WorldWideScience

Sample records for intersectoral coordination community

  1. The implementation of intersectoral community approaches targeting childhood obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleij, van der M.J.J.

    2017-01-01

    Childhood obesity remains a major public health concern. To successfully address the childhood obesity epidemic, intersectoral community interventions that take into account the multifactorial aetiology of childhood obesity are needed. However, the implementation of such interventions has proved to

  2. Addressing cancer disparities via community network mobilization and intersectoral partnerships: a social network analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoba Ramanadhan

    Full Text Available Community mobilization and collaboration among diverse partners are vital components of the effort to reduce and eliminate cancer disparities in the United States. We studied the development and impact of intersectoral connections among the members of the Massachusetts Community Network for Cancer Education, Research, and Training (MassCONECT. As one of the Community Network Program sites funded by the National Cancer Institute, this infrastructure-building initiative utilized principles of Community-based Participatory Research (CBPR to unite community coalitions, researchers, policymakers, and other important stakeholders to address cancer disparities in three Massachusetts communities: Boston, Lawrence, and Worcester. We conducted a cross-sectional, sociometric network analysis four years after the network was formed. A total of 38 of 55 members participated in the study (69% response rate. Over four years of collaboration, the number of intersectoral connections reported by members (intersectoral out-degree increased, as did the extent to which such connections were reported reciprocally (intersectoral reciprocity. We assessed relationships between these markers of intersectoral collaboration and three intermediate outcomes in the effort to reduce and eliminate cancer disparities: delivery of community activities, policy engagement, and grants/publications. We found a positive and statistically significant relationship between intersectoral out-degree and community activities and policy engagement (the relationship was borderline significant for grants/publications. We found a positive and statistically significant relationship between intersectoral reciprocity and community activities and grants/publications (the relationship was borderline significant for policy engagement. The study suggests that intersectoral connections may be important drivers of diverse intermediate outcomes in the effort to reduce and eliminate cancer disparities

  3. Intersectoral coordination in Aedes aegypti control. A pilot project in Havana City, Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, L; Perez, D; Pérez, T; Sosa, T; Cruz, G; Kouri, G; Boelaert, M; Van der Stuyft, P

    2005-01-01

    Background The 55th World Health Assembly declared dengue prevention and control a priority and urged Member States to develop sustainable intersectoral strategies to this end. To provide evidence for the reorientation of the dengue prevention policy in Cuba, we launched an intervention study to document the effectiveness of a local-level intersectoral approach. We used a quasi-experimental design. Social scientists introduced participatory methods to facilitate dialogue in the biweekly meetings of the intersectoral Health Council of the intervention area. This council subsequently developed an intersectoral plan for dengue prevention, of which the core objective was to design and implement activities for communication and social mobilization. In the control area, routine dengue control activities continued without additional input. Knowledge, attitudes and perceptions of dengue, and entomological indices were compared inside and between the areas before and after the 1-year intervention period. In the intervention area the Health Council elaborated an intersectoral plan for dengue prevention focused on source reduction. The Aedes aegypti control methods consisted in eliminating useless containers in the houses and surroundings, covering tanks, and cleaning public and inhabited areas. It was implemented through communication and social mobilization. The Health Council in the control area occasionally discussed dengue issues but did not develop a coordinated action plan. Good knowledge about breeding sites and disease symptoms increased significantly (by 49.7% and 17.1% respectively) in the intervention area as well as the proportion of respondents eliminating containers in and around their houses (by 44%). No changes were observed in the control area. The House Index in the intervention area was 3.72% at baseline and decreased to 0.61% after 1 year. In the control area it remained stable throughout the study period (1.31% and 1.65% respectively). The introduction

  4. Critical Stakeholder Determinants to the Implementation of Intersectoral Community Approaches Targeting Childhood Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kleij, R. M. J. J.; Crone, M. R.; Reis, R.; Paulussen, T. G. W. M.

    2016-01-01

    Several intersectoral community approaches targeting childhood obesity (IACOs) have been launched in the Netherlands. Translation of these approaches into practice is however arduous and implementation. We therefore studied the implementation of five IACOs in the Netherlands for one-and-a-half years. IACO implementation was evaluated via an…

  5. Factors in creating sustainable intersectoral community mobilization for prevention of heart and lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdages, Josée; Sauvageau, Lyne; Lepage, Céline

    2003-06-01

    This paper describes factors facilitating and working against successful community mobilization in the implementation of an integrated prevention programme for cardiovascular disease and lung cancer in four community settings in Québec, Canada. Implementation evaluation data from several sources showed that over the 3-year period, mobilization was partly achieved in all four communities, although the degree of success varied. The data support those of previous studies showing that several factors are key to effective intersectoral community mobilization: (i) involvement of concerned and influential community members with a commitment to shared goals and a visible community focus; (ii) formation of multi-organization systems among appropriate organizations, recognizing their strengths, resources and competencies, and preserving both their autonomy and interdependence with an appreciation of divergent perspectives; (iii) development of decision-making mechanisms through the setting up of formal structural arrangements to facilitate decisions with clear leadership; (iv) clear definition of objectives, tasks, roles and responsibilities; and (v) official support and legitimization from participating agencies, government authorities, and organizations with adequate resources devoted to partnership building. This study also replicated a number of barriers to the creation of sustainable intersectoral community mobilization, notably the potentially destructive role of power conflicts among the key institutional partners.

  6. A stitch in time saves nine? A repeated cross-sectional case study on the implementation of the intersectoral community approach Youth At a Healthy Weight

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleij, R.M.J.J. van der; Crone, M.R.; Paulussen, T.G.W.M.; Gaar, V.M. van de; Reis, R.

    2015-01-01

    Background The implementation of programs complex in design, such as the intersectoral community approach Youth At a Healthy Weight (JOGG), often deviates from their application as intended. There is limited knowledge of their implementation processes, making it difficult to formulate sound

  7. Implementing and evaluating e-communication to improve intersectoral cooperation between hospitals and local communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolaisen, Anne; Qvist, Peter

    2015-01-01

    services for the patient. The Region of Southern Denmark has implemented e-communication to improve the cooperation across health care sectors. Communities and hospitals in the Region of Southern Denmark agreed to comply to specified quality standards for the content and timeliness of information exchange...... these will be presented at the conference. Keywords: e-communication, cooperation across health care sectors, audit, evaluation, practice...

  8. Importance of intersectoral co-ordination in the control of communicable diseases, with special reference to plague in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilonzo, B S

    1994-07-01

    Human health, agriculture, including livestock, energy, education, wildlife, construction, forestry and trade sectors are inter-related and their co-ordination is an important pre-requisite for successful control of most communicable diseases including plague. Similar linkage between research, policy, training and extension activities in each sector are essential for any successful control strategy. Inadequate agricultural produce, inaccessibility of people to the available food and ignorance on proper preparation and usage of available food materials are responsible for malnutrition, and malnourished people are very vulnerable to disease. Irrigation schemes facilitate breeding of various disease vectors and transmission of some communicable diseases. Forests are ecologically favourable for some disease vectors and reservoirs for tsetse flies and rodents, while deforestation leads to soil erosion, lack of rainfall and consequently reduced productivity in agriculture which may result in poor nutrition of the population. Wildlife and livestock serve as reservoirs and/or carriers of various zoonoses including plague, trypanosomiasis and rabies. Lack of proper co-ordination of these sectors in communicable disease control programmes can result in serious and undesirable consequences. Indiscriminate killing of rodents in order to minimize food damage by these vermin forces their flea ectoparasites to seek alternative hosts, including man, a development which may result in transmission of plague from rodents to man. Similarly, avoidance of proper quarantine during plague epidemics, an undertaking which is usually aimed at maintaining economic and social links with places outside the affected focus, can result in the disease becoming widespread and consequently make any control strategies more difficult and expensive.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. A stitch in time saves nine? A repeated cross-sectional case study on the implementation of the intersectoral community approach Youth at a Healthy Weight Health behavior, health promotion and society

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.M. Van Der Kleij (Rianne Mjj); M.R. Crone (Mathilde); A.D.C. Paulussen (Aimée); V.M.J. Kruitwagen - van de Gaar (Vivian); R. Reis (Ria)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The implementation of programs complex in design, such as the intersectoral community approach Youth At a Healthy Weight (JOGG), often deviates from their application as intended. There is limited knowledge of their implementation processes, making it difficult to formulate

  10. International, intersectoral, or unobservable?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitze, Timo; Naveed, Amjad; Ahmad, Nisar

    2016-01-01

    for these methodical advances when estimating sectoral knowledge production functions for OECD countries under weak and strong cross-sectional dependence. By doing so, we are able to uncover technology- and trade-related R&D spillover channels associated with social returns to R&D, while effectively controlling......In the theoretical and empirical growth literature, private and social returns to R&D have been identified as the key drivers of productivity gains and economic development. However, recently the debate on the relative importance of private vis-à-vis social returns has been reinforced...... for other types of productivity spillovers and latent macroeconomic shocks. Our results highlight the role played by international-intersectoral R&D spillovers for the social rate of return to R&D, while we get limited evidence for private returns to R&D once cross-sectional dependence is properly accounted...

  11. Intersectoral labor mobility and deforestation in Ghana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Owusu, V.; Yerfi Fosu, K.; Burger, C.P.J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper quantifies the effects of the determinants of intersectoral labor mobility and the effect of intersectoral labor mobility on deforestation in Ghana over the period 1970–2008. A cointegration and error correction modeling approach is employed. The empirical results show that labor mobility

  12. Assessing Inter-Sectoral Climate Change Risks: The Role of ISIMIP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenzweig, Cynthia; Arnell, Nigel W.; Ebi, Kristie L.; Lotze-Campen, Hermann; Raes, Frank; Rapley, Chris; Smith, Mark Stafford; Cramer, Wolfgang; Frieler, Katja; Reyer, Christopher P. O.; hide

    2017-01-01

    The aims of the Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project (ISIMIP) are to provide a framework for the intercomparison of global and regional-scale risk models within and across multiple sectors and to enable coordinated multi-sectoral assessments of different risks and their aggregated effects. The overarching goal is to use the knowledge gained to support adaptation and mitigation decisions that require regional or global perspectives within the context of facilitating transformations to enable sustainable development, despite inevitable climate shifts and disruptions. ISIMIP uses community-agreed sets of scenarios with standardized climate variables and socioeconomic projections as inputs for projecting future risks and associated uncertainties, within and across sectors. The results are consistent multi-model assessments of sectoral risks and opportunities that enable studies that integrate across sectors, providing support for implementation of the Paris Agreement under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.

  13. Distributed detection of communities in complex networks using synthetic coordinates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papadakis, H; Fragopoulou, P; Panagiotakis, C

    2014-01-01

    Various applications like finding Web communities, detecting the structure of social networks, and even analyzing a graph’s structure to uncover Internet attacks are just some of the applications for which community detection is important. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that finds the entire community structure of a network, on the basis of local interactions between neighboring nodes and an unsupervised distributed hierarchical clustering algorithm. The novelty of the proposed approach, named SCCD (standing for synthetic coordinate community detection), lies in the fact that the algorithm is based on the use of Vivaldi synthetic network coordinates computed by a distributed algorithm. The current paper not only presents an efficient distributed community finding algorithm, but also demonstrates that synthetic network coordinates could be used to derive efficient solutions to a variety of problems. Experimental results and comparisons with other methods from the literature are presented for a variety of benchmark graphs with known community structure, derived from varying a number of graph parameters and real data set graphs. The experimental results and comparisons to existing methods with similar computation cost on real and synthetic data sets demonstrate the high performance and robustness of the proposed scheme. (paper)

  14. Intersectorality in the 'Health in Schools' Program: an evaluation of the political-management process and working practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Marta Caires de; Esperidião, Monique Azevedo; Medina, Maria Guadalupe

    2017-06-01

    This study analyzed inter-sectoral activities between the health and education sectors in implementing the Health in Schools program in a city within a metropolitan region in northeast Brazil. Analysis of the political-management process looked at the following dimensions: professional practices and subject understanding of intersectorality. The results show that subjects define intersectorality as partnership and joint efforts. Regarding decision making and resource mobilization, during program implementation we noticed that healthcare leads, and education tends to play a more peripheral role. Health activities in the schools use a biomedical approach and primarily consist of lectures. We believe that the program strengthened the relationship between these two sectors. However, intersectoral coordination in the political-management process and practices show weaknesses and limitations.

  15. Pediatric Asthma Care Coordination in Underserved Communities: A Quasiexperimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janevic, Mary R; Stoll, Shelley; Wilkin, Margaret; Song, Peter X K; Baptist, Alan; Lara, Marielena; Ramos-Valencia, Gilberto; Bryant-Stephens, Tyra; Persky, Victoria; Uyeda, Kimberly; Lesch, Julie Kennedy; Wang, Wen; Malveaux, Floyd J

    2016-11-01

    To assess the effect of care coordination on asthma outcomes among children in underserved urban communities. We enrolled children, most of whom had very poorly or not well-controlled asthma, in medical-social care coordination programs in Los Angeles, California; Chicago, Illinois; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and San Juan, Puerto Rico in 2011 to 2014. Participants (n = 805; mean age = 7 years) were 60% male, 50% African American, and 42% Latino. We assessed asthma symptoms and health care utilization via parent interview at baseline and 12 months. To prevent overestimation of intervention effects, we constructed a comparison group using bootstrap resampling of matched control cases from previous pediatric asthma trials. At follow-up, intervention participants had 2.2 fewer symptom days per month (SD = 0.3; P < .01) and 1.9 fewer symptom nights per month (SD = 0.35; P < .01) than did the comparison group. The relative risk in the past year associated with the intervention was 0.63 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.45, 0.89) for an emergency department visit and 0.69 (95% CI = 0.47, 1.01) for hospitalization. Care coordination may improve pediatric asthma symptom control and reduce emergency department visits. Expanding third-party reimbursement for care coordination services may help reduce pediatric asthma disparities.

  16. IHY Modeling Support at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chulaki, A.; Hesse, Michael; Kuznetsova, Masha; MacNeice, P.; Rastaetter, L.

    2005-01-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) is a US inter-agency activity aiming at research in support of the generation of advanced space weather models. As one of its main functions, the CCMC provides to researchers the use of space science models, even if they are not model owners themselves. In particular, the CCMC provides to the research community the execution of "runs-onrequest" for specific events of interest to space science researchers. Through this activity and the concurrent development of advanced visualization tools, CCMC provides, to the general science community, unprecedented access to a large number of state-of-the-art research models. CCMC houses models that cover the entire domain from the Sun to the Earth. In this presentation, we will provide an overview of CCMC modeling services that are available to support activities during the International Heliospheric Year. In order to tailor CCMC activities to IHY needs, we will also invite community input into our IHY planning activities.

  17. Energy Management in Prosumer Communities: A Coordinated Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Verschae

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of uncontrollable renewable energy is having a positive impact on our health, the climate, and the economy, but it is also pushing the limits of the power system. The main reason for this is that, in any power system, the generation and consumption must match each other at all times. Thus, if we want to further introduce uncontrollable generation, we need a large ability to manage the demand. However, the ability to control the power consumption of existing demand management approaches is limited, and most of these approaches cannot contribute to the introduction of reneweables, because they do not consider distributed uncontrolled consumption and generation in the control. Furthermore, these methods do not allow users to exchange or jointly manage their power generation and consumption. In this context, we propose an augmented energy management model for prosumers (i.e., producer and consumer. This model considers controlled and uncontrolled generation and consumption, as well as the prosumer’s ability (i to plan the intended power consumption; and (ii to manage real-time deviations from the intended consumption. We apply this model to the energy management of prosumer communities, by allowing the prosumers to coordinate their power consumption plan, to manage the deviations from the intended consumption, and to help each other by compensating deviations. The proposed approach seeks to enhance the power system, and to enable a prosumer society that takes account social and environmental issues, as well as each prosumer’s quality of life.

  18. Dynamic intersectoral models with power-law memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasova, Valentina V.; Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2018-01-01

    Intersectoral dynamic models with power-law memory are proposed. The equations of open and closed intersectoral models, in which the memory effects are described by the Caputo derivatives of non-integer orders, are derived. We suggest solutions of these equations, which have the form of linear combinations of the Mittag-Leffler functions and which are characterized by different effective growth rates. Examples of intersectoral dynamics with power-law memory are suggested for two sectoral cases. We formulate two principles of intersectoral dynamics with memory: the principle of changing of technological growth rates and the principle of domination change. It has been shown that in the input-output economic dynamics the effects of fading memory can change the economic growth rate and dominant behavior of economic sectors.

  19. Antioxidant micronutrients as intersectoral link between health and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antioxidant micronutrients as intersectoral link between health and agriculture. ... desirable by helping to prevent disease, promoting health and improving the ... for sustainable development of which health should be a goal (Afr. J. Biomed.

  20. Factors shaping intersectoral action in primary health care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaf, Julia; Baum, Fran; Freeman, Toby; Labonte, Ron; Javanparast, Sara; Jolley, Gwyn; Lawless, Angela; Bentley, Michael

    2014-12-01

    To examine case studies of good practice in intersectoral action for health as one part of evaluating comprehensive primary health care in six sites in South Australia and the Northern Territory. Interviews with primary health care workers, collaborating agency staff and service users (Total N=33); augmented by relevant documents from the services and collaborating partners. The value of intersectoral action for health and the importance of partner relationships to primary health care services were both strongly endorsed. Factors facilitating intersectoral action included sufficient human and financial resources, diverse backgrounds and skills and the personal rewards that sustain commitment. Key constraining factors were financial and time limitations, and a political and policy context which has become less supportive of intersectoral action; including changes to primary health care. While intersectoral action is an effective way for primary health care services to address social determinants of health, commitment to social justice and to adopting a social view of health are constrained by a broader health service now largely reinforcing a biomedical model. Effective organisational practices and policies are needed to address social determinants of health in primary health care and to provide a supportive context for workers engaging in intersectoral action. © 2014 Public Health Association of Australia.

  1. Continuous Cash Benefit (BCP) for disabled individuals: access barriers and intersectoral gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaitsman, Jeni; Lobato, Lenaura de Vasconcelos Costa

    2017-11-01

    The 1988 Constitution approved the Continuous Cash Benefit (BCP) directed to elders and disabled persons with a household per capita income of 25% of the minimum wage, and around 4 million people received this benefit in 2015. The design of BPC for disabled persons involves organizations of social security, social welfare and health. This paper discusses how some intersectoral coordination mechanisms gaps between these areas produce access barriers to potential beneficiaries. Results stem from a qualitative study performed with physicians, administrative staff and social workers from the National Institute of Social Security (INSS) and of the Social Welfare Reference Center (CRAS) in three municipalities of different Brazilian regions. Intersectoral coordination and cooperation are more structured at the Federal level. At the local level, they rely on informal and horizontal initiatives, which produce immediate but discontinuous solutions. The role of the CRAS remains contingent on the implementation. The need to establish institutionalized mechanisms for coordination and cooperation between social welfare, health and social insurance to improve the implementation and reduce barriers to access to the BCP is apparent.

  2. Intersectorality and social participation as coping policies for health inequities-worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorati, Regina Celia; Arcêncio, Ricardo A; Segura Del Pozo, Javier; Ramasco-Gutiérrez, Milagros; Serrano-Gallardo, Pilar

    2017-09-18

    To determine the impact that intersectoral policies and social participation, implemented worldwide, have had on the modification of the social determinants for health and on the reduction of social health inequities. A scoping review of the literature published in the period 2005-2015 was performed. The literature search was conducted on PubMed and Scielo databases. Two researchers reviewed each document. Data were analysed according to the intersectoral action and social participation variables and according to the theoretical frameworks of the Social Determinants Model of the Commission on Social Determinants of Health (CSDH) and the theoretical constructs of Social Capital (SC) and Life Course (LC). Out of 45 documents likely to be selected for final review, all of them based on title and abstract, 20 documents were eventually picked out and analysed; most them (n = 8) were conducted in all Latin America and Latin America's countries. Twelve documents reported intersectoral action associated with social participation in partnership with different institutions. Regarding theoretical frameworks, most of studies (n = 8) used CSDH and SC. In relation to health outcomes, the studies showed mainly: increased access to health and education, follow-up of pregnant women, increasing in prenatal examinations, reduction in malnutrition/child mortality, reduction in extreme poverty/hunger; reduction in epidemics/tuberculosis, control of alcohol/drug consumption, promotion of health/mental as well as basic sanitation improvements. Intersectoral and social participation experiences studied yielded positive outcomes regarding health status and quality of life in the communities in which such experiences were implemented. Copyright © 2017 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Elusive implementation: an ethnographic study of intersectoral policymaking for health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Ditte Heering; Rod, Morten Hulvej; Waldorff, Susanne Boch; Tjørnhøj-Thomsen, Tine

    2018-01-30

    For more than 30 years policy action across sectors has been celebrated as a necessary and viable way to affect the social factors impacting on health. In particular intersectoral action on the social determinants of health is considered necessary to address social inequalities in health. However, despite growing support for intersectoral policymaking, implementation remains a challenge. Critics argue that public health has remained naïve about the policy process and a better understanding is needed. Based on ethnographic data, this paper conducts an in-depth analysis of a local process of intersectoral policymaking in order to gain a better understanding of the challenges posed by implementation. To help conceptualize the process, we apply the theoretical perspective of organizational neo-institutionalism, in particular the concepts of rationalized myth and decoupling. On the basis of an explorative study among ten Danish municipalities, we conducted an ethnographic study of the development of a municipal-wide implementation strategy for the intersectoral health policy of a medium-sized municipality. The main data sources consist of ethnographic field notes from participant observation and interview transcripts. By providing detailed contextual description, we show how an apparent failure to move from policy to action is played out by the ongoing production of abstract rhetoric and vague plans. We find that idealization of universal intersectoralism, inconsistent demands, and doubts about economic outcomes challenge the notion of implementation as moving from rhetoric to action. We argue that the 'myth' of intersectoralism may be instrumental in avoiding the specification of action to implement the policy, and that the policy instead serves as a way to display and support good intentions and hereby continue the process. On this basis we expand the discussion on implementation challenges regarding intersectoral policymaking for health.

  4. Evaluating intersectoral collaboration: a model for assessment by service users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bengt Ahgren

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: DELTA was launched as a project in 1997 to improve intersectoral collaboration in the rehabilitation field. In 2005 DELTA was transformed into a local association for financial co-ordination between the institutions involved. Based on a study of the DELTA service users, the purpose of this article is to develop and to validate a model that can be used to assess the integration of welfare services from the perspective of the service users. Theory: The foundation of integration is a well functioning structure of integration. Without such structural conditions, it is difficult to develop a process of integration that combines the resources and competences of the collaborating organisations to create services advantageous for the service users. In this way, both the structure and the process will contribute to the outcome of integration. Method: The study was carried out as a retrospective cross-sectional survey during two weeks, including all the current service users of DELTA. The questionnaire contained 32 questions, which were derived from the theoretical framework and research on service users, capturing perceptions of integration structure, process and outcome. Ordinal scales and open questions where used for the assessment. Results: The survey had a response rate of 82% and no serious biases of the results were detected. The study shows that the users of the rehabilitation services perceived the services as well integrated, relevant and adapted to their needs. The assessment model was tested for reliability and validity and a few modifications were suggested. Some key measurement themes were derived from the study. Conclusion: The model developed in this study is an important step towards an assessment of service integration from the perspective of the service users. It needs to be further refined, however, before it can be used in other evaluations of collaboration in the provision of integrated welfare services.

  5. COORDINATING HOSPITAL AND COMMUNITY WORK ADJUSTMENT SERVICES. FINAL REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    GOERTZEL, VICTOR; AND OTHERS

    THE GOALS OF THIS STUDY WERE TO USE WORK TO HELP PATIENTS LEAVE THE CAMARILLO STATE HOSPITAL SOONER, BECOME A PART OF THE COMMUNITY, AND BECOME SELF-SUPPORTING. THE PROJECT SELECTED 146 SCHIZOPHRENIC MALES WHO HAD A HISTORY OF POOR WORK ADJUSTMENT. AS PART OF THE TREATMENT, THE MEN WERE PLACED IN THE HOSPITAL BAKERY. AFTER ADJUSTMENT TO THE WORK…

  6. Developing community based rehabilitation for cancer survivors: Organizing for coordination and coherence in practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Karen; Cutchin, Malcolm

    2013-01-01

    Background. Increasing incidence of cancer combined with prolonged survival have raised the need for developing community based rehabilitation. The objectives of the analysis were to describe and interpret the key issues related to coordination and coherence of community-based cancer rehabilitation......-based organization, and informal relationships were fundamental for developing coordination and coherence. Conclusions. Coordination and coherence in community-based rehabilitation relies on increased collaboration, which may best be optimized by use of shared frameworks within and across systems. Results highlight...... in Denmark and to provide insights relevant for other contexts. Methods. Twenty-seven rehabilitation managers across 15 municipalities in Denmark comprised the sample. The study was designed with a combination of data collection methods including questionnaires, individual interviews, and focus groups...

  7. Intersectoral Transfer, Growth, and Inequality in Rural Ecuador

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elbers, C.T.M.; Lanjouw, P.F.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we study intersectoral transfer and its impact on the distribution of income in Ecuador. We find that income shares between farm and nonfarm activities are roughly equal, on average, although the rich in rural areas typically receive a greater share of income from nonfarm sources. Thus

  8. Intersectoral action on SDH and equity in Australian health policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Matthew; Baum, Frances E; MacDougall, Colin; Newman, Lareen; McDermott, Dennis; Phillips, Clare

    2017-12-01

    Intersectoral action between public agencies across policy sectors, and between levels of government, is seen as essential for effective action by governments to address social determinants of health (SDH) and to reduce health inequities. The health sector has been identified as having a crucial stewardship role, to engage other policy sectors in action to address the impacts of their policies on health. This article reports on research to investigate intersectoral action on SDH and health inequities in Australian health policy. We gathered and individually analysed 266 policy documents, being all of the published, strategic health policies of the national Australian government and eight State/Territory governments, current at the time of sampling in late 2012-early 2013. Our analysis showed that strategies for intersectoral action were common in Australian health policy, but predominantly concerned with extending access to individualized medical or behavioural interventions to client groups in other policy sectors. Where intersectoral strategies did propose action on SDH (other than access to health-care), they were mostly limited to addressing proximal factors, rather than policy settings affecting the distribution of socioeconomic resources. There was little evidence of engagement between the health sector and those policy sectors most able to influence systemic socioeconomic inequalities in Australia. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Distributed Coordination of Electric Vehicle Charging in a Community Microgrid Considering Real-Time Price

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Chendan; Schaltz, Erik; Quintero, Juan Carlos Vasquez

    2016-01-01

    The predictable increasing adoption of EV by residential users imposes the necessity of Electric Vehicle charging coordination, in order to charge effectively while minimizing the impact on the grid. In this paper, a two-stage distributed coordination algorithm for electric vehicle charging...... management in a community microgrid is proposed. Each local EV charging controller is taken as an agent, which can manage the charging to achieve the optimization of the whole community by communicating in a sparse network. The proposed algorithm aims at optimizing real-time, which manages the charging...

  10. Advancing Ocean Science Through Coordination, Community Building, and Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benway, H. M.

    2016-02-01

    The US Ocean Carbon and Biogeochemistry (OCB) Program (www.us-ocb.org) is a dynamic network of scientists working across disciplines to understand the ocean's role in the global carbon cycle and how marine ecosystems and biogeochemical cycles are responding to environmental change. The OCB Project Office, which is based at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), serves as a central information hub for this network, bringing different scientific disciplines together and cultivating partnerships with complementary US and international programs to address high-priority research questions. The OCB Project Office plays multiple important support roles, such as hosting and co-sponsoring workshops, short courses, working groups, and synthesis activities on emerging research issues; engaging with relevant national and international science planning initiatives; and developing education and outreach activities and products with the goal of promoting ocean carbon science to broader audiences. Current scientific focus areas of OCB include ocean observations (shipboard, autonomous, satellite, etc.); changing ocean chemistry (acidification, expanding low-oxygen conditions, etc.); ocean carbon uptake and storage; estuarine and coastal carbon cycling; biological pump and associated biological and biogeochemical processes and carbon fluxes; and marine ecosystem response to environmental and evolutionary changes, including physiological and molecular-level responses of individual organisms, as well as shifts in community structure and function. OCB is a bottom-up organization that responds to the continually evolving priorities and needs of its network and engages marine scientists at all career stages. The scientific leadership of OCB includes a scientific steering committee and subcommittees on ocean time-series, ocean acidification, and ocean fertilization. This presentation will highlight recent OCB activities and products of interest to the ocean science community.

  11. Developing community based rehabilitation for cancer survivors: organizing for coordination and coherence in practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Increasing incidences of cancer combined with prolonged survival have raised the need for developing community based rehabilitation. The objectives of the analysis were to describe and interpret the key issues related to coordination and coherence of community-based cancer rehabilitation in Denmark and to provide insights relevant for other contexts. Methods Twenty-seven rehabilitation managers across 15 municipalities in Denmark comprised the sample. The study was designed with a combination of data collection methods including questionnaires, individual interviews, and focus groups. A Grounded Theory approach was used to analyze the data. Results A lack of shared cultures among health care providers and systems of delivery was a primary barrier to collaboration which was essential for establishing coordination of care. Formal multidisciplinary steering committees, team-based organization, and informal relationships were fundamental for developing coordination and coherence. Conclusions Coordination and coherence in community-based rehabilitation relies on increased collaboration, which may best be optimized by use of shared frameworks within and across systems. Results highlight the challenges faced in practical implementation of community rehabilitation and point to possible strategies for its enhancement. PMID:24004881

  12. [Characteristics of the leadership of health center coordinators in the autonomous community of Murcia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menárguez Puche, J F; Saturno Hernández, P J

    1998-12-01

    To describe the style and effectiveness (adaptability) of the leadership of coordinators of an autonomous community according to the model of leadership on the ground, analysing its relationship with the work environment. Observational crossover study. All the functioning teams in this community. Medical and nursing coordinators. Hersey and Blanchard's questionnaire on leadership on the ground was employed. This identifies 1) the predominant style (scoring for style 0-12). On the approach of the coordinator to personal relationships and/or task development, it identifies 4 points: direction, persuasion, participation, delegation. 2) Adaptability of the manager (ranging from +24 to -24), based on that the best choice between different options depends on the maturity of the group. To contrast work environment and leadership, a validated questionnaire, adapted to our milieu, was used. Overall reply rate (51 coordinators) was 89.4%. Analysis of styles was: persuasive 5.05 points (SD = 1.25), participatory 4.74 (SD 1.76), directive 1.2 (SD 1.11) and delegating 0.34 (SD 0.68). Adaptability scored 8.38 points (SD = 4.67), and was greater for the nursing coordinators (p Leadership adaptability was quite high and greater in nursing. The most prevalent styles were the persuasive and the participatory, more efficacious in teams of average maturity. Theoretical effectiveness was positively related to a better work environment.

  13. Intersectoral partnerships constitution, framework for Serbian tourism competitiveness growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jegdić Vaso

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Intersectoral partnership is a means of strategic management that incorporates economical, social and environmental developmental aims. The Serbian tourist industry is characterized by numerous small and average-sized enterprises with limited resources for research, development, marketing and other investments. That requires addressing other subjects (stakeholders. By establishing partnership networks and clusters, stakeholders acquire necessary means and get opportunities for the development and improvement of competition of tourist products and destinations.

  14. Partnership for Sustainable Communities: Five Years of Learning from Communities and Coordinating Federal Investments

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report commemorating the fifth anniversary of the HUD-DOT-EPA Partnership for Sustainable Communities shows how the three agencies are changing their policies and removing barriers to help communities.

  15. Recurrently connected and localized neuronal communities initiate coordinated spontaneous activity in neuronal networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Hayder; Maccione, Alessandro; Nieus, Thierry

    2017-01-01

    Developing neuronal systems intrinsically generate coordinated spontaneous activity that propagates by involving a large number of synchronously firing neurons. In vivo, waves of spikes transiently characterize the activity of developing brain circuits and are fundamental for activity-dependent circuit formation. In vitro, coordinated spontaneous spiking activity, or network bursts (NBs), interleaved within periods of asynchronous spikes emerge during the development of 2D and 3D neuronal cultures. Several studies have investigated this type of activity and its dynamics, but how a neuronal system generates these coordinated events remains unclear. Here, we investigate at a cellular level the generation of network bursts in spontaneously active neuronal cultures by exploiting high-resolution multielectrode array recordings and computational network modelling. Our analysis reveals that NBs are generated in specialized regions of the network (functional neuronal communities) that feature neuronal links with high cross-correlation peak values, sub-millisecond lags and that share very similar structural connectivity motifs providing recurrent interactions. We show that the particular properties of these local structures enable locally amplifying spontaneous asynchronous spikes and that this mechanism can lead to the initiation of NBs. Through the analysis of simulated and experimental data, we also show that AMPA currents drive the coordinated activity, while NMDA and GABA currents are only involved in shaping the dynamics of NBs. Overall, our results suggest that the presence of functional neuronal communities with recurrent local connections allows a neuronal system to generate spontaneous coordinated spiking activity events. As suggested by the rules used for implementing our computational model, such functional communities might naturally emerge during network development by following simple constraints on distance-based connectivity. PMID:28749937

  16. Recurrently connected and localized neuronal communities initiate coordinated spontaneous activity in neuronal networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Lonardoni

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Developing neuronal systems intrinsically generate coordinated spontaneous activity that propagates by involving a large number of synchronously firing neurons. In vivo, waves of spikes transiently characterize the activity of developing brain circuits and are fundamental for activity-dependent circuit formation. In vitro, coordinated spontaneous spiking activity, or network bursts (NBs, interleaved within periods of asynchronous spikes emerge during the development of 2D and 3D neuronal cultures. Several studies have investigated this type of activity and its dynamics, but how a neuronal system generates these coordinated events remains unclear. Here, we investigate at a cellular level the generation of network bursts in spontaneously active neuronal cultures by exploiting high-resolution multielectrode array recordings and computational network modelling. Our analysis reveals that NBs are generated in specialized regions of the network (functional neuronal communities that feature neuronal links with high cross-correlation peak values, sub-millisecond lags and that share very similar structural connectivity motifs providing recurrent interactions. We show that the particular properties of these local structures enable locally amplifying spontaneous asynchronous spikes and that this mechanism can lead to the initiation of NBs. Through the analysis of simulated and experimental data, we also show that AMPA currents drive the coordinated activity, while NMDA and GABA currents are only involved in shaping the dynamics of NBs. Overall, our results suggest that the presence of functional neuronal communities with recurrent local connections allows a neuronal system to generate spontaneous coordinated spiking activity events. As suggested by the rules used for implementing our computational model, such functional communities might naturally emerge during network development by following simple constraints on distance-based connectivity.

  17. A Real-World Community Health Worker Care Coordination Model for High-Risk Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Molly A; Perry-Bell, Kenita; Minier, Mark; Glassgow, Anne Elizabeth; Van Voorhees, Benjamin W

    2018-04-01

    Health care systems across the United States are considering community health worker (CHW) services for high-risk patients, despite limited data on how to build and sustain effective CHW programs. We describe the process of providing CHW services to 5,289 at-risk patients within a state-run health system. The program includes 30 CHWs, six care coordinators, the Director of Care Coordination, the Medical Director, a registered nurse, mental health specialists, and legal specialists. CHWs are organized into geographic and specialized teams. All CHWs receive basic training that includes oral and mental health; some receive additional disease-specific training. CHWs develop individualized care coordination plans with patients. The implementation of these plans involves delivery of a wide range of social service and coordination support. The number of CHW contacts is determined by patient risk. CHWs spend about 60% of their time in an office setting. To deliver the program optimally, we had to develop multiple CHW job categories that allow for CHW specialization. We created new technology systems to manage operations. Field issues resulted in program changes to improve service delivery and ensure safety. Our experience serves as a model for how to integrate CHWs into clinical and community systems.

  18. The Model of Coordination of Communication Channels for Small Tourist Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena VASKOVIĆ

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available By including e-business, small tourist communities were allowed, apart from their classic offers, to appear on the global market, but that caused the need for automation and coordination of booking capacity tasks. Advertising and booking in these communities are performed by a conventional agency arrangement, the Internet, mobile services or by tourists themselves upon their arrival in the local community where they can reserve the accommodation. The possibility of booking accommodation capacities in many ways creates additional benefits for considerable usage of excess capacity, but as a side effect there is a problem of coordination of communication channels in order to avoid double-booking. On the other hand, the local administration has a problem with the registration and the payment of the tourist tax, particularly if the tourists do not stay long. With the automation and coordination of communication channels, conflicts can be completely avoided, and the reservation system informs all interested parties and reports to the local administration.

  19. An Integrated Model of Co-ordinated Community-Based Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharlach, Andrew E; Graham, Carrie L; Berridge, Clara

    2015-08-01

    Co-ordinated approaches to community-based care are a central component of current and proposed efforts to help vulnerable older adults obtain needed services and supports and reduce unnecessary use of health care resources. This study examines ElderHelp Concierge Club, an integrated community-based care model that includes comprehensive personal and environmental assessment, multilevel care co-ordination, a mix of professional and volunteer service providers, and a capitated, income-adjusted fee model. Evaluation includes a retrospective study (n = 96) of service use and perceived program impact, and a prospective study (n = 21) of changes in participant physical and social well-being and health services utilization. Over the period of this study, participants showed greater mobility, greater ability to meet household needs, greater access to health care, reduced social isolation, reduced home hazards, fewer falls, and greater perceived ability to obtain assistance needed to age in place. This study provides preliminary evidence that an integrated multilevel care co-ordination approach may be an effective and efficient model for serving vulnerable community-based elders, especially low and moderate-income elders who otherwise could not afford the cost of care. The findings suggest the need for multisite controlled studies to more rigorously evaluate program impacts and the optimal mix of various program components. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Evaluation of intersectoral resources in the composition of care networks for crack users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Barbosa de Pinho

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To evaluate the intersectoral resources in the composition of care networks for crack users. Method: Evaluative, qualitative study based on the Fourth Generation Evaluation. The participants were 10 users, 11 family members, eight workers, and seven managers from a municipality in the metropolitan region of Porto Alegre/Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Data were collected in 2014 through observation and semi-structured interviews. The analysis occurred by the constant comparative method. Results: Stakeholders have discussed how the Public Prosecutor's Office and the Military Brigade are inserted in the network, since they carry out actions that often are not compatible with the psychosocial care proposal. The need for expansion and maintenance of liaisons with community resources was identified. Conclusion: It is noted the need for sector integration and participation of all social agents from different spheres in order to promote and evaluate the practices and policies of care for crack users.

  1. Cracking the humanitarian logistic coordination challenge: lessons from the urban search and rescue community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatham, Peter; Spens, Karen

    2016-04-01

    The challenges of achieving successful inter-agency logistic coordination in preparing for and responding to natural disasters and complex emergencies are both well understood and well documented. However, although many of these challenges remain unresolved, the literature reveals that the organisations that form the urban search and rescue (USAR) community have attained a high level of coherence and interoperability that results in a highly efficient and effective response. Therefore, this paper uses the idea of 'borrowing' from other fields as it explores how the processes and procedures used by the USAR community might be applied to improve humanitarian logistic operations. The paper analyses the USAR model and explores how the resultant challenges might be addressed in a humanitarian logistic context. The paper recommends that further research be undertaken in order to develop a modified USAR model that could be operationalised by the international community of humanitarian logisticians. © 2016 The Author(s). Disasters © Overseas Development Institute, 2016.

  2. Typical and Top-Ranked Polish Private Higher Education: Intersectoral and Intrasectoral Distinctiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musial, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation analyzes the degree and shape of differences between private and public sectors (intersectoral) and within the private sector (intrasectoral) in Polish higher education. The intersectoral hypothesis is that Poland's two sectors are quite different and that these differences mostly follow those claimed and so far found in leading…

  3. An Integrative Behavioral Health Care Model Using Automated SBIRT and Care Coordination in Community Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwinnells, Ronald; Misik, Lauren

    2017-10-01

    Efficient and effective integration of behavioral health programs in a community health care practice emphasizes patient-centered medical home principles to improve quality of care. A prospective, 3-period, interrupted time series study was used to explore which of 3 different integrative behavioral health care screening and management processes were the most efficient and effective in prompting behavioral health screening, identification, interventions, and referrals in a community health practice. A total of 99.5% ( P < .001) of medical patients completed behavioral health screenings; brief intervention rates nearly doubled to 83% ( P < .001) and 100% ( P < .001) of identified at-risk patients had referrals made using a combination of electronic tablets, electronic medical record, and behavioral health care coordination.

  4. Community participation in disease control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermejo, A; Bekui, A

    1993-05-01

    The main determinants of community participation in disease control programmes are identified and a framework with eleven variables is developed. Attention is drawn to the political background, community characteristics, the managerial capacity of the provider and the epidemiology of the disease. The framework is designed to guide health professionals in the systematic assessment and monitoring of participation in disease control programmes. Analysis of the Ghanaian Guinea Worm Eradication Programme and the Nicaraguan Tuberculosis Control Programme are presented as case studies. They show that political support does not guarantee community participation in disease control programmes and stress the importance of other determinants such as commitment to PHC, intersectoral coordination, the project approach and human resources. The relevance of the epidemiology of the disease in determining what degree of community participation will be most effective is highlighted by the case studies.

  5. A Study of Four Library Programs for Disadvantaged Persons. Part II, Appendices B: Brooklyn Public Library Community Coordinator Project, the New York Public Library North Manhattan Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winsor, Charlotte B.; Burrows, Lodema

    This document contains observations of library staff and interviews with community members about the Brooklyn Public Library Community Coordinator Project and the New York Public Library North Manhattan Project. The Community Coordinator Project employs four professional librarians to take an active part in community institutions and organizations…

  6. Proposal for coordinated health research in PFAS-contaminated communities in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruton, Thomas A; Blum, Arlene

    2017-11-14

    The drinking water of more than six million Americans in numerous communities has been found to contain highly fluorinated chemicals at concentrations of concern. Certain of these chemicals, including perfluorooctanoic acid and perfluorooctane sulfonic acid, are known to be persistent, bioaccumulative, and associated with adverse health outcomes in humans and animal models. The possible health impacts of exposure to highly fluorinated chemicals are of great concern to communities whose water has been impacted. Community members want information, and are asking for biomonitoring, exposure pathway analysis, and health studies. Governmental agencies are striving to deal with these multiple concerns in the face of information and resource constraints. We propose the development of a high-level research strategy to maximize what can be learned about health effects of highly fluorinated chemicals and methods to reduce or eliminate exposure. We suggest coordinating the research across multiple communities for greater statistical power. If implemented, such a strategy could help to generate information and evidence integration to enable regulatory decision making and contribute to reducing future exposures.

  7. Latest Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) services and innovative tools supporting the space weather research and operational communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, A. M. M.; Rastaetter, L.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Mays, M. L.; Chulaki, A.; Shim, J. S.; MacNeice, P. J.; Taktakishvili, A.; Collado-Vega, Y. M.; Weigand, C.; Zheng, Y.; Mullinix, R.; Patel, K.; Pembroke, A. D.; Pulkkinen, A. A.; Boblitt, J. M.; Bakshi, S. S.; Tsui, T.

    2017-12-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC), with the fundamental goal of aiding the transition of modern space science models into space weather forecasting while supporting space science research, has been serving as an integral hub for over 15 years, providing invaluable resources to both space weather scientific and operational communities. CCMC has developed and provided innovative web-based point of access tools varying from: Runs-On-Request System - providing unprecedented global access to the largest collection of state-of-the-art solar and space physics models, Integrated Space Weather Analysis (iSWA) - a powerful dissemination system for space weather information, Advanced Online Visualization and Analysis tools for more accurate interpretation of model results, Standard Data formats for Simulation Data downloads, and Mobile apps to view space weather data anywhere to the scientific community. In addition to supporting research and performing model evaluations, CCMC also supports space science education by hosting summer students through local universities. In this poster, we will showcase CCMC's latest innovative tools and services, and CCMC's tools that revolutionized the way we do research and improve our operational space weather capabilities. CCMC's free tools and resources are all publicly available online (http://ccmc.gsfc.nasa.gov).

  8. Nurse Educator Pathway Project: a competency-based intersectoral curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Lynne; Frost, Linda J; Bigl, Julie; Clauson, Marion; McRae, Cora; Scarborough, Kathy S; Murphy, Sue; Jillings, Carol; Gillespie, Frank

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we begin by providing an overview of the Educator Pathway Project (EPP), an education infrastructure that was developed in response to emerging critical nursing workplace issues, and the related demand for enhanced workplace education. We then describe the EPP competency-based curriculum designed to prepare nurses as preceptors, mentors, and educators to lead learning with diverse learner groups. This competency-based curriculum was developed through a collaboration of nurse leaders across practice, academic, and union sectors and drew from a widely embraced curriculum development model (Iwasiw, Goldenberg, & Andrusyzyn, 2005). The goal of the curriculum was to prepare nurses through a four-level career pathway model that contextualized practice and education theory to various education-related roles and levels of experience within the practice setting. Over 1,100 nurses participated in this innovative intersectoral nursing initiative.

  9. Organizational culture, intersectoral collaboration and mental health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Penelope Fay; Pattison, Philippa Eleanor

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to investigate whether and how organizational culture moderates the influence of other organizational capacities on the uptake of new mental health care roles by non-medical primary health and social care services. Using a cross-sectional survey design, data were collected in 2004 from providers in 41 services in Victoria, Australia, recruited using purposeful sampling. Respondents within each service worked as a group to complete a structured interview that collected quantitative and qualitative data simultaneously. Five domains of organizational capacity were analyzed: leadership, moral support and participation; organizational culture; shared concepts, policies, processes and structures; access to resource support; and social model of health. A principal components analysis explored the structure of data about roles and capacities, and multiple regression analysis examined relationships between them. The unit of analysis was the service (n = 41). Organizational culture was directly associated with involvement in two types of mental health care roles and moderated the influence of factors in the inter-organizational environment on role involvement. Congruence between the values embodied in organizational culture, communicated in messages from the environment, and underlying particular mental health care activities may play a critical role in shaping the emergence of intersectoral working and the uptake of new roles. This study is the first to demonstrate the importance of organizational culture to intersectoral collaboration in health care, and one of very few to examine organizational culture as a predictor of performance, compared with other organizational-level factors, in a multivariate analysis. Theory is developed to explain the findings.

  10. Disease Management Project Breast Cancer in Hesse - 5-Year Survival Data: Successful Model of Intersectoral Communication for Quality Assurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackisch, C; Funk, A; König, K; Lubbe, D; Misselwitz, B; Wagner, U

    2014-03-01

    Introduction: The Disease Management Project Breast Cancer (DMP Breast Cancer) was first launched in Hesse in 2004. The project is supported by the health insurance companies in Hesse and the Professional Association of Gynaecologists in Hesse. The aim is to offer structured treatment programmes to all women diagnosed with breast cancer in Hesse by creating intersectoral cooperations between coordinating clinics, associated hospitals and gynaecologists in private practice who registered in the DMP programme. Method: Between 1 January 2005 and 30 June 2011, 13 973 women were enrolled in the DMP programme. Results: After data cleansing, survival rates were calculated for a total of 11 214 women. The 5-year overall survival (OS) rate was 86.3 %; survival rates according to tumour stage on presentation were 92.2 % (pT1) and 82.3 % (pT2), respectively. The impact of steroid hormone receptor status on survival (87.8 % for receptor-positive cancers vs. 78.9 % for receptor-negative cancers) and of age at first diagnosis on survival (≤ 35 years = 91 %) were calculated. Conclusion: The project showed that intersectoral cooperation led to significant improvements in the quality of treatment over time, as measured by quality indicators and outcomes after treatment.

  11. The NASA Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) Next Generation Space Weather Data Warehouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddox, M. M.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Pulkkinen, A. A.; Zheng, Y.; Rastaetter, L.; Chulaki, A.; Pembroke, A. D.; Wiegand, C.; Mullinix, R.; Boblitt, J.; Mendoza, A. M. M.; Swindell, M. J., IV; Bakshi, S. S.; Mays, M. L.; Shim, J. S.; Hesse, M.; Collado-Vega, Y. M.; Taktakishvili, A.; MacNeice, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables, supports, and performs research and development for next generation space science and space weather models. The CCMC currently hosts a large and expanding collection of state-or-the-art, physics-based space weather models that have been developed by the international research community. There are many tools and services provided by the CCMC that are currently available world-wide, along with the ongoing development of new innovative systems and software for research, discovery, validation, visualization, and forecasting. Over the history of the CCMC's existence, there has been one constant engineering challenge - describing, managing, and disseminating data. To address the challenges that accompany an ever-expanding number of models to support, along with a growing catalog of simulation output - the CCMC is currently developing a flexible and extensible space weather data warehouse to support both internal and external systems and applications. This paper intends to chronicle the evolution and future of the CCMC's data infrastructure, and the current infrastructure re-engineering activities that seek to leverage existing community data model standards like SPASE and the IMPEx Simulation Data Model.

  12. Community Coordinated Modeling Center: A Powerful Resource in Space Science and Space Weather Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chulaki, A.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Rastaetter, L.; MacNeice, P. J.; Shim, J. S.; Pulkkinen, A. A.; Taktakishvili, A.; Mays, M. L.; Mendoza, A. M. M.; Zheng, Y.; Mullinix, R.; Collado-Vega, Y. M.; Maddox, M. M.; Pembroke, A. D.; Wiegand, C.

    2015-12-01

    Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) is a NASA affiliated interagency partnership with the primary goal of aiding the transition of modern space science models into space weather forecasting while supporting space science research. Additionally, over the past ten years it has established itself as a global space science education resource supporting undergraduate and graduate education and research, and spreading space weather awareness worldwide. A unique combination of assets, capabilities and close ties to the scientific and educational communities enable this small group to serve as a hub for raising generations of young space scientists and engineers. CCMC resources are publicly available online, providing unprecedented global access to the largest collection of modern space science models (developed by the international research community). CCMC has revolutionized the way simulations are utilized in classrooms settings, student projects, and scientific labs and serves hundreds of educators, students and researchers every year. Another major CCMC asset is an expert space weather prototyping team primarily serving NASA's interplanetary space weather needs. Capitalizing on its unrivaled capabilities and experiences, the team provides in-depth space weather training to students and professionals worldwide, and offers an amazing opportunity for undergraduates to engage in real-time space weather monitoring, analysis, forecasting and research. In-house development of state-of-the-art space weather tools and applications provides exciting opportunities to students majoring in computer science and computer engineering fields to intern with the software engineers at the CCMC while also learning about the space weather from the NASA scientists.

