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Sample records for interrupted coding sequences

  1. ICDS database: interrupted CoDing sequences in prokaryotic genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrodou, Emmanuel; Deshayes, Caroline; Muller, Jean; Schaeffer, Christine; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Ripp, Raymond; Poch, Olivier; Reyrat, Jean-Marc; Lecompte, Odile

    2006-01-01

    Unrecognized frameshifts, in-frame stop codons and sequencing errors lead to Interrupted CoDing Sequence (ICDS) that can seriously affect all subsequent steps of functional characterization, from in silico analysis to high-throughput proteomic projects. Here, we describe the Interrupted CoDing Sequence database containing ICDS detected by a similarity-based approach in 80 complete prokaryotic genomes. ICDS can be retrieved by species browsing or similarity searches via a web interface (http://www-bio3d-igbmc.u-strasbg.fr/ICDS/). The definition of each interrupted gene is provided as well as the ICDS genomic localization with the surrounding sequence. Furthermore, to facilitate the experimental characterization of ICDS, we propose optimized primers for re-sequencing purposes. The database will be regularly updated with additional data from ongoing sequenced genomes. Our strategy has been validated by three independent tests: (i) ICDS prediction on a benchmark of artificially created frameshifts, (ii) comparison of predicted ICDS and results obtained from the comparison of the two genomic sequences of Bacillus licheniformis strain ATCC 14580 and (iii) re-sequencing of 25 predicted ICDS of the recently sequenced genome of Mycobacterium smegmatis. This allows us to estimate the specificity and sensitivity (95 and 82%, respectively) of our program and the efficiency of primer determination.

  2. Detecting the molecular scars of evolution in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex by analyzing interrupted coding sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poch Olivier

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computer-assisted analyses have shown that all bacterial genomes contain a small percentage of open reading frames with a frameshift or in-frame stop codon We report here a comparative analysis of these interrupted coding sequences (ICDSs in six isolates of M. tuberculosis, two of M. bovis and one of M. africanum and question their phenotypic impact and evolutionary significance. Results ICDSs were classified as "common to all strains" or "strain-specific". Common ICDSs are believed to result from mutations acquired before the divergence of the species, whereas strain-specific ICDSs were acquired after this divergence. Comparative analyses of these ICDSs therefore define the molecular signature of a particular strain, phylogenetic lineage or species, which may be useful for inferring phenotypic traits such as virulence and molecular relationships. For instance, in silico analysis of the W-Beijing lineage of M. tuberculosis, an emergent family involved in several outbreaks, is readily distinguishable from other phyla by its smaller number of common ICDSs, including at least one known to be associated with virulence. Our observation was confirmed through the sequencing analysis of ICDSs in a panel of 21 clinical M. tuberculosis strains. This analysis further illustrates the divergence of the W-Beijing lineage from other phyla in terms of the number of full-length ORFs not containing a frameshift. We further show that ICDS formation is not associated with the presence of a mutated promoter, and suggest that promoter extinction is not the main cause of pseudogene formation. Conclusion The correlation between ICDSs, function and phenotypes could have important evolutionary implications. This study provides population geneticists with a list of targets, which could undergo selective pressure and thus alters relationships between the various lineages of M. tuberculosis strains and their host. This approach could be applied to any

  3. Avoiding Interruptions - QoE Trade-offs in Block-coded Streaming Media Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Parandehgheibi, Ali; Shakkottai, Srinivas; Ozdaglar, Asu

    2010-01-01

    We take an analytical approach to study Quality of user Experience (QoE) for video streaming applications. First, we show that random linear network coding applied to blocks of video frames can significantly simplify the packet requests at the network layer and save resources by avoiding duplicate packet reception. Network coding allows us to model the receiver's buffer as a queue with Poisson arrivals and deterministic departures. We consider the probability of interruption in video playback as well as the number of initially buffered packets (initial waiting time) as the QoE metrics. We characterize the optimal trade-off between these metrics by providing upper and lower bounds on the minimum initial buffer size, required to achieve certain level of interruption probability for different regimes of the system parameters. Our bounds are asymptotically tight as the file size goes to infinity.

  4. SPARSE SEQUENCE CONSTRUCTION OF LDPC CODES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    This letter proposes a novel and simple construction of regular Low-Density Parity-Check (LDPC) codes using sparse binary sequences. It utilizes the cyclic cross correlation function of sparse sequences to generate codes with girth8. The new codes perform well using the sumproduct decoding. Low encodingcomplexity can also be achieved due to the inherent quasi-cyclic structure of the codes.

  5. Sequencing analysis of the spinal bulbar muscular atrophy CAG expansion reveals absence of repeat interruptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fratta, Pietro; Collins, Toby; Pemble, Sally; Nethisinghe, Suran; Devoy, Anny; Giunti, Paola; Sweeney, Mary G; Hanna, Michael G; Fisher, Elizabeth M C

    2014-02-01

    Trinucleotide repeat disorders are a heterogeneous group of diseases caused by the expansion, beyond a pathogenic threshold, of unstable DNA tracts in different genes. Sequence interruptions in the repeats have been described in the majority of these disorders and may influence disease phenotype and heritability. Spinal bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a motor neuron disease caused by a CAG trinucleotide expansion in the androgen receptor (AR) gene. Diagnostic testing and previous research have relied on fragment analysis polymerase chain reaction to determine the AR CAG repeat size, and have therefore not been able to assess the presence of interruptions. We here report a sequencing study of the AR CAG repeat in a cohort of SBMA patients and control subjects in the United Kingdom. We found no repeat interruptions to be present, and we describe differences between sequencing and traditional sizing methods.

