fruit ripening. In contrast, their interspecific inbred lines principally accumulated lutein and β-carotene, leading to orange flesh color. The PSY1 gene exhibited higher expression levels at earlier stages of fruit development in the Maxchata lines, potentially triggering the increased carotenoid accumulation seen in these fruits. Likewise, the higher transcription level of CHYB gene observed in the two interspecific inbred lines might be correlated with high lutein in these hybrids. However, this study could not explain the observed β-carotene accumulation on the basis of gene expression.

  1. Occurrence of numerically unreduced (2n) gametes in Alstroemeria interspecific hybrids and their significance for sexual polyploidization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramanna, M.S.; Kuipers, G.; Jacobsen, E.

    2003-01-01

    The F1 hybrids of seven diploid Alstroemeria species (2n=2x=16) were investigated for the production of numerically unreduced (2n) gametes and their mode of origin. Based on a survey of 17 interspecific hybrid combinations, consisting of 119 genotypes, it was found that the F1 hybrids of

  2. Evidence for the Emergence of New Rice Types of Interspecific Hybrid Origin in West African Farmers' Fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuijten, H.A.C.P.; Treuren, van R.; Struik, P.C.; Mokuwa, G.A.; Okry, F.; Teeken, B.W.E.; Richards, P.

    2009-01-01

    In West Africa two rice species (Oryza glaberrima Steud. and Oryza sativa L.) co-exist. Although originally it was thought that interspecific hybridization is impossible without biotechnological methods, progenies of hybridization appear to occur in farmer fields. AFLP analysis was used to assess

  3. Population-Specific Responses to Interspecific Competition in the Gut Microbiota of Two Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar) Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaoping; Chaganti, Subba Rao; Heath, Daniel D

    2018-01-01

    The gut microbial community in vertebrates plays a role in nutrient digestion and absorption, development of intestine and immune systems, resistance to infection, regulation of bone mass and even host behavior and can thus impact host fitness. Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) reintroduction efforts into Lake Ontario, Canada, have been unsuccessful, likely due to competition with non-native salmonids. In this study, we explored interspecific competition effects on the gut microbiota of two Atlantic salmon populations (LaHave and Sebago) resulting from four non-native salmonids. After 10 months of rearing in semi-natural stream tanks under six interspecific competition treatments, we characterized the gut microbiota of 178 Atlantic salmon by parallel sequencing the 16S rRNA gene. We found 3978 bacterial OTUs across all samples. Microbiota alpha diversity and abundance of 27 OTUs significantly differed between the two populations. Interspecific competition reduced relative abundance of potential beneficial bacteria (six genera of lactic acid bacteria) as well as 13 OTUs, but only in the LaHave population, indicating population-specific competition effects. The pattern of gut microbiota response to interspecific competition may reflect local adaptation of the host-microbiota interactions and can be used to select candidate populations for improved species reintroduction success.

  4. Effects of intra- and interspecific competition on the sensitivity of Daphnia magna populations to the fungicide carbendazim

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arco, Del Ana Isabel; Rico Artero, Andreu; Brink, van den P.J.

    2015-01-01

    The ecological risk assessment of pesticides is generally based on toxicity data obtained from single-species laboratory experiments and does not take into account ecological interactions such as competition or predation. Intraspecific and interspecific competition are expected to result in

  5. Effects of intra- and interspecific competition on diet, growth and behaviour of Labeo calbasu (Hamilton) and Cirrhinus cirrhosus (Bloch)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahman, M.M.; Verdegem, M.C.J.

    2010-01-01

    Effects of intra- and interspecific competition on diet, growth, grazing, swimming, resting and social behaviour of two carps calbasu (Labeo calbasu) and mrigal (Cirrhinus cirrhosus) were examined in single and mixed species treatments. Three treatments (tanks with 4 L. calbasu, 4 C. cirrhosus or 2

  6. Somatic embryogenesis from corolla tubes of interspecific amphiploids between cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) and its wild species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somatic embryogenesis in vitro provides an efficient means of plant multiplication, facilitating sunflower improvement and germplasm innovation. In the present study, using interspecific amphiploids (2n=4x=68) between cultivated sunflower and wild perennial Helianthus species as explant donors, soma...

  7. [RAPD analysis of the intraspecific and interspecific variation and phylogenetic relationships of Aegilops L. species with the U genome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goriunova, S V; Chikida, N N; Kochieva, E Z

    2010-07-01

    RAPD analysis was used to study the genetic variation and phylogenetic relationships of polyploid Aegilops species with the U genome. In total, 115 DNA samples of eight polyploid species containing the U genome and the diploid species Ae. umbellulata (U) were examined. Substantial interspecific polymorphism was observed for the majority of the polyploid species with the U genome (interspecific differences, 0.01-0,2; proportion of polymorphic loci, 56.6-88.2%). Aegilops triuncialis was identified as the only alloploid species with low interspecific polymorphism (interspecific differences, 0-0.01, P = 50%) in the U-genome group. The U-genome Aegilops species proved to be separated from other species of the genus. The phylogenetic relationships were established for the U-genome species. The greatest separation within the U-genome group was observed for the US-genome species Ae. kotschyi and Ae. variabilis. The tetraploid species Ae. triaristata and Ae. columnaris, which had the UX genome, and the hexaploid species Ae. recta (UXN) were found to be related to each other and separate from the UM-genome species. A similarity was observed between the U M-genome species Ae. ovata and Ae. biuncialis, which had the UM genome, and the ancestral diploid U-genome species Ae. umbellulata. The UC-genome species Ae. triuncialis was rather separate and slightly similar to the UX-genome species.

  8. Evaluation of the reaction oof interspecific hybrids of common bean and tepary bean to Bradyrhizobium y Rhizobium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interspecific hybrids between common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris L., and tepary bean, Phaseolus acutifolius A. Gray, have the potential to increase bean production in regions where rainfall is limited. In 2014, an experiment was initiated using a split-plot design. The treatments included inoculation, ...

  9. Thermal barriers for compartments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreutzer, Cory J.; Lustbader, Jason A.

    2017-10-17

    An aspect of the present disclosure is a thermal barrier that includes a core layer having a first surface, a second surface, and a first edge, and a first outer layer that includes a third surface and a second edge, where the third surface substantially contacts the first surface, the core layer is configured to minimize conductive heat transfer through the barrier, and the first outer layer is configured to maximize reflection of light away from the barrier.

  10. Tunnel barrier schottky

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Rongming; Cao, Yu; Li, Zijian; Williams, Adam J.

    2018-02-20

    A diode includes: a semiconductor substrate; a cathode metal layer contacting a bottom of the substrate; a semiconductor drift layer on the substrate; a graded aluminum gallium nitride (AlGaN) semiconductor barrier layer on the drift layer and having a larger bandgap than the drift layer, the barrier layer having a top surface and a bottom surface between the drift layer and the top surface, the barrier layer having an increasing aluminum composition from the bottom surface to the top surface; and an anode metal layer directly contacting the top surface of the barrier layer.

  11. Molecular genetic evidence for interspecific hybridization among endemic Hispaniolan Bursera (Burseraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Andrea; Simpson, Beryl B

    2004-06-01

    Historically, genetic introgression among species as well as hybrid origins for species of the diploid tree genus Bursera (Burseraceae) have been proposed based on the supposition that individuals morphologically intermediate between sympatric "parent" species must be derived from hybridization. This study reports the first molecular genetic evidence for both unidirectional and reciprocal interspecific hybridization within Bursera. Phylogenies of hybrids and other species in B. subgenus Bursera are reconstructed based on nuclear and chloroplast sequence data. Compelling evidence supports the hybrid origin of three endemic Hispaniolan species: B. brunea (B. nashii × B. simaruba), B. gracilipes (B. spinescens × B. simaruba), and B. ovata (B. simaruba × B. spinescens). Cloning studies of nuclear markers from B. ovata suggests that this species is an introgressed or later backcross generation hybrid and thus reproduces sexually.

  12. Abnormal spindle orientation during microsporogenesis in an interspecific Brachiaria (Gramineae hybrid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Beatriz Mendes-Bonato

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a case of abnormal spindle orientation during microsporogenesis in an interspecific hybrid of the tropical grass Brachiaria. In the affected plant, prophase I was normal. In metaphase I, bivalents were regularly co-oriented but distantly positioned and spread over the equatorial plate. In anaphase I, chromosomes failed to converge into focused poles due to parallel spindle fibers. As a consequence, in telophase I, an elongated nucleus or several micronuclei were observed in each pole. In the second division, the behavior was the same, leading to polyads with several micronuclei. A total of 40% of meiotic products were affected. The use of this hybrid in production systems needing good-quality seeds is discussed.

  13. First report of interspecific facultative social parasitism in the paper wasp genus Mischocyttarus Saussure (Hymenoptera, Vespidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago S. Montagna

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available First report of interspecific facultative social parasitism in the paper wasp genus Mischocyttarus Saussure (Hymenoptera, Vespidae. Parasitism of colonies of the social wasp Mischocyttarus cerberus Ducke, 1918 by females of Mischocyttarus consimilis Zikán, 1949 was observed in a rural area of Dourados, state of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. In all monitored cases, the invasion occurred in the pre-emergence colony stage, generally by a single female of M. consimilis. The period of establishment of the foreign female in the host colony was marked by antagonistic behaviors between the host female and the invasive. In general, the architecture of the parasitized nest was modified from the typical architecture of the host species nest.

  14. Embryogenic calli induced in interspecific (Elaeis guineensis x E. oleifera hybrid zygotic embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Cristina da Silva Angelo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The hybridization between oil palm (Elaeis guineensis and caiaué (E. oleifera plants is directed to obtainprogenies presenting high yields like oil palm but with reduced shoot height and resistance to lethal yellowing like caiaué.Cloning F1, BC1 and BC2 progenies can make the replication of selection trials easier. The objective of this work was to inducesomatic embryogenesis in interspecific zygotic embryos collected 100 days after pollination. Three progenies were cultivatedin an induction medium developed for Tenera (E. guineensis tp. dura x pisifera embryos. The number of embryos bearing calliand germinating was recorded and submitted to the Z test. Calli were weighted and submitted to histological analysis.Progenies differed in the number of embryos presenting plumules and calli simultaneously. By the ninth month, the apices ofincompletely developed somatic embryos were observed protruding from the surfaces of nodular calli. Highly embryogenicand friable secondary calli producing globular somatic embryos were not observed.

  15. Host responses to interspecific brood parasitism: a by-product of adaptations to conspecific parasitism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samas, Peter; Hauber, Mark E; Cassey, Phillip; Grim, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Why have birds evolved the ability to reject eggs? Typically, foreign egg discrimination is interpreted as evidence that interspecific brood parasitism (IP) has selected for the host's ability to recognize and eliminate foreign eggs. Fewer studies explore the alternative hypothesis that rejection of interspecific eggs is a by-product of host defenses, evolved against conspecific parasitism (CP). We performed a large scale study with replication across taxa (two congeneric Turdus thrushes), space (populations), time (breeding seasons), and treatments (three types of experimental eggs), using a consistent design of egg rejection experiments (n = 1057 nests; including controls), in areas with potential IP either present (Europe; native populations) or absent (New Zealand; introduced populations). These comparisons benefited from the known length of allopatry (one and a half centuries), with no gene flow between native and introduced populations, which is rarely available in host-parasite systems. Hosts rejected CP at unusually high rates for passerines (up to 60%). CP rejection rates were higher in populations with higher conspecific breeding densities and no risks of IP, supporting the CP hypothesis. IP rejection rates did not covary geographically with IP risk, contradicting the IP hypothesis. High egg rejection rates were maintained in the relatively long-term isolation from IP despite non-trivial rejection costs and errors. These egg rejection patterns, combined with recent findings that these thrushes are currently unsuitable hosts of the obligate parasitic common cuckoo (Cuculus canorus), are in agreement with the hypothesis that the rejection of IP is a by-product of fine-tuned egg discrimination evolved due to CP. Our study highlights the importance of considering both IP and CP simultaneously as potential drivers in the evolution of egg discrimination, and illustrates how populations introduced to novel ecological contexts can provide critical insights

  16. Phenology and interspecific association of Forficula auricularia and Forficula pubescens in apple orchards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaume Lordan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The European earwig Forficula auricularia L. (Dermaptera: Forficulidae has been widely studied as a key predator of pests in temperate regions, but its phenology and behavior may differ in warmer areas such as the Mediterranean. Here we assessed the phenology, aggregation, and interspecific association of F. auricularia and Forficula pubescens Gené, the only two species found consistently in both ground and canopy shelters in Mediterranean apple orchards. In addition to F. auricularia and F. pubescens, three other earwig species, namely Labidura riparia Pallas, Nala lividipes Dufour and Euborellia moesta Gené, were found occasionally. The mature stages of F. auricularia were observed mainly from May to November in tree shelters and immature ones from October to June in ground shelters. Adult individuals of F. pubescens were observed year-round and nymph instars were detected from April to June in ground as well as in tree shelters. The suitability of the current degree-days models for temperate regions was evaluated for the prediction of European earwig phenology in a Mediterranean climate. Regarding interspecific association, F. auricularia and F. pubescens co-occurred in canopies without apparent competition. This study provides useful weekly data about the phenology of the two earwig species throughout the year that can be used to detect the key periods during which to enhance their populations in pip fruit orchards or to control them in stone fruit crops. Furthermore, our results are of relevance for the development of new phenological models of earwigs in Mediterranean areas where nymphs hibernate, a feature that makes current models inaccurate.

  17. Phenology and interspecific association of Forficula auricularia and Forficula pubescens in apple orchards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lordan, J.; Alegre, S.; Moerkens, R.; Sarasúa, M.J.; Alins, G.

    2015-07-01

    The European earwig Forficula auricularia L. (Dermaptera: Forficulidae) has been widely studied as a key predator of pests in temperate regions, but its phenology and behavior may differ in warmer areas such as the Mediterranean. Here we assessed the phenology, aggregation, and interspecific association of F. auricularia and Forficula pubescens Gené, the only two species found consistently in both ground and canopy shelters in Mediterranean apple orchards. In addition to F. auricularia and F. pubescens, three other earwig species, namely Labidura riparia Pallas, Nala lividipes Dufour and Euborellia moesta Gené, were found occasionally. The mature stages of F. auricularia were observed mainly from May to November in tree shelters and immature ones from October to June in ground shelters. Adult individuals of F. pubescens were observed year-round and nymph instars were detected from April to June in ground as well as in tree shelters. The suitability of the current degree-days models for temperate regions was evaluated for the prediction of European earwig phenology in a Mediterranean climate. Regarding interspecific association, F. auricularia and F. pubescens co-occurred in canopies without apparent competition. This study provides useful weekly data about the phenology of the two earwig species throughout the year that can be used to detect the key periods during which to enhance their populations in pip fruit orchards or to control them in stone fruit crops. Furthermore, our results are of relevance for the development of new phenological models of earwigs in Mediterranean areas where nymphs hibernate, a feature that makes current models inaccurate. (Author)

  18. Establishment and interspecific associations in two species of Ichthyocotylurus (Trematoda) parasites in perch (Perca fluviatilis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Co-infections of multiple parasite species in hosts may lead to interspecific associations and subsequently shape the structure of a parasite community. However, few studies have focused on these associations in highly abundant parasite species or, in particular, investigated how the associations develop with time in hosts exposed to co-infecting parasite species for the first time. We investigated metacercarial establishment and interspecific associations in the trematodes Ichthyocotylurus variegatus and I. pileatus co-infecting three age cohorts of young perch (Perca fluviatilis). Results We found that the timing of transmission of the two Ichthyocotylurus species was very similar, but they showed differences in metacercarial development essentially so that the metacercariae of I. pileatus became encapsulated faster. Correlations between the abundances of the species were significantly positive after the first summer of host life and also within the main site of infection, the swim bladder. High or low abundances of both parasite species were also more frequent in the same host individuals than expected by chance, independently of host age or size. However, the highest abundances of the species were nevertheless observed in different host individuals and this pattern was consistent in all age cohorts. Conclusions The results suggest similar temporal patterns of transmission, non-random establishment, and facilitative rather than competitive associations between the parasite species independently of the age of the infracommunities. However, we suggest that spatial differences in exposure are most likely responsible for the segregation of the parasite species observed in the few most heavily infected hosts. Regardless of the underlying mechanism, the result suggests that between-species associations should be interpreted with caution along with detailed examination of the parasite distribution among host individuals. PMID:21599910

  19. Functional evolution of jumping in frogs: Interspecific differences in take-off and landing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Stephen M; Montuelle, Stephane J; Schmidt, André; Krause, Cornelia; Naylor, Emily; Essner, Richard L

    2016-03-01

    Ancestral frogs underwent anatomical shifts including elongation of the hindlimbs and pelvis and reduction of the tail and vertebral column that heralded the transition to jumping as a primary mode of locomotion. Jumping has been hypothesized to have evolved in a step-wise fashion with basal frogs taking-off with synchronous hindlimb extension and crash-landing on their bodies, and then their limbs move forward. Subsequently, frogs began to recycle the forelimbs forward earlier in the jump to control landing. Frogs with forelimb landing radiated into many forms, locomotor modes, habitats, and niches with controlled landing thought to improve escape behavior. While the biology of take-off behavior has seen considerable study, interspecific comparisons of take-off and landing behavior are limited. In order to understand the evolution of jumping and controlled landing in frogs, data are needed on the movements of the limbs and body across an array of taxa. Here, we present the first description and comparison of kinematics of the hindlimbs, forelimbs and body during take-off and landing in relation to ground reaction forces in four frog species spanning the frog phylogeny. The goal of this study is to understand what interspecific differences reveal about the evolution of take-off and controlled landing in frogs. We provide the first comparative description of the entire process of jumping in frogs. Statistical comparisons identify both homologous behaviors and significant differences among species that are used to map patterns of trait evolution and generate hypotheses regarding the functional evolution of take-off and landing in frogs. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Interspecific differences between D. pulex and D. magna in tolerance to cyanobacteria with protease inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian J Kuster

    Full Text Available It is known that cyanobacteria negatively affect herbivores due to their production of toxins such as protease inhibitors. In the present study we investigated potential interspecific differences between two major herbivores, Daphnia magna and Daphnia pulex, in terms of their tolerance to cyanobacteria with protease inhibitors. Seven clones each of D. magna and of D. pulex were isolated from different habitats in Europe and North America. To test for interspecific differences in the daphnids' tolerance to cyanobacteria, their somatic and population growth rates were determined for each D. magna and D. pulex clone after exposure to varying concentrations of two Microcystis aeruginosa strains. The M. aeruginosa strains NIVA and PCC(- contained either chymotrypsin or trypsin inhibitors, but no microcystins. Mean somatic and population growth rates on a diet with 20% NIVA were significantly more reduced in D. pulex than in D. magna. On a diet with 10% PCC(-, the population growth of D. pulex was significantly more reduced than that of D. magna. This indicates that D. magna is more tolerant to cyanobacteria with protease inhibitors than D. pulex. The reduction of growth rates was possibly caused by an interference of cyanobacterial inhibitors with proteases in the gut of Daphnia, as many other conceivable factors, which might have been able to explain the reduced growth, could be excluded as causal factors. Protease assays revealed that the sensitivities of chymotrypsins and trypsins to cyanobacterial protease inhibitors did not differ between D. magna and D. pulex. However, D. magna exhibited a 2.3-fold higher specific chymotrypsin activity than D. pulex, which explains the observed higher tolerance to cyanobacterial protease inhibitors of D. magna. The present study suggests that D. magna may control the development of cyanobacterial blooms more efficiently than D. pulex due to differences in their tolerance to cyanobacteria with protease

  1. Interspecific and locational differences in metal levels in edible fish tissue from Saudi Arabia

    KAUST Repository

    Burger, Joanna

    2014-07-06

    Metal levels in fish have been extensively studied, but little data currently exists for the Middle East. We examined the levels of metals and metalloids (aluminum, arsenic, copper, manganese, selenium, zinc, and mercury) in the flesh of 13 fish species collected from three fishing sites and a local fish market in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. We tested the following null hypotheses: (1) there are no interspecific differences in metal levels, (2) there are no differences in metal levels in fishes between market and fishing sites, (3) there are no size-related differences in metal levels, and (4) there are no differences in selenium:mercury molar ratio among different fish species. There were significant interspecific differences in concentrations for all metals. There was an order of magnitude difference in the levels of aluminum, arsenic, mercury, manganese, and selenium, indicating wide variation in potential effects on the fish themselves and on their predators. Fishes from Area II, close to a large commercial port, had the highest levels of arsenic, mercury, and selenium, followed by market fishes. Mercury was positively correlated with body size in 6 of the 13 fish species examined. Mercury was correlated positively with arsenic and selenium, but negatively with aluminum, cobalt, copper, manganese, and zinc. Selenium:mercury molar ratios varied significantly among species, with Carangoides bajad, Cephalopholis argus, Variola louti, and Ephinephelus tauvina having ratios below 10:1. These findings can be used in risk assessments, design of mercury reduction plans, development of fish advisories to protect public health, and future management decision-making.