  13. "Walking in a maze": community providers' difficulties coordinating health care for homeless patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaCoursiere Zucchero, Terri; McDannold, Sarah; McInnes, D Keith

    2016-09-07

    While dual usage of US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and non-VA health services increases access to care and choice for veterans, it is also associated with a number of negative consequences including increased morbidity and mortality. Veterans with multiple health conditions, such as the homeless, may be particularly susceptible to the adverse effects of dual use. Homeless veteran dual use is an understudied yet timely topic given the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and Veterans Choice Act of 2014, both of which may increase non-VA care for this population. The study purpose was to evaluate homeless veteran dual use of VA and non-VA health care by describing the experiences, perspectives, and recommendations of community providers who care for the population. Three semi-structured focus group interviews were conducted with medical, dental, and behavioral health providers at a large, urban Health Care for the Homeless (HCH) program. Qualitative content analysis procedures were used. HCH providers experienced challenges coordinating care with VA medical centers for their veteran patients. Participants lacked knowledge about the VA health care system and were unable to help their patients navigate it. The HCH and VA medical centers lacked clear lines of communication. Providers could not access the VA medical records of their patients and felt this hampered the quality and efficiency of care veterans received. Substantial challenges exist in coordinating care for homeless veteran dual users. Our findings suggest recommendations related to education, communication, access to electronic medical records, and collaborative partnerships. Without dedicated effort to improve coordination, dual use is likely to exacerbate the fragmented care that is the norm for many homeless persons.

  14. Partnership effectiveness in primary community care networks: A national empirical analysis of partners' coordination infrastructure designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Blossom Yen-Ju; Lin, Yung-Kai; Lin, Cheng-Chieh

    2010-01-01

    Previous empirical and managerial studies have ignored the effectiveness of integrated health networks. It has been argued that the varying definitions and strategic imperatives of integrated organizations may have complicated the assessment of the outcomes/performance of varying models, particularly when their market structures and contexts differed. This study aimed to empirically verify a theoretical perspective on the coordination infrastructure designs and the effectiveness of the primary community care networks (PCCNs) formed and funded by the Bureau of National Health Insurance since March 2003. The PCCNs present a model to replace the traditional fragmented providers in Taiwan's health care. The study used a cross-sectional mailed survey designed to ascertain partnership coordination infrastructure and integration of governance, clinical care, bonding, finances, and information. The outcome indicators were PCCNs' perceived performance and willingness to remain within the network. Structural equation modeling examined the causal relationships, controlling for organizational and environmental factors. Primary data collection occurred from February through December 2005, via structured questionnaires sent to 172 PCCNs. Using the individual PCCN as the unit of analysis, the results found that a network's efforts regarding coordination infrastructures were positively related to the PCCN's perceived performance and willingness to remain within the network. In addition, PCCNs practicing in rural areas and in areas with higher density of medical resources had better perceived effectiveness and willingness to cooperate in the network.Practical Implication: The lack of both an operational definition and an information about system-wide integration may have obstructed understanding of integrated health networks' organizational dynamics. This study empirically examined individual PCCNs and offers new insights on how to improve networks' organizational design and

  15. Intersectorality and social participation as coping policies for health inequities-worldwide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Celia Fiorati

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the impact that intersectoral policies and social participation, implemented worldwide, have had on the modification of the social determinants for health and on the reduction of social health inequities. Method: A scoping review of the literature published in the period 2005-2015 was performed. The literature search was conducted on PubMed and Scielo databases. Two researchers reviewed each document. Data were analysed according to the intersectoral action and social participation variables and according to the theoretical frameworks of the Social Determinants Model of the Commission on Social Determinants of Health (CSDH and the theoretical constructs of Social Capital (SC and Life Course (LC. Results: Out of 45 documents likely to be selected for final review, all of them based on title and abstract, 20 documents were eventually picked out and analysed; most them (n = 8 were conducted in all Latin America and Latin America's countries. Twelve documents reported intersectoral action associated with social participation in partnership with different institutions. Regarding theoretical frameworks, most of studies (n = 8 used CSDH and SC. In relation to health outcomes, the studies showed mainly: increased access to health and education, follow-up of pregnant women, increasing in prenatal examinations, reduction in malnutrition/child mortality, reduction in extreme poverty/hunger; reduction in epidemics/tuberculosis, control of alcohol/drug consumption, promotion of health/mental as well as basic sanitation improvements. Conclusions: Intersectoral and social participation experiences studied yielded positive outcomes regarding health status and quality of life in the communities in which such experiences were implemented. Resumen: Objetivo: Determinar el impacto que las políticas intersectoriales y la participación social, implementadas en todo el mundo, han tenido tanto en la modificación de los determinantes sociales

  16. Coordinated Community Intervention for Domestic Violence: The Effects of Arrest and Prosecution on Recidivism of Woman Abuse Perpetrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolman, Richard M.; Weisz, Arlene

    1995-01-01

    Reports results of a study on the effectiveness of a coordinated community intervention to reduce domestic violence in DuPage County, IL. Logistic regression analysis indicated that arrest significantly deterred subsequent domestic violence incidents over an 18-month follow-up period, especially with those with a previous history of police…

  17. Can a Community of Practice Improve Physical Therapists' Self-Perceived Practice in Developmental Coordination Disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camden, Chantal; Rivard, Lisa M; Hurtubise, Karen; Héguy, Léa; Berbari, Jade

    2017-07-01

    Communities of practice (CoPs) are useful knowledge translation (KT) strategies, but little is known about their impact on physical therapists' self-perceived practice. The impact of a CoP on physical therapists' self-perceived practice was evaluated, and factors influencing changes in self-perceived knowledge, skills, and practice related to developmental coordination disorder (DCD) were explored. An explanatory sequential mixed-methods design was used, guided by the Theory of Reasoned Action and Theory of Planned Behavior. Physical therapists participated in a DCD physical therapist CoP, which included 2 full-day, face-to-face workshops, with access to a 5-month online forum between the workshops, and completed questionnaires at 3 time-points: before the first workshop, before accessing the online forum, and following the second workshop. Measures completed before and after the CoP included closed-ended questions providing global scores on therapists' self-perceived knowledge, skills, and practice. Physical therapists' sociodemographic characteristics, information-seeking style, use of the online forum, and behavioral change goals were also collected. Paired t-tests, ANCOVAs, and linear regression models were used to analyze the data. Forty-one physical therapists completed all questionnaires. Their self-perceived knowledge, skills, and practice change scores were significantly higher (+0.47, +1.23, and +2.61, respectively; P behavioral changes influence patient outcomes. © 2017 American Physical Therapy Association

  18. Space Weather Forecasting and Research at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronne, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Space Weather Research Center (SWRC), within the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC), provides experimental research forecasts and analysis for NASA's robotic mission operators. Space weather conditions are monitored to provide advance warning and forecasts based on observations and modeling using the integrated Space Weather Analysis Network (iSWA). Space weather forecasters come from a variety of backgrounds, ranging from modelers to astrophysicists to undergraduate students. This presentation will discuss space weather operations and research from an undergraduate perspective. The Space Weather Research, Education, and Development Initiative (SW REDI) is the starting point for many undergraduate opportunities in space weather forecasting and research. Space weather analyst interns play an active role year-round as entry-level space weather analysts. Students develop the technical and professional skills to forecast space weather through a summer internship that includes a two week long space weather boot camp, mentorship, poster session, and research opportunities. My unique development of research projects includes studying high speed stream events as well as a study of 20 historic, high-impact solar energetic particle events. This unique opportunity to combine daily real-time analysis with related research prepares students for future careers in Heliophysics.

  19. Intersectoral collaboration for physical activity in Korean Healthy Cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Eunjeong

    2016-09-01

    Intersectoral collaboration (ISC) is important in the health field because the complexity of determinants of health makes it difficult for one institution to resolve all health issues. Promotion of physical activity can especially benefit from a multi-sectoral approach. Despite so much emphasis on its importance in both primary health and health promotion, ISC has been underachieved in the field. This study aimed to examine the characteristics and level of ISC among physical activity programs in Healthy Cities as compared to non-Healthy Cities. I conducted a postal survey where 24 people from Healthy Cities and 72 people from non-Healthy Cities participated. The survey included questions to measure the level of ISC as well as to determine ISC partners and activities. Among the entire 393 physical activity programs, 336 (85.5%) had some kind of collaboration with one or more partners. The percentage having one or more partners was greater in Healthy Cities than in non-Healthy Cities. However, there were no statistical differences between the two groups in terms of the level of ISC within a municipal organization. Collaboration activities of the other departments were mostly supportive, such as providing a venue, recruiting participants and publicizing, and other kinds of administrative support. To strengthen ISC in Korean Healthy Cities, various actions including providing a legal basis, specific and substantive supports, financial incentives, and organizational recognitions will be helpful as well as the development of partnerships with other departments in urban planning, transport, urban design, and communication. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Intersectoral approaches and integrated services in achieving the right to health for refugees upon resettlement: a scoping review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadi, Dena; Langlois, Etienne V; Ho, Shirley; Friberg, Peter; Tomson, Göran

    2017-08-30

    Global insecurity and climate change are exacerbating the need for improved management of refugee resettlement services. International standards hold states responsible for the protection of the right of non-citizens to an adequate standard of physical and mental health while recognising the importance of social determinants of health. However, programmes to protect refugees' right to health often lack coordination and monitoring. This paper describes the protocol for a scoping review to explore barriers and facilitators to the integration of health services for refugees; the content, process and actors involved in protecting refugee health; and the extent to which intersectoral approaches are leveraged to protect refugees' right to health on resettlement, especially for vulnerable groups such as women and children. Peer-reviewed (through four databases including MEDLINE, Web of Science, Global Health and PsycINFO) and grey literature were searched to identify programmes and interventions designed to promote refugee health in receiving countries. Two reviewers will screen articles and abstract data. Two frameworks for integration and intersectoral action will be applied to understand how and why certain approaches work while others do not and to identify the actors involved in achieving success at different levels of integration as defined by these frameworks. Findings from the scoping review will be shared in relevant conferences and meetings. A brief will be created with lessons learnt from successful programmes to inform decision making in design of refugee programmes and services. Ethical approval is not required as human subjects are not involved. Registered on Open Science Framework at https://osf.io/gt9ck/. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  1. A Community-Building Framework for Collaborative Research Coordination across the Education and Biology Research Disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelaez, Nancy; Anderson, Trevor R.; Gardner, Stephanie M.; Yin, Yue; Abraham, Joel K.; Barlett, Edward L.; Gormally, Cara; Hurney, Carol A.; Long, Tammy M.; Newman, Dina L.; Sirum, Karen; Stevens, Michael T.

    2018-01-01

    Since 2009, the U.S. National Science Foundation Directorate for Biological Sciences has funded Research Coordination Networks (RCN) aimed at collaborative efforts to improve participation, learning, and assessment in undergraduate biology education (UBE). RCN-UBE projects focus on coordination and communication among scientists and educators who…

  2. Coordination of services for dual diagnosis clients in the interface between specialist and community care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjørkquist C

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Catharina Bjørkquist, Gunnar Vold Hansen Faculty of Health and Welfare, Østfold University College, Halden, Norway Purpose: The aim of this article is to study the coordination of comprehensive services for clients with concurrent substance abuse and mental health disorders (dual diagnosis, which is a very complex client group. In order to achieve comprehensive care and treatment, the service providers need to cooperate and coordinate, but the questions here, are how this is done and how appropriate the coordination is. Data and methods: Data were collected from group interviews during a 1-day workshop with clients, relatives, and employees from the various services involved. Results: Information exchange between the services was generally in writing. Coordination between substance abuse and mental health services was experienced as fragmented. ­Employees had an unclear perception of the work and expertise of the other service providers involved. There were examples of disparity between the services a municipality could offer and client needs. A coordinator, if available, was emphasized by both clients and service providers as serving an important function in coordination and relationship building. Conclusion: Predominantly written communication and unclear division of responsibilities and duties resulted in employees creating stereotypes of each other, both within specialist health services and between specialist and municipal health services. A coordinator was able to coordinate various inputs, often through informal contact, with a view to establishing appropriate services for individual clients. Coordination in interagency meeting points, such as “responsibility teams”, was the most successful solution, but this will involve a greater degree of networking than is common today. Keywords: addiction and mental health issues, collaboration, coordination, specialist health services, primary care

  3. Factors influencing perceived sustainability of Dutch community health programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeer, A. J. M.; van Assema, P.; Hesdahl, B.; Harting, J.; de Vries, N. K.

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the perceived sustainability of community health programs organized by local intersectoral coalitions, as well as the factors that collaborating partners think might influence sustainability. Semi-structured interviews were conducted among 31 collaborating partners of 5 community health

  4. [Constraints and opportunities for inter-sector health promotion initiatives: a case study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Rosana

    2015-07-01

    This article analyzes the implementation of inter-sector initiatives linked to the Family Grant, Family Health, and School Health Programs in the Manguinhos neighborhood in the North Zone of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The study was conducted in 2010 and 2011 and included document review, local observation, and 25 interviews with program managers, professionals, and staff. This was an exploratory case study using a qualitative approach that identified constraints and opportunities for inter-sector health experiences, contributing to the debate on the effectiveness of health promotion and poverty relief programs.

  5. Joint Community Health Needs Assessments as a Path for Coordinating Community-Wide Health Improvement Efforts Between Hospitals and Local Health Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlton, Erik L; Singh, Simone Rauscher

    2018-05-01

    To examine the association between hospital-local health department (LHD) collaboration around community health needs assessments (CHNAs) and hospital investment in community health. We combined 2015 National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO) Forces of Change, 2013 NACCHO Profile, and 2014-2015 Area Health Resource File data to identify a sample of LHDs (n = 439) across the United States. We included data on hospitals' community benefit from their 2014 tax filings (Internal Revenue Service Form 990, Schedule H). We used bivariate and multivariate regression analyses to examine LHDs' involvement in hospitals' CHNAs and implementation strategies and the relationship with hospital investment in community health. The LHDs that collaborated with hospitals around CHNAs were significantly more likely to be involved in joint implementation planning activities than were those that did not. Importantly, LHD involvement in hospitals' implementation strategies was associated with greater hospital investment in community health improvement initiatives. Joint CHNAs may improve coordination of community-wide health improvement efforts between hospitals and LHDs and encourage hospital investment in community health improvement activities. Public Health Implications. Policies that strengthen LHD-hospital collaboration around the CHNA may enhance hospital investments in community health.

  6. International cooperation for food and nutrition security: Systematization of the participatory, contextualized, and intersectoral educational practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciene BURLANDY

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The present study systematized the experience gained with the project Construindo capacidades em segurança alimentar e nutricional no Brasil, Canadá e Angola (2004-2010, Building food and nutrition security skills in Brazil, Canada, and Angola, whose objective was to qualify actions that promote food and nutrition security in the three countries using different educational practices. The activities were organized in the following subprojects: (a online distance learning courses; (b workshops to train managers, government technicians, representatives of civil society organizations, and social subjects who offered to act as a link between communities; and (c local pilot projects. The present study reports this experience. The educational practices implemented in the municipalities of Araçuaí (MG, Juazeiro (BA, and Fortaleza (CE were analyzed based on systematized information in the project reports and activity records (texts and photographs. The analytical reference was based on the concept of food and nutrition education, guided by the fundamentals of Popular Education and Paulo Freire; on the concept of food and nutrition security; and on the following analytical dimensions: participation, contextualization of educational practices, and intersectoriality. The results evidenced how educational practices contributed to the construction of shared concepts of food and nutrition security from an intersectoral and participatory perspective that values the peculiarities of diet in different socioeconomic and cultural contexts, and highlights daily situations and local traditions. They also expose the limits and potentialities of an experience of this magnitude, conducted from an interdisciplinarity perspective and using participatory methods.

  7. Effects of pediatric asthma care coordination in underserved communities on parent perceptions of care and asthma-management confidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janevic, Mary R; Baptist, Alan P; Bryant-Stephens, Tyra; Lara, Marielena; Persky, Victoria; Ramos-Valencia, Gilberto; Uyeda, Kimberly; Hazan, Rebecca; Garrity, Ashley; Malveaux, Floyd J

    2017-06-01

    Disparities by race and socioeconomic status persist in pediatric asthma morbidity, mortality, and treatment. Improving parent/provider communication and parents' asthma-management confidence may result in better asthma control in vulnerable populations. The Merck Childhood Asthma Network, Inc. funded an initiative to implement medical-social care coordination to improve asthma outcomes at sites in four low-income, urban communities (Los Angeles, CA; Philadelphia, PA; Chicago, IL; and San Juan, PR.) As part of a cross-site evaluation of this effort, pre- post-program changes in parents' reports of asthma care and management were assessed. Across sites, 805 parents or other caregivers responded to a baseline survey that was repeated one year later following their child's participation in care coordination. Parents' asthma-management confidence, as well as their perceptions of provider access, trust, and communication, were measured with Likert scales. Linear mixed models were used to assess improvement in these variables, across and within sites, adjusting for sociodemographics. Pooled across sites, the adjusted mean estimate for all outcomes showed a significant improvement (p asthma care coordination, as implemented variously in diverse settings, was associated with improvement in parents' perceptions of asthma care and self-reported asthma-management knowledge and confidence. This positive impact on parents may help sustain care coordination's impact on children.

  8. Real options approach to inter-sectoral migration of U.S.farm labor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulcan Onel; Barry K. Goodwin

    2014-01-01

    The core of the literature on inter-sectoral labor migration is based on net present value models of investment in which individuals are assumed to migrate to take advantage of positive wage differentials. In this article, we argue that a real options approach, taken together with the adjustment costs associated with sectoral relocation, may provide a basis for...

  9. The Impact of a Technology Coordinator's Belief System upon Using Technology to Create a Community's History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, Scott M.

    2010-01-01

    As it has been shown that teachers of social studies content are less likely than teachers of other content areas to utilize technology in their classroom, this study focuses on one instructional technology coordinators' beliefs towards technology, instruction, and students and how these beliefs impacted how technology was utilized during a…

  10. Tough Times: Community Coordination and Development in Child Protective Services in a Rurban Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deaton, Bob; Morgan, Dan

    The origins and development of the Missoula Council for Child Protection and Family Support are traced during its first 9 months as a community group focusing upon projects and issues to alleviate child abuse and neglect. The approach used is described as a mixture of rural community development and planning. Among projects listed as completed…

  11. Stakeholders perspectives on the key components of community-based interventions coordinating care in dementia: a qualitative systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backhouse, Amy; Richards, David A; McCabe, Rose; Watkins, Ross; Dickens, Chris

    2017-11-22

    Interventions aiming to coordinate services for the community-based dementia population vary in components, organisation and implementation. In this review we aimed to investigate the views of stakeholders on the key components of community-based interventions coordinating care in dementia. We searched four databases from inception to June 2015; Medline, The Cochrane Library, EMBASE and PsycINFO, this was aided by a search of four grey literature databases, and backward and forward citation tracking of included papers. Title and abstract screening was followed by a full text screen by two independent reviewers, and quality was assessed using the CASP appraisal tool. We then conducted thematic synthesis on extracted data. A total of seven papers from five independent studies were included in the review, and encompassed the views of over 100 participants from three countries. Through thematic synthesis we identified 32 initial codes that were grouped into 5 second-order themes: (1) case manager had four associated codes and described preferences for the case manager personal and professional attributes, including a sound knowledge in dementia and availability of local services; (2) communication had five associated codes and emphasized the importance stakeholders placed on multichannel communication with service users, as well as between multidisciplinary teams and across organisations; (3) intervention had 11 associated codes which focused primarily on the practicalities of implementation such as the contact type and frequency between case managers and service users, and the importance of case manager training and service evaluation; (4) resources had five associated codes which outlined stakeholder views on the required resources for coordinating interventions and potential overlap with existing resources, as well as arising issues when available resources do not meet those required for successful implementation; and (5) support had seven associated codes that

  12. Stakeholders perspectives on the key components of community-based interventions coordinating care in dementia: a qualitative systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Backhouse

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interventions aiming to coordinate services for the community-based dementia population vary in components, organisation and implementation. In this review we aimed to investigate the views of stakeholders on the key components of community-based interventions coordinating care in dementia. Methods We searched four databases from inception to June 2015; Medline, The Cochrane Library, EMBASE and PsycINFO, this was aided by a search of four grey literature databases, and backward and forward citation tracking of included papers. Title and abstract screening was followed by a full text screen by two independent reviewers, and quality was assessed using the CASP appraisal tool. We then conducted thematic synthesis on extracted data. Results A total of seven papers from five independent studies were included in the review, and encompassed the views of over 100 participants from three countries. Through thematic synthesis we identified 32 initial codes that were grouped into 5 second-order themes: (1 case manager had four associated codes and described preferences for the case manager personal and professional attributes, including a sound knowledge in dementia and availability of local services; (2 communication had five associated codes and emphasized the importance stakeholders placed on multichannel communication with service users, as well as between multidisciplinary teams and across organisations; (3 intervention had 11 associated codes which focused primarily on the practicalities of implementation such as the contact type and frequency between case managers and service users, and the importance of case manager training and service evaluation; (4 resources had five associated codes which outlined stakeholder views on the required resources for coordinating interventions and potential overlap with existing resources, as well as arising issues when available resources do not meet those required for successful implementation

  13. A Coordinated Approach to Communicating Pediatric-Related Information on Pandemic Influenza at the Community Level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HCTT CHE

    2009-12-16

    The purpose of this document is to provide a suggested approach, based on input from pediatric stakeholders, to communicating pediatric-related information on pandemic influenza at the community level in a step-by-step manner.

  14. Community Based Research Network: Opportunities for Coordination of Care, Public Health Surveillance, and Farmworker Research

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, Sharon P.; Heyer, Nicholas; Shipp, Eva M.; Ryder, E. Roberta; Hendrikson, Edward; Socias, Christina M; del Junco, Deborah J.; Valerio, Melissa; Partida, Sylvia

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The lack of aggregated longitudinal health data on farmworkers has severely limited opportunities to conduct research to improve their health status. To correct this problem, we have created the infrastructure necessary to develop and maintain a national Research Data Repository of migrant and seasonal farmworker patients and other community members receiving medical care from Community and Migrant Health Centers (C/MHCs). Project specific research databases can be easily extrac...

  15. Intersectoral action for health equity as it relates to climate change in Canada: contributions from critical systems heuristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buse, Chris

    2013-12-01

    Intersectoral action (ISA) has been at the forefront of public health policy discussions since the 1970s. ISA incorporates a broader perspective of public health issues and coordinates efforts to address the social, political, economic and environmental contexts from which health determinants operate and are created. Despite being forwarded as a useful way to address and treat complex or 'wicked' problems, such policy issues are still often addressed within, rather than across, disciplinary silos and ISA has been documented to fail more often than it succeeds. This paper contributes to an understanding of ISA by outlining and applying critical systems heuristics (CSH) theory and methods. CSH theory and methods are described and discussed before applying them to the example of addressing climate change and health equity through public health practice. CSH thinking provides useful tools to engage stakeholders, question relations of power that may exist between collaborating partners, and move beyond power inequalities that guide ISA initiatives. CSH is a compelling framing that can improve an understanding of the collaborative relationships that are a prerequisite for engaging in ISA to address complex or 'wicked' policy problems such as climate change. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Integrated complex care coordination for children with medical complexity: A mixed-methods evaluation of tertiary care-community collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohen Eyal

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary care medical homes may improve health outcomes for children with special healthcare needs (CSHCN, by improving care coordination. However, community-based primary care practices may be challenged to deliver comprehensive care coordination to complex subsets of CSHCN such as children with medical complexity (CMC. Linking a tertiary care center with the community may achieve cost effective and high quality care for CMC. The objective of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of community-based complex care clinics integrated with a tertiary care center. Methods A before- and after-intervention study design with mixed (quantitative/qualitative methods was utilized. Clinics at two community hospitals distant from tertiary care were staffed by local community pediatricians with the tertiary care center nurse practitioner and linked with primary care providers. Eighty-one children with underlying chronic conditions, fragility, requirement for high intensity care and/or technology assistance, and involvement of multiple providers participated. Main outcome measures included health care utilization and expenditures, parent reports of parent- and child-quality of life [QOL (SF-36®, CPCHILD©, PedsQL™], and family-centered care (MPOC-20®. Comparisons were made in equal (up to 1 year pre- and post-periods supplemented by qualitative perspectives of families and pediatricians. Results Total health care system costs decreased from median (IQR $244 (981 per patient per month (PPPM pre-enrolment to $131 (355 PPPM post-enrolment (p=.007, driven primarily by fewer inpatient days in the tertiary care center (p=.006. Parents reported decreased out of pocket expenses (p© domains [Health Standardization Section (p=.04; Comfort and Emotions (p=.03], while total CPCHILD© score decreased between baseline and 1 year (p=.003. Parents and providers reported the ability to receive care close to home as a key benefit. Conclusions Complex

  17. Beyond leadership: political strategies for coordination in health policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Scott L; Lillvis, Denise F

    2014-05-01

    Health in All Policies (HiAP) promises to improve population health by harnessing the energies and activities of various sectors. Nevertheless, it faces well-documented bureaucratic obstacles and appears to require intersectoral governance if it is to be established. The basic problems of establishing intersectoral governance for HiAP are known to public administration and political science. On reading that literature, we find that the difficulty of establishing intersectoral governance for HiAP breaks down into two kinds of problems: that of establishing coordinated actions at all (coordination); and ensuring that they endure in changed political circumstances (durability). We further find that policymakers' solutions fall into three categories: visible ones of political will (e.g., plans and targets); bureaucratic changes such as the introduction of Health Impact Assessment or reorganization; and indirect methods such as data publication and support from outside groups to put pressure on the government. It can seem that Health in All Policies, like much of public health, depends on effective and committed policymakers but is vulnerable to changing political winds. The three kinds of strategies suggest how policymakers can, and do, create intersectoral governance that functions and persists, expanding the range of effective policy recommendations. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  18. Is a Sense of Community Vital to Interagency Coordination? (Interagency Paper, Number 3, January 2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    belongingness .” Bellah, et.al. (1985) define community as the following: Acommunity is a group of people who are socially interdependent, who participate...2006) similarly suggest that education and communication, along with employee participation and involvement in the process, are critical in ensuring

  19. Universal health coverage and intersectoral action for health: key messages from Disease Control Priorities, 3rd edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamison, Dean T; Adeyi, Olusoji; Anand, Shuchi; Atun, Rifat; Bertozzi, Stefano; Bhutta, Zulfiqar; Binagwaho, Agnes; Black, Robert; Blecher, Mark; Bloom, Barry R; Brouwer, Elizabeth; Bundy, Donald A P; Chisholm, Dan; Cieza, Alarcos; Cullen, Mark; Danforth, Kristen; de Silva, Nilanthi; Debas, Haile T; Donkor, Peter; Dua, Tarun; Fleming, Kenneth A; Gallivan, Mark; Garcia, Patricia J; Gawande, Atul; Gaziano, Thomas; Gelband, Hellen; Glass, Roger; Glassman, Amanda; Gray, Glenda; Habte, Demissie; Holmes, King K; Horton, Susan; Hutton, Guy; Jha, Prabhat; Knaul, Felicia M; Kobusingye, Olive; Krakauer, Eric L; Kruk, Margaret E; Lachmann, Peter; Laxminarayan, Ramanan; Levin, Carol; Looi, Lai Meng; Madhav, Nita; Mahmoud, Adel; Mbanya, Jean Claude; Measham, Anthony; Medina-Mora, María Elena; Medlin, Carol; Mills, Anne; Mills, Jody-Anne; Montoya, Jaime; Norheim, Ole; Olson, Zachary; Omokhodion, Folashade; Oppenheim, Ben; Ord, Toby; Patel, Vikram; Patton, George C; Peabody, John; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Qi, Jinyuan; Reynolds, Teri; Ruacan, Sevket; Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy; Sepúlveda, Jaime; Skolnik, Richard; Smith, Kirk R; Temmerman, Marleen; Tollman, Stephen; Verguet, Stéphane; Walker, Damian G; Walker, Neff; Wu, Yangfeng; Zhao, Kun

    2018-01-01

    The World Bank is publishing nine volumes of Disease Control Priorities, 3rd edition (DCP3) between 2015 and 2018. Volume 9, Improving Health and Reducing Poverty, summarises the main messages from all the volumes and contains cross-cutting analyses. This Review draws on all nine volumes to convey conclusions. The analysis in DCP3 is built around 21 essential packages that were developed in the nine volumes. Each essential package addresses the concerns of a major professional community (eg, child health or surgery) and contains a mix of intersectoral policies and health-sector interventions. 71 intersectoral prevention policies were identified in total, 29 of which are priorities for early introduction. Interventions within the health sector were grouped onto five platforms (population based, community level, health centre, first-level hospital, and referral hospital). DCP3 defines a model concept of essential universal health coverage (EUHC) with 218 interventions that provides a starting point for country-specific analysis of priorities. Assuming steady-state implementation by 2030, EUHC in lower-middle-income countries would reduce premature deaths by an estimated 4·2 million per year. Estimated total costs prove substantial: about 9·1% of (current) gross national income (GNI) in low-income countries and 5·2% of GNI in lower-middle-income countries. Financing provision of continuing intervention against chronic conditions accounts for about half of estimated incremental costs. For lower-middle-income countries, the mortality reduction from implementing the EUHC can only reach about half the mortality reduction in non-communicable diseases called for by the Sustainable Development Goals. Full achievement will require increased investment or sustained intersectoral action, and actions by finance ministries to tax smoking and polluting emissions and to reduce or eliminate (often large) subsidies on fossil fuels appear of central importance. DCP3 is intended to

  20. Universal health coverage and intersectoral action for health: key messages from Disease Control Priorities, 3rd edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamison, Dean T; Alwan, Ala; Mock, Charles N; Nugent, Rachel; Watkins, David; Adeyi, Olusoji; Anand, Shuchi; Atun, Rifat; Bertozzi, Stefano; Bhutta, Zulfiqar; Binagwaho, Agnes; Black, Robert; Blecher, Mark; Bloom, Barry R; Brouwer, Elizabeth; Bundy, Donald A P; Chisholm, Dan; Cieza, Alarcos; Cullen, Mark; Danforth, Kristen; de Silva, Nilanthi; Debas, Haile T; Donkor, Peter; Dua, Tarun; Fleming, Kenneth A; Gallivan, Mark; Garcia, Patricia J; Gawande, Atul; Gaziano, Thomas; Gelband, Hellen; Glass, Roger; Glassman, Amanda; Gray, Glenda; Habte, Demissie; Holmes, King K; Horton, Susan; Hutton, Guy; Jha, Prabhat; Knaul, Felicia M; Kobusingye, Olive; Krakauer, Eric L; Kruk, Margaret E; Lachmann, Peter; Laxminarayan, Ramanan; Levin, Carol; Looi, Lai Meng; Madhav, Nita; Mahmoud, Adel; Mbanya, Jean Claude; Measham, Anthony; Medina-Mora, María Elena; Medlin, Carol; Mills, Anne; Mills, Jody-Anne; Montoya, Jaime; Norheim, Ole; Olson, Zachary; Omokhodion, Folashade; Oppenheim, Ben; Ord, Toby; Patel, Vikram; Patton, George C; Peabody, John; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Qi, Jinyuan; Reynolds, Teri; Ruacan, Sevket; Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy; Sepúlveda, Jaime; Skolnik, Richard; Smith, Kirk R; Temmerman, Marleen; Tollman, Stephen; Verguet, Stéphane; Walker, Damian G; Walker, Neff; Wu, Yangfeng; Zhao, Kun

    2018-03-17

    The World Bank is publishing nine volumes of Disease Control Priorities, 3rd edition (DCP3) between 2015 and 2018. Volume 9, Improving Health and Reducing Poverty, summarises the main messages from all the volumes and contains cross-cutting analyses. This Review draws on all nine volumes to convey conclusions. The analysis in DCP3 is built around 21 essential packages that were developed in the nine volumes. Each essential package addresses the concerns of a major professional community (eg, child health or surgery) and contains a mix of intersectoral policies and health-sector interventions. 71 intersectoral prevention policies were identified in total, 29 of which are priorities for early introduction. Interventions within the health sector were grouped onto five platforms (population based, community level, health centre, first-level hospital, and referral hospital). DCP3 defines a model concept of essential universal health coverage (EUHC) with 218 interventions that provides a starting point for country-specific analysis of priorities. Assuming steady-state implementation by 2030, EUHC in lower-middle-income countries would reduce premature deaths by an estimated 4·2 million per year. Estimated total costs prove substantial: about 9·1% of (current) gross national income (GNI) in low-income countries and 5·2% of GNI in lower-middle-income countries. Financing provision of continuing intervention against chronic conditions accounts for about half of estimated incremental costs. For lower-middle-income countries, the mortality reduction from implementing the EUHC can only reach about half the mortality reduction in non-communicable diseases called for by the Sustainable Development Goals. Full achievement will require increased investment or sustained intersectoral action, and actions by finance ministries to tax smoking and polluting emissions and to reduce or eliminate (often large) subsidies on fossil fuels appear of central importance. DCP3 is intended to

  1. Structural change and inter-sectoral mobility in a two-sector economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoci, Angelo; Galeotti, Marcello; Iannucci, Gianluca; Russu, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies the dynamics of a two-sector economy (with a natural resource-dependent sector and an industrial sector) characterized by free inter-sectoral labor mobility and heterogeneity of agents (workers and entrepreneurs). In such a context, we analyze the effects of the deterioration of natural resources, caused by the production activity of both sectors, on inter-sectoral movements of the labor force (structural changes), on ecological dynamics and on the revenues of workers and entrepreneurs. As in the seminal work by Matsuyama (1992), we obtain that a low productivity of labor in the resource-dependent sector can fuel the industrialization process. However, differently from Matsuyama, in our model the industrialization process may give rise to a reduction in workers’ revenues if the contribution to environmental depletion of the industrial sector, per unit of product, is higher than that of the resource-dependent one.

  2. Access, equity and social cohesion: evaluation of intersectoral strategies for people experiencing homelessness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor da Costa Borysow

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To understand and evaluate the work of intersectoral assistance on the insertion and the flow of people in situation of street with severe mental illness in public services of Mental Health. Method A case study developed from ten visits to a night shelter between March and April 2012. For data collection, the participant observation and semi-structured interviews were carried out with four sheltered individuals, as well as non-directive group interviews with five technicians of the social-assistance services. Results Were analyzed using Content Analysis and developing a Logic Model validated with the professionals involved. Conclusion The social assistance services are the main entry of this clientele in the public network of assistance services, and the Mental Health services have difficulty in responding to the specificities of the same clientele and in establishing intersectoral work.

  3. Structural integration and performance of inter-sectoral public health-related policy networks: An analysis across policy phases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, D. T. J. M.; Raab, J.; Grêaux, K. M.; Stronks, K.; Harting, J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Inter-sectoral policy networks may be effective in addressing environmental determinants of health with interventions. However, contradictory results are reported on relations between structural network characteristics (i.e., composition and integration) and network performance, such as

  4. Structural integration and performance of inter-sectoral public health-related policy networks : An analysis across policy phases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Dorothee; Raab, J.; Grêaux, Kimberley M.; Stronks, Karien; Harting, Janneke

    2017-01-01

    Background: Inter-sectoral policy networks may be effective in addressing environmental determinants of health with interventions. However, contradictory results are reported on relations between structure and network characteristics (i.e., composition and integration) and network performance, such

  5. Referential calls coordinate multi-species mobbing in a forest bird community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Toshitaka N

    2016-01-01

    Japanese great tits ( Parus minor ) use a sophisticated system of anti-predator communication when defending their offspring: they produce different mobbing calls for different nest predators (snake versus non-snake predators) and thereby convey this information to conspecifics (i.e. functionally referential call system). The present playback experiments revealed that these calls also serve to coordinate multi-species mobbing at nests; snake-specific mobbing calls attracted heterospecific individuals close to the sound source and elicited snake-searching behaviour, whereas non-snake mobbing calls attracted these birds at a distance. This study demonstrates for the first time that referential mobbing calls trigger different formations of multi-species mobbing parties.

  6. [Community coordination of dental care needs in a home medical care support ward and at home].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumi, Yasunori; Ozawa, Nobuyoshi; Miura, Hiroko; Miura, Hisayuki; Toba, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain the current statuses and problems of dental home care patients by surveying the oral care status and needs of patients in the home medical care support ward at the National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology. Patients that required continuous oral management even after discharge from the hospital were referred to local dental clinics to receive home dental care. We investigated the suitability and problems associated with such care, and identified the dental care needs of home patients and the status of local care coordination, including those in hospitals. The subjects were 82 patients. We ascertained their general condition and oral status, and also investigated the problems associated with patients judged to need specialized oral care by a dentist during oral treatment. Patients who required continuous specialized oral care after discharge from hospital were referred to dental clinics that could provide regular care, and the problems at the time of referral were identified. Dry mouth was reported by many patients. A large number of patients also needed specialized dental treatment such as the removal of dental calculus or tooth extraction. Problems were seen in oral function, with 38 of the patients (46%) unable to gargle and 23 (28%) unable to hold their mouths open. About half of the patients also had dementia, and communication with these patients was difficult. Of the 43 patients who were judged to need continuing oral care after discharge from hospital, their referral to a dental clinic for regular care was successful for 22 (51%) patients and unsuccessful for 21 (49%) patients. The reasons for unsuccessful referrals included the fact that the family, patient, nurse, or caregiver did not understand the need for specialized oral care. The present results suggest the need for specialized oral treatment in home medical care. These findings also suggest that coordinating seamless dental care among primary physicians

  7. Intersectoral cooperation in the sphere of public health care: ways of optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natan G. Korshever

    2017-08-01

    Material and Methods — There were analyzed the normative legal field of public health care, the results of anonymous survey of 838 physicians – health care organizers including 34 experts, and of 6,106 persons not engaged in medical professions. Results — There were established the list and significance of 37 health determinants; the effect produced on them by 23 state and public sectors engaged in health care; characteristics of these sectors’ interaction. There were substantiated 38 informative vectors for evaluating the effectiveness of intersectoral cooperation in the sphere of public health care – 22 simple (each representing a single informative criterion and 16 complex (consisting of several, from 3 to 12 informative criteria. There was developed an automatic multi-vector method for assessing success in intersectoral cooperation in the sphere of public health care in a territorial formation (formations, and there was designed an appropriate technology of optimization, including the primary multi-vector analysis, purposeful correction and dynamic evaluation. Conclusion — Public health care optimization is a process which should be carried out with regard to hierarchic interaction of the engaged sectors and peculiarities of their influence on health determinants, multi-vector evaluation of intersectoral cooperation efficacy aimed to substantiate and choose such administrative decisions which prove to be the best from the viewpoint of resulting effective achievements. The obtained materials may be realized in everyday practice of public health care.

  8. Coordinated Investigation of Micronesian Anthropology, 1947-1949. Property, Kin, and Community on Truk

    Science.gov (United States)

    1951-01-01

    kin includes persons who are married to the consanguineal relatives of one’s spouse. Consanguineal relationship terms are extended to relations of...COMMUNITY ON TRUK 103 and consanguineal relatives who are remoter than those in the fuluk, but with whom an active relationship is maintained. One’s miirlir...Chart 1. Chart 1 shows the relationship between occupancy of pin me wddn statuses and the categories of consanguineal relatives of a male and of a

  9. Changing Housing for Elderly People and Co-ordination Issues in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houben, P.P.J.A.M.

    2001-01-01

    The inter-sectoral policy systems of housing for elderly people in the EU-countries change with the implementation of ageing in place and by general processes of modernisation of society and welfare state. For implementation of the innovations the relevance of co-ordination between the sector

  10. Understanding the role of intersectoral convergence in the delivery of essential maternal and child nutrition interventions in Odisha, India: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunny S; Avula, Rasmi; Ved, Rajani; Kohli, Neha; Singh, Kavita; van den Bold, Mara; Kadiyala, Suneetha; Menon, Purnima

    2017-02-02

    Convergence of sectoral programs is important for scaling up essential maternal and child health and nutrition interventions. In India, these interventions are implemented by two government programs - Integrated Child Development Services (ICDS) and National Rural Health Mission (NRHM). These programs are designed to work together, but there is limited understanding of the nature and extent of coordination in place and needed at the various administrative levels. Our study examined how intersectoral convergence in nutrition programming is operationalized between ICDS and NRHM from the state to village levels in Odisha, and the factors influencing convergence in policy implementation and service delivery. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with state-level stakeholders (n = 12), district (n = 19) and block officials (n = 66), and frontline workers (FLWs, n = 48). Systematic coding and content analysis of transcripts were undertaken to elucidate themes and patterns related to the degree and mechanisms of convergence, types of actions/services, and facilitators and barriers. Close collaboration at state level was observed in developing guidelines, planning, and reviewing programs, facilitated by a shared motivation and recognized leadership for coordination. However, the health department was perceived to drive the agenda, and different priorities and little data sharing presented challenges. At the district level, there were joint planning and review meetings, trainings, and data sharing, but poor participation in the intersectoral meetings and limited supervision. While the block level is the hub for planning and supervision, cooperation is limited by the lack of guidelines for coordination, heavy workload, inadequate resources, and poor communication. Strong collaboration among FLWs was facilitated by close interpersonal communication and mutual understanding of roles and responsibilities. Congruent or shared priorities and regularity of

  11. Understanding the role of intersectoral convergence in the delivery of essential maternal and child nutrition interventions in Odisha, India: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunny S. Kim

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Convergence of sectoral programs is important for scaling up essential maternal and child health and nutrition interventions. In India, these interventions are implemented by two government programs – Integrated Child Development Services (ICDS and National Rural Health Mission (NRHM. These programs are designed to work together, but there is limited understanding of the nature and extent of coordination in place and needed at the various administrative levels. Our study examined how intersectoral convergence in nutrition programming is operationalized between ICDS and NRHM from the state to village levels in Odisha, and the factors influencing convergence in policy implementation and service delivery. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with state-level stakeholders (n = 12, district (n = 19 and block officials (n = 66, and frontline workers (FLWs, n = 48. Systematic coding and content analysis of transcripts were undertaken to elucidate themes and patterns related to the degree and mechanisms of convergence, types of actions/services, and facilitators and barriers. Results Close collaboration at state level was observed in developing guidelines, planning, and reviewing programs, facilitated by a shared motivation and recognized leadership for coordination. However, the health department was perceived to drive the agenda, and different priorities and little data sharing presented challenges. At the district level, there were joint planning and review meetings, trainings, and data sharing, but poor participation in the intersectoral meetings and limited supervision. While the block level is the hub for planning and supervision, cooperation is limited by the lack of guidelines for coordination, heavy workload, inadequate resources, and poor communication. Strong collaboration among FLWs was facilitated by close interpersonal communication and mutual understanding of roles and responsibilities

  12. On intersectoral allocations, factors substitutability and multiple long-run growth paths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Odile; Drugeon, Jean-Pierre; Venditti, Alain

    2003-01-01

    This article considers a two-sector model of economic growth with "labour-augmenting" intersectoral external effects stemming from the aggregate capital stock. It is shown that equilibrium balanced growth paths with a non-trivial labour allocation scheme become available. A set of sufficient...... conditions for the existence of multiple equilibrium growth rays is provided and their determinacy properties are then characterised. Finally, examination of a parameterised C.E.S. economy illustrates the central role of non-unitary values for the elasticity of substitution in the multiplicity issue...

  13. Health museums or theme parks: a new approach to intersectoral collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, H; Ashton, J; Edwards, P

    1986-01-01

    This paper is an outline of a proposed initiative on intersectoral collaboration in health promotion--collaboration between health, tourist, cultural and entertainment sectors to provide a powerful mass educational experience about the human mind and body. There has been a recent rise in interest in using the technology of museums, science centres, exploratories and theme parks for the promotion of health. This revival is shown to have a historical tradition in the health education museum started in this century in Europe 75 years ago at the Deutsches Hygiene Museum and then spreading to the USA. The proposed Body, Mind, City Museum planned for Liverpool acts as a future model for a new type of health Museum; a mixture of science exploratorium and a Walt Disney-style them park. It is intended that "hand-on" exhibits using interactive video, computers, games and experiences will be used to test people's own capacities or to describe biological functions or processes. This will be combined with park rides and simulations with their inherent appeal of fun, movement and surprise, for example the ride through the blood vessels and the "walk-through brain". This type of venture has a number of special features and advantages; it is truly intersectoral, it may be self-financing, and it can provide a mass audience with a powerful individual experience.

  14. [Problem areas and examples of best practice in intersectoral medication treatment--a literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrmann, Lena; Ollenschläger, Günter

    2014-01-01

    Transitions between the outpatient and inpatient sector are a critical phase in medication treatment. This article provides an overview of published problem areas and examples of best practice in the intersectoral medication treatment. Data with regard to related problem areas and examples of best practice was collected in August 2011 by a systematic literature research. The relevant literature was identified using the following databases and search engines: MEDLINE, The Cochrane Library, EMBASE, Google, and Google Scholar. Additionally, a hand search was done on the websites of SpringerLink and Thieme Connect. The initial search yielded a total of 4,409 records which were further selected in two screening steps and analysed according to their relevance. Of the remaining 63 records, 3 exclusively described problem areas, 11 of them examples of best practice, and 49 provided information on both problem areas and examples of best practice with regard to intersectoral medication treatment. Among other things, problem areas include varying legal regulations in inpatient and outpatient medication treatment, drug therapy interruptions after hospital discharge, or deficits in communication and continuity of care. Examples of best practice are projects, programmes, initiatives, recommendations, and points to consider with respect to medication reconciliation, pharmaceutical support, or transitions of care. Problem areas as well as examples of best practice are mainly focused on the transition from inpatient to outpatient care. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  15. [Child protection network and the intersector implementation of the circle of security as alternatives to medication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Ana Laura Martins M M; de Souza, Paulo Haddad; de Oliveira, Mônica Martins; Paraguay, Nestor Luiz Bruzzi B

    2014-09-01

    To describe the clinical history of a child with aggressive behavior and recurring death-theme speech, and report the experience of the team of authors, who proposed an alternative to medication through the establishment of a protection network and the inter-sector implementation of the circle of security concept. A 5-year-old child has a violent and aggressive behavior at the day-care. The child was diagnosed by the healthcare center with depressive disorder and behavioral disorder, and was medicated with sertraline and risperidone. Side effects were observed, and the medications were discontinued. Despite several actions, such as talks, teamwork, psychological and psychiatric follow-up, the child's behavior remained unchanged. A unique therapeutic project was developed by Universidade Estadual de Campinas' Medical School students in order to establish a connection between the entities responsible for the child's care (daycare center, healthcare center, and family). Thus, the team was able to develop a basic care protection network. The implementation of the inter-sector circle of security, as well as the communication and cooperation among the teams, produced very favorable results in this case. This initiative was shown to be a feasible and effective alternative to the use of medication for this child. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. British Association for the Study of Community Dentistry (BASCD) guidance on sampling for surveys of child dental health. A BASCD coordinated dental epidemiology programme quality standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pine, C M; Pitts, N B; Nugent, Z J

    1997-03-01

    The British Association for the Study of Community Dentistry (BASCD) is responsible for the coordination of locally based surveys of child dental health which permit local and national comparisons between health authorities and regions. These surveys began in 1985/86 in England and Wales, 1987/88 in Scotland and 1993/94 in Northern Ireland. BASCD has taken an increasing lead in setting quality standards in discussion with the NHS Epidemiology Coordinators of the Dental Epidemiology Programme. This paper comprises guidance on the sampling for these surveys.

  17. When Clock Time Governs Interaction: How Time Influences Health Professionals' Intersectoral Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendix Andersen, Anne; Beedholm, Kirsten; Kolbæk, Raymond; Frederiksen, Kirsten

    2018-06-01

    When setting up patient pathways that cross health care sectors, professionals in emergency units strive to fulfill system requirements by creating efficient patient pathways that comply with standards for length of stay. We conducted an ethnographic field study, focusing on health professionals' collaboration, of 10 elderly patients with chronic illnesses, following them from discharge to their home or other places where they received health care services. We found that clock time not only governed the professionals' ways of collaborating, but acceleration of patient pathways also became an overall goal in health care delivery. Professionals' efforts to save time came to represent a "monetary value," leading to speedier planning of patient pathways and consequent risks of disregarding important issues when treating and caring for elderly patients. We suggest that such issues are significant to the future planning and improvement of patient pathways that involve elderly citizens who are in need of intersectoral health care delivery.

  18. Community development: an important way for coordinating development of population and social economy in rural areas of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J

    1995-01-01

    This article explains how community development is important to rural socioeconomic development in China. Almost all rural socioeconomic activities occur at the community level. Community development encourages voluntarism and self-development, which contribute to adoption of more modern ideas, morals, and values. Community development stimulates changes that favor decreased childbearing and a high quality of child rearing. The special features of Chinese rural communities are identified as underdevelopment, population pressure and resource degradation, collective entities, greater social cohesion, flexibility, affiliations as government units, and access to other useful community organizations. The development model for communities varied over time from an emphasis on family planning to a focus on women's development, poverty alleviation, or economic development. Well-developed communities focused on social security systems, service networks, or environmental protection. Community development is tied to economic development. The growth of collectives played an important role in community development. Women's active and extensive participation and leadership by other influential persons were important forces in community development. Women served as agents of change. Mass participation is now a key feature of community development. Former communes did not include the same level of voluntarism. Community development directly supports increased incomes for families, which decreases the emphasis on children as a source of income. The economic value of children is reduced when communities provide social security. The greater value placed on males is reduced when women's income is increased. Community development lowers the social value of children by improving people's quality of life and by creating a modern social environment.

  19. "In Our Corner": A Qualitative Descriptive Study of Patient Engagement in a Community-Based Care Coordination Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefcik, Justine S; Petrovsky, Darina; Streur, Megan; Toles, Mark; O'Connor, Melissa; Ulrich, Connie M; Marcantonio, Sherry; Coburn, Ken; Naylor, Mary D; Moriarty, Helene

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore participants' experience in the Health Quality Partners (HQP) Care Coordination Program that contributed to their continued engagement. Older adults with multiple chronic conditions often have limited engagement in health care services and face fragmented health care delivery. This can lead to increased risk for disability, mortality, poor quality of life, and increased health care utilization. A qualitative descriptive design with two focus groups was conducted with a total of 20 older adults enrolled in HQP's Care Coordination Program. Conventional content analysis was the analytical technique. The overarching theme resulting from the analysis was "in our corner," with subthemes "opportunities to learn and socialize" and "dedicated nurses," suggesting that these are the primary contributing factors to engagement in HQP's Care Coordination Program. Study findings suggest that nurses play an integral role in patient engagement among older adults enrolled in a care coordination program.