  6. Constructing circuit codes by permuting initial sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Wynn, Ed

    2012-01-01

    Two new constructions are presented for coils and snakes in the hypercube. Improvements are made on the best known results for snake-in-the-box coils of dimensions 9, 10 and 11, and for some other circuit codes of dimensions between 8 and 13. In the first construction, circuit codes are generated from permuted copies of an initial transition sequence; the multiple copies constrain the search, so that long codes can be found relatively efficiently. In the second construction, two lower-dimensional paths are joined together with only one or two changes in the highest dimension; this requires a search for a permutation of the second sequence to fit around the first. It is possible to investigate sequences of vertices of the hypercube, including circuit codes, by connecting the corresponding vertices in an extended graph related to the hypercube. As an example of this, invertible circuit codes are briefly discussed.

  7. Reappearance of an 11-year-old sequence in an HIV-1 infected patient during treatment interruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, T.V.; Gerstoft, J.; Nielsen, C.;

    2008-01-01

    HIV-1 from a patient with multi-drug resistant virus was identified as wild type during treatment interruption. The aim of the study was to describe how the viral population is affected by treatment interruptions and use phylogeny to reconstruct the evolutionary pattern. 15 samples covering 13 y...... and 2 treatment interruptions were analysed in both pol and env. The wild type virus found in the sample from the second treatment interruption in 2002 had not been present as a dominant population since 1994. Phylogeny showed that the 2002 sample was more closely related to wild type sequences than...... to other sequences sampled in 2002. This indicated that the wild type virus was caused by recruitment from the viral archives rather than reversion of previously circulating resistant strains. A few weeks after re-initiated treatment, virus showed full resistance, indicating that resistant virus...

  8. Common interruptions in the repeating tripeptide sequence of non-fibrillar collagens: sequence analysis and structural studies on triple-helix peptide models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiagarajan, Geetha; Li, Yingjie; Mohs, Angela; Strafaci, Christopher; Popiel, Magdalena; Baum, Jean; Brodsky, Barbara

    2008-02-22

    Interruptions in the repeating (Gly-X1-X2)(n) amino acid sequence pattern are found in the triple-helix domains of all non-fibrillar collagens, and perturbations to the triple-helix at such sites are likely to play a role in collagen higher-order structure and function. This study defines the sequence features and structural consequences of the most common interruption, where one residue is missing from the tripeptide pattern, Gly-X1-X2-Gly-AA(1)-Gly-X1-X2, designated G1G interruptions. Residues found within G1G interruptions are predominantly hydrophobic (70%), followed by a significant amount of charged residues (16%), and the Gly-X1-X2 triplets flanking the interruption are atypical. Studies on peptide models indicate the degree of destabilization is much greater when Pro is in the interruption, GP, than when hydrophobic residues (GF, GY) are present, and a rigid Gly-Pro-Hyp tripeptide adjacent to the interruption leads to greater destabilization than a flexible Gly-Ala-Ala sequence. Modeling based on NMR data indicates the Phe residue within a GF interruption is located on the outside of the triple helix. The G1G interruptions resemble a previously studied collagen interruption GPOGAAVMGPO, designated G4G-type, in that both are destabilizing, but allow continuation of rod-like triple helices and maintenance of the single residue stagger throughout the imperfection, with a loss of axial register of the superhelix on both sides. Both kinds of interruptions result in a highly localized perturbation in hydrogen bonding and dihedral angles, but the hydrophobic residue of a G4G interruption packs near the central axis of the superhelix, while the hydrophobic residue of a G1G interruption is located on the triple-helix surface. The different structural consequences of G1G and G4G interruptions in the repeating tripeptide sequence pattern suggest a physical basis for their differential susceptibility to matrix metalloproteinases in type X collagen.

  9. Short sequence motifs, overrepresented in mammalian conservednon-coding sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minovitsky, Simon; Stegmaier, Philip; Kel, Alexander; Kondrashov,Alexey S.; Dubchak, Inna

    2007-02-21

    Background: A substantial fraction of non-coding DNAsequences of multicellular eukaryotes is under selective constraint. Inparticular, ~;5 percent of the human genome consists of conservednon-coding sequences (CNSs). CNSs differ from other genomic sequences intheir nucleotide composition and must play important functional roles,which mostly remain obscure.Results: We investigated relative abundancesof short sequence motifs in all human CNSs present in the human/mousewhole-genome alignments vs. three background sets of sequences: (i)weakly conserved or unconserved non-coding sequences (non-CNSs); (ii)near-promoter sequences (located between nucleotides -500 and -1500,relative to a start of transcription); and (iii) random sequences withthe same nucleotide composition as that of CNSs. When compared tonon-CNSs and near-promoter sequences, CNSs possess an excess of AT-richmotifs, often containing runs of identical nucleotides. In contrast, whencompared to random sequences, CNSs contain an excess of GC-rich motifswhich, however, lack CpG dinucleotides. Thus, abundance of short sequencemotifs in human CNSs, taken as a whole, is mostly determined by theiroverall compositional properties and not by overrepresentation of anyspecific short motifs. These properties are: (i) high AT-content of CNSs,(ii) a tendency, probably due to context-dependent mutation, of A's andT's to clump, (iii) presence of short GC-rich regions, and (iv) avoidanceof CpG contexts, due to their hypermutability. Only a small number ofshort motifs, overrepresented in all human CNSs are similar to bindingsites of transcription factors from the FOX family.Conclusion: Human CNSsas a whole appear to be too broad a class of sequences to possess strongfootprints of any short sequence-specific functions. Such footprintsshould be studied at the level of functional subclasses of CNSs, such asthose which flank genes with a particular pattern of expression. Overallproperties of CNSs are affected by