  2. Interspecific reciprocity explains mobbing behaviour of the breeding chaffinches, Fringilla coelebs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krams, Indrikis; Krama, Tatjana

    2002-01-01

    When prey animals discover a predator close by, they mob it while uttering characteristic sounds that attract other prey individuals to the vicinity. Mobbing causes a predator to vacate its immediate foraging area, which gives an opportunity for prey individuals to continue their interrupted daily activity. Besides the increased benefits, mobbing behaviour also has its costs owing to injuries or death. The initiator of mobbing may be at increased risk of predation by attracting the predator's attention, especially if not joined by other neighbouring prey individuals. Communities of breeding birds have always been considered as temporal aggregations. Since an altruist could not prevent cheaters from exploiting its altruism in an anonymous community, this excluded any possibility of explaining mobbing behaviour in terms of reciprocal altruism. However, sedentary birds may have become acquainted since the previous non-breeding season. Migrant birds, forming anonymous communities at the beginning of the breeding season, may also develop closer social ties during the course of the breeding season. We tested whether a male chaffinch, a migrant bird, would initiate active harassment of a predator both at the beginning of the breeding season and a week later when it has become a member of a non-anonymous multi-species aggregation of sedentary birds. We expected that male chaffinches would be less likely to initiate a mob at the beginning of the breeding season when part of an anonymous multi-species aggregation of migratory birds. However, their mobbing activity should increase as the breeding season advances. Our results support these predictions. Cooperation among individuals belonging to different species in driving the predator away may be explained as interspecific reciprocity based on interspecific recognition and temporal stability of the breeding communities. PMID:12495502

  3. Interspecific semantic alarm call recognition in the solitary Sahamalaza sportive lemur, Lepilemur sahamalazensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Seiler

    Full Text Available As alarm calls indicate the presence of predators, the correct interpretation of alarm calls, including those of other species, is essential for predator avoidance. Conversely, communication calls of other species might indicate the perceived absence of a predator and hence allow a reduction in vigilance. This "eavesdropping" was demonstrated in birds and mammals, including lemur species. Interspecific communication between taxonomic groups has so far been reported in some reptiles and mammals, including three primate species. So far, neither semantic nor interspecific communication has been tested in a solitary and nocturnal lemur species. The aim of this study was to investigate if the nocturnal and solitary Sahamalaza sportive lemur, Lepilemur sahamalazensis, is able to access semantic information of sympatric species. During the day, this species faces the risk of falling prey to aerial and terrestrial predators and therefore shows high levels of vigilance. We presented alarm calls of the crested coua, the Madagascar magpie-robin and aerial, terrestrial and agitation alarm calls of the blue-eyed black lemur to 19 individual Sahamalaza sportive lemurs resting in tree holes. Songs of both bird species' and contact calls of the blue-eyed black lemur were used as a control. After alarm calls of crested coua, Madagascar magpie-robin and aerial alarm of the blue-eyed black lemur, the lemurs scanned up and their vigilance increased significantly. After presentation of terrestrial alarm and agitation calls of the blue-eyed black lemur, the animals did not show significant changes in scanning direction or in the duration of vigilance. Sportive lemur vigilance decreased after playbacks of songs of the bird species and contact calls of blue-eyed black lemurs. Our results indicate that the Sahamalaza sportive lemur is capable of using information on predator presence as well as predator type of different sympatric species, using their referential

  4. Development of a set of SSR markers for genetic polymorphism detection and interspecific hybrid jute breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipnarayan Saha

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Corchorus capsularis (white jute and C. olitorius (dark jute are the two principal cultivated species of jute that produce natural bast fiber of commercial importance. We have identified 4509 simple sequence repeat (SSR loci from 34,163 unigene sequences of C. capsularis to develop a non-redundant set of 2079 flanking primer pairs. Among the SSRs, trinucleotide repeats were most frequent (60% followed by dinucleotide repeats (37.6%. Annotation of the SSR-containing unigenes revealed their putative functions in various biological and molecular processes, including responses to biotic and abiotic signals. Eighteen expressed gene-derived SSR (eSSR markers were successfully mapped to the existing single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP linkage map of jute, providing additional anchor points. Amplification of 72% of the 74 randomly selected primer pairs was successful in a panel of 24 jute accessions, comprising five and twelve accessions of C. capsularis and C. olitorius, respectively, and seven wild jute species. Forty-three primer pairs produced an average of 2.7 alleles and 58.1% polymorphism in a panel of 24 jute accessions. The mean PIC value was 0.34 but some markers showed PIC values higher than 0.5, suggesting that these markers can efficiently measure genetic diversity and serve for mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTLs in jute. A primer polymorphism survey with parents of a wide-hybridized population between a cultivated jute and its wild relative revealed their efficacy for interspecific hybrid identification. For ready accessibility of jute eSSR primers, we compiled all information in a user-friendly web database, JuteMarkerdb (http://jutemarkerdb.icar.gov.in/ for the first time in jute. This eSSR resource in jute is expected to be of use in characterization of germplasm, interspecific hybrid and variety identification, and marker-assisted breeding of superior-quality jute.

  5. Spatial distribution and interspecific associations of tree species in a tropical seasonal rain forest of China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoyu Lan

    Full Text Available Studying the spatial pattern and interspecific associations of plant species may provide valuable insights into processes and mechanisms that maintain species coexistence. Point pattern analysis was used to analyze the spatial distribution patterns of twenty dominant tree species, their interspecific spatial associations and changes across life stages in a 20-ha permanent plot of seasonal tropical rainforest in Xishuangbanna, China, to test mechanisms maintaining species coexistence. Torus-translation tests were used to quantify positive or negative associations of the species to topographic habitats. The results showed: (1 fourteen of the twenty tree species were negatively (or positively associated with one or two of the topographic variables, which evidences that the niche contributes to the spatial pattern of these species. (2 Most saplings of the study species showed a significantly clumped distribution at small scales (0-10 m which was lost at larger scales (10-30 m. (3 The degree of spatial clumping deceases from saplings, to poles, to adults indicates that density-dependent mortality of the offspring is ubiquitous in species. (4 It is notable that a high number of positive small-scale interactions were found among the twenty species. For saplings, 42.6% of all combinations of species pairs showed positive associations at neighborhood scales up to five meters, but only 38.4% were negative. For poles and adults, positive associations at these distances still made up 45.5% and 29.5%, respectively. In conclusion, there is considerable evidence for the presence of positive interactions among the tree species, which suggests that species herd protection may occur in our plot. In addition, niche assembly and limited dispersal (likely contribute to the spatial patterns of tree species in the tropical seasonal rain forest in Xishuangbanna, China.

  6. Interspecific sex in grass smuts and the genetic diversity of their pheromone-receptor system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronny Kellner

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The grass smuts comprise a speciose group of biotrophic plant parasites, so-called Ustilaginaceae, which are specifically adapted to hosts of sweet grasses, the Poaceae family. Mating takes a central role in their life cycle, as it initiates parasitism by a morphological and physiological transition from saprobic yeast cells to pathogenic filaments. As in other fungi, sexual identity is determined by specific genomic regions encoding allelic variants of a pheromone-receptor (PR system and heterodimerising transcription factors. Both operate in a biphasic mating process that starts with PR-triggered recognition, directed growth of conjugation hyphae, and plasmogamy of compatible mating partners. So far, studies on the PR system of grass smuts revealed diverse interspecific compatibility and mating type determination. However, many questions concerning the specificity and evolutionary origin of the PR system remain unanswered. Combining comparative genetics and biological approaches, we report on the specificity of the PR system and its genetic diversity in 10 species spanning about 100 million years of mating type evolution. We show that three highly syntenic PR alleles are prevalent among members of the Ustilaginaceae, favouring a triallelic determination as the plesiomorphic characteristic of this group. Furthermore, the analysis of PR loci revealed increased genetic diversity of single PR locus genes compared to genes of flanking regions. Performing interspecies sex tests, we detected a high potential for hybridisation that is directly linked to pheromone signalling as known from intraspecies sex. Although the PR system seems to be optimised for intraspecific compatibility, the observed functional plasticity of the PR system increases the potential for interspecific sex, which might allow the hybrid-based genesis of newly combined host specificities.

  7. Interactive effects of interspecific competition and microhabitat on early post-settlement survival in a coral reef fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonin, M. C.; Srinivasan, M.; Almany, G. R.; Jones, G. P.

    2009-03-01

    Microhabitat type and the competition for microhabitats can each influence patterns of abundance and mortality in coral reef fish communities; however, the effect of microhabitat on the intensity and outcome of competition is not well understood. In Kimbe Bay, Papua New Guinea, surveys were used to quantify microhabitat use and selectivity in two live-coral specialist damselfishes (Pomacentridae), Chrysiptera parasema, and Dascyllus melanurus. A patch reef experiment was then conducted to test how intra- and interspecific competition interacts with two types of microhabitat to influence survival of recently settled C. parasema. Surveys demonstrated that C. parasema and D. melanurus recruits utilized similar coral microhabitats; 72% of C. parasema and 85% of D. melanurus used corymbose and bottlebrush growth forms of Acropora. One microhabitat type, Pocillopora sp. coral, was commonly used by D. melanurus but rarely by C. parasema. The patch reef experiment revealed that both microhabitat and interspecific competition influence abundance of recently settled C. parasema. Microhabitat had the strongest influence on survival of C. parasema. In the absence of interspecific competitors, ~85% of C. parasema survived for 5 days after transplantation to high-complexity bottlebrush Acropora reefs when compared to only 25% survival of Pocillopora reefs. In both microhabitats, interspecific competition with D. melanurus, but not intraspecific competition, significantly decreased the survival of C. parasema. Taken together, these results suggest that the observed distribution of C. parasema results from specialized microhabitat requirements and competition for space in those microhabitats. This study demonstrates that interspecific competition and microhabitat type can interact to influence early post-settlement survival in coral reef fishes, though, whether and how these factors influence survival will depend on the behavioural attributes and strength of habitat associations

  8. Host-feeding behaviour of Dermacentor reticulatus and Dermacentor marginatus in mono-specific and inter-specific infestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buczek, Alicja; Bartosik, Katarzyna; Zając, Zbigniew; Stanko, Michał

    2015-09-17

    Given the sympatric occurrence in some regions of Europe and the great epidemiological significance of D. reticulatus and D. marginatus species, we investigated the behaviour of these ticks during inter-specific and mono-specific host infestations. The investigations were conducted on rabbits at 20 ± 3 °C and humidity of 38 ± 1 %. The inter-specific infestations groups consisted of 20 females and ten males of D. marginatus and 20 females and ten males of D. reticulatus on each host, whereas mono-specific infestations involved 40 females and 20 males of each species. The investigations have demonstrated competition between the two tick species resulting in modification of the behaviour on the host and the feeding course in D. marginatus females by the presence of D. reticulatus. In the inter-specific group, D. marginatus females attached for a longer time (mean 2.74 ± 1.12 h) than in the mono-specific group (mean 1.24 ± 0.97 h) (p mono-specific group (13.15 ± 2.53 days) (p mono-specific infestation (p = 0.0155). In D. reticulatus females, no significant difference was found in the host attachment and feeding rates between the mono-specific and inter-specific groups. The differences in the behaviour of the females from both species during co-feeding reflect physiological adaptation to environmental conditions, which enables them to ingest blood and reproduce. During co-feeding of D. reticulatus and D. marginatus on the same host, two inter-specific systems with different physiological features are formed, which may influence the transmission of tick-borne pathogens.

  9. Genetic dissection of growth, wood basic density and gene expression in interspecific backcrosses of Eucalyptus grandis and E. urophylla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullan, Anand Raj Kumar; van Dyk, Maria M; Hefer, Charles A; Jones, Nicoletta; Kanzler, Arnulf; Myburg, Alexander A

    2012-07-20

    F1 hybrid clones of Eucalyptus grandis and E. urophylla are widely grown for pulp and paper production in tropical and subtropical regions. Volume growth and wood quality are priority objectives in Eucalyptus tree improvement. The molecular basis of quantitative variation and trait expression in eucalypt hybrids, however, remains largely unknown. The recent availability of a draft genome sequence (http://www.phytozome.net) and genome-wide genotyping platforms, combined with high levels of genetic variation and high linkage disequilibrium in hybrid crosses, greatly facilitate the detection of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) as well as underlying candidate genes for growth and wood property traits. In this study, we used Diversity Arrays Technology markers to assess the genetic architecture of volume growth (diameter at breast height, DBH) and wood basic density in four-year-old progeny of an interspecific backcross pedigree of E. grandis and E. urophylla. In addition, we used Illumina RNA-Seq expression profiling in the E. urophylla backcross family to identify cis- and trans-acting polymorphisms (eQTLs) affecting transcript abundance of genes underlying QTLs for wood basic density. A total of five QTLs for DBH and 12 for wood basic density were identified in the two backcross families. Individual QTLs for DBH and wood basic density explained 3.1 to 12.2% of phenotypic variation. Candidate genes underlying QTLs for wood basic density on linkage groups 8 and 9 were found to share trans-acting eQTLs located on linkage groups 4 and 10, which in turn coincided with QTLs for wood basic density suggesting that these QTLs represent segregating components of an underlying transcriptional network. This is the first demonstration of the use of next-generation expression profiling to quantify transcript abundance in a segregating tree population and identify candidate genes potentially affecting wood property variation. The QTLs identified in this study provide a resource for

  10. Red pericarp introgression lines derived from interspecific crosses of rice: physicochemical characteristics, antioxidative properties and phenolic content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Neerja; Kaur, Rimaljeet; Mangat, Gurjit S; Singh, Kuldeep

    2014-11-01

    Antioxidative properties and physicochemical characteristics of introgression lines (ILs) and their recurrent parents were analyzed. In addition, catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities and free radical-scavenging capacity were evaluated, since these are important antioxidative properties for developing nutraceutical and functional foods. Comparative analysis of the brown and milled rice fractions of ILs with their respective recurrent parents revealed 2.26- and 1.22-fold increase in total phenolics, 1.95- and 2.09-fold increase in flavonoids, 8.38- and 6.80-fold increase in proanthocyanidins and 1.55- and 1.20-fold increase in tannins in brown and milled rice fractions respectively. Higher CAT (1.36- and 1.89-fold) and SOD (1.71- and 2.02-fold) activities and Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC, 7.13- and 1.98-fold) were observed in brown and milled rice fractions respectively of ILs compared with their respective recurrent parents. A high and positive correlation was obtained between TEAC and total phenols (0.73, P ≤ 0.01), flavonoids (0.66, P ≤ 0.05) and proanthocyanidins (0.69, P ≤ 0.05). The yield parameters and physicochemical characteristics of the grains, in general, were comparable in the ILs and their respective recurrent parents. The ILs of rice reported in the present study exhibited significant positive differences in the content of phenolic constituents and antioxidant properties with good grain quality characteristics over their recurrent parents, indicating their potential as a natural source of phytochemicals for nutraceutical and functional food development. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. The result of a two-stages cross intra and interspecific selection of sugar cane crop potential clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herwati A.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Sugarcane is one of strategic and important food commodities in Indonesia because it is the main source of sugar producers. Domestic sugar production in 2015 only reached 2.5 million tons, while its needs are 5.6 million tons which resulting in a shortage of 3.1 million tons to be met from import. The production in 2016 just reached 2.5 million tons causing the shortages that must be filled by import as much as 3.1 million tons. The Ministry of Agriculture has a program for sugar self-sufficiency that is expected to be achieved by 2014 with production is expected to reach 5.7 million tons. The discrepancy between production levels at this time with the target in 2014 still quite wide. The target accession can be reached by intensification and land extension or expansion. The availability of land development with the availability of adequate water has to face obstacles competing with rice plant as the main staple food. In 2007 more than 60% sugar cane crop was in dry land (Hadisaputro, et al., 2008. The expansion of dry land still has an opportunity to be developed in various ways such as the availability of sugar cane varieties with drought resistant. The research objectives are to accomplish the drought resistant selection in the field to the result of crossbreeding clones in 2014 (MLG-14. The activities implemented in KP. Karangploso, Malang, started on January until December 2016. The research materials are 51 crop clones of two stage selection which 7 varieties are PSDK, PSJT 941, PS 881, PSJK, VMC 76-16, GLAGAH, ERIANTHUS, CENING, BL, and PS 881 as a control. Using a randomized block design with three replication were planted in plots consisting of three arc along the 5 m. The PKP range (from center to center of arc are 100 cm length. The range between replications is 2.5 – 3 cm length. The seeds form is a one eye mule (bud set. Furthermore, after 1.5 month old, the seeds were selected based on its uniformly conditions and then planted in the segment with the range of 50 cm length between plants, so the plants amount per plot as many as 30 plants. Fertilizer dose of 160 kg N + 70 kg P2O5+ 60 kg K2O per hectare or equivalent to 800 kg ZA + 200 kg SP36 + 100 kg KCl per hectare. Observation were did at the age of 11 months. The parameter that being observed were plant height, stem lenght, number of stems/ clump, steam diameter, number of segments, heavy stems intact, heavy stem/ m, the brix average, and voos of stem. The result showed the highest parameters in comparison with the parent for plant height (347 cm and the stem lenght (301 cm is MLG 02/14/86, the number of stem, not voos of stem productive MLG 14/2/42 (45 stems, stem’s diameter and not voos of stem,VMC 76-16 (39.8 cm, not voos of stem, the amount of segments MLG 14/5/15 (27 segments, not voos of stem and ERIANTHUS (27.6, stem’s weight, MLG 14/2/44 (2.12 kg, and the brix average value not voos of stem and BL (24.7% not voos of stem.

  12. Inbreeding, heterosis, fertility, plasmon differentiation and Phytophthora resistance in Solanum verrucosum Schlechtd., and some interspecific crosses in Solanum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdalla, M.M.F.

    1970-01-01

    Solanum verrucosum (2n = 24) is a self-compatible, highly fertile species. This conclusion is drawn from the results of studies on 21 various introductions of this species. In spite of self-compatibility and good male and female fertility, the species generally needs a pollinating agent to

  13. The threshold anomaly from the simultaneous calculation of elastic scattering and fusion cross sections for the systems {sup 9}Be+{sup 144}Sm and {sup 9}Be+{sup 64}Zn for energies around the barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camacho, A. G.; Aguilera, E. F.; Quiroz, E. M. [Departamento de Aceleradores, ININ, La Marquesa, 52750 Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Gomes, P. R. S.; Lubian, J. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminenese, Av. Litoranea s/n, Gragoata, Niteroi, 24210-340 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2008-12-15

    The energy dependence of the optical potential is used to study the threshold anomaly for reactions with the weakly bound projectile {sup 9}Be on {sup 144}Sm and {sup 64}Zn for energies around the Coulomb barrier. The energy dependent potential parameters are obtained from a simultaneous X{sup 2}-analysis of elastic scattering and fusion data. There are signatures that in fact, the so-called breakup threshold anomaly shows up for these systems. This finding is in agreement with other calculations involving weakly bound projectiles. (Author)

  14. The threshold anomaly from the simultaneous calculation of elastic scattering and fusion cross sections for the systems 9Be+144Sm and 9Be+64Zn for energies around the barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camacho, A. G.; Aguilera, E. F.; Quiroz, E. M.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Lubian, J.

    2008-01-01

    The energy dependence of the optical potential is used to study the threshold anomaly for reactions with the weakly bound projectile 9 Be on 144 Sm and 64 Zn for energies around the Coulomb barrier. The energy dependent potential parameters are obtained from a simultaneous X 2 -analysis of elastic scattering and fusion data. There are signatures that in fact, the so-called breakup threshold anomaly shows up for these systems. This finding is in agreement with other calculations involving weakly bound projectiles. (Author)

  15. Transforming Education: Overcoming Barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Jane L.; Goren, Paul D.

    Barriers to progress in educational reform exist inside and outside the education system. Some arise where new practices encounter traditional expectations and boundaries, but others go much deeper than education, such as poverty, racism, local political conflicts, and human resistance to change. The following five categories of barriers are…

  16. Catalytic thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Anand A.; Campbell, Christian X.; Subramanian, Ramesh

    2009-06-02

    A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

  17. Fusion barrier distributions and fission anisotropies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinde, D.J.; Morton, C.R.; Dasgupta, M.; Leigh, J.R.; Lestone, J.P.; Lemmon, R.C.; Mein, J.C.; Newton, J.O.; Timmers, H.; Rowley, N.; Kruppa, A.T.

    1995-01-01

    Fusion excitation functions for 16,17 O+ 144 Sm have been measured to high precision. The extracted fusion barrier distributions show a double-peaked structure interpreted in terms of coupling to inelastic collective excitations of the target. The effect of the positive Q-value neutron stripping channel is evident in the reaction with 17 O. Fission and evaporation residue cross-sections and excitation functions have been measured for the reaction of 16 O+ 208 Pb and the fusion barrier distribution and fission anisotropies determined. It is found that the moments of the fusion l-distribution determined from the fusion and fission measurements are in good agreement. ((orig.))

  18. Traditional and cyberbullying victimization as correlates of psychosocial distress and barriers to a healthy lifestyle among severely obese adolescents – a matched case–control study on prevalence and results from a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Obese youth are at increased risk for peer victimization, which may heighten their risk of psychosocial problems and physical activity avoidance, and lower the effectiveness of professional and lifestyle weight-loss initiatives. Little is known about obese adolescents’ risk for victimization from cyber-bullying and how this relates to psychosocial functioning and healthy lifestyle barriers. The purpose of the study was to assess traditional and cyber-victimization among adolescents with severe obesity and its relation to psychosocial distress and barriers to healthy lifestyles. Methods A sample of 102 obese adolescents (mean age = 15.32 ±1.71) in residential treatment was matched with 102 normal-weight youngsters from the Health Behavior in School-aged Children (HBSC) study (mean age = 15.30 ±1.73). Results Adolescents with obesity were significantly more often cyber-victimized than normal-weight peers. Obese youth victimized by traditional bullying experienced lower quality of life, lower motivation for physical activity and higher avoidance and emotional coping towards healthy lifestyles than those non-victimized. Obese cyber-victims experienced significantly higher suicidal ideation. Conclusions Traditional and cyber-victimization may hinder treatment effectiveness and healthy lifestyle change in adolescents with obesity. Health professionals should pro-actively address peer victimization and psychosocial functioning during multidisciplinary obesity treatment. Schools could contribute to a better physical and psychosocial health of obese youth by implementing multi-behavioral health-promotion programs. PMID:24593118

  19. Traditional and cyberbullying victimization as correlates of psychosocial distress and barriers to a healthy lifestyle among severely obese adolescents--a matched case-control study on prevalence and results from a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSmet, Ann; Deforche, Benedicte; Hublet, Anne; Tanghe, Ann; Stremersch, Evi; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse

    2014-03-05

    Obese youth are at increased risk for peer victimization, which may heighten their risk of psychosocial problems and physical activity avoidance, and lower the effectiveness of professional and lifestyle weight-loss initiatives. Little is known about obese adolescents' risk for victimization from cyber-bullying and how this relates to psychosocial functioning and healthy lifestyle barriers. The purpose of the study was to assess traditional and cyber-victimization among adolescents with severe obesity and its relation to psychosocial distress and barriers to healthy lifestyles. A sample of 102 obese adolescents (mean age=15.32±1.71) in residential treatment was matched with 102 normal-weight youngsters from the Health Behavior in School-aged Children (HBSC) study (mean age=15.30±1.73). Adolescents with obesity were significantly more often cyber-victimized than normal-weight peers. Obese youth victimized by traditional bullying experienced lower quality of life, lower motivation for physical activity and higher avoidance and emotional coping towards healthy lifestyles than those non-victimized. Obese cyber-victims experienced significantly higher suicidal ideation. Traditional and cyber-victimization may hinder treatment effectiveness and healthy lifestyle change in adolescents with obesity. Health professionals should pro-actively address peer victimization and psychosocial functioning during multidisciplinary obesity treatment. Schools could contribute to a better physical and psychosocial health of obese youth by implementing multi-behavioral health-promotion programs.

  20. A Crossing Method for Quinoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Peterson

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available As sustainable production of quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd. increases and its geographic range of cultivation expands, quinoa breeding will allow use of the crop’s wide genetic diversity for cultivar improvement and for adaptation to new agroecosystems and climactic regimes. Such breeding work will require a reliable technique for crossing quinoa plants using hand emasculation. The technique described herein focuses on the isolation of small flower clusters produced low on the plant, emasculation of male flowers, and subsequent pairing of the emasculated female parent with a male parent undergoing anthesis. Various traits, such as plant color, seed color, and axil pigmentation can be used to confirm the successful production of F1 plants. The manual hybridization technology provides a significant advantage over pairing plants and relying on chance cross-pollination, and has been successfully used to generate crosses between quinoa cultivars, as well as interspecific crosses between quinoa and Chenopodium berlandieri. This technology will help pave the way for the introduction and sustainable expansion of quinoa on a global scale across a wide range of target environments and diverse farming systems.