  20. ‘Teach, reduce and discharge’: Community nurses’ textual production of ‘independence’ and the coordination of discharge from home care services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Watt

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Over the past three decades, the Canadian healthcare system has undergone significant reform and restructuring. As a result, healthcare and healthcare costs are relocated from hospitals to the community (McGregor, 2001. Text-based technology is increasingly used to standardize care and contain healthcare spending. This paper examines an example of a text-based technology used in the School Health Support Services programme for students with diabetes in Ontario, Canada. Using institutional ethnography, the inquiry starts with parents’ concerns regarding the premature termination of nursing care for their children with diabetes at school. The exploration shows how these parents’ concerns are hooked into the institutional work of assessment for service discharge conducted by the Community Care Access Centre (CCAC care coordinators. The analysis shows how the institutional category of ‘independence’ coordinates the service discharge work of the CCAC care coordinators with that of the nursing work of community nurses at school. The activation of the category of ‘independence’ by the nurses mediates their work, orienting their focus away from providing direct nursing care, and towards transferring primary care to children with diabetes. Children doing diabetes self-care work at school is then written up in nursing texts to stand in for children’s ability to manage diabetes ‘independently’. The textual production of ‘independence’ enables the next institutional course of action, that is, the discharge of children from nursing services at school. In this process, children with diabetes are drawn into doing the discharge work that ultimately serves the cost-containment interests of the institution. This institutional process also functions to obscure important actualities: It obscures how children’s ‘independence’ is co-created on a daily basis with their parents and relies on their parents’ work, and it discounts the

  1. 5-4-3-2-1 go! Coordinating pediatric resident education and community health promotion to address the obesity epidemic in children and youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Christiane Ellen; Necheles, Jonathan Wolf; Mayefsky, Jay Hirsh; Wright, Lydia Katherine; Rankin, Kristin Michele

    2011-03-01

    This study investigated the feasibility and effectiveness of training pediatric residents to conduct a brief clinic-based behavioral intervention in coordination with community dissemination of a health promotion message developed by the Consortium for Lowering Obesity in Chicago Children. A total of 113 residents completed a short (obesity rates: increased intake of fruits and vegetables (28% vs 16%, P < .01), increased intake of water (30% vs 19%, P < .01), increased physical activity (40% vs 29%, P < .03), and decreased television time (36% vs 24%, P < .01). Brief training using the 5-4-3-2-1-Go! message seems to be feasible and effective.

  2. How Intersectoral Health Promotion Changes Professional Practices: A Case Study From Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Mads; Burau, Viola; Ledderer, Loni

    2018-05-01

    Intersectoral health promotion (IHP) has pushed health professions to engage in new tasks and interprofessional ways of working. We studied how care assistants from a nursing home and school teachers implemented a cookery project targeted at children ("Cool Beans") as an example of an IHP project in Denmark. Our aim was to examine the impact of the IHP project on the practices of the professions involved. We used a qualitative case study to investigate joint care and teaching situations with the two professions and their users. Our data consisted of documents, participatory observations, and informal interviews (17 hours) as well as semistructured interviews with professionals (n = 4). We used a sociological institutional framework to analyze the professional practices emerging in joint care and teaching situations and identified three themes of new professional activities: (1) "interplay" related to making different generations collaborate on the tasks involved in the cookery session; (2) "care" concerned with caregiving activities; and (3) "learning" focused on schooling on healthy food and cooking. We conclude that changes in professional practices occurred informally and were induced by the concrete activities in the cookery project. The specific, practical tasks of the IHP project thus offered an important leverage for future interprofessional collaborations.

  3. Transformative capabilities in the “very Old economy”: Intersectoral Innovation networks and learning alliances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Schmierl

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The central starting point of the paper is that well-known classical patterns of creating innovations are changing. Innovation processes aren’t originated exclusively within ‘knowledge intensive’ (high-tech companies any more, but rather mutually between companies of different sectors. This has twofold consequences: On the one hand, the so-called high-tech industry influences non-high-tech branches as well as important suppliers of innovative solutions. On the other hand, the particular requirements and conditions of so-called low-tech branches affect companies of high-tech industries as specific drivers of innovation, too. Considered as a productive force, intersectoral cooperation becomes a main source of innovation, further growing in importance; innovation processes are more and more organized along “distributed knowledge bases” across economic sectors.Therefore, the main thesis of the paper is that today´s knowledge isn’t located within one company originating from one industrial sector any more, but is distributed along the respective value-chain and various sectors. At the same time, the “network” is not only relevant in technology-intensive branches such as IT industry or automotive industry, but becomes also a relevant analytical category for exploring “low-tech” industries and their innovation processes.

  4. Design of the Intersector Welding Robot for vacuum vessel assembly and maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, L.; Dagenais, J.-F.; Daenner, W.; Maisonnier, D.

    2000-01-01

    Next Step Fusion Devices require on-site (field weld) joining of sectors of the thick-walled vacuum vessel for structural and vacuum integrity. EFDA (European Fusion Development Agreement) is supporting an R and D programme to investigate processes for assembly of the vacuum vessel and to carry out cutting, re-welding and inspection for remote sector replacement, forming part of the overall VV/blanket research effort. In order to direct the process end-effectors along the field joint zone, a track-mounted Intersector Welding Robot (IWR) on a mock-up of a region of the vacuum vessel has been designed and is described in this paper. A rail-mounted hexapod type robot offers six axes of motion over a limited work envelope with high payload to robot weight ratio. A solution to the production of reduced pressure local vacuum is the installation of short, lightweight segments bolted to each other and the vessel wall. The various process heads can be mounted using end-effectors of special design. To minimise the supply and interface problems for the IWR prototype, its motion control and electronic systems will be embedded locally. A laser scan with camera forms the on-line seam tracking capability to compensate for rail and seam deviations

  5. Analysis of Inter-Sectoral Differentiation in Setting the Vision and Mission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zrinka Blažević

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Design and implementation of strategy is the backbone of the business enterprise. Strategic management process begins by establishing the vision and mission. Therefore, they are important components of further development of the overall company strategy. Following the above, we can conclude that it is of paramount importance to set a quality statement about the vision and mission to develop strategies in a positive direction, being at the same time comprehensible and stimulating to all target groups. Economic development divides activities in four different sectors (primary, secondary, tertiary and quaternary. Each sector has its own specifics, which become a key component of differentiation of that sector in relation to others. Therefore, it can be assumed that the company's strategy within each sector is set in accordance with sector specifics. On the basis of the above mentioned facts we come to a conclusion that there are key components that are company’s strategies specific for each sector, which also differentiate strategy compared to strategies of other sectors. The aim of this paper is to find specific components to develop a strategy for each sector, and key components of inter-sectoral differentiation in setting the vision and mission.

  6. Structural integration and performance of inter-sectoral public health-related policy networks: An analysis across policy phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, D T J M; Raab, J; Grêaux, K M; Stronks, K; Harting, J

    2017-12-01

    Inter-sectoral policy networks may be effective in addressing environmental determinants of health with interventions. However, contradictory results are reported on relations between structural network characteristics (i.e., composition and integration) and network performance, such as addressing environmental determinants of health. This study examines these relations in different phases of the policy process. A multiple-case study was performed on four public health-related policy networks. Using a snowball method among network actors, overall and sub-networks per policy phase were identified and the policy sector of each actor was assigned. To operationalise the outcome variable, interventions were classified by the proportion of environmental determinants they addressed. In the overall networks, no relation was found between structural network characteristics and network performance. In most effective cases, the policy development sub-networks were characterised by integration with less interrelations between actors (low cohesion), more equally distributed distances between the actors (low closeness centralisation), and horizontal integration in inter-sectoral cliques. The most effective case had non-public health central actors with less connections in all sub-networks. The results suggest that, to address environmental determinants of health, sub-networks should be inter-sectorally composed in the policy development rather than in the intervention development and implementation phases, and that policy development actors should have the opportunity to connect with other actors, without strong direction from a central actor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of a Multi-Dimensional and Inter-Sectoral Intervention on the Adherence of Psychiatric Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Pauly

    Full Text Available In psychiatry, hospital stays and transitions to the ambulatory sector are susceptible to major changes in drug therapy that lead to complex medication regimens and common non-adherence among psychiatric patients. A multi-dimensional and inter-sectoral intervention is hypothesized to improve the adherence of psychiatric patients to their pharmacotherapy.269 patients from a German university hospital were included in a prospective, open, clinical trial with consecutive control and intervention groups. Control patients (09/2012-03/2013 received usual care, whereas intervention patients (05/2013-12/2013 underwent a program to enhance adherence during their stay and up to three months after discharge. The program consisted of therapy simplification and individualized patient education (multi-dimensional component during the stay and at discharge, as well as subsequent phone calls after discharge (inter-sectoral component. Adherence was measured by the "Medication Adherence Report Scale" (MARS and the "Drug Attitude Inventory" (DAI.The improvement in the MARS score between admission and three months after discharge was 1.33 points (95% CI: 0.73-1.93 higher in the intervention group compared to controls. In addition, the DAI score improved 1.93 points (95% CI: 1.15-2.72 more for intervention patients.These two findings indicate significantly higher medication adherence following the investigated multi-dimensional and inter-sectoral program.German Clinical Trials Register DRKS00006358.

  8. Structural Change and Income Inequality – Agricultural Development and Inter-sectoral Dualism in the Developing World, 1960-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin P. Andersson

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Structural change consists of the long-term changes in the sectoral composition of output and employment. We introduce a structural change perspective to the study of income inequality in 27 countries of the developing world for the period 1960-2010. The service sector has become the main employer, but the agricultural sector is central to the income distribution because poverty is mostly rural, and the labor surplus is high. We decompose the sectoral composition of aggregate labor productivity at the country level, divide the countries into agrarian, dual (beginner, intermediate and advanced, and mature economies and use the inter-sectoral productivity gap to test the effect of structural change on income inequality. We confirm increases in agricultural productivity everywhere and find that the inter-sectoral gap is positively associated with income inequality. The effect is negligible in agrarian and advanced economies but powerful in dual beginner economies: an increase of 1% in the inter-sectoral gap increases income inequality by 0.5%. The effect peters out in dual intermediate economies and disappears completely in dual advanced economies. Finally, redistribution has been the key to compensating the losers in the income changes, particularly for those entering the non-agricultural economy.

  9. Implementation of an Intersectoral Program to Eliminate Human and Canine Rabies: The Bohol Rabies Prevention and Elimination Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapiz, Stella Marie D.; Miranda, Mary Elizabeth G.; Garcia, Romulo G.; Daguro, Leonida I.; Paman, Meydalyn D.; Madrinan, Frederick P.; Rances, Polizena A.; Briggs, Deborah J.

    2012-01-01

    Background The province of Bohol, located in the Visayas islands region in the Philippines has a human population of 1.13 million and was the 4th highest region for human rabies deaths in the country, averaging 10 per year, prior to the initiation of the Bohol Rabies Prevention and Elimination Project (BRPEP). Aims The BRPEP was initiated in 2007 with the goal of building a sustainable program that would prevent human rabies by eliminating rabies at its source, in dogs, by 2010. This goal was in line with the Philippine National Rabies Program whose objective is to eliminate rabies by 2020. Methods The intersectoral BRPEP was launched in 2007 and integrated the expertise and resources from the sectors of agriculture, public health and safety, education, environment, legal affairs, interior and local government. The program included: increasing local community involvement; implementing dog population control; conducting mass dog vaccination; improving dog bite management; instituting veterinary quarantine; and improving diagnostic capability, surveillance and monitoring. Funding was secured from the national government, provincial, municipal and village units, dog owners, NGOs, the regional office of the WHO, the UBS Optimus Foundation, and the Global Alliance for Rabies Control. The BRPEP was managed by the Bohol Rabies Prevention and Eradication Council (BRPEC) under the jurisdiction of the Governor of Bohol. Parallel organizations were created at the municipal level and village level. Community volunteers facilitated the institution of the program. Dog population surveys were conducted to plan for sufficient resources to vaccinate the required 70% of the dogs living in the province. Two island-wide mass vaccination campaigns were conducted followed by “catch up” vaccination campaigns. Registration of dogs was implemented including a small fee that was rolled back into the program to maintain sustainability. Children were educated by introducing rabies

  10. A randomized controlled trial of a community-based dementia care coordination intervention: effects of MIND at Home on caregiver outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Jeremy A; Black, Betty S; Johnston, Deirdre; Hess, Edward; Leoutsakos, Jeannie-Marie; Gitlin, Laura N; Rabins, Peter V; Lyketsos, Constantine G; Samus, Quincy M

    2015-04-01

    To assess whether MIND at Home, a community-based, multicomponent, care coordination intervention, reduces unmet caregiving needs and burden in informal caregivers of persons with memory disorders. An 18-month randomized controlled trial of 289 community-living care recipient (CR)-caregiver (informal caregivers, i.e., unpaid individuals who regularly assisted the CR) dyads from 28 postal code areas of Baltimore, Maryland was conducted. All dyads and the CR's primary care physician received the written needs assessment results and intervention recommendations. Intervention dyads then received an 18-month care coordination intervention delivered by nonclinical community workers to address unmet care needs through individualized care planning, referral and linkage to dementia services, provision of caregiver dementia education and skill-building strategies, and care progress monitoring by an interdisciplinary team. Primary outcome was total percent of unmet caregiver needs at 18 months. Secondary outcomes included objective and subjective caregiver burden measures, quality of life (QOL), and depression. Total percent of unmet caregiver needs declined in both groups from baseline to 18 months, with no statistically significant between-group difference. No significant group differences occurred in most caregiver burden measures, depression, or QOL. There was a potentially clinically relevant reduction in self-reported number of hours caregivers spent with the CR for MIND participants compared with control subjects. No statistically significant impacts on caregiver outcomes were found after multiple comparison adjustments. However, MIND at Home appeared to have had a modest and clinically meaningful impact on informal caregiver time spent with CRs. Copyright © 2015 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The effectiveness of community-based coordinating interventions in dementia care: a meta-analysis and subgroup analysis of intervention components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backhouse, Amy; Ukoumunne, Obioha C; Richards, David A; McCabe, Rose; Watkins, Ross; Dickens, Chris

    2017-11-13

    Interventions aiming to coordinate services for the community-based dementia population vary in components, organisation and implementation. In this review we aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of community-based care coordinating interventions on health outcomes and investigate whether specific components of interventions influence their effects. We searched four databases from inception to April 2017: Medline, The Cochrane Library, EMBASE and PsycINFO. This was aided by a search of four grey literature databases, and backward and forward citation tracking of included papers. Title and abstract screening was followed by a full text screen by two independent reviewers, and quality was assessed using the CASP appraisal tool. We then conducted meta-analyses and subgroup analyses. A total of 14 randomised controlled trials (RCTs) involving 10,372 participants were included in the review. Altogether we carried out 12 meta-analyses and 19 subgroup analyses. Meta-analyses found coordinating interventions showed a statistically significant improvement in both patient behaviour measured using the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) (mean difference (MD) = -9.5; 95% confidence interval (CI): -18.1 to -1.0; p = 0.03; number of studies (n) = 4; I 2  = 88%) and caregiver burden (standardised mean difference (SMD) = -0.54; 95% CI: -1.01 to -0.07; p = 0.02; n = 5, I 2  = 92%) compared to the control group. Subgroup analyses found interventions using a case manager with a nursing background showed a greater positive effect on caregiver quality of life than those that used case managers from other professional backgrounds (SMD = 0.94 versus 0.03, respectively; p < 0.001). Interventions that did not provide supervision for the case managers showed greater effectiveness for reducing the percentage of patients that are institutionalised compared to those that provided supervision (odds ratio (OR) = 0.27 versus 0.96 respectively; p = 0.02). There was little

  12. The effectiveness of community-based coordinating interventions in dementia care: a meta-analysis and subgroup analysis of intervention components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Backhouse

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interventions aiming to coordinate services for the community-based dementia population vary in components, organisation and implementation. In this review we aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of community-based care coordinating interventions on health outcomes and investigate whether specific components of interventions influence their effects. Methods We searched four databases from inception to April 2017: Medline, The Cochrane Library, EMBASE and PsycINFO. This was aided by a search of four grey literature databases, and backward and forward citation tracking of included papers. Title and abstract screening was followed by a full text screen by two independent reviewers, and quality was assessed using the CASP appraisal tool. We then conducted meta-analyses and subgroup analyses. Results A total of 14 randomised controlled trials (RCTs involving 10,372 participants were included in the review. Altogether we carried out 12 meta-analyses and 19 subgroup analyses. Meta-analyses found coordinating interventions showed a statistically significant improvement in both patient behaviour measured using the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI (mean difference (MD = −9.5; 95% confidence interval (CI: −18.1 to −1.0; p = 0.03; number of studies (n = 4; I2 = 88% and caregiver burden (standardised mean difference (SMD = −0.54; 95% CI: -1.01 to −0.07; p = 0.02; n = 5, I2 = 92% compared to the control group. Subgroup analyses found interventions using a case manager with a nursing background showed a greater positive effect on caregiver quality of life than those that used case managers from other professional backgrounds (SMD = 0.94 versus 0.03, respectively; p < 0.001. Interventions that did not provide supervision for the case managers showed greater effectiveness for reducing the percentage of patients that are institutionalised compared to those that provided supervision (odds ratio (OR = 0.27 versus 0

  13. Práticas intersetoriais nas políticas públicas de promoção de saúde Intersectoral practices in public policies for health promotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine de Azevedo

    2012-01-01

    unpreparedness of political and technical managers and health professionals to take intersectoral actions and administrative matters that hinder the implementation of integrated actions. This unpreparedness leads, among other damages, to the lack of recognition of some themes of the policies as legitimate questions of public health. Moreover, many remain in the policy agendas, centralized decisions that prevent community participation and the emergence of problems adjusted to local realities, whose solutions require intersectoral and creative interventions. Thus, it becomes essential to foster an effective educational process to form interdisciplinary health professionals with intersectoral viewpoint in line with the guidelines of public policies to promote health. It is also important to highlight the territorial dimension and social networks, improving participatory processes that enhance the intersectoral perspective of these policies, as well as to stimulate the activation of the subject in decision making.

  14. Comprehensive geriatric assessment, multifactorial interventions and nurse-led care coordination to prevent functional decline in community-dwelling older persons: protocol of a cluster randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suijker Jacqueline J

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional decline in community-dwelling older persons is associated with the loss of independence, the need for hospital and nursing-home care and premature death. The effectiveness of multifactorial interventions in preventing functional decline remains controversial. The aim of this study is to investigate whether functional decline in community-dwelling older persons can be delayed or prevented by a comprehensive geriatric assessment, multifactorial interventions and nurse-led care coordination. Methods/Design In a cluster randomized controlled trial, with the general practice as the unit of randomization, 1281 participants from 25 general practices will be enrolled in each condition to compare the intervention with usual care. The intervention will focus on older persons who are at increased risk for functional decline, identified by an Identification of Seniors at Risk Primary Care (ISAR-PC score (≥ 2. These older persons will receive a comprehensive geriatric assessment, an individually tailored care and treatment plan, consisting of multifactorial, evidence-based interventions and subsequent nurse-led care coordination. The control group will receive 'care as usual' by the general practitioner (GP. The main outcome after 12 months is the level of physical functioning on the modified Katz-15 index score. The secondary outcomes are health-related quality of life, psychological and social functioning, healthcare utilization and institutionalization. Furthermore, a process evaluation and cost-effectiveness analysis will be performed. Discussion This study will provide new knowledge regarding the effectiveness and feasibility of a comprehensive geriatric assessment, multifactorial interventions and nurse-led elderly care in general practice. Trial registration NTR2653 Grant Unrestricted grant 'The Netherlands Organisation for Health Research and development' no 313020201

  15. Conditions for addressing environmental determinants of health behavior in intersectoral policy networks: A fuzzy set Qualitative Comparative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, D T J M; Verweij, S; Grêaux, K; Stronks, K; Harting, J

    2017-12-01

    Improving health requires changes in the social, physical, economic and political determinants of health behavior. For the realization of policies that address these environmental determinants, intersectoral policy networks are considered necessary for the pooling of resources to implement different policy instruments. However, such network diversity may increase network complexity and therefore hamper network performance. Network complexity may be reduced by network management and the provision of financial resources. This study examined whether network diversity - amidst the other conditions - is indeed needed to address environmental determinants of health behavior. We included 25 intersectoral policy networks in Dutch municipalities aimed at reducing overweight, smoking, and alcohol/drugs abuse. For our fuzzy set Qualitative Comparative Analysis we used data from three web-based surveys among (a) project leaders regarding network diversity and size (n = 38); (b) project leaders and project partners regarding management (n = 278); and (c) implementation professionals regarding types of environmental determinants addressed (n = 137). Data on budgets were retrieved from project application forms. Contrary to their intentions, most policy networks typically addressed personal determinants. If the environment was addressed too, it was mostly the social environment. To address environmental determinants of health behavior, network diversity (>50% of the actors are non-public health) was necessary in networks that were either small (policy networks in improving health behaviors by addressing a variety of environmental determinants. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Poisson Coordinates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xian-Ying; Hu, Shi-Min

    2013-02-01

    Harmonic functions are the critical points of a Dirichlet energy functional, the linear projections of conformal maps. They play an important role in computer graphics, particularly for gradient-domain image processing and shape-preserving geometric computation. We propose Poisson coordinates, a novel transfinite interpolation scheme based on the Poisson integral formula, as a rapid way to estimate a harmonic function on a certain domain with desired boundary values. Poisson coordinates are an extension of the Mean Value coordinates (MVCs) which inherit their linear precision, smoothness, and kernel positivity. We give explicit formulas for Poisson coordinates in both continuous and 2D discrete forms. Superior to MVCs, Poisson coordinates are proved to be pseudoharmonic (i.e., they reproduce harmonic functions on n-dimensional balls). Our experimental results show that Poisson coordinates have lower Dirichlet energies than MVCs on a number of typical 2D domains (particularly convex domains). As well as presenting a formula, our approach provides useful insights for further studies on coordinates-based interpolation and fast estimation of harmonic functions.

  17. Empowerment of Afro-Colombian community leaders from Primary Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilma Florisa Velásquez G.

    2017-05-01

    organization, community engagement, intersectoral work, and expanding project management. These are key factors for improving, by means of socio-economic progress, health and the integral development of the community.

  18. Blended and Co-Existing Worlds in Intersectoral Mobilities of European PhD Graduates in the Social Sciences and Humanities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millard, Debbie

    2018-01-01

    This paper argues that links between academia and other economic sectors are increasing, especially through intersectoral mobility of university graduates. Murray [(2010). "The Oncomouse that Roared: Hybrid Exchange Strategies as a Source of Distinction at the Boundary of Overlapping Institutions." "American Journal of…

  19. Coordinating Communities and Building Governance in the Development of Schematic and Semantic Standards: the Key to Solving Global Earth and Space Science Challenges in the 21st Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyborn, L. A.

    2007-12-01

    standards also require some form of governance to maintain and then extend the standard as the science evolves to meet new challenges. A standard that does have some governance is GeoSciML, a data transfer standard for geoscience map data. GeoSciML is currently being developed by a consortium of 7 countries under the auspices of the Commission for the Management of and Application of Geoscience Information (CGI), a commission of the International Union of Geological Sciences. Perhaps other `ML' or ontology and vocabulary development `teams' need to look to their international domain specific specialty societies for endorsement and governance. But the issue goes beyond Earth and Space Sciences, as increasingly cross and intra disciplinary science requires machine to machine interaction with other science disciplines such as physics, chemistry and astronomy. For example, for geochemistry do we develop GeochemistryML or do we extend the existing Chemical Markup Language? Again, the question is who will provide the coordination of the development of the required schematic and semantic standards that underpin machine to machine global integration of science data. Is this a role for ICSU or CODATA or who? In order to address this issue, Geoscience Australia and CSIRO established the Solid Earth and Environmental Grid Community website to enable communities to `advertise' standards development and to provide a community TWIKI where standards can be developed in a globally `open' environment.

  20. Coordinated Transportation: Problems and Promise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fickes, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Examines the legal, administrative, and logistical barriers that have prevented the wide acceptance of coordinating community and school transportation services and why these barriers may be breaking down. Two examples of successful implementation of coordinated transportation are examined: employing a single system to serve all transportation…

  1. Valuing inter-sectoral costs and benefits of interventions in the healthcare sector: methods for obtaining unit prices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drost, Ruben M W A; Paulus, Aggie T G; Ruwaard, Dirk; Evers, Silvia M A A

    2017-02-01

    There is a lack of knowledge about methods for valuing health intervention-related costs and monetary benefits in the education and criminal justice sectors, also known as 'inter-sectoral costs and benefits' (ICBs). The objective of this study was to develop methods for obtaining unit prices for the valuation of ICBs. By conducting an exploratory literature study and expert interviews, several generic methods were developed. The methods' feasibility was assessed through application in the Netherlands. Results were validated in an expert meeting, which was attended by policy makers, public health experts, health economists and HTA-experts, and discussed at several international conferences and symposia. The study resulted in four methods, including the opportunity cost method (A) and valuation using available unit prices (B), self-constructed unit prices (C) or hourly labor costs (D). The methods developed can be used internationally and are valuable for the broad international field of HTA.

  2. British Association for the Study of Community Dentistry (BASCD) guidance on the statistical aspects of training and calibration of examiners for surveys of child dental health. A BASCD coordinated dental epidemiology programme quality standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pine, C M; Pitts, N B; Nugent, Z J

    1997-03-01

    The British Association for the Study of Community Dentistry (BASCD) is responsible for the coordination of locally based surveys of child dental health which permit local and national comparisons between health authorities and regions. These surveys began in 1985/86 in England and Wales, 1987/88 in Scotland and 1993/94 in Northern Ireland. BASCD has taken an increasing lead in setting quality standards in discussion with the NHS Epidemiology Coordinators of the Dental Epidemiology Programme. This paper comprises guidance on the statistical aspects of training and calibration of examiners for these surveys.

  3. Validation for global solar wind prediction using Ulysses comparison: Multiple coronal and heliospheric models installed at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, L. K.; MacNeice, P. J.; Mays, M. L.; Taktakishvili, A.; Odstrcil, D.; Jackson, B.; Yu, H.-S.; Riley, P.; Sokolov, I. V.

    2016-08-01

    The prediction of the background global solar wind is a necessary part of space weather forecasting. Several coronal and heliospheric models have been installed and/or recently upgraded at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC), including the Wang-Sheely-Arge (WSA)-Enlil model, MHD-Around-a-Sphere (MAS)-Enlil model, Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF), and heliospheric tomography using interplanetary scintillation data. Ulysses recorded the last fast latitudinal scan from southern to northern poles in 2007. By comparing the modeling results with Ulysses observations over seven Carrington rotations, we have extended our third-party validation from the previous near-Earth solar wind to middle to high latitudes, in the same late declining phase of solar cycle 23. Besides visual comparison, we have quantitatively assessed the models' capabilities in reproducing the time series, statistics, and latitudinal variations of solar wind parameters for a specific range of model parameter settings, inputs, and grid configurations available at CCMC. The WSA-Enlil model results vary with three different magnetogram inputs. The MAS-Enlil model captures the solar wind parameters well, despite its underestimation of the speed at middle to high latitudes. The new version of SWMF misses many solar wind variations probably because it uses lower grid resolution than other models. The interplanetary scintillation-tomography cannot capture the latitudinal variations of solar wind well yet. Because the model performance varies with parameter settings which are optimized for different epochs or flow states, the performance metric study provided here can serve as a template that researchers can use to validate the models for the time periods and conditions of interest to them.

  4. Validation for Global Solar Wind Prediction Using Ulysses Comparison: Multiple Coronal and Heliospheric Models Installed at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, L. K.; MacNeice, P. J.; Mays, M. L.; Taktakishvili, A.; Odstrcil, D.; Jackson, B.; Yu, H.-S.; Riley, P.; Sokolov, I. V.

    2016-01-01

    The prediction of the background global solar wind is a necessary part of space weather forecasting. Several coronal and heliospheric models have been installed and/or recently upgraded at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC), including the Wang-Sheely-Arge (WSA)-Enlil model, MHD-Around-a-Sphere (MAS)-Enlil model, Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF), and Heliospheric tomography using interplanetary scintillation data. Ulysses recorded the last fast latitudinal scan from southern to northern poles in 2007. By comparing the modeling results with Ulysses observations over seven Carrington rotations, we have extended our third-party validation from the previous near-Earth solar wind to middle to high latitudes, in the same late declining phase of solar cycle 23. Besides visual comparison, wehave quantitatively assessed the models capabilities in reproducing the time series, statistics, and latitudinal variations of solar wind parameters for a specific range of model parameter settings, inputs, and grid configurations available at CCMC. The WSA-Enlil model results vary with three different magnetogram inputs.The MAS-Enlil model captures the solar wind parameters well, despite its underestimation of the speed at middle to high latitudes. The new version of SWMF misses many solar wind variations probably because it uses lower grid resolution than other models. The interplanetary scintillation-tomography cannot capture the latitudinal variations of solar wind well yet. Because the model performance varies with parameter settings which are optimized for different epochs or flow states, the performance metric study provided here can serve as a template that researchers can use to validate the models for the time periods and conditions of interest to them.

  5. Coordination cycles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Steiner, Jakub

    -, č. 274 (2005), s. 1-26 ISSN 1211-3298 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70850503 Keywords : coordination * crises * cycles and fluctuations Subject RIV: AH - Economics http://www.cerge-ei.cz/pdf/wp/Wp274.pdf

  6. Coordination cycles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Steiner, Jakub

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 1 (2008), s. 308-327 ISSN 0899-8256 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70850503 Keywords : global games * coordination * crises * cycles and fluctuations Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 1.333, year: 2008

  7. Effects of Ving Tsun Chinese Martial Art Training on Upper Extremity Muscle Strength and Eye-Hand Coordination in Community-Dwelling Middle-Aged and Older Adults: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Shamay S. M.; Cheng, Yoyo T. Y.; Yu, Esther Y. T.; Chow, Gary C. C.; Chak, Yvonne T. C.; Chan, Ivy K. Y.; Zhang, Joni; Macfarlane, Duncan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the effects of Ving Tsun (VT) martial art training on the upper extremity muscle strength and eye-hand coordination of middle-aged and older adults. Methods. This study used a nonequivalent pretest-posttest control group design. Forty-two community-dwelling healthy adults participated in the study; 24 (mean age ± SD = 68.5 ± 6.7 years) underwent VT training for 4 weeks (a supervised VT session twice a week, plus daily home practice), and 18 (mean age ± SD = 72.0 ± 6.7 years) received no VT training and acted as controls. Shoulder and elbow isometric muscle strength and eye-hand coordination were evaluated using the Lafayette Manual Muscle Test System and a computerized finger-pointing test, respectively. Results. Elbow extensor peak force increased by 13.9% (P = 0.007) in the VT group and the time to reach peak force decreased (9.9%) differentially in the VT group compared to the control group (P = 0.033). For the eye-hand coordination assessment outcomes, reaction time increased by 2.9% in the VT group and decreased by 5.3% in the control group (P = 0.002). Conclusions. Four weeks of VT training could improve elbow extensor isometric peak force and the time to reach peak force but not eye-hand coordination in community-dwelling middle-aged and older adults. PMID:27525020

  8. Effects of Ving Tsun Chinese Martial Art Training on Upper Extremity Muscle Strength and Eye-Hand Coordination in Community-Dwelling Middle-Aged and Older Adults: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Shirley S M; Ng, Shamay S M; Cheng, Yoyo T Y; Wong, Janet Y H; Yu, Esther Y T; Chow, Gary C C; Chak, Yvonne T C; Chan, Ivy K Y; Zhang, Joni; Macfarlane, Duncan; Chung, Louisa M Y

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the effects of Ving Tsun (VT) martial art training on the upper extremity muscle strength and eye-hand coordination of middle-aged and older adults. Methods. This study used a nonequivalent pretest-posttest control group design. Forty-two community-dwelling healthy adults participated in the study; 24 (mean age ± SD = 68.5 ± 6.7 years) underwent VT training for 4 weeks (a supervised VT session twice a week, plus daily home practice), and 18 (mean age ± SD = 72.0 ± 6.7 years) received no VT training and acted as controls. Shoulder and elbow isometric muscle strength and eye-hand coordination were evaluated using the Lafayette Manual Muscle Test System and a computerized finger-pointing test, respectively. Results. Elbow extensor peak force increased by 13.9% (P = 0.007) in the VT group and the time to reach peak force decreased (9.9%) differentially in the VT group compared to the control group (P = 0.033). For the eye-hand coordination assessment outcomes, reaction time increased by 2.9% in the VT group and decreased by 5.3% in the control group (P = 0.002). Conclusions. Four weeks of VT training could improve elbow extensor isometric peak force and the time to reach peak force but not eye-hand coordination in community-dwelling middle-aged and older adults.

  9. Effects of Ving Tsun Chinese Martial Art Training on Upper Extremity Muscle Strength and Eye-Hand Coordination in Community-Dwelling Middle-Aged and Older Adults: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley S. M. Fong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To evaluate the effects of Ving Tsun (VT martial art training on the upper extremity muscle strength and eye-hand coordination of middle-aged and older adults. Methods. This study used a nonequivalent pretest-posttest control group design. Forty-two community-dwelling healthy adults participated in the study; 24 (mean age ± SD = 68.5±6.7 years underwent VT training for 4 weeks (a supervised VT session twice a week, plus daily home practice, and 18 (mean age ± SD = 72.0±6.7 years received no VT training and acted as controls. Shoulder and elbow isometric muscle strength and eye-hand coordination were evaluated using the Lafayette Manual Muscle Test System and a computerized finger-pointing test, respectively. Results. Elbow extensor peak force increased by 13.9% (P=0.007 in the VT group and the time to reach peak force decreased (9.9% differentially in the VT group compared to the control group (P=0.033. For the eye-hand coordination assessment outcomes, reaction time increased by 2.9% in the VT group and decreased by 5.3% in the control group (P=0.002. Conclusions. Four weeks of VT training could improve elbow extensor isometric peak force and the time to reach peak force but not eye-hand coordination in community-dwelling middle-aged and older adults.

  10. [School readiness and community mobilization: study retrospective in a Montreal area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurin, Isabelle; Bilodeau, Angèle; Chartrand, Sébastien

    2012-02-22

    This article presents a modelling of the collective decision-making process by which a community-based population-level intervention transformed the organization of early childhood services in a Montréal community from 2001 to 2006. Multisectoral players from a childhood/family issue table. The chosen territory is one of the most multi-ethnic and poorest neighbourhoods of Montréal. The intervention being examined is Understanding the Early Years (UEY), a Canada-wide initiative aiming to strengthen communities' capacity to use quality information to support the thought process relating to the organization of early childhood services. Twelve Canadian regions took part, including Montréal. The time chart for the collective decision-making process presents the events that significantly influenced the procedure: establishment of an intersectoral working committee, production of a portrait of the neighbourhood, think tank, development and implementation of the Passage maison-école [home-to-school] and Femmes-Relais [relay women] projects, retreats, and inclusion of school readiness as a priority focus area in the neighbourhood's three-year action plan. Also presented are the contextual factors that influenced decision making: the neighbourhood's cooperation and coordination history, the researcher's involvement, financial support and shared leadership. The benefits of UEY-Montréal in this territory extended beyond 2006. With respect to current priorities for action in early childhood, this territory is a good example of mobilization for school readiness.

  11. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball

    Overview From a technical perspective, CMS has been in “beam operation” state since 6th November. The detector is fully closed with all components operational and the magnetic field is normally at the nominal 3.8T. The UXC cavern is normally closed with the radiation veto set. Access to UXC is now only possible during downtimes of LHC. Such accesses must be carefully planned, documented and carried out in agreement with CMS Technical Coordination, Experimental Area Management, LHC programme coordination and the CCC. Material flow in and out of UXC is now strictly controlled. Access to USC remains possible at any time, although, for safety reasons, it is necessary to register with the shift crew in the control room before going down.It is obligatory for all material leaving UXC to pass through the underground buffer zone for RP scanning, database entry and appropriate labeling for traceability. Technical coordination (notably Stephane Bally and Christoph Schaefer), the shift crew and run ...

  12. TESS Follow-up Observing Program (TFOP) Working Group:A Mission-led Effort to Coordinate Community Resources to Confirm TESS Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Karen; Quinn, Samuel N.; Latham, David W.; Christiansen, Jessie; Ciardi, David; Dragomir, Diana; Crossfield, Ian; Seager, Sara

    2018-01-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will observe most of the sky over a period of two years. Observations will be conducted in 26 sectors of sky coverage and each sector will be observed for ~27 days. Data from each sector is expected to produce hundreds of transiting planet candidates (PCs) per month and thousands over the two year nominal mission. The TFOP Working Group (WG) is a mission-led effort organized to efficiently provide follow-up observations to confirm candidates as planets or reject them as false positives. The primary goal of the TFOP WG is to facilitate achievement of the Level One Science Requirement to measure masses for 50 transiting planets smaller than 4 Earth radii. Secondary goals are to serve any science coming out of TESS and to foster communication and coordination both within the TESS Science Team and with the community at large. The TFOP WG is organized as five Sub Groups (SGs). SG1 will provide seeing-limited imaging to measure blending within a candidate's aperture and time-series photometry to identify false positives and in some cases to improve ephemerides, light curves, and/or transit time variation (TTV) measurements. SG2 will provide reconnaissance spectroscopy to identify astrophysical false positives and to contribute to improved host star parameters. SG3 will provide high-resolution imaging with adaptive optics, speckle imaging, and lucky imaging to detect nearby objects. SG4 will provide precise radial velocities to derive orbits of planet(s) and measure their mass(es) relative to the host star. SG5 will provide space-based photometry to confirm and/or improve the TESS photometric ephemerides, and will also provide improved light curves for transit events or TTV measurements. We describe the TFOP WG observing and planet confirmation process, the five SGs that comprise the TFOP WG, ExoFOP-TESS and other web-based tools being developed to support TFOP WG observers, other advantages of joining the TFOP WG, the TFOP

  13. You're a "What"? Recycling Coordinator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torpey, Elka Maria

    2011-01-01

    Recycling coordinators supervise curbside and dropoff recycling programs for municipal governments or private firms. Today, recycling is mandatory in many communities. And advancements in collection and processing methods have helped to increase the quantity of materials for which the recycling coordinator is responsible. In some communities,…

  14. Tracking the genealogy of CO2 emissions in the electricity sector: An intersectoral approach applied to the Spanish case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarancon Moran, Miguel Angel; Albinana, Fernando Callejas; Del Rio, Pablo

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyses the factors leading to CO 2 emissions in the Spanish electricity generation sector in order to propose effective mitigation policies aimed at tackling those emissions. Traditionally, two broad categories of those factors have been considered in the literature: those related to the supply of electricity (technological features of the sector) and those related to the level of economic activity (demand factors). This paper focuses on an additional element, which has usually been neglected, the structural factor, which refers to the set of intersectoral transactions (related to the technologies used in other productive sectors) which connect, in either a direct or an indirect way, the general economic activity with the supply of electricity and, thus, with the emissions of the electricity generation sector. This analysis allows us to identify the so-called 'sectors structurally responsible for emissions' (SSER), whose production functions involve transactions which connect the demand for goods and services with the emissions of the electricity generation sector. The methodology is based on an input-output approach and a sensitivity analysis. The paper shows that there are structural rigidities, deeply ingrained within the economic system, which lead to emissions from the electricity generation sector for which this sector cannot be held responsible. These rigidities limit the effectiveness of policies aimed at emissions mitigation in this sector. (author)

  15. Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    stability Science & Innovation Collaboration Careers Community Environment Science & Innovation Recruitment Events Community Commitment Giving Campaigns, Drives Economic Development Employee Funded neighbor pledge: contribute to quality of life in Northern New Mexico through economic development

  16. Coordinating controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1986-07-15

    While physics Laboratories are having to absorb cuts in resources, the machines they rely on are becoming more and more complex, requiring increasingly sophisticated systems. Rather than being a resourceful engineer or physicist able to timber together solutions in his 'backyard', the modern controls specialist has become a professional in his own right. Because of possible conflicts between increasing sophistication on one hand and scarcer resources on the other, there was felt a need for more contacts among controls specialists to exchange experiences, coordinate development and discuss 'family problems', away from meetings where the main interest is on experimental physics.

  17. Coordinated unbundling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timmermans, Bram; Zabala-Iturriagagoitia, Jon Mikel

    2013-01-01

    Public procurement for innovation is a matter of using public demand to trigger innovation. Empirical studies have demonstrated that demand-based policy instruments can be considered to be a powerful tool in stimulating innovative processes among existing firms; however, the existing literature has...... not focused on the role this policy instrument can play in the promotion of (knowledge-intensive) entrepreneurship. This paper investigates this link in more detail and introduces the concept of coordinated unbundling as a strategy that can facilitate this purpose. We also present a framework on how...

  18. Coordinating controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    While physics Laboratories are having to absorb cuts in resources, the machines they rely on are becoming more and more complex, requiring increasingly sophisticated systems. Rather than being a resourceful engineer or physicist able to timber together solutions in his 'backyard', the modern controls specialist has become a professional in his own right. Because of possible conflicts between increasing sophistication on one hand and scarcer resources on the other, there was felt a need for more contacts among controls specialists to exchange experiences, coordinate development and discuss 'family problems', away from meetings where the main interest is on experimental physics

  19. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball

    2010-01-01

    Operational Experience At the end of the first full-year running period of LHC, CMS is established as a reliable, robust and mature experiment. In particular common systems and infrastructure faults accounted for <0.6 % CMS downtime during LHC pp physics. Technical operation throughout the entire year was rather smooth, the main faults requiring UXC access being sub-detector power systems and rack-cooling turbines. All such problems were corrected during scheduled technical stops, in the shadow of tunnel access needed by the LHC, or in negotiated accesses or access extensions. Nevertheless, the number of necessary accesses to the UXC averaged more than one per week and the technical stops were inevitably packed with work packages, typically 30 being executed within a few days, placing a high load on the coordination and area management teams. It is an appropriate moment for CMS Technical Coordination to thank all those in many CERN departments and in the Collaboration, who were involved in CMS techni...

  20. [The mental health promotion of children and teenagers in vulnerability and social violence: the challenges for an intersectoral network].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passos, Izabel Christina Friche; Vieira, Kelly; Moreira, Laura; Rodrigues, Flávia; Amorim, Margarete; Santos, Cláudia; Abreu, Ana; Gomes, Lucas; Mendes, Luciana; Lima, Isabella; Moura, Francisco; França, Cassandra; Ferraz, Cláudia

    This paper presents and discusses the results of an intervention research conducted in Ouro Preto, Brazil from August 2014 to March 2016. The main objective was to contribute to the development of an intersectoral and interdisciplinary network to face psychosocial vulnerabilities of children and teenagers, especially related to sexual violence and drug use. To achieve this, we identified the difficulties faced by the Sistema de Garantia de Direitos Humanos da Criança e do Adolescente (SGDHCA) implemented by the municipality which take care of this population. We also identified protective and promotion factors accomplished to empower them. The methodology used combines Deleuze and Guattari Cartography, Institutional Analysis and the Cross Training. This latter methodology was developed by a group of researchers of Douglas Institute, in Montreal, which we met through scientific co-operation with our laboratory. On account of the practical-theoric and co-participative activities with the professional network of Ouro Preto, we produced a detailed diagnosis of the SGDHCA and a document proposing short, medium and long-term strategies. As final result, we intend to help the local collective-the Forum Intersetorial da Infância e Juventude-to develop a work plan from the proposed actions. In this paper we will concentrate the potential of the methodology used by presenting outcome from two important moments of the research: the discussions of successful and unsuccessful cases that elucidate the network operation and the potential and difficulties arising from the Rotation Positional, important technical of the Cross Training.

  1. Evaluation of a Coordinated School-Based Obesity Prevention Program in a Hispanic Community: Choosing Healthy and Active Lifestyles for Kids/healthy Schools Healthy Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger-Jenkins, Evelyn; Rausch, John; Okah, Ebiere; Tsao, Daisy; Nieto, Andres; Lyda, Elizabeth; Meyer, Dodi; McCord, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Background: Obesity is a public health concern that disproportionately affects underserved and minority communities. Purpose: To evaluate whether a comprehensive obesity prevention program that targets children and school staff in an underserved Hispanic community affects obesity related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors among both students and…

  2. Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauer, Kit, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    Art in context of community is the theme of this newsletter. The theme is introduced in an editorial "Community-Enlarging the Definition" (Kit Grauer). Related articles include: (1) "The Children's Bridge is not Destroyed: Heart in the Middle of the World" (Emil Robert Tanay); (2) "Making Bridges: The Sock Doll…

  3. RUN COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    Christophe Delaere

    2013-01-01

    The focus of Run Coordination during LS1 is to monitor closely the advance of maintenance and upgrade activities, to smooth interactions between subsystems and to ensure that all are ready in time to resume operations in 2015 with a fully calibrated and understood detector. After electricity and cooling were restored to all equipment, at about the time of the last CMS week, recommissioning activities were resumed for all subsystems. On 7 October, DCS shifts began 24/7 to allow subsystems to remain on to facilitate operations. That culminated with the Global Run in November (GriN), which   took place as scheduled during the week of 4 November. The GriN has been the first centrally managed operation since the beginning of LS1, and involved all subdetectors but the Pixel Tracker presently in a lab upstairs. All nights were therefore dedicated to long stable runs with as many subdetectors as possible. Among the many achievements in that week, three items may be highlighted. First, the Strip...

  4. RUN COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Delaere

    2013-01-01

    Since the LHC ceased operations in February, a lot has been going on at Point 5, and Run Coordination continues to monitor closely the advance of maintenance and upgrade activities. In the last months, the Pixel detector was extracted and is now stored in the pixel lab in SX5; the beam pipe has been removed and ME1/1 removal has started. We regained access to the vactank and some work on the RBX of HB has started. Since mid-June, electricity and cooling are back in S1 and S2, allowing us to turn equipment back on, at least during the day. 24/7 shifts are not foreseen in the next weeks, and safety tours are mandatory to keep equipment on overnight, but re-commissioning activities are slowly being resumed. Given the (slight) delays accumulated in LS1, it was decided to merge the two global runs initially foreseen into a single exercise during the week of 4 November 2013. The aim of the global run is to check that we can run (parts of) CMS after several months switched off, with the new VME PCs installed, th...

  5. Spilt milk: an inter-sectoral partnership that failed to advance milk security for low-income lone mothers in Nova Scotia, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Lynn; Glanville, N Theresa; Hilchie-Pye, Andrea

    2011-03-01

    Canadian agricultural policy supports higher milk prices. Consequently, poor families lack sufficient funds to purchase adequate quantities of milk. Low-income lone mothers in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia suggested their preferred strategies for improved access to milk. We then built inter-sectoral support for a policy intervention to address their recommendations. Our research-to-action process led to a policy dialogue focusing on an electronic smart card that would permit the delivery of lower-priced milk to poor households. While all agreed that milk insecurity was an important issue, the project ultimately failed because of the entrenched positions of influential stakeholder groups.

  6. Knowledge coordination in distributed software management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, John Stouby; Mathiassen, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Software organizations are increasingly relying on cross-organizational and cross-border collaboration, requiring effective coordination of distributed knowledge. However, such coordination is challenging due to spatial separation, diverging communities-of-practice, and unevenly distributed...... communication breakdowns on recordings of their combined teleconferencing and real-time collaborative modeling. As a result, we offer theoretical propositions that explain how distributed software managers can deal with communication breakdowns and effectively coordinate knowledge through multimodal virtual...

  7. Program of Education for Community Coordination and Action in Warren County: What Kind of a County Do We Want Warren County To Be?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Donald H.; Wallerstedt, Jane

    A program initiated by Simpson College and assisted by a committee of representatives from Warren County, Iowa, to assist the population of the County to understand their community and its problems and set priorities in meeting these problems is reported. Two hundred key leaders, representative of the geographic, educational, economic, religious,…

  8. Observation of Online Communities: A Discussion of Online and Offline Observer Roles in Studying Development, Cooperation and Coordination in an Open Source Software Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sladjana V. Nørskov

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the application of observation to online settings with a special focus on observer roles. It draws on a study of online observation of a virtual community, i.e. an open source software (OSS community. The paper examines general and specific advantages and disadvantages of the observer roles in online settings by relating these roles to the same roles assumed in offline settings. The study suggests that under the right circumstances online and offline observation may benefit from being combined as they complement each other well. Quality issues and factors important to elicit trustworthy observational data from online study settings, such as OSS communities, are discussed. A proposition is made concerning how threats to credibility and transferability in relation to online observation (i.e. lack of richness and detail, risk of misunderstandings can be diminished, while maintaining the level of dependability (which is potentially high due to a greater degree of anonymity and "isolation" in online settings. The paper thus suggests that the less participative the researcher's online observer role is, the more s/he should consider introducing offline data collection techniques rather than adopting a more participative role in the observed online setting. This methodological discussion forms the basis for making a well-considered choice of online observer role rather than passively sliding into a role assigned by the setting. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs110358

  9. Are rehabilitation and/or care co-ordination interventions delivered in the community effective in reducing depression, facilitating participation and improving quality of life after stroke?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graven, Christine; Brock, Kim; Hill, Keith; Joubert, Lynette

    2011-01-01

    To conduct a systematic review to explore the effectiveness of community-based rehabilitation interventions delivered by allied health professionals and/or nursing staff in reducing depression, facilitating participation and improving health-related quality of life (HRQoL) post-inpatient stroke rehabilitation. A search was conducted in the databases of MEDLINE, PEDro, CINAHL and the Cochrane Library. Publications were classified into categories based on the type of the interventions. Best evidence synthesis and meta-analysis were utilised to determine the level of evidence. Fifty-four studies were included in the review, and divided into nine broad intervention categories. Meta-analysis demonstrated significant reduction in depression with exercise interventions (n = 137; effect estimate SMD: -2.03, 95%CI: -3.22, -0.85). Community-based interventions targeting participation and leisure domains showed moderate evidence for improvement in global participation measures and HRQoL. Comprehensive rehabilitation demonstrated limited evidence for depression and participation, and strong evidence for HRQoL. There is limited to moderate evidence supporting some rehabilitation interventions in affecting the outcomes of depression, participation and HRQoL post-stroke. Heterogeneity of the studies made evidence synthesis difficult. Further consideration needs to be given to the type and timing of outcome measures selected to represent the domains of participation and HRQoL.