  10. Detecting overlapping coding sequences in virus genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown Chris M

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detecting new coding sequences (CDSs in viral genomes can be difficult for several reasons. The typically compact genomes often contain a number of overlapping coding and non-coding functional elements, which can result in unusual patterns of codon usage; conservation between related sequences can be difficult to interpret – especially within overlapping genes; and viruses often employ non-canonical translational mechanisms – e.g. frameshifting, stop codon read-through, leaky-scanning and internal ribosome entry sites – which can conceal potentially coding open reading frames (ORFs. Results In a previous paper we introduced a new statistic – MLOGD (Maximum Likelihood Overlapping Gene Detector – for detecting and analysing overlapping CDSs. Here we present (a an improved MLOGD statistic, (b a greatly extended suite of software using MLOGD, (c a database of results for 640 virus sequence alignments, and (d a web-interface to the software and database. Tests show that, from an alignment with just 20 mutations, MLOGD can discriminate non-overlapping CDSs from non-coding ORFs with a typical accuracy of up to 98%, and can detect CDSs overlapping known CDSs with a typical accuracy of 90%. In addition, the software produces a variety of statistics and graphics, useful for analysing an input multiple sequence alignment. Conclusion MLOGD is an easy-to-use tool for virus genome annotation, detecting new CDSs – in particular overlapping or short CDSs – and for analysing overlapping CDSs following frameshift sites. The software, web-server, database and supplementary material are available at http://guinevere.otago.ac.nz/mlogd.html.

  11. Novel overlapping coding sequences in Chlamydia trachomatis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Klaus Thorleif; Petersen, Lise; Falk, Søren;

    2006-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is the aetiological agent of trachoma and sexually transmitted infections. The C. trachomatis genome sequence revealed an organism adapted to the intracellular habitat with a high coding ratio and a small genome consisting of 1.042-kilobase (kb) with 895 annotated protein...... of the novel genes in C. trachomatis Serovar A and Chlamydia muridarum. Several of the genes have typical gene-like and protein-like features. Furthermore, we confirm transcriptional activity from 10 of the putative genes. The combined evidence suggests that at least seven of the 15 are protein coding genes...

  12. Random Coding Bounds for DNA Codes Based on Fibonacci Ensembles of DNA Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    COVERED (From - To) 6 Jul 08 – 11 Jul 08 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE RANDOM CODING BOUNDS FOR DNA CODES BASED ON FIBONACCI ENSEMBLES OF DNA SEQUENCES ... sequences which are generalizations of the Fibonacci sequences . 15. SUBJECT TERMS DNA Codes, Fibonacci Ensembles, DNA Computing, Code Optimization 16...coding bound on the rate of DNA codes is proved. To obtain the bound, we use some ensembles of DNA sequences which are generalizations of the Fibonacci

  13. Efficient Quantum Private Communication Based on Dynamic Control Code Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zheng-Wen; Feng, Xiao-Yi; Peng, Jin-Ye; Zeng, Gui-Hua; Qi, Jin

    2016-12-01

    Based on chaos and quantum properties, we propose a quantum private communication scheme with dynamic control code sequence. The initial sequence is obtained via chaotic systems, and the control code sequence is derived by grouping, XOR and extracting. A shift cycle algorithm is designed to enable the dynamic change of control code sequence. Analysis shows that transmission efficiency could reach 100 % with high dynamics and security.

  14. Efficient Quantum Private Communication Based on Dynamic Control Code Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zheng-Wen; Feng, Xiao-Yi; Peng, Jin-Ye; Zeng, Gui-Hua; Qi, Jin

    2017-04-01

    Based on chaos and quantum properties, we propose a quantum private communication scheme with dynamic control code sequence. The initial sequence is obtained via chaotic systems, and the control code sequence is derived by grouping, XOR and extracting. A shift cycle algorithm is designed to enable the dynamic change of control code sequence. Analysis shows that transmission efficiency could reach 100 % with high dynamics and security.

  15. Code domains in tandem repetitive DNA sequence structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, P

    1992-10-01

    Traditionally, many people doing research in molecular biology attribute coding properties to a given DNA sequence if this sequence contains an open reading frame for translation into a sequence of amino acids. This protein coding capability of DNA was detected about 30 years ago. The underlying genetic code is highly conserved and present in every biological species studied so far. Today, it is obvious that DNA has a much larger coding potential for other important tasks. Apart from coding for specific RNA molecules such as rRNA, snRNA and tRNA molecules, specific structural and sequence patterns of the DNA chain itself express distinct codes for the regulation and expression of its genetic activity. A chromatin code has been defined for phasing of the histone-octamer protein complex in the nucleosome. A translation frame code has been shown to exist that determines correct triplet counting at the ribosome during protein synthesis. A loop code seems to organize the single stranded interaction of the nascent RNA chain with proteins during the splicing process, and a splicing code phases successive 5' and 3' splicing sites. Most of these DNA codes are not exclusively based on the primary DNA sequence itself, but also seem to include specific features of the corresponding higher order structures. Based on the view that these various DNA codes are genetically instructive for specific molecular interactions or processes, important in the nucleus during interphase and during cell division, the coding capability of tandem repetitive DNA sequences has recently been reconsidered.

  16. Feature-based Image Sequence Compression Coding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A novel compressing method for video teleconference applications is presented. Semantic-based coding based on human image feature is realized, where human features are adopted as parameters. Model-based coding and the concept of vector coding are combined with the work on image feature extraction to obtain the result.

  17. ARC Code TI: sequenceMiner

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The sequenceMiner was developed to address the problem of detecting and describing anomalies in large sets of high-dimensional symbol sequences. sequenceMiner works...

  18. Interrupt Handlers in Java

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Stephan; Schoeberl, Martin; Ravn, Anders Peter

    2008-01-01

    An important part of implementing device drivers is to control the interrupt facilities of the hardware platform and to program interrupt handlers. Current methods for handling interrupts in Java use a server thread waiting for the VM to signal an interrupt occurrence. It means that the interrupt...... is handled at a later time, which has some disadvantages. We present constructs that allow interrupts to be handled directly and not at a later point decided by a scheduler. A desirable feature of our approach is that we do not require a native middleware layer but can handle interrupts entirely with Java...... code. We have implemented our approach using an interpreter and a Java processor, and give an example demonstrating its use....