  1. Feline immunodeficiency virus cross-species transmission: Implications for emergence of new lentiviral infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Justin; Malmberg, Jennifer L.; Wood, Britta A.; Hladky, Sahaja; Troyer, Ryan; Roelke, Melody; Cunningham, Mark W.; McBride, Roy; Vickers, Winston; Boyce, Walter; Boydston, Erin E.; Serieys, Laurel E.K.; Riley, Seth P D; Crooks, Kevin R.; VandeWoude, Sue

    2016-01-01

    Owing to a complex history of host-parasite coevolution, lentiviruses exhibit a high degree of species specificity. Given the well-documented viral archeology of HIV emergence following human exposures to SIV, understanding processes that promote successful cross-species lentiviral transmissions is highly relevant. We have previously reported natural cross-species transmission of a subtype of feline immunodeficiency virus, puma lentivirus A (PLVA), between bobcats (Lynx rufus) and mountain lions (Puma concolor) in a small number of animals in California and Florida. In this study we investigate host-specific selection pressures, within-host viral fitness, and inter- vs. intra-species transmission patterns among a larger collection of PLV isolates from free-ranging bobcats and mountain lions. Analysis of proviral and viral RNA levels demonstrates that PLVA fitness is severely restricted in mountain lions compared to bobcats. We document evidence of diversifying selection in three of six PLVA genomes from mountain lions, but did not detect selection among twenty PLVA isolates from bobcats. These findings support that PLVA is a bobcat-adapted virus, which is less fit in mountain lions and under intense selection pressure in the novel host. Ancestral reconstruction of transmission events reveals intraspecific PLVA transmission has occurred among panthers (Puma concolor coryi) in Florida following initial cross-species infection from bobcats. In contrast, interspecific transmission from bobcats to mountain lions predominates in California. These findings document outcomes of cross-species lentiviral transmission events among felids that compare to emergence of HIV from nonhuman primates.IMPORTANCE Cross-species transmission episodes can be singular, dead-end events or can result in viral replication and spread in the new species. The factors that determine which outcome will occur are complex, and the risk of new virus emergence is therefore difficult to predict. Here

  2. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Cross-Species Transmission: Implications for Emergence of New Lentiviral Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Justin; Malmberg, Jennifer L; Wood, Britta A; Hladky, Sahaja; Troyer, Ryan; Roelke, Melody; Cunningham, Mark; McBride, Roy; Vickers, Winston; Boyce, Walter; Boydston, Erin; Serieys, Laurel; Riley, Seth; Crooks, Kevin; VandeWoude, Sue

    2017-03-01

    Owing to a complex history of host-parasite coevolution, lentiviruses exhibit a high degree of species specificity. Given the well-documented viral archeology of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) emergence following human exposures to simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), an understanding of processes that promote successful cross-species lentiviral transmissions is highly relevant. We previously reported natural cross-species transmission of a subtype of feline immunodeficiency virus, puma lentivirus A (PLVA), between bobcats ( Lynx rufus ) and mountain lions ( Puma concolor ) for a small number of animals in California and Florida. In this study, we investigate host-specific selection pressures, within-host viral fitness, and inter- versus intraspecies transmission patterns among a larger collection of PLV isolates from free-ranging bobcats and mountain lions. Analyses of proviral and viral RNA levels demonstrate that PLVA fitness is severely restricted in mountain lions compared to that in bobcats. We document evidence of diversifying selection in three of six PLVA genomes from mountain lions, but we did not detect selection among 20 PLVA isolates from bobcats. These findings support the hypothesis that PLVA is a bobcat-adapted virus which is less fit in mountain lions and under intense selection pressure in the novel host. Ancestral reconstruction of transmission events reveals that intraspecific PLVA transmission has occurred among panthers ( Puma concolor coryi ) in Florida following the initial cross-species infection from bobcats. In contrast, interspecific transmission from bobcats to mountain lions predominates in California. These findings document outcomes of cross-species lentiviral transmission events among felids that compare to the emergence of HIV from nonhuman primates. IMPORTANCE Cross-species transmission episodes can be singular, dead-end events or can result in viral replication and spread in the new species. The factors that determine which

  3. Vehicle barrier systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sena, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    The ground vehicle is one of the most effective tools available to an adversary force. Vehicles can be used to penetrate many types of perimeter barriers, transport equipment and personnel rapidly over long distances, and deliver large amounts of explosives directly to facilities in suicide missions. The function of a vehicle barrier system is to detain or disable a defined threat vehicle at a selected distance from a protected facility. Numerous facilities are installing, or planning to install, vehicle barrier systems and many of these facilities are requesting guidance to do so adequately. Therefore, vehicle barriers are being evaluated to determine their stopping capabilities so that systems can be designed that are both balanced and capable of providing a desired degree of protection. Equally important, many of the considerations that should be taken into account when establishing a vehicle barrier system have been identified. These considerations which pertain to site preparation, barrier selection, system integration and operation, and vehicle/barrier interaction, are discussed in this paper

  4. Effect of breakup on near barrier fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dasgupta, M.; Berriman, A.C.; Butt, R.D.; Hinde, D.J.; Morton, C.R.; Newton, J.O.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Unstable neutron-rich nuclei having very weakly bound neutrons exhibit characteristic features such as a neutron halo extending to large radii, and a low energy threshold for breakup. These features may dramatically affect fusion and other reaction processes. It is well accepted that the extended nuclear matter distribution will lead to an enhancement in fusion cross-sections over those for tightly bound nuclei. The effect of couplings to channels which act as doorways to breakup is, however, controversial, with model predictions differing in the relative magnitudes of enhancement and suppression. To investigate the effect on fusion of couplings specific to unstable neutron-rich nuclei, it is necessary to understand (and then predict) the cross-sections expected for their stable counterparts. This requires knowledge of the energy of the average fusion barrier, and information on the couplings. Experimentally all this information can be obtained from precisely measured fusion cross-sections. Such precision measurements of complete fusion cross-sections for 9 Be + 208 Pb and 6 Li, 7 Li + 209 Bi systems have been done at the Australian National University. The distribution of fusion barriers extracted from these data were used to reliably predict the expected fusion cross-sections. Comparison of the theoretical expectations with the experimentally measured cross-sections show conclusively that complete fusion, at above barrier energies, for all three systems is suppressed (by about 30%) compared with the fusion of more tightly bound nuclei. These measurements, in conjunction with incomplete fusion cross-sections, which were also measured, should encourage a complete theoretical description of fusion and breakup

  5. Differential susceptibility to the Withering Syndrome agent and renal coccidia in juvenile Haliotis rufescens, Haliotis discus hannai and the interspecific hybrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Roxana; Lohrmann, Karin B; Pizarro, Javiera; Brokordt, Katherina

    2014-02-01

    Withering Syndrome (WS) is a pathogenic chronic disease caused by the intracellular rickettsial-like bacterium "Candidatus Xenohaliotis californiensis" (WS-RLOs), which affects many abalone species. The renal coccidium (Margolisiella haliotis) has often been observed concurrent with WS infection. The red abalone Haliotis rufescens is a very susceptible species to WS and is also infected by the coccidium M. haliotis. In contrast, the Japanese abalone Haliotis discus hannai is not infected by these parasites. Interspecific hybridization is a method for improving important traits in animal husbandry. The objective of this study was to determine susceptibility to WS-RLO and M. haliotis infection in the hybrid generated from a cross between red and Japanese abalones. Juveniles from both species and the interspecific hybrid were challenged by exposure to effluent from red abalone adults infected with both parasites. The animals were analyzed by histology at 130days post-challenge. A 33% prevalence WS-RLOs was observed in the red abalone H. rufescens, whereas a 20% prevalence was observed in the hybrid. Infections were graded on a scale of 0-3. Of these red abalones infected, 53% presented grade 1 infection intensity, 10% had grade 2 infections, and 50% had grade 3 infections. However, the hybrids only presented intensities at the extremes of the scale; of those infected 33% showed grade 1 infections and 66% had grade 3 infections. The coccidium prevalence was 7% in red abalone individuals and 13% in the hybrid abalone. In contrast, the Japanese abalone did not present infections with either parasite. As with the prevalence, the infection intensities for the coccidium were higher in the hybrid abalone; of those infected 25% had grade 2 infections, and 75% had grade 3 infections, but the red abalone presented only grade 2 infection intensities. Therefore, the hybrid did not inherited non-susceptibility or resistance characteristics of the parental H. discus hannai and

  6. Recycler barrier RF buckets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, C.M.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The Recycler Ring at Fermilab uses a barrier rf systems for all of its rf manipulations. In this paper, I will give an overview of historical perspective on barrier rf system, the longitudinal beam dynamics issues, aspects of rf linearization to produce long flat bunches and methods used for emittance measurements of the beam in the RR barrier rf buckets. Current rf manipulation schemes used for antiproton beam stacking and longitudinal momentum mining of the RR beam for the Tevatron collider operation are explained along with their importance in spectacular success of the Tevatron luminosity performance.

  7. Converse Barrier Certificate Theorem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafael; Sloth, Christoffer

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a converse barrier certificate theorem for a generic dynamical system.We show that a barrier certificate exists for any safe dynamical system defined on a compact manifold. Other authors have developed a related result, by assuming that the dynamical system has no singular...... points in the considered subset of the state space. In this paper, we redefine the standard notion of safety to comply with generic dynamical systems with multiple singularities. Afterwards, we prove the converse barrier certificate theorem and illustrate the differences between ours and previous work...

  8. Converse Barrier Certificate Theorems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafael; Sloth, Christoffer

    2016-01-01

    This paper shows that a barrier certificate exists for any safe dynamical system. Specifically, we prove converse barrier certificate theorems for a class of structurally stable dynamical systems. Other authors have developed a related result by assuming that the dynamical system has neither...... singular points nor closed orbits. In this paper, we redefine the standard notion of safety to comply with dynamical systems with multiple singular elements. Hereafter, we prove the converse barrier certificate theorems and highlight the differences between our results and previous work by a number...

  9. Heavy metals in fish from the Aleutians: Interspecific and locational differences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burger, Joanna, E-mail: burger@biology.rutgers.edu [Division of Life Sciences, Rutgers University, 604 Allison Road, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Gochfeld, Michael [Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Rutgers-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Jeitner, Christian; Pittfield, Taryn [Division of Life Sciences, Rutgers University, 604 Allison Road, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Donio, Mark [Division of Life Sciences, Rutgers University, 604 Allison Road, Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    2014-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine levels of arsenic, cadmium, lead, mercury and selenium in edible tissue of seven species of marine fish collected from several Aleutian islands (in 2004) to determine: (1) interspecific differences, (2) locational differences (among Aleutian Islands), (3) size-related differences in any metal levels within a species, and (4) potential risk to the fish or to predators on the fish, including humans. We also compared metals levels to those of three other fish species previously examined in detail, as well as examining metals in the edible tissue of octopus (Octopus dofleini). Octopus did not have the highest levels of any metal. There were significant interspecific differences in all metal levels among the fish species, although the differences were less than an order of magnitude, except for arsenic (mean of 19,500 ppb in Flathead sole, Hippoglossoides elassodon). Significant intraisland variation occurred among the four sites on Amchitka, but there was not a consistent pattern. There were significant interisland differences for some metals and species. Mercury levels increased significantly with size for several species; lead increased significantly for only one fish species; and cadmium and selenium decreased significantly with size for halibut (Hippoglossus stenolepis). The Alaskan Department of Health and Social Services supports unrestricted consumption of most Alaskan fish species for all people, including pregnant women. Most mean metal concentrations were well below the levels known to adversely affect the fish themselves, or predators that consume them (including humans), except for mercury in three fish species (mean levels just below 0.3 ppm), and arsenic in two fish species. However, even at low mercury levels, people who consume fish almost daily will exceed guideline values from the Centers for Disease Control and the Environmental Protection Agency. - Highlights: • Cadmium, lead, mercury and selenium

  10. Heavy metals in fish from the Aleutians: Interspecific and locational differences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Jeitner, Christian; Pittfield, Taryn; Donio, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine levels of arsenic, cadmium, lead, mercury and selenium in edible tissue of seven species of marine fish collected from several Aleutian islands (in 2004) to determine: (1) interspecific differences, (2) locational differences (among Aleutian Islands), (3) size-related differences in any metal levels within a species, and (4) potential risk to the fish or to predators on the fish, including humans. We also compared metals levels to those of three other fish species previously examined in detail, as well as examining metals in the edible tissue of octopus (Octopus dofleini). Octopus did not have the highest levels of any metal. There were significant interspecific differences in all metal levels among the fish species, although the differences were less than an order of magnitude, except for arsenic (mean of 19,500 ppb in Flathead sole, Hippoglossoides elassodon). Significant intraisland variation occurred among the four sites on Amchitka, but there was not a consistent pattern. There were significant interisland differences for some metals and species. Mercury levels increased significantly with size for several species; lead increased significantly for only one fish species; and cadmium and selenium decreased significantly with size for halibut (Hippoglossus stenolepis). The Alaskan Department of Health and Social Services supports unrestricted consumption of most Alaskan fish species for all people, including pregnant women. Most mean metal concentrations were well below the levels known to adversely affect the fish themselves, or predators that consume them (including humans), except for mercury in three fish species (mean levels just below 0.3 ppm), and arsenic in two fish species. However, even at low mercury levels, people who consume fish almost daily will exceed guideline values from the Centers for Disease Control and the Environmental Protection Agency. - Highlights: • Cadmium, lead, mercury and selenium

  11. Molecular Genetic Markers of Intra- and Interspecific Divergence within Starfish and Sea Urchins (Echinodermata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, N B; Vladychenskaya, I P; Drozdov, A L; Kedrova, O S

    2016-09-01

    A fragment of the mitochondrial COI gene from isolates of several echinoderm species was sequenced. The isolates were from three species of starfish from the Asteriidae family (Asterias amurensis and Aphelasterias japonica collected in the Sea of Japan and Asterias rubens collected in the White Sea) and from the sea urchin Echinocardium cordatum (family Loveniidae) collected in the Sea of Japan. Additionally, regions including internal transcribed spacers and 5.8S rRNA (ITS1 - 5.8S rDNA - ITS2) were sequenced for the three studied starfish species. Phylogenetic analysis of the obtained COI sequences together with earlier determined homologous COI sequences from Ast. forbesii, Ast. rubens, and Echinocardium laevigaster from the North Atlantic and E. cordatum from the Yellow and North Seas (GenBank) placed them into strictly conspecific clusters with high bootstrap support (99% in all cases). Only two exceptions - Ast. rubens DQ077915 sequence placed with the Ast. forbesii cluster and Aph. japonica DQ992560 sequence placed with the Ast. amurensis cluster - were likely results of species misidentification. The intraspecific polymorphism for the COI gene within the Asteriidae family varied within a range of 0.2-0.9% as estimated from the genetic distances. The corresponding intrageneric and intergeneric values were 10.4-12.1 and 21.8-29.8%, respectively. The interspecific divergence for the COI gene in the sea urchin of Echinocardium genus (family Loveniidae) was significantly higher (17.1-17.7%) than in the starfish, while intergeneric divergence (14.6-25.7%) was similar to that in asteroids. The interspecific genetic distances for the nuclear transcribed sequences (ITS1 - 5.8S rDNA - ITS2) within the Asteriidae family were lower (3.1-4.5%), and the intergeneric distances were significantly higher (32.8-35.0%), compared to the corresponding distances for the COI gene. These results suggest that the investigated molecular-genetic markers could be used for segregation

  12. Species limits, interspecific hybridization and phylogeny in the cryptic land snail complex Pyramidula: The power of RADseq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razkin, Oihana; Sonet, Gontran; Breugelmans, Karin; Madeira, María José; Gómez-Moliner, Benjamín Juan; Backeljau, Thierry

    2016-08-01

    Restriction site-associated DNA sequencing (RADseq) was used to jointly assess phylogenetic relationships, interspecific hybridization and species delimitation in the cryptic, non-model land snail complex Pyramidula. A robust phylogeny was inferred using a matrix of concatenated sequences of almost 1,500,000bp long, containing >97,000 polymorphic sites. Maximum likelihood analyses fully resolved the phylogenetic relationships among species and drastically improved phylogenetic trees obtained from mtDNA and nDNA gene trees (COI, 16S rRNA, 5.8S rRNA, ITS2 and 28S rRNA sequence data). The best species delimitation scenario was selected on the basis of 875 unlinked single nucleotide polymorphisms, showing that nine Pyramidula species should be distinguished in Europe. Applying D-statistics provided no or weak evidence of interspecific hybridization among Pyramidula, except for some evidence of gene flow between two species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Optimistic barrier synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, David M.

    1992-01-01

    Barrier synchronization is fundamental operation in parallel computation. In many contexts, at the point a processor enters a barrier it knows that it has already processed all the work required of it prior to synchronization. The alternative case, when a processor cannot enter a barrier with the assurance that it has already performed all the necessary pre-synchronization computation, is treated. The problem arises when the number of pre-sychronization messages to be received by a processor is unkown, for example, in a parallel discrete simulation or any other computation that is largely driven by an unpredictable exchange of messages. We describe an optimistic O(log sup 2 P) barrier algorithm for such problems, study its performance on a large-scale parallel system, and consider extensions to general associative reductions as well as associative parallel prefix computations.

  14. Barrier Infrared Detector (BIRD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A recent breakthrough in MWIR detector design, has resulted in a high operating temperature (HOT) barrier infrared detector (BIRD) that is capable of spectral...

  15. Protective barrier development: Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wing, N.R.; Gee, G.W.

    1990-01-01

    Protective barrier and warning marker systems are being developed to isolate wastes disposed of near the earth's surface at the Hanford Site. The barrier is designed to function in an arid to semiarid climate, to limit infiltration and percolation of water through the waste zone to near-zero, to be maintenance free, and to last up to 10,000 yr. Natural materials (e.g., fine soil, sand, gravel, riprap, clay, asphalt) have been selected to optimize barrier performance and longevity and to create an integrated structure with redundant features. These materials isolate wastes by limiting water drainage; reducing the likelihood of plant, animal, and human intrusion; controlling emission of noxious gases; and minimizing erosion. Westinghouse Hanford Company and Pacific Northwest Laboratory efforts to assess the performance of various barrier and marker designs will be discussed

  16. Are We Eating Our Way to Prostate Cancer—A Hypothesis Based on the Evolution, Bioaccumulation, and Interspecific Transfer of miR-150

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesh Vaidyanathan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are well established epigenetic modifiers. There is a lot of work being done to identify the evolutionary transfer of miRNAs both at intra- and interspecific levels. In this hypothesis-driven review, we have suggested a possible reason as to why miR-150 can be a promising diagnostic biomarker for prostate cancer using theories of evolution, bio-accumulation, and interspecific transfer of miRNAs.

  17. Evaluation of Relationships between Growth Rate, Tree Size, Lignocellulose Composition, and Enzymatic Saccharification in Interspecific Corymbia Hybrids and Parental Taxa

    OpenAIRE

    Healey, Adam L.; Lee, David J.; Lupoi, Jason S.; Papa, Gabriella; Guenther, Joel M.; Corno, Luca; Adani, Fabrizio; Singh, Seema; Simmons, Blake A.; Henry, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    © 2016 Healey,Lee,Lupoi,Papa,Guenther,Corno,Adani,Singh,Simmons and Henry. In order for a lignocellulosic bioenergy feedstock to be considered sustainable,it must possess a high rate of growth to supply biomass for conversion. Despite the desirability of a fast growth rate for industrial application,it is unclear what effect growth rate has on biomass composition or saccharification. We characterized Klason lignin,glucan,and xylan content with response to growth in Corymbia interspecific F1 h...

  18. Evaluation of relationships between growth rate, tree size, lignocellulose composition and enzymatic saccharification in interspecific Corymbia hybrids and parental taxa.

    OpenAIRE

    Adam L Healey; David John Lee; David John Lee; Jason S Lupoi; Gabriella Papa; Joel M Guenther; Joel M Guenther; Luca Corno; Fabrizio Adani; Seema Singh; Seema Singh; Blake Simmons; Blake Simmons; Robert Henry

    2016-01-01

    In order for a lignocellulosic bioenergy feedstock to be considered sustainable, it must possess a high rate of growth to supply biomass for conversion. Despite the desirability of a fast growth rate for industrial application, it is unclear what effect growth rate has on biomass composition or saccharification. We characterized Klason lignin, glucan, and xylan content with response to growth in Corymbia interspecific F1 hybrid families (HF) and parental species C. torelliana (CT) and C. citr...

  19. Interspecific interactions between Phragmites australis and Spartina alterniflora along a tidal gradient in the Dongtan wetland, Eastern China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Yuan

    Full Text Available The invasive species Spartina alterniora Loisel was introduced to the eastern coast of China in the 1970s and 1980s for the purposes of land reclamation and the prevention of soil erosion. The resulting interspecific competition had an important influence on the distribution of native vegetation, which makes studying the patterns and mechanisms of the interactions between Spartina alterniora Loisel and the native species Phragmites australis (Cav. Trin ex Steud in this region very important. There have been some researches on the interspecific interactions between P. australis and S. alterniora in the Dongtan wetland of Chongming, east China, most of which has focused on the comparison of their physiological characteristics. In this paper, we conducted a neighbor removal experiment along a tidal gradient to evaluate the relative competitive abilities of the two species by calculating their relative neighbor effect (RNE index. We also looked at the influence of environmental stress and disturbance on the competitive abilities of the two species by comparing interaction strength (I among different tidal zones both for P. australis and S. alterniora. Finally, we measured physiological characteristics of the two species to assess the physiological mechanisms behind their different competitive abilities. Both negative and positive interactions were found between P. australis and S. alterniora along the environmental gradient. When the direction of the competitive intensity index for P. australis and S. alterniora was consistent, the competitive or facilitative effect of S. alterniora on P. australis was stronger than that of P. australis on S. alterniora. The interspecific interactions of P. australis and S. alterniora varied with environmental conditions, as well as with the method used, to measure interspecific interactions.