  10. Community-based environmental management for malaria control: evidence from a small-scale intervention in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Marcia C; Tsuruta, Atsuko; Kanamori, Shogo; Kannady, Khadija; Mkude, Sixbert

    2009-04-08

    Historically, environmental management has brought important achievements in malaria control and overall improvements of health conditions. Currently, however, implementation is often considered not to be cost-effective. A community-based environmental management for malaria control was conducted in Dar es Salaam between 2005 and 2007. After community sensitization, two drains were cleaned followed by maintenance. This paper assessed the impact of the intervention on community awareness, prevalence of malaria infection, and Anopheles larval presence in drains. A survey was conducted in neighbourhoods adjacent to cleaned drains; for comparison, neighbourhoods adjacent to two drains treated with larvicides and two drains under no intervention were also surveyed. Data routinely collected by the Urban Malaria Control Programme were also used. Diverse impacts were evaluated through comparison of means, odds ratios (OR), logistic regression, and time trends calculated by moving averages. Individual awareness of health risks and intervention goals were significantly higher among sensitized neighbourhoods. A reduction in the odds of malaria infection during the post-cleaning period in intervention neighbourhoods was observed when compared to the pre-cleaning period (OR = 0.12, 95% CI 0.05-0.3, p water was flowing at normal velocity). A three-month moving average of the percentage of water habitats in that drain containing pupae and/or Anopheles larvae indicated a decline in larval density. In the other drain, lack of proper resources and local commitment limited success. Although environmental management was historically coordinated by authoritarian/colonial regimes or by industries/corporations, its successful implementation as part of an integrated vector management framework for malaria control under democratic governments can be possible if four conditions are observed: political will and commitment, community sensitization and participation, provision of financial

  11. Intersectoral Action to Enhance the Social Inclusion of Socially Vulnerable Youth through Sport: An Exploration of the Elements of Successful Partnerships between Youth Work Organisations and Local Sports Clubs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Hermens

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Research shows that participation in sport is positively related to self-esteem, self-regulation skills, and social inclusion. As socially vulnerable youngsters participate less frequently in sports activities than their average peers, youth work organisations try to guide their clients (i.e., socially vulnerable youngsters to local sports clubs and inclusive sports activities. Inclusive sports activities, however, cannot be provided by youth work organisations alone. Therefore, in the Netherlands, intersectoral action involving both youth work organisations and local sports clubs has emerged. Because youth workers and stakeholders in local sports clubs are not used to collaborating with each other, we explored the factors that contribute to the quality and performance of such intersectoral actions. On the basis of five open interviews with youth workers and three focus groups with stakeholders in local sports clubs, we described factors relating to the organisation of intersectoral action among youth workers and local sports clubs that are preconditions for the success of this specific type of intersectoral action.

  12. [Potential of Information and Communications Technology to Improve Intersectoral Processes of Care: A Case Study of the Specialised Outpatient Palliative Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Delpho, C; Schubert, H-J

    2015-09-01

    The added value of information and communications technologies should be demonstrated precisely in such areas of care in which the importance of intersectoral and interdisciplinary cooperation is particularly high. In the context of the accompanying research of a supply concept for palliative care patients, the potential of a digital documentation process was comparatively analysed with the conventional paper-based workflow. Data were collected in the form of a multi-methodological approach and processed for the project in 3 stages: (1) Development and analysis of a palliative care process with the focus on all relevant steps of documentation. (2) Questionnaire design and the comparative mapping of specific process times. (3) Sampling, selection, and analysis of patient records and their derivable insights of process iterations. With the use of ICT, the treatment time per patient is reduced by up to 53% and achieves a reduction in costs and workload by up to 901 min. The result of an up to 213% increase in the number of patient contacts allows a higher continuity of care. Although the 16% increase in documentation loyalty improves the usability of cross-team documented information, it partially extends the workload on the level of individual actors. By using a digital health record around 31% more patients could be treated with the same staffing ratio. The multi-stage analysis of the palliative care process showed that ICT has a decisive influence on the process dimension of intersectoral cooperation. Due to favourable organisational conditions the pioneering work of palliative care also provides important guidance for a successful use of ICT technologies in the context of innovative forms of care. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Co-location as a Driver for Cross-Sectoral Collaboration with General Practitioners as Coordinators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheele, Christian Elling; Vrangbæk, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    The issue of integrated care and inter-sectoral collaboration is on the health policy agenda in many countries. Yet, there is limited knowledge about the effects of the different policy instruments used to achieve this. This paper studies co-location as a driver for cross-sectoral collaboration...... with general practitioners (GPs) acting as coordinators in a municipal health centre. The purpose of the health centre, which is staffed by health professionals from municipal, regional and private sectors, is to provide primary health services to the citizens of the municipality. Co......-locating these professionals is supposed to benefit e.g., elder citizens and patients with chronic diseases who frequently require services from health professionals across administrative sectors. Methodologically, the analysis is based on qualitative data in the form of semi-structured interviews with the health...

  14. Determining the competences of community based workers for disability-inclusive development in rural areas of South Africa, Botswana and Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, Theresa; van Pletzen, Ermien; Booyens, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    system' and 'promoting participation in economic activities'. Third, coordinated and efficient intersectoral management systems involved 'gaining community and professional recognition' and the ability to coordinate efforts ('it's not a one-man show'). The CDWs spoke of their commitment to fighting the inequities and social injustices that persons with disabilities experienced. They facilitate change and manage the multiple transitions experienced by the families at different stages of the disabled person's development. Disability-inclusive development embraces a philosophy of social inclusion and a set of values that seeks to protect the human dignity and rights of persons with disabilities. It requires a workforce equipped with skills to work intersectorally and in a cross-disciplinary manner in order to operationalise the community-based rehabilitation guidelines that are designed to promote delivery of services in remote and rural areas. CDWs potentially have a unique set of competencies that enables them to facilitate disability-inclusive community development in rural areas. The themes reveal how the CDWs contribute to building relationships that restore the humanity and dignity of persons with disabilities in their family and community. These competencies draw from different disciplines which necessitates recognition of the CDWs as a cross-disciplinary profession.

  15. Coordinating Filtering Strategies in Cooperative Agent Communities

    OpenAIRE

    Milosevic, Dragan

    2006-01-01

    Eine Folge der gegenwärtigen Informationsflut ist, dass die Benutzer die gewünschten Informationen in verschiedenen Quellen suchen müssen. Sie haben dabei große Schwierigkeiten ihr Informationsbedürfnis formal zu beschreiben. Folglich führen selten manuell erstellte Anfragen an ein Suchsystem zu befriedigenden Ergebnissen. Ein kritischer Faktor bei der Suche nach gewünschten Informationen ist die Antwortzeit des Systems, d.h. die Zeitspanne zwischen dem Absenden einer Suchanfrage und der Präs...

  16. Explicitly computing geodetic coordinates from Cartesian coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Huaien

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents a new form of quartic equation based on Lagrange's extremum law and a Groebner basis under the constraint that the geodetic height is the shortest distance between a given point and the reference ellipsoid. A very explicit and concise formulae of the quartic equation by Ferrari's line is found, which avoids the need of a good starting guess for iterative methods. A new explicit algorithm is then proposed to compute geodetic coordinates from Cartesian coordinates. The convergence region of the algorithm is investigated and the corresponding correct solution is given. Lastly, the algorithm is validated with numerical experiments.

  17. [Intersectoral, convergent and sustainable actions: the challenges of the "Bolsa Família" program in Manguinhos shantytown in Rio de Janeiro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Rosana; Coelho, Angela Virginia; Nogueira, Milena Ferreira; Bocca, Cláudia

    2011-11-01

    Some studies have revealed the impact of the family welfare allowance based on the fulfillment of certain conditions on improving living conditions and access to health and education services in different countries. However, gaps persist relating to the evaluation of the benefits of such programs among the groups that have greater difficulty in gaining access to public services or advances in the quality of education and school performance. Moreover, there is limited evidence of adequacy of the program to the respective contexts of implementation, levels of adhesion and local cooperation and strategies adopted for integration with other social policy programs. The scope of this article is to discuss the findings of the study of the implementation of the "Bolsa Familia" in the Manguinhos shantytown area in Rio de Janeiro conducted in 2007 and 2008 based on semi-structured interviews with program officials and local stakeholders. In conclusion, the study shows that the sustainability of "Bolsa Familia" actions to reduce poverty and promote health equity calls for strengthening the vertical and horizontal communication channels between government levels, public managers and civil associations, recognition of the complexity of the local social demands and an intersectoral agenda.

  18. Tracking the genealogy of CO{sub 2} emissions in the electricity sector: An intersectoral approach applied to the Spanish case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarancon Moran, Miguel Angel; Albinana, Fernando Callejas [Faculty of Law and Business, Universidad de Castilla - La Mancha, Ronda de Toledo s/n, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Del Rio, Pablo [Facultad of Social Sciences and Law, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, C/Cobertizo de S. Pedro Martir s/n, Toledo 45071 (Spain)

    2008-06-15

    This paper analyses the factors leading to CO{sub 2} emissions in the Spanish electricity generation sector in order to propose effective mitigation policies aimed at tackling those emissions. Traditionally, two broad categories of those factors have been considered in the literature: those related to the supply of electricity (technological features of the sector) and those related to the level of economic activity (demand factors). This paper focuses on an additional element, which has usually been neglected, the structural factor, which refers to the set of intersectoral transactions (related to the technologies used in other productive sectors) which connect, in either a direct or an indirect way, the general economic activity with the supply of electricity and, thus, with the emissions of the electricity generation sector. This analysis allows us to identify the so-called 'sectors structurally responsible for emissions' (SSER), whose production functions involve transactions which connect the demand for goods and services with the emissions of the electricity generation sector. The methodology is based on an input-output approach and a sensitivity analysis. The paper shows that there are structural rigidities, deeply ingrained within the economic system, which lead to emissions from the electricity generation sector for which this sector cannot be held responsible. These rigidities limit the effectiveness of policies aimed at emissions mitigation in this sector. (author)

  19. The curvature coordinate system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almegaard, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    The paper describes a concept for a curvature coordinate system on regular curved surfaces from which faceted surfaces with plane quadrangular facets can be designed. The lines of curvature are used as parametric lines for the curvature coordinate system on the surface. A new conjugate set of lin...

  20. Coordinate measuring machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, Leonardo

    This document is used in connection with three exercises of 2 hours duration as a part of the course GEOMETRICAL METROLOGY AND MACHINE TESTING. The exercises concern three aspects of coordinate measuring: 1) Measuring and verification of tolerances on coordinate measuring machines, 2) Traceabilit...... and uncertainty during coordinate measurements, 3) Digitalisation and Reverse Engineering. This document contains a short description of each step in the exercise and schemes with room for taking notes of the results.......This document is used in connection with three exercises of 2 hours duration as a part of the course GEOMETRICAL METROLOGY AND MACHINE TESTING. The exercises concern three aspects of coordinate measuring: 1) Measuring and verification of tolerances on coordinate measuring machines, 2) Traceability...

  1. Towards an International Polar Data Coordination Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P L Pulsifer

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Data management is integral to sound polar science. Through analysis of documents reporting on meetings of the Arctic data management community, a set of priorities and strategies are identified. These include the need to improve data sharing, make use of existing resources, and better engage stakeholders. Network theory is applied to a preliminary inventory of polar and global data management actors to improve understanding of the emerging community of practice. Under the name the Arctic Data Coordination Network, we propose a model network that can support the community in achieving their goals through improving connectivity between existing actors.

  2. Development and implementation of FRESH--a post-secondary nutrition education program incorporating population strategies, experiential learning and intersectoral partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, June I; Zok, Anne V; Quenneville, Emily P M; Dworatzek, Paula D N

    2014-07-11

    The FRESH (Food Resources and Education for Student Health) peer nutrition education program engages undergraduate and graduate students in experiential learning to improve the campus food and nutrition environment and promote healthy behaviours among university students. University students in general, and graduate and undergraduate food and nutrition students as program designers and peer educators, respectively. Large university campus in southwestern Ontario. A peer nutrition education program, utilizing multiple population strategies and intersectoral partnerships, was created by and for university students with faculty and food service personnel as mentors. The population health strategies employed were building awareness and program branding; developing personal skills through peer nutrition education and hands-on cooking demonstrations; and creating supportive environments through incentive programs for fruit and dairy as well as point-of-purchase menu labelling. The program has reached students, staff and faculty through over 60 interactive FRESH displays and education sessions. Website and social media have also had a significant reach with over 4,000 website visits and 277 Facebook "likes". FRESH has also improved the food environment for over 5,000 students in residence, e.g., 1,931 FRESH Fruit/Dairy Cards have been returned for free fruit/milk cartons. Graduate students in Foods and Nutrition continue to participate every year (cumulative n=60) in ongoing program development. Peer educators have developed enhanced leadership, public speaking and group facilitation skills, and the ability to creatively apply what they have learned in the classroom to new contexts. Increased nutrition knowledge and an improved food environment could, over the long term, support improved university student health.

  3. Regional transit coordination guidebook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Constant growth in rural areas and extensive suburban development have contributed to increasingly more people needing seamless and adequate public transportation into and from nearby cities. Coordinating existing services or determining the need for...

  4. Supercritical Airfoil Coordinates

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Rectangular Supercritical Wing (Ricketts) - design and measured locations are provided in an Excel file RSW_airfoil_coordinates_ricketts.xls . One sheet is with Non...

  5. Developmental coordination disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developmental coordination disorder can lead to: Learning problems Low self-esteem resulting from poor ability at sports and teasing by other children Repeated injuries Weight gain as a result of not wanting to participate ...

  6. Environmental Compliance Issue Coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    An order to establish the Department of Energy (DOE) requirements for coordination of significant environmental compliance issues to ensure timely development and consistent application of Departmental environmental policy and guidance

  7. Data Management Coordinators (DMC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Regional Data Management Coordinators (DMCs) were identified to serve as the primary contact for each region for all Water Quality Framework activities. They will facilitate and communicate information to the necessary individuals at the region and tra

  8. Coordinating Work with Groupware

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pors, Jens Kaaber; Simonsen, Jesper

    2003-01-01

    One important goal of employing groupware is to make possible complex collaboration between geographically distributed groups. This requires a dual transformation of both technology and work practice. The challenge is to re­duce the complexity of the coordination work by successfully inte....... Using the CSCW frame­work of coordination mechanisms, we have elicited six general factors influencing the integration of the groupware application in two situations....

  9. Luminescent lanthanide coordination polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, L.; Evans, O.R.; Foxman, B.M.; Lin, W.

    1999-12-13

    One-dimensional lanthanide coordination polymers with the formula Ln(isonicotinate){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} (Ln = Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Tb; 1a-f) were synthesized by treating nitrate or perchlorate salts of Ln(III) with 4-pyridinecarboxaldehyde under hydro(solvo)thermal conditions. Single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction studies indicate that these lanthanide coordination polymers adopt two different structures. While Ce(III), Pr(III), and Nd(III) complexes adopt a chain structure with alternating Ln-(carboxylate){sub 2}-Ln and Ln-(carboxylate){sub 4}-Ln linkages, Sm(III), Eu(III), and Tb(III) complexes have a doubly carboxylate-bridged infinite-chain structure with one chelating carboxylate group on each metal center. In both structures, the lanthanide centers also bind to two water molecules to yield an eight-coordinate, square antiprismatic geometry. The pyridine nitrogen atoms of the isonicotinate groups do not coordinate to the metal centers in these lanthanide(III) complexes; instead, they direct the formation of Ln(III) coordination polymers via hydrogen bonding with coordinated water molecules. Photoluminescence measurements show that Tb(isonicotinate){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} is highly emissive at room temperature with a quantum yield of {approximately}90%. These results indicate that highly luminescent lanthanide coordination polymers can be assembled using a combination of coordination and hydrogen bonds. Crystal data for 1a: monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}/c, a = 9.712(2) {angstrom}, b = 19.833(4) {angstrom}, c = 11.616(2) {angstrom}, {beta} = 111.89(3){degree}, Z = 4. Crystal data for 1f: monoclinic space group C2/c, a = 20.253(4) {angstrom}, b = 11.584(2) {angstrom}, c = 9.839(2) {angstrom}, {beta} = 115.64(3){degree}, Z = 8.

  10. Coordinate-invariant regularization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halpern, M.B.

    1987-01-01

    A general phase-space framework for coordinate-invariant regularization is given. The development is geometric, with all regularization contained in regularized DeWitt Superstructures on field deformations. Parallel development of invariant coordinate-space regularization is obtained by regularized functional integration of the momenta. As representative examples of the general formulation, the regularized general non-linear sigma model and regularized quantum gravity are discussed. copyright 1987 Academic Press, Inc

  11. Impacts of dialysis transportation on Florida's coordinated public transportation programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    The National Center for Transit Research (NCTR) at the University of South Florida (USF) collected quantitative and qualitative data from Community Transportation Coordinators (CTCs) throughout Florida. An online survey and a series of personal inter...

  12. Magnetic Coordinate Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laundal, K. M.; Richmond, A. D.

    2017-03-01

    Geospace phenomena such as the aurora, plasma motion, ionospheric currents and associated magnetic field disturbances are highly organized by Earth's main magnetic field. This is due to the fact that the charged particles that comprise space plasma can move almost freely along magnetic field lines, but not across them. For this reason it is sensible to present such phenomena relative to Earth's magnetic field. A large variety of magnetic coordinate systems exist, designed for different purposes and regions, ranging from the magnetopause to the ionosphere. In this paper we review the most common magnetic coordinate systems and describe how they are defined, where they are used, and how to convert between them. The definitions are presented based on the spherical harmonic expansion coefficients of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) and, in some of the coordinate systems, the position of the Sun which we show how to calculate from the time and date. The most detailed coordinate systems take the full IGRF into account and define magnetic latitude and longitude such that they are constant along field lines. These coordinate systems, which are useful at ionospheric altitudes, are non-orthogonal. We show how to handle vectors and vector calculus in such coordinates, and discuss how systematic errors may appear if this is not done correctly.

  13. [Binocular coordination during reading].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassou, L; Granié, M; Pugh, A K; Morucci, J P

    1992-01-01

    Is there an effect on binocular coordination during reading of oculomotor imbalance (heterophoria, strabismus and inadequate convergence) and of functional lateral characteristics (eye preference and perceptually privileged visual laterality)? Recordings of the binocular eye-movements of ten-year-old children show that oculomotor imbalances occur most often among children whose left visual perceptual channel is privileged, and that these subjects can present optomotor dissociation and manifest lack of motor coordination. Close binocular motor coordination is far from being the norm in reading. The faster reader displays saccades of differing spatial amplitude and the slower reader an oculomotor hyperactivity, especially during fixations. The recording of binocular movements in reading appears to be an excellent means of diagnosing difficulties related to visual laterality and to problems associated with oculomotor imbalance.

  14. Distribution Loss Reduction by Household Consumption Coordination in Smart Grids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juelsgaard, Morten; Andersen, Palle; Wisniewski, Rafal

    2014-01-01

    for coordinating consumption of electrical energy within the community, with the purpose of reducing grid loading and active power losses. For this we present a simplified model of the electrical grid, including system losses and capacity constraints. Coordination is performed in a distributed fashion, where each...... are obeyed. These objectives are enforced by coordinating consumers through a nonlinear penalty on power consumption. We present simulation test-cases, illustrating that significant reduction of active losses, can be obtained by such coordination. The distributed optimization algorithm employs...

  15. Minimization of Distribution Grid Losses by Consumption Coordination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juelsgaard, Morten; Andersen, Palle; Wisniewski, Rafal

    2013-01-01

    for coordinating consumption of electrical energy within the community, with the purpose of reducing grid loading and active power losses. For this we present a simplified model of the electrical grid, including system losses and capacity constraints. Coordination is performed in a distributed fashion, where each...... are obeyed. These objectives are enforced by coordinating consumers through nonlinear tariffs on power consumption. We present simulation test-cases, illustrating that significant reduction of active losses, can be obtained by such coordination. The distributed optimization algorithm, employs the alternating...

  16. Environment-friendly type energy and coordinated community development project. Feasibility study for industrialization of high efficiency waste-fired power generation system (industrial refuse derived fuel and gas turbine combined type); Kankyo chowagata energy community keisei sokushin. Kokoritsu haikibutsu hatsuden (sangyo RDF GT fukugogata) jigyoka FS chosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    High efficiency power generation, which is useful for promoting the environment-friendly type energy and coordinated community, is investigated by combining a steam turbine power generation system using the PS-RDF (paper sludge-refuse derived fuel) and a gas turbine (GT) combined cycle. Industrialization plan for processing PS in low cost has been made to ensure the profitability by participating the wholesale power supply under the law of electric power industry. This combined system is similar to the so-called super power generation using municipal garbage, but the lower temperature of steam from GT waste heat boilers (WHB) is super-heated by the flue gas from RDF boiler, which is called advanced power generation system (A.S.S.). The total power generation capacity is 149,000 kW, which consists of three 35,000 kW units of GT and one 44,000 kW unit of steam turbine. When comparing the combined system (A.S.S.) and usual one with the independent installation of the RDF steam power generation system and a GT combined cycle, the A.S.S. provides the repowering efficiency of 7,600 kW output with exactly the same quantity of fuel input as usual one. 71 figs., 31 tabs.

  17. Quantifying linguistic coordination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fusaroli, Riccardo; Tylén, Kristian

    task (Bahrami et al 2010, Fusaroli et al. 2012) we extend to linguistic coordination dynamical measures of recurrence employed in the analysis of sensorimotor coordination (such as heart-rate (Konvalinka et al 2011), postural sway (Shockley 2005) and eye-movements (Dale, Richardson and Kirkham 2012......). We employ nominal recurrence analysis (Orsucci et al 2005, Dale et al 2011) on the decision-making conversations between the participants. We report strong correlations between various indexes of recurrence and collective performance. We argue this method allows us to quantify the qualities...

  18. Assessing the impacts of 1.5 °C global warming – simulation protocol of the Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project (ISIMIP2b

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Frieler

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In Paris, France, December 2015, the Conference of the Parties (COP to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC invited the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC to provide a special report in 2018 on the impacts of global warming of 1.5 °C above pre-industrial levels and related global greenhouse gas emission pathways. In Nairobi, Kenya, April 2016, the IPCC panel accepted the invitation. Here we describe the response devised within the Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project (ISIMIP to provide tailored, cross-sectorally consistent impact projections to broaden the scientific basis for the report. The simulation protocol is designed to allow for (1 separation of the impacts of historical warming starting from pre-industrial conditions from impacts of other drivers such as historical land-use changes (based on pre-industrial and historical impact model simulations; (2 quantification of the impacts of additional warming up to 1.5 °C, including a potential overshoot and long-term impacts up to 2299, and comparison to higher levels of global mean temperature change (based on the low-emissions Representative Concentration Pathway RCP2.6 and a no-mitigation pathway RCP6.0 with socio-economic conditions fixed at 2005 levels; and (3 assessment of the climate effects based on the same climate scenarios while accounting for simultaneous changes in socio-economic conditions following the middle-of-the-road Shared Socioeconomic Pathway (SSP2, Fricko et al., 2016 and in particular differential bioenergy requirements associated with the transformation of the energy system to comply with RCP2.6 compared to RCP6.0. With the aim of providing the scientific basis for an aggregation of impacts across sectors and analysis of cross-sectoral interactions that may dampen or amplify sectoral impacts, the protocol is designed to facilitate consistent impact projections from a range of impact models across

  19. Assessing the impacts of 1.5°C of global warming - The Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project (ISIMIP) approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frieler, Katja; Warszawski, Lila; Zhao, Fang

    2017-04-01

    In Paris, France, December 2015 the Conference of Parties (COP) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) invited the IPCC to provide a "special report in 2018 on the impacts of global warming of 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels and related global greenhouse gas emission pathways". In Nairobi, Kenya, April 2016 the IPCC panel accepted the invitation. Here we describe the model simulations planned within the Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project (ISIMIP) to address the request by providing tailored cross-sectoral consistent impacts projections. The protocol is designed to allow for 1) a separation of the impacts of the historical warming starting from pre-industrial conditions from other human drivers such as historical land use changes (based on pre-industrial and historical impact model simulations), 2) a quantification of the effects of an additional warming to 1.5°C including a potential overshoot and long term effects up to 2300 in comparison to a no-mitigation scenario (based on the low emissions Representative Concentration Pathway RCP2.6 and a no-mitigation scenario RCP6.0) keeping socio-economic conditions fixed at year 2005 levels, and 3) an assessment of the climate effects based on the same climate scenarios but accounting for parallel changes in socio-economic conditions following the middle of the road Shared Socioeconomic Pathway (SSP2) and differential bio-energy requirements associated with the transformation of the energy system to reach RCP2.6 compared to RCP6.0. To provide the scientific basis for an aggregation of impacts across sectors and an analysis of cross-sectoral interactions potentially damping or amplifying sectoral impacts the protocol is designed to provide consistent impacts projections across a range of impact models from different sectors (global and regional hydrological models, global gridded crop models, global vegetation models, regional forestry models, global and regional marine

  20. Assessing the impacts of 1.5 °C global warming - simulation protocol of the Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project (ISIMIP2b)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frieler, Katja; Lange, Stefan; Piontek, Franziska; Reyer, Christopher P. O.; Schewe, Jacob; Warszawski, Lila; Zhao, Fang; Chini, Louise; Denvil, Sebastien; Emanuel, Kerry; Geiger, Tobias; Halladay, Kate; Hurtt, George; Mengel, Matthias; Murakami, Daisuke; Ostberg, Sebastian; Popp, Alexander; Riva, Riccardo; Stevanovic, Miodrag; Suzuki, Tatsuo; Volkholz, Jan; Burke, Eleanor; Ciais, Philippe; Ebi, Kristie; Eddy, Tyler D.; Elliott, Joshua; Galbraith, Eric; Gosling, Simon N.; Hattermann, Fred; Hickler, Thomas; Hinkel, Jochen; Hof, Christian; Huber, Veronika; Jägermeyr, Jonas; Krysanova, Valentina; Marcé, Rafael; Müller Schmied, Hannes; Mouratiadou, Ioanna; Pierson, Don; Tittensor, Derek P.; Vautard, Robert; van Vliet, Michelle; Biber, Matthias F.; Betts, Richard A.; Bodirsky, Benjamin Leon; Deryng, Delphine; Frolking, Steve; Jones, Chris D.; Lotze, Heike K.; Lotze-Campen, Hermann; Sahajpal, Ritvik; Thonicke, Kirsten; Tian, Hanqin; Yamagata, Yoshiki

    2017-11-01

    In Paris, France, December 2015, the Conference of the Parties (COP) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) invited the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) to provide a special report in 2018 on the impacts of global warming of 1.5 °C above pre-industrial levels and related global greenhouse gas emission pathways. In Nairobi, Kenya, April 2016, the IPCC panel accepted the invitation. Here we describe the response devised within the Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project (ISIMIP) to provide tailored, cross-sectorally consistent impact projections to broaden the scientific basis for the report. The simulation protocol is designed to allow for (1) separation of the impacts of historical warming starting from pre-industrial conditions from impacts of other drivers such as historical land-use changes (based on pre-industrial and historical impact model simulations); (2) quantification of the impacts of additional warming up to 1.5 °C, including a potential overshoot and long-term impacts up to 2299, and comparison to higher levels of global mean temperature change (based on the low-emissions Representative Concentration Pathway RCP2.6 and a no-mitigation pathway RCP6.0) with socio-economic conditions fixed at 2005 levels; and (3) assessment of the climate effects based on the same climate scenarios while accounting for simultaneous changes in socio-economic conditions following the middle-of-the-road Shared Socioeconomic Pathway (SSP2, Fricko et al., 2016) and in particular differential bioenergy requirements associated with the transformation of the energy system to comply with RCP2.6 compared to RCP6.0. With the aim of providing the scientific basis for an aggregation of impacts across sectors and analysis of cross-sectoral interactions that may dampen or amplify sectoral impacts, the protocol is designed to facilitate consistent impact projections from a range of impact models across different sectors (global

  1. Polish Higher Education: Intersectoral Distinctiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musial, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    This study analyzes degrees of differences between the private and public sectors of Polish higher education. It finds them to be strong: Polish private institutions function very differently from Polish public institutions and these differences correspond with those found in the literature on higher education elsewhere in the world. Polish…

  2. Dimensions of Organizational Coordination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Andreas Schmidt; Aldewereld, Huib; Dignum, Virginia

    2013-01-01

    be supported to include organizational objectives and constraints into their reasoning processes by considering two alternatives: agent reasoning and middleware regulation. We show how agents can use an organizational specification to achieve organizational objectives by delegating and coordinating...... their activities with other agents in the society, using the GOAL agent programming language and the OperA organizational model....

  3. Reusability of coordination programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Arbab (Farhad); C.L. Blom (Kees); F.J. Burger (Freek); C.T.H. Everaars (Kees)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractIsolating computation and communication concerns into separate pure computation and pure coordination modules enhances modularity, understandability, and reusability of parallel and/or distributed software. This can be achieved by moving communication primitives (such as SendMessage and

  4. [Civilian-military coordination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Montravel, G

    2002-01-01

    Current humanitarian emergencies create complex, mutidimensional situations that stimulate simultaneous responses from a wide variety of sources including governments, non-governmental organizations (NGO), United Nations agencies, and private individuals. As a result, it has become essential to establish a coherent framework in which each actor can contribute promptly and effectively to the overall effort. This is the role of the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs. Regardless of the circumstances and level of coordination, cooperation and collaboration between humanitarian and military personnel, it is necessary to bear in mind their objectives. The purpose of humanitarian action is to reduce human suffering. The purpose of military intervention is to stop warfare. The author of this article will discuss the three major obstacles to civilian-military coordination (strategic, tactical, and operational). Operations cannot be conducted smoothly and differences cannot be ironed out without mutual respect between the two parties, an explicit definition of their respective duties and responsibilities, a clear understanding of their cultural differences, and the presence of an organization and facilities for coordination and arbitrage by a neutral referee.

  5. Coordination of hand shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesyna, Colin; Pundi, Krishna; Flanders, Martha

    2011-03-09

    The neural control of hand movement involves coordination of the sensory, motor, and memory systems. Recent studies have documented the motor coordinates for hand shape, but less is known about the corresponding patterns of somatosensory activity. To initiate this line of investigation, the present study characterized the sense of hand shape by evaluating the influence of differences in the amount of grasping or twisting force, and differences in forearm orientation. Human subjects were asked to use the left hand to report the perceived shape of the right hand. In the first experiment, six commonly grasped items were arranged on the table in front of the subject: bottle, doorknob, egg, notebook, carton, and pan. With eyes closed, subjects used the right hand to lightly touch, forcefully support, or imagine holding each object, while 15 joint angles were measured in each hand with a pair of wired gloves. The forces introduced by supporting or twisting did not influence the perceptual report of hand shape, but for most objects, the report was distorted in a consistent manner by differences in forearm orientation. Subjects appeared to adjust the intrinsic joint angles of the left hand, as well as the left wrist posture, so as to maintain the imagined object in its proper spatial orientation. In a second experiment, this result was largely replicated with unfamiliar objects. Thus, somatosensory and motor information appear to be coordinated in an object-based, spatial-coordinate system, sensitive to orientation relative to gravitational forces, but invariant to grasp forcefulness.

  6. Block coordination copolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Kyoung Moo; Wong-Foy, Antek G; Matzger, Adam J; Benin, Annabelle I; Willis, Richard R

    2012-11-13

    The present invention provides compositions of crystalline coordination copolymers wherein multiple organic molecules are assembled to produce porous framework materials with layered or core-shell structures. These materials are synthesized by sequential growth techniques such as the seed growth technique. In addition, the invention provides a simple procedure for controlling functionality.

  7. Coordination failure caused by sunspots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beugnot, Julie; Gürgüç, Zeynep; Øvlisen, Frederik Roose

    2012-01-01

    on the efficient equilibrium, we consider sunspots as a potential reason for coordination failure. We conduct an experiment with a three player 2x2x2 game in which coordination on the efficient equilibrium is easy and should normally occur. In the control session, we find almost perfect coordination on the payoff......-dominant equilibrium, but in the sunspot treatment, dis-coordination is frequent. Sunspots lead to significant inefficiency, and we conclude that sunspots can indeed cause coordination failure....

  8. Improving Project Manufacturing Coordination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korpivaara Ville

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research is to develop firms’ project manufacturing coordination. The development will be made by centralizing the manufacturing information flows in one system. To be able to centralize information, a deep user need assessment is required. After user needs have been identified, the existing system will be developed to match these needs. The theoretical background is achieved through exploring the literature of project manufacturing, development project success factors and different frameworks and tools for development project execution. The focus of this research is rather in customer need assessment than in system’s technical expertise. To ensure the deep understanding of customer needs this study is executed by action research method. As a result of this research the information system for project manufacturing coordination was developed to respond revealed needs of the stakeholders. The new system improves the quality of the manufacturing information, eliminates waste in manufacturing coordination processes and offers a better visibility to the project manufacturing. Hence it provides a solid base for the further development of project manufacturing.

  9. Universal mechatronics coordinator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, Patrick F.

    1999-11-01

    Mechatronic systems incorporate multiple actuators and sensor which must be properly coordinated to achieve the desired system functionality. Many mechatronic systems are designed as one-of-a-kind custom projects without consideration for facilitating future system or alterations and extensions to the current syste. Thus, subsequent changes to the system are slow, different, and costly. It has become apparent that manufacturing processes, and thus the mechatronics which embody them, need to be agile in order to more quickly and easily respond to changing customer demands or market pressures. To achieve agility, both the hardware and software of the system need to be designed such that the creation of new system and the alteration and extension of current system is fast and easy. This paper describes the design of a Universal Mechatronics Coordinator (UMC) which facilitates agile setup and changeover of coordination software for mechatronic systems. The UMC is capable of sequencing continuous and discrete actions that are programmed as stimulus-response pairs, as state machines, or a combination of the two. It facilitates the modular, reusable programing of continuous actions such as servo control algorithms, data collection code, and safety checking routines; and discrete actions such as reporting achieved states, and turning on/off binary devices. The UMC has been applied to the control of a z- theta assembly robot for the Minifactory project and is applicable to a spectrum of widely differing mechatronic systems.

  10. Coordinating towards a Common Good

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Francisco C.; Pacheco, Jorge M.

    2010-09-01

    Throughout their life, humans often engage in collective endeavors ranging from family related issues to global warming. In all cases, the tragedy of the commons threatens the possibility of reaching the optimal solution associated with global cooperation, a scenario predicted by theory and demonstrated by many experiments. Using the toolbox of evolutionary game theory, I will address two important aspects of evolutionary dynamics that have been neglected so far in the context of public goods games and evolution of cooperation. On one hand, the fact that often there is a threshold above which a public good is reached [1, 2]. On the other hand, the fact that individuals often participate in several games, related to the their social context and pattern of social ties, defined by a social network [3, 4, 5]. In the first case, the existence of a threshold above which collective action is materialized dictates a rich pattern of evolutionary dynamics where the direction of natural selection can be inverted compared to standard expectations. Scenarios of defector dominance, pure coordination or coexistence may arise simultaneously. Both finite and infinite population models are analyzed. In networked games, cooperation blooms whenever the act of contributing is more important than the effort contributed. In particular, the heterogeneous nature of social networks naturally induces a symmetry breaking of the dilemmas of cooperation, as contributions made by cooperators may become contingent on the social context in which the individual is embedded. This diversity in context provides an advantage to cooperators, which is particularly strong when both wealth and social ties follow a power-law distribution, providing clues on the self-organization of social communities. Finally, in both situations, it can be shown that individuals no longer play a defection dominance dilemma, but effectively engage in a general N-person coordination game. Even if locally defection may seem

  11. Coordinating International Response to Emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bice, S. D.

    2007-01-01

    Pandemic disease, natural disasters and terrorism can affect thousands of people in a relatively short period of time anywhere in the world. Our recent international experience with hurricanes, earthquakes, tsunamis and infectious diseases (AIDS, TB and highly pathogenic avian influenza) show us that we must respond with a coordinated approach or we will fail the very people we intend to help. Nations from around the world are often eager to send assistance to the site of a disaster, but coordinating the incoming aid is more often flawed and imprecise than it must be in order to save lives and mitigate suffering. How can any one country, suffering from a horrendous calamity coordinate the incoming aid from around the world? Can any one agency hope to coordinate the myriad nation's response let alone that of the hundreds of non-governmental organizations? Currently, the answer is sadly, no. The purpose of this presentation is not to recommend one over the many international bodies which claim to oversee humanitarian assistance; the purpose of this presentation is to discuss the elements of only one aspect of the overall response effort: public health and medical response coordination. Public health response is of course different than a purely medical response. Traditionally, in a natural disaster, immediate public health concerns center around water, sewerage/waste disposal, potential for disease outbreaks, etc, whereas medical response concentrates on triage, saving those who can be saved, patching up the injured, and to a lesser extent, primary care to the survivors. In order to avoid political controversy, this presentation will use the example of Hurricane Iniki in Hawaii, September 1992, to illustrate key concepts. The State of Hawaii is no stranger to natural disasters. Their emergency response mechanisms are well honed, exercised and quite capable. However, the local community leaders on Kauai Island went thru each of the following phases before they

  12. Coordinator, Translation Services | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Coordinator, Translation Services coordinates the overall operations of the ... services in IDRC by acting as the main resource person for internal clients ... all operational issues in order to ensure good quality products delivered on time.

  13. European Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-05-01

    The European Community was established in 1951 to reconcile France and Germany after World War II and to make possible the eventual federation of Europe. By 1986, there were 12 member countries: France, Italy, Belgium, the Federal Republic of Germany, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Denmark, Ireland, the United Kingdom, Greece, Spain, and Portugal. Principal areas of concern are internal and external trade, agriculture, monetary coordination, fisheries, common industrial and commercial policies, assistance, science and research, and common social and regional policies. The European Community has a budget of US$34.035 billion/year, funded by customs duties and 1.4% of each member's value-added tax. The treaties establishing the European Community call for members to form a common market, a common customs tariff, and common agricultural, transport, economic, and nuclear policies. Major European Community institutions include the Commission, Council of Ministers, European Parliament, Court of Justice, and Economic and Social Committee. The Community is the world's largest trading unit, accounting for 15% of world trade. The 2 main goals of the Community's industrial policy are to create an open internal market and to promote technological innovation in order to improve international competitiveness. The European Community aims to contribute to the economic and social development of Third World countries as well.

  14. Recursive Advice for Coordination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terepeta, Michal Tomasz; Nielson, Hanne Riis; Nielson, Flemming

    2012-01-01

    Aspect-oriented programming is a programming paradigm that is often praised for the ability to create modular software and separate cross-cutting concerns. Recently aspects have been also considered in the context of coordination languages, offering similar advantages. However, introducing aspects...... challenging. This is important since ensuring that a system does not contain errors is often equivalent to proving that some states are not reachable. In this paper we show how to solve these challenges by applying a successful technique from the area of software model checking, namely communicating pushdown...

  15. Numerical relativity in spherical coordinates with the Einstein Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewes, Vassilios; Zlochower, Yosef; Campanelli, Manuela; Ruchlin, Ian; Etienne, Zachariah B.; Baumgarte, Thomas W.

    2018-04-01

    Numerical relativity codes that do not make assumptions on spatial symmetries most commonly adopt Cartesian coordinates. While these coordinates have many attractive features, spherical coordinates are much better suited to take advantage of approximate symmetries in a number of astrophysical objects, including single stars, black holes, and accretion disks. While the appearance of coordinate singularities often spoils numerical relativity simulations in spherical coordinates, especially in the absence of any symmetry assumptions, it has recently been demonstrated that these problems can be avoided if the coordinate singularities are handled analytically. This is possible with the help of a reference-metric version of the Baumgarte-Shapiro-Shibata-Nakamura formulation together with a proper rescaling of tensorial quantities. In this paper we report on an implementation of this formalism in the Einstein Toolkit. We adapt the Einstein Toolkit infrastructure, originally designed for Cartesian coordinates, to handle spherical coordinates, by providing appropriate boundary conditions at both inner and outer boundaries. We perform numerical simulations for a disturbed Kerr black hole, extract the gravitational wave signal, and demonstrate that the noise in these signals is orders of magnitude smaller when computed on spherical grids rather than Cartesian grids. With the public release of our new Einstein Toolkit thorns, our methods for numerical relativity in spherical coordinates will become available to the entire numerical relativity community.

  16. Preventing Teen Pregnancy: Coordinating Community Efforts. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Human Resources and Intergovernmental Relations of the Committee on Government Reform and Oversight. House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourth Congress, Second Session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Government Reform and Oversight.

    The Subcommittee on Human Resources and Intergovernmental Relations of the House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform and Oversight met to consider the causes of and solutions to teen pregnancy and the role of community organizations in prevention efforts. Opening remarks by Representative Christopher Shays were followed by statements…

  17. VIRTUE ETHICS - NEW COORDINATES FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PUP ANCA

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Operating with business ethic we meet, some ethical systems, some of them developed in Antiquity, that still have a great influence upon economics development. One of these is the ethics of virtue. The aim of this paper work is to focus upon the one ethical system virtue ethics and to illustrate his influence in economical field, offering a new coordination in this direction. We understand the importance of the human character for a successful leadership and management. Recent ethical dilemmas illustrate us how a vicious character has an influence not only to the possessor of that type of character but also to the entire community where he develop his activities. For a comprehensive understanding I expose a briefly review on virtue ethics as it was developed by Plato and Aristotle, ant its new coordination and influence upon our contemporaneous economy, illustrated by some examples.

  18. Network Coordinator Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himwich, Ed; Strand, Richard

    2013-01-01

    This report includes an assessment of the network performance in terms of lost observing time for the 2012 calendar year. Overall, the observing time loss was about 12.3%, which is in-line with previous years. A table of relative incidence of problems with various subsystems is presented. The most significant identified causes of loss were electronics rack problems (accounting for about 21.8% of losses), antenna reliability (18.1%), RFI (11.8%), and receiver problems (11.7%). About 14.2% of the losses occurred for unknown reasons. New antennas are under development in the USA, Germany, and Spain. There are plans for new telescopes in Norway and Sweden. Other activities of the Network Coordinator are summarized.

  19. Coordinating Group report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    In December 1992, western governors and four federal agencies established a Federal Advisory Committee to Develop On-site Innovative Technologies for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (the DOIT Committee). The purpose of the Committee is to advise the federal government on ways to improve waste cleanup technology development and the cleanup of federal sites in the West. The Committee directed in January 1993 that information be collected from a wide range of potential stakeholders and that innovative technology candidate projects be identified, organized, set in motion, and evaluated to test new partnerships, regulatory approaches, and technologies which will lead to improve site cleanup. Five working groups were organized, one to develop broad project selection and evaluation criteria and four to focus on specific contaminant problems. A Coordinating Group comprised of working group spokesmen and federal and state representatives, was set up to plan and organize the routine functioning of these working groups. The working groups were charged with defining particular contaminant problems; identifying shortcomings in technology development, stakeholder involvement, regulatory review, and commercialization which impede the resolution of these problems; and identifying candidate sites or technologies which could serve as regional innovative demonstration projects to test new approaches to overcome the shortcomings. This report from the Coordinating Group to the DOIT Committee highlights the key findings and opportunities uncovered by these fact-finding working groups. It provides a basis from which recommendations from the DOIT Committee to the federal government can be made. It also includes observations from two public roundtables, one on commercialization and another on regulatory and institutional barriers impeding technology development and cleanup

  20. The Power of Community Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capers, Natasha; Shah, Shital C.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, Shital Shah, who supports community schools as assistant director for educational issues at the American Federation of Teachers, and Natasha Capers, a coordinator for the New York City Coalition for Educational Justice (CEJ), a parent-led collaborative of unions and community organizations, discuss the community schools movement…

  1. Coordinates in relativistic Hamiltonian mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, S.N.

    1984-01-01

    The physical (covariant and measurable) coordinates of free particles and covariant coordinates of the center of inertia are found for three main forms of relativistic dynamics. In the point form of dynamics, the covariant coordinates of two directly interacting particles are found, and the equations of motion are brought to the explicitly covariant form. These equations are generalized to the case of interaction with an external electromagnetic field

  2. The committee of scientific expertise coordination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Placed under the MIES control, the Committee of scientific expertise coordination defines the needs, the contain and the planing of expertises realized in function of Climate national and international decisions and negotiations calendars. The Committee verifies the different expertises and offers the administrations, scientific tools and techniques useful for the negotiations. It can also define long-dated research needs which require the scientific community mobilization. This paper provides some document of the Committee: objectives, operating and priorities of the Committee, scenarios ''Factor 4'' and ''crack technology'', perceptions and practices, developing countries (China, India...), Euromed. (A.L.B.)

  3. A comparative study of the N metabolism of phytoplankton and periphyton communities in oligotrophic lakes. Part of a coordinated programme on isotopic-tracer-aided research and monitoring on agricultural residue - biological interactions in aquatic ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, C.R.

    1982-08-01

    Limnological research at Castle Lake, CA, and Lake Tahoe, CA-NEV, USA, during the period 1977-1982 has emphasized the effects of nutrient enrichment and deficiency on primary producers. The low ambient pools of nitrogenous nutrients and their low rates of transformation have necessitated the use of isotope tracer methods ( 14 C, 15 N, 13 N). These techniques have been used in concert with physiological assays, growth bio-assays, and whole-ecosystem nitrogen enrichments. Our most significant results, to date, include: (1) Delineation of 5 algal communities which are spatially distinct yet occur in the same lake and which differ with regard to their principal sources of N; (2) Determination of the relative affinities of the above communities for the various sources of N; (3) Demonstration of the importance of internally regenerated N to phytoplankton productivity; (4) Development of sensitive methodology to utilize the short-lived radioisotope 13 N (t1/2=10 mins) for studies of denitrification and nitrate uptake in aquatic ecosystems; (5) Comparisons of a variety of physiological assays for N-deficiency in aquatic microorganisms, involving short-term and long-term experiments in containers and in an N-enriched lake. The controlled ecosystem manipulations were intended to simulate the effects of watershed disturbance on nitrogen loading in order to more accurately evaluate their potential impacts on inorganic carbon and nitrogen assimilation by natural algal communities. Our research is an experimental approach for contrasting the strategies of planktonic and benthic algae living in the same lake but differing with regard to their principal sources of nitrogen

  4. Coordination of Conditional Poisson Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grafström Anton

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Sample coordination seeks to maximize or to minimize the overlap of two or more samples. The former is known as positive coordination, and the latter as negative coordination. Positive coordination is mainly used for estimation purposes and to reduce data collection costs. Negative coordination is mainly performed to diminish the response burden of the sampled units. Poisson sampling design with permanent random numbers provides an optimum coordination degree of two or more samples. The size of a Poisson sample is, however, random. Conditional Poisson (CP sampling is a modification of the classical Poisson sampling that produces a fixed-size πps sample. We introduce two methods to coordinate Conditional Poisson samples over time or simultaneously. The first one uses permanent random numbers and the list-sequential implementation of CP sampling. The second method uses a CP sample in the first selection and provides an approximate one in the second selection because the prescribed inclusion probabilities are not respected exactly. The methods are evaluated using the size of the expected sample overlap, and are compared with their competitors using Monte Carlo simulation. The new methods provide a good coordination degree of two samples, close to the performance of Poisson sampling with permanent random numbers.

  5. Coordination in continuously repeated games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weeren, A.J.T.M.; Schumacher, J.M.; Engwerda, J.C.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we propose a model to describe the effectiveness of coordination in a continuously repeated two-player game. We study how the choice of a decision rule by a coordinator affects the strategic behavior of the players, resulting in more or less cooperation. Our model requires the analysis

  6. Bare coordination: the semantic shift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Swart, Henriette; Le Bruyn, Bert

    2014-01-01

    This paper develops an analysis of the syntax-semantics interface of two types of split coordination structures. In the first type, two bare singular count nouns appear as arguments in a coordinated structure, as in bride and groom were happy. We call this the N&N construction. In the second type,

  7. Applying a basic development needs approach for sustainable and integrated community development in less-developed areas: report of ongoing Iranian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi-Lari, M; Farshad, A A; Assaei, S E; Vaez Mahdavi, M R; Akbari, M E; Ameri, A; Salimi, Z; Gray, D

    2005-06-01

    Despite considerable achievements in the provision of basic developmental facilities in terms of drinking water, access to primary healthcare services, high-quality and nutritious food, social services, and proper housing facilities, there are many rural and slum communities in Iran where these essential needs remain unfulfilled. Lack of equity is prominent, as large differences exist in underprivileged provinces. New policies developed in the past two decades have resulted in substantial achievements in meeting population needs and reducing the socio-economic gap; nevertheless, poverty levels, unemployment due to a large increase in the birth rate in the early 1980s, and lack of community participation are matters yet to be addressed. To overcome these deficiencies, a basic development needs approach was adopted to promote the concept of community self-help and self-reliance through intersectoral collaboration, creating an environment where people could take an active part in the development process, with the Iranian government providing the necessary support to achieve the desired level of development. Following firm commitment from the Iranian government and technical support from the World Health Organization Regional Office, basic development needs was assigned a high priority in health and health-related sectors, reflected in the third National Masterplan (2001-2005). A comprehensive intersectoral plan was designed, and pilot projects were commenced in three villages. Each village elected a representative, and committee clusters were formed to run and monitor projects identified by a process of local needs assessment and priority assignment. In each region, a variety of needs were elicited from these assessments, which were actively supported by local authorities. A basic development needs approach was found to be a reliable discipline to improve community participation, needs-led resource allocation and intersectoral co-operation in community development

  8. Multipole structure and coordinate systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burko, Lior M

    2007-01-01

    Multipole expansions depend on the coordinate system, so that coefficients of multipole moments can be set equal to zero by an appropriate choice of coordinates. Therefore, it is meaningless to say that a physical system has a nonvanishing quadrupole moment, say, without specifying which coordinate system is used. (Except if this moment is the lowest non-vanishing one.) This result is demonstrated for the case of two equal like electric charges. Specifically, an adapted coordinate system in which the potential is given by a monopole term only is explicitly found, the coefficients of all higher multipoles vanish identically. It is suggested that this result can be generalized to other potential problems, by making equal coordinate surfaces adapt to the potential problem's equipotential surfaces

  9. Co-ordination Action on Ocean Energy (CA-OE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tedd, James; Frigaard, Peter

    In October 2004, the Co-ordination Action on Ocean Energy (CA-OE) was launched, co-financed by the European Commission, under the Renewable Energy Technologies priority within the 6th Framework programme, contract number 502701, chaired by Kim Nielsen, Rambøll, Denmark. The project involves 41...... partners. In general the public is not aware of the development of ocean energy and its exploitation. There is a need to make a united effort from the developers and research community to present the various principles and results in a coordinated manner with public appeal. The main objectives of the Co......-ordination Action on Ocean Energy are: To develop a common knowledge base necessary for coherent research and development policiesTo bring a co-ordinated approach within key areas of ocean energy research and development.To provide a forum for the longer term marketing of promising research developments...

  10. Why Integrate Educational and Community Facilities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fessas-Emmanouil, Helen D.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses coordination of educational and community facilities in order to encourage more rational investments and more efficient use of premises. Such coordination may reduce the economic burden imposed upon citizens for the provision of separate facilities for school and community. However, implementation of such a facility presupposes radical…

  11. Keep Meaning in Conversational Coordination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Clare Cuffari

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Coordination is a widely employed term across recent quantitative and qualitative approaches to intersubjectivity, particularly approaches that give embodiment and enaction central explanatory roles. With a focus on linguistic and bodily coordination in conversational contexts, I review the operational meaning of coordination in recent empirical research and related theorizing of embodied intersubjectivity. This discussion articulates what must be involved in treating linguistic meaning as dynamic processes of coordination. The coordination approach presents languaging as a set of dynamic self-organizing processes and actions on multiple timescales and across multiple modalities that come about and work in certain domains (those jointly constructed in social, interactive, high-order sense-making. These processes go beyond meaning at the level that is available to first-person experience. I take one crucial consequence of this to be the ubiquitously moral nature of languaging with others. Languaging coordinates experience, among other levels of behavior and event. Ethical effort is called for by the automatic autonomy-influencing forces of languaging as coordination.