  19. Interrupt Handlers in Java

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Stephan; Schoeberl, Martin; Ravn, Anders Peter

    2008-01-01

    An important part of implementing device drivers is to control the interrupt facilities of the hardware platform and to program interrupt handlers. Current methods for handling interrupts in Java use a server thread waiting for the VM to signal an interrupt occurrence. It means that the interrupt...... is handled at a later time, which has some disadvantages. We present constructs that allow interrupts to be handled directly and not at a later point decided by a scheduler. A desirable feature of our approach is that we do not require a native middleware layer but can handle interrupts entirely with Java...... code. We have implemented our approach using an interpreter and a Java processor, and give an example demonstrating its use....

  20. SEQassembly: A Practical Tools Program for Coding Sequences Splicing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hongbin; Yang, Hang; Fu, Lei; Qin, Long; Li, Huili; He, Feng; Wang, Bo; Wu, Xiaoming

    CDS (Coding Sequences) is a portion of mRNA sequences, which are composed by a number of exon sequence segments. The construction of CDS sequence is important for profound genetic analysis such as genotyping. A program in MATLAB environment is presented, which can process batch of samples sequences into code segments under the guide of reference exon models, and splice these code segments of same sample source into CDS according to the exon order in queue file. This program is useful in transcriptional polymorphism detection and gene function study.

  1. Ancient DNA sequence revealed by error-correcting codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, Marcelo M; Spoladore, Larissa; Faria, Luzinete C B; Rocha, Andréa S L; Silva-Filho, Marcio C; Palazzo, Reginaldo

    2015-07-10

    A previously described DNA sequence generator algorithm (DNA-SGA) using error-correcting codes has been employed as a computational tool to address the evolutionary pathway of the genetic code. The code-generated sequence alignment demonstrated that a residue mutation revealed by the code can be found in the same position in sequences of distantly related taxa. Furthermore, the code-generated sequences do not promote amino acid changes in the deviant genomes through codon reassignment. A Bayesian evolutionary analysis of both code-generated and homologous sequences of the Arabidopsis thaliana malate dehydrogenase gene indicates an approximately 1 MYA divergence time from the MDH code-generated sequence node to its paralogous sequences. The DNA-SGA helps to determine the plesiomorphic state of DNA sequences because a single nucleotide alteration often occurs in distantly related taxa and can be found in the alternative codon patterns of noncanonical genetic codes. As a consequence, the algorithm may reveal an earlier stage of the evolution of the standard code.

  2. Hybrid Coding of Image Sequences by Using Wavelet Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Surin

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new method of hybrid coding of image sequences byusing wavelet transform is proposed. The basic MPEG scheme with DCT hasbeen modificated in sense of replacement DCT by wavelet transform. Inthe proposed method, the motion estimation and compensation are usedfor motion vectors calculation and different frame between currentframe and compensated frame is coded by using wavelet transform. Someexperimental results of image sequences coding by using a new methodare presented.

  3. Which Are More Random: Coding or Noncoding DNA Sequences?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Fang; ZHENG Wei-Mou

    2002-01-01

    Evidence seems to show that coding DNA is more random than noncoding DNA, but other conflictingevidence also exists. Based on the third-base degeneracy of codons, we regard the third position of codons as a 'noisy'position. By deleting one fixed position of non-overlapping triplets in a given sequence, three masked sequences may bededuced from the sequence. We have investigated the block-to-site mutual information functions of coding and noncodingsequences in yeast without and with the masking. Characteristics that distinguish coding from noncoding DNA havebeen found. It is observed that the strong correlations in the coding regions may be blocked by the third base of codons,and the proper masking can extract the correlations. Distribution of dimeric tandem repeats of unmasked sequences isalso compared with that of masked sequences.

  4. Whole-Exome Sequencing Identifies Homozygous GPR161 Mutation in a Family with Pituitary Stalk Interruption Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaca, Ender; Buyukkaya, Ramazan; Pehlivan, Davut; Charng, Wu-Lin; Yaykasli, Kursat O.; Bayram, Yavuz; Gambin, Tomasz; Withers, Marjorie; Atik, Mehmed M.; Arslanoglu, Ilknur; Bolu, Semih; Erdin, Serkan; Buyukkaya, Ayla; Yaykasli, Emine; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Muzny, Donna M.; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Pituitary stalk interruption syndrome (PSIS) is a rare, congenital anomaly of the pituitary gland characterized by pituitary gland insufficiency, thin or discontinuous pituitary stalk, anterior pituitary hypoplasia, and ectopic positioning of the posterior pituitary gland (neurohypophysis). The clinical presentation of patients with PSIS varies from isolated growth hormone (GH) deficiency to combined pituitary insufficiency and accompanying extrapituitary findings. Mutations in HESX1, LHX4, OTX2, SOX3, and PROKR2 have been associated with PSIS in less than 5% of cases; thus, the underlying genetic etiology for the vast majority of cases remains to be determined. Objective: We applied whole-exome sequencing (WES) to a consanguineous family with two affected siblings who have pituitary gland insufficiency and radiographic findings of hypoplastic (thin) pituitary gland, empty sella, ectopic neurohypophysis, and interrupted pitiutary stalk—characteristic clinical diagnostic findings of PSIS. Design and Participants: WES was applied to two affected and one unaffected siblings. Results: WES of two affected and one unaffected sibling revealed a unique homozygous missense mutation in GPR161, which encodes the orphan G protein–coupled receptor 161, a protein responsible for transducing extracellular signals across the plasma membrane into the cell. Conclusion: Mutations of GPR161 may be implicated as a potential novel cause of PSIS. PMID:25322266

  5. SinEx DB: a database for single exon coding sequences in mammalian genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorquera, Roddy; Ortiz, Rodrigo; Ossandon, F; Cárdenas, Juan Pablo; Sepúlveda, Rene; González, Carolina; Holmes, David S