  20. Tropical forests are non-equilibrium ecosystems governed by interspecific competition based on universal 1/6 niche width.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Fort

    Full Text Available Tropical forests are mega-diverse ecosystems that display complex and non-equilibrium dynamics. However, theoretical approaches have largely focused on explaining steady-state behaviour and fitting snapshots of data. Here we show that local and niche interspecific competition can realistically and parsimoniously explain the observed non-equilibrium regime of permanent plots of nine tropical forests, in eight different countries. Our spatially-explicit model, besides predicting with accuracy the main biodiversity metrics for these plots, can also reproduce their dynamics. A central finding is that tropical tree species have a universal niche width of approximately 1/6 of the niche axis that echoes the observed widespread convergence in their functional traits enabling them to exploit similar resources and to coexist despite of having large niche overlap. This niche width yields an average ratio of 0.25 between interspecific and intraspecific competition that corresponds to an intermediate value between the extreme claims of the neutral model and the classical niche-based model of community assembly (where interspecific competition is dominant. In addition, our model can explain and yield observed spatial patterns that classical niche-based and neutral theories cannot.

  1. Barriers to Medical Error Reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorolajal, Jalal; Rezaie, Shirin; Aghighi, Negar

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to explore the prevalence of medical error underreporting and associated barriers. This cross-sectional study was performed from September to December 2012. Five hospitals, affiliated with Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, in Hamedan, Iran were investigated. A self-administered questionnaire was used for data collection. Participants consisted of physicians, nurses, midwives, residents, interns, and staffs of radiology and laboratory departments. Overall, 50.26% of subjects had committed but not reported medical errors. The main reasons mentioned for underreporting were lack of effective medical error reporting system (60.0%), lack of proper reporting form (51.8%), lack of peer supporting a person who has committed an error (56.0%), and lack of personal attention to the importance of medical errors (62.9%). The rate of committing medical errors was higher in men (71.4%), age of 50-40 years (67.6%), less-experienced personnel (58.7%), educational level of MSc (87.5%), and staff of radiology department (88.9%). This study outlined the main barriers to reporting medical errors and associated factors that may be helpful for healthcare organizations in improving medical error reporting as an essential component for patient safety enhancement.

  2. Barriers to medical error reporting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalal Poorolajal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study was conducted to explore the prevalence of medical error underreporting and associated barriers. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed from September to December 2012. Five hospitals, affiliated with Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, in Hamedan,Iran were investigated. A self-administered questionnaire was used for data collection. Participants consisted of physicians, nurses, midwives, residents, interns, and staffs of radiology and laboratory departments. Results: Overall, 50.26% of subjects had committed but not reported medical errors. The main reasons mentioned for underreporting were lack of effective medical error reporting system (60.0%, lack of proper reporting form (51.8%, lack of peer supporting a person who has committed an error (56.0%, and lack of personal attention to the importance of medical errors (62.9%. The rate of committing medical errors was higher in men (71.4%, age of 50-40 years (67.6%, less-experienced personnel (58.7%, educational level of MSc (87.5%, and staff of radiology department (88.9%. Conclusions: This study outlined the main barriers to reporting medical errors and associated factors that may be helpful for healthcare organizations in improving medical error reporting as an essential component for patient safety enhancement.

  3. TAI vacuolar invertase orthologs: the interspecific variability in tomato plants (Solanum section Lycopersicon).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slugina, M A; Shchennikova, A V; Kochieva, E Z

    2017-10-01

    Understanding the genetic mechanisms underlying carbohydrate metabolism can promote the development of biotechnological advances in fruit plants. The flesh tomato fruit represents an ideal system for examining the role of sucrose cleavage enzymes in fruit development, and wild tomato species differing in storage sugars serve as an excellent research material for this purpose. Plant vacuolar invertase is a key enzyme of sucrose metabolism in the sink organs. In the present study, we identified complete gene sequences encoding the TAI vacuolar invertase in 11 wild and one cultivated tomato accessions of the Solanum section Lycopersicon. The average level of interspecific polymorphism in TAI genes was 8.58%; however, in the green-fruited tomatoes, the TAI genes contained 100 times more SNPs than those in the red-fruited accessions. The TAI proteins demonstrated 8% variability, whereas the red-fruited species had none. A TAI-based phylogenetic tree revealed two main clusters containing self-compatible and self-incompatible species, which concurs with the previous crossability-based division and demonstrates that the TAI genes reflect the evolutionary relationships between the red- and green-fruited tomatoes. Furthermore, we detected differential expression patterns of the TAI genes in the fruits of wild and cultivated tomatoes, which corresponded to sugar composition. The polymorphism analysis of the TAI acid invertases of Solanum section Lycopersicon species will contribute to the understanding of the genetic potential of TAI genes to impact tomato breeding through genetic engineering of the carbohydrate composition in the fruit.

  4. Learning and owner-stranger effects on interspecific communication in domestic dogs (Canis familiaris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgier, Angel M; Jakovcevic, Adriana; Mustaca, Alba E; Bentosela, Mariana

    2009-05-01

    Domestic dogs are very successful at following human cues like gazing or pointing to find hidden food in an object choice task. They solve this kind of situation at their first attempts and from early stages of their development and perform better than wolves. Most of the authors proposed that these abilities are a domestication product, and independent from learning processes. There are few systematic studies on the effects of learning on dogs' communicative skills. We aim to evaluate the effect of extinction and reversal learning procedures on the use of the pointing gesture in an object choice task. The results showed that dogs stopped following the pointing cue in the extinction and that they learned to choose the not pointed container in the reversal learning. Results suggest that instrumental learning plays an important role in interspecific communication mechanisms between humans and dogs. In both experiments for half of the subjects the pointer was the owner and for the rest was a stranger. A differential effect was found: extinction was slower but reversal learning was faster when the owner gave the cue. This data indicates that the relationship of the dog with the person who emits the cue influences performance.

  5. Behavioral and life-history evidence for interspecific competition in the larvae of two heliconian butterflies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millan, Carolina; Borges, Simone Silva; Rodrigues, Daniela; Moreira, Gilson Rudinei Pires

    2013-10-01

    Interspecific competition in herbivorous insects remains a controversial issue. To date, many studied systems have not met assumptions of the traditional competition theory, and a new paradigm has been emerging. We examined the behavioral and life-history consequences of common host plant use of Heliconius erato and Dryas iulia (Nymphalidae) in relation to Passiflora suberosa (Passifloraceae). Larvae of the former use the apical portion of this host; the latter is presumably able to explore all plant parts. We assessed host use pattern in relation to leaf age, when reared either alone ( D. iulia) or together ( D. iulia and H. erato). Larval feeding choice tests with respect to leaf age were performed, and performance was recorded. Observations were made to assess antagonistic behavior of H. erato and D. iulia towards each other, if any. Similarly to H. erato, D. iulia fed on the young leaves significantly more than the mature ones; larvae were not induced to prefer mature leaves. First instars of H. erato used only the apical parts of P. suberosa and displayed aggressive behavior towards D. iulia, which moved to the lower shoot portions. Larval mortality and development time of both species significantly increased when reared together; such performance costs were more pronounced in D. iulia than H. erato. Our study gathers evidences that use of P. suberosa by these heliconian butterflies represent a case of competitive exclusion resulting in niche differentiation, where costs are higher for D. iulia than H. erato.

  6. Intra- and interspecific chromosome polymorphisms in cultivated Cichorium L. species (Asteraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardes, Ebenézer C S; Benko-Iseppon, Ana M; Vasconcelos, Santelmo; Carvalho, Reginaldo; Brasileiro-Vidal, Ana C

    2013-09-01

    Endive (Cichorium endivia L.) and chicory (C. intybus L.) both have 2n = 18, but until now, there has been no detailed karyomorphological characterization. The present work evaluated five accessions of each species using FISH with rDNA probes and fluorochrome staining with CMA and DAPI. Both species presented distinct banding patterns after fluorochrome staining: while endive had proximal CMA(++)/DAPI(-) bands in the short arms of pairs 1, 2 and 3, chicory had proximal CMA-positive bands in chromosomes 1 and 3 and interstitial in the short arm of chromosome 8. Among endive accessions, FISH procedures revealed conserved position and number of 5S and 45S rDNA sites (two and three pairs, respectively), associated with the CMA-positive bands. Notwithstanding, polymorphisms were detected within chicory accessions regarding the number and the distribution of rDNA sites in relation to the most frequent karyotype (two pairs with 45S and one with 5S rDNA). The karyological markers developed allowed karyotypic differentiation between both species, uncovering peculiarities in the number and position of rDNA sites, which suggest chromosome rearrangements, such as translocations in chicory cultivars. The interspecific and intraspecific polymorphisms observed emphasize the potential of karyomorphological evaluations, helping our understanding of the relationships and evolution of the group.

  7. Intra- and interspecific chromosome polymorphisms in cultivated Cichorium L. species (Asteraceae

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    Ebenézer C.S. Bernardes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Endive (Cichorium endivia L. and chicory (C. intybus L. both have 2n = 18, but until now, there has been no detailed karyomorphological characterization. The present work evaluated five accessions of each species using FISH with rDNA probes and fluorochrome staining with CMA and DAPI. Both species presented distinct banding patterns after fluorochrome staining: while endive had proximal CMA++/DAPI- bands in the short arms of pairs 1, 2 and 3, chicory had proximal CMA-positive bands in chromosomes 1 and 3 and interstitial in the short arm of chromosome 8. Among endive accessions, FISH procedures revealed conserved position and number of 5S and 45S rDNA sites (two and three pairs, respectively, associated with the CMA-positive bands. Notwithstanding, polymorphisms were detected within chicory accessions regarding the number and the distribution of rDNA sites in relation to the most frequent karyotype (two pairs with 45S and one with 5S rDNA. The karyological markers developed allowed karyotypic differentiation between both species, uncovering peculiarities in the number and position of rDNA sites, which suggest chromosome rearrangements, such as translocations in chicory cultivars. The interspecific and intraspecific polymorphisms observed emphasize the potential of karyomorphological evaluations, helping our understanding of the relationships and evolution of the group.

  8. Concordance between stabilizing sexual selection, intraspecific variation, and interspecific divergence inPhymata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punzalan, David; Rowe, Locke

    2016-11-01

    Empirical studies show that lineages typically exhibit long periods of evolutionary stasis and that relative levels of within-species trait covariance often correlate with the extent of between-species trait divergence. These observations have been interpreted by some as evidence of genetic constraints persisting for long periods of time. However, an alternative explanation is that both intra- and interspecific variation are shaped by the features of the adaptive landscape (e.g., stabilizing selection). Employing a genus of insects that are diverse with respect to a suite of secondary sex traits, we related data describing nonlinear phenotypic (sexual) selection to intraspecific trait covariances and macroevolutionary divergence. We found support for two key predictions (1) that intraspecific trait covariation would be aligned with stabilizing selection and (2) that there would be restricted macroevolutionary divergence in the direction of stabilizing selection. The observed alignment of all three matrices offers a point of caution in interpreting standing variability as metrics of evolutionary constraint. Our results also illustrate the power of sexual selection for determining variation observed at both short and long timescales and account for the apparently slow evolution of some secondary sex characters in this lineage.

  9. Examining dog-human play: the characteristics, affect, and vocalizations of a unique interspecific interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Alexandra; Hecht, Julie

    2016-07-01

    Despite the growing interest in research on the interaction between humans and dogs, only a very few research projects focus on the routines between dogs and their owners. In this study, we investigated one such routine: dog-human play. Dyadic interspecific play is known to be a common interaction between owner and charge, but the details of what counts as play have not been thoroughly researched. Similarly, though people represent that "play" is pleasurable, no study has yet undertaken to determine whether different forms of play are associated with different affective states. Thus, we aimed to generate an inventory of the forms of dyadic play, the vocalizations within play, and to investigate the relationship of affect to elements of play. Via a global citizen science project, we solicited videotapes of dog-human play sessions from dog owners. We coded 187 play bouts via frame-by-frame video playback. We then assessed the relationship between various intra-bout variables and owner affect (positive or neutral) during play (dog affect was overwhelmingly positive). Amount of physical contact ("touch"), level of activity of owner ("movement"), and physical closeness of dog-owner dyad ("proximity") were highly correlated with positive affect. Owner vocalizations were found to contain different elements in positive- and neutral-affect play. One novel category of play, "tease", was found. We conclude that not all play is created equal: the experience of play to the owner participant is strongly related to a few identifiable characteristics of the interaction.

  10. Global warming increases the interspecific competitiveness of the invasive plant alligator weed, Alternanthera philoxeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao; Ismail, Mohannad; Ding, Jianqing

    2017-01-01

    Global warming could accelerate the spread of invasive species to higher latitudes and intensify their effects on native species. Here, we report results of two years of field surveys along a latitudinal gradient (21°N to 31°N) in southern China, to determine the species structure of the invasive plant Alternanthera philoxeroides community. We also performed a replacement series experiment (mono and mixed) to evaluate the effects of elevated temperature on the competitiveness of A. philoxeroides with the native co-occurring species Digitaria sanguinalis. In the field survey, we found that the dominance of A. philoxeroides increased with increasing of latitude gradient while cover of D. sanguinalis decreased. In monospecific plantings, artificial warming reduced the length of D. sanguinalis roots. In mixed plantings, warming reduced both A. philoxeroides abundance and D. sanguinalis stem length when A. philoxeroides was more prevalent in the planting. Warming also significantly reduced D. sanguinalis biomass, but increased that of A. philoxeroides. In addition, elevated temperatures significantly reduced the relative yield (RY) of D. sanguinalis, particularly when A. philoxeroides was planted in higher proportion in the plot. These results suggest that the invasiveness of A. philoxeroides increased with increasing latitude, and that warming may increase the effectiveness of its interspecific competition with D. sanguinalis. Hence, under global warming conditions, the harm to native species from A. philoxeroides would increase at higher latitudes. Our findings are critical for predicting the invasiveness of alien species under climate change. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Inter-specific variation in headspace scent volatiles composition of four commercially cultivated jasmine flowers.

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    Bera, Paramita; Kotamreddy, Jhansi Narmada Reddy; Samanta, Tanmoy; Maiti, Saborni; Mitra, Adinpunya

    2015-01-01

    Jasmines are commercially grown for their fragrant flowers and essential oil production. The flowers of jasmine emit sweet-smelling fragrance from evening till midnight. This study was designed to study the composition and inter-specific variation of the emitted scent volatiles from flowers of four commercially cultivated Jasminum species namely, Jasminum sambac, Jasminum auriculatum, Jasminum grandiflorum and Jasminum multiflorum. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis revealed that the scent volatiles composition of these flowers was predominantly enriched with both terpenoid and benzenoid compounds. Linalool and (3E,6E)-α-farnesene were identified as the major monoterpene and sesquiterpene in all the four species, respectively. The most abundant benzenoid detected in all flowers was benzyl acetate. Comparison of volatile profiles indicated a variation in fragrance contents and types emitted from these four jasmine flowers. The outcome of this study shall help in elucidating the enzymes and genes of fragrance biosynthesis in jasmines and in aiming to create flowers with improved scent quality.

  12. Co-dominance and succession in forest dynamics: the role of interspecific differences in crown transmissivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammarano, Mario

    2011-09-21

    Forests that are composed of two or more tree species with similar ecological strategies appear to contradict the competitive exclusion principle. Beech-maple communities are a well-known example of such a system. On a local scale, a number of mechanisms have been proposed to explain the coexistence of these two species. These are reciprocal replacement, external factors that favour alternatively one or the other species and demographic stochasticity. This paper presents and analyses a simple mathematical model that shows that external factors are not an essential requirement for coexistence. Rather, coexistence requires interspecific differences in light transmissivity through the crowns of adult trees. However, all the three mechanisms mentioned above can be interpreted within the framework of the model. Furthermore, many models of forest dynamics make use of shade tolerance as a key feature in describing successional dynamics. Despite its importance, however, shade tolerance does not have a commonly accepted quantitative definition. Here, a simple scheme is proposed where the relationship between shade tolerance, individual traits (growth and survival) and successional status is defined. This might have important implications in understanding the overall dynamics. Theoretical results have been compared with a number of studies carried out in North American forests. In particular, coexistence in beech-maple communities and the relation between shade tolerance and successional status in a beech-hemlock-birch community have been discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Naked Mole Rat Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells and Their Contribution to Interspecific Chimera

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    Sang-Goo Lee

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Naked mole rats (NMRs are exceptionally long-lived, cancer-resistant rodents. Identifying the defining characteristics of these traits may shed light on aging and cancer mechanisms. Here, we report the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs from NMR fibroblasts and their contribution to mouse-NMR chimeric embryos. Efficient reprogramming could be observed under N2B27+2i conditions. The iPSCs displayed a characteristic morphology, expressed pluripotent markers, formed embryoid bodies, and showed typical differentiation patterns. Interestingly, NMR embryonic fibroblasts and the derived iPSCs had propensity for a tetraploid karyotype and were resistant to forming teratomas, but within mouse blastocysts they contributed to both interspecific placenta and fetus. Gene expression patterns of NMR iPSCs were more similar to those of human than mouse iPSCs. Overall, we uncovered unique features of NMR iPSCs and report a mouse-NMR chimeric model. The iPSCs and associated cell culture systems can be used for a variety of biological and biomedical applications.

  14. INTERSPECIFIC ANALYSIS OF GENETIC DIVERSITY IN Pyrus spp. and Malus spp

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    ANA CRUZ MORILLO CORONADO

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Boyacá is one of the departments of Colombia pioneer in the national production of deciduous, especially peaches, plums, pears and apples. Eight Random Amplified Microsatellite primers (RAMs were evaluated in eleven apple (Malus communis, seven pears (Pyrus communis, two apricots (Prunus armeniaca L. and one almond (Prunus amigdalus L. materials from deciduous collection of the Pedagogical and Technological University of Colombia. A total of 128 bands were generated with molecular weights ranging between 250 and 1300 Kb. Two groups and subgroups were formed, a similarity coefficient of 0,55, according to specie and fruit characteristics. The number of polymorphic loci ranged between 96 and 123 for CGA and ACA primers, respectively. The average value of heterozygosity was 0,34, much lower than values found in other genetic diversity studies in the genus Malus and Pyrus. Similarity index and genetic distances corrobate the synteny between these genomes which can be taken advantage for identifying of genes, comparative mapping and interspecific hybridization.

  15. Life span and reproductive cost explain interspecific variation in the optimal onset of reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourocq, Emeline; Bize, Pierre; Bouwhuis, Sandra; Bradley, Russell; Charmantier, Anne; de la Cruz, Carlos; Drobniak, Szymon M; Espie, Richard H M; Herényi, Márton; Hötker, Hermann; Krüger, Oliver; Marzluff, John; Møller, Anders P; Nakagawa, Shinichi; Phillips, Richard A; Radford, Andrew N; Roulin, Alexandre; Török, János; Valencia, Juliana; van de Pol, Martijn; Warkentin, Ian G; Winney, Isabel S; Wood, Andrew G; Griesser, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Fitness can be profoundly influenced by the age at first reproduction (AFR), but to date the AFR-fitness relationship only has been investigated intraspecifically. Here, we investigated the relationship between AFR and average lifetime reproductive success (LRS) across 34 bird species. We assessed differences in the deviation of the Optimal AFR (i.e., the species-specific AFR associated with the highest LRS) from the age at sexual maturity, considering potential effects of life history as well as social and ecological factors. Most individuals adopted the species-specific Optimal AFR and both the mean and Optimal AFR of species correlated positively with life span. Interspecific deviations of the Optimal AFR were associated with indices reflecting a change in LRS or survival as a function of AFR: a delayed AFR was beneficial in species where early AFR was associated with a decrease in subsequent survival or reproductive output. Overall, our results suggest that a delayed onset of reproduction beyond maturity is an optimal strategy explained by a long life span and costs of early reproduction. By providing the first empirical confirmations of key predictions of life-history theory across species, this study contributes to a better understanding of life-history evolution. © 2016 The Author(s). Evolution © 2016 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  16. Meta-analysis of the effects of forest fragmentation on interspecific interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrach, Ainhoa; Laurance, William F; Larrinaga, Asier R; Santamaria, Luis

    2014-10-01

    Forest fragmentation dramatically alters species persistence and distribution and affects many ecological interactions among species. Recent studies suggest that mutualisms, such as pollination and seed dispersal, are more sensitive to the negative effects of forest fragmentation than antagonisms, such as predation or herbivory. We applied meta-analytical techniques to evaluate this hypothesis and quantified the relative contributions of different components of the fragmentation process (decreases in fragment size, edge effects, increased isolation, and habitat degradation) to the overall effect. The effects of fragmentation on mutualisms were primarily driven by habitat degradation, edge effects, and fragment isolation, and, as predicted, they were consistently more negative on mutualisms than on antagonisms. For the most studied interaction type, seed dispersal, only certain components of fragmentation had significant (edge effects) or marginally significant (fragment size) effects. Seed size modulated the effect of fragmentation: species with large seeds showed stronger negative impacts of fragmentation via reduced dispersal rates. Our results reveal that different components of the habitat fragmentation process have varying impacts on key mutualisms. We also conclude that antagonistic interactions have been understudied in fragmented landscapes, most of the research has concentrated on particular types of mutualistic interactions such as seed dispersal, and that available studies of interspecific interactions have a strong geographical bias (arising mostly from studies carried out in Brazil, Chile, and the United States). © 2014 Society for Conservation Biology.

  17. Microarray analysis of differential gene expression elicited in Trametes versicolor during interspecific mycelial interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyre, Catherine; Muftah, Wafa; Hiscox, Jennifer; Hunt, Julie; Kille, Peter; Boddy, Lynne; Rogers, Hilary J

    2010-08-01

    Trametes versicolor is an important white rot fungus of both industrial and ecological interest. Saprotrophic basidiomycetes are the major decomposition agents in woodland ecosystems, and rarely form monospecific populations, therefore interspecific mycelial interactions continually occur. Interactions have different outcomes including replacement of one species by the other or deadlock. We have made subtractive cDNA libraries to enrich for genes that are expressed when T. versicolor interacts with another saprotrophic basidiomycete, Stereum gausapatum, an interaction that results in the replacement of the latter. Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) (1920) were used for microarray analysis, and their expression compared during interaction with three different fungi: S. gausapatum (replaced by T. versicolor), Bjerkandera adusta (deadlock) and Hypholoma fasciculare (replaced T. versicolor). Expression of significantly more probes changed in the interaction between T. versicolor and S. gausapatum or B. adusta compared to H. fasciculare, suggesting a relationship between interaction outcome and changes in gene expression. Copyright © 2010 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Interspecific Plant Interactions Reflected in Soil Bacterial Community Structure and Nitrogen Cycling in Primary Succession

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    Joseph E. Knelman

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Past research demonstrating the importance plant–microbe interactions as drivers of ecosystem succession has focused on how plants condition soil microbial communities, impacting subsequent plant performance and plant community assembly. These studies, however, largely treat microbial communities as a black box. In this study, we sought to examine how emblematic shifts from early successional Alnus viridus ssp. sinuata (Sitka alder to late successional Picea sitchensis (Sitka spruce in primary succession may be reflected in specific belowground changes in bacterial community structure and nitrogen cycling related to the interaction of these two plants. We examined early successional alder-conditioned soils in a glacial forefield to delineate how alders alter the soil microbial community with increasing dominance. Further, we assessed the impact of late-successional spruce plants on these early successional alder-conditioned microbiomes and related nitrogen cycling through a leachate addition microcosm experiment. We show how increasingly abundant alder select for particular bacterial taxa. Additionally, we found that spruce leachate significantly alters the composition of these microbial communities in large part by driving declines in taxa that are enriched by alder, including bacterial symbionts. We found these effects to be spruce specific, beyond a general leachate effect. Our work also demonstrates a unique influence of spruce on ammonium availability. Such insights bolster theory relating the importance of plant–microbe interactions with late-successional plants and interspecific plant interactions more generally.