  12. Coordinating distributed work : Exploring situated coordination with gaming-simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Laere, J.

    2003-01-01

    Organizational work has become more and more distributed nowadays. Information and communication technologies (ICT) provide opportunities to improve coordination of distributed work, but in practice many organizations struggle with integrating new organizational structures, new work practices and

  13. Randomized controlled trial of a coordinated care intervention to improve risk factor control after stroke or transient ischemic attack in the safety net: Secondary stroke prevention by Uniting Community and Chronic care model teams Early to End Disparities (SUCCEED).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towfighi, Amytis; Cheng, Eric M; Ayala-Rivera, Monica; McCreath, Heather; Sanossian, Nerses; Dutta, Tara; Mehta, Bijal; Bryg, Robert; Rao, Neal; Song, Shlee; Razmara, Ali; Ramirez, Magaly; Sivers-Teixeira, Theresa; Tran, Jamie; Mojarro-Huang, Elizabeth; Montoya, Ana; Corrales, Marilyn; Martinez, Beatrice; Willis, Phyllis; Macias, Mireya; Ibrahim, Nancy; Wu, Shinyi; Wacksman, Jeremy; Haber, Hilary; Richards, Adam; Barry, Frances; Hill, Valerie; Mittman, Brian; Cunningham, William; Liu, Honghu; Ganz, David A; Factor, Diane; Vickrey, Barbara G

    2017-02-06

    Recurrent strokes are preventable through awareness and control of risk factors such as hypertension, and through lifestyle changes such as healthier diets, greater physical activity, and smoking cessation. However, vascular risk factor control is frequently poor among stroke survivors, particularly among socio-economically disadvantaged blacks, Latinos and other people of color. The Chronic Care Model (CCM) is an effective framework for multi-component interventions aimed at improving care processes and outcomes for individuals with chronic disease. In addition, community health workers (CHWs) have played an integral role in reducing health disparities; however, their effectiveness in reducing vascular risk among stroke survivors remains unknown. Our objectives are to develop, test, and assess the economic value of a CCM-based intervention using an Advanced Practice Clinician (APC)-CHW team to improve risk factor control after stroke in an under-resourced, racially/ethnically diverse population. In this single-blind randomized controlled trial, 516 adults (≥40 years) with an ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack or intracerebral hemorrhage within the prior 90 days are being enrolled at five sites within the Los Angeles County safety-net setting and randomized 1:1 to intervention vs usual care. Participants are excluded if they do not speak English, Spanish, Cantonese, Mandarin, or Korean or if they are unable to consent. The intervention includes a minimum of three clinic visits in the healthcare setting, three home visits, and Chronic Disease Self-Management Program group workshops in community venues. The primary outcome is blood pressure (BP) control (systolic BP risk factors including lipids and hemoglobin A1c, (3) inflammation (C reactive protein [CRP]), (4) medication adherence, (5) lifestyle factors (smoking, diet, and physical activity), (6) estimated relative reduction in risk for recurrent stroke or myocardial infarction (MI), and (7) cost

  14. Territorial development and Community currencies : Symbolic meanings in Brazilian Community development banks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Fare (Marie); C. de Freitas (Carlos); C. Meyer (Camille)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBrazilian community development banks (CDBs) have established various coordinated financial mechanisms aiming to restructure poor and peripheral local economies. Their development strategy includes an instrument to facilitate access to microfinance and a community currency, combined with

  15. Estrategia intersectorial y participativa con enfoque de ecosalud para la prevención de la transmisión de dengue en el nivel local An inter-sector participatory strategy in Cuba using an ecosystem approach to prevent dengue transmission at the local level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Díaz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cuba está ubicada en una zona de países con alta incidencia de dengue. En los últimos 10 años ha sido afectada por varias epidemias, es por ello que se diseñó, implementó y evaluó una estrategia participativa, basada en el enfoque de ecosalud, la cual estuvo dirigida a propiciar acciones intersectoriales en la gestión del ecosistema para disminuir las poblaciones del mosquito Aedes aegypti y prevenir la transmisión de dengue en el municipio Cotorro de Ciudad de La Habana, Cuba. Para el desarrollo de este trabajo se utilizó la metodología de investigación acción participativa. Como resultado del proceso se pudo describir una estrategia que garantiza la participación activa de la comunidad, los sectores y el gobierno en la producción de ecosistemas saludables, se desarrollaron acciones de prevención y control oportunas e integrados que disminuyeron los riesgos para la proliferación del vector y la transmisión local de la enfermedad. Este enfoque permitió el análisis holístico de los problemas, su priorización y la gestión de sus soluciones; la estrategia se sostiene dos años después de concluido el proceso.Cuba is located among a group of countries with high dengue incidence. Following several epidemics in the last 10 years, the country designed, implemented, and evaluated a participatory strategy based on the Ecohealth approach. The aim was to promote inter-sector ecosystem management to decrease Aedes aegypti infestation and prevent dengue transmission in the municipality of Cotorro, in Havana city. The study adopted a participatory research methodology. The strategy ensured active participation by the community, diverse sectors, and government in the production of healthy ecosystems. Timely and integrated measures for prevention and control were developed, thereby decreasing the risk of vector proliferation and local dengue transmission. The approach allowed holistic problem analysis, priority setting, and

  16. The coordinate transforming in geography information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Xiang; Chen Gang

    2003-01-01

    The coordinate transforming of geography information system includes two kinds of transforming, map projection and coordinate-transforming. This paper proposed a arithmetic of coordinate-transforming, it implement the transforming between the longitude-latitude coordinate and the screen coordinate and apply it in the GIS. The preferable effect was made. (authors)

  17. Who matters in coordination problems?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sákovics, J.; Steiner, Jakub

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 102, č. 7 (2012), s. 3439-3461 ISSN 0002-8282 Institutional support: RVO:67985998 Keywords : coordination problem s * heterogeneous agents Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 2.792, year: 2012

  18. Coordination Processes in International Organisations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nedergaard, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The EU is not a member of the International Labour Organisation (ILO), but relatively elaborate EU coordination takes place anyway. This paper addresses two research questions: 1) How is it possible to evaluate the coordination of the EU in its specific observable configuration in the ILO?, and 2......-à-vis their principals, the Member States. The Commission is the leading agent in the phase leading up to the Conference; the Presidency then takes over. On the one hand, due to the Treaty obligations and their interpretations by the Court of Justice, both the Presidency and the Commission are kept within tight limits...... by the principals. On the other hand, both before and during the Conference, the Member States accept the so-called discursive coordination of the Commission, which seems to be of great (but often neglected) importance. Owing to the organisational set-up in which coordination takes place, the EU is able...

  19. Hall effect in noncommutative coordinates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dayi, Oemer F.; Jellal, Ahmed

    2002-01-01

    We consider electrons in uniform external magnetic and electric fields which move on a plane whose coordinates are noncommuting. Spectrum and eigenfunctions of the related Hamiltonian are obtained. We derive the electric current whose expectation value gives the Hall effect in terms of an effective magnetic field. We present a receipt to find the action which can be utilized in path integrals for noncommuting coordinates. In terms of this action we calculate the related Aharonov-Bohm phase and show that it also yields the same effective magnetic field. When magnetic field is strong enough this phase becomes independent of magnetic field. Measurement of it may give some hints on spatial noncommutativity. The noncommutativity parameter θ can be tuned such that electrons moving in noncommutative coordinates are interpreted as either leading to the fractional quantum Hall effect or composite fermions in the usual coordinates

  20. Future in actinoids coordination chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitazawa, Takafumi

    2006-01-01

    Actinoids coordination chemistry is concerned with spent nuclear fuel reprocessing, specifically with solid-state chemistry of nuclear fuels, separation process with radioactive substances, and geological disposal of high-level radioactive substances. In the 21st century, accumulation of minor actinides, Np, Am, Cm, and others will be realized according with the present program of nuclear energy development. The present article briefly introduces general properties of actinide elements, followed by their coordination chemistry compared with rare earths coordination chemistry. Special facility needed to treat actinoids as well as their chemistry is briefly explained, together with the specific experimental apparatus such as X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) and time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectrometry (TRLFS) with synchrotron radiation facilities. The effect of coordination with actinoids in the environment chemistry is important in underground disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. For theoretical analysis of the results with actinoids chemistry, relativistic calculation is needed. (S. Ohno)

  1. Coordination theory and collaboration technology

    CERN Document Server

    Olson, Gary M; Smith, John B

    2001-01-01

    The National Science Foundation funded the first Coordination Theory and Collaboration Technology initiative to look at systems that support collaborations in business and elsewhere. This book explores the global revolution in human interconnectedness. It will discuss the various collaborative workgroups and their use in technology. The initiative focuses on processes of coordination and cooperation among autonomous units in human systems, in computer and communication systems, and in hybrid organizations of both systems. This initiative is motivated by three scientific issues which have been

  2. Path integrals in curvilinear coordinates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokhorov, L.V.

    1984-01-01

    Integration limits are studied for presenting the path integral curvilinear coordinates. For spherical (and topoloqically equivalent) coordinates it is shown that in formulas involving classical action in the exponent integration over all variables should be carried out within infinite limits. Another peculiarity is associated with appearance of the operator q which provides a complete definition of the wave functions out of the physical region. arguments are given upporting the validity of the cited statament in the general case

  3. 45 CFR 2506.33 - How will the Corporation coordinate salary offsets with other agencies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How will the Corporation coordinate salary offsets... (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE COLLECTION OF DEBTS Salary Offset § 2506.33 How will the Corporation coordinate salary offsets with other agencies? (a) Responsibilities of the...

  4. Three coordination compounds based on benzene tetracarboxylate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    YUNLONG WU

    nescence, considerable attention has been focused on the construction of coordination .... measurements were performed on ground powder samples at .... Figure 2. (a) Coordination environment of Co1 ion in compound 2. (b) Coordination.

  5. Managing interteam coordination within and between organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Thomas Arend

    2015-01-01

    To accomplish complex tasks and effectively respond to environmental contingencies, teams must coordinate task-related issues with other teams (i.e., interteam coordination). Regrettably, interteam coordination is often complicated by misunderstandings that can arise from differences in teams’

  6. Motor coordination uses external spatial coordinates independent of developmental vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heed, Tobias; Röder, Brigitte

    2014-07-01

    The constraints that guide bimanual movement coordination are informative about the processing principles underlying movement planning in humans. For example, symmetry relative to the body midline benefits finger and hand movements independent of hand posture. This symmetry constraint has been interpreted to indicate that movement coordination is guided by a perceptual code. Although it has been assumed implicitly that the perceptual system at the heart of this constraint is vision, this relationship has not been tested. Here, congenitally blind and sighted participants made symmetrical and non-symmetrical (that is, parallel) bimanual tapping and finger oscillation movements. For both groups, symmetrical movements were executed more correctly than parallel movements, independent of anatomical constraints like finger homology and hand posture. For the blind, the reliance on external spatial factors in movement coordination stands in stark contrast to their use of an anatomical reference frame in perceptual processing. Thus, the externally coded symmetry constraint evident in bimanual coordination can develop in the absence of the visual system, suggesting that the visual system is not critical for the establishment of an external-spatial reference frame in movement coordination. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The importance of intersectoral factors in promoting equity-oriented universal health coverage: a multilevel analysis of social determinants affecting neonatal infant and under-five mortality in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huda, Tanvir M; Tahsina, Tazeen; El Arifeen, Shams; Dibley, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Health is multidimensional and affected by a wide range of factors, many of which are outside the health sector. To improve population health and reduce health inequality, it is important that we take into account the complex interactions among social, environmental, behavioural, and biological factors and design our health interventions accordingly. This study examines mortality differentials in children of different age groups by key social determinants of health (SDH) including parental education and employment, mother's level of autonomy, age, asset index, living arrangements (utilities), and other geographical contextual factors (area of residence, road conditions). We used data from the two rounds of Bangladesh Health and Demographic Survey, a nationally representative sample survey of the population residing in Bangladesh. Multilevel logistic models were used to study the impact of SDH on child mortality. The study found that the mother's age, the education of both parents, the mother's autonomy to take decisions about matters linked to the health of her child, the household socio-economic conditions, the geographical region of residence, and the condition of the roads were significantly associated with higher risks of neonatal, infant, and under-five mortality in Bangladesh. The study findings suggest there are complex relationships among different SDH. Thus larger intersectoral actions will be needed to reduce disparities in child health and mortality and achieve meaningful progress towards equity-oriented universal health coverage.

  8. The importance of intersectoral factors in promoting equity-oriented universal health coverage: a multilevel analysis of social determinants affecting neonatal infant and under-five mortality in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanvir M. Huda

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Health is multidimensional and affected by a wide range of factors, many of which are outside the health sector. To improve population health and reduce health inequality, it is important that we take into account the complex interactions among social, environmental, behavioural, and biological factors and design our health interventions accordingly. Objectives: This study examines mortality differentials in children of different age groups by key social determinants of health (SDH including parental education and employment, mother's level of autonomy, age, asset index, living arrangements (utilities, and other geographical contextual factors (area of residence, road conditions. Design: We used data from the two rounds of Bangladesh Health and Demographic Survey, a nationally representative sample survey of the population residing in Bangladesh. Multilevel logistic models were used to study the impact of SDH on child mortality. Results: The study found that the mother's age, the education of both parents, the mother's autonomy to take decisions about matters linked to the health of her child, the household socio-economic conditions, the geographical region of residence, and the condition of the roads were significantly associated with higher risks of neonatal, infant, and under-five mortality in Bangladesh. Conclusion: The study findings suggest there are complex relationships among different SDH. Thus larger intersectoral actions will be needed to reduce disparities in child health and mortality and achieve meaningful progress towards equity-oriented universal health coverage.

  9. The committee of scientific expertise coordination; Le comite de coordination d'expertise scientifique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    Placed under the MIES control, the Committee of scientific expertise coordination defines the needs, the contain and the planing of expertises realized in function of Climate national and international decisions and negotiations calendars. The Committee verifies the different expertises and offers the administrations, scientific tools and techniques useful for the negotiations. It can also define long-dated research needs which require the scientific community mobilization. This paper provides some document of the Committee: objectives, operating and priorities of the Committee, scenarios ''Factor 4'' and ''crack technology'', perceptions and practices, developing countries (China, India...), Euromed. (A.L.B.)

  10. The committee of scientific expertise coordination; Le comite de coordination d'expertise scientifique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    Placed under the MIES control, the Committee of scientific expertise coordination defines the needs, the contain and the planing of expertises realized in function of Climate national and international decisions and negotiations calendars. The Committee verifies the different expertises and offers the administrations, scientific tools and techniques useful for the negotiations. It can also define long-dated research needs which require the scientific community mobilization. This paper provides some document of the Committee: objectives, operating and priorities of the Committee, scenarios ''Factor 4'' and ''crack technology'', perceptions and practices, developing countries (China, India...), Euromed. (A.L.B.)

  11. Geriatric Cooperatives in Southwestern Ontario: A novel way of increasing inter-sectoral partnerships in the care of older adults with responsive behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutmanis, Iris; Hillier, Loretta M

    2018-01-01

    Established in 2010, Geriatric Cooperatives support the evolving Behavioural Supports Ontario (BSO) programme in the South West Local Health Integration Network. Geriatric Cooperatives bring together members representing relevant cross-sectoral services and are tasked with identifying system gaps associated with the BSO target population as well as developing work plans specific to their local area, leveraging local capacity, and co-ordinating and improving linkages between sectors and services. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the partnerships formed over time within these Cooperatives in order to inform their ongoing development and sustainability. In 2012 and in 2015, Geriatric Cooperative members were invited to complete the Partnership Self-Assessment Tool (PSAT), a valid and reliable tool for evaluating collaborative processes and identifying areas in need of improvement. Scoring the PSAT involves the calculation of mean scores (ranging from 1 to 5) for each of six dimensions describing effective collaboration; higher mean scores reflect better functioning. Two psychometrically sound versions of the PSAT exist; the shorter version (PSAT-S) scores fewer items in three dimensions. Survey response rates for the three Cooperatives that were evaluated in both 2012 and 2015 were 70% in 2012 and 36% in 2015; 57% of members who completed the survey in 2015 were new Cooperative members. Both years, more than 25% of respondents selected "don't know" for three of the nine items used to score the administration and management dimension. Both PSAT and PSAT-S mean dimension scores across both years reflected that more effort is needed to maximise collaborative potential. Use of the PSAT has promoted a better understanding of how partnerships are functioning. Knowledge of where more work is required along with effective strategies to overcome weak areas and gaps in functioning has the potential to ensure that these Cooperatives are successful. © 2017 John Wiley

  12. Integration of water, sanitation, and hygiene for the prevention and control of neglected tropical diseases: a rationale for inter-sectoral collaboration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew C Freeman

    Full Text Available Improvements of water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH infrastructure and appropriate health-seeking behavior are necessary for achieving sustained control, elimination, or eradication of many neglected tropical diseases (NTDs. Indeed, the global strategies to fight NTDs include provision of WASH, but few programs have specific WASH targets and approaches. Collaboration between disease control programs and stakeholders in WASH is a critical next step. A group of stakeholders from the NTD control, child health, and WASH sectors convened in late 2012 to discuss opportunities for, and barriers to, collaboration. The group agreed on a common vision, namely "Disease-free communities that have adequate and equitable access to water and sanitation, and that practice good hygiene." Four key areas of collaboration were identified, including (i advocacy, policy, and communication; (ii capacity building and training; (iii mapping, data collection, and monitoring; and (iv research. We discuss strategic opportunities and ways forward for enhanced collaboration between the WASH and the NTD sectors.

  13. Integration of water, sanitation, and hygiene for the prevention and control of neglected tropical diseases: a rationale for inter-sectoral collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Matthew C; Ogden, Stephanie; Jacobson, Julie; Abbott, Daniel; Addiss, David G; Amnie, Asrat G; Beckwith, Colin; Cairncross, Sandy; Callejas, Rafael; Colford, Jack M; Emerson, Paul M; Fenwick, Alan; Fishman, Rebecca; Gallo, Kerry; Grimes, Jack; Karapetyan, Gagik; Keene, Brooks; Lammie, Patrick J; Macarthur, Chad; Lochery, Peter; Petach, Helen; Platt, Jennifer; Prabasi, Sarina; Rosenboom, Jan Willem; Roy, Sharon; Saywell, Darren; Schechtman, Lisa; Tantri, Anupama; Velleman, Yael; Utzinger, Jürg

    2013-01-01

    Improvements of water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) infrastructure and appropriate health-seeking behavior are necessary for achieving sustained control, elimination, or eradication of many neglected tropical diseases (NTDs). Indeed, the global strategies to fight NTDs include provision of WASH, but few programs have specific WASH targets and approaches. Collaboration between disease control programs and stakeholders in WASH is a critical next step. A group of stakeholders from the NTD control, child health, and WASH sectors convened in late 2012 to discuss opportunities for, and barriers to, collaboration. The group agreed on a common vision, namely "Disease-free communities that have adequate and equitable access to water and sanitation, and that practice good hygiene." Four key areas of collaboration were identified, including (i) advocacy, policy, and communication; (ii) capacity building and training; (iii) mapping, data collection, and monitoring; and (iv) research. We discuss strategic opportunities and ways forward for enhanced collaboration between the WASH and the NTD sectors.

  14. Collaborative Communities of Firms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    and developing strategic initiatives that aid the community as a whole. We discuss the facilitator role of the shared services provider, contrasting it with the coordinator role found in other multi-firm organizations, and we show how shared services providers function by describing three examples...... is an organizational model called the collaborative community of firms. This chapter addresses an important organizational role in a collaborative community, that of the shared services provider. The shared services provider acts as a facilitator in the community, helping member firms collaborate with one another...... of collaborative communities of firms from different sectors: the U.S.-based Blade.org and two Denmark-based communities, the Kalundborg Industrial Symbiosis and MG50. Implications for the theory and practice of organization design are discussed....

  15. Federal interagency radiation policy coordination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, A.L.

    1984-01-01

    The author discusses Federal interagency radiation policy coordination. The Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination (CIRRPC) is explained as being dedicated to the success and forward motion of enhanced radiation research and policy coordination. Both CIRRPC and the Science Panel are staffed with Federal employees. Their expertise includes many and various radiation disciplines including cytogenetics, dosimetry, epidemiology, genetics, health physics, nuclear medicine, radiology, radiation carcinogenesis, and risk assessment. Ten scientific and technical issues in their preliminary order are presented: radioepidemiological tables; de minimis radiation levels; radon progeny health effects; occupational exposure registry; measurement, recording, and control of radiation; food irradiation; use of radiation in science, industry, and medicine; nonionizing radiation; and remedial actions

  16. An argument for VP coordination: scene-setting coordination and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article demonstrates the properties of this curious construction type and proposes the first analysis to date. It is argued that this is an instance of VP coordination and that this configuration allows the possibility of high merger of direct objects in a constrained fashion. Southern African Linguistics and Applied Language ...

  17. Collaborative Communities of Firms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøllingtoft, Anne; Müller, Sabine; Ulhøi, John Parm

    2011-01-01

    and developing strategic initiatives that aid the community as a whole. We discuss the facilitator role of the shared services provider, contrasting it with the coordinator role found in other multi-firm organizations, and we show how shared services providers function by describing three examples...... of collaborative communities of firms from different sectors: the U.S.-based Blade.org and two Denmark-based communities, the Kalundborg Industrial Symbiosis and MG50. Implications for the theory and practice of organization design are discussed....

  18. Evaluating the Relational Coordination instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Kasper; Lundstrøm, Sanne Lykke

    2014-01-01

    consistency, interrater agreement and reliability, structural validity, content validity. However as relational coordination is being used as a diagnostics tool it is important to examine further if the instrument can measure changes. Indeed we need to know how precise and sensitive the instrument is when....... We distinguish between statistical and clinical significance. Statistical significance is calculated using T-test. Clinical significance is the minimal amount of change in relational coordination score that is not considered noise. Sensitivity of the instrument i.e. the ability of the instrument...

  19. Cation coordination in oxychloride glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J A [Energy Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Holland, D [Physics Department, Warwick University, Coventry (United Kingdom); Bland, J [Physics Department, University of Liverpool, PO Box 147, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Johnson, C E [Physics Department, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL (United States); Thomas, M F [Physics Department, University of Liverpool, PO Box 147, Liverpool (United Kingdom)

    2003-02-19

    Glasses containing mixtures of cations and anions of nominal compositions [Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3}]{sub x} - [ZnCl{sub 2}]{sub 1-x} where x = 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, and 1.00, have been studied by means of neutron diffraction and Raman and Moessbauer spectroscopy. There is preferential bonding within the system with the absence of Sb-Cl bonds. Antimony is found to be threefold coordinated to oxygen, and zinc fourfold coordinated. The main contributing species are of the form [Sb(OSb){sub 2}(OZn)] and [Zn(ClZn){sub 2}(OSb){sub 2}].

  20. Cation coordination in oxychloride glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J A; Holland, D; Bland, J; Johnson, C E; Thomas, M F

    2003-01-01

    Glasses containing mixtures of cations and anions of nominal compositions [Sb 2 O 3 ] x - [ZnCl 2 ] 1-x where x = 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, and 1.00, have been studied by means of neutron diffraction and Raman and Moessbauer spectroscopy. There is preferential bonding within the system with the absence of Sb-Cl bonds. Antimony is found to be threefold coordinated to oxygen, and zinc fourfold coordinated. The main contributing species are of the form [Sb(OSb) 2 (OZn)] and [Zn(ClZn) 2 (OSb) 2

  1. Bare coordination: the semantic shift

    OpenAIRE

    de Swart, Henriette; Le Bruyn, Bert

    2014-01-01

    This paper develops an analysis of the syntax-semantics interface of two types of split coordination structures. In the first type, two bare singular count nouns appear as arguments in a coordinated structure, as in bride and groom were happy. We call this the N&N construction. In the second type, the determiner shows agreement with the first conjunct, while the second conjunct is bare, as in the Spanish example el hornero y hornera cobraban en panes (‘thesg.m bakersg.m and bakersg.f werepl p...

  2. 47 CFR 95.1113 - Frequency coordinator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES Wireless Medical Telemetry Service (WMTS) General Provisions § 95.1113 Frequency coordinator. (a) The Commission will designate a frequency coordinator(s) to manage the usage of the frequency bands for the operation of medical telemetry devices. (b) The frequency coordinator shall (1) Review and...

  3. 29 CFR 42.8 - Coordination plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Coordination plan. 42.8 Section 42.8 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor COORDINATED ENFORCEMENT § 42.8 Coordination plan. (a) Based upon, among other things, the... coordination plan concerning farm labor-related responsibilities of the Department, including migrant housing...

  4. Service Coordination Policies and Models: National Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbin, Gloria L.; Bruder, M.; Mazzarella, C.; Gabbard, G.; Reynolds, C.

    This report discusses the findings of a study that investigated state coordination of early intervention services for infants, toddlers, and young children with disabilities. State Part C coordinators participated in a survey that sought their perceptions of values under girding service coordination, approach to service coordination, policies,…

  5. U.S. CWMD Coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-11

    coordination. For example, it conducted joint vehicle inspection training for Pakistani Customs and Border Guard personnel at a US- Mexico border...biological material, including such hazards as: anthrax, botulism, cholera , Ebola virus hemorrhagic fever, E. coli, Plague, and smallpox 79

  6. Collective coordinates on symplectic manifolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razumov, A.V.; Taranov, A.Yu.

    1981-01-01

    For an arbitrary Lie group of canonical transformations on a symplectic manifold collective coordinates are introduced. They describe a motion of the dynamical system as a whole under the group transformations. Some properties of Lie group of canonical transformations are considered [ru

  7. Motivic amplitudes and cluster coordinates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golden, J.K.; Goncharov, A.B.; Spradlin, M.; Vergu, C.; Volovich, A.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we study motivic amplitudes — objects which contain all of the essential mathematical content of scattering amplitudes in planar SYM theory in a completely canonical way, free from the ambiguities inherent in any attempt to choose particular functional representatives. We find that the cluster structure on the kinematic configuration space Conf n (ℙ 3 ) underlies the structure of motivic amplitudes. Specifically, we compute explicitly the coproduct of the two-loop seven-particle MHV motivic amplitude A 7,2 M and find that like the previously known six-particle amplitude, it depends only on certain preferred coordinates known in the mathematics literature as cluster X-coordinates on Conf n (ℙ 3 ). We also find intriguing relations between motivic amplitudes and the geometry of generalized associahedrons, to which cluster coordinates have a natural combinatoric connection. For example, the obstruction to A 7,2 M being expressible in terms of classical polylogarithms is most naturally represented by certain quadrilateral faces of the appropriate associahedron. We also find and prove the first known functional equation for the trilogarithm in which all 40 arguments are cluster X-coordinates of a single algebra. In this respect it is similar to Abel’s 5-term dilogarithm identity

  8. Co-ordinated Classroom Lectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Darell Boyd

    From a series of lectures, a selection of eight are oriented principally toward the biologically developing child, and the physiological operations in visual process. The numbered lectures are--(1) The Coordinated Classroom, its Philosophy and Principles, (2) An Outline of a Biological Point of View, (3) The Evolution of Structure--despite man's…

  9. Henry Taube and Coordination Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    dropdown arrow Site Map A-Z Index Menu Synopsis Henry Taube and Coordination Chemistry Resources with Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus, at Stanford University, received the 1983 Nobel Prize in Chemistry " there from 1940-41. "I became deeply interested in chemistry soon after I came to Berkeley,"

  10. Possibility of extending space-time coordinates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yongcheng.

    1993-11-01

    It has been shown that one coordinate system can describe a whole space-time region except some supersurfaces on which there are coordinate singularities. The conditions of extending a coordinate from real field to complex field are studied. It has been shown that many-valued coordinate transformations may help us to extend space-time regions and many-valued metric functions may make one coordinate region to describe more than one space-time regions. (author). 11 refs

  11. What is the difference between a 2, 3, 4, or 5 °C world and how good are we at telling this difference? Results from ISI-MIP the first Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frieler, K.; Huber, V.; Piontek, F.; Schewe, J.; Serdeczny, O.; Warszawski, L.

    2012-12-01

    The Inter-sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project (ISI-MIP) aims to synthesize the state-of-the-art knowledge of climate change impacts at different levels of global warming. Over 25 climate impact modelling teams from around the world, working within the agriculture, water, biomes, infrastructure and health sectors, are collaborating to find answers to the question "What is the difference between a 2, 3, 4, or 5 °C world and how good are we at telling this difference?". The analysis is based on common, bias-corrected climate projections, and socio-economic pathways. The first, fast-tracked phase of the ISI-MIP has a focus on global impact models. The project's experimental design is formulated to distinguish the uncertainty introduced by the impact models themselves, from the inherent uncertainty in the climate projections and the variety of plausible socio-economic futures. Novel metrics, developed to emphasize societal impacts, will be used to identify regional 'hot-spots' of climate change impacts, as well as to quantify the cross-sectoral impact of the increasing frequency of extreme events in future climates. We present here first results from the Fast-Track phase of the project covering impact simulations in the biomes, agriculture and water sectors, in which the societal impacts of climate change are quantified for different levels of global warming. We also discuss the design of the scenario set-up and impact indicators chosen to suit the unique cross-sectoral, multi-model nature of the project.

  12. Contornos e sinergias entre a política de saúde e o adolescente privado de liberdade: intersetorialidade como desafio = Contours and synergies between health policy and adolescents deprived of liberty: intersectoral approach as challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carvalho, Rafael Nicolau

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available O artigo objetiva discutir a situação dos adolescentes em privação de liberdade no que se refere ao atendimento público em saúde. Parte-se do pressuposto de que o direito à saúde vem sendo negado, mesmo que o Estatuto da Criança e do Adolescente já exista há duas décadas. A materialidade deste direito específico depende de mudanças estruturais rigorosas entre as políticas de base social, no que concerne aos patamares de financiamento, às suas formas de gestão e, nomeadamente, do tipo de postura que o Estado tem assumido frente à questão da criança e do adolescente. A estratégia da intersetorialidade se revela fundamental, porém depende de um lastro de variáveis ainda não consolidados no país. The article aims to discuss the situation of adolescents in the deprivation of liberty with regard to the public in health care. It is assumed that the right to health has been denied, even though the status of children and adolescents already exist for two decades. The materiality of this specific duty depends on rigorous structural changes between basic social policies, on the terraces of funding and its forms of management and in particular the type of attitude that the State has taken forward the issue of children and adolescents. The strategy of intersectoral approach is crucial, but it depends on a variable ballast still not consolidated in the country.

  13. 76 FR 40591 - Coordinating Policies on Automotive Communities and Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-11

    ... automakers in 2010 gained market share for the first time since 1995. The automotive supply chain, which... Department of Labor set aside funds for green jobs and job training for high- growth sectors of the economy...

  14. A new model of care collaboration for community-dwelling elders: findings and lessons learned from the NORC-health care linkage evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinne Kyriacou

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and Background: Few financial incentives in the United States encourage coordination across the health and social care systems. Supportive Service Programs (SSPs, operating in Naturally Occurring Retirement Communities (NORCs, attempt to increase access to care and enhance care quality for aging residents.  This article presents findings from an evaluation conducted from 2004 to 2006 looking at the feasibility, quality and outcomes of linking health and social services through innovative NORC-SSP and health organization micro-collaborations.  Methods: Four NORC-SSPs participated in the study by finding a health care organization or community-based physicians to collaborate with on addressing health conditions that could benefit from a biopsychosocial approach. Each site focused on a specific population, addressed a specific condition or problem, and created different linkages to address the target problem.  Using a case study approach, incorporating both qualitative and quantitative methods, this evaluation sought to answer the following two primary questions: 1 Have the participating sites created viable linkages between their organizations that did not exist prior to the study; and, 2 To what extent have the linkages resulted in improvements in clinical and other health and social outcomes?    Results: Findings suggest that immediate outcomes were widely achieved across sites: knowledge of other sector providers’ capabilities and services increased; communication across providers increased; identification of target population increased; and, awareness of risks, symptoms and health seeking behaviors among clients/patients increased.  Furthermore, intermediate outcomes were also widely achieved: shared care planning increased across providers; continuity of care was enhanced; disease management improved; and self care among clients improved.  Finally, several linkage partnerships were also able to demonstrate improvements

  15. Up-to-date Geomagnetic Coordinate Transforms with AACGM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, G. K.; Morrison, D.; Barnes, R. J.; Potter, M.; Schaefer, R. K.

    2017-12-01

    Geomagnetic plasmas organize along magnetic field lines, thus, it is often appropriate to use magnetic field line conjunctions for comparisons between spacecraft observations. Due to the expense of tracing magnetic field lines, the Altitude-Adjusted Corrected GeoMagnetic (AACGM) coordinate system is used. The (AACGM) coordinates are defined by the best fit dipole of the Earth's magnetic field and have been a standard tool used by the SPA community for a long time. However, standard 5 year updated coefficients for this transform are no longer available after the 2010 set. A new version of AACGM (V2 - Shepard, 2014) has been defined. AACGM V2 is fit to a spherical harmonic expansion. A pitfall with this V2 coordinate system is that it is undefined near the magnetic equator, which is problematic for determining conjunctions for spacecraft that with ground stations that pass through these regions. We have derived a new set of coefficients valid for the current epoch that allow us to continue to use the original version of AACGM. We also explore the errors that are introduced by ignoring the magnetic field caused by magnetospheric electric currents. The derived coefficients are made available to the public along with Java software that can be used to evaluate the AACGM coordinates. Shepard, S., 2014, Altitude-Adjusted Corrected Geomagnetic Coordinates: Definition and Functional Approximations, Jour. Geophys. Res., 119, 020264, DOI:10.1002/2014JA020264

  16. Final report of coordination and cooperation with the European Union on embankment failure analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    There has been an emphasis in the European Union (EU) community on the investigation of extreme flood processes and the uncertainties related to these processes. Over a 3-year period, the EU and the U.S. dam safety community (1) coordinated their efforts and collected information needed to integrate...

  17. On coordinates and coordinate transformation in Einstein's theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou Peiyuan

    1983-01-01

    This investigation is a further exposition of the significance of coordinates and their transformation in Einstein's theory of gravitation. The author considers the static axisymmetric field as an example, starts with its metric in the cylindrical coordinates, transforms this metric and the field equations into the Weyl-Levi-Civita system of coordinates, and supplements them with the harmonic condition. Both of the field equations and the harmonic condition are then transformed back to the original Cartesian system. Solutions for the static fields of an infinite plane with uniform surface density and an infinite rod with uniform linear density of matter, and of a body with spherical symmetry, are obtained again to show the necessity of the harmonic condition in their solutions. The fact that under the harmonic condition the solutions of the field equations for these problems contain their corresponding Newtonian potentials as approximations, is a strong support to the argument that the harmonic condition should be a physical supplement to Einstein's theory of gravitation. (Auth.)

  18. TURNAROUND COORDINATOR. YES OR NOT?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin HROMÁDKA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Both low cost carriers ‘fresh wind’ and liberalisation of ground handling market makes airlines to be cost-wise in every single field. Thus, ground handling contract are cutting down in terms of their costs. Handling companies struggle with pressure being put from the market environment, they rush 25 minutes turnaround with couple of people. This can be potentially dangerous from the safety point of view. One of possible solutions seems to be introducing turnaround coordinator, person who would supervise the ramp handling procedures. This paper discusses the role of turnaround coordinator within the aircraft turnaround process. Duties and responsibilities of this person are described. However, not every airport is staffing this position. The survey shows that smaller airports pay much more attention to this issue than the big ones.

  19. A coordination language for databases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Ximeng; Wu, Xi; Lluch Lafuente, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    We present a coordination language for the modeling of distributed database applications. The language, baptized Klaim-DB, borrows the concepts of localities and nets of the coordination language Klaim but re-incarnates the tuple spaces of Klaim as databases. It provides high-level abstractions...... and primitives for the access and manipulation of structured data, with integrity and atomicity considerations. We present the formal semantics of Klaim-DB and develop a type system that avoids potential runtime errors such as certain evaluation errors and mismatches of data format in tables, which are monitored...... in the semantics. The use of the language is illustrated in a scenario where the sales from different branches of a chain of department stores are aggregated from their local databases. Raising the abstraction level and encapsulating integrity checks in the language primitives have benefited the modeling task...

  20. Coordinating talk and practical action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oshima, Sae; Streeck, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates how talk and practical action are coordinated during one type of activity involving professional communication: the service-assessment sequence in hair salons. During this activity, a practical inspection of the haircut must be coupled with sequentially produced verbal acts....... Our analysis of four examples reveals that there is no fixed relationship between the organization of talk and practical action. Instead, people manipulate this relationship on a moment-by-moment basis, often coordinating the two into a single, integral package, or relying on one stream of action...... to achieve progress in the other. These findings imply that some multimodal activities that are brought into alignment may have their own, separate and independent procedural logic and sequencing patterns and that these can be brought into play to create or deal with constraints in each other....

  1. Improving Channel Coordination Through Franchising

    OpenAIRE

    Rajiv Lal

    1990-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the role of franchising arrangements in improving coordination between channel members. In particular we focus on two elements of the franchising contract, namely, the royalty structure and the monitoring technology. We begin with a simple analysis where a manufacturer distributes its product through a retailer and the retail demand is affected by the retail price and the service provided by the retailer. In this context we show that neither royalty payments nor moni...

  2. Coordination in the European Union

    OpenAIRE

    Martin Feldstein

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the sources of current conflict within the EU and the EMU. The topics discussed include the recent ECB policy of bond buying (the OMT policy), the attempts to advance the "European Project" of stronger political union (the fiscal compact, the banking union, and the proposals for budget supervision). Contrary to the claims of the European leadership, the progress that has been made has been by individual countries and not by coordinated action. The special problems of Franc...

  3. Coordination strategies of crew management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Sharon; Cano, Yvonne; Bryant, Don

    1991-01-01

    An exploratory study that describes and contrasts two three-person flight crews performing in a B-727 simulator is presented. This study specifically attempts to delineate crew communication patterns accounting for measured differences in performance across routine and nonroutine flight patterns. The communication patterns in the two crews evaluated indicated different modes of coordination, i.e., standardization in the less effective crew and planning/mutual adjustment in the more effective crew.

  4. Monetary and Fiscal Policy Coordination

    OpenAIRE

    Hanif, Muhammad N.; Arby, Muhammad Farooq

    2003-01-01

    Macroeconomic policies are meant to achieve non-inflationary, stable growth. There are two major groups of policy instruments to achieve the purpose; one is related to monetary conditions and the other to fiscal conditions. Monetary instruments are employed by the central bank and fiscal instruments are employed by ministry of finance. The objectives and implications of policy measures taken by the two institutions often conflict with each other and thus call for policy coordination for effec...

  5. Inorganic, coordination and organometallic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jursik, F.

    1978-01-01

    Separation of cations and anions of inorganic, coordination and metalloorganic compounds by the method of liquid column chromatography is considered. Common scheme of multicomponent cation mixture is suggesteed. Separation conditions, adsrbents, eluents, pH value solution concenstration, elution rate are also suggested. Separation of rare earth elements Cs, Be, Cd, Te, Th, U, Mo, Re, V, Ru, Zr, In compounds is considered as an example of liquid column chromatography application. Data on column chromatography application are summarized in a table

  6. Porphyrin coordination polymer nanospheres and nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongchun; Shelnutt, John A.; Medforth, Craig J.

    2012-12-04

    A porphyrin coordination polymer nanostructure comprising a network of pyridyl porphyrin molecules and coordinating metal ions coordinatively bound through the pyridyl groups. In some embodiments, the porphyrins are metalloporphyrins. A variety of nanostructures are formed by the network polymer, including nanospheres, polygonal nanostructures, nanorods, and nanofibers, depending on a variety of factors including coordination metal ion, porphyrin type, metal of the metalloporphyrin, and degree of agitation during nanostructure formation. Reduction of coordinating metal ions may be used to form metal nanoparticles on the coordination polymer nanostructure.

  7. Rare earth niobate coordination polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniz, Collin N.; Patel, Hiral; Fast, Dylan B.; Rohwer, Lauren E. S.; Reinheimer, Eric W.; Dolgos, Michelle; Graham, Matt W.; Nyman, May

    2018-03-01

    Rare-earth (RE) coordination polymers are infinitely tailorable to yield luminescent materials for various applications. Here we described the synthesis of a heterometallic rare-earth coordination compound ((CH3)2SO)3(RE)NbO(C2O4)3((CH3)2SO) = dimethylsulfoxide, DMSO, (C2O2= oxalate), (RE=La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb). The structure was obtained from single crystal X-ray diffraction of the La analogue. The Nb˭O and DMSO terminal-bonding character guides assembly of an open framework structure with noncentrosymmetric RE-coordination geometry, and large spacing between the RE centers. A second structure was observed by PXRD for the smaller rare earths (Dy, Ho, Er, Yb); this structure has not yet been determined. The materials were further characterized using FTIR, and photoluminescence measurements. Characteristic excitation and emission transitions were observed for RE = Nd, Sm, Eu, and Tb. Quantum yield (QY) measurements were performed by exciting Eu and Tb analoges at 394 nm (QY 66%) and 464 nm (QY 71%) for Eu; and 370 nm (QY=40%) for Tb. We attribute the high QY and bright luminescence to two main structure-function properties of the system; namely the absence of water in the structure, and absence of concentration quenching.

  8. Co-ordinated action between youth-care and sports: facilitators and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermens, Niels; de Langen, Lisanne; Verkooijen, Kirsten T; Koelen, Maria A

    2017-07-01

    In the Netherlands, youth-care organisations and community sports clubs are collaborating to increase socially vulnerable youths' participation in sport. This is rooted in the idea that sports clubs are settings for youth development. As not much is known about co-ordinated action involving professional care organisations and community sports clubs, this study aims to generate insight into facilitators of and barriers to successful co-ordinated action between these two organisations. A cross-sectional study was conducted using in-depth semi-structured qualitative interview data. In total, 23 interviews were held at five locations where co-ordinated action between youth-care and sports takes place. Interviewees were youth-care workers, representatives from community sports clubs, and Care Sport Connectors who were assigned to encourage and manage the co-ordinated action. Using inductive coding procedures, this study shows that existing and good relationships, a boundary spanner, care workers' attitudes, knowledge and competences of the participants, organisational policies and ambitions, and some elements external to the co-ordinated action were reported to be facilitators or barriers. In addition, the participants reported that the different facilitators and barriers influenced the success of the co-ordinated action at different stages of the co-ordinated action. Future research is recommended to further explore the role of boundary spanners in co-ordinated action involving social care organisations and community sports clubs, and to identify what external elements (e.g. events, processes, national policies) are turning points in the formation, implementation and continuation of such co-ordinated action. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Promoting Mental Health and Community Participation: A study on participatory arts practice, creativity and play in the city of Buenos Aires, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Bang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to describe and analyze a participative health experience involving art, creativity and play, in articulation with the strategy of Comprehensive Primary Health Care focused on mental health. This experience is conducted by a network of institutions in Buenos Aires City.This is an exploratory and descriptive case study based on qualitative research methodologies. From an ethnographic perspective, the fieldwork revolved around interviews and participant observation records. The systematization process followed qualitative analysis content techniques. The outcomes describe a practice cored in intersectoral work, community participation, occupation of public space, creation of community gathering spaces and conformation of solidarity ties for addressing complex psychosocial issues. The main participatory processes focused on community organization and collective artistic creations are described. It is concluded that this experience shows great transforming potential, creating community conditions suitable for joint decision making on the health- illness care process itself.

  10. Global Ocean Carbon and Biogeochemistry Coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telszewski, Maciej; Tanhua, Toste; Palacz, Artur

    2016-04-01

    The complexity of the marine carbon cycle and its numerous connections to carbon's atmospheric and terrestrial pathways means that a wide range of approaches have to be used in order to establish it's qualitative and quantitative role in the global climate system. Ocean carbon and biogeochemistry research, observations, and modelling are conducted at national, regional, and global levels to quantify the global ocean uptake of atmospheric CO2 and to understand controls of this process, the variability of uptake and vulnerability of carbon fluxes into the ocean. These science activities require support by a sustained, international effort that provides a central communication forum and coordination services to facilitate the compatibility and comparability of results from individual efforts and development of the ocean carbon data products that can be integrated with the terrestrial, atmospheric and human dimensions components of the global carbon cycle. The International Ocean Carbon Coordination Project (IOCCP) was created in 2005 by the IOC of UNESCO and the Scientific Committee on Oceanic Research. IOCCP provides an international, program-independent forum for global coordination of ocean carbon and biogeochemistry observations and integration with global carbon cycle science programs. The IOCCP coordinates an ever-increasing set of observations-related activities in the following domains: underway observations of biogeochemical water properties, ocean interior observations, ship-based time-series observations, large-scale ocean acidification monitoring, inorganic nutrients observations, biogeochemical instruments and autonomous sensors and data and information creation. Our contribution is through the facilitation of the development of globally acceptable strategies, methodologies, practices and standards homogenizing efforts of the research community and scientific advisory groups as well as integrating the ocean biogeochemistry observations with the

  11. Multisites Coordination in Shared Multicast Trees

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dommel, H-P; Garcia-Luna-Aceves, J. J

    1999-01-01

    .... The protocol supports Internet-wide coordination for large and highly interactive groupwork, relying on transmission of coordination directives between group members across a shared end-to-end multicast tree...

  12. International Coordination of Lunar Polar Volatiles Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruener, J. E.; Suzuki, N. H.; Carpenter, J. D.

    2015-10-01

    The International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG) has established a study team to coordinate the worldwide interest in lunar polar volatiles, and in particular water ice, in an effort to stimulate cooperation and collaboration.

  13. The Imperative for Improved Global Economic Coordination

    OpenAIRE

    Stiglitz, Joseph E.

    2009-01-01

    While global coordination is absolutely essential, success in achieving it may prove difficult because economic globalization has outpaced political globalization. If we are to succeed, we will have to manage coordination better than we have in the past.

  14. Dreams: a framework for distributed synchronous coordination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Proença, J.; Clarke, D.; Vink, de E.P.; Arbab, F.

    2012-01-01

    Synchronous coordination systems, such as Reo, exchange data via indivisible actions, while distributed systems are typically asynchronous and assume that messages can be delayed or get lost. To combine these seemingly contradictory notions, we introduce the Dreams framework. Coordination patterns

  15. Reusable coordinator modules for massively concurrent applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Arbab (Farhad); C.L. Blom (Kees); F.J. Burger (Freek); C.T.H. Everaars (Kees)

    1998-01-01

    htmlabstractIsolating computation and communication concerns into separate pure computation and pure coordination modules enhances modularity, understandability and reusability of parallel and/or distributed software. MANIFOLD is a pure coordination language that encourages this separation. We use

  16. Coordinator, Evaluation Unit | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Job Summary The Evaluation Unit Coordinator is expected to: ... with Centre policies and procedures and disseminates information to Unit staff on changes ... Coordinates the planning and organization of technical and administrative meetings ...

  17. Process Coordination & Policy Officer | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Such liaison aims to ensure that the operational aspects and requirements are taken into account. ... Business Process Coordination and Change Management ... plan and coordinating the update of the Division's work plan by all managers; ...

  18. Community Education Parenting Resource Guide. Bulletin 1982, No. 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradwell, John; And Others

    Designed for use by community education coordinators, elementary classroom teachers, PTA workers, school volunteers, and parents, this guide offers suggestions about ways to unite the school and the home in efforts to help children learn. The first section discusses the expanded role of the community education coordinator in parenting programs and…

  19. Building AN International Polar Data Coordination Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulsifer, P. L.; Yarmey, L.; Manley, W. F.; Gaylord, A. G.; Tweedie, C. E.

    2013-12-01

    In the spirit of the World Data Center system developed to manage data resulting from the International Geophysical Year of 1957-58, the International Polar Year 2007-2009 (IPY) resulted in significant progress towards establishing an international polar data management network. However, a sustained international network is still evolving. In this paper we argue that the fundamental building blocks for such a network exist and that the time is right to move forward. We focus on the Arctic component of such a network with linkages to Antarctic network building activities. A review of an important set of Network building blocks is presented: i) the legacy of the IPY data and information service; ii) global data management services with a polar component (e.g. World Data System); iii) regional systems (e.g. Arctic Observing Viewer; iv) nationally focused programs (e.g. Arctic Observing Viewer, Advanced Cooperative Arctic Data and Information Service, Polar Data Catalogue, Inuit Knowledge Centre); v) programs focused on the local (e.g. Exchange for Local Observations and Knowledge of the Arctic, Geomatics and Cartographic Research Centre). We discuss current activities and results with respect to three priority areas needed to establish a strong and effective Network. First, a summary of network building activities reports on a series of productive meetings, including the Arctic Observing Summit and the Polar Data Forum, that have resulted in a core set of Network nodes and participants and a refined vision for the Network. Second, we recognize that interoperability for information sharing fundamentally relies on the creation and adoption of community-based data description standards and data delivery mechanisms. There is a broad range of interoperability frameworks and specifications available; however, these need to be adapted for polar community needs. Progress towards Network interoperability is reviewed, and a prototype distributed data systems is demonstrated. We

  20. Modeling Coordination Problems in a Music Ensemble

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frimodt-Møller, Søren R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper considers in general terms, how musicians are able to coordinate through rational choices in a situation of (temporary) doubt in an ensemble performance. A fictitious example involving a 5-bar development in an unknown piece of music is analyzed in terms of epistemic logic, more...... to coordinate. Such coordination can be described in terms of Michael Bacharach's theory of variable frames as an aid to solve game theoretic coordination problems....

  1. Parenting Coordinators' Practices Recommendations: A Qualitative Study

    OpenAIRE

    Hirsch, Barbara Phyllis

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study used a phenomenological approach to understand the experiences of seven parenting coordinators in using parenting coordination practices that they have found to be effective and would recommend to other parenting coordinators to achieve the following goals: educating parents, increasing the quality of parenting and co-parenting, managing conflict, and involving children and other family members in the process of parenting coordination. Data were collected with semi-str...

  2. A Dynamic Coordination Mechanism Using Adjustable Autonomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neef, R.M.; Vecht, B. van der; Dignum, F.; Meyer, J.J.C.

    2008-01-01

    Agents in an organization need to coordinate their actions in order to reach the organizational goals. This research describes the relation between types of coordination and the autonomy of actors. In an experimental setting we show that there is not one best way to coordinate in all situations. The

  3. A Dynamic Coordination Mechanism Using Adjustable Autonomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vecht, B. van der; Dignum, F.; Meyer, J.J.C.; Neef, R.M.

    2007-01-01

    Agents in an organization need to coordinate their actions in order to reach the organizational goals. This research describes the relation between types of coordination and the autonomy of actors. In an experimental setting we show that there is not one best way to coordinate in all situations. The

  4. 45 CFR 1310.23 - Coordinated transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coordinated transportation. 1310.23 Section 1310... START PROGRAM HEAD START TRANSPORTATION Special Requirements § 1310.23 Coordinated transportation. (a) Each agency providing transportation services must make reasonable efforts to coordinate transportation...