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic genes are typically interrupted by intragenic, noncoding sequences termed introns. However, some genes lack introns in their coding sequence (CDS) and are generally known as 'single exon genes' (SEGs). In this work, a SEG is defined as a nuclear, protein-coding gene that lacks introns in its CDS. Whereas, many public databases of Eukaryotic multi-exon genes are available, there are only two specialized databases for SEGs. The present work addresses the need for a more extensive and diverse database by creating SinEx DB, a publicly available, searchable database of predicted SEGs from 10 completely sequenced mammalian genomes including human. SinEx DB houses the DNA and protein sequence information of these SEGs and includes their functional predictions (KOG) and the relative distribution of these functions within species. The information is stored in a relational database built with My SQL Server 5.1.33 and the complete dataset of SEG sequences and their functional predictions are available for downloading. SinEx DB can be interrogated by: (i) a browsable phylogenetic schema, (ii) carrying out BLAST searches to the in-house SinEx DB of SEGs and (iii) via an advanced search mode in which the database can be searched by key words and any combination of searches by species and predicted functions. SinEx DB provides a rich source of information for advancing our understanding of the evolution and function of SEGs.Database URL: www.sinex.cl.

  6. The impact of the nucleosome code on protein-coding sequence evolution in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Warnecke

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Coding sequence evolution was once thought to be the result of selection on optimal protein function alone. Selection can, however, also act at the RNA level, for example, to facilitate rapid translation or ensure correct splicing. Here, we ask whether the way DNA works also imposes constraints on coding sequence evolution. We identify nucleosome positioning as a likely candidate to set up such a DNA-level selective regime and use high-resolution microarray data in yeast to compare the evolution of coding sequence bound to or free from nucleosomes. Controlling for gene expression and intra-gene location, we find a nucleosome-free "linker" sequence to evolve on average 5-6% slower at synonymous sites. A reduced rate of evolution in linker is especially evident at the 5' end of genes, where the effect extends to non-synonymous substitution rates. This is consistent with regular nucleosome architecture in this region being important in the context of gene expression control. As predicted, codons likely to generate a sequence unfavourable to nucleosome formation are enriched in linker sequence. Amino acid content is likewise skewed as a function of nucleosome occupancy. We conclude that selection operating on DNA to maintain correct positioning of nucleosomes impacts codon choice, amino acid choice, and synonymous and non-synonymous rates of evolution in coding sequence. The results support the exclusion model for nucleosome positioning and provide an alternative interpretation for runs of rare codons. As the intimate association of histones and DNA is a universal characteristic of genic sequence in eukaryotes, selection on coding sequence composition imposed by nucleosome positioning should be phylogenetically widespread.

  7. Evaluating the protein coding potential of exonized transposable element sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borodovsky Mark

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transposable element (TE sequences, once thought to be merely selfish or parasitic members of the genomic community, have been shown to contribute a wide variety of functional sequences to their host genomes. Analysis of complete genome sequences have turned up numerous cases where TE sequences have been incorporated as exons into mRNAs, and it is widely assumed that such 'exonized' TEs encode protein sequences. However, the extent to which TE-derived sequences actually encode proteins is unknown and a matter of some controversy. We have tried to address this outstanding issue from two perspectives: i-by evaluating ascertainment biases related to the search methods used to uncover TE-derived protein coding sequences (CDS and ii-through a probabilistic codon-frequency based analysis of the protein coding potential of TE-derived exons. Results We compared the ability of three classes of sequence similarity search methods to detect TE-derived sequences among data sets of experimentally characterized proteins: 1-a profile-based hidden Markov model (HMM approach, 2-BLAST methods and 3-RepeatMasker. Profile based methods are more sensitive and more selective than the other methods evaluated. However, the application of profile-based search methods to the detection of TE-derived sequences among well-curated experimentally characterized protein data sets did not turn up many more cases than had been previously detected and nowhere near as many cases as recent genome-wide searches have. We observed that the different search methods used were complementary in the sense that they yielded largely non-overlapping sets of hits and differed in their ability to recover known cases of TE-derived CDS. The probabilistic analysis of TE-derived exon sequences indicates that these sequences have low protein coding potential on average. In particular, non-autonomous TEs that do not encode protein sequences, such as Alu elements, are frequently

  8. Application of T-Code, Turbo Codes and Pseudo-Random Sequence for Steganography

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    Anil Kumar

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we propose new technique that will address the problem of robustness and data safety in steganography. The steganography consists of techniques to allow the communication between two persons, hiding not only the contents but also the very existence of the communication in the eyes of any observer. T-Codes used with Turbo Codes generates cryptic and error-coded data stream, which is hidden in the stego-object using Pseudo-Random sequence. This technique makes our processed data stream non-vulnerable to the attack of an active intruder, or due to noise in the transmission link.