  19. Interspecific Plant Interactions Reflected in Soil Bacterial Community Structure and Nitrogen Cycling in Primary Succession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knelman, Joseph E; Graham, Emily B; Prevéy, Janet S; Robeson, Michael S; Kelly, Patrick; Hood, Eran; Schmidt, Steve K

    2018-01-01

    Past research demonstrating the importance plant-microbe interactions as drivers of ecosystem succession has focused on how plants condition soil microbial communities, impacting subsequent plant performance and plant community assembly. These studies, however, largely treat microbial communities as a black box. In this study, we sought to examine how emblematic shifts from early successional Alnus viridus ssp. sinuata (Sitka alder) to late successional Picea sitchensis (Sitka spruce) in primary succession may be reflected in specific belowground changes in bacterial community structure and nitrogen cycling related to the interaction of these two plants. We examined early successional alder-conditioned soils in a glacial forefield to delineate how alders alter the soil microbial community with increasing dominance. Further, we assessed the impact of late-successional spruce plants on these early successional alder-conditioned microbiomes and related nitrogen cycling through a leachate addition microcosm experiment. We show how increasingly abundant alder select for particular bacterial taxa. Additionally, we found that spruce leachate significantly alters the composition of these microbial communities in large part by driving declines in taxa that are enriched by alder, including bacterial symbionts. We found these effects to be spruce specific, beyond a general leachate effect. Our work also demonstrates a unique influence of spruce on ammonium availability. Such insights bolster theory relating the importance of plant-microbe interactions with late-successional plants and interspecific plant interactions more generally.

  20. Interspecific variation in the phenology of advertisement calling in a temperate Australian frog community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heard, Geoffrey W; Canessa, Stefano; Parris, Kirsten M

    2015-09-01

    Spatial and temporal partitioning of resources underlies the coexistence of species with similar niches. In communities of frogs and toads, the phenology of advertisement calling provides insights into temporal partitioning of reproductive effort and its implications for community dynamics. This study assessed the phenology of advertisement calling in an anuran community from Melbourne, in southern Australia. We collated data from 1432 surveys of 253 sites and used logistic regression to quantify seasonality in the nightly probability of calling and the influence of meteorological variables on this probability for six species of frogs. We found limited overlap in the predicted seasonal peaks of calling among these species. Those shown to have overlapping calling peaks are unlikely to be in direct competition, due to differences in larval ecology (Crinia signifera and Litoria ewingii) or differences in calling behavior and acoustics (Limnodynastes dumerilii and Litoria raniformis). In contrast, closely related and ecologically similar species (Crinia signfera and Crinia parinsignifera;Litoria ewingii and Litoria verreauxii) appear to have staggered seasonal peaks of calling. In combination with interspecific variation in the meteorological correlates of calling, these results may be indicative of temporal partitioning of reproductive activity to facilitate coexistence, as has been reported for tropical and temperate anurans from other parts of the globe.

  1. Interspecific variation in heavy metal body concentrations in Hong Kong marine invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmore, G

    2001-01-01

    Accumulated body concentrations of cadmium, copper and zinc were investigated in 19 species of intertidal invertebrates (the barnacles Tetraclita squamosa, Capitulum mitella, Balanus amphitrite, Megabalanus volcano, the bivalves Saccostrea cucullata, Septifer virgatus and Brachidontes atratus, the chiton Acanthopleura japonica and the gastropods Cellana grata, Cellana toreuma, Patelloida saccharina, Patelloida pygmaea, Siphonaria japonica, Tegula argyrostoma, Lunella coronata, Monodonta labio, Nerita albicilla, Thais clavigera and Thais luteostoma) collected from a relatively unpolluted area in Hong Kong, i.e. two shores within the Cape d'Aguilar Marine Reserve. In general body metal concentrations could be explained by the accumulation strategy of the analysed organism and by physiological requirements for the essential metals, i.e. copper and zinc. Zinc concentrations were, therefore, greatest in the barnacles and the oyster S. cucullata. Copper concentrations were greatest in those gastropods containing the respiratory pigment haemocyanin and in S. cucullata. One species collected from the sheltered shore, i.e. T. luteostoma, had much higher copper body concentrations compared with exposed shore conspecifics and this may be attributed to a diet that was dominated by oysters, which have high copper body concentrations. In contrast to both copper and zinc, cadmium body concentrations showed little interspecific variation.

  2. Interspecific gene flow in a multispecies oak hybrid zone in the Sierra Tarahumara of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñaloza-Ramírez, Juan Manuel; González-Rodríguez, Antonio; Mendoza-Cuenca, Luis; Caron, Henri; Kremer, Antoine; Oyama, Ken

    2010-03-01

    Interspecific gene flow can occur in many combinations among species within the genus Quercus, but simultaneous hybridization among more than two species has been rarely analysed. The present study addresses the genetic structure and morphological variation in a triple hybrid zone formed by Q. hypoleucoides, Q. scytophylla and Q. sideroxyla in north-western Mexico. A total of 247 trees from ten reference and 13 presumed intermediate populations were characterized using leaf shape variation and geometric morphometrics, and seven nuclear microsatellites as genetic markers. Discriminant function analysis was performed for leaf shape variation, and estimates of genetic diversity and structure, and individual Bayesian genetic assignments were obtained. Reference populations formed three completely distinct groups according to discriminant function analysis based on the morphological data, and showed low, but significant, genetic differentiation. Populations from the zone of contact contained individuals morphologically intermediate between pairs of species in different combinations, or even among the three species. The Bayesian admixture analysis found that three main genetic clusters best fitted the data, with good correspondence of reference populations of each species to one of the genetic clusters, but various degrees of admixture evidenced in populations from the contact area. The three oak species have formed a complex hybrid zone that is geographically structured as a mosaic, and comprising a wide range of genotypes, including hybrids between different species pairs, backcrosses and probable triple hybrids.

  3. Pilot whales attracted to killer whale sounds: acoustically-mediated interspecific interactions in cetaceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curé, Charlotte; Antunes, Ricardo; Samarra, Filipa; Alves, Ana Catarina; Visser, Fleur; Kvadsheim, Petter H; Miller, Patrick J O

    2012-01-01

    In cetaceans' communities, interactions between individuals of different species are often observed in the wild. Yet, due to methodological and technical challenges very little is known about the mediation of these interactions and their effect on cetaceans' behavior. Killer whales (Orcinus orca) are a highly vocal species and can be both food competitors and potential predators of many other cetaceans. Thus, the interception of their vocalizations by unintended cetacean receivers may be particularly important in mediating interspecific interactions. To address this hypothesis, we conducted playbacks of killer whale vocalizations recorded during herring-feeding activity to free-ranging long-finned pilot whales (Globicephala melas). Using a multi-sensor tag, we were able to track the whales and to monitor changes of their movements and social behavior in response to the playbacks. We demonstrated that the playback of killer whale sounds to pilot whales induced a clear increase in group size and a strong attraction of the animals towards the sound source. These findings provide the first experimental evidence that the interception of heterospecific vocalizations can mediate interactions between different cetacean species in previously unrecognized ways.

  4. Inter-specific coral chimerism: genetically distinct multicellular structures associated with tissue loss in Montipora capitata.

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    Thierry M Work

    Full Text Available Montipora white syndrome (MWS results in tissue-loss that is often lethal to Montipora capitata, a major reef building coral that is abundant and dominant in the Hawai'ian Archipelago. Within some MWS-affected colonies in Kane'ohe Bay, Oahu, Hawai'i, we saw unusual motile multicellular structures within gastrovascular canals (hereafter referred to as invasive gastrovascular multicellular structure-IGMS that were associated with thinning and fragmentation of the basal body wall. IGMS were in significantly greater densities in coral fragments manifesting tissue-loss compared to paired normal fragments. Mesenterial filaments from these colonies yielded typical M. capitata mitochondrial haplotypes (CO1, CR, while IGMS from the same colony consistently yielded distinct haplotypes previously only found in a different Montipora species (Montipora flabellata. Protein profiles showed consistent differences between paired mesenterial filaments and IGMS from the same colonies as did seven microsatellite loci that also exhibited an excess of alleles per locus inconsistent with a single diploid organism. We hypothesize that IGMS are a parasitic cellular lineage resulting from the chimeric fusion between M. capitata and M. flabellata larvae followed by morphological reabsorption of M. flabellata and subsequent formation of cell-lineage parasites. We term this disease Montiporaiasis. Although intra-specific chimerism is common in colonial animals, this is the first suspected inter-specific example and the first associated with tissue loss.

  5. Meiosis in elephant grass (Pennisetum purpureum, pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum (Poaceae, Poales and their interspecific hybrids

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    Vânia Helena Techio

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The cultivated and sexually compatible species Pennisetum purpureum (elephant grass, 2n = 4x = 28 and Pennisetum glaucum (pearl millet, 2n = 2x = 14 can undergo hybridization which favors the amplification of their genetic background and the introgression of favorable alleles into breeding programs. The main problem with interspecific hybrids of these species is infertility due to triploidy (2n = 3x = 21. This study describes meiosis in elephant grass x pearl millet hybrids and their progenitors. Panicles were prepared according to the conventional protocol for meiotic studies and Alexander’s stain was used for assessing pollen viability. Pearl millet accessions presented regular meiosis with seven bivalents and high pollen viability. For elephant grass, 14 bivalents in diakinesis and metaphase I were observed. The BAG 63 elephant grass accession, derived from tissue culture, presented a high frequency of meiotic abnormalities. The three hybrid accessions presented a high frequency of abnormalities characterized by irregular chromosomal segregation which resulted in the formation of sterile pollen.

  6. Caffeine inheritance in interspecific hybrids of Coffea arabica x Coffea canephora (Gentianales, Rubiaceae

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    Regina H.G. Priolli

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Caffeine inheritance was investigated in F2 and BC1F1 generations between Coffea arabica var. Bourbon Vermelho (BV and Coffea canephora var. Robusta 4x (R4x. The caffeine content of seeds and leaves was determined during 2004 and 2005. Microsatellite loci-markers were used to deduce the meiotic pattern of chromosome pairing of tetraploid interspecific hybrids. Genetic analysis indicated that caffeine content in seeds was quantitatively inherited and controlled by genes with additive effects. The estimates of broad-sense heritability of caffeine content in seeds were high for both generations. In coffee leaves, the caffeine content (BSH from the same populations showed transgressive segregants with enhanced levels and high BSH. Segregation of loci-markers in BC1F1 populations showed that the ratios of the gametes genotype did not differ significantly from those expected assuming random associations and tetrasomic inheritance. The results confirm the existence of distinct mechanisms controlling the caffeine content in seeds and leaves, the gene exchange between the C. arabica BV and C. canephora R4x genomes and favorable conditions for improving caffeine content in this coffee population.

  7. SOCIO-PSYCHOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF INTERSPECIFIC INTERACTIONS IN A GROUP “HUMAN - PET”

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    A V Gagarin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article reveals the features of interspecific interaction “Human - Pet” in aspects of psychology and behaviorism. This direction is shown to be promising in the theoretical and applied aspects. This is significant for the study of individual social activity and human life, as well as social groups. The article identifies the promising areas of the research of such interaction: in the development of family and child-parent relations; in the asocial individual development under the influence of various factors (social and personal; in various directions of media development (social advertising on television and in print, in fiction and film; in socially-significant communicating in social networks (communication through video sharing, etc.. It is shown that this perspective is important for research in education and upbringing. We have come to the conclusion that the problems are of social significance because the direct and/or indirect human contact with natural objects contributes to the development of different spheres of his/her personality (cognitive, communicative, aesthetic, ethical, emotional, volitional.

  8. Effects of local adaptation and interspecific competition on species' responses to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocedi, Greta; Atkins, Katherine E; Liao, Jishan; Henry, Roslyn C; Travis, Justin M J; Hellmann, Jessica J

    2013-09-01

    Local adaptation and species interactions have been shown to affect geographic ranges; therefore, we need models of climate impact that include both factors. To identify possible dynamics of species when including these factors, we ran simulations of two competing species using an individual-based, coupled map-lattice model using a linear climatic gradient that varies across latitude and is warmed over time. Reproductive success is governed by an individual's adaptation to local climate as well as its location relative to global constraints. In exploratory experiments varying the strength of adaptation and competition, competition reduces genetic diversity and slows range change, although the two species can coexist in the absence of climate change and shift in the absence of competitors. We also found that one species can drive the other to extinction, sometimes long after climate change ends. Weak selection on local adaptation and poor dispersal ability also caused surfing of cooler-adapted phenotypes from the expanding margin backwards, causing loss of warmer-adapted phenotypes. Finally, geographic ranges can become disjointed, losing centrally-adapted genotypes. These initial results suggest that the interplay between local adaptation and interspecific competition can significantly influence species' responses to climate change, in a way that demands future research. © 2013 New York Academy of Sciences.

  9. Concentration of trace elements in feathers of three Antarctic penguins: Geographical and interspecific differences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerez, Silvia [Area de Toxicologia, Facultad de Veterinaria, Universidad de Murcia, Campus de Espinardo, 30100 Murcia (Spain); Motas, Miguel, E-mail: motas@um.es [Area de Toxicologia, Facultad de Veterinaria, Universidad de Murcia, Campus de Espinardo, 30100 Murcia (Spain); Palacios, Maria Jose; Valera, Francisco [Departamento de Ecologia Funcional y Evolutiva, Estacion Experimental de Zonas Aridas, CSIC, Carretera de Sacramento s/n, 04120 La Canada de San Urbano, Almeria (Spain); Cuervo, Jose Javier; Barbosa, Andres [Departamento de Ecologia Funcional y Evolutiva, Estacion Experimental de Zonas Aridas, CSIC, Carretera de Sacramento s/n, 04120 La Canada de San Urbano, Almeria (Spain); Departamento de Ecologia Evolutiva, Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, CSIC, C/Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-10-15

    Antarctica is often considered as one of the last pristine regions, but it could be affected by pollution at global and local scale. Concentrations of Al, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Cd and Pb were determinated by ICP-MS in feathers (n = 207 individuals) of gentoo, chinstrap and Adelie penguin collected in 8 locations throughout the Antarctic Peninsula (2006-2007). The highest levels of several elements were found in samples from King George Island (8.08, 20.29 and 1.76 {mu}g g{sup -1} dw for Cr, Cu and Pb, respectively) and Deception Island (203.13, 3.26 and 164.26 {mu}g g{sup -1} dw for Al, Mn and Fe, respectively), where probably human activities and large-scale transport of pollutants contribute to increase metal levels. Concentrations of Cr, Mn, Cu, Se or Pb, which are similar to others found in different regions of the world, show that some areas in Antarctica are not utterly pristine. - Highlights: > We study levels of trace elements in feathers of Antarctic penguins. > Eight different rookeries throughout the Antarctic Peninsula were sampled. > Interspecific (gentoo, chinstrap, Adelie) and geographical differences were tested. > Relatively high metal levels were found in areas with major human presence. > Penguin feather can be useful for metals monitoring in the Antarctic environment. - Trace element levels in feathers of three penguin species from the Antarctic Peninsula indicate the presence of pollution in certain locations.

  10. VOC emissions influence intra- and interspecific interactions among stored-product Coleoptera in paddy rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giunti, Giulia; Palmeri, Vincenzo; Algeri, Giuseppe Massimo; Campolo, Orlando

    2018-02-01

    Olfaction is a pivotal sense for insects and granivorous pests may exploit grain volatiles for food selection. Tribolium confusum, is a secondary pest of stored cereals that benefits from primary pests' infestation, as other secondary feeders, triggering competition. This study aimed to evaluate the preferences of T. confusum females toward different-infested paddy rice, highlighting the impact of intra- and interspecific competition. Tribolium confusum showed positive chemotaxis toward rice infested by larvae of a primary pest (Sitophilus zeamais), but not for grain attacked by adults alone. Furthermore, kernels concurrently infested by a primary (S. zeamais) and a secondary pest (T. confusum or Cryptolestes ferrugineus) were evaluated in Y-tube bioassays, highlighting that both food-sources were innately attractive for T. confusum females. Moreover, females positively oriented toward rice infested by conspecifics, while they avoided grain infested by C. ferrugineus, averting an extremely competitive habitat. Behavioural responses of T. confusum females and volatile emissions of different-infested rice highlighted the occurrence of plant-mediated interactions among insects from the same trophic guild. Seventy volatiles were identified and significant differences among the tested food-sources were recorded, emphasizing the presence of 6 putative attractants and 6 repellents, which may be useful biocontrol tools.

  11. Ecological energetics of forage fish from the Mediterranean Sea: Seasonal dynamics and interspecific differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albo-Puigserver, M.; Muñoz, A.; Navarro, J.; Coll, M.; Pethybridge, H.; Sánchez, S.; Palomera, I.

    2017-06-01

    Small and medium pelagic fishes play a central role in marine food webs by transferring energy from plankton to top predators. In this study, direct calorimetry was used to analyze the energy density of seven pelagic species collected over four seasons from the western Mediterranean Sea: anchovy Engraulis encrasicolus, sardine Sardina pilchardus, round sardinella Sardinella aurita, horse mackerels Trachurus trachurus and T. mediterraneus, and mackerels Scomber scombrus and S. colias. Inter-specific differences in energy density were linked to spawning period, energy allocation strategies for reproduction and growth, and feeding ecologies. Energy density of each species varied over time, with the exception of S. colias, likely due to its high energetic requirements related to migration throughout the year. In general, higher energy density was observed in spring for all species, regardless of their breeding strategy, probably as a consequence of the late-winter phytoplankton bloom. These results provide new insights into the temporal availability of energy in the pelagic ecosystem of the Mediterranean Sea, which are pivotal for understanding how the population dynamics of small and medium pelagic fishes and their predators may respond to environmental changes and fishing impacts. In addition, the differences found in energy density between species highlighted the importance of using species specific energy-values in ecosystem assessment tools such as bioenergetic and food web models.

  12. Pilot whales attracted to killer whale sounds: acoustically-mediated interspecific interactions in cetaceans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Curé

    Full Text Available In cetaceans' communities, interactions between individuals of different species are often observed in the wild. Yet, due to methodological and technical challenges very little is known about the mediation of these interactions and their effect on cetaceans' behavior. Killer whales (Orcinus orca are a highly vocal species and can be both food competitors and potential predators of many other cetaceans. Thus, the interception of their vocalizations by unintended cetacean receivers may be particularly important in mediating interspecific interactions. To address this hypothesis, we conducted playbacks of killer whale vocalizations recorded during herring-feeding activity to free-ranging long-finned pilot whales (Globicephala melas. Using a multi-sensor tag, we were able to track the whales and to monitor changes of their movements and social behavior in response to the playbacks. We demonstrated that the playback of killer whale sounds to pilot whales induced a clear increase in group size and a strong attraction of the animals towards the sound source. These findings provide the first experimental evidence that the interception of heterospecific vocalizations can mediate interactions between different cetacean species in previously unrecognized ways.

  13. Intra- and Interspecific Competition Between Western Flower Thrips and Sweetpotato Whitefly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qing-Jun; Hou, Wen-Jie; Li, Fei; Xu, Bao-Yun; Xie, Wen; Wang, Shao-Li; Zhang, You-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande), and the sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius), are both invasive insect pests and are present in most of the same agricultural crops without a clear dominance of either species. Here, intra- and interspecific competition in B. tabaci and F. occidentalis was determined under controlled experiments. The results showed that intraspecific competition was distinct in F. occidentalis and that the co-occurrence of B. tabaci had a strong effect on F. occidentalis , resulting in a decrease in oviposition. Significant intraspecific competition was found in B. tabaci , and the coexistence of F. occidentalis had limited effect on the oviposition of B. tabaci . In a selective host plant preference experiment, both F. occidentalis and B. tabaci preferred eggplants most, followed by cucumbers and tomatoes. On cucumber plants, B. tabaci was predominant, whereas on eggplant and tomato plants, F. occidentalis and B. tabaci exhibited comparative competitive abilities during the initial stage. However, over time, higher numbers of B. tabaci than that of F. occidentalis were found on the two host plants. Our in vitro and potted plant experiments indicate that B. tabaci is competitively superior to F. occidentalis , which might help to explain their differential distribution patterns in China. PMID:25480973

  14. Pesticide-mediated interspecific competition between local and invasive thrips pests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xueyin; Reitz, Stuart R.; Yuan, Huiguo; Lei, Zhongren; Paini, Dean Ronald; Gao, Yulin

    2017-01-01

    Competitive interactions between species can be mitigated or even reversed in the presence of anthropogenic influences. The thrips species Frankliniella occidentalis and Thrips tabaci are highly invasive and damaging agricultural pests throughout the world. Where the species co-occur, one species tends to eventually predominate over the other. Avermectin and beta-cypermethrin are commonly used insecticides to manage thrips in China, and laboratory bioassays demonstrated that F. occidentalis is significantly less susceptible than T. tabaci to these insecticides. In laboratory cage trials in which both species were exposed to insecticide treated cabbage plants, F. occidentalis became the predominant species. In contrast, T. tabaci completely displaced F. occidentalis on plants that were not treated with insecticides. In field trials, the species co-existed on cabbage before insecticide treatments began, but with T. tabaci being the predominant species. Following application of avermectin or beta-cypermethrin, F. occidentalis became the predominant species, while in plots not treated with insecticides, T. tabaci remained the predominant species. These results indicate that T. tabaci is an intrinsically superior competitor to F. occidentalis, but its competitive advantage can be counteracted through differential susceptibilities of the species to insecticides. These results further demonstrate the importance of external factors, such as insecticide applications, in mediating the outcome of interspecific interactions and produce rapid unanticipated shifts in the demographics of pest complexes. PMID:28084404

  15. Collective spectra along the fission barrier

    OpenAIRE

    Pigni M. T.; Andreev A. V.; Shneidman T. M.; Massimi C.; Vannini G.; Ventura A.

    2012-01-01

    Discrete and continuous spectra of fissioning nuclei at the humps of fission barriers (Bohr transition states) and in the intermediate wells (superdeformed and hyperdeformed states) play a key role in the calculation of fission cross sections. A theoretical evaluation of the collective parts of the spectra is possible within the framework of the dinuclear system model, which treats the wave function of the fissioning nucleus as a superposition of a mononucleus configuration and two–cluster co...