  5. The unified coordination language UnCL.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.S. de Boer (Frank); J.V. Guillen Scholten (Juan); J.F. Jacob (Joost)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we show how to use a (subset) of UML as an Unified Coordination Language (UnCL) that is based on a separation of concerns between coordination and computation. As such UnCL provides a general language for the coordination of, in particular, object-oriented applications. The

  6. A Note on the Dipole Coordinates

    OpenAIRE

    Kageyama, Akira; Sugiyama, Tooru; Watanabe, Kunihiko; Sato, Tetsuya

    2004-01-01

    A couple of orthogonal coordinates for dipole geometry are proposed for numerical simulations of plasma geophysics in the Earth's dipole magnetic field. These coordinates have proper metric profiles along field lines in contrast to the standard dipole coordinate system that is commonly used in analytical studies for dipole geometry.

  7. Optimization of strong and weak coordinates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, M.; Bickelhaupt, F.M.

    2006-01-01

    We present a new scheme for the geometry optimization of equilibrium and transition state structures that can be used for both strong and weak coordinates. We use a screening function that depends on atom-pair distances to differentiate strong coordinates from weak coordinates. This differentiation

  8. 47 CFR 27.57 - International coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Technical Standards § 27.57 International coordination. (a) WCS operations in the border areas shall be subject to coordination with those countries and provide protection to non-U.S... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false International coordination. 27.57 Section 27.57...

  9. 40 CFR 109.6 - Coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coordination. 109.6 Section 109.6 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS CRITERIA FOR STATE, LOCAL AND REGIONAL OIL REMOVAL CONTINGENCY PLANS § 109.6 Coordination. For the purposes of coordination...

  10. 49 CFR 214.325 - Train coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD WORKPLACE SAFETY Roadway Worker Protection § 214.325 Train coordination. Working limits established by a roadway worker through the use of train coordination shall comply with the... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Train coordination. 214.325 Section 214.325...

  11. Computation at a coordinate singularity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prusa, Joseph M.

    2018-05-01

    Coordinate singularities are sometimes encountered in computational problems. An important example involves global atmospheric models used for climate and weather prediction. Classical spherical coordinates can be used to parameterize the manifold - that is, generate a grid for the computational spherical shell domain. This particular parameterization offers significant benefits such as orthogonality and exact representation of curvature and connection (Christoffel) coefficients. But it also exhibits two polar singularities and at or near these points typical continuity/integral constraints on dependent fields and their derivatives are generally inadequate and lead to poor model performance and erroneous results. Other parameterizations have been developed that eliminate polar singularities, but problems of weaker singularities and enhanced grid noise compared to spherical coordinates (away from the poles) persist. In this study reparameterization invariance of geometric objects (scalars, vectors and the forms generated by their covariant derivatives) is utilized to generate asymptotic forms for dependent fields of interest valid in the neighborhood of a pole. The central concept is that such objects cannot be altered by the metric structure of a parameterization. The new boundary conditions enforce symmetries that are required for transformations of geometric objects. They are implemented in an implicit polar filter of a structured grid, nonhydrostatic global atmospheric model that is simulating idealized Held-Suarez flows. A series of test simulations using different configurations of the asymptotic boundary conditions are made, along with control simulations that use the default model numerics with no absorber, at three different grid sizes. Typically the test simulations are ∼ 20% faster in wall clock time than the control-resulting from a decrease in noise at the poles in all cases. In the control simulations adverse numerical effects from the polar

  12. Application coordination in pervasive systems

    CERN Document Server

    Majuntke, Verena Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    Pervasive applications are designed to support users in their daily life. For this purpose, applications interact with their environment, i.e. their context. They are able to adapt themselves to context changes or to explicitly change the context via actuators. If multiple applications are executed in the same context, interferences are likely to occur. To manage interferences, a coordination framework is presented in this thesis. Interferences are detected using a context model and information about applications' interaction with the context. The resolution of interference is achieved through

  13. Coordination compounds in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurisson, S.; Berning, D.; Wei Jia; Dangshe Ma

    1993-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals, drugs containing a radionuclide, are used routinely in nuclear medicine departments for the diagnosis of disease and are under investigation for use in the treatment of disease. Nuclear medicine takes advantage of both the nuclear properties of the radionuclide and the pharmacological properties of the radiopharmaceutical. Herein lies the real strength of nuclear medicine, the ability to monitor biochemical and physiological functions in vivo. This review discusses the coordination chemistry that forms the basis for nuclear medicine applications of the FDA-approved radiopharmaceuticals that are in clinical use, and of the most promising diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals that are in various stages of development. 232 refs

  14. Coordinated hybrid automatic repeat request

    KAUST Repository

    Makki, Behrooz

    2014-11-01

    We develop a coordinated hybrid automatic repeat request (HARQ) approach. With the proposed scheme, if a user message is correctly decoded in the first HARQ rounds, its spectrum is allocated to other users, to improve the network outage probability and the users\\' fairness. The results, which are obtained for single- and multiple-antenna setups, demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed approach in different conditions. For instance, with a maximum of M retransmissions and single transmit/receive antennas, the diversity gain of a user increases from M to (J+1)(M-1)+1 where J is the number of users helping that user.

  15. Organizing to Coordinate Child Care Services. (With an Appendix) The Greater Minneapolis Day Care Association: Early History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratliff, Patricia; Berryman, Pauline

    Systems of coordinating child care services are analyzed as a guide to organizing. Federal Community Child Care (4-C) are the focus of the analysis. In Part I, evolution of coordination, an initial steering committee is followed through its various phases of expansion--initial impetus, visibility, staffing patterns, parent involvement, community…

  16. CHILDREN'S HEALTH PROTECTION IN INTERSECTORAL CONNECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.E. Lapin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently discovered phenomenon of compensatory mechanism of absence of legislative durable national policy in health protection of children is described in this article. This mechanism was developed as a result of evolution of intersect oral connection for the sake of children's health protection. «National family policy», «national policy for the sake of children», «national policy in the field of circulation of narcotic, psychotropic substances and in the field of counteraction to its illegal use», «national policy of Russian federation in the field of education», «national policy in the field of labor relations» perform functions of such compensatory mechanism. Fact of regulation of social relations in the sphere of children's health protection with means of different active directions of national policy is evidence of legal assignment of a number of problems in children's health protection as real subject of policy. The negative feature of this problem is incomplete and fragmentary regulation of relationships in the field of children's health protection. This is the reason, which maintains a status of children's health protection service as passive dirigible object but not an active regulative factor.Key words: children, health, national policy.

  17. Challenges and opportunities for implementing an intersectoral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    nomadic pastoralism, household water storage, water resource development ... policy guidelines, differences in sectoral mandates and management culture, lack of .... sustainable, cost-effective integrated malaria control programmes in some ...

  18. Ambiguous Expectations for Intersectoral Action for Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heering Holt, Ditte; Waldorff, Susanne Boch; Tjørnhøj-Thomsen, Tine

    2018-01-01

    of such ideas has proven difficult though. In this paper we argue that neo-institutional theory can help us conceptualize implementation challenges by pointing to implicit expectations and contradictions associated with the ISA idea itself. With Denmark as empirical case, we conducted a document analysis...

  19. Managing chronic myeloid leukemia: a coordinated team care perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Stacie; Lord, Katharine; Bethelmie-Bryan, Beverly; Shepard, Marian W; Neely, Jessica; McLemore, Morgan; Reddy, Satyanarayan K; Montero, Aldemar; Jonas, William S; Gladney, Sara Pierson; Khanwani, Shyam L; Reddy, Silpa C; Lahiry, Anup K; Heffner, Leonard T; Winton, Elliott; Arellano, Martha; Khoury, Hanna Jean

    2012-04-01

    Treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) has seen dramatic progress in recent years with the development of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). To take maximum advantage of therapy with TKIs, compliance and good understanding of monitoring response to therapy are essential. We established a team that included a hematologist, a physician assistant (PA), and a nurse who work closely with a social worker, a pharmacist, and a research coordinator to assist patients throughout their journey with CML. The patient and the referring community oncologist were incorporated into this team. This coordinated team care approach takes advantage of each member's specific skills to provide patients with education about CML, encourage patients' strong involvement in tracking/monitoring results/response to therapy, and support patients with issues that arise throughout the long course of the disease. A low rate of noncompliance with clinic visits (3%) was an indirect measure of the impact of this approach. The inclusion of the referring oncologist in the team extended the tracking of monitoring results to the community practice. We conclude that a coordinated team care approach is feasible in the management of patients with CML. This approach provided patients with education and a good understanding of response to therapy and improved relations with the health care team. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Coordination and Integration of Global Ocean Observing through JCOMM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legler, D. M.; Meldrum, D. T.; Hill, K. L.; Charpentier, E.

    2016-02-01

    The primary objective of the JCOMM Observations Coordination Group (OCG) is to provide technical coordination to implement fully integrated ocean observing system across the entire marine meteorology and oceanographic community. JCOMM OCG works in partnership with the Global Ocean Observing System, , which focusses on setting observing system requirements and conducting evalutions. JCOMM OCG initially focused on major global observing networks (e.g. Argo profiling floats, moored buoys, ship based observations, sea level stations, reference sites, etc), and is now expanding its horizon in recognition of new observing needs and new technologies/networks (e.g. ocean gliders). Over the next five years the JCOMM OCG is focusing its attention on integration and coordination in four major areas: observing network implementation particularly in response to integrated ocean observing requirements; observing system monitoring and metrics; standards and best practices; and improving integrated data management and access. This presentation will describe the scope and mission of JCOMM OCG; summarize the state of the global ocean observing system; highlight recent successes and resources for the research, prediction, and assessment communities; summarize our plans for the next several years; and suggest engagement opportunities.

  1. Unpacking Coordination Benefits in Supply Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrick, Irene J.; Maitland, Carleen; Pogrebnyakov, Nicolai

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines how coordination among firms in supply networks generates benefits in the short and long terms for firms. It focuses on information technology (IT) and process improvement coordination. Analysis was performed on quantitative and qualitative data from a sample of SMEs in plastics...... manufacturing in Pennsylvania. Results indicate that coordination on both IT and process improvement leads to short- and long-term benefits. These relationships were mediated by the adoption of innovations (when coordinating on IT) and access to new capabilities (in process improvement coordination......). These results extend the understanding of how participation in supply networks benefits individual firms....

  2. Community Strategic Visioning as a Method to Define and Address Poverty: An Analysis from Select Rural Montana Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachapelle, Paul; Austin, Eric; Clark, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Community strategic visioning is a citizen-based planning process in which diverse sectors of a community collectively determine a future state and coordinate a plan of action. Twenty-one communities in rural Montana participated in a multi-phase poverty reduction program that culminated in a community strategic vision process. Research on this…

  3. Coordinated research projects (CRP). Coordinated research project (CRP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, Hidekazu; Koike, Fumihiro; Nakamura, Nobuyuki

    2013-01-01

    In the present paper, the contribution of Japanese scientists in coordinated research projects on thermonuclear fusion. Representative subjects taken in seven projects are the precise computation of theoretical data on electron-molecule collisions in the peripheral plasma, the computation of spectroscopic data of multi-charged tungsten ions, the spectroscopic measurement of multi-charged tungsten ions using an ion trap device, the development of collisional-radiative model for plasmas including hydrogen and helium, the computational and theoretical studies on the behavior of tungsten and beryllium in the plasma-wall interaction, the study on the property of dusts generated in fusion devices. These subjects are those of most important issues in ITER. (author)

  4. Optimal Energy Management of Multi-Microgrids with Sequentially Coordinated Operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nah-Oak Song

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We propose an optimal electric energy management of a cooperative multi-microgrid community with sequentially coordinated operations. The sequentially coordinated operations are suggested to distribute computational burden and yet to make the optimal 24 energy management of multi-microgrids possible. The sequential operations are mathematically modeled to find the optimal operation conditions and illustrated with physical interpretation of how to achieve optimal energy management in the cooperative multi-microgrid community. This global electric energy optimization of the cooperative community is realized by the ancillary internal trading between the microgrids in the cooperative community which reduces the extra cost from unnecessary external trading by adjusting the electric energy production amounts of combined heat and power (CHP generators and amounts of both internal and external electric energy trading of the cooperative community. A simulation study is also conducted to validate the proposed mathematical energy management models.

  5. Monitoring Resource Utilization in a Health Care Coordination Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popejoy, Lori L; Jaddoo, Julie; Sherman, Jan; Howk, Christopher; Nguyen, Raymond; Parker, Jerry C

    2015-01-01

    This initial article describes the development of a health care coordination intervention and documentation system designed using the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Care Coordination Atlas framework for Centers for Medicare & Medicaid-funded innovation project, Leveraging Information Technology to Guide High-Tech, High-Touch Care (LIGHT). The study occurred at an academic medical center that serves 114 counties. Twenty-five registered nurse care managers (NCMs) were hired to work with 137 providers in 10 family community and internal medicine clinics. Patients were allocated into one of the four tiers on the basis of their chronic medical conditions and health care utilization. Using a documentation system on the basis of the AHRQ domains developed for this study, time and touch data were calculated for 8,593 Medicare, Medicaid, or dual-eligible patients. We discovered through the touch and time analysis that the majority of health care coordination activity occurred in the AHRQ domains of communication, assess needs and goals, and facilitate transitions, accounting for 79% of the NCM time and 61% of the touches. As expected, increasing tier levels resulted in increased use of NCM resources. Tier 3 accounted for roughly 16% of the patients and received 159 minutes/member (33% of total minutes), and Tier 4 accounted for 4% of patients and received 316 minutes/member (17% of all minutes). In contrast Tier 2, which did not require routine touches per protocol, had 5,507 patients (64%), and those patients received 5,246 hours of health care coordination, or 57 minutes/member, and took 48% of NCM time. 1. The AHRQ Care Coordination Atlas offered a systematic way to build a documentation system that allowed for the extraction of data that was used to calculate the amount of time and the number of touches that NCMs delivered per member. 2. Using a framework to systematically guide the work of health care coordination helped NCMs to think strategically

  6. "Just like I'm saving money in the bank": client perspectives on care coordination services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freij, Maysoun; Weiss, Linda; Gass, Jonathon; Trezza, Claudia; Wiener, Abigail; Melly, Jeannine; Volland, Patricia

    2011-10-01

    Older adults face many challenges to community living. The literature has not sufficiently explored the roles of care coordination in the maintenance of housing and access to health care among older adults, particularly from their own perspectives. This qualitative study analyzes the findings from 25 interviews and 6 focus group discussions (48 participants) with a multiethnic sample of older adults in the New York City area. Care coordination services appear to assist older adults access health care, and to a lesser extent, maintain affordable housing. Disparities in access to care coordination appear to remain for immigrant, minority and suburban populations.

  7. Factors influencing perceived sustainability of Dutch community health programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeer, A J M; Van Assema, P; Hesdahl, B; Harting, J; De Vries, N K

    2015-09-01

    We assessed the perceived sustainability of community health programs organized by local intersectoral coalitions, as well as the factors that collaborating partners think might influence sustainability. Semi-structured interviews were conducted among 31 collaborating partners of 5 community health programs in deprived neighborhoods in the southern part of the Netherlands. The interview guide was based on a conceptual framework that includes factors related to the context, the leading organization, leadership, the coalition, collaborating partners, interventions and outcomes. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and content analyzed using NVivo 8.0. Participants in each of the programs varied in their perceptions of the sustainability of the program, but those people collaborating in pre-existing neighborhood structures expressed relatively high faith in their continuation. The participating citizens in particular believed that these structures would continue to address the health of the community in the future. We found factors from all categories of the conceptual framework that were perceived to influence sustainability. The program leaders appeared to be crucial to the programs, as they were frequently mentioned in close interaction with other factors. Program leaders should use a motivating and supportive leadership style and should act as 'program champions'. © The Author (2013). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Community care and social services.

    OpenAIRE

    Renwick, D.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of community care is to enable people with various types of disability to live in their own homes, rather than in institutions. This involves the provision of support and services at home by various agencies. After a critical report in 1986 identified problems with coordination and flexibility of community care services, the white paper Caring for People (1989) stated the government's aim to provide a "needs led," responsive range of services, promoting maximum independence of those w...

  9. The CARE project - Coordinated Accelerator Research in Europe

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    A one-day presentation of the project will take place on Monday February 10th in the CERN Council Chamber. The meeting will start a 9am and is expected to end at 4:30pm. The meeting, which is open to the whole community, will present an initiative on accelerator R&D in Europe, supported by ECFA, with the aim to bid for European Union support through the Framework 6 scheme. This initiative is coordinated by a steering group (ESGARD - European Steering Group on Accelerator Research and Development), which has been set up to coordinate European efforts on accelerator R&D and the submission of such bids. The initial bids have to be submitted by April 15th. All those interested in accelerator R&D are welcome to attend.

  10. Common Data Format (CDF) and Coordinated Data Analysis Web (CDAWeb)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candey, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    The Coordinated Data Analysis Web (CDAWeb) data browsing system provides plotting, listing and open access v ia FTP, HTTP, and web services (REST, SOAP, OPeNDAP) for data from mo st NASA Heliophysics missions and is heavily used by the community. C ombining data from many instruments and missions enables broad resear ch analysis and correlation and coordination with other experiments a nd missions. Crucial to its effectiveness is the use of a standard se lf-describing data format, in this case, the Common Data Format (CDF) , also developed at the Space Physics Data facility , and the use of metadata standa rds (easily edited with SKTeditor ). CDAweb is based on a set of IDL routines, CDAWlib . . The CDF project also maintains soft ware and services for translating between many standard formats (CDF. netCDF, HDF, FITS, XML) .

  11. Social forces for team coordination in ball possession game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Keiko; Shima, Hiroyuki; Fujii, Keisuke; Tabuchi, Noriyuki; Yamamoto, Yuji

    2018-02-01

    Team coordination is a basic human behavioral trait observed in many real-life communities. To promote teamwork, it is important to cultivate social skills that elicit team coordination. In the present work, we consider which social skills are indispensable for individuals performing a ball possession game in soccer. We develop a simple social force model that describes the synchronized motion of offensive players. Comparing the simulation results with experimental observations, we uncovered that the cooperative social force, a measure of perception skill, has the most important role in reproducing the harmonized collective motion of experienced players in the task. We further developed an experimental tool that facilitates real players' perceptions of interpersonal distance, revealing that the tool improves novice players' motions as if the cooperative social force were imposed.

  12. Coordinated control of electrical drives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keresztely, S.

    1983-01-01

    The control system developed for the fuel handling machine of nuclear power plants contains seven microcomputers. Redundant hardware and software structure ensures high reliability and availability. The sensors are doubled and each set is connected to its own microcomputer for evaluation of measurements. The control program, coordinating seven electrical drives, is run on two identical microcomputers, and has access to both sets of measurement results. Two control desks are provided. The seventh microcomputer generates the digital picture of the working site around the actual position and the picture is sent to color TV monitors at the control desks. System reliability: failure of any part of the system causes an error message and no action. System availability: for emergency purposes, one of every pair of the identical subsystems must be operational. In this emergency mode unconditional reliability is lost. (author)

  13. Coordination control of distributed systems

    CERN Document Server

    Villa, Tiziano

    2015-01-01

    This book describes how control of distributed systems can be advanced by an integration of control, communication, and computation. The global control objectives are met by judicious combinations of local and nonlocal observations taking advantage of various forms of communication exchanges between distributed controllers. Control architectures are considered according to  increasing degrees of cooperation of local controllers:  fully distributed or decentralized control,  control with communication between controllers,  coordination control, and multilevel control.  The book covers also topics bridging computer science, communication, and control, like communication for control of networks, average consensus for distributed systems, and modeling and verification of discrete and of hybrid systems. Examples and case studies are introduced in the first part of the text and developed throughout the book. They include: control of underwater vehicles, automated-guided vehicles on a container terminal, contro...

  14. Control coordination abilities in shock combat sports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya Boychenko

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: optimize the process control level of coordination abilities in martial arts. Material and Methods: analysis and compilation of scientific and methodological literature, interviews with coaches of drum martial arts, video analysis techniques, teacher observations. Results: identified specific types of coordination abilities in shock combat sports. Pod branny and offered specific and nonspecific tests to monitor the level of species athletes coordination abilities. Conclusion: it is determined that in order to achieve victory in the fight martial artists to navigate the space to be able to assess and manage dynamic and spatio-temporal parameters of movements, maintain balance, have a high coordination of movements. The proposed tests to monitor species coordination abilities athletes allow an objective assessment of not only the overall level of coordination, and the level of specific types of manifestations of this ability.

  15. Photoactive devices including porphyrinoids with coordinating additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Stephen R; Zimmerman, Jeramy; Yu, Eric K; Thompson, Mark E; Trinh, Cong; Whited, Matthew; Diev, Vlacheslav

    2015-05-12

    Coordinating additives are included in porphyrinoid-based materials to promote intermolecular organization and improve one or more photoelectric characteristics of the materials. The coordinating additives are selected from fullerene compounds and organic compounds having free electron pairs. Combinations of different coordinating additives can be used to tailor the characteristic properties of such porphyrinoid-based materials, including porphyrin oligomers. Bidentate ligands are one type of coordinating additive that can form coordination bonds with a central metal ion of two different porphyrinoid compounds to promote porphyrinoid alignment and/or pi-stacking. The coordinating additives can shift the absorption spectrum of a photoactive material toward higher wavelengths, increase the external quantum efficiency of the material, or both.

  16. Hamiltonization of theories with degenerate coordinates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gitman, D.M.; Tyutin, I.V.

    2002-01-01

    We consider a class of Lagrangian theories where part of the coordinates does not have any time derivatives in the Lagrange function (we call such coordinates degenerate). We advocate that it is reasonable to reconsider the conventional definition of singularity based on the usual Hessian and, moreover, to simplify the conventional hamiltonization procedure. In particular, in such a procedure, it is not necessary to complete the degenerate coordinates with the corresponding conjugate momenta

  17. Hamiltonization of theories with degenerate coordinates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gitman, D.M. E-mail: gitman@fma.if.usp.br; Tyutin, I.V. E-mail: tyutin@lpi.ru

    2002-05-27

    We consider a class of Lagrangian theories where part of the coordinates does not have any time derivatives in the Lagrange function (we call such coordinates degenerate). We advocate that it is reasonable to reconsider the conventional definition of singularity based on the usual Hessian and, moreover, to simplify the conventional hamiltonization procedure. In particular, in such a procedure, it is not necessary to complete the degenerate coordinates with the corresponding conjugate momenta.

  18. Convergence of barycentric coordinates to barycentric kernels

    KAUST Repository

    Kosinka, Jiří

    2016-02-12

    We investigate the close correspondence between barycentric coordinates and barycentric kernels from the point of view of the limit process when finer and finer polygons converge to a smooth convex domain. We show that any barycentric kernel is the limit of a set of barycentric coordinates and prove that the convergence rate is quadratic. Our convergence analysis extends naturally to barycentric interpolants and mappings induced by barycentric coordinates and kernels. We verify our theoretical convergence results numerically on several examples.

  19. Convergence of barycentric coordinates to barycentric kernels

    KAUST Repository

    Kosinka, Jiří ; Barton, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the close correspondence between barycentric coordinates and barycentric kernels from the point of view of the limit process when finer and finer polygons converge to a smooth convex domain. We show that any barycentric kernel is the limit of a set of barycentric coordinates and prove that the convergence rate is quadratic. Our convergence analysis extends naturally to barycentric interpolants and mappings induced by barycentric coordinates and kernels. We verify our theoretical convergence results numerically on several examples.

  20. Intersetorialidade, convergência e sustentabilidade: desafios do programa Bolsa Família em Manguinhos, RJ Intersectoral, convergent and sustainable actions: the challenges of the "Bolsa Família" program in Manguinhos shantytown in Rio de Janeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana Magalhães

    2011-11-01

    strategies adopted for integration with other social policy programs. The scope of this article is to discuss the findings of the study of the implementation of the "Bolsa Familia" in the Manguinhos shantytown area in Rio de Janeiro conducted in 2007 and 2008 based on semi-structured interviews with program officials and local stakeholders. In conclusion, the study shows that the sustainability of "Bolsa Familia" actions to reduce poverty and promote health equity calls for strengthening the vertical and horizontal communication channels between government levels, public managers and civil associations, recognition of the complexity of the local social demands and an intersectoral agenda.

  1. Group Coordination Support in Networked Multimedia Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dommel, Hans-Peter

    1999-01-01

    .... In this dissertation, we address network control and coordination functions to orchestrate synchronous multimedia groupwork, establishing a sharing discipline on multimedia resources and guaranteeing...

  2. EPOS for Coordination of Asynchronous Sensor Webs

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop, integrate, and deploy software-based tools to coordinate asynchronous, distributed missions and optimize observation planning spanning simultaneous...

  3. Quantization in rotating co-ordinates revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, F.; Qadir, A.

    1982-07-01

    Recent work on quantization in rotating co-ordinates showed that no radiation would be seen by an observer rotating with a constant angular speed. This work used a Galilean-type co-ordinate transformation. We show that the same result holds for a Lorentz-type co-ordinate system, in spite of the fact that the metric has a co-ordinate singularity at rΩ = 1. Further, we are able to define positive and negative energy modes for a particular case of a non-static, non-stationary metric. (author)

  4. Internationally coordinated glacier monitoring: strategy and datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoelzle, Martin; Armstrong, Richard; Fetterer, Florence; Gärtner-Roer, Isabelle; Haeberli, Wilfried; Kääb, Andreas; Kargel, Jeff; Nussbaumer, Samuel; Paul, Frank; Raup, Bruce; Zemp, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Internationally coordinated monitoring of long-term glacier changes provide key indicator data about global climate change and began in the year 1894 as an internationally coordinated effort to establish standardized observations. Today, world-wide monitoring of glaciers and ice caps is embedded within the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) in support of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) as an important Essential Climate Variable (ECV). The Global Terrestrial Network for Glaciers (GTN-G) was established in 1999 with the task of coordinating measurements and to ensure the continuous development and adaptation of the international strategies to the long-term needs of users in science and policy. The basic monitoring principles must be relevant, feasible, comprehensive and understandable to a wider scientific community as well as to policy makers and the general public. Data access has to be free and unrestricted, the quality of the standardized and calibrated data must be high and a combination of detailed process studies at selected field sites with global coverage by satellite remote sensing is envisaged. Recently a GTN-G Steering Committee was established to guide and advise the operational bodies responsible for the international glacier monitoring, which are the World Glacier Monitoring Service (WGMS), the US National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC), and the Global Land Ice Measurements from Space (GLIMS) initiative. Several online databases containing a wealth of diverse data types having different levels of detail and global coverage provide fast access to continuously updated information on glacier fluctuation and inventory data. For world-wide inventories, data are now available through (a) the World Glacier Inventory containing tabular information of about 130,000 glaciers covering an area of around 240,000 km2, (b) the GLIMS-database containing digital outlines of around 118,000 glaciers with different time stamps and

  5. A patient with autism and severe depression: medical and ethical challenges for an adolescent medicine unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, S Rachel; Ng, Cindy; McDonald, Ann; Walters, Tamara

    2005-10-17

    An adolescent with autism and intellectual disability presented with severe depression related to menstruation. Because of the complex medical, psychiatric and ethical issues involved, her care was coordinated by a hospital-based adolescent medicine unit. After trials of other therapies over an extended period and interdisciplinary and intersectoral case conferencing, it was decided that hysterectomy was the most appropriate management. This case highlights the complexity of adolescent health care in a tertiary hospital, the importance of intersectoral cooperation between hospital and community, and the integral role of interdisciplinary care of adolescent patients with chronic conditions.

  6. 78 FR 23276 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request: Community Drill...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-18

    ... Secretary of Homeland Security to ``coordinate a comprehensive campaign to build and sustain national... future outreach strategies related to participation in Community Drill Day. Affected Public: Individuals...

  7. Coordinating with the "Inner GPS".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, André A

    2015-06-01

    The 2014 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine was awarded for the discoveries that have elucidated the components of the internal positioning system that is centered on the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex. Here I provide a less than objective discussion of the importance of these accomplishments to systems neuroscience. By identifying positioning components like place, direction, distance, borders and the like, the field is given the opportunity to have a shot at piecing together how these components are integrated into the synthetic positioning sense. We are also given what is in my view, the most experimentally accessible and therefore potentially understandable, cognitive representation. Lest we feel too confident in the completeness of our understanding, and to inspire redoubled curiosity, I briefly describe a preliminary observation from our work with the psychosis-inducing drug phencyclidine (PCP). While PCP does not disturb where individual place cells fire, it dramatically discoordinates how these cells discharge together in time. Trying to understand how the positioning component cells are coordinated to provide useful knowledge is an exciting and tenable problem to be working on. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Emission and null coordinates: geometrical properties and physical construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coll, Bartolome; Ferrando, Joan J; Morales-Lladosa, Juan A

    2011-01-01

    A Relativistic Positioning System is defined by four clocks (emitters) broadcasting their proper time. Then, every event reached by the signals is naturally labeled by these four times which are the emission coordinates of this event. The coordinate hypersurfaces of the emission coordinates are the future light cones based on the emitter trajectories. For this reason the emission coordinates have been also named null coordinates or light coordinates. Nevertheless, other coordinate systems used in different relativistic contexts have the own right to be named null or light coordinates. Here we analyze when one can say that a coordinate is a null coordinate and when one can say that a coordinate system is null. Moreover, we examine the physical construction and the geometrical properties of several n ull coordinate systems : the emission and the reception coordinates, the radar coordinates, and the Bondi-Sachs coordinates, among others.

  9. Vaidya spacetime in the diagonal coordinates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berezin, V. A., E-mail: berezin@inr.ac.ru; Dokuchaev, V. I., E-mail: dokuchaev@inr.ac.ru; Eroshenko, Yu. N., E-mail: eroshenko@inr.ac.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    We have analyzed the transformation from initial coordinates (v, r) of the Vaidya metric with light coordinate v to the most physical diagonal coordinates (t, r). An exact solution has been obtained for the corresponding metric tensor in the case of a linear dependence of the mass function of the Vaidya metric on light coordinate v. In the diagonal coordinates, a narrow region (with a width proportional to the mass growth rate of a black hole) has been detected near the visibility horizon of the Vaidya accreting black hole, in which the metric differs qualitatively from the Schwarzschild metric and cannot be represented as a small perturbation. It has been shown that, in this case, a single set of diagonal coordinates (t, r) is insufficient to cover the entire range of initial coordinates (v, r) outside the visibility horizon; at least three sets of diagonal coordinates are required, the domains of which are separated by singular surfaces on which the metric components have singularities (either g{sub 00} = 0 or g{sub 00} = ∞). The energy–momentum tensor diverges on these surfaces; however, the tidal forces turn out to be finite, which follows from an analysis of the deviation equations for geodesics. Therefore, these singular surfaces are exclusively coordinate singularities that can be referred to as false fire-walls because there are no physical singularities on them. We have also considered the transformation from the initial coordinates to other diagonal coordinates (η, y), in which the solution is obtained in explicit form, and there is no energy–momentum tensor divergence.

  10. Care coordinators: a controlled evaluation of an inpatient mental health service innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Malcolm W; Wilson, Michael; Bergquist, Karla; Thorburn, John

    2012-02-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the impact of introducing designated care coordinators into an acute mental health inpatient unit in terms of service delivery, clinical outcomes, and service user and significant other perceptions. A pre-post-controlled design was implemented with a consecutive sample of 292 service users admitted and staying more than 5 days in two wards, with care coordinators introduced in one ward. Data were obtained from clinical records, standard measures, and service user and significant other surveys. Care coordinator input was associated with significant improvements in service delivery and stronger involvement of significant others and community resources. Care-coordinated clients showed significantly better clinical outcomes, including the Health of Nations Outcome Scales behaviour subscale, less time in the intensive care subunit, less community crisis team input in the week following discharge, and lower rates of readmission in the month following discharge. Care-coordinated service users and their significant others gave higher ratings of service delivery, outcome, and satisfaction. The results indicate that designated care coordinators significantly improve care processes, outcomes, and service user experience in acute inpatient mental health settings. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2011 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  11. THE CARE PROJECT - Coordinated Accelerator Research in Europe

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    A one-day presentation of the project will take place on Monday February 10th in the CERN Council Chamber. The meeting will start a 9am and is expected to end at 4:30pm. The meeting, which is open to the whole community, will present an initiative on accelerator R&D in Europe, supported by ECFA, with the aim to bid for European Union support through the Framework 6 scheme. This initiative is coordinated by a steering group (ESGARD - European Steering Group on Accelerator Research and Development), which has been set up to coordinate European efforts on accelerator R&D and the submission of such bids. The initial bids have to be submitted by April 15th. All those interested in accelerator R&D are welcome to attend. Presentation of the CARE project (Coordinated Accelerator Research in Europe) to be submitted within FP6 February 10th, at CERN in the council room Agenda Chair : C. Wyss 9:00 General presentation of FP6 and introduction of IA proposal (R. Aleksan) 9:45 Networking activities on e ...

  12. On superfield covariant quantization in general coordinates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gitman, D.M.; Moshin, P. Yu.; Tomazelli, J.L.

    2005-01-01

    We propose a natural extension of the BRST-antiBRST superfield covariant scheme in general coordinates. Thus, the coordinate dependence of the basic tensor fields and scalar density of the formalism is extended from the base supermanifold to the complete set of superfield variables. (orig.)

  13. On superfield covariant quantization in general coordinates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gitman, D.M. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica, Sao Paulo, S.P (Brazil); Moshin, P. Yu. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica, Sao Paulo, S.P (Brazil); Tomsk State Pedagogical University, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Tomazelli, J.L. [UNESP, Departamento de Fisica e Quimica, Campus de Guaratingueta (Brazil)

    2005-12-01

    We propose a natural extension of the BRST-antiBRST superfield covariant scheme in general coordinates. Thus, the coordinate dependence of the basic tensor fields and scalar density of the formalism is extended from the base supermanifold to the complete set of superfield variables. (orig.)

  14. Self-triggered coordination with ternary controllers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Persis, Claudio; Frasca, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    This paper regards coordination of networked systems with ternary controllers. We develop a hybrid coordination system which implements a self-triggered communication policy, based on polling the neighbors upon need. We prove that the proposed scheme ensures finite-time convergence to a neighborhood

  15. Politics of coordination in environmental health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jesper; Kjærgård, Bente; Jelsøe, Erling

    2015-01-01

    on environmental policy integration, for studying the efforts and paradoxes in sector co-ordination, in order to reflect on the pro et cons of integrative approaches to environment and public health. We will give an overview of the various approaches to coordinative efforts from an international to a national...

  16. Project Coordinator - Karianet | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Primary Duties or Responsibilities. The specific responsibilities of the Project Coordinator are grouped into three categories: Knowledge Management, Research Management and Project Management. As Knowledge Manager, the program coordinator will play a lead role in: Introducing and using knowledge management ...

  17. Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-05-31

    This report summarizes EMaCC activities for fiscal year 1990 and describes the materials research programs of various offices and divisions within the department. The DOE Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) serves primarily to enhance coordination among the Department's materials programs and to further the effective use of materials expertise within the department. (JL)

  18. Conventions and institutions in coordination problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Lecq, S.G.

    1996-01-01

    This survey article starts with a game-theory interpretation of coordination problems that occur in an economy. Three types of games are discussed in which the degree of coordination versus conflict varies. It is shown that game-theoretic techniques for equilibrium selection or securing the highest

  19. 78 FR 73819 - Forest Resource Coordinating Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Forest Resource Coordinating Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of Cancellation. SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service was required to cancel the October 17-18, 2013 meeting of the Forest Resource Coordinating Committee...

  20. 78 FR 57128 - Forest Resource Coordinating Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-17

    ... agencies and the private sector, to effectively address the national priorities for non-industrial private... Coordinating Committee Web site at http://www.fs.fed.us/spf/coop/frcc/ . Visitors are encouraged to call ahead... Resource Coordinating Committee can be found by visiting the Committee's Web site at: http://www.fs.fed.us...

  1. 40 CFR 35.272 - Funding coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Funding coordination. 35.272 Section 35.272 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE....272 Funding coordination. Recipients must use the lead-based paint program funding in a way that...

  2. 40 CFR 35.691 - Funding coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Funding coordination. 35.691 Section 35.691 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE...(g)) § 35.691 Funding coordination. Recipients must use the Lead-Based Paint program funding in a way...

  3. 40 CFR 233.31 - Coordination requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coordination requirements. 233.31 Section 233.31 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) OCEAN DUMPING 404 STATE PROGRAM REGULATIONS Program Operation § 233.31 Coordination requirements. (a) If a proposed...

  4. 7 CFR 624.5 - Coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Coordination. 624.5 Section 624.5 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WATER RESOURCES EMERGENCY WATERSHED PROTECTION § 624.5 Coordination. (a) If the President declares...

  5. Vendor-Buyer Coordination in Supply Chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J.J. Verheijen (Bas)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractCollaboration between firms in order to coordinate supply chain operations can lead to both strategic and operational benefits. Many advanced forms of collaboration arrangements between firms exist with the aim to coordinate supply chain decisions and to reap these benefits. This

  6. Microgrids and distributed generation systems: Control, operation, coordination and planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Liang

    Distributed Energy Resources (DERs) which include distributed generations (DGs), distributed energy storage systems, and adjustable loads are key components in microgrid operations. A microgrid is a small electric power system integrated with on-site DERs to serve all or some portion of the local load and connected to the utility grid through the point of common coupling (PCC). Microgrids can operate in both grid-connected mode and island mode. The structure and components of hierarchical control for a microgrid at Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT) are discussed and analyzed. Case studies would address the reliable and economic operation of IIT microgrid. The simulation results of IIT microgrid operation demonstrate that the hierarchical control and the coordination strategy of distributed energy resources (DERs) is an effective way of optimizing the economic operation and the reliability of microgrids. The benefits and challenges of DC microgrids are addressed with a DC model for the IIT microgrid. We presented the hierarchical control strategy including the primary, secondary, and tertiary controls for economic operation and the resilience of a DC microgrid. The simulation results verify that the proposed coordinated strategy is an effective way of ensuring the resilient response of DC microgrids to emergencies and optimizing their economic operation at steady state. The concept and prototype of a community microgrid that interconnecting multiple microgrids in a community are proposed. Two works are conducted. For the coordination, novel three-level hierarchical coordination strategy to coordinate the optimal power exchanges among neighboring microgrids is proposed. For the planning, a multi-microgrid interconnection planning framework using probabilistic minimal cut-set (MCS) based iterative methodology is proposed for enhancing the economic, resilience, and reliability signals in multi-microgrid operations. The implementation of high-reliability microgrids

  7. Evaluation of vertical coordinate and vertical mixing algorithms in the HYbrid-Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliwell, George R.

    Vertical coordinate and vertical mixing algorithms included in the HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) are evaluated in low-resolution climatological simulations of the Atlantic Ocean. The hybrid vertical coordinates are isopycnic in the deep ocean interior, but smoothly transition to level (pressure) coordinates near the ocean surface, to sigma coordinates in shallow water regions, and back again to level coordinates in very shallow water. By comparing simulations to climatology, the best model performance is realized using hybrid coordinates in conjunction with one of the three available differential vertical mixing models: the nonlocal K-Profile Parameterization, the NASA GISS level 2 turbulence closure, and the Mellor-Yamada level 2.5 turbulence closure. Good performance is also achieved using the quasi-slab Price-Weller-Pinkel dynamical instability model. Differences among these simulations are too small relative to other errors and biases to identify the "best" vertical mixing model for low-resolution climate simulations. Model performance deteriorates slightly when the Kraus-Turner slab mixed layer model is used with hybrid coordinates. This deterioration is smallest when solar radiation penetrates beneath the mixed layer and when shear instability mixing is included. A simulation performed using isopycnic coordinates to emulate the Miami Isopycnic Coordinate Ocean Model (MICOM), which uses Kraus-Turner mixing without penetrating shortwave radiation and shear instability mixing, demonstrates that the advantages of switching from isopycnic to hybrid coordinates and including more sophisticated turbulence closures outweigh the negative numerical effects of maintaining hybrid vertical coordinates.

  8. Coordinated School Health and the Contribution of a District Wellness Coordinator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westrich, Lisa; Sanchez, Monika; Strobel, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Background: A San Francisco Bay Area school health initiative was established in fall 2010 to improve wellness programs in 4 local school districts using the Coordinated School Health (CSH) model. This study examines the role of district-wide wellness coordinators and the ways in which they contribute to intentional coordination of health and…

  9. Relational Coordination in Danish General Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundstrøm, Sanne Lykke

    . The dissertation present the research study and a collection of three research papers prepared during the period from May 2010 to June 2014. Relational coordination and organisational social capital are measures of novel aspects of an organisation's performance. Relational coordination analyse the communication...... and relationship networks through which work is coordinated across functional and organisational boundaries. Previous studies have shown that relational coordination is positively associated with delivery of care for patients with chronic illness. Organisational social capital is used when analysing...... the psychosocial work environment in organisations, and is seen as a powerful resources for improving organisational performance. Relational coordination and organisational social capital may oer new insight and opportunities for general practice to learn. General practice provides cost-efficient, first...

  10. Coordinate metrology accuracy of systems and measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Sładek, Jerzy A

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses on effective methods for assessing the accuracy of both coordinate measuring systems and coordinate measurements. It mainly reports on original research work conducted by Sladek’s team at Cracow University of Technology’s Laboratory of Coordinate Metrology. The book describes the implementation of different methods, including artificial neural networks, the Matrix Method, the Monte Carlo method and the virtual CMM (Coordinate Measuring Machine), and demonstrates how these methods can be effectively used in practice to gauge the accuracy of coordinate measurements. Moreover, the book includes an introduction to the theory of measurement uncertainty and to key techniques for assessing measurement accuracy. All methods and tools are presented in detail, using suitable mathematical formulations and illustrated with numerous examples. The book fills an important gap in the literature, providing readers with an advanced text on a topic that has been rapidly developing in recent years. The book...

  11. The shallow water equations in Lagrangian coordinates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mead, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    Recent advances in the collection of Lagrangian data from the ocean and results about the well-posedness of the primitive equations have led to a renewed interest in solving flow equations in Lagrangian coordinates. We do not take the view that solving in Lagrangian coordinates equates to solving on a moving grid that can become twisted or distorted. Rather, the grid in Lagrangian coordinates represents the initial position of particles, and it does not change with time. We apply numerical methods traditionally used to solve differential equations in Eulerian coordinates, to solve the shallow water equations in Lagrangian coordinates. The difficulty with solving in Lagrangian coordinates is that the transformation from Eulerian coordinates results in solving a highly nonlinear partial differential equation. The non-linearity is mainly due to the Jacobian of the coordinate transformation, which is a precise record of how the particles are rotated and stretched. The inverse Jacobian must be calculated, thus Lagrangian coordinates cannot be used in instances where the Jacobian vanishes. For linear (spatial) flows we give an explicit formula for the Jacobian and describe the two situations where the Lagrangian shallow water equations cannot be used because either the Jacobian vanishes or the shallow water assumption is violated. We also prove that linear (in space) steady state solutions of the Lagrangian shallow water equations have Jacobian equal to one. In the situations where the shallow water equations can be solved in Lagrangian coordinates, accurate numerical solutions are found with finite differences, the Chebyshev pseudospectral method, and the fourth order Runge-Kutta method. The numerical results shown here emphasize the need for high order temporal approximations for long time integrations

  12. A trichordal temporal approach to digital coordination: the sociomaterial mangling of the CERN grid

    CERN Document Server

    Venters, Will; Barrett, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This paper develops a sociomaterial perspective on dig ital coordination. It extends Pickering’s mangle of practice by using a trichordal approach to temporal em ergence. We provide new understanding as to how the nonhuman and human agencies involved in coordination are embedded in the past, present, and future. We draw on an in-depth field study conducted between 2006 and 2010 of the development, introduction, and use of a computing grid infrastructure by the CERN partic le physics community. Three coordination tensions are identified at different temporal dimensions, namely obtaining adequate transparency in the present, modeling a future infrastructure, and the historical disciplining of social and material inertias. We propose and develop the concept of digital coordination, and contribut e a trichordal temporal approach to understanding the development and use of digital infrastructure as being or ientated to the past and future while emerging in the present.

  13. [Coordination between pharmaceutical services for integrated pharmacotherapy: the case of Catalonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Karen Sarmento; Goldbaum, Moisés; Guayta-Escolies, Rafel; Modamio, Pilar; Mariño, Eduardo Luis; Tolsá, José Luis Segú

    2017-08-01

    Pharmaceutical policies have been considered strategies to contribute to the guarantee of care coordination and clinical integration. This study sought to describe the pharmaceutical services developed at different levels of care in the health network in Catalonia, as well as to identify and analyze the mechanisms and instruments that act as facilitators and/or barriers to the coordination of pharmacotherapy. This is a descriptive study of 12 cases of hospital pharmacy services, primary care and community pharmacies. Advances related to the perception, formalization and clinical and assistance coordination of the pharmaceutical services were identified. However, weaknesses and potential improvements in coordination were observed. The conclusion drawn was that the different tools and instruments implemented appear to facilitate a greater possibility of integration between pharmaceutical services and the latter with the health services network to contribute to integrated pharmacotherapy.

  14. Lessons Learned from the Whole Child and Coordinated School Health Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasberry, Catherine N.; Slade, Sean; Lohrmann, David K.; Valois, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The new Whole School, Whole Community, Whole Child (WSCC) model, designed to depict links between health and learning, is founded on concepts of coordinated school health (CSH) and a whole child approach to education. Methods: The existing literature, including scientific articles and key publications from national agencies and…

  15. Quantifying Collaboration Using Himmelman's Strategies for Working Together: Findings from the Tennessee Coordinated School Health Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Megan A; Southerland, Jodi L.; Richards, Kasie; Slawson, Deborah L; Behringer, Bruce; Johns-Womack, Rebecca; Smith, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Coordinated school health programs (CSHPs), a type of health promoting school (HPS) program adopted by Canada and the USA, were developed to provide a comprehensive approach to school health in the USA. Community partnerships are central to CSHP and HPS efforts, yet the quality of collaboration efforts is rarely assessed. The purpose of…

  16. Enhancing response coordination through the assessment of response network structural dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Abbasi

    Full Text Available Preparing for intensifying threats of emergencies in unexpected, dangerous, and serious natural or man-made events, and consequent management of the situation, is highly demanding in terms of coordinating the personnel and resources to support human lives and the environment. This necessitates prompt action to manage the uncertainties and risks imposed by such extreme events, which requires collaborative operation among different stakeholders (i.e., the personnel from both the state and local communities. This research aims to find a way to enhance the coordination of multi-organizational response operations. To do so, this manuscript investigates the role of participants in the formed coordination response network and also the emergence and temporal dynamics of the network. By analyzing an inter-personal response coordination operation to an extreme bushfire event, the networks' and participants' structural change is evaluated during the evolution of the operation network over four time durations. The results reveal that the coordination response network becomes more decentralized over time due to the high volume of communication required to exchange information. New emerging communication structures often do not fit the developed plans, which stress the need for coordination by feedback in addition to by plan. In addition, we find that the participant's brokering role in the response operation network identifies a formal and informal coordination role. This is useful for comparison of network structures to examine whether what really happens during response operations complies with the initial policy.

  17. Future Secretariat: an innovation research coordination and governance structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojima, D. S.; Johan, R.; Cramer, W.; Fukushi, K.; Allard, S.

    2014-12-01

    Future Earth, an emerging global sustainability research program, will be managed by a novel, internationally distributed secretariat spanning the globe and providing a platform for co-design, co-production, and co-delivery of knowledge to support research on the earth system, global development and transformation toward sustainability. The Future Earth secretariat has an innovative structure consisting of five global hubs functioning as a single entity; these hubs are located in Canada, Japan, France, Sweden, and the United States. The secretariat's reach is extended through a set of regional hubs covering Latin America, the Middle East, Africa, Europe, and Asia, with the potential to expand to additional areas. This secretariat will operate under the auspices of the Future Earth Governing Council The Future Earth Secretariat will support and enable the implementation of knowledge-sharing between research and stakeholder communities to enable society to cope with and to alter global environmental trends, and to transition society toward sustainability. The secretariat will provide coordination support to over 25 global environmental core projects and committees; coordinate scientific work across the whole Future Earth agenda; develop and implement innovative mechanisms for bottom-up inputs, synthesis and integration. Future Earth, as a research program, aims to support global transformations toward sustainability through partnerships among scientific and stakeholder communities worldwide. It brings together existing international environmental research core projects associated with DIVERSITAS, the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme, the International Human Dimensions Programme, and the World Climate Research Programme—to support coordinated, interdisciplinary research that can be used by decision makers seeking to reduce their impact and provide more sustainable products and services. USGCRP partners with Future Earth through scientific participation in

  18. Why Did Zika Not Explode in Cuba? The Role of Active Community Participation to Sustain Control of Vector-Borne Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Marta; Pérez, Dennis; Guzman, Maria G; Barrington, Clare

    2017-08-01

    As the global public health community develops strategies for sustainable Zika prevention and control, assessment of the Cuban response to Zika provides critical lessons learned. Cuba's early and successful response to Zika, grounded in the country's long-standing dengue prevention and control program, serves as a model of rapid mobilization of intersectoral efforts. Sustaining this response requires applying the evidence generated within the Cuban dengue program that active community participation improves outcomes and is sustainable and cost-effective. There is also a need for implementation science efforts to assess the transferability of lessons learned from Zika prevention and control to other pathogens and from one context to another in addition to how to take these efforts to scale.

  19. Movement constraints on interpersonal coordination and communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolston, Michael T; Shockley, Kevin; Riley, Michael A; Richardson, Michael J

    2014-10-01

    The present study investigated how constraining movement affects interpersonal coordination and joint cognitive performance. Pairs of participants worked cooperatively to solve picture-puzzle tasks in which they conversed to identify differences between pictures in 3 degree-of-constraint conditions: both participants were free to move their hands (free-free; FF); both participants' hands were restrained (restrained-restrained; RR); and the hands of 1 participant were free while the hands of the other participant were restrained (free-restrained; FR). Eye tracking data were collected, and movement was measured at the waist, hand, and head. Data were analyzed using Cross-Recurrence Quantification Analysis (CRQ). Postural sway coordination, gaze coordination, and task performance were predicted to be highest in FF, followed by RR, and then by FR. Results showed the asymmetric FR condition generally exhibited lesser degrees of coordination than the symmetric Conditions FF and RR, and that the patterning of coordination in the symmetric conditions varied across the measured body segments. These results demonstrate that movement restraints affect not only interpersonal postural coordination, but also joint attention. Additionally, significant positive relationships were found between task performance and total amount of anterior-posterior movement measured at the head, hand and waist; number of utterances; and number of differences pairs found in the puzzles. These findings indicate a relationship between movement and task performance consistent with the hypotheses that both interpersonal coordination and cognitive performance are sensitive to local action constraints.