  9. Nonlinear Aspects of Coding and Noncoding DNA Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    2001-03-01

    One of the most remarkable features of human DNA is that 97 percent is not coding for proteins. Studying this noncoding DNA is important both for practical reasons (to distinguish it from the coding DNA as the human genome is sequenced), and for scientific reasons (why is the noncoding DNA present at all, if it appears to have little if any purpose?). In this talk we discuss new methods of analyzing coding and noncoding DNA in parallel, with a view to uncovering different statistical properties of the two kinds of DNA. We also speculate on possible roles of noncoding DNA. The work reported here was carried out primarily by P. Bernaola-Galvan, S. V. Buldyrev, P. Carpena, N. Dokholyan, A. L. Goldberger, I. Grosse, S. Havlin, H. Herzel, J. L. Oliver, C.-K. Peng, M. Simons, H. E. Stanley, R. H. R. Stanley, and G. M. Viswanathan. [1] For a brief overview in language that physicists can understand, see H. E. Stanley, S. V. Buldyrev, A. L. Goldberger, S. Havlin, C.-K. Peng, and M. Simons, "Scaling Features of Noncoding DNA" [Proc. XII Max Born Symposium, Wroclaw], Physica A 273, 1-18 (1999). [2] I. Grosse, H. Herzel, S. V. Buldyrev, and H. E. Stanley, "Species Independence of Mutual Information in Coding and Noncoding DNA," Phys. Rev. E 61, 5624-5629 (2000). [3] P. Bernaola-Galvan, I. Grosse, P. Carpena, J. L. Oliver, and H. E. Stanley, "Identification of DNA Coding Regions Using an Entropic Segmentation Method," Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 1342-1345 (2000). [4] N. Dokholyan, S. V. Buldyrev, S. Havlin, and H. E. Stanley, "Distributions of Dimeric Tandem Repeats in Non-coding and Coding DNA Sequences," J. Theor. Biol. 202, 273-282 (2000). [5] R. H. R. Stanley, N. V. Dokholyan, S. V. Buldyrev, S. Havlin, and H. E. Stanley, "Clumping of Identical Oligonucleotides in Coding and Noncoding DNA Sequences," J. Biomol. Structure and Design 17, 79-87 (1999). [6] N. Dokholyan, S. V. Buldyrev, S. Havlin, and H. E. Stanley, "Distribution of Base Pair Repeats in Coding and Noncoding DNA

  10. DNA watermarks in non-coding regulatory sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pyka Martin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA watermarks can be applied to identify the unauthorized use of genetically modified organisms. It has been shown that coding regions can be used to encrypt information into living organisms by using the DNA-Crypt algorithm. Yet, if the sequence of interest presents a non-coding DNA sequence, either the function of a resulting functional RNA molecule or a regulatory sequence, such as a promoter, could be affected. For our studies we used the small cytoplasmic RNA 1 in yeast and the lac promoter region of Escherichia coli. Findings The lac promoter was deactivated by the integrated watermark. In addition, the RNA molecules displayed altered configurations after introducing a watermark, but surprisingly were functionally intact, which has been verified by analyzing the growth characteristics of both wild type and watermarked scR1 transformed yeast cells. In a third approach we introduced a second overlapping watermark into the lac promoter, which did not affect the promoter activity. Conclusion Even though the watermarked RNA and one of the watermarked promoters did not show any significant differences compared to the wild type RNA and wild type promoter region, respectively, it cannot be generalized that other RNA molecules or regulatory sequences behave accordingly. Therefore, we do not recommend integrating watermark sequences into regulatory regions.

  11. The Cipher Code of Simple Sequence Repeats in "Vampire Pathogens".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Geng; Bello-Orti, Bernardo; Aragon, Virginia; Tucker, Alexander W; Luo, Rui; Ren, Pinxing; Bi, Dingren; Zhou, Rui; Jin, Hui

    2015-07-28

    Blood inside mammals is a forbidden area for the majority of prokaryotic microbes; however, red blood cells tropism microbes, like "vampire pathogens" (VP), succeed in matching scarce nutrients and surviving strong immunity reactions. Here, we found VP of Mycoplasma, Rhizobiales, and Rickettsiales showed significantly higher counts of (AG)n dimeric simple sequence repeats (Di-SSRs) in the genomes, coding and non-coding regions than non Vampire Pathogens (N_VP). Regression analysis indicated a significant correlation between GC content and the span of (AG)n-Di-SSR variation. Gene Ontology (GO) terms with abundance of (AG)3-Di-SSRs shared by the VP strains were associated with purine nucleotide metabolism (FDR < 0.01), indicating an adaptation to the limited availability of purine and nucleotide precursors in blood. Di-amino acids coded by (AG)n-Di-SSRs included all three six-fold code amino acids (Arg, Leu and Ser) and significantly higher counts of Di-amino acids coded by (AG)3, (GA)3, and (TC)3 in VP than N_VP. Furthermore, significant differences (P < 0.001) on the numbers of triplexes formed from (AG)n-Di-SSRs between VP and N_VP in Mycoplasma suggested the potential role of (AG)n-Di-SSRs in gene regulation.

  12. Network interruptions

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    On Sunday 12 June 2005, a site-wide security software upgrade will be performed on all CERN network equipment. This maintenance operation will cause at least 2 short network interruptions of 2 minutes on each equipment item. There are hundreds of such items across the CERN site (Meyrin, Prévessin and all SPS and LHC pits), and it will thus take the whole day to treat them all. All network users and services will be affected. Central batch computing services will be interrupted during this period, expected to last from 8 a.m. until late evening. Job submission will still be possible but no jobs will actually be run. It is hoped to complete the computer centre upgrades in the morning so that stable access can be restored to lxplus, afs and nice services as soon as possible; this cannot be guaranteed, however. The opportunity will be used to interrupt and perform upgrades on the CERN Document Servers.

  13. Genetic algorithms with permutation coding for multiple sequence alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Othman, Mohamed Tahar; Abdel-Azim, Gamil

    2013-08-01

    Multiple sequence alignment (MSA) is one of the topics of bio informatics that has seriously been researched. It is known as NP-complete problem. It is also considered as one of the most important and daunting tasks in computational biology. Concerning this a wide number of heuristic algorithms have been proposed to find optimal alignment. Among these heuristic algorithms are genetic algorithms (GA). The GA has mainly two major weaknesses: it is time consuming and can cause local minima. One of the significant aspects in the GA process in MSA is to maximize the similarities between sequences by adding and shuffling the gaps of Solution Coding (SC). Several ways for SC have been introduced. One of them is the Permutation Coding (PC). We propose a hybrid algorithm based on genetic algorithms (GAs) with a PC and 2-opt algorithm. The PC helps to code the MSA solution which maximizes the gain of resources, reliability and diversity of GA. The use of the PC opens the area by applying all functions over permutations for MSA. Thus, we suggest an algorithm to calculate the scoring function for multiple alignments based on PC, which is used as fitness function. The time complexity of the GA is reduced by using this algorithm. Our GA is implemented with different selections strategies and different crossovers. The probability of crossover and mutation is set as one strategy. Relevant patents have been probed in the topic.