  16. Characteristics of novel polymer based on pseudo-polyamino acids GluLa-DPG-PEG600: binding of albumin, biocompatibility, biodistribution and potential crossing the blood-brain barrier in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. O. Chekh

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our work was to study biological properties of the polymer based on pseudo-polyamino acids GluLa-DPG-PEG600, its ability to bind albumin, as well as its localization in rat body and influence on physio­logical and functional state of rat kidneys and liver. We have found the ability of GluLa-DPG-PEG600 to bind bovine serum albumin (BSA using electrophoresis in 5% polyacrylamide gel. Structural and functional state of the liver and kidneys of rats after injections of polymer were investigated by histological analysis of organs and determination the activities of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, gamma-glutamyltransferase and content of cholesterol and creatinine in blood. Our results showed little toxic effect of GluLa-DPG-PEG600 on rat body. Using fluorescent microscopy we have studied polymer in complex with BSA distribution in rat body: after intravenous injection polymer are localized in kidneys and spleen, and after intramuscular – in liver and brain. It has been shown that polymer passed through the blood-brain barrier and are localized in the immune organ – spleen, indicating GluLa-DPG-PEG600 as a potential drug transporter.

  17. Effects of intra- and interspecific competition on the sensitivity of Daphnia magna populations to the fungicide carbendazim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Arco, Ana Isabel; Rico, Andreu; van den Brink, Paul J

    2015-08-01

    The ecological risk assessment of pesticides is generally based on toxicity data obtained from single-species laboratory experiments and does not take into account ecological interactions such as competition or predation. Intraspecific and interspecific competition are expected to result in additional stress and might increase the sensitivity of aquatic populations to pesticide contamination. To test this hypothesis, the effects of the fungicide carbendazim were assessed on the population dynamics of the micro-crustacean Daphnia magna under different levels of intraspecific and interspecific competition for an algal food resource, using the rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus as competing species. The experiments were performed in glass jars with three different carbendazim concentrations (i.e., 50, 100 and 150 µg/L), and had a duration of 25 days, with a 4-day pre-treatment period in which competition was allowed to take place and a 21-day exposure period. The endpoints evaluated were D. magna total population abundance and population structure. Results of these experiments show that competition stress on its own had a significant influence on shaping D. magna population's structure, however, a different response was observed in the intraspecific and interspecific competition experiments. The use of a 4-day pre-treatment period in the intraspecific experiment already led to an absence of interactive effects due to the quick abundance confluence between the different intraspecific treatments, thus not allowing the observation of interactive effects between competition and carbendazim stress. Results of the interspecific competition experiment showed that rotifers were quickly outcompeted by D. magna and that D. magna even profited from the rotifer presence through exploitative competition, which alleviated the original stress caused by the algal resource limitation. These experiments suggest that competition interactions play an important role in defining population

  18. Intestinal Barrier and Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julio-Pieper, M; Bravo, J A

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal barrier function contributes to gut homeostasis by modulating absorption of water, electrolytes, and nutrients from the lumen into the circulation while restricting the passage of noxious luminal substances and microorganisms. Chronic conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and celiac disease are associated to intestinal barrier dysfunction. Here, the hypothesis is that a leaky intestinal wall allowing for indiscriminate passage of intraluminal compounds to the vascular compartment could in turn lead to systemic inflammation. An increasing number of studies are now investigating the association between gut permeability and CNS disorders, under the premise that translocation of intestinal luminal contents could affect CNS function, either directly or indirectly. Still, it is unknown whether disruption of intestinal barrier is a causative agent or a consequence in these situations. Here, we discuss the latest evidence pointing to an association between increased gut permeability and disrupted behavioral responses. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Skin barrier in rosacea*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addor, Flavia Alvim Sant'Anna

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies about the cutaneous barrier demonstrated consistent evidence that the stratum corneum is a metabolically active structure and also has adaptive functions, may play a regulatory role in the inflammatory response with activation of keratinocytes, angiogenesis and fibroplasia, whose intensity depends primarily on the intensity the stimulus. There are few studies investigating the abnormalities of the skin barrier in rosacea, but the existing data already show that there are changes resulting from inflammation, which can generate a vicious circle caused a prolongation of flare-ups and worsening of symptoms. This article aims to gather the most relevant literature data about the characteristics and effects of the state of the skin barrier in rosacea. PMID:26982780

  20. Health Barriers to Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delaney Gracy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article summarizes the results from a 2013 online survey with 408 principals and assistant principals in New York City public elementary and middle schools. The survey assessed three primary areas: health issues in the school, health issues perceived as barriers to learning for affected students, and resources needed to address these barriers. Eighteen of the 22 health conditions listed in the survey were considered a moderate or serious issue within their schools by at least 10% of respondents. All 22 of the health issues were perceived as a barrier to learning by between 12% and 87% of the respondents. Representatives from schools that serve a higher percentage of low-income students reported significantly higher levels of concern about the extent of health issues and their impact on learning. Respondents most often said they need linkages with organizations that can provide additional services and resources at the school, especially for mental health.

  1. Assemblage organization in stream fishes: effects of environmental variation and interspecific interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, G.D.; Ratajczak, R.E.; Crawford, M. M.; Freeman, Mary C.

    1998-01-01

    We assessed the relative importance of environmental variation, interspecific competition for space, and predator abundance on assemblage structure and microhabitat use in a stream fish assemblage inhabiting Coweeta Creek, North Carolina, USA. Our study encompassed a ten year time span (1983-1992) and included some of the highest and lowest flows in the last 58 years. We collected 16 seasonal samples which included data on: 1) habitat availability (total and microhabitat) and microhabitat diversity, 2) assemblage structure (i.e., the number and abundances of species comprising a subset of the community), and 3) microhabitat use and overlap. We classified habitat availability data on the basis of year, season, and hydrologic period. Hydrologic period (i.e., pre-drought [PR], drought [D], and post-drought [PO]) represented the temporal location of a sample with respect to a four-year drought that occurred during the study. Hydrologic period explained a greater amount of variance in habitat availability data than either season or year. Total habitat availability was significantly greater during PO than in PR or D, although microhabitat diversity did not differ among either seasons or hydrologic periods. There were significantly fewer high-flow events (i.e., > 2.1 m3/s) during D than in either PR or PO periods. We observed a total of 16 species during our investigation, and the total number of species was significantly higher in D than in PR samples. Correlation analyses between the number of species present (total and abundant species) and environmental data yielded limited results, although the total number of species was inversely correlated with total habitat availability. A cluster analysis grouped assemblage structure samples by hydrologic period rather than season or year, supporting the contention that variation in annual flow had a strong impact on this assemblage. The drought had little effect on the numerical abundance of benthic species in this assemblage

  2. Interspecific variation in prey capture behavior by co-occurring Nepenthes pitcher plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Lijin; Chung, Arthur YC; Clarke, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Pitcher plants of the genus Nepenthes capture a wide range of arthropod prey for nutritional benefit, using complex combinations of visual and olfactory signals and gravity-driven pitfall trapping mechanisms. In many localities throughout Southeast Asia, several Nepenthes different species occur in mixed populations. Often, the species present at any given location have strongly divergent trap structures and preliminary surveys indicate that different species trap different combinations of arthropod prey, even when growing at the same locality. On this basis, it has been proposed that co-existing Nepenthes species may be engaged in niche segregation with regards to arthropod prey, avoiding direct competition with congeners by deploying traps that have modifications that enable them to target specific prey types. We examined prey capture among 3 multi-species Nepenthes populations in Borneo, finding that co-existing Nepenthes species do capture different combinations of prey, but that significant interspecific variations in arthropod prey combinations can often be detected only at sub-ordinal taxonomic ranks. In all lowland Nepenthes species examined, the dominant prey taxon is Formicidae, but montane Nepenthes trap few (or no) ants and 2 of the 3 species studied have evolved to target alternative sources of nutrition, such as tree shrew feces. Using similarity and null model analyses, we detected evidence for niche segregation with regards to formicid prey among 5 lowland, sympatric Nepenthes species in Sarawak. However, we were unable to determine whether these results provide support for the niche segregation hypothesis, or whether they simply reflect unquantified variation in heterogeneous habitats and/or ant communities in the study sites. These findings are used to propose improvements to the design of field experiments that seek to test hypotheses about targeted prey capture patterns in Nepenthes. PMID:24481246

  3. Interspecific competition for shelters in territorial and gregarious intertidal grazers: consequences for individual behaviour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moisés A Aguilera

    Full Text Available Experiments have shown that interspecific interactions within consumer guilds can alter patterns of distribution, abundance and size of species. Plastic behavioural responses can be modulated by agonistic interactions. In many cases, consumers compete for space and shelters, and these interactions change the manner in which they exploit food. This study investigates the consequences of competition in the spatial and temporal organization of behaviour of intertidal grazers, which share algal resources and the use of rock crevices while resting, but exhibit different body sizes, spatial behaviour and foraging modes. We evaluate interaction strength between small gregarious Siphonaria lessoni and the larger territorial keyhole limpet Fissurella crassa and between S. lessoni and the medium-size gregarious chiton Chiton granosus. Using field manipulations and artificial arenas in the laboratory, we tested whether the use of crevices, micro-spatial distribution and activity are modified by the density of conspecifics and the presence of heterospecifics. Our results show that small-scale spatial segregation observed in the field between S. lessoni and C. granosus result from species-specific differences in habitat use. In turn, we found evidence that spatial segregation between F. crassa and S. lessoni results from highly asymmetric interference competition in the use of shelters. The presence of F. crassa reduced the use of crevices and growth rates of S. lessoni. Effects on growth rates are assumed to result from exposure to harsh environmental conditions rather than food limitation. Thus, neither gregarious behaviour nor differences in activity were sufficient to prevent competition with the larger grazer. Our study illustrates the importance of competition for shelters, which results in behavioural changes of the smaller-sized species, and how these plastic responses can translate into differences in growth rates. Use of shelters can thus be

  4. Vasotocin Actions on Electric Behavior: Interspecific, Seasonal, and Social Context-Dependent Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, Rossana; Batista, Gervasio; Lorenzo, Daniel; Macadar, Omar; Silva, Ana

    2010-01-01

    Social behavior diversity is correlated with distinctively distributed patterns of a conserved brain network, which depend on the action of neuroendocrine messengers that integrate extrinsic and intrinsic cues. Arginine vasotocin (AVT) is a key integrator underlying differences in behavior across vertebrate taxa. Weakly electric fish use their electric organ discharges (EODs) as social behavioral displays. We examined the effect of AVT on EOD rate in two species of Gymnotiformes with different social strategies: Gymnotus omarorum, territorial and highly aggressive, and Brachyhypopomus gauderio, gregarious and aggressive only between breeding males. AVT induced a long-lasting and progressive increase of EOD rate in isolated B. gauderio, partially blocked by the V1a AVT receptor antagonist (Manning compound, MC), and had no effects in G. omarorum. AVT also induced a long-lasting increase in the firing rate (prevented by MC) of the isolated medullary pacemaker nucleus (PN) of B. gauderio when tested in an in vitro preparation, indicating that the PN is the direct effector of AVT actions. AVT is involved in the seasonal, social context-dependent nocturnal increase of EOD rate that has been recently described in B. gauderio to play a role in mate selection. AVT produced the additional nocturnal increase of EOD rate in non-breeding males, whereas MC blocked it in breeding males. Also, AVT induced a larger EOD rate increase in reproductive dyads than in agonistic encounters. We demonstrated interspecific, seasonal, and context-dependent actions of AVT on the PN that contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms the brain uses to shape sociality. PMID:20802858

  5. Gene coexpression network analysis of oil biosynthesis in an interspecific backcross of oil palm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerin, Chloé; Joët, Thierry; Serret, Julien; Lashermes, Philippe; Vaissayre, Virginie; Agbessi, Mawussé D T; Beulé, Thierry; Severac, Dany; Amblard, Philippe; Tregear, James; Durand-Gasselin, Tristan; Morcillo, Fabienne; Dussert, Stéphane

    2016-09-01

    Global demand for vegetable oils is increasing at a dramatic rate, while our understanding of the regulation of oil biosynthesis in plants remains limited. To gain insights into the mechanisms that govern oil synthesis and fatty acid (FA) composition in the oil palm fruit, we used a multilevel approach combining gene coexpression analysis, quantification of allele-specific expression and joint multivariate analysis of transcriptomic and lipid data, in an interspecific backcross population between the African oil palm, Elaeis guineensis, and the American oil palm, Elaeis oleifera, which display contrasting oil contents and FA compositions. The gene coexpression network produced revealed tight transcriptional coordination of fatty acid synthesis (FAS) in the plastid with sugar sensing, plastidial glycolysis, transient starch storage and carbon recapture pathways. It also revealed a concerted regulation, along with FAS, of both the transfer of nascent FA to the endoplasmic reticulum, where triacylglycerol assembly occurs, and of the production of glycerol-3-phosphate, which provides the backbone of triacylglycerols. Plastid biogenesis and auxin transport were the two other biological processes most tightly connected to FAS in the network. In addition to WRINKLED1, a transcription factor (TF) known to activate FAS genes, two novel TFs, termed NF-YB-1 and ZFP-1, were found at the core of the FAS module. The saturated FA content of palm oil appeared to vary above all in relation to the level of transcripts of the gene coding for β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase II. Our findings should facilitate the development of breeding and engineering strategies in this and other oil crops. © 2016 The Authors. The Plant Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Relationships between Nutrient Heterogeneity, Root Growth, and Hormones: Evidence for Interspecific Variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jia; Jones, Robert H; Mou, Pu

    2018-02-28

    (1) Background: Plant roots respond to nutrients through root architecture that is regulated by hormones. Strong inter-specific variation in root architecture has been well documented, but physiological mechanisms that may control the variation have not. (2) Methods: We examined correlations between root architecture and hormones to seek clues on mechanisms behind root foraging behavior. In the green house at Beijing Normal University, hydroponic culture experiments were used to examine the root responses of four species- Callistephus chinensis , Solidago canadensis , Ailanthus altissima , Oryza sativa- to two nitrogen types (NO₃ - or NH₄⁺), three nitrogen concentrations (low, medium, and high concentrations of 0.2, 1, and 18 mM, respectively) and two ways of nitrogen application (stable vs. variable). The plants were harvested after 36 days to measure root mass, 1st order root length, seminal root length for O. sativa , density of the 1st order laterals, seminal root number for O. sativa , the inter-node length of the 1st order laterals, and root hormone contents of indole-3-acetic acid, abscisic acid, and cytokinins (zeatin + zeatinriboside). (3) Results: Species differed significantly in their root architecture responses to nitrogen treatments. They also differed significantly in hormone responses to the nitrogen treatments. Additionally, the correlations between root architecture and hormone responses were quite variable across the species. Each hormone had highly species-specific relationships with root responses. (4) Conclusions: Our finding implies that a particular root foraging behavior is probably not controlled by the same biochemical pathway in all species.

  7. Relationships between Nutrient Heterogeneity, Root Growth, and Hormones: Evidence for Interspecific Variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Dong

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available (1 Background: Plant roots respond to nutrients through root architecture that is regulated by hormones. Strong inter-specific variation in root architecture has been well documented, but physiological mechanisms that may control the variation have not. (2 Methods: We examined correlations between root architecture and hormones to seek clues on mechanisms behind root foraging behavior. In the green house at Beijing Normal University, hydroponic culture experiments were used to examine the root responses of four species—Callistephus chinensis, Solidago canadensis, Ailanthus altissima, Oryza sativa—to two nitrogen types (NO3− or NH4+, three nitrogen concentrations (low, medium, and high concentrations of 0.2, 1, and 18 mM, respectively and two ways of nitrogen application (stable vs. variable. The plants were harvested after 36 days to measure root mass, 1st order root length, seminal root length for O. sativa, density of the 1st order laterals, seminal root number for O. sativa, the inter-node length of the 1st order laterals, and root hormone contents of indole-3-acetic acid, abscisic acid, and cytokinins (zeatin + zeatinriboside. (3 Results: Species differed significantly in their root architecture responses to nitrogen treatments. They also differed significantly in hormone responses to the nitrogen treatments. Additionally, the correlations between root architecture and hormone responses were quite variable across the species. Each hormone had highly species-specific relationships with root responses. (4 Conclusions: Our finding implies that a particular root foraging behavior is probably not controlled by the same biochemical pathway in all species.

  8. Intra- and interspecific differences in diet quality and composition in a large herbivore community.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Redjadj

    Full Text Available Species diversity in large herbivore communities is often explained by niche segregation allowed by differences in body mass and digestive morphophysiological features. Based on large number of gut samples in fall and winter, we analysed the temporal dynamics of diet composition, quality and interspecific overlap of 4 coexisting mountain herbivores. We tested whether the relative consumption of grass and browse differed among species of different rumen types (moose-type and intermediate-type, whether diet was of lower quality for the largest species, whether we could identify plant species which determined diet quality, and whether these plants, which could be "key-food-resources" were similar for all herbivores. Our analyses revealed that (1 body mass and rumen types were overall poor predictors of diet composition and quality, although the roe deer, a species with a moose-type rumen was confirmed as an "obligatory non grazer", while red deer, the largest species, had the most lignified diet; (2 diet overlap among herbivores was well predicted by rumen type (high among species of intermediate types only, when measured over broad plant groups, (3 the relationship between diet composition and quality differed among herbivore species, and the actual plant species used during winter which determined the diet quality, was herbivore species-specific. Even if diets overlapped to a great extent, the species-specific relationships between diet composition and quality suggest that herbivores may select different plant species within similar plant group types, or different plant parts and that this, along with other behavioural mechanisms of ecological niche segregation, may contribute to the coexistence of large herbivores of relatively similar body mass, as observed in mountain ecosystems.

  9. In situ cardiac perfusion reveals interspecific variation of intraventricular flow separation in reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, William; Axelsson, Michael; Altimiras, Jordi; Wang, Tobias

    2016-07-15

    The ventricles of non-crocodilian reptiles are incompletely divided and provide an opportunity for mixing of oxygen-poor blood and oxygen-rich blood (intracardiac shunting). However, both cardiac morphology and in vivo shunting patterns exhibit considerable interspecific variation within reptiles. In the present study, we develop an in situ double-perfused heart approach to characterise the propensity and capacity for shunting in five reptile species: the turtle Trachemys scripta, the rock python Python sebae, the yellow anaconda Eunectes notaeus, the varanid lizard Varanus exanthematicus and the bearded dragon Pogona vitticeps To simulate changes in vascular bed resistance, pulmonary and systemic afterloads were independently manipulated and changes in blood flow distribution amongst the central outflow tracts were monitored. As previously demonstrated in Burmese pythons, rock pythons and varanid lizards exhibited pronounced intraventricular flow separation. As pulmonary or systemic afterload was raised, flow in the respective circulation decreased. However, flow in the other circulation, where afterload was constant, remained stable. This correlates with the convergent evolution of intraventricular pressure separation and the large intraventricular muscular ridge, which compartmentalises the ventricle, in these species. Conversely, in the three other species, the pulmonary and systemic flows were strongly mutually dependent, such that the decrease in pulmonary flow in response to elevated pulmonary afterload resulted in redistribution of perfusate to the systemic circuit (and vice versa). Thus, in these species, the muscular ridge appeared labile and blood could readily transverse the intraventricular cava. We conclude that relatively minor structural differences between non-crocodilian reptiles result in the fundamental changes in cardiac function. Further, our study emphasises that functionally similar intracardiac flow separation evolved independently in

  10. Constitutive type VI secretion system expression gives Vibrio cholerae intra- and interspecific competitive advantages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Unterweger

    Full Text Available The type VI secretion system (T6SS mediates protein translocation across the cell membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, including Vibrio cholerae - the causative agent of cholera. All V. cholerae strains examined to date harbor gene clusters encoding a T6SS. Structural similarity and sequence homology between components of the T6SS and the T4 bacteriophage cell-puncturing device suggest that the T6SS functions as a contractile molecular syringe to inject effector molecules into prokaryotic and eukaryotic target cells. Regulation of the T6SS is critical. A subset of V. cholerae strains, including the clinical O37 serogroup strain V52, express T6SS constitutively. In contrast, pandemic strains impose tight control that can be genetically disrupted: mutations in the quorum sensing gene luxO and the newly described regulator gene tsrA lead to constitutive T6SS expression in the El Tor strain C6706. In this report, we examined environmental V. cholerae isolates from the Rio Grande with regard to T6SS regulation. Rough V. cholerae lacking O-antigen carried a nonsense mutation in the gene encoding the global T6SS regulator VasH and did not display virulent behavior towards Escherichia coli and other environmental bacteria. In contrast, smooth V. cholerae strains engaged constitutively in type VI-mediated secretion and displayed virulence towards prokaryotes (E. coli and other environmental bacteria and a eukaryote (the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. Furthermore, smooth V. cholerae strains were able to outcompete each other in a T6SS-dependent manner. The work presented here suggests that constitutive T6SS expression provides V. cholerae with an advantage in intraspecific and interspecific competition.