  20. Near-Horizon Geodesics for Astrophysical and Idealised Black Holes: Coordinate Velocity and Coordinate Acceleration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petarpa Boonserm

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Geodesics (by definition have an intrinsic 4-acceleration zero. However, when expressed in terms of coordinates, the coordinate acceleration d 2 x i / d t 2 can very easily be non-zero, and the coordinate velocity d x i / d t can behave unexpectedly. The situation becomes extremely delicate in the near-horizon limit—for both astrophysical and idealised black holes—where an inappropriate choice of coordinates can quite easily lead to significant confusion. We shall carefully explore the relative merits of horizon-penetrating versus horizon-non-penetrating coordinates, arguing that in the near-horizon limit the coordinate acceleration d 2 x i / d t 2 is best interpreted in terms of horizon-penetrating coordinates.

  1. Coordination Logic for Repulsive Resolution Maneuvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narkawicz, Anthony J.; Munoz, Cesar A.; Dutle, Aaron M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an algorithm for determining the direction an aircraft should maneuver in the event of a potential conflict with another aircraft. The algorithm is implicitly coordinated, meaning that with perfectly reliable computations and information, it will in- dependently provide directional information that is guaranteed to be coordinated without any additional information exchange or direct communication. The logic is inspired by the logic of TCAS II, the airborne system designed to reduce the risk of mid-air collisions between aircraft. TCAS II provides pilots with only vertical resolution advice, while the proposed algorithm, using a similar logic, provides implicitly coordinated vertical and horizontal directional advice.

  2. 9th Conference on Coordinate Measuring Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, Leonardo; Dorph, Pernille

    2001-01-01

    This one-day conference on coordinate measuring machines is the 9th in a row of conferences organised in connection with the Danish CMM Club, a users’ group regarding CMMs that has existed in Denmark since 1994. The Danish CMM Club was founded by the Department of Manufacturing Engineering...... termination of the second lifetime cycle of the club. This conference treates the traceability of geometrical measurements with particular reference to those obtained using coordinate measuring machines. A number of on-going activities and new achievements in coordinate metrology are presented by European...

  3. Distributed Coordination of Household Electricity Consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juelsgaard, Morten; Teixeira, Andre; Johansson, Mikael

    2014-01-01

    This work presents a distributed framework for coordination of flexible electricity consumption for a number of households in the distribution grid. We conduct coordination with the purpose of minimizing a trade-off between individual concerns about discomfort and electricity cost, on the one hand......, and joint concerns about grid losses and voltage variations on the other. Our contribution is mainly to illustrate how to conduct distributed coordination when consumers are jointly coupled by grid losses and voltage variations. In addition we illustrate the benefit of including consumption management...... in the grid operation, and how different types of consumption may present various benefits....

  4. Community Economics

    OpenAIRE

    武藤, 宣道; Nobumichi, MUTOH

    2000-01-01

    This paper examines the new field of community economics with respect to Japan. A number of studies in community economics have already been produced in OECD countries including the United States. Although these are of great interest, each country has its own historical, socioeconomic context and must therefore develop its own approach to community economics. Community-oriented economics is neither macro-nor micro-economics in the standard economics textbook sense. Most community economics st...

  5. Community-Based Disaster Management: A Lesson Learned From Community Emergency Response Management in Banyumas, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratama, A. Y.; Sariffuddin, S.

    2018-02-01

    This article aimed to review community-based disaster management in terms of its independent coordination and disaster management. Community resilience was tested during disaster emergency. While panic, the community is required to be viable and able to evacuate, manage logistic, collect data on damage and the victim, and coordinate with outsiders independently. The community in Gununglurah Village, Banyumas Regency which was hit by a landslide in 2015 provides a lesson learned about community based disaster management. This research used qualitative descriptive methodology with in-depth interview with 23 informants from the community, donor institution, village officers, and government officers. Through traditional and informal methods, the community implemented disaster management that was categorized into 3 mechanisms that were social, functional, and sequential mechanism. These mechanisms controlled different portion in which social mechanism holds the most important role in disaster management, then functional mechanism and sequential mechanism. Various community activities in the village equipped the community with organizational experience to manage logistic, human resource and other coordination. In 2007, in fact, there was vulnerability risk assessment done by the local government, which recommended efforts to be done by the community to reduce the disaster risk, yet it was not implemented. It was interesting to note that in spite of the independent disaster management there was a scientific assessment neglected. Based on this research, a new discussion on how to synchronize the endogenous knowledge with scientific modern knowledge was opened.

  6. Coordination and Convening of the 2016 Arctic Science Summit Week

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinzman, Larry D. [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States)

    2016-11-13

    The Arctic Science Summit Week, Arctic Observing Summit, Arctic Council Senior Arctic Officials, Model Arctic Council, and International Arctic Assembly were convened on the campus of the University of Alaska Fairbanks with great productivity and satisfaction of the participants. We were pleased to welcome over 1000 participants from 30 different nations and over 130 different institutions. The organization and execution of these meetings was extensive and complex involving more than 250 coordinators, volunteers and contributors from across Alaska. The participants were enthusiastic in their praise of the content and accomplishments of the meeting, but they were equally happy about the genuine welcome offered to our guests by the people of Alaska. Hosting a complex event such as this summit required an army of supporting services and we were blessed to have volunteers from Fairbanks, North Pole, Anchorage and other communities throughout Alaska helping us meet these needs. This truly was an event hosted by the people of Alaska. The significance of these events cannot be overstated. The US and global communities are finally coming to the realization of the important role that the Arctic plays in international politics, economics, and science. The Arctic has experienced tremendous changes in recent years, offering new opportunities that may be addressed through international collaborations, and serious challenges that must be addressed through active investment, adaptation and national and international coordination. Over 10% of the meeting participants were indigenous peoples, from indigenous organizations or hailed from small remote communities. This is still lower than we had hoped, but it is greater participation than similar meetings have experienced in the past. It is through such engagement that we can attack problems related to the changing environment, stagnant economies, and social ills.

  7. Superfield extended BRST quantization in general coordinates

    OpenAIRE

    Geyer, B.; Gitman, D. M.; Lavrov, P. M.; Moshin, P. Yu.

    2003-01-01

    We propose a superfield formalism of Lagrangian BRST-antiBRST quantization of arbitrary gauge theories in general coordinates with the base manifold of fields and antifields desribed in terms of both bosonic and fermionic variables.

  8. Modeling, Control and Coordination of Helicopter Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ren, Beibei; Chen, Chang; Fua, Cheng-Heng; Lee, Tong Heng

    2012-01-01

    Modeling, Control and Coordination of Helicopter Systems provides a comprehensive treatment of helicopter systems, ranging from related nonlinear flight dynamic modeling and stability analysis to advanced control design for single helicopter systems, and also covers issues related to the coordination and formation control of multiple helicopter systems to achieve high performance tasks. Ensuring stability in helicopter flight is a challenging problem for nonlinear control design and development. This book is a valuable reference on modeling, control and coordination of helicopter systems,providing readers with practical solutions for the problems that still plague helicopter system design and implementation. Readers will gain a complete picture of helicopters at the systems level, as well as a better understanding of the technical intricacies involved. This book also: Presents a complete picture of modeling, control and coordination for helicopter systems Provides a modeling platform for a general class of ro...

  9. Axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic equilibria in local polar coordinates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clemente, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    The Grad--Shafranov equation for an ideal magnetohydrodynamic axisymmetric toroidal configuration is solved analytically in a local polar coordinate system using a novel method which produces solutions valid up to the second order in the inverse aspect ratio expansion

  10. Selective Placement Program Coordinator (SPPC) Directory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — List of the Selective Placement Program Coordinators (SPPC) in Federal agencies, updated as needed. Users can filter the list by choosing a state and/or agency name.

  11. Unraveling interlimb interactions underlying bimanual coordination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridderikhoff, A.; Daffertshofer, A.; Peper, C.E.; Beek, P.J.

    2005-01-01

    Three sources of interlimb interactions have been postulated to underlie the stability characteristics of bimanual coordination but have never been evaluated in conjunction: integrated timing of feedforward control signals, phase entrainment by contralateral afference, and timing corrections based

  12. The Schwarzschild metric: It's the coordinates, stupid!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromholz, Pierre; Poisson, Eric; Will, Clifford M.

    2014-04-01

    Every general relativity textbook emphasizes that coordinates have no physical meaning. Nevertheless, a coordinate choice must be made in order to carry out real calculations, and that choice can make the difference between a calculation that is simple and one that is a mess. We give a concrete illustration of the maxim that "coordinates matter" using the exact Schwarzschild solution for a vacuum, static spherical spacetime. We review the standard textbook derivation, Schwarzschild's original 1916 derivation, and a derivation using the Landau-Lifshitz formulation of the Einstein field equations. The last derivation is much more complicated, has one aspect for which we have been unable to find a solution, and gives an explicit illustration of the fact that the Schwarzschild geometry can be described in infinitely many coordinate systems.

  13. HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM): Global

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Global HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) and U.S. Navy Coupled Ocean Data Assimilation (NCODA) 3-day, daily forecast at approximately 9-km (1/12-degree)...

  14. Human Resources Coordinator | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Human Resources Coordinator supports the HR Business Partner in the delivery of ... of various reports for HR Business Partners and HR management. ... services and information to candidates applying on job openings in IDRC, ...

  15. Coordination in Categorical Compositional Distributional Semantics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitri Kartsaklis

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available An open problem with categorical compositional distributional semantics is the representation of words that are considered semantically vacuous from a distributional perspective, such as determiners, prepositions, relative pronouns or coordinators. This paper deals with the topic of coordination between identical syntactic types, which accounts for the majority of coordination cases in language. By exploiting the compact closed structure of the underlying category and Frobenius operators canonically induced over the fixed basis of finite-dimensional vector spaces, we provide a morphism as representation of a coordinator tensor, and we show how it lifts from atomic types to compound types. Linguistic intuitions are provided, and the importance of the Frobenius operators as an addition to the compact closed setting with regard to language is discussed.

  16. Coordination Approaches for Complex Software Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosse, T.; Hoogendoorn, M.; Treur, J.

    2006-01-01

    This document presents the results of a collaboration between the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Department of Artificial Intelligence and Force Vision to investigate coordination approaches for complex software systems. The project was funded by Force Vision.

  17. Coordination Polymer Gels by Electron Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji Ha; Cho, Young Je; Jung, Jong Hwa [Gyeongsang National Univ., Jinju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-01

    Hydrogenation of a pyridine derivative possessing tetrazole moieties as end groups, without long alkyl chain groups, results in the formation of a Mg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} coordination polymer gel. The polymer exhibits a strong fluorescence enhancement upon gel formation. 1 can also be gloated with a variety of magnesium anions such as SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, NO{sub 3}{sup -}, Cl{sup -}, Br{sup -} and I{sup -}, indicating that the coordination polymer gel formation of 1 does not strongly depends on anions. The Seam and ABM images of Mg{sup 2+} coordination polymer gel 1 display a flabbier network with several micrometers long, widths in the range 60-70 nm and thicknesses of about 3 nm. In addition, photophysical studies show that the hydrogel exhibits a typical {pi}-{pi} transition and gives rise to high fluorescence behavior. The coordination polymer hydrogel exhibits viscoelastic behavior as evidenced from the rheological studies.

  18. Coordinating Transit Transfers in Real Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-06

    Transfers are a major source of travel time variability for transit passengers. Coordinating transfers between transit routes in real time can reduce passenger waiting times and travel time variability, but these benefits need to be contrasted with t...

  19. Junior Information and Records Coordinator | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Information and Records Operations (IRO) Program Support ... Coordinator to support him/her performing day to day business assigned to this position. ... Digitization and digital assets management are main tasks to guarantee that digital ...

  20. Process Coordination and Policy Officer | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Such liaison aims to ensure that the operational aspects and requirements are taken into account. ... Business Process Coordination and Change Management ... Liaises with the Resources Planning and Development Officer of the Office of ...

  1. Desynchronizing electrical and sensory coordinated reset neuromodulation

    OpenAIRE

    Popovych, Oleksandr V.; Tass, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    Coordinated reset (CR) stimulation is a desynchronizing stimulation technique based on timely coordinated phase resets of sub-populations of a synchronized neuronal ensemble. It has initially been computationally developed for electrical deep brain stimulation (DBS), to enable an effective desynchronization and unlearning of pathological synchrony and connectivity (anti-kindling). Here we computationally show for ensembles of spiking and bursting model neurons interacting via excitatory and i...

  2. Desynchronizing Electrical and Sensory Coordinated Reset Neuromodulation

    OpenAIRE

    Oleksandr V. Popovych; Peter A. Tass; Peter A. Tass

    2012-01-01

    Coordinated reset (CR) stimulation is a desynchronizing stimulation technique based on timely coordinated phase resets of sub-populations of a synchronized neuronal ensemble. It has initially been computationally developed for electrical deep brain stimulation (DBS),to enable an effective desynchronization and unlearning of pathological synchrony and connectivity (anti-kindling). Here we computationally show for ensembles of spiking and bursting model neurons interacting via excitatory and in...

  3. Collaborative Supply Chain Planning and Coordination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Chee Yew

    products, differentiating retailers, accurate response (with forecast adjustment and premature replenishment), quick response (order-penetration-point relocation and lead-time reduction). These analyses extend the Fisher Model of responsiveness and refine six propositions or principles of responsiveness...... processes, particularly the behaviour of risk-taking/avoidance, conflict resolutions, and self-interest. All these lead to conclusion of five propositions or principles of supply chain coordination, and the theory of coordination process and behaviour. Combining the propositions of responsiveness...

  4. Trends in coordination and transmission service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    Investor-owned utilities increasingly are taking significant advantage of the benefits available from coordination transactions and transmission service. This chapter describes Edison Electric Institute (EEI's) estimate as to the growth in sales-for-resale (including coordination service) over the past two decades. With respect to transmission service, this chapter describes the significant growth in both the level of transmission service and the number of transmission agreements

  5. Co-ordinating Product Developing Activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terkelsen, Søren Bendix

    1996-01-01

    The paper contains a presentation of research methods to be used in case studies in product development and a presentation on how to deal with Design Co-ordination according to litterature......The paper contains a presentation of research methods to be used in case studies in product development and a presentation on how to deal with Design Co-ordination according to litterature...

  6. Traceability and uncertainty estimation in coordinate metrology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Savio, Enrico; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2001-01-01

    National and international standards have defined performance verification procedures for coordinate measuring machines (CMMs) that typically involve their ability to measure calibrated lengths and to a certain extent form. It is recognised that, without further analysis or testing, these results...... are required. Depending on the requirements for uncertainty level, different approaches may be adopted to achieve traceability. Especially in the case of complex measurement situations and workpieces the procedures are not trivial. This paper discusses the establishment of traceability in coordinate metrology...

  7. Control Coordination of Large Scale Hereditary Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-07-01

    Theory - A Hilbert Space Approach, (Academic Press, New York, 1982). [4] W. Findeisen , F. N. Bailey, M. Brdys, K Malinowski, P. Tatjewski and A. Wozniak... Findeisen et al. (1980), in the sense that local models are used in the design of component control laws and a higher level coordination problem is...Vol. 1, pp. 590-591, 1985. 3. W. Findeisen , F.N. Bailley, M. Brdys, K. Malinowski, P. Tatjewski and A. Wozniak, Control Coordination in Hierarchical

  8. Coordinated supply chain dynamic production planning model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Charu; Grabis, Janis

    2001-10-01

    Coordination of different and often contradicting interests of individual supply chain members is one of the important issues in supply chain management because the individual members can not succeed without success of the supply chain and vice versa. This paper investigates a supply chain dynamic production planning problem with emphasis on coordination. A planning problem is formally described using a supply chain kernel, which defines supply chain configuration, management policies, available resources and objectives both at supply chain or macro and supply chain member or micro levels. The coordinated model is solved in order to balance decisions made at the macro and micro levels and members' profitability is used as the coordination criterion. The coordinated model is used to determine inventory levels and production capacity across the supply chain. Application of the coordinated model distributes costs burden uniformly among supply chain members and preserves overall efficiency of the supply chain. Influence of the demand series uncertainty is investigated. The production planning model is a part of the integrated supply chain decision modeling system, which is shared among the supply chain members across the Internet.

  9. [A community education strategy to promote participation in dengue prevention in Cuba].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Lizet; Pérez, Dennis; Alfonso, Lázara; Castro, Marta; Sánchez, Luis Manuel; Van der Stuyft, Patrick; Kourí, Gustavo

    2008-07-01

    To document the process and analyze the results of implementing a strategy aimed at increasing community participation in the fight against the dengue mosquito vector. From May 2002 to May 2004, an intervention was implemented to advance social action against dengue in three districts of the municipality of Playa, La Habana, Cuba. A learning group and community working groups (CWG) were organized in each location. A community education model was followed that combines putting the plan of action into practice, with sessions to reflect and learn from the results, and then reworking of the actions for subsequent stages. Diagnostic tools were developed for communities, preventative actions, communication, surveillance, and evaluation. Changes in participation were identified by applying the content analysis technique to the documents and through interviews with key informants. The community work advanced at a pace relative to the abilities and interests of each community with different areas of focus: healthy community, environmental risk, and entomological risk. Positive changes in the concept of participation were obtained, according to the five areas evaluated: leadership, needs assessment, organization, management, and mobilization of resources. At the end of two years of intervention, the rate of Aedes aegypti larvae and pupae deposits found per 100 households had declined 79% and cases of dengue were not detected in any of the districts. This strategy reduced mosquito vector infestation levels by increasing community participation in decision-making and strengthening the competencies of the medical teams and CWGs so that they lead participative processes in the community and raised confidence in their ability to achieve change with the appropriate resources and intersectoral support.

  10. European coordination for coastal HF radar data in EMODnet Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mader, Julien; Novellino, Antonio; Gorringe, Patrick; Griffa, Annalisa; Schulz-Stellenfleth, Johannes; Montero, Pedro; Montovani, Carlo; Ayensa, Garbi; Vila, Begoña; Rubio, Anna; Sagarminaga, Yolanda

    2015-04-01

    Historically, joint effort has been put on observing open ocean, organizing, homogenizing, sharing and reinforcing the impact of the acquired information based on one technology: ARGO with profilers Argo floats, EuroSites, ESONET-NoE, FixO3 for deep water platforms, Ferrybox for stations in ships of opportunities, and GROOM for the more recent gliders. This kind of networking creates synergies and makes easier the implementation of this source of data in the European Data exchange services like EMODnet, ROOSs portals, or any applied services in the Blue economy. One main targeted improvement in the second phase of EMODnet projects is the assembling of data along coastline. In that sense, further coordination is recommended between platform operators around a specific technology in order to make easier the implementation of the data in the platforms (4th EuroGOOS DATAMEQ WG). HF radar is today recognized internationally as a cost-effective solution to provide high spatial and temporal resolution current maps (depending on the instrument operation frequency, covering from a few kilometres offshore up to 200 km) that are needed for many applications for issues related to ocean surface drift or sea state characterization. Significant heterogeneity still exists in Europe concerning technological configurations, data processing, quality standards and data availability. This makes more difficult the development of a significant network for achieving the needed accessibility to HF Radar data for a pan European use. EuroGOOS took the initiative to lead and coordinate activities within the various observation platforms by establishing a number of Ocean Observing Task Teams such as HF-Radars. The purpose is to coordinate and join the technological, scientific and operational HF radar communities at European level. The goal of the group is on the harmonization of systems requirements, systems design, data quality, improvement and proof of the readiness and standardization of

  11. Information Systems Coordinate Emergency Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The rescue crews have been searching for the woman for nearly a week. Hurricane Katrina devastated Hancock County, the southernmost point in Mississippi, and the woman had stayed through the storm in her beach house. There is little hope of finding her alive; the search teams know she is gone because the house is gone. Late at night in the art classroom of the school that is serving as the county s emergency operations center, Craig Harvey is discussing the search with the center s commander. Harvey is the Chief Operating Officer of a unique company called NVision Solutions Inc., based at NASA s Stennis Space Center in Bay St. Louis, only a couple of miles away. He and his entire staff have set up a volunteer operation in the art room, supporting the emergency management efforts using technology and capabilities the company developed through its NASA partnerships. As he talks to the commander, Harvey feels an idea taking shape that might lead them to the woman s location. Working with surface elevation data and hydrological principles, Harvey creates a map showing how the floodwaters from the storm would have flowed along the topography of the region around the woman s former home. Using the map, search crews find the woman s body in 15 minutes. Recovering individuals who have been lost is a sad reality of emergency management in the wake of a disaster like Hurricane Katrina in 2005. But the sooner answers can be provided, the sooner a community s overall recovery can take place. When damage is extensive, resources are scattered, and people are in dire need of food, shelter, and medical assistance, the speed and efficiency of emergency operations can be the key to limiting the impact of a disaster and speeding the process of recovery. And a key to quick and effective emergency planning and response is geographic information. With a host of Earth-observing satellites orbiting the globe at all times, NASA generates an unmatched wealth of data about our ever

  12. Corporate Philanthropy Toward Community Health Improvement in Manufacturing Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Megan; Farley, Diane; Maechling, Claude R; Dunlop, Dorothy D; French, Dustin D; Holl, Jane L

    2018-06-01

    Virtually all large employers engage in corporate philanthropy, but little is known about the extent to which it is directed toward improving community health. We conducted in-depth interviews with leaders of corporate philanthropy from 13 of the largest manufacturing companies in the US to understand how giving decisions were made, the extent to which funding was directed towards improving community health, and whether companies coordinate with local public health agencies. We found that corporate giving was sizable and directed towards communities in which the manufacturers have a large presence. Giving was aligned with the social determinants of health (i.e., aimed at improving economic stability, the neighborhood and physical environment, education, food security and nutrition, the community and social context, and the health care system). However, improving public health was not often cited as a goal of corporate giving, and coordination with public health agencies was limited. Our results suggest that there may be opportunities for public health agencies to help guide corporate philanthropy, particularly by sharing community-level data and offering their measurement and evaluation expertise.

  13. Civil Engineering and Building Service Topographic Permanent Landmarks Network. Spatial Coordinate Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lepadatu Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable development is a modern concept of adaptation conditions for achieving objectives that respond simultaneously to at least three major requirements: economic, social and environmental. Achieving sustainable development cannot be accomplished without a change of mentality of people and without communities able to use resources rationally and efficiently. For an efficient application programs surveying topography discipline the students have imagined and created a network of local topographic permanent terminals required for reporting the rectangular coordinates of applications. In order to obtain more accurate values of these coordinates we have made several types of measurements that will be presented in detail in this work.

  14. New ways for the coordination of research for the dosimetry of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuhmacher, Helmut

    2009-01-01

    The European Radiation Dosimetry Group (EURADOS) is a network of about 50 institutions from nearly oil European countries which coordinates research and development for the dosimetry of ionizing radiation. EURADOS was supported over many years by the European Communities. Since 2008 EURADOS is registered as a non-profit society (eingetragener Verein, e.V.) in Braunschweig with the office at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). This new formal status and the related independence from European research programmes allows new ways in the coordination of research. (orig.)

  15. Postural Coordination during Socio-motor Improvisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueugnon, Mathieu; Salesse, Robin N; Coste, Alexandre; Zhao, Zhong; Bardy, Benoît G; Marin, Ludovic

    2016-01-01

    Human interaction often relies on socio-motor improvisation. Creating unprepared movements during social interaction is not a random process but relies on rules of synchronization. These situations do not only involve people to be coordinated, but also require the adjustment of their posture in order to maintain balance and support movements. The present study investigated posture in such a context. More precisely, we first evaluated the impact of amplitude and complexity of arm movements on posture in solo situation. Then, we assessed the impact of interpersonal coordination on posture using the mirror game in which dyads performed improvised and synchronized movements (i.e., duo situation). Posture was measured through ankle-hip coordination in medio-lateral and antero-posterior directions (ML and AP respectively). Our results revealed the spontaneous emergence of in-phase pattern in ML direction and antiphase pattern in AP direction for solo and duo situations. These two patterns respectively refer to the simultaneous flexion/extension of the ankles and the hips in the same or opposite direction. It suggests different functional roles of postural coordination patterns in each direction, with in-phase supporting task performance in ML (dynamical stability) and antiphase supporting postural control in AP (mechanical stability). Although amplitude of movement did not influence posture, movement complexity disturbed postural stability in both directions. Conversely, interpersonal coordination promoted postural stability in ML but not in AP direction. These results are discussed in terms of the difference in coupling strength between ankle-hip coordination and interpersonal coordination.

  16. Postural coordination during socio-motor improvisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Gueugnon

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Human interaction often relies on socio-motor improvisation. Creating unprepared movements during social interaction is not a random process but relies on rules of synchronization. These situations do not only involve people to be coordinated, but also require the adjustment of their posture in order to maintain balance and support movements. The present study investigated posture in such a context. More precisely, we first evaluated the impact of amplitude and complexity of arm movements on posture in solo situation. Then, we assessed the impact of interpersonal coordination on posture using the mirror game in which dyads performed improvised and synchronized movements (i.e., duo situation. Posture was measured through ankle-hip coordination in medio-lateral and antero-posterior directions (ML and AP respectively. Our results revealed the spontaneous emergence of in-phase pattern in ML direction and anti-phase pattern in AP direction for solo and duo situations. These two patterns respectively refer to the simultaneous flexion/extension of the ankles and the hips in the same or opposite direction. It suggests different functional roles of postural coordination patterns in each direction, with in-phase supporting task performance in ML (dynamical stability and antiphase supporting postural control in AP (mechanical stability. Although amplitude of movement did not influence posture, movement complexity disturbed postural stability in both directions. Conversely, interpersonal coordination promoted postural stability in ML but not in AP direction. These results are discussed in terms of the difference in coupling strength between ankle-hip coordination and interpersonal coordination.

  17. Communicating Processes with Data for Supervisory Coordination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasen Markovski

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We employ supervisory controllers to safely coordinate high-level discrete(-event behavior of distributed components of complex systems. Supervisory controllers observe discrete-event system behavior, make a decision on allowed activities, and communicate the control signals to the involved parties. Models of the supervisory controllers can be automatically synthesized based on formal models of the system components and a formalization of the safe coordination (control requirements. Based on the obtained models, code generation can be used to implement the supervisory controllers in software, on a PLC, or an embedded (microprocessor. In this article, we develop a process theory with data that supports a model-based systems engineering framework for supervisory coordination. We employ communication to distinguish between the different flows of information, i.e., observation and supervision, whereas we employ data to specify the coordination requirements more compactly, and to increase the expressivity of the framework. To illustrate the framework, we remodel an industrial case study involving coordination of maintenance procedures of a printing process of a high-tech Oce printer.

  18. Adaptation of coordination mechanisms to network structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herwig Mittermayer

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The coordination efficiency of Supply Chain Management is determined by two opposite poles: benefit from improved planning results and associated coordination cost. The centralization grade, applied coordination mechanisms and IT support have influence on both categories. Therefore three reference types are developed and subsequently detailed in business process models for different network structures. In a simulation study the performance of these organization forms are compared in a process plant network. Coordination benefit is observed if the planning mode is altered by means of a demand planning IT tool. Coordination cost is divided into structural and activity-dependent cost. The activity level rises when reactive planning iterations become necessary as a consequence of inconsistencies among planning levels. Some characteristic influence factors are considered to be a reason for uninfeasible planning. In this study the effect of capacity availability and stochastic machine downtimes is investigated in an uncertain demand situation. Results that if the network runs with high overcapacity, central planning is less likely to increase benefit enough to outweigh associated cost. Otherwise, if capacity constraints are crucial, a central planning mode is recommendable. When also unforeseen machine downtimes are low, the use of sophisticated IT tools is most profitable.

  19. Coordination and standardization of federal sedimentation activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glysson, G. Douglas; Gray, John R.

    1997-01-01

    In August 1964, the Bureau of the Budget issued Circular A-67 to set forth guidelines for the coordination of water-data acquisition activities throughout the Federal government. The U.S. Department of the Interior was assigned the task of implementing Circular A-67, which in turn redelegated this responsibility to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Delegation of the lead responsibility for water-data coordination to the USGS occurred because of its historical role as the primary agency for water-data acquisition in the United States. To provide overall leadership for implementing the provisions of Circular A-67, the USGS established the Office of Water Data Coordination in the Water Resources Division (WRD). In addition, regional and district offices of the WRD were delegated responsibility for coordinating water data within their geographic areas of responsibility. On December 10, 1991, the Office of Management and Budget issued OMB Number Memorandum M-92-01, which expands the USGS's coordination role to encompass all water information. This includes data critical to water resources in the following categories: - surface- and ground-water quality and quantity,

  20. Athena Community Office

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Núnez, S.; Barcons, X.; Barret, D.; Bozzo, E.; Carrera, F. J.; Ceballos, M. T.; Gómez, S.; Monterde, M. P.; Rau, A.

    2017-03-01

    The Athena Community Office (ACO) has been established by ESA's Athena Science Study Team (ASST) in order to obtain support in performing its tasks assigned by ESA, and most specially in the ASST role as "focal point for the interests of the broad scientific community". The ACO is led by the Instituto de Física de Cantabria (CSIC-UC), and its activities are funded by CSIC and UC. Further ACO contributors are the University of Geneva, MPE and IRAP. In this poster, we present ACO to the Spanish Astronomical Community, informing about its main responsibilities, which are: assist the ASST in organising and collecting support from the Athena Working Groups and Topical Panels; organise and maintain the documentation generated by the Athena Working Groups and Topical Panels; manage the Working Group and Topical Panel membership lists; assist the ASST in promoting Athena science capabilities in the research world, through conferences and workshops; keep a record of all papers and presentations related to Athena; support the production of ASST documents; produce and distribute regularly an Athena Newsletter, informing the community about all mission and science developments; create and maintain the Athena Community web portal; maintain an active communication activity; promote, organise and support Athena science-related public outreach, in coordination with ESA and other agencies involved when appropriate; and, design, produce materials and provide pointers to available materials produced by other parties. In summary, ACO is meant to become a focal point to facilitate the scientific exchange between the Athena activities and the scientific community at large, and to disseminate the Athena science objectives to the general public.

  1. A framework of manufacturer-retailer coordination process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Chee Yew; Johansen, John

    2008-01-01

    Purpose - Triggered by perceived inefficiency and inequality, buyers and suppliers coordinate with each other. The purpose of this paper is to develop a framework of coordination process based on theoretical review and verifications from three case studies. Design/methodology/approach - The appro......Purpose - Triggered by perceived inefficiency and inequality, buyers and suppliers coordinate with each other. The purpose of this paper is to develop a framework of coordination process based on theoretical review and verifications from three case studies. Design...... there was disagreement. Third, closer mode of coordination, which involved joint evaluation and derivation of coordination solutions, reduced the numbers of iterative coordination cycles. These empirical findings verified the presupposed framework of coordination process. Research limitations/implications - Three...... qualitative case studies may not be highly generalisable and multiple dyadic coordination processes may occur. However, the findings form a foundation for further understanding of the coordination process. Originality/value - The proposed framework of the coordination process further expands the theories...

  2. Highlights from e-EPS: Coordinated Access to Light sources

    CERN Multimedia

    e-EPS News

    2014-01-01

    The CALIPSO project, which runs until May 2015, will contribute to the effective exploitation of European synchrotrons and free electron lasers. CALIPSO (Coordinated Access to Light sources to Promote Standards and Optimisation) includes 20 partners forming one of the largest Research Networks in the world.   e-EPS interviewed M. Bertolo, CALIPSO project manager and his assistant C. Blasetti. Which challenges are addressed by CALIPSO? CALIPSO’s goal is to optimize the exploitation of the European synchrotrons and Free Electron Lasers. With respect to previous projects funded by the European Commission, it foresees significant improvements in integration, innovation and user-friendliness in all three areas of networking, transnational access and instrumentation. The Transnational Access program potentially benefits a community of 25,000 estimated users offering free open access to 12 synchrotrons and 5 free electron lasers solely based on scientific merit. In ad...

  3. Polysulfide coordination clusters of the lanthanides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Ying-Zhao; Bestgen, Sebastian; Gamer, Michael T.; Roesky, Peter W. [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Konchenko, Sergey N. [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, SB RAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University (Russian Federation)

    2017-10-16

    The reaction of [(DippForm){sub 2}Ln(thf){sub 2}] with an excess of elemental sulfur in toluene resulted in the formation of the trinuclear polysulfide coordination clusters [(DippForm){sub 3}Ln{sub 3}S{sub 12}] (Ln=Sm, Yb; DippForm=N,N'-bis(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)formamidinate). These are the first f element coordination clusters (Ln{sub n}S{sub x}) with a larger polysulfide unit (n and x>2). The formation of the coordination clusters can be rationalized by the reductive cleavage of S{sub 8} with divalent lanthanides. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Nonparametric variational optimization of reaction coordinates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banushkina, Polina V.; Krivov, Sergei V., E-mail: s.krivov@leeds.ac.uk [Astbury Center for Structural Molecular Biology, Faculty of Biological Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2015-11-14

    State of the art realistic simulations of complex atomic processes commonly produce trajectories of large size, making the development of automated analysis tools very important. A popular approach aimed at extracting dynamical information consists of projecting these trajectories into optimally selected reaction coordinates or collective variables. For equilibrium dynamics between any two boundary states, the committor function also known as the folding probability in protein folding studies is often considered as the optimal coordinate. To determine it, one selects a functional form with many parameters and trains it on the trajectories using various criteria. A major problem with such an approach is that a poor initial choice of the functional form may lead to sub-optimal results. Here, we describe an approach which allows one to optimize the reaction coordinate without selecting its functional form and thus avoiding this source of error.

  5. Non-commutativity in polar coordinates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, James P. [Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo, Ciudad Universitaria, Instituto de Fisica y Matematicas, Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)

    2017-05-15

    We reconsider the fundamental commutation relations for non-commutative R{sup 2} described in polar coordinates with non-commutativity parameter θ. Previous analysis found that the natural transition from Cartesian coordinates to the traditional polar system led to a representation of [r, φ] as an everywhere diverging series. In this article we compute the Borel resummation of this series, showing that it can subsequently be extended throughout parameter space and hence provide an interpretation of this commutator. Our analysis provides a complete solution for arbitrary r and θ that reproduces the earlier calculations at lowest order and benefits from being generally applicable to problems in a two-dimensional non-commutative space. We compare our results to previous literature in the (pseudo-)commuting limit, finding a surprising spatial dependence for the coordinate commutator when θ >> r{sup 2}. Finally, we raise some questions for future study in light of this progress. (orig.)

  6. Culture-dependent strategies in coordination games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Matthew O; Xing, Yiqing

    2014-07-22

    We examine different populations' play in coordination games in online experiments with over 1,000 study participants. Study participants played a two-player coordination game that had multiple equilibria: two equilibria with highly asymmetric payoffs and another equilibrium with symmetric payoffs but a slightly lower total payoff. Study participants were predominantly from India and the United States. Study participants residing in India played the strategies leading to asymmetric payoffs significantly more frequently than study participants residing in the United States who showed a greater play of the strategy leading to the symmetric payoffs. In addition, when prompted to play asymmetrically, the population from India responded even more significantly than those from the United States. Overall, study participants' predictions of how others would play were more accurate when the other player was from their own populations, and they coordinated significantly more frequently and earned significantly higher payoffs when matched with other study participants from their own population than when matched across populations.

  7. Coordination: Neural, Behavioral and Social Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Fuchs, Armin

    2008-01-01

    One of the most striking features of Coordination Dynamics is its interdisciplinary character. The problems we are trying to solve in this field range from behavioral phenomena of interlimb coordination and coordination between stimuli and movements (perception-action tasks) through neural activation patterns that can be observed during these tasks to clinical applications and social behavior. It is not surprising that close collaboration among scientists from different fields as psychology, kinesiology, neurology and even physics are imperative to deal with the enormous difficulties we are facing when we try to understand a system as complex as the human brain. The chapters in this volume are not simply write-ups of the lectures given by the experts at the meeting but are written in a way that they give sufficient introductory information to be comprehensible and useful for all interested scientists and students.

  8. A Process Algebra for Supervisory Coordination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jos Baeten

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A supervisory controller controls and coordinates the behavior of different components of a complex machine by observing their discrete behaviour. Supervisory control theory studies automated synthesis of controller models, known as supervisors, based on formal models of the machine components and a formalization of the requirements. Subsequently, code generation can be used to implement this supervisor in software, on a PLC, or embedded microprocessor. In this article, we take a closer look at the control loop that couples the supervisory controller and the machine. We model both event-based and state-based observations using process algebra and bisimulation-based semantics. The main application area of supervisory control that we consider is coordination, referred to as supervisory coordination, and we give an academic and an industrial example, discussing the process-theoretic concepts employed.

  9. TIARA: Toward accelerator R&D coordination

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2011-01-01

    The preparatory phase of the TIARA (Test Infrastructure and Accelerator Research Area) project has begun. In January, members from 11 research institutes in 8 European countries began a three-year collaboration intended to enhance, improve and structure R&D efforts in the area of accelerator science and technology in Europe.   Partly funded by the European Commission under its Seventh Framework Programme (FP7), the TIARA project is being coordinated by the CEA (Commissariat à l’Énergie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives). “The aim of the project is to arrive at an organisational structure that will provide coordination for R&D efforts and associated infrastructures in the field of particle accelerators in Europe,” explains the CEA’s Céline Tanguy, project coordinator assistant. “The new structure, which we hope will be a durable one, will be set up at the end of the project’s preparatory phase....

  10. Conflict as driver of pluricentric coordination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eva

    2014-01-01

    and reconstructing the institutional conditions that make coordination possible. The productive role of conflicts is particularly visible in times of radical change that calls for a recasting of the sedimented world views and practices of the involved actors, as well as the relationship between them. A case study......Governance theory and planning theory share a tendency to either overlook the role of conflicts in coordination processes or view them as a disruptive force that must be modified or neutralized. In effect, there is little research into the productive role of conflicts in constructing...... of the formation of new pluricentric regional governance arenas in Denmark provides important insights into how conflicts contribute to a gradual recasting of the institutional conditions that make coordination possible....

  11. Anatomic breast coordinate system for mammogram analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karemore, Gopal; Brandt, S.; Karssemeijer, N.

    2011-01-01

    was represented by geodesic distance (s) from nipple and parametric angle (¿) as shown in figure 1. The scoring technique called MTR (mammographic texture resemblance marker) used this breast coordinate system to extract Gaussian derivative features. The features extracted using the (x,y) and the curve......Purpose Many researchers have investigated measures also other than density in the mammogram such as measures based on texture to improve breast cancer risk assessment. However, parenchymal texture characteristics are highly dependent on the orientation of vasculature structure and fibrous tissue...... methodologies as seen from table 2 in given temporal study. Conclusion The curve-linear anatomical breast coordinate system facilitated computerized analysis of mammograms. The proposed coordinate system slightly improved the risk segregation by Mammographic Texture Resemblance and minimized the geometrical...

  12. Impaired Visual Motor Coordination in Obese Adults.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gaul, David

    2016-09-01

    Objective. To investigate whether obesity alters the sensory motor integration process and movement outcome during a visual rhythmic coordination task. Methods. 88 participants (44 obese and 44 matched control) sat on a chair equipped with a wrist pendulum oscillating in the sagittal plane. The task was to swing the pendulum in synchrony with a moving visual stimulus displayed on a screen. Results. Obese participants demonstrated significantly (p < 0.01) higher values for continuous relative phase (CRP) indicating poorer level of coordination, increased movement variability (p < 0.05), and a larger amplitude (p < 0.05) than their healthy weight counterparts. Conclusion. These results highlight the existence of visual sensory integration deficiencies for obese participants. The obese group have greater difficulty in synchronizing their movement with a visual stimulus. Considering that visual motor coordination is an essential component of many activities of daily living, any impairment could significantly affect quality of life.

  13. Strained coordinate methods in rotating stars. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, B.L.

    1977-01-01

    It was shown in a previous paper (Smith, 1976) that the method of strained coordinates may be usefully employed in the determination of the structure of rotating polytropes. In the present work this idea is extended to Main-Sequence stars with conservative centrifugal fields. The structure variables, pressure, density and temperature are considered pure functions of an auxiliary coordinate s (the strained coordinate) and the governing equations written in a form that closely resembles the structure equations for spherical stars but with the correction factors that are functions of s. A systematic, order-by-order derivation of these factors is outlined and applied in detail to a Cowling-model star in uniform rotation. The techniques can be extended beyond first order and external boundary conditions are applied, as they should be, at the true surface of the star. Roche approximations are not needed. (Auth.)

  14. Improving care coordination using organisational routines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prætorius, Thim

    2016-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to systematically apply theory of organisational routines to standardised care pathways. The explanatory power of routines is used to address open questions in the care pathway literature about their coordinating and organising role, the way they change......: care pathways and coordination, change, replication, the organisation and health care professionals. Research limitations/implications – The paper is conceptual and uses care pathways as illustrative instances of hospital routines. The propositions provide a starting point for empirical research....... Practical implications – The analysis highlights implications that health care professionals and managers have to consider in relation to coordination, change, replication, the way the organisation influences care pathways and the way care pathways influence health care professionals. Originality...

  15. Coordinate sensitive detectors based on microchannel plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruntman, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    Coordinate-sensitive detectors (CSD) on the basis of microchannel plates permit to determine in a digital form the coordinates of every recorded particle and they are used in different fields of physical experiment. The sensitive surface diameter of such detectors can reach 10 cm, and spatial resolution - 10 μm. In the review provided CSD with microchannel plates are classified according to the ways of coordinate determination, different types of the detectors, pecUliarities of their design and electron flowsheet are described. It is pointed out that there are reasons for introduction of CSD into practice of laboratory physical investigations in various fields, where the particle recorded is electron or is able to form a secondary electron. It is attributed to nuclear physics, physics of electron and atom collisions, optics, mass-spectrometry, electron microscopy, X-ray analysis, investigation of surfaces

  16. Coordinated Voltage Control of Active Distribution Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a centralized coordinated voltage control method for active distribution network to solve off-limit problem of voltage after incorporation of distributed generation (DG. The proposed method consists of two parts, it coordinated primal-dual interior point method-based voltage regulation schemes of DG reactive powers and capacitors with centralized on-load tap changer (OLTC controlling method which utilizes system’s maximum and minimum voltages, to improve the qualified rate of voltage and reduce the operation numbers of OLTC. The proposed coordination has considered the cost of capacitors. The method is tested using a radial edited IEEE-33 nodes distribution network which is modelled using MATLAB.

  17. Obesity and Motor Coordination Ability in Taiwanese Children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yi-Ching; Wu, Sheng K.; Cairney, John

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the associations between obesity and motor coordination ability in Taiwanese children with and without developmental coordination disorder (DCD). 2029 children (1078 boys, 951 girls) aged nine to ten years were chosen randomly from 14 elementary schools across Taiwan. We used bioelectrical impedance…

  18. Variationally optimal selection of slow coordinates and reaction coordinates in macromolecular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noe, Frank

    To efficiently simulate and generate understanding from simulations of complex macromolecular systems, the concept of slow collective coordinates or reaction coordinates is of fundamental importance. Here we will introduce variational approaches to approximate the slow coordinates and the reaction coordinates between selected end-states given MD simulations of the macromolecular system and a (possibly large) basis set of candidate coordinates. We will then discuss how to select physically intuitive order paremeters that are good surrogates of this variationally optimal result. These result can be used in order to construct Markov state models or other models of the stationary and kinetics properties, in order to parametrize low-dimensional / coarse-grained model of the dynamics. Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, European Research Council.

  19. Coordination under the Shadow of Career Concerns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Alexander; Morgenstern, Albrecht

    2010-01-01

    concerns arise. The effects of career concerns can both be 'good' (enhancing incentives for effort in developing ideas) and 'bad' (preventing voluntary coordination). Our model shows how a firm can take these conflicting forces into account through the design of its explicit incentive system and the way......A firm's innovation process requires employees to develop novel ideas and to coordinate with each other to turn the tacit knowledge embodying these ideas into better products and services. Such work outcomes provide signals about employees' abilities to the labor market, and therefore career...

  20. Collective motion and the generator coordinate method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passos, E.J.V. de

    1981-01-01

    The generator coordinate method is used to construct a collective subspace of the many-body Hylbert space. The construction is based on the analysis of the properties of the overlaps of the generator states. Some well-known misbehaviours of the generator coordinate weight functions are clearly identified as of kinematical origin. A standard orthonormal representation in the collective subspace is introduced which eliminates them. It is also indicated how appropriate collective dynamical variables can be defined a posteriori. To illustrate the properties of the collective subspaces applications are made to a) translational invariant overlap kernels b) to one and two-conjugate parameter families of generator states. (Author) [pt

  1. Coordination under the Shadow of Career Concerns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Alexander; Morgenstern, Albrecht

    To innovate, firms require their employees to develop novel ideas and to coordinate with each other to turn these ideas into products, services or business strategies. Because the quality of implemented designs that employees are associated with affects their labor market opportunities, career...... concerns arise that can both be ‘good’ (enhancing incentives for effort in developing ideas) and ‘bad’ (preventing voluntary coordination). Depending on the strength of career concerns, either group-based incentives or team production are optimal. This finding provides a possible link between the increased...

  2. IAEA Co-ordinated Research Program (CRP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrenk, M.

    2010-01-01

    The Coordinated Research Project is a topical collection of research agreements and contracts. The research contracts are awarded with financial support of about 10-20% of the total contract cost. Among the activities of the project is the organization of consultant group meetings and workshops involving several international experts and representatives of users and developers of border radiation monitoring equipment. The project also supports in coordinating the development of equipment and techniques for up-to-date border monitoring and in establishing of a process for providing nuclear forensics support to member states

  3. Coordination polyhedra CsCln in crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serezhkin, V.N.; Serezhkina, L.B.

    1999-01-01

    Characteristics of the Voronoi-Dirichlet polyhedrons are estimated for 133 crystallographic cesium atoms in chlorides Cs x M y Cl z (M=Cd, Sc, V, Nb, Mo, W, Ru, Re, etc.). It is found that cesium atoms have coordination numbers 6,8,9,10, 11 and 12 as regards the chlorine atoms. The results of cesium atom coordination sphere examination by the crossing spheres method are presented. Metal-metal interactions (including Cs-Cs) in the structure of certain chlorides are revealed

  4. Cantilever torque magnetometry on coordination compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perfetti, Mauro

    2017-01-01

    compounds, such as quantum computation or information storage. This review enlightens that CTM offers a unique combination of accuracy and precision to disentangle noncollinear contributions inside Single Crystals as well as the sensitivity to detect molecular order of thin films. CTM can also detect......Cantilever Torque Magnetometry (CTM) is one of the leading techniques to deeply understand magnetic anisotropy of coordination compounds. The knowledge of magnetic anisotropy is a mandatory requirement before proceeding with any future application related to the magnetic properties of coordination...... quantum phenomena such as magnetization steps and molecular hysteresis curves. Moreover, it can also provide the energy levels splitting and avefunctions composition, especially if coupled with microwave radiation....

  5. Breakdowns in Coordination Between Air Traffic Controllers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearman, Chris; Orasanu, Judith; Miller, Ronald C.

    2011-01-01

    This talk outlines the complexity of coordination in air traffic control, introduces the NextGen technologies, identifies common causes for coordination breakdowns in air traffic control and examines whether these causes are likely to be reduced with the introduction of NextGen technologies. While some of the common causes of breakdowns will be reduced in a NextGen environment this conclusion should be drawn carefully given the current stage of development of the technologies and the observation that new technologies often shift problems rather than reduce them.

  6. Coordinating knowledge transfer within manufacturing networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Cheng; Johansen, John; Boer, Harry

    2008-01-01

    Along with increasing globalization, the management of international manufacturing networks is becoming increasingly important for industrial companies. This paper mainly focuses on the coordination of knowledge transfer within manufacturing networks. In this context, we propose the time......-place matrix as a tool for mapping the distribution of knowledge within manufacturing networks. Using this tool, four important questions about the coordination of knowledge transfer within a manufacturing network are identified: know-where, know-what, know-when, know-how to transfer. The relationships among...

  7. Health Services Utilization in Older Adults with Dementia Receiving Care Coordination: The MIND at Home Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amjad, Halima; Wong, Stephanie K; Roth, David L; Huang, Jin; Willink, Amber; Black, Betty S; Johnston, Deirdre; Rabins, Peter V; Gitlin, Laura N; Lyketsos, Constantine G; Samus, Quincy M

    2018-02-01

    To investigate effects of a novel dementia care coordination program on health services utilization. A total of 303 community-dwelling adults aged ≥70 with a cognitive disorder in Baltimore, Maryland (2008-2011). Single-blind RCT evaluating efficacy of an 18-month care coordination intervention delivered through community-based nonclinical care coordinators, supported by an interdisciplinary clinical team. Study partners reported acute care/inpatient, outpatient, and home- and community-based service utilization at baseline, 9, and 18 months. From baseline to 18 months, there were no significant group differences in acute care/inpatient or total outpatient services use, although intervention participants had significantly increased outpatient dementia/mental health visits from 9 to 18 months (p = .04) relative to controls. Home and community-based support service use significantly increased from baseline to 18 months in the intervention compared to control (p = .005). While this dementia care coordination program did not impact acute care/inpatient services utilization, it increased use of dementia-related outpatient medical care and nonmedical supportive community services, a combination that may have helped participants remain at home longer. Future care model modifications that emphasize delirium, falls prevention, and behavior management may be needed to influence inpatient service use. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  8. Strengthening community leadership: evaluation findings from the california healthy cities and communities program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegler, Michelle C; Norton, Barbara L; Aronson, Robert E

    2008-04-01

    Collaborative approaches to community health improvement such as healthy cities and communities have the potential to strengthen community capacity through leadership development. The healthy cities and communities process orients existing local leadership to new community problem-solving strategies and draws out leadership abilities among residents not previously engaged in civic life. In an evaluation of the California Healthy Cities and Communities (CHCC) Program, leadership development was one of several outcomes assessed at the civic-participation level of the social ecology. Data collection methods included focus groups and surveys, semistructured interviews with coordinators and community leaders, and review of program documents. Findings suggest that the CHCC program enhanced capacity by expanding new leadership opportunities through coalition participation, program implementation, and civic leadership roles related to spin-off organizations and broader collaborative structures. Communities in rural regions were particularly successful in achieving significant leadership outcomes.

  9. Mathematical Abstraction: Constructing Concept of Parallel Coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurhasanah, F.; Kusumah, Y. S.; Sabandar, J.; Suryadi, D.

    2017-09-01

    Mathematical abstraction is an important process in teaching and learning mathematics so pre-service mathematics teachers need to understand and experience this process. One of the theoretical-methodological frameworks for studying this process is Abstraction in Context (AiC). Based on this framework, abstraction process comprises of observable epistemic actions, Recognition, Building-With, Construction, and Consolidation called as RBC + C model. This study investigates and analyzes how pre-service mathematics teachers constructed and consolidated concept of Parallel Coordinates in a group discussion. It uses AiC framework for analyzing mathematical abstraction of a group of pre-service teachers consisted of four students in learning Parallel Coordinates concepts. The data were collected through video recording, students’ worksheet, test, and field notes. The result shows that the students’ prior knowledge related to concept of the Cartesian coordinate has significant role in the process of constructing Parallel Coordinates concept as a new knowledge. The consolidation process is influenced by the social interaction between group members. The abstraction process taken place in this group were dominated by empirical abstraction that emphasizes on the aspect of identifying characteristic of manipulated or imagined object during the process of recognizing and building-with.