  14. Complete coding sequences of the rabbitpox virus genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, G; Chen, N; Roper, R L; Feng, Z; Hunter, A; Danila, M; Lefkowitz, E J; Buller, R M L; Upton, C

    2005-11-01

    Rabbitpox virus (RPXV) is highly virulent for rabbits and it has long been suspected to be a close relative of vaccinia virus. To explore these questions, the complete coding region of the rabbitpox virus genome was sequenced to permit comparison with sequenced strains of vaccinia virus and other orthopoxviruses. The genome of RPXV strain Utrecht (RPXV-UTR) is 197 731 nucleotides long, excluding the terminal hairpin structures at each end of the genome. The RPXV-UTR genome has 66.5 % A + T content, 184 putative functional genes and 12 fragmented ORF regions that are intact in other orthopoxviruses. The sequence of the RPXV-UTR genome reveals that two RPXV-UTR genes have orthologues in variola virus (VARV; the causative agent of smallpox), but not in vaccinia virus (VACV) strains. These genes are a zinc RING finger protein gene (RPXV-UTR-008) and an ankyrin repeat family protein gene (RPXV-UTR-180). A third gene, encoding a chemokine-binding protein (RPXV-UTR-001/184), is complete in VARV but functional only in some VACV strains. Examination of the evolutionary relationship between RPXV and other orthopoxviruses was carried out using the central 143 kb DNA sequence conserved among all completely sequenced orthopoxviruses and also the protein sequences of 49 gene products present in all completely sequenced chordopoxviruses. The results of these analyses both confirm that RPXV-UTR is most closely related to VACV and suggest that RPXV has not evolved directly from any of the sequenced VACV strains, since RPXV contains a 719 bp region not previously identified in any VACV.

  15. Edge-Oriented Compression Coding on Image Sequence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    An edge-oriented image sequence coding scheme is presented.On the basis of edge detecting,an image could be divided into the sensitized region and the smooth region.In this scheme,the architecture of sensityzed region is approximated with linear type of segments.Then a rectangle belt is constructed for each segment.Finally,the gray value distribution in the region is fitted by normal forms polynomials.The model matching and motion analysis are also based on the architecture of sensityized region.For the smooth region we use the run length scanning and linear approximating.By means of normal forms polynomial fitting and motion prediction by matching,the images are compressed.It is shown through the simulations that the subjective quality of reconstructed picture is excellent at 0.0075 bit-per-pel.

  16. Isolation and sequence analysis of Clpg1, a gene coding for an endopolygalacturonase of the phytopathogenic fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centis, S; Dumas, B; Fournier, J; Marolda, M; Esquerré-Tugayé, M T

    1996-04-17

    Oligodeoxyribonucleotide primers designed from the N-terminal amino acid (aa) sequence of the endopolygalacturonase (EndoPG) of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum (Cl) race beta and from an internal sequence conserved among different fungal EndoPG were used in a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify genomic related sequences of the fungus. A 542-bp fragment, designated pgA, was obtained and used as a probe to screen a partial genomic library of Cl. Among the positive clones, one was further analyzed. Nucleotide sequencing of this clone revealed on ORF encoding a 363-amino-acid (aa) polypeptide beginning with a signal peptide of 26 aa interrupted by an intron of 70 bp, and showing a high degree of homology to ten fungal EndoPG sequences. Consensus sequences were identified in the 5' non-coding region. This genomic clone was thereafter designated Clpg1. Southern analysis, performed with a Clpg1-specific probe, showed that this gene is present as a single copy in the Cl genome.

  17. Mutations Related to Antiretroviral Resistance Identified by Ultra-Deep Sequencing in HIV-1 Infected Children under Structured Interruptions of HAART.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Manuel Vazquez-Guillen

    Full Text Available Although Structured Treatment Interruptions (STI are currently not considered an alternative strategy for antiretroviral treatment, their true benefits and limitations have not been fully established. Some studies suggest the possibility of improving the quality of life of patients with this strategy; however, the information that has been obtained corresponds mostly to studies conducted in adults, with a lack of knowledge about its impact on children. Furthermore, mutations associated with antiretroviral resistance could be selected due to sub-therapeutic levels of HAART at each interruption period. Genotyping methods to determine the resistance profiles of the infecting viruses have become increasingly important for the management of patients under STI, thus low-abundance antiretroviral drug-resistant mutations (DRM's at levels under limit of detection of conventional genotyping (<20% of quasispecies could increase the risk of virologic failure. In this work, we analyzed the protease and reverse transcriptase regions of the pol gene by ultra-deep sequencing in pediatric patients under STI with the aim of determining the presence of high- and low-abundance DRM's in the viral rebounds generated by the STI. High-abundance mutations in protease and high- and low-abundance mutations in reverse transcriptase were detected but no one of these are directly associated with resistance to antiretroviral drugs. The results could suggest that the evaluated STI program is virologically safe, but strict and carefully planned studies, with greater numbers of patients and interruption/restart cycles, are still needed to evaluate the selection of DRM's during STI.