  11. Panmixia and Limited Interspecific Introgression in Coyotes (Canis latrans) from West Virginia and Virginia, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohling, Justin H; Mastro, Lauren L; Adams, Jennifer R; Gese, Eric M; Owen, Sheldon F; Waits, Lisette P

    2017-09-01

    The expansion of coyotes (Canis latrans) into the eastern United States has had major consequences for ecological communities and wildlife managers. Despite this, there has been little investigation of the genetics of coyotes across much of this region, especially outside of the northeast. Understanding patterns of genetic structure and interspecific introgression would provide insights into the colonization history of the species, its response to the modern environment, and interactions with other canids. We examined the genetic characteristics of 121 coyotes from the mid-Atlantic states of West Virginia and Virginia by genotyping 17 polymorphic nuclear DNA microsatellite loci. These genotypes were compared with those from other canid populations to evaluate the extent of genetic introgression. We conducted spatial clustering analyses and spatial autocorrelation to assess genetic structure among sampled coyotes. Coyotes across the 2 states had high genetic diversity, and we found no evidence of genetic structure. Six to sixteen percent of individuals displayed some evidence of genetic introgression from other species depending on the method and criteria used, but the population possessed predominantly coyote ancestry. Our findings suggested introgression from other canid populations has played less of a role in shaping the genetic character of coyotes in these states compared with populations closer to the Canadian border. Coyotes appear to display a panmictic population structure despite high habitat heterogeneity and heavy human influence in the spatial environment, underscoring the adaptability of the species. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The American Genetic Association 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  12. Local climate determines intra- and interspecific variation in sexual size dimorphism in mountain grasshopper communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laiolo, P; Illera, J C; Obeso, J R

    2013-10-01

    The climate is often evoked to explain broad-scale clines of body size, yet its involvement in the processes that generate size inequality in the two sexes (sexual size dimorphism) remains elusive. Here, we analyse climatic clines of sexual size dimorphism along a wide elevation gradient (i) among grasshopper species in a phylogenetically controlled scenario and (ii) within species differing in distribution and cold tolerance, to highlight patterns generated at different time scales, mainly evolutionary (among species or higher taxa) and ontogenetic or microevolutionary (within species). At the interspecific level, grasshoppers were slightly smaller and less dimorphic at high elevations. These clines were associated with gradients of precipitation and sun exposure, which are likely indicators of other factors that directly exert selective pressures, such as resource availability and conditions for effective thermoregulation. Within species, we found a positive effect of temperature and a negative effect of elevation on body size, especially on condition-dependent measures of body size (total body length rather than hind femur length) and in species inhabiting the highest elevations. In spite of a certain degree of species-specific variation, females tended to adjust their body size more often than males, suggesting that body size in females can evolve faster among species and can be more plastic or dependent on nutritional conditions within species living in adverse climates. Natural selection on female body size may therefore prevail over sexual selection on male body size in alpine environments, and abiotic factors may trigger consistent phenotypic patterns across taxonomic scales. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2013 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  13. Vasotocin actions on electric behavior: interspecific, seasonal, and social context-dependent differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossana Perrone

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Social behavior diversity is correlated with distinctively distributed patterns of a conserved brain network, which depend on the action of neuroendocrine messengers that integrate extrinsic and intrinsic cues. Arginine-vasotocin (AVT is a key integrator underlying differences in behavior across vertebrate taxa. Weakly electric fish use their electric organ discharges (EODs as social behavioral displays. We examined the effect of AVT on EOD rate in two species of Gymnotiformes with different social strategies: Gymnotus omarorum, territorial and highly aggressive, and Brachyhypopomus gauderio, gregarious and aggressive only between breeding males. AVT induced a long-lasting and progressive increase of EOD rate in isolated B. gauderio, partially blocked by the V1a AVT receptor antagonist (Manning compound, MC, and had no effects in G. omarorum. AVT also induced a long-lasting increase in the firing rate (prevented by MC of the isolated medullary pacemaker nucleus (PN of B. gauderio when tested in an in vitro preparation, indicating that the PN is the direct effector of AVT actions. AVT is involved in the seasonal, social context-dependent nocturnal increase of EOD rate that has been recently described in B. gauderio to play a role in mate selection. AVT produced the additional nocturnal increase of EOD rate in non-breeding males, whereas MC blocked it in breeding males. Also, AVT induced a larger EOD rate increase in reproductive dyads than in agonistic encounters. We demonstrated interspecific, seasonal, and context-dependent actions of AVT on the PN that contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms the brain uses to shape sociality.

  14. Interspecific embryo transfer from mouflon (Ovis gmelini musimon) to domestic Corriedale sheep in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, T E; Hunter, J W; Soler, J P

    2007-09-01

    An interspecific embryo transfer program was conducted for genetic improvement and increasing the number of offspring from a flock of mouflon sheep in Argentina. The female donor mouflons were divided into three groups, G1 (n=5), G2 (n=4) and G3 (n=5). The total NIH-FSH-P1 dose given to each donor on the superovulatory treatment was 260, 200 and 160 mg for G1, G2 and G3, respectively. The mouflons in G3 were maidens, while the others were multiparous. Domestic Corriedale ewes (n=60) were synchronized and used as recipients. The embryo recovery and transfer was performed by a surgical method. Mouflons (n=13) responded to the superovulatory treatment with an average of 9.1+/-2.8 ovulations. A low incidence of early luteal regression was found (1 out of 14 donors). Embryo recovery rates were 60, 31 and 76% in groups G1, G2 and G3, respectively. The percentage of transferable embryos obtained in G1 and in G2 exceeded 80%. None of the embryos obtained from G3 were of transferable quality. In G1, 25 transferable embryos were recovered and transferred to 13 recipients, resulting in a pregnancy rate of 76.9% (10/13). In G2, 10 embryos were transferred to 5 recipients, resulting in a 60% pregnancy rate (3/5). Lambing rate was 60% (15/25) and 30% (3/10) for G1 and G2, respectively. Thirteen lambs were born to the 14 donors following natural service after the embryo recoveries. This study demonstrates that the application of IET technology would have great reproductive impact, especially when the donor mouflon hinds are selected according to age and reproductive history.

  15. Different intra- and interspecific facilitation mechanisms between two Mediterranean trees under a climate change scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimeno, Teresa E; Escudero, Adrián; Valladares, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    In harsh environments facilitation alleviates biotic and abiotic constraints on tree recruitment. Under ongoing drier climate change, we expect facilitation to increase as a driver of coexistence. However, this might not hold under extreme abiotic stress and when the outcome depends on the interaction with other drivers such as altered herbivore pressure due to land use change. We performed a field water-manipulation experiment to quantify the importance of facilitation in two coexisting Mediterranean trees (dominant Juniperus thurifera and coexisting Quercus ilex subsp. ballota) under a climate change scenario. Shifts in canopy dominance favouring Q. ilex could be based on the extension of heterospecific facilitation to the detriment of conspecific alleviation. We found that saplings of both species transplanted under the canopy of nurse trees had greater survival probability, growth and photochemical efficiency. Intra- and interspecific facilitation mechanisms differed: alleviation of abiotic stress benefited both species during summer and J. thurifera during winter, whereas browsing protection was relevant only for Q. ilex. Facilitation was greater under the dry treatment only for Q. ilex, which partially agreed with the predictions of the stress gradient hypothesis. We conclude that present rainfall availability limits neither J. thurifera nor Q. ilex establishment. Nevertheless, under current global change scenarios, imposing increasing abiotic stress together with altered herbivore browsing, nurse trees could differentially facilitate the establishment of Q. ilex due to species-specific traits, i.e. palatability; drought, heat and cold tolerance, underlying species differences in the facilitation mechanisms and eventually triggering a change from pure juniper woodlands to mixed formations.

  16. 'They hear "Africa" and they think that there can't be any good services'--perceived context in cross-national learning: a qualitative study of the barriers to Reverse Innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Matthew; Weisberger, Emily; Silver, Diana; Macinko, James

    2015-11-19

    Country-of-origin of a product can negatively influence its rating, particularly if the product is from a low-income country. It follows that how non-traditional sources of innovation, such as low-income countries, are perceived is likely to be an important part of a diffusion process, particularly given the strong social and cognitive boundaries associated with the healthcare professions. Between September and December 2014, we conducted eleven in-depth face-to-face or telephone interviews with key informants from innovation, health and social policy circles, experts in international comparative policy research and leaders in Reverse Innovation in the United States. Interviews were open-ended with guiding probes into the barriers and enablers to Reverse Innovation in the US context, specifically also to understand whether, in their experience translating or attempting to translate innovations from low-income contexts into the US, the source of the innovation matters in the adopter context. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and analyzed thematically using the process of constant comparison. Our findings show that innovations from low-income countries tend to be discounted early on because of prior assumptions about the potential for these contexts to offer solutions to healthcare problems in the US. Judgments are made about the similarity of low-income contexts with the US, even though this is based oftentimes on flimsy perceptions only. Mixing levels of analysis, local and national, leads to country-level stereotyping and missed opportunities to learn from low-income countries. Our research highlights that prior expectations, invoked by the Low-income country cue, are interfering with a transparent and objective learning process. There may be merit in adopting some techniques from the cognitive psychology and marketing literatures to understand better the relative importance of source in healthcare research and innovation diffusion. Counter

  17. Multi-level barriers analysis to promote guideline based nursing care: a leadership strategy from home health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, Wendy A; Graham, Ian D; Davies, Barbara L

    2013-07-01

    Understanding the types of barriers that exist when implementing change can assist healthcare managers to tailor implementation strategies for optimal patient outcomes. The aim of this paper is to present an organising framework, the Barriers Assessment Taxonomy, for understanding barriers to nurses' use of clinical practice guideline recommendations. Barriers to recommendations are illustrated using the Barriers Assessment Taxonomy and insights discussed. As part of a pilot implementation study, semi-structured interviews (n = 26) were conducted to understand barriers to nurses' use of nine guideline recommendations for diabetic foot ulcers. Content analysis of verbatim transcripts included thematic coding and categorising barriers using the Barriers Assessment Taxonomy. Nineteen barriers were associated with nine recommendations, crossing five levels of the health care delivery system. The Barriers Assessment Taxonomy revealed that all recommendations had individual and organisational level barriers, with one recommendation having barriers at all levels. Individual level barriers were most frequent and lack of knowledge and skills was the only barrier that crossed all recommendations. The Barriers Assessment Taxonomy provides a framework for nursing managers to understand the complexity of barriers that exist, and can assist in choosing intervention strategies to support improved quality care and patient outcomes. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Dynamical analysis on heavy-ion fusion reactions near Coulomb barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Zhaoqing; Jin Genming; Zhang Fengshou

    2008-01-01

    The shell correction is proposed in the improved isospin dependent quantum molecular dynamics (ImIQMD) model, which plays an important role in heavy-ion fusion reactions near Coulomb barrier. By using the ImIQMD model, the static and dynamical fusion barriers, dynamical barrier distribution in the fusion reactions are analyzed systematically. The fusion and capture excitation functions for a series of reaction systems are calculated and compared with experimental data. It is found that the fusion cross sections for neutron-rich systems increase obviously, and the strong shell effects of two colliding nuclei result in a decrease of the fusion cross sections at the sub-barrier energies. The lowering of the dynamical fusion barriers favors the enhancement of the sub-barrier fusion cross sections, which is related to the nucleon transfer and the neck formation in the fusion reactions

  19. Great Barrier Reef

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    A better than average view of the Great Barrier Reef was captured by SeaWiFS on a recent overpass. There is sunglint northeast of the reef and there appears to be some sort of filamentous bloom in the Capricorn Channel.

  20. Production of interspecific Campanula hybrids by ovule culture: exploring the effecto of ovule isolation time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Röper, A.C.; Lütken, H.; Christensen, B.; Boutilier, K.A.; Petersen, K.K.; Müller, R.

    2015-01-01

    The Campanula genus comprises several economically important ornamental plants species.Wide hybridisation is a method to increase phenotypic variability, but is limited due to interspecies hybridisation barriers.In this study we investigated whether ovule culture could be used to increase the

  1. Sound trapping and dredging barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Wang, Xiaonan; Yu, Wuzhou; Jiang, Zaixiu; Mao, Dongxing

    2017-06-01

    When sound barriers are installed on both sides of a noise source, degradation in performance is observed. Barriers having negative-phase-gradient surfaces successfully eliminate this drawback by trapping sound energy in between the barriers. In contrast, barriers can also be designed to "dredge" the energy flux out. An extended model considering higher-order diffractions, which resulted from the interplay of the induced surface wave and barrier surface periodicity, is presented. It is found that the sound dredging barriers provide a remarkable enhancement over the trapping ones, and hence have the potential to be widely used in noise control engineering.

  2. Spatial patterns, ecological niches, and interspecific competition of avian brood parasites: inferring from a case study of Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin-Won; Noh, Hee-Jin; Lee, Yunkyoung; Kwon, Young-Soo; Kim, Chang-Hoe; Yoo, Jeong-Chil

    2014-09-01

    Since obligate avian brood parasites depend completely on the effort of other host species for rearing their progeny, the availability of hosts will be a critical resource for their life history. Circumstantial evidence suggests that intense competition for host species may exist not only within but also between species. So far, however, few studies have demonstrated whether the interspecific competition really occurs in the system of avian brood parasitism and how the nature of brood parasitism is related to their niche evolution. Using the occurrence data of five avian brood parasites from two sources of nationwide bird surveys in South Korea and publically available environmental/climatic data, we identified their distribution patterns and ecological niches, and applied species distribution modeling to infer the effect of interspecific competition on their spatial distribution. We found that the distribution patterns of five avian brood parasites could be characterized by altitude and climatic conditions, but overall their spatial ranges and ecological niches extensively overlapped with each other. We also found that the predicted distribution areas of each species were generally comparable to the realized distribution areas, and the numbers of individuals in areas where multiple species were predicted to coexist showed positive relationships among species. In conclusion, despite following different coevolutionary trajectories to adapt to their respect host species, five species of avian brood parasites breeding in South Korea occupied broadly similar ecological niches, implying that they tend to conserve ancestral preferences for ecological conditions. Furthermore, our results indicated that contrary to expectation interspecific competition for host availability between avian brood parasites seemed to be trivial, and thus, play little role in shaping their spatial distributions and ecological niches. Future studies, including the complete ranges of avian brood

  3. Interactive effects of juvenile defoliation, light conditions, and interspecific competition on growth and ectomycorrhizal colonization of Fagus sylvatica and Pinus sylvestris seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trocha, Lidia K; Weiser, Ewa; Robakowski, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Seedlings of forest tree species are exposed to a number of abiotic (organ loss or damage, light shortage) and biotic (interspecific competition) stress factors, which may lead to an inhibition of growth and reproduction and, eventually, to plant death. Growth of the host and its mycorrhizal symbiont is often closely linked, and hence, host damage may negatively affect the symbiont. We designed a pot experiment to study the response of light-demanding Pinus sylvestris and shade-tolerant Fagus sylvatica seedlings to a set of abiotic and biotic stresses and subsequent effects on ectomycorrhizal (ECM) root tip colonization, seedling biomass, and leaf nitrogen content. The light regime had a more pronounced effect on ECM colonization than did juvenile damage. The interspecific competition resulted in higher ECM root tip abundance for Pinus, but this effect was insignificant in Fagus. Low light and interspecific competition resulted in lower seedling biomass compared to high light, and the effect of the latter was partially masked by high light. Leaf nitrogen responded differently in Fagus and Pinus when they grew in interspecific competition. Our results indicated that for both light-demanding (Pinus) and shade-tolerant (Fagus) species, the light environment was a major factor affecting seedling growth and ECM root tip abundance. The light conditions favorable for the growth of seedlings may to some extent compensate for the harmful effects of juvenile organ loss or damage and interspecific competition.

  4. Geophysical characterization of subsurface barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borns, D.J.

    1995-08-01

    An option for controlling contaminant migration from plumes and buried waste sites is to construct a subsurface barrier of a low-permeability material. The successful application of subsurface barriers requires processes to verify the emplacement and effectiveness of barrier and to monitor the performance of a barrier after emplacement. Non destructive and remote sensing techniques, such as geophysical methods, are possible technologies to address these needs. The changes in mechanical, hydrologic and chemical properties associated with the emplacement of an engineered barrier will affect geophysical properties such a seismic velocity, electrical conductivity, and dielectric constant. Also, the barrier, once emplaced and interacting with the in situ geologic system, may affect the paths along which electrical current flows in the subsurface. These changes in properties and processes facilitate the detection and monitoring of the barrier. The approaches to characterizing and monitoring engineered barriers can be divided between (1) methods that directly image the barrier using the contrasts in physical properties between the barrier and the host soil or rock and (2) methods that reflect flow processes around or through the barrier. For example, seismic methods that delineate the changes in density and stiffness associated with the barrier represents a direct imaging method. Electrical self potential methods and flow probes based on heat flow methods represent techniques that can delineate the flow path or flow processes around and through a barrier

  5. The inter-specific hybrid Silene latifolia x S. viscosa reveals early events of sex chromosome evolution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žlůvová, Jitka; Lengerová, Martina; Marková, Michaela; Hobza, Roman; Nicolas, Michael; Vyskot, Boris; Charlesworth, Deborah; Negrutiu, Ioan; Janoušek, Bohuslav

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 4 (2005), s. 327-336 ISSN 1520-541X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA522/02/1485; GA ČR(CZ) GA521/05/2076; GA ČR(CZ) GD204/05/H505; GA ČR(CZ) GP204/05/P505 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : interspecific hybrid * sex chromosomes * Silene latifolia Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.390, year: 2005

  6. Impact of Quaternary climatic changes and interspecific competition on the demographic history of a highly mobile generalist carnivore, the coyote.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koblmüller, Stephan; Wayne, Robert K; Leonard, Jennifer A

    2012-08-23

    Recurrent cycles of climatic change during the Quaternary period have dramatically affected the population genetic structure of many species. We reconstruct the recent demographic history of the coyote (Canis latrans) through the use of Bayesian techniques to examine the effects of Late Quaternary climatic perturbations on the genetic structure of a highly mobile generalist species. Our analysis reveals a lack of phylogeographic structure throughout the range but past population size changes correlated with climatic changes. We conclude that even generalist carnivorous species are very susceptible to environmental changes associated with climatic perturbations. This effect may be enhanced in coyotes by interspecific competition with larger carnivores.

  7. Deep inelastic scattering near the Coulomb barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehring, J.; Back, B.; Chan, K. [and others

    1995-08-01

    Deep inelastic scattering was recently observed in heavy ion reactions at incident energies near and below the Coulomb barrier. Traditional models of this process are based on frictional forces and are designed to predict the features of deep inelastic processes at energies above the barrier. They cannot be applied at energies below the barrier where the nuclear overlap is small and friction is negligible. The presence of deep inelastic scattering at these energies requires a different explanation. The first observation of deep inelastic scattering near the barrier was in the systems {sup 124,112}Sn + {sup 58,64}Ni by Wolfs et al. We previously extended these measurements to the system {sup 136}Xe + {sup 64}Ni and currently measured the system {sup 124}Xe + {sup 58}Ni. We obtained better statistics, better mass and energy resolution, and more complete angular coverage in the Xe + Ni measurements. The cross sections and angular distributions are similar in all of the Sn + Ni and Xe + Ni systems. The data are currently being analyzed and compared with new theoretical calculations. They will be part of the thesis of J. Gehring.

  8. Apoplastic Diffusion Barriers in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Lukas; Franke, Rochus Benni; Geldner, Niko; Reina-Pinto, José J.; Kunst, Ljerka

    2013-01-01

    During the development of Arabidopsis and other land plants, diffusion barriers are formed in the apoplast of specialized tissues within a variety of plant organs. While the cuticle of the epidermis is the primary diffusion barrier in the shoot, the Casparian strips and suberin lamellae of the endodermis and the periderm represent the diffusion barriers in the root. Different classes of molecules contribute to the formation of extracellular diffusion barriers in an organ- and tissue-specific manner. Cutin and wax are the major components of the cuticle, lignin forms the early Casparian strip, and suberin is deposited in the stage II endodermis and the periderm. The current status of our understanding of the relationships between the chemical structure, ultrastructure and physiological functions of plant diffusion barriers is discussed. Specific aspects of the synthesis of diffusion barrier components and protocols that can be used for the assessment of barrier function and important barrier properties are also presented. PMID:24465172

  9. Microenxertia interespecífica ex vitro em maracujazeiros Ex vitro interspecific micrografting in passionflower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Vicente Souza Pereira

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar o efeito da espécie de Passiflora usada como porta-enxerto no pegamento e desenvolvimento da microenxertia interespecífica ex vitro e caracterizar anatomicamente a região em que ela é realizada. Ápices caulinares de Passiflora edulis f. flavicarpa foram enxertados em hipocótilo de porta-enxertos de P. alata, P. cincinnata, P. edulis e P. setacea. Foram avaliados o desenvolvimento da microenxertia, a ocorrência de brotações adventícias do porta-enxerto e o percentual de microenxertos com folhas expandidas. Os porta-enxertos foram submetidos à avaliação anatômica e histoquímica. O desenvolvimento dos microenxertos e o número de brotações adventícias foram maiores quando se utilizou porta-enxertos de P. edulis e menores com porta-enxertos de P. setacea e P. alata. Porta-enxertos de P. edulis, P. cincinnata, P. alata e P. setacea proporcionaram, respectivamente, 30,3, 10, 1,6 e 0% de microenxertos com folhas expandidas. As avaliações histológicas evidenciaram maior espessura da região cortical em porta-enxertos de P. edulis, enquanto em P. setacea foi observado menor número de camadas corticais, maior quantidade de fibras floemáticas e de alcaloides, características que influenciaram negativamente o resultado da microenxertia.This study aimed at evaluating the effect of Passiflora species used as rootstocks on the success and development of ex vitro interspecific micrografting, and at anatomically characterizing the region where it is done. Stem apices of Passiflora edulis f. flavicarpa were grafted onto the hypocotyl of P. alata, P. cincinnata, P. edulis, and P. setacea seedlings. The micrografting development, the occurrence of adventitious shoots in rootstocks and the percentage of micrografts with expanded leaves were evaluated. The rootstocks were subjected to anatomical and histochemical evaluation. Micrograft development and adventitious shoot number were higher when P. edulis

  10. Interspecific interactions drive cultural co-evolution and acoustic convergence in syntopic species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laiolo, Paola

    2012-05-01

    1. Antagonistic interactions have been favourite subjects of studies on species co-evolution, because coexistence among competing species often results in quantifiable character displacement. A common output for competitive interactions is trait divergence, although the opposite phenomenon, convergence, has been proposed to evolve in some instances, for example in the communication behaviour of species that maintain mutually exclusive territories. 2. I use here experimental and observational evidence to study how species interactions drive heterospecific signal convergence and analyse how convergence feeds back to the interaction itself, in the form of aggressive behaviour. I recorded the learned territorial signals of two non-hybridizing larks, Galerida cristata and G. theklae, and used allopatric populations as controls for evaluating acoustic convergence in syntopy. Acoustic variation was analysed with respect to social conditions controlling for other potential agents of natural selection, habitat and climate. 3. Interspecific convergence of Galerida calls peaked in syntopy. Although call acoustic structure was affected by climate and habitat, it matched gradients of density and proximity to congeners even at small local scales. The process of cultural transmission, in which individuals may acquire components of behaviour by copying neighbours, enhances the correlation between call acoustics and the local social milieu. 4. Territories were defended against both species, but playback stimuli of convergent congener calls elicited a stronger aggressive reaction than congener calls from allopatric locations. 5. This study shows that learned behaviours may co-evolve as a consequence of antagonistic interactions, determining reciprocal cultural evolution or cultural co-evolution. As for (biological) co-evolution, the distribution of competing species influences whether a particular area becomes a syntopic environment in which convergence is occurring, or

  11. Performance of engineered barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajaram, V.; Dean, P.V.; McLellan, S.A.

    1997-01-01

    Engineered barriers, both vertical and horizontal, have been used to isolate hazardous wastes from contact, precipitation, surface water and groundwater. The primary objective of this study was to determine the performance of subsurface barriers installed throughout the U.S. over the past 20 years to contain hazardous wastes. Evaluation of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Subtitle C or equivalent caps was a secondary objective. A nationwide search was launched to select hazardous waste sites at which vertical barrier walls and/or caps had been used as the containment method. None of the sites selected had an engineered floor. From an initial list of 130 sites, 34 sites were selected on the basis of availability of monitoring data for detailed analysis of actual field performance. This paper will briefly discuss preliminary findings regarding the design, construction quality assurance/construction quality control (CQA/CQC), and monitoring at the 34 sites. In addition, the short-term performance of these sites (less than 5 years) is presented since very little long-term performance data was available

  12. Mass asymmetric fission barriers for 75Br

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delis, D. N.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Bowman, D. R.; Colonna, N.; Hanold, K.; Jing, K.; Justice, M.; Meng, J. C.; Peaslee, G. F.; Wozniak, G. J.; Moretto, L. G.