  10. Spectroscopic, thermal and biological studies of coordination

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Spectroscopic, thermal and biological studies of coordination compounds of sulfasalazine drug: Mn(II), Hg(II), Cr(III), ZrO(II), VO(II) and Y(III) transition metal ... The thermal decomposition of the complexes as well as thermodynamic parameters ( *}, *, * and *) were estimated using Coats–Redfern and ...

  11. Quadratic independence of coordinate functions of certain ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... are `quadratically independent' in the sense that they do not satisfy any nontrivial homogeneous quadratic relations among them. Using this, it is proved that there is no genuine compact quantum group which can act faithfully on C ( M ) such that the action leaves invariant the linear span of the above coordinate functions.

  12. Supply chain coordination in industrial symbiosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herczeg, Gabor; Akkerman, Renzo; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    2013-01-01

    Industrial symbiosis (IS) is a form of supply chain cooperation in industrial networks in order to achieve collective benefits by leveraging each other’s by-products and sharing services and utilities. This paper investigates the concept of IS from the perspective of supply chain coordination (SC...

  13. Legal Coordinator | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Develops systems and procedures for administering and tracking legal undertakings, coordinates and consolidates the legal information in order to meet deadlines. • Collaborates with the Secretary and General Counsel to ensure that all legal issues are handled efficiently, while respecting the highly confidential nature of ...

  14. Coordination models Orc and Reo compared

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M.P. Proença (Jose); D.G. Clarke (David)

    2008-01-01

    htmlabstractOrc and Reo are two complementary approaches to the problem of coordinating components or services. On one hand, Orc is highly asynchronous, dynamic, and based on ephemeral connections to services. On the other hand, Reo is based on the interplay between synchronization and mutual

  15. Motivation, Coordination and Cognition in Cooperatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Feng (Li)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractA cooperative is a firm collectively owned by many independent input suppliers or buyers. This dissertation examines the nature of a cooperative and its efficiency compared with other governance structures from the perspectives of motivation, coordination and cognition. We find that the

  16. Coordinated Collaboration between Heterogeneous Distributed Energy Resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahin Abdollahy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A power distribution feeder, where a heterogeneous set of distributed energy resources is deployed, is examined by simulation. The energy resources include PV, battery storage, natural gas GenSet, fuel cells, and active thermal storage for commercial buildings. The resource scenario considered is one that may exist in a not too distant future. Two cases of interaction between different resources are examined. One interaction involves a GenSet used to partially offset the duty cycle of a smoothing battery connected to a large PV system. The other example involves the coordination of twenty thermal storage devices, each associated with a commercial building. Storage devices are intended to provide maximum benefit to the building, but it is shown that this can have a deleterious effect on the overall system, unless the action of the individual storage devices is coordinated. A network based approach is also introduced to calculate some type of effectiveness metric to all available resources which take part in coordinated operation. The main finding is that it is possible to achieve synergy between DERs on a system; however this required a unified strategy to coordinate the action of all devices in a decentralized way.

  17. 77 FR 778 - Council Coordination Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-06

    ... Coordination Committee Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and... Resources, Habitat Blueprint, Managing Our Nations III Conference, and other topics related to... p.m.--Habitat Blueprint. 2:30 p.m.-3:30 p.m.--Managing Our Nation's Fisheries (MONF) III Conference...

  18. Attentional Demands on Motor-Respiratory Coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessler, Eric E.; Amazeen, Polemnia G.

    2009-01-01

    Athletic performance requires the pacing of breathing with exercise, known as motor-respiratory coordination (MRC). In this study, we added cognitive and physical constraints while participants intentionally controlled their breathing locations during rhythmic arm movement. This is the first study to examine a cognitive constraint on MRC.…

  19. Stochastic Strategy Adjustment in Coordination Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kosfeld, M.

    1999-01-01

    We explore a model of equilibrium selection in coordination games, where agents stochastically adjust their strategies to changes in their local environment. Instead of playing perturbed best-response, we assume that agents follow a rule of "switching to better strategies more likely". We relate

  20. Health Coordination Manual. Head Start Health Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Administration for Children, Youth, and Families (DHHS), Washington, DC. Head Start Bureau.

    Part 1 of this manual on coordinating health care services for Head Start children provides an overview of what Head Start health staff should do to meet the medical, mental health, nutritional, and/or dental needs of Head Start children, staff, and family members. Offering examples, lists, action steps, and charts for clarification, part 2…

  1. Developmental coordination disorder: evaluation and treatment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leemrijse, C.

    2003-01-01

    A child's popularity is often related to his or her proficiency in sports and games, and children value physical competence highly. The movement difficulties of children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) often invite ridicule from their peers. Children with DCD have a poor motor

  2. INFCE technical co-ordinating committee documents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-07-01

    A collection of the documents covering the period December 1977 through February 1980 submitted to or generated by the Technical Co-ordinating Comittee is presented. The documents cover primarily the organizational aspects of INFCE, but conclusions from the various Working Groups are summarized.

  3. Neuromuscular Control and Coordination during Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li

    2004-01-01

    The neuromuscular control aspect of cycling has been investigated through the effects of modifying posture and cadence. These studies show that changing posture has a more profound influence on neuromuscular coordination than does changing slope. Most of the changes with standing posture occur late in the downstroke: increased ankle and knee joint…

  4. Field test of coordinated ramp metering (CRM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-15

    This project has focused on field implementation and testing of a Coordinated Ramp Metering (CRM) algorithm at California State Route 99 : Northbound corridor in Sacramento between Calvine Road and the SR50 interchange after 12th Ave. It is a 9 mile ...

  5. Self-Defense Distributed Engagement Coordinator

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Distributed Engagement Coordinator MIT Lincoln Laboratory helped develop a unique decision support tool that automatically evaluates responses to...Laboratory researchers collaborated with scientists from the Operations Research Center at MIT’s Sloan School of Management to apply modern computational...epidemic.  A Technology Solution MIT Lincoln Laboratory, in collaboration with the Office of Naval Research (ONR), has developed an automated

  6. Coordinating Council. Ninth Meeting: Total Quality Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes the 9th meeting of the STI Coordinating Council. The council listened to the speakers' understanding of Total Quality Management (TQM) principles and heard stories of successful applications of these principles. Definitions of quality stated were focused on customer satisfaction. Reports presented by the speakers are also included.

  7. INFCE technical co-ordinating committee documents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A collection of the documents covering the period December 1977 through February 1980 submitted to or generated by the Technical Co-ordinating Comittee is presented. The documents cover primarily the organizational aspects of INFCE, but conclusions from the various Working Trays are summarized

  8. 47 CFR 15.525 - Coordination requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... the UWB device. If the imaging device is intended to be used for mobile applications, the geographical... Government through the National Telecommunications and Information Administration. The information provided... coordination of routine UWB operations shall not take longer than 15 business days from the receipt of the...

  9. Protection coordination: Determination of break point set

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Madani, S.M.; Rijanto, H.

    1998-01-01

    Modern power system networks are often multiloop structured. The co-ordinated setting of overcurrent and distance protective relays in such networks is tedious and time consuming. The complicated part of this problem is the determination of a proper minimum set of relays, the so-called minimum

  10. 77 FR 260 - Forest Resource Coordinating Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-04

    ... USDA and the broader forestry sector, with specific focus on owners of non-industrial private... Coordinator, by phone at (202) 205-1376 or by email at [email protected]us or Ted Beauvais, FRCC Designted Federal Officer, by phone (202) 205-1190 or by email at [email protected]us . Individuals who use...

  11. 78 FR 6806 - Forest Resource Coordinating Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-31

    .... Department of Agriculture, and coordination with State agencies and the private sector, to effectively address the national priorities for non- industrial private forest land. The purpose of the meeting is... [email protected]us . All comments, including names and addresses when provided, are placed in the record...

  12. 78 FR 73819 - Forest Resource Coordinating Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-09

    ..., Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 (Pub. L. 110-246). Additional information on the Forest Resource... into the Whitten Building. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Maya Solomon, Forest Resource Coordinating... forest health, and landscape scale conservation and management. The meeting is open to the public. All...

  13. Children Use Salience to Solve Coordination Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grueneisen, Sebastian; Wyman, Emily; Tomasello, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Humans are routinely required to coordinate with others. When communication is not possible, adults often achieve this by using salient cues in the environment (e.g. going to the Eiffel Tower, as an obvious meeting point). To explore the development of this capacity, we presented dyads of 3-, 5-, and 8-year-olds (N = 144) with a coordination…

  14. The students’ coordinating conjunction acquisition order

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deby Irawan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed at uncovering the students’ acquisition order of coordinating conjunction for then to seek the possible causes of such phenomenon. Quantitative approach with implicational scaling and qualitative approach with case study were employed with test, focused-group interview, and document analysis of some related textbooks as the instruments. A test consist of 70 questions about the usage of seven coordinating conjunctions in which each word is represented by 10 questions was given to the 13 students of eleventh grade of senior high school for the data collection related to the students’ acquisition order. The documents were then analyzed through several steps as suggested by the expert. The results show that the students acquire “and”, “so”, “for”, “but”, “or”, “yet”, and “nor” as in order. The external factors which influence the order are the formal complexity of each conjunction and the lack of exposure of coordinating conjunction both in the teaching activity and textbooks. Thus, teachers are suggested to provide more explicit teaching on coordinating conjunction and necessary knowledge about the usage of each word. Also, book writers should provide ample exposure to give students more knowledge about the usage of those conjunctions in a meaningful context.

  15. Coordinating health care: lessons from Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trond Tjerbo

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: What influences the coordination of care between general practitioners and hospitals? In this paper, general practitioner satisfaction with hospital—GP interaction is revealed, and related to several background variables. Method: A questionnaire was sent to all general practitioners in Norway (3388, asking their opinion on the interaction and coordination of health care in their district. A second questionnaire was sent to all the somatic hospitals in Norway (59 regarding formal routines and structures. The results were analysed using ordinary least squares regression. Results: General practitioners tend to be less satisfied with the coordination of care when their primary hospital is large and cost-effective with a high share of elderly patients. Together with the degree to which the general practitioner is involved in arenas where hospital physicians and general practitioners interact, these factors turned out to be good predictors of general practitioner satisfaction. Implication: To improve coordination between general practitioners and specialists, one should focus upon the structural traits within the hospitals in different regions as well as creating common arenas where the physicians can interact.

  16. Deriving force field parameters for coordination complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norrby, Per-Ola; Brandt, Peter

    2001-01-01

    The process of deriving molecular mechanics force fields for coordination complexes is outlined. Force field basics are introduced with an emphasis on special requirements for metal complexes. The review is then focused on how to set up the initial model, define the target, refine the parameters......, and validate the final force field, Alternatives to force field derivation are discussed briefly....

  17. Mechanical signaling coordinates the embryonic heartbeat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, Kevin K.; Rocks, Jason W.; Chen, Christina Yingxian; Cho, Sangkyun; Merkus, Koen E.; Rajaratnam, Anjali; Robison, Patrick; Tewari, Manorama; Vogel, Kenneth; Majkut, Stephanie F.; Prosser, Benjamin L.; Discher, Dennis E.; Liu, Andrea J.

    2016-01-01

    In the beating heart, cardiac myocytes (CMs) contract in a coordinated fashion, generating contractile wave fronts that propagate through the heart with each beat. Coordinating this wave front requires fast and robust signaling mechanisms between CMs. The primary signaling mechanism has long been identified as electrical: gap junctions conduct ions between CMs, triggering membrane depolarization, intracellular calcium release, and actomyosin contraction. In contrast, we propose here that, in the early embryonic heart tube, the signaling mechanism coordinating beats is mechanical rather than electrical. We present a simple biophysical model in which CMs are mechanically excitable inclusions embedded within the extracellular matrix (ECM), modeled as an elastic-fluid biphasic material. Our model predicts strong stiffness dependence in both the heartbeat velocity and strain in isolated hearts, as well as the strain for a hydrogel-cultured CM, in quantitative agreement with recent experiments. We challenge our model with experiments disrupting electrical conduction by perfusing intact adult and embryonic hearts with a gap junction blocker, β-glycyrrhetinic acid (BGA). We find this treatment causes rapid failure in adult hearts but not embryonic hearts—consistent with our hypothesis. Last, our model predicts a minimum matrix stiffness necessary to propagate a mechanically coordinated wave front. The predicted value is in accord with our stiffness measurements at the onset of beating, suggesting that mechanical signaling may initiate the very first heartbeats. PMID:27457951

  18. Improving care coordination using organisational routines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prætorius, Thim

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to systematically apply theory of organisational routines to standardised care pathways. The explanatory power of routines is used to address open questions in the care pathway literature about their coordinating and organising role, the way they change and can be replicated, the way they are influenced by the organisation and the way they influence health care professionals. Theory of routines is systematically applied to care pathways in order to develop theoretically derived propositions. Care pathways mirror routines by being recurrent, collective and embedded and specific to an organisation. In particular, care pathways resemble standard operating procedures that can give rise to recurrent collective action patterns. In all, 11 propositions related to five categories are proposed by building on these insights: care pathways and coordination, change, replication, the organisation and health care professionals. Research limitations/implications - The paper is conceptual and uses care pathways as illustrative instances of hospital routines. The propositions provide a starting point for empirical research. The analysis highlights implications that health care professionals and managers have to consider in relation to coordination, change, replication, the way the organisation influences care pathways and the way care pathways influence health care professionals. Originality/value - Theory on organisational routines offers fundamental, yet unexplored, insights into hospital processes, including in particular care coordination.

  19. Field transformations, collective coordinates and BRST invariance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfaro, J.; Damgaard, P.H.

    1989-12-01

    A very large class of general field transformations can be viewed as a field theory generalization of the method of collective coordinates. The introduction of new variables induces a gauge invariance in the transformed theory, and the freedom left in gauge fixing this new invariance can be used to find equivalent formulations of the same theory. First the Batalin-Fradkin-Vilkovisky formalism is applied to the Hamiltonian formulation of physical systems that can be described in terms of collective coordinates. We then show how this type of collective coordinate scheme can be generalized to field transformations, and discuss the War Identities of the associated BRST invariance. For Yang-Mills theory a connection to topological field theory and the background field method is explained in detail. In general the resulting BRST invariance we find hidden in any quantum field theory can be viewed as a consequence of our freedom in choosing a basis of coordinates φ(χ) in the action S[φ]. (orig.)

  20. Learning From Movie-Sets Coordination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egebjerg, Christin

    the best person in the job can become tired from keeping a high level of overview, information and coordination of escalating problem chains. This paper describes the innovative experiment of designing and testing on construction professionals a proto-version of a similar digital tool and system...

  1. 20 CFR 631.37 - Coordination activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... TITLE III OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT State Administration § 631.37 Coordination activities. (a..., including the formation of labor-management committees under this part, the dislocated worker unit shall... Training Act (29 U.S.C. 1721 note), title IV-C of the Job Training Partnership Act (29 U.S.C. 1721, et seq...

  2. 75 FR 69573 - Export Enforcement Coordination Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-15

    ... Export Enforcement Coordination Center By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and... enforcement of United States export control laws and enhanced intelligence exchange in support of such enforcement efforts, it is hereby ordered as follows: Section 1. Policy. Export controls are critical to...

  3. Community relations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neil, C.

    1997-01-01

    The interaction of the oil and gas companies with the Northern communities regarding drilling activities was an important aspect of oil and gas operations conducted in the Beaufort Sea. During the 1960s the industry and aboriginal people basically ignored each other. Later, the industry put more emphasis on community consultation until finally two-way communication was established. Respect for the land and the environment were very important to aboriginal people who depended on the land and its resources for their traditional way of life. Community relations policies by the various companies involved in the area, and the impact they have had on their respective communities were recounted. Not all efforts were successful, however, the companies and the communities learned from their experiences, and by the time operations ceased, the communities seemed to be more appreciative of the ways they were being treated by the oil companies. 22 figs

  4. Claiming Community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Steffen Bo

    As its point of departure this working paper takes the multitude of different uses and meanings of the concept of community in local politics in Cape Town. Instead of attempting to define it in substantive terms, the paper takes a social constructivist approach to the study of community...... is termed community work. First, the paper explores how community has become a governmental strategy, employed by the apartheid regime as well, although in different ways, as post-apartheid local government. Secondly, the paper explores the ways in which community becomes the means in which local residents...... lay claim on the state, as well as how it enters into local power struggles between different political groups within the township. In the third part, the paper explores how the meanings of community and the struggles to realise it have changed as South Africa, nationally and locally, has become...

  5. Investigating the Constrained Action Hypothesis: A Movement Coordination and Coordination Variability Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Anthony; Wu, Will; Nakajima, Mimi; Becker, James

    2017-09-19

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of focus of attention cues on movement coordination and coordination variability in the lower extremity. Twenty participants performed the standing long jump under both internal and external focus of attention conditions. A modified vector coding technique was used to evaluate the influence of attentional focus cues on lower extremity coordination patterns and coordination variability during the jumps. Participants jumped significantly further under an external focus of attention condition compared with an internal focus of attention condition (p = .035, effect size = .29). Focus of attention also influenced coordination between the ankle and knee, F(6, 19) = 2.87, p = .012, effect size = .388, with participants primarily using their knees under the internal focus of attention, and using both their ankles and knees under the external focus of attention. Attentional focus cues did not influence ankle-knee, F(1, 19) = 0.02, p = .98, effect size = .02, or hip-knee, F(1, 19) = 5.00, p = .49, effect size = .16, coordination variability. Results suggest that while attentional focus may not directly influence movement coordination condition, there is still a change in movement strategy resulting in greater jump distances following an external focus of attention.

  6. Distributed sensor coordination for advanced energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tumer, Kagan [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). School of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

    2015-03-12

    Motivation: The ability to collect key system level information is critical to the safe, efficient and reliable operation of advanced power systems. Recent advances in sensor technology have enabled some level of decision making directly at the sensor level. However, coordinating large numbers of sensors, particularly heterogeneous sensors, to achieve system level objectives such as predicting plant efficiency, reducing downtime or predicting outages requires sophisticated coordination algorithms. Indeed, a critical issue in such systems is how to ensure the interaction of a large number of heterogenous system components do not interfere with one another and lead to undesirable behavior. Objectives and Contributions: The long-term objective of this work is to provide sensor deployment, coordination and networking algorithms for large numbers of sensors to ensure the safe, reliable, and robust operation of advanced energy systems. Our two specific objectives are to: 1. Derive sensor performance metrics for heterogeneous sensor networks. 2. Demonstrate effectiveness, scalability and reconfigurability of heterogeneous sensor network in advanced power systems. The key technical contribution of this work is to push the coordination step to the design of the objective functions of the sensors, allowing networks of heterogeneous sensors to be controlled. By ensuring that the control and coordination is not specific to particular sensor hardware, this approach enables the design and operation of large heterogeneous sensor networks. In addition to the coordination coordination mechanism, this approach allows the system to be reconfigured in response to changing needs (e.g., sudden external events requiring new responses) or changing sensor network characteristics (e.g., sudden changes to plant condition). Impact: The impact of this work extends to a large class of problems relevant to the National Energy Technology Laboratory including sensor placement, heterogeneous sensor

  7. The coordination dynamics of social neuromarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tognoli, Emmanuelle; Kelso, J. A. Scott

    2015-01-01

    Social behavior is a complex integrative function that entails many aspects of the brain’s sensory, cognitive, emotional and movement capacities. Its neural processes are seldom simultaneous but occur according to precise spatiotemporal choreographies, manifested by the coordination of their oscillations within and between brains. Methods with good temporal resolution can help to identify so-called “neuromarkers” of social function and aid in disentangling the dynamical architecture of social brains. In our ongoing research, we have used dual-electroencephalography (EEG) to study neuromarker dynamics during synchronic interactions in which pairs of subjects coordinate behavior spontaneously and intentionally (social coordination) and during diachronic transactions that require subjects to perceive or behave in turn (action observation, delayed imitation). In this paper, after outlining our dynamical approach to the neurophysiological basis of social behavior, we examine commonalities and differences in the neuromarkers that are recruited for both kinds of tasks. We find the neuromarker landscape to be task-specific: synchronic paradigms of social coordination reveal medial mu, alpha and the phi complex as contributing neuromarkers. Diachronic tasks recruit alpha as well, in addition to lateral mu rhythms and the newly discovered nu and kappa rhythms whose functional significance is still unclear. Social coordination, observation, and delayed imitation share commonality of context: in each of our experiments, subjects exchanged information through visual perception and moved in similar ways. Nonetheless, there was little overlap between their neuromarkers, a result that hints strongly of task-specific neural mechanisms for social behavior. The only neuromarker that transcended both synchronic and diachronic social behaviors was the ubiquitous alpha rhythm, which appears to be a key signature of visually-mediated social behaviors. The present paper is both an

  8. The coordination dynamics of social neuromarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle eTognoli

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Social behavior is a complex integrative function that entails many aspects of the brain's sensory, cognitive, emotional and motor capacities. Its neural processes are seldom simultaneous but occur according to precise spatiotemporal choreographies, manifested by the coordination of their oscillations within and between brains. Methods with good temporal resolution can help to identify so-called neuromarkers of social function and aid in disentangling the dynamical architecture of social brains. In our ongoing research, we have used dual-EEG to study neuromarker dynamics during synchronic interactions in which pairs of subjects coordinate behavior spontaneously and intentionally (social coordination and during diachronic transactions that require subjects to perceive or behave in turn (action observation, delayed imitation. In this paper, after outlining our dynamical approach to the neurophysiological basis of social behavior, we examine commonalities and differences in the neuromarkers that are recruited for both kinds of tasks. We find the neuromarker landscape to be task-specific: synchronic paradigms of social coordination reveal medial mu, alpha and the phi complex as contributing neuromarkers. Diachronic tasks recruit alpha as well, in addition to lateral mu rhythms and the newly discovered nu and kappa rhythms whose functional significance is still unclear. Social coordination, observation, and delayed imitation share commonality of context: in each of our experiments, subjects exchanged information through visual perception and moved in similar ways. Nonetheless, there was little overlap between their neuromarkers, a result that hints strongly of task-specific neural mechanisms for social behavior. The only neuromarker that transcended both synchronic and diachronic social behaviors was the ubiquitous alpha rhythm, which appears to be a key signature of visually-mediated social behaviors. The present paper is both an entry point and a

  9. The coordination dynamics of social neuromarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tognoli, Emmanuelle; Kelso, J A Scott

    2015-01-01

    Social behavior is a complex integrative function that entails many aspects of the brain's sensory, cognitive, emotional and movement capacities. Its neural processes are seldom simultaneous but occur according to precise spatiotemporal choreographies, manifested by the coordination of their oscillations within and between brains. Methods with good temporal resolution can help to identify so-called "neuromarkers" of social function and aid in disentangling the dynamical architecture of social brains. In our ongoing research, we have used dual-electroencephalography (EEG) to study neuromarker dynamics during synchronic interactions in which pairs of subjects coordinate behavior spontaneously and intentionally (social coordination) and during diachronic transactions that require subjects to perceive or behave in turn (action observation, delayed imitation). In this paper, after outlining our dynamical approach to the neurophysiological basis of social behavior, we examine commonalities and differences in the neuromarkers that are recruited for both kinds of tasks. We find the neuromarker landscape to be task-specific: synchronic paradigms of social coordination reveal medial mu, alpha and the phi complex as contributing neuromarkers. Diachronic tasks recruit alpha as well, in addition to lateral mu rhythms and the newly discovered nu and kappa rhythms whose functional significance is still unclear. Social coordination, observation, and delayed imitation share commonality of context: in each of our experiments, subjects exchanged information through visual perception and moved in similar ways. Nonetheless, there was little overlap between their neuromarkers, a result that hints strongly of task-specific neural mechanisms for social behavior. The only neuromarker that transcended both synchronic and diachronic social behaviors was the ubiquitous alpha rhythm, which appears to be a key signature of visually-mediated social behaviors. The present paper is both an entry

  10. Health Sector Coordination in Disasters: Barriers & Facilitators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadkarim Bahadori

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Coordination is a critical factor in successful organization and appropriate response to disasters. In this regard, a centralized coordination mechanism is the first step towards an effective, efficient, and sustainable response in order to be ensured of the short- and long-term recovery. Thus, this study aimed to identify and prioritize the barriers and facilitators of coordination in disasters. Materials and Methods: This research was a descriptive and cross-sectional study, conducted in 2016. The participants comprised 22 experts in field of disaster. Data collection tool was a researcher-made questionnaire according to the analytical hierarchy process approach. For data analysis, we used Expert Choice software. Results: Based on the results, “dominance of organizational approach instead of national points of view when addressing the health management during disasters,” took the first priority rank, earning the score of 0.344 among the barriers. Furthermore, among the facilitators, “having a processive and organizational view in health management during disasters,” took the first priority rank, earning the score of 0.374. Conclusion: To increase the effective coordination in health area, we should develop infrastructure and structural measures, which include bolstering authorities’ belief about the health system’s role in the response to disasters, reinforcing the national approach rather than organizational approach in the field of health at disasters, implementing the coordination requirements, attending sufficiently and specifically to public participation, reducing the organizational friction in the health field for sharing resources and information, raising the level of readiness with a focus on people and training programs, and finally creating an evolutionary process in the health field at disasters.

  11. Does Coordinated Postpartum Care Influence Costs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Zemp

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Questions under study: To investigate changes to health insurance costs for post-discharge postpartum care after the introduction of a midwife-led coordinated care model. Methods: The study included mothers and their newborns insured by the Helsana health insurance group in Switzerland and who delivered between January 2012 and May 2013 in the canton of Basel Stadt (BS (intervention canton. We compared monthly post-discharge costs before the launch of a coordinated postpartum care model (control phase, n = 144 to those after its introduction (intervention phase, n = 92. Costs in the intervention canton were also compared to those in five control cantons without a coordinated postpartum care model (cross-sectional control group: n = 7, 767. Results: The average monthly post-discharge costs for mothers remained unchanged in the seven months following the introduction of a coordinated postpartum care model, despite a higher use of midwife services (increasing from 72% to 80%. Likewise, monthly costs did not differ between the intervention canton and five control cantons. In multivariate analyses, the ambulatory costs for mothers were not associated with the post-intervention phase. Cross-sectionally, however, they were positively associated with midwifery use. For children, costs in the post-intervention phase were lower in the first month after hospital discharge compared to the pre-intervention phase (difference of –114 CHF [95%CI –202 CHF to –27 CHF], yet no differences were seen in the cross-sectional comparison. Conclusions: The introduction of a coordinated postpartum care model was associated with decreased costs for neonates in the first month after hospital discharge. Despite increased midwifery use, costs for mothers remained unchanged.

  12. Marketing: A Definition for Community Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotler, Philip; Goldgehn, Leslie A.

    1981-01-01

    Defines marketing and discusses the eight steps of the marketing process. Emphasizes the necessity of having one individual or committee responsible for coordinating marketing functions. Notes that marketing's success depends on its acceptance by all levels of the institution. Lists the benefits of implementing marketing in a community college.…

  13. Biclique communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Sune Lehmann; Hansen-Schwartz, Martin; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2008-01-01

    We present a method for detecting communities in bipartite networks. Based on an extension of the k-clique community detection algorithm, we demonstrate how modular structure in bipartite networks presents itself as overlapping bicliques. If bipartite information is available, the biclique...... community detection algorithm retains all of the advantages of the k-clique algorithm, but avoids discarding important structural information when performing a one-mode projection of the network. Further, the biclique community detection algorithm provides a level of flexibility by incorporating independent...

  14. Lessons learned from the application of a participatory evaluation methodology to healthy municipalities, cities and communities initiatives in selected countries of the Americas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Marilyn; Franceschini, Maria Cristina

    2007-01-01

    Health promotion has made significant strides in the past few decades in the Americas. Creating a healthy and supportive setting, also known as the settings approach, continues to be one of the most widely used health promotion strategies. Interest in evaluating the effectiveness of these strategies has been increasing greatly in the past few years. Participatory evaluation holds great promise for helping to generate this evidence and promote understanding of the factors that affect, positively or negatively, the advances of health promotion in the Region. During 2004-2006, a Participatory Evaluation methodology was introduced into several countries in the Americas through formal trainings conducted by the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) in collaboration with country partners. This article summarizes the main lessons learned from the application of the participatory evaluation methodology in various countries in Latin America and the Caribbean. Factors affecting the evaluation of the initiatives were identified at multiple levels (individual, community, organizational, political, economic, etc.). Specific issues that were addressed included the political context, turnover of personnel in key institutions, concerns related to the effectiveness of participatory processes, and the existence of strong and sustained leadership at the country level. These factors are intertwined and affect each other in very complex ways, a fact that was reflected in the municipalities' experiences with participatory evaluation. Challenges included the ability to secure resources for the evaluation, the time needed to conclude the process, and working in an intersectoral manner. However, participating municipalities reported that the process of implementing a participatory evaluation and working with various stakeholders had an empowering effect: communities and stakeholders were more willing and interested in participating in health promotion initiatives in a sustained manner

  15. Department of Defense and Department of State Planning and Coordination Efforts in West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-10

    influence in the region. Other world powers such as China, Russia and India also have economic and political interests in western African countries...development plans and policies based on the needs of the citizens such as reducing poverty , providing affordable and available housing and community...concern. Often women and girls are the targets of rape, 20 UN Secretary-General, UN Coordination of

  16. The importance of health information technology in care coordination and transitional care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipriano, Pamela F; Bowles, Kathryn; Dailey, Maureen; Dykes, Patricia; Lamb, Gerri; Naylor, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Care coordination and transitional care services are strategically important for achieving the priorities of better care, better health, and reduced costs embodied in the National Strategy for Quality Improvement in Health Care (National Quality Strategy [NQS]). Some of the most vulnerable times in a person’s care occur with changes in condition as well as movement within and between settings of care. The American Academy of Nursing (AAN) believes it is essential to facilitate the coordination of care and transitions by using health information technology (HIT) to collect, share, and analyze data that communicate patient-centered information among patients, families, and care providers across communities. HIT makes information accessible, actionable, timely, customizable, and portable. Rapid access to information also creates efficiencies in care by eliminating redundancies and illuminating health history and prior care. The adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) and information systems can enable care coordination to be more effective but only when a number of essential elements are addressed to reflect the team-based nature of care coordination as well as a focus on the individual’s needs and preferences. To that end, the AAN offers a set of recommendations to guide the development of the infrastructure, standards, content, and measures for electronically enabled care coordination and transitions in care as well as research needed to build the evidence base to assess outcomes of the associated interventions.

  17. Impact of Relational Coordination on Nurse Job Satisfaction, Work Engagement and Burnout: Achieving the Quadruple Aim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havens, Donna Sullivan; Gittell, Jody Hoffer; Vasey, Joseph

    2018-03-01

    To explore how relational coordination, known to enhance quality and efficiency outcomes for patients and hospitals, impacts direct care nurse outcomes such as burnout, work engagement, and job satisfaction, addressing the "Quadruple Aim," to improve the experience of providing care. Hospitals are complex organizations in which multiple providers work interdependently, under conditions of uncertainty and time constraints, to deliver safe quality care despite differences in specialization, training, and status. Relational coordination-communicating and relating for the purpose of task integration-is known to improve quality, safety, and efficiency under these conditions, but less is known about its impact on the well-being of direct care providers themselves. Surveys measuring relational coordination among nurses and other types of providers as well as job-related outcomes in 5 acute care community hospitals were completed by direct care RNs. Relational coordination was significantly related to increased job satisfaction, increased work engagement, and reduced burnout. Relational coordination contributes to the well-being of direct care nurses, addressing the Quadruple Aim by improving the experience of providing care.

  18. Strengthening human resources for health through information, coordination and accountability mechanisms: the case of the Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badr, Elsheikh; Mohamed, Nazar A; Afzal, Muhammad Mahmood; Bile, Khalif Mohamud

    2013-11-01

    Human resources for health (HRH) in the Sudan were limited by shortages and the maldistribution of health workers, poor management, service fragmentation, poor retention of health workers in rural areas, and a weak health information system. A "country coordination and facilitation" process was implemented to strengthen the national HRH observatory, provide a coordination platform for key stakeholders, catalyse policy support and HRH planning, harmonize the mobilization of resources, strengthen HRH managerial structures, establish new training institutions and scale up the training of community health workers. The national government of the Sudan sanctioned state-level governance of the health system but many states lacked coherent HRH plans and policies. A paucity of training institutions constrained HRH production and the adequate and equitable deployment of health workers in rural areas. The country coordination and facilitation process prompted the establishment of a robust HRH information system and the development of the technical capacities and tools necessary for data analysis and evidence-based participatory decision-making and action. The success of the country coordination and facilitation process was substantiated by the stakeholders' coordinated support, which was built on solid evidence of the challenges in HRH and shared accountability in the planning and implementation of responses to those challenges. The support led to political commitment and the mobilization of resources for HRH. The leadership that was promoted and the educational institutions that were opened should facilitate the training, deployment and retention of the health workers needed to achieve universal health coverage.

  19. Rhythmic Interlimb Coordination Impairments and the Risk for Developing Mobility Limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Eric G; Leveille, Suzanne G; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M; Travison, Thomas; Kennedy, David N; Tucker, Katherine L; Al Snih, Soham; Markides, Kyriakos S; Bean, Jonathan F

    2017-08-01

    The identification of novel rehabilitative impairments that are risk factors for mobility limitations may improve their prevention and treatment among older adults. We tested the hypothesis that impaired rhythmic interlimb ankle and shoulder coordination are risk factors for subsequent mobility limitations among older adults. We conducted a 1-year prospective cohort study of community-dwelling older adults (N = 99) aged 67 years and older who did not have mobility limitations (Short Physical Performance Battery score > 9) at baseline. Participants performed antiphase coordination of the right and left ankles or shoulders while paced by an auditory metronome. Using multivariable logistic regression, we determined odds ratios (ORs) for mobility limitations at 1-year follow-up as a function of coordination variability and asymmetry. After adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, Mini-Mental State Examination score, number of chronic conditions, and baseline Short Physical Performance Battery score, ORs were significant for developing mobility limitations based on a 1 SD difference in the variability of ankle (OR = 1.88; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.16-3.05) and shoulder (OR = 1.96; 95% CI: 1.17-3.29) coordination. ORs were significant for asymmetry of shoulder (OR = 2.11; 95% CI: 1.25-3.57), but not ankle (OR = 0.95; 95% CI: 0.59-1.55) coordination. Similar results were found in unadjusted analyses. The results support our hypothesis that impaired interlimb ankle and shoulder coordination are risk factors for the development of mobility limitations. Future work is needed to further examine the peripheral and central mechanisms underlying this relationship and to test whether enhancing coordination alters mobility limitations. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. How groups co-ordinate their concepts and terminology: implications for medical informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrod, S

    1998-11-01

    Conceptual and terminological systems are established and maintained by the communities who use them. This paper reports experiments which investigate the role of communication and interaction in the process. The experiments show that isolated pairs of communicators and virtual communities of interacting pairs naturally converge on their own conceptual and terminological systems when confronted with a common task. The results also indicate that the system converged on is optimal for that particular group engaged in that particular task. These findings are discussed in relation to the increasing use of tightly coordinated medical teams and its implications for getting them to adopt standardized medical terminologies.

  1. [Community Nutrition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranceta, Javier

    2004-06-01

    In the last 20 years, Public Health Nutrition focused mainly on the qualitative aspects which may influence the onset of chronic diseases, quality of life, physical and mental performance and life expectancy. This applied knowledge organised as part of preventive and health promotion programs led to the development of Community Nutrition. The aim of Community Nutrition actions is to adequate lifestyles related to food consumption patterns in order to improve the quality of life and contribute to health promotion of the population in the community where programs and services are delivered. Key functions to develop in a Community Nutrition Unit consist in the identification and assessment of nutrition problems in the community as well as the design, implementation and evaluation of intervention programs by means of appropriate strategies. These should aim at different populations groups and settings, such as work places, schools, high risk groups or the general public. Nowadays, Community Nutrition work efforts should focus on three main aspects: nutrition education in schools and in the community; food safety and food security and the development and reinforcement of food preparation skills across all age groups. Social catering services, either in schools, the work place or at the community level, need to ensure adequate nutritional supply, provide foods contributing to healthy eating practices as well as to enhance culinary traditions and social learning. Food safety and food security have become a top priority in Public Health. The concepts referes to the availability of food safe and adequate as well as in sufficient amount in order to satisfy nutrition requirements of all individuals in the community. Social changes along new scientific developments will introduce new demands in Community Nutrition work and individual dietary counselling will become a key strategy. In order to face new challenges, community nutrition pactitioners require a high quality

  2. Community Exemption from Payment for Health Services (Burkina ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The project will be carried out in coordination with local communities and with endogenous funds. Researchers will examine the feasibility, efficacy and sustainability of the intervention by means of case studies in 10 health centres in the same district. The results will be fed back to the communities via workshops, and a final ...

  3. Community Mental Health: Issues for Social Work Practice and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Arthur J., Ed.

    Articles by social work educators on some of the critical issues in community mental health are presented. Examined are some conceptual and program developments related to coordination, continuity of care, and the use of teams in planning and service delivery for community mental health (Lawrence K. Berg). The issue of civil commitment to and…

  4. Community noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragdon, C. R.

    Airport and community land use planning as they relate to airport noise reduction are discussed. Legislation, community relations, and the physiological effect of airport noise are considered. Noise at the Logan, Los Angeles, and Minneapolis/St. Paul airports is discussed.

  5. A Customizable Model for Chronic Disease Coordination: Lessons Learned From the Coordinated Chronic Disease Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voetsch, Karen; Sequeira, Sonia; Chavez, Amy Holmes

    2016-03-31

    In 2012, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provided funding and technical assistance to all states and territories to implement the Coordinated Chronic Disease Program, marking the first time that all state health departments had federal resources to coordinate chronic disease prevention and control programs. This article describes lessons learned from this initiative and identifies key elements of a coordinated approach. We analyzed 80 programmatic documents from 21 states and conducted semistructured interviews with 7 chronic disease directors. Six overarching themes emerged: 1) focused agenda, 2) identification of functions, 3) comprehensive planning, 4) collaborative leadership and expertise, 5) managed resources, and 6) relationship building. These elements supported 4 essential activities: 1) evidence-based interventions, 2) strategic use of staff, 3) consistent communication, and 4) strong program infrastructure. On the basis of these elements and activities, we propose a conceptual model that frames overarching concepts, skills, and strategies needed to coordinate state chronic disease prevention and control programs.

  6. Transition Metal Complexes Coordinated by Water Soluble Phosphane Ligands: How Cyclodextrins Can Alter the Coordination Sphere?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Ferreira

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The behaviour of platinum(II and palladium(0 complexes coordinated by various hydrosoluble monodentate phosphane ligands has been investigated by 31P{1H} NMR spectroscopy in the presence of randomly methylated β-cyclodextrin (RAME-β-CD. This molecular receptor can have no impact on the organometallic complexes, induce the formation of phosphane low-coordinated complexes or form coordination second sphere species. These three behaviours are under thermodynamic control and are governed not only by the affinity of RAME-β-CD for the phosphane but also by the phosphane stereoelectronic properties. When observed, the low-coordinated complexes may be formed either via a preliminary decoordination of the phosphane followed by a complexation of the free ligand by the CD or via the generation of organometallic species complexed by CD which then lead to expulsion of ligands to decrease their internal steric hindrance.

  7. Community Drive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnussen, Rikke

    2018-01-01

    Schools and educational institutions are challenged by not adequately educating students for independent knowledge collaboration and solving of complex societal challenges (Bundsgaard & Hansen, 2016; Slot et al., 2017). As an alternative strategy to formal learning has Community-driven research...... opportunity to break boundaries between research institutions and surrounding communities through the involvement of new types of actors, knowledge forms and institutions (OECD, 2011). This paper presents the project Community Drive a three year cross disciplinary community-driven game– and data-based project....... In the paper we present how the project Community Drive initiated in May 2018 is based on results from pilot projects conducted from 2014 – 2017. Overall these studies showed that it is a strong motivational factor for students to be given the task to change their living conditions through redesign...

  8. Community Ecology

    CERN Document Server

    1988-01-01

    This book presents the proceedings of a workshop on community ecology organized at Davis, in April, 1986, sponsored by the Sloan Foundation. There have been several recent symposia on community ecology (Strong et. al., 1984, Diamond and Case, 1987) which have covered a wide range of topics. The goal of the workshop at Davis was more narrow: to explore the role of scale in developing a theoretical approach to understanding communities. There are a number of aspects of scale that enter into attempts to understand ecological communities. One of the most basic is organizational scale. Should community ecology proceed by building up from population biology? This question and its ramifications are stressed throughout the book and explored in the first chapter by Simon Levin. Notions of scale have long been important in understanding physical systems. Thus, in understanding the interactions of organisms with their physical environment, questions of scale become paramount. These more physical questions illustrate the...

  9. Control options for communal energy turnaround by energy coordination centres. Investigation based on the Erzgebirge energy region; Steuerungsmoeglichkeiten der kommunalen Energiewende durch Energieleitstellen. Untersuchung anhand der Energieregion-Erzgebirge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuk, David

    2012-11-01

    The book investigates the role of energy coordination centres for communal energy turnaround. The investigations were carried out in the Erzgebirge energy region, which comprises 13 member communities. It was found that the influence of an energy coordination centre on a community is parallel to the community's awareness of the necessity of local energy turnaround measures. Energy control centres can sharpen this awareness of communities by outlining individual advantages of engagement with these issues and by making concrete suggestions for projects. Here, it becomes clear that communities will be more interested especially in bigger investment projects of an (external)financially strong investor. Most of the communities under investigation were in the range of 1,000 to 7,000 inhabitants; it must be assumed that in this case the opinions of the highest-ranked person of communal authority. This consideration should influence the scope of action of energy coordination centres. The example of a 'pioneering community' in the energy region showed that the consulting services of the energy coordination centre not only led to lower energy consumption (and, in consequence, lower energy expenses) on a medium-term basis but also helped to coordinate the activities of initiatives, e.g. initiatives promoting citizens-owned solar power stations. As the book shows, energy coordination centres take care of communities in general but are also actively supporting initiatives within the community and have a coordinating function when it comes to intercommunity projects. While energy coordination centres are not a 'heal-all' for implementation of the energy turnaround at community level or regional level, they must be viewed as a powerful instrument to achieve it. (orig.)

  10. Robust Parameter Coordination for Multidisciplinary Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    This paper introduced a robust parameter coordination method to analyze parameter uncertainties so as to predict conflicts and coordinate parameters in multidisciplinary design. The proposed method is based on constraints network, which gives a formulated model to analyze the coupling effects between design variables and product specifications. In this model, interval boxes are adopted to describe the uncertainty of design parameters quantitatively to enhance the design robustness. To solve this constraint network model, a general consistent algorithm framework is designed and implemented with interval arithmetic and the genetic algorithm, which can deal with both algebraic and ordinary differential equations. With the help of this method, designers could infer the consistent solution space from the given specifications. A case study involving the design of a bogie dumping system demonstrates the usefulness of this approach.

  11. Chaotic coordinates for the Large Helical Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, S. R., E-mail: shudson@pppl.gov [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Suzuki, Y. [National Institute for Natural Sciences, National Institute for Fusion Sciences, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, 509-5292 (Japan)

    2014-10-15

    The theory of quadratic-flux-minimizing (QFM) surfaces is reviewed, and numerical techniques that allow high-order QFM surfaces to be efficiently constructed for experimentally relevant, non-integrable magnetic fields are described. As a practical example, the chaotic edge of the magnetic field in the Large Helical Device (LHD) is examined. A precise technique for finding the boundary surface is implemented, the hierarchy of partial barriers associated with the near-critical cantori is constructed, and a coordinate system, which we call chaotic coordinates, that is based on a selection of QFM surfaces is constructed that simplifies the description of the magnetic field, so that flux surfaces become “straight” and islands become “square.”.

  12. Update of technical coordinating committee activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarado, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    The Technical Coordinating Committee has its origins in the earliest days of implementing the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act. Between 1982 and 1985, individuals in several of the states felt that coordination among the states would be beneficial to all by affording states a cost-effective method for sharing ideas, discussing alternatives, and presenting solutions to common problems. At the current time, the committee comprises members from each of the sited states. Various compacts, federal agencies, and industry groups participate in committee activities. The Low-Level Management Program provides support for the committee through the provision of logistical support and limited manpower allocation. Activities of the committee have recently focused on waste treatment and minimization technologies. The committee also has worked diligently to see the review of the 3RSTAT computer code completed. The committee has taken a position on various regulatory proposals the past year. The committee expects to continue its work until new sites are brought online

  13. Coordinate transformations and matter waves cloaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammadi, G.R.; Moghaddam, A.G.; Mohammadkhani, R.

    2016-01-01

    Transformation method provides an efficient tool to control wave propagation inside the materials. Using the coordinate transformation approach, we study invisibility cloaks with sphere, cylinder and ellipsoid structures for electronic waves propagation. The underlying physics behind this investigation is the fact that Schrödinger equation with position dependent mass tensor and potentials has a covariant form which follows the coordinate transformation. Using this technique we obtain the exact spatial form of the mass tensor and potentials for a variety of cloaks with different shapes. - Highlights: • Invisibility cloaks for matter waves with three different geometries. • Exact analytical form of the effective mass tensor and potential. • Analogy between cloaking for quantum mechanical waves with classical electromagnetic waves. • Possible experimental realization in engineered semiconducting structures.

  14. Motor coordination and balance in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, R J; Morton, J; Dunnett, S B

    2001-08-01

    Measurement of motor coordination and balance can be used not only to assess the effect of drugs or other experimental manipulations on mice and rats, but also to characterize the motor phenotype of transgenic or knock-out animals. Three well established and widely used protocols for measuring motor coordination and balance in mice and rats (rotarod, beam walking and footprint analysis) are described in this unit. The tests can be used equally well for rats and mice, and have been used both for the phenotypic characterization of transgenic mice and for evaluating the effects of lesions and aging in rats. The protocols are described in the primary context of testing mice, but modifications of the test apparatus or variations in the test parameters for assessment of rats are noted.

  15. Certified standards and vertical coordination in aquaculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trifkovic, Neda

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the interaction between food standards and vertical coordination in the Vietnamese pangasius sector. For farmers and processors alike, the adoption of standards is motivated by a desire to improve market access by ensuring high quality supply. Instead of encouraging the applic......This paper explores the interaction between food standards and vertical coordination in the Vietnamese pangasius sector. For farmers and processors alike, the adoption of standards is motivated by a desire to improve market access by ensuring high quality supply. Instead of encouraging...... the application of standards and contract farming, processing companies prefer to vertically integrate primary production largely due to concerns over the stable supply of pangasius with satisfactory quality and safety attributes. These tendencies increase the market dominance of industrial farming and worsen...

  16. Coordinating quality practices in Direct Trade coffee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holland, Emil; Kjeldsen, Chris; Kerndrup, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few decades, many food niches have emerged with a specific focus on quality. In specialty coffee, micro roasters have brought about Direct Trade coffee as a way of organising an alternative around new tastes and qualities through ongoing and ‘direct’ relations to farmers...... and cooperatives. But Direct Trade also involves exporters. We ask, how do exporters and roasters work together in these new coffee relations, and what do they work on? We observe and participate in a situation where Colombian coffee exporters visit Danish roasters. They tour the roasting facilities and taste...... a number of coffees. Often, the term power is used to analyse such value chain interactions, but we argue that the term coordination better opens up these interactions for exploration and analysis. What emerges is a coordination of quality. Through touring and tasting, issues emerge and differences...

  17. Coordinated Platoon Routing in a Metropolitan Network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, Jeffrey; Munson, Todd; Sokolov, Vadim

    2016-10-10

    Platooning vehicles—connected and automated vehicles traveling with small intervehicle distances—use less fuel because of reduced aerodynamic drag. Given a network de- fined by vertex and edge sets and a set of vehicles with origin/destination nodes/times, we model and solve the combinatorial optimization problem of coordinated routing of vehicles in a manner that routes them to their destination on time while using the least amount of fuel. Common approaches decompose the platoon coordination and vehicle routing into separate problems. Our model addresses both problems simultaneously to obtain the best solution. We use modern modeling techniques and constraints implied from analyzing the platoon routing problem to address larger numbers of vehicles and larger networks than previously considered. While the numerical method used is unable to certify optimality for candidate solutions to all networks and parameters considered, we obtain excellent solutions in approximately one minute for much larger networks and vehicle sets than previously considered in the literature.

  18. Particle simulation in curvilinear coordinate systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeBrun, M.J.; Tajima, T.

    1989-01-01

    We present methods for particle simulation of plasmas in a nearly arbitrary coordinate metric and describe a toroidal electrostatic simulation code that evolved from this effort. A Mercier-type coordinate system is used, with a nonuniform radial grid for improved cross-field resolution. A fast iterative method for solving the Poisson equation is employed, and the interpolation/filtering technique shown to be momentum and energy conserving in the continuum limit. Lorentz ion and drift electron species are used. The code has been thoroughly tested for its reproduction of linear and nonlinear physics, and has been applied to the toroidal drift wave problem and its impact on anomalous transport in tokamaks. 40 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab

  19. Update of technical coordinating committee activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarado, R.A.

    1995-12-31

    The Technical Coordinating Committee has its origins in the earliest days of implementing the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act. Between 1982 and 1985, individuals in several of the states felt that coordination among the states would be beneficial to all by affording states a cost-effective method for sharing ideas, discussing alternatives, and presenting solutions to common problems. At the current time, the committee comprises members from each of the sited states. Various compacts, federal agencies, and industry groups participate in committee activities. The Low-Level Management Program provides support for the committee through the provision of logistical support and limited manpower allocation. Activities of the committee have recently focused on waste treatment and minimization technologies. The committee also has worked diligently to see the review of the 3RSTAT computer code completed. The committee has taken a position on various regulatory proposals the past year. The committee expects to continue its work until new sites are brought online.

  20. Team reasoning: Solving the puzzle of coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colman, Andrew M; Gold, Natalie

    2017-11-03

    In many everyday activities, individuals have a common interest in coordinating their actions. Orthodox game theory cannot explain such intuitively obvious forms of coordination as the selection of an outcome that is best for all in a common-interest game. Theories of team reasoning provide a convincing solution by proposing that people are sometimes motivated to maximize the collective payoff of a group and that they adopt a distinctive mode of reasoning from preferences to decisions. This also offers a compelling explanation of cooperation in social dilemmas. A review of team reasoning and related theories suggests how team reasoning could be incorporated into psychological theories of group identification and social value orientation theory to provide a deeper understanding of these phenomena.