    1991-11-01

    Fragments with atomic numbers covering nearly the entire range of the mass-asymmetry coordinate (4 < Z < 27) were observed from the 5.0, 6.2, 6.9, 8.0, 10.2 and 12.7 MeV/A 63Cu + 12C reactions. Energy spectra and angular distributions show the presence of projectile-like and target-like components along with an isotropic component. The isotropic component appears as a Coulomb ring in the invariant cross-section plots indicating the presence of a binary compound nucleus decay which is confirmed by the coincidence data. Excitation functions were constructed for each Z value and a nearly complete set of mass-asymmetric barriers has been extracted for 75Br. There is excellent agreement between the experimentally determined barriers and the finite-range model predictions.

  13. There are many barriers to species' migrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth J Feeley

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Temperature-change trajectories are being used to identify the geographic barriers and thermal ‘cul-de-sacs’ that will limit the ability of many species to track climate change by migrating. We argue that there are many other potential barriers to species’ migrations. These include stable ecotones, discordant shifts in climatic variables, human land use, and species’ limited dispersal abilities. To illustrate our argument, for each 0.5° latitude/longitude grid cell of the Earth’s land surface, we mapped and tallied the number of cells for which future (2060–2080 climate represents an analog of the focal cell’s current climate. We compared results when only considering temperature with those for which both temperature and total annual precipitation were considered in concert. We also compared results when accounting for only geographic barriers (no cross-continental migration with those involving both geographic and potential ecological barriers (no cross-biome migration. As expected, the number of future climate analogs available to each pixel decreased markedly with each added layer of complexity (e.g. the proportion of the Earth’s land surface without any available future climate analogs increased from 3% to more than 36% with the inclusion of precipitation and ecological boundaries. While including additional variables can increase model complexity and uncertainty, we must strive to incorporate the factors that we know will limit species’ ranges and migrations if we hope to predict the effects of climate change at a high-enough degree of accuracy to guide management decisions.

  14. The genomic distribution of intraspecific and interspecific sequence divergence of human segmental duplications relative to human/chimpanzee chromosomal rearrangements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eichler Evan E

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been suggested that chromosomal rearrangements harbor the molecular footprint of the biological phenomena which they induce, in the form, for instance, of changes in the sequence divergence rates of linked genes. So far, all the studies of these potential associations have focused on the relationship between structural changes and the rates of evolution of single-copy DNA and have tried to exclude segmental duplications (SDs. This is paradoxical, since SDs are one of the primary forces driving the evolution of structure and function in our genomes and have been linked not only with novel genes acquiring new functions, but also with overall higher DNA sequence divergence and major chromosomal rearrangements. Results Here we take the opposite view and focus on SDs. We analyze several of the features of SDs, including the rates of intraspecific divergence between paralogous copies of human SDs and of interspecific divergence between human SDs and chimpanzee DNA. We study how divergence measures relate to chromosomal rearrangements, while considering other factors that affect evolutionary rates in single copy DNA. Conclusion We find that interspecific SD divergence behaves similarly to divergence of single-copy DNA. In contrast, old and recent paralogous copies of SDs do present different patterns of intraspecific divergence. Also, we show that some relatively recent SDs accumulate in regions that carry inversions in sister lineages.

  15. INTERSPECIFIC AGGRESSIVE BEHAVIOR OF THE CORALLIMORPHARIAN CORYNACTIS CALIFORNICA (CNIDARIA: ANTHOZOA): EFFECTS ON SYMPATRIC CORALS AND SEA ANEMONES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Nanette E

    1987-08-01

    Corallimorpharians are sessile cnidarians that are morphologically similar to the actiniarian sea anemones and scleractinian corals. This study describes for the first time the behavioral mechanism and effects of aggression by a corallimorpharian. Polyps of the temperate clonal corallimorpharian Corynactis californica extruded their mesenteries and associated filaments onto members of certain species of sea anemones and corals. They did not exhibit this behavior intraspecifically, and members of different clones of C. californica remained expanded upon contact. In contrast, members of four species of corals and zoanthids responded to contact with C. californica by contracting their tentacles, and members of three sea anemone species bent or moved away, detached from the substrate, or attacked using their aggressive structures. When interspecific contact was prolonged, individuals of C. californica extruded filaments onto, and killed polyps of, the sea anemones Anthopleura elegantissima and Metridium senile within 3 weeks, and the corals Astrangia lajollaensis and Balanophyllia elegans within 4-10 months under laboratory conditions. The use of extruded mesenterial filaments by C. californica to attack members of other anthozoan species is similar to the aggressive behavior exhibited by many scleractinian reef corals. Field observations suggest that C. californica may use this agonistic behavior during interspecific competition for space on hard marine substrate.

  16. DNA Methylation Alterations at 5'-CCGG Sites in the Interspecific and Intraspecific Hybridizations Derived from Brassica rapa and B. napus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanshan Xiong

    Full Text Available DNA methylation is an important regulatory mechanism for gene expression that involved in the biological processes of development and differentiation in plants. To investigate the association of DNA methylation with heterosis in Brassica, a set of intraspecific hybrids in Brassica rapa and B. napus and interspecific hybrids between B. rapa and B. napus, together with parental lines, were used to monitor alterations in cytosine methylation at 5'-CCGG sites in seedlings and buds by methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism analysis. The methylation status of approximately a quarter of the methylation sites changed between seedlings and buds. These alterations were related closely to the genomic structure and heterozygous status among accessions. The methylation status in the majority of DNA methylation sites detected in hybrids was the same as that in at least one of the parental lines in both seedlings and buds. However, the association between patterns of cytosine methylation and heterosis varied among different traits and between tissues in hybrids of Brassica, although a few methylation loci were associated with heterosis. Our data suggest that changes in DNA methylation at 5'-CCGG sites are not associated simply with heterosis in the interspecific and intraspecific hybridizations derived from B. rapa and B. napus.

  17. Species interactions and chemical stress: combined effects of intraspecific and interspecific interactions and pyrene on Daphnia magna population dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viaene, Karel P J; De Laender, Frederik; Rico, Andreu; Van den Brink, Paul J; Di Guardo, Antonio; Morselli, Melissa; Janssen, Colin R

    2015-08-01

    Species interactions are often suggested as an important factor when assessing the effects of chemicals on higher levels of biological organization. Nevertheless, the contribution of intraspecific and interspecific interactions to chemical effects on populations is often overlooked. In the present study, Daphnia magna populations were initiated with different levels of intraspecific competition, interspecific competition, and predation and exposed to pyrene pulses. Generalized linear models were used to test which of these factors significantly explained population size and structure at different time points. Pyrene had a negative effect on total population densities, with effects being more pronounced on smaller D. magna individuals. Among all species interactions tested, predation had the largest negative effect on population densities. Predation and high initial intraspecific competition were shown to interact antagonistically with pyrene exposure. This was attributed to differences in population structure before pyrene exposure and pyrene-induced reductions in predation pressure by Chaoborus sp. larvae. The present study provides empirical evidence that species interactions within and between populations can alter the response of aquatic populations to chemical exposure. Therefore, such interactions are important factors to be considered in ecological risk assessments. © 2015 SETAC.

  18. Fungal Volatiles Can Act as Carbon Sources and Semiochemicals to Mediate Interspecific Interactions Among Bark Beetle-Associated Fungal Symbionts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan A Cale

    Full Text Available Mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae has killed millions of hectares of pine forests in western North America. Beetle success is dependent upon a community of symbiotic fungi comprised of Grosmannia clavigera, Ophiostoma montium, and Leptographium longiclavatum. Factors regulating the dynamics of this community during pine infection are largely unknown. However, fungal volatile organic compounds (FVOCs help shape fungal interactions in model and agricultural systems and thus may be important drivers of interactions among bark beetle-associated fungi. We investigated whether FVOCs can mediate interspecific interactions among mountain pine beetle's fungal symbionts by affecting fungal growth and reproduction. Headspace volatiles were collected and identified to determine species-specific volatile profiles. Interspecific effects of volatiles on fungal growth and conidia production were assessed by pairing physically-separated fungal cultures grown either on a carbon-poor or -rich substrate, inside a shared-headspace environment. Fungal VOC profiles differed by species and influenced the growth and/or conidia production of the other species. Further, our results showed that FVOCs can be used as carbon sources for fungi developing on carbon-poor substrates. This is the first report demonstrating that FVOCs can drive interactions among bark beetle fungal symbionts, and thus are important factors in beetle attack success.

  19. Interspecific hybridization as a tool to understand vocal divergence: the example of crowing in quail (Genus Coturnix.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Derégnaucourt

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the mechanisms that lead organisms to be separated into distinct species remains a challenge in evolutionary biology. Interspecific hybridization, which results from incomplete reproductive isolation, is a useful tool to investigate such mechanisms. In birds, interspecific hybridization is relatively frequent, despite the fact that closed species exhibit morphological and behavioural differences. Evolution of behaviour is difficult to investigate on a large timescale since it does not 'fossilize'. Here I propose that calls of hybrid non-songbirds that develop without the influence of learning may help in understanding the gradual process that leads to vocal divergence during speciation. I recorded crows produced by the European quail (Coturnix c. coturnix, the domestic Japanese quail (Coturnix c. japonica and their hybrids (F1, F2 and backcrosses. Most crowing patterns were intermediate to those of the parental species; some were similar to one or the other parental species, or not present in either parental species. I also observed vocal changes in hybrid crows during the breeding season and from one year to the other. This vocal variability resembles those observed during the ontogeny of the crow in quails. It is likely that similar mechanisms involved in vocal changes during ontogeny might have driven vocal divergence in the species of Palearctic quails. I suggest that hybrid crows might have resembled those produced by intermediary forms of quails during speciation.

  20. Intraspecific and interspecific competition in Callosobruchus maculatus (F.) and Callosobruchus subinnotatus (Pic) on stored bambara groundnut, Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdcourt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lale, N E.S.; Vidal, S

    2001-10-01

    Intraspecific competition was studied in Callosobruchus maculatus and Callosobruchus subinnotatus. Interspecific competition between the two bruchids was also studied to determine which of these species is likely to cause more damage to stored bambara groundnuts, Vigna subterranea in cases of joint infestation. Results showed that increasing the adult density up to 8 females per 10g of bambara groundnut seeds did not significantly reduce the mean number of eggs laid per female, the number of eggs developing to the adult stage, or the weight of emerged adults of either species. The developmental period of the two species was also not significantly affected. The adult emergence curve of C. maculatus was similar to that of C. subinnotatus and was of the scramble type. C. maculatus performed better than C. subinnotatus in interspecific competition and it achieved this through a higher egg-laying ability and a higher rate of progeny production coupled with a shorter life-cycle. The implications of these findings with respect to damage and possible loss of stored bambara groundnut are discussed.

  1. Barrier mechanisms in the Drosophila blood-brain barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Jane Hindle

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The invertebrate blood-brain barrier field is growing at a rapid pace and, in recent years, studies have shown a physiologic and molecular complexity that has begun to rival its vertebrate counterpart. Novel mechanisms of paracellular barrier maintenance through GPCR signaling were the first demonstrations of the complex adaptive mechanisms of barrier physiology. Building upon this work, the integrity of the invertebrate blood-brain barrier has recently been shown to require coordinated function of all layers of the compound barrier structure, analogous to signaling between the layers of the vertebrate neurovascular unit. These findings strengthen the notion that many blood-brain barrier mechanisms are conserved between vertebrates and invertebrates, and suggest that novel findings in invertebrate model organisms will have a significant impact on the understanding of vertebrate BBB functions. In this vein, important roles in coordinating localized and systemic signaling to dictate organism development and growth are beginning to show how the blood-brain barrier can govern whole animal physiologies. This includes novel functions of blood-brain barrier gap junctions in orchestrating synchronized neuroblast proliferation, and of blood-brain barrier secreted antagonists of insulin receptor signaling. These advancements and others are pushing the field forward in exciting new directions. In this review, we provide a synopsis of invertebrate blood-brain barrier anatomy and physiology, with a focus on insights from the past 5 years, and highlight important areas for future study.

  2. DNA nanovehicles and the biological barriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okholm, Anders Hauge; Kjems, Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    DNA is emerging as a smart material to construct nanovehicles for targeted drug delivery. The programmability of Watson-Crick base paring enables construction of defined and dynamic DNA nanostructures of almost arbitrary shape and DNA can readily be functionalized with a variety of molecular...... be overcome. Here, we highlight recent strategies for DNA nanostructures in drug delivery, DNA nanovehicles, to facilitate targeting and crossing of the biological barriers. In light of this, we discuss future solutions and challenges for DNA nanovehicles to unravel their great potential to facilitate...

  3. Linguistic Barriers and Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Frederik

    2016-01-01

    The influence of language on social capital in low-skill and ethnically diverse workplaces has thus far received very limited attention within the sociology of work. As the ethnically diverse workplace is an important social space for the construction of social relations bridging different social...... and intercultural communication, this article analyses interviews with 31 employees from two highly ethnically diverse Danish workplaces. The article shows how linguistic barriers such as different levels of majority language competence and their consequent misunderstandings breed mistrust and hostility, whilst...... communication related to collaboration and ‘small talk’ may provide linguistic bridges to social capital formation....

  4. [Barrier methods of contraception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, A; Edelman, D A

    1982-01-01

    Vaginal methods of contraception were the earliest types used and some references to them date back to antiquity. Most of the vaginal contraceptive agents identified by the ancient Greeks, Indians, Japanese, and Chinese have been found in modern laboratory tests to have spermicidal properties, but it is doubtful that the methods were fully reliable or were used by many people. During the 19th century the condom, vaginal spermicides, and diaphragm became available. The development of nonoxynol-9 and other nonirritating but effective spermicidal agents improved vaginal contraceptives greatly by the 1950s, but starting in the 1960s newer methods began to replace the vaginal methods. Interest in barrier methods has been reawakened somewhat by concern about the health effects of hormonal methods. At present all barrier methods leave something to be desired. Failure rates of 3-30% for barrier methods in general have been estimated, but the higher rates are believed due to incorrect or inconsistent use. Theoretical failure rates of condoms and diaphragms have been estimated at 3/100 women-years, but in actual use failure rates may reach 15 for condoms and 13 for diaphragms used with spermicides. Use-effectiveness rates are greatly influenced by motivation. For a variety of reasons, the acceptability of barrier methods is low, especially in developing countries. New developments in spermicidal agents include sperm inhibitors, which impede the fertilizing capacity of sperm rather than attempting a spermicidal effect; a number of such agents have been studied and have proven more effective in animal tests than conventional spermicides. Neosampoon, a new spermicidal foam, has attracted an increasing number of users, especially in developing countries. A new condom, made of thin polymers and containing a standard dose of nonoxynol-9, has been designed to dissolve in the vaginal fluid. Further studies are needed of its acceptability, efficacy, and side effects before it becomes

  5. Market and policy barriers to energy storage deployment :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatnagar, Dhruv; Currier, Aileen B.; Hernandez, Jacquelynne; Ma, Ookie; Kirby, Brendan

    2013-09-01

    Electric energy storage technologies have recently been in the spotlight, discussed as essential grid assets that can provide services to increase the reliability and resiliency of the grid, including furthering the integration of variable renewable energy resources. Though they can provide numerous grid services, there are a number of factors that restrict their current deployment. The most significant barrier to deployment is high capital costs, though several recent deployments indicate that capital costs are decreasing and energy storage may be the preferred economic alternative in certain situations. However, a number of other market and regulatory barriers persist, limiting further deployment. These barriers can be categorized into regulatory barriers, market (economic) barriers, utility and developer business model barriers, crosscutting barriers and technology barriers. This report, through interviews with stakeholders and review of regulatory filings in four regions roughly representative of the United States, identifies the key barriers restricting further energy storage development in the country. The report also includes a discussion of possible solutions to address these barriers and a review of initiatives around the country at the federal, regional and state levels that are addressing some of these issues. Energy storage could have a key role to play in the future grid, but market and regulatory issues have to be addressed to allow storage resources open market access and compensation for the services they are capable of providing. Progress has been made in this effort, but much remains to be done and will require continued engagement from regulators, policy makers, market operators, utilities, developers and manufacturers.

  6. Lipase activity, mesocarp oil content, and iodine value in oil palm fruits of Elaeis guineensis, Elaeis oleifera, and the interspecific hybrid O×G (E. oleifera × E. guineensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadena, Tatiana; Prada, Fausto; Perea, Aidé; Romero, Hernán Mauricio

    2013-02-01

    One factor affecting crude palm oil quality is the formation of free fatty acids (FFA), often attributed to the hydrolytic action of mesocarp lipase. The aim of this work was to evaluate the enzyme behavior and to look toward new genotypes with low FFA production, high yield, and better oil quality. Lipase activity was strongly activated at low temperatures (5 °C). At this temperature PLL, SOO, POL, and POO (P, palmitic; L, linoleic; S, stearic; O, oleic) were the most hydrolyzed triacylglycerols in Elaeis guineensis fruits. Ethylene production decreased from 36 nL g(-1) h(-1) at room temperature to 2 nL g(-1) h(-1) at 5 °C. Lipase activity of E. guineensis, the E. oleifera × E. guineensis (O×G) hybrid, and E. oleifera were 52.7%, 32.9%, and oil in the mesocarp of 54.7%, followed by the O×G hybrid (47.0%), and E. oleifera (13.6%), and the iodine values were 52.0, 66.3, and 77.4 g I(2) 100 g(-1), respectively. This work allowed the identification of interspecific O×G hybrids as promising crosses with less lipase activity and higher iodine value than E. guineensis. Although O×G crosses produce less oil in the mesocarp than commercial E. guineensis; this feature could be improved by further breeding to introduce new genes from E. oleifera into the hybrids. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. Trends in drug delivery through tissue barriers containing tight junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tscheik, Christian; Blasig, Ingolf E; Winkler, Lars

    2013-04-01

    A limitation in the uptake of many drugs is the restricted permeation through tissue barriers. There are two general ways to cross barriers formed by cell layers: by transcytosis or by diffusion through the intercellular space. In the latter, tight junctions (TJs) play the decisive role in the regulation of the barrier permeability. Thus, transient modulation of TJs is a potent strategy to improve drug delivery. There have been extensive studies on surfactant-like absorption enhancers. One of the most effective enhancers found is sodium caprate. However, this modulates TJs in an unspecific fashion. A novel approach would be the specific modulation of TJ-associated marvel proteins and claudins, which are the main structural components of the TJs. Recent studies have identified synthetic peptidomimetics and RNA interference techniques to downregulate the expression of targeted TJ proteins. This review summarizes current progress and discusses the impact on TJs' barrier function.

  8. Near vision spectacle coverage and barriers to near vision ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine the near vision spectacle coverage and barriers to obtaining near vision correction among adults aged 35 years and older in the Cape Coast Metropolis of Ghana. Methods: A population-based cross-sectional study design was adopted and 500 out of 576 participants aged 35 years and older were ...

  9. Li breakup polarization potential at near barrier energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubian, F. J.; Correa, T.; Gomes, P.R.S.; Paes, B; Figueira, J. M.; Abriola, D.; Fernandez, J. O.; Capurro, O. A.; Marti, G.V.; Martinez, D.; Heimann; Negri, A.; Pacheco, A. J.; Padron, I.

    2007-01-01

    Inelastic and one neutron transfer cross sections at energies around the Coulomb barrier were used to derive dynamic polarization potential (DPP) for the 7 Li + 27 Al system. The DPP due to breakup, obtained in a simple way, indicates that its real part is repulsive at nearbarrier energies. (Author)

  10. Fusion around the barrier for Li ·12 C

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Fusion cross-sections for the Li +½¾. C reaction have been measured at energies above the Coulomb barrier by the direct detection of evaporation residues. The heavy evaporation residues with energies below 3 MeV could not be separated out from thea-particles in the spectrum and hence their contribution was ...

  11. Fusion around the barrier for 7 Li+ 12 C

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fusion cross-sections for the 7Li + 12C reaction have been measured at energies above the Coulomb barrier by the direct detection of evaporation residues. The heavy evaporation residues with energies below 3 MeV could not be separated out from the -particles in the spectrum and hence their contribution was ...

  12. Barriers and Facilitators to Research Utilization as Perceived by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to examine business educators' perceptions of barriers and facilitators to research utilization. A cross-sectional survey design was used and business educators participated (response rate 89%, n = 180/210). One questionnaire, Research Utilization Questionnaire (RUQ), was used. Data were ...

  13. Barriers to Physical Activity in Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roberton, Terri; Bucks, Romola S.; Skinner, Timothy C.

    2011-01-01

    on physical activity participation and perceived barriers to physical activity participation were collected using a cross-sectional survey and analysed using independent samples t-tests. We found that, regardless of level of ambulation or ability to transfer, few participants reported being physically active...

  14. Barriers to Accessing Eye Care Services in the Federal Capital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Key words: Barriers, access, eye care, u lisa on, FCT. Journal of the Nigerian Optometric Association. 1. HJ Eye Clinic Abuja, Nigeria. 2. Department of Public Health, Faculty of Allied Medical Sciences ,College of Medicine,. University of Calabar, Cross River State, Nigeria. 3. Brien Holden Vision Institute, West Africa sub- ...

  15. Cancer awareness and perceived barriers to health seeking in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Low cancer awareness may lead to delays in cancer screening behaviour and diagnosis. Objectives: We set out to assess public awareness of cancer and perceived barriers to seeking help among the rural population of Murewa district in a cross-sectional survey o f384 conveniently selected respondents.

  16. Barriers and attitudes towards HIV Voluntary Counselling an

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OBJECTIVE: To determine barriers and attitudes towards voluntary counseling and HIV-testing among secondary school students in Sengerema district. METHODOLOGY: A cross-sectional study was done in Sengerema district, Mwanza August 2006. A total of 400 secondary school students from the two schools ...

  17. Phenotypic and genetic aspects of epithelial barrier function in asthmatic patients

    OpenAIRE

    Loxham, Matthew; Davies, Donna E.

    2017-01-01

    The bronchial epithelium is continuously exposed to a multitude of noxious challenges in inhaled air. Cellular contact with most damaging agents is reduced by the action of the mucociliary apparatus and by formation of a physical barrier that controls passage of ions and macromolecules. In conjunction with these defensive barrier functions, immunomodulatory cross-talk between the bronchial epithelium and tissue-resident immune cells controls the tissue microenvironment and barrier homeostasis...

  18. Collective spectra along the fission barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pigni M. T.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Discrete and continuous spectra of fissioning nuclei at the humps of fission