  18. Mutations Related to Antiretroviral Resistance Identified by Ultra-Deep Sequencing in HIV-1 Infected Children under Structured Interruptions of HAART

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez-Guillen, Jose Manuel; Palacios-Saucedo, Gerardo C.; Rivera-Morales, Lydia G.; Garcia-Campos, Jorge; Ortiz-Lopez, Rocio; Noguera-Julian, Marc; Paredes, Roger; Vielma-Ramirez, Herlinda J.; Ramirez, Teresa J.; Chavez-Garcia, Marcelino; Lopez-Guillen, Paulo; Briones-Lara, Evangelina; Sanchez-Sanchez, Luz M.; Vazquez-Martinez, Carlos A.; Rodriguez-Padilla, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Although Structured Treatment Interruptions (STI) are currently not considered an alternative strategy for antiretroviral treatment, their true benefits and limitations have not been fully established. Some studies suggest the possibility of improving the quality of life of patients with this strategy; however, the information that has been obtained corresponds mostly to studies conducted in adults, with a lack of knowledge about its impact on children. Furthermore, mutations associated with antiretroviral resistance could be selected due to sub-therapeutic levels of HAART at each interruption period. Genotyping methods to determine the resistance profiles of the infecting viruses have become increasingly important for the management of patients under STI, thus low-abundance antiretroviral drug-resistant mutations (DRM’s) at levels under limit of detection of conventional genotyping (<20% of quasispecies) could increase the risk of virologic failure. In this work, we analyzed the protease and reverse transcriptase regions of the pol gene by ultra-deep sequencing in pediatric patients under STI with the aim of determining the presence of high- and low-abundance DRM’s in the viral rebounds generated by the STI. High-abundance mutations in protease and high- and low-abundance mutations in reverse transcriptase were detected but no one of these are directly associated with resistance to antiretroviral drugs. The results could suggest that the evaluated STI program is virologically safe, but strict and carefully planned studies, with greater numbers of patients and interruption/restart cycles, are still needed to evaluate the selection of DRM’s during STI. PMID:26807922

  19. Coding patient emotional cues and concerns in medical consultations: the Verona coding definitions of emotional sequences (VR-CoDES).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, C.; Piccolo, L. del; Bensing, J.; Bergvik, S.; Haes, H. de; Eide, H.; Fletcher, I.; Goss, C.; Heaven, C.; Humphris, G.; Young-Mi, K.; Langewitz, W.; Meeuwesen, L.; Nuebling, M.; Rimondini, M.; Salmon, P.; Dulmen, S. van; Wissow, L.; Zandbelt, L.; Finset, A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To present the Verona Coding Definitions of Emotional Sequences (VR-CoDES CC), a consensus based system for coding patient expressions of emotional distress in medical consultations, defined as Cues or Concerns. Methods: The system was developed by an international group of communication

  20. Fast comparison of IS radar code sequences for lag profile inversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Lehtinen

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available A fast method for theoretically comparing the posteriori variances produced by different phase code sequences in incoherent scatter radar (ISR experiments is introduced. Alternating codes of types 1 and 2 are known to be optimal for selected range resolutions, but the code sets are inconveniently long for many purposes like ground clutter estimation and in cases where coherent echoes from lower ionospheric layers are to be analyzed in addition to standard F-layer spectra.

    The method is used in practice for searching binary code quads that have estimation accuracy almost equal to that of much longer alternating code sets. Though the code sequences can consist of as few as four different transmission envelopes, the lag profile estimation variances are near to the theoretical minimum. Thus the short code sequence is equally good as a full cycle of alternating codes with the same pulse length and bit length. The short code groups cannot be directly decoded, but the decoding is done in connection with more computationally expensive lag profile inversion in data analysis.

    The actual code searches as well as the analysis and real data results from the found short code searches are explained in other papers sent to the same issue of this journal. We also discuss interesting subtle differences found between the different alternating codes by this method. We assume that thermal noise dominates the incoherent scatter signal.

  1. Indoor Mobile Positioning Based on Lidar Data and Coded Sequence Pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z.; Dong, B.; Chen, D.

    2016-10-01

    This paper proposed a coded sequence pattern for automatic matching of LiDAR point data, the methods including SIFT features, Otsu segmentation and Fast Hough transformation for the identification, positioning and interpret of the coded sequence patterns, the POSIT model for fast computing the translation and rotation parameters of LiDAR point data, so as to achieve fast matching of LiDAR point data and automatic 3D mapping of indoor shafts and tunnels.

  2. Recurrent Coding Sequence Variation Explains Only A Small Fraction of the Genetic Architecture of Colorectal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timofeeva, Maria N.; Ben Kinnersley, [Unknown; Farrington, Susan M.; Whiffin, Nicola; Palles, Claire; Svinti, Victoria; Lloyd, Amy; Gorman, Maggie; Ooi, Li-Yin; Hosking, Fay; Barclay, Ella; Zgaga, Lina; Dobbins, Sara; Martin, Lynn; Theodoratou, Evropi; Broderick, Peter; Tenesa, Albert; Smillie, Claire; Grimes, Graeme; Hayward, Caroline; Campbell, Archie; Porteous, David; Deary, Ian J.; Harris, Sarah E.; Northwood, Emma L.; Barrett, Jennifer H.; Smith, Gillian; Wolf, Roland; Forman, David; Morreau, Hans; Ruano, Dina; Tops, Carli; Wijnen, Juul; Schrumpf, Melanie; Boot, Arnoud; Vasen, Hans F. A.; Hes, Frederik J.; van Wezel, Tom; Franke, Andre; Lieb, Wolgang; Schafmayer, Clemens; Hampe, Jochen; Buch, Stephan; Propping, Peter; Hemminki, Kari; Foersti, Asta; Westers, Helga; Hofstra, Robert; Pinheiro, Manuela; Pinto, Carla; Teixeira, Manuel; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Fernandez-Rozadilla, Ceres; Carracedo, Angel; Castells, Antoni; Castellvi-Bel, Sergi; Campbell, Harry; Bishop, D. Timothy; Tomlinson, Ian P. M.; Dunlop, Malcolm G.; Houlston, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    Whilst common genetic variation in many non-coding genomic regulatory regions are known to impart risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), much of the heritability of CRC remains unexplained. To examine the role of recurrent coding sequence variation in CRC aetiology, we genotyped 12,638 CRCs cases and 29,0

  3. Recurrent Coding Sequence Variation Explains Only A Small Fraction of the Genetic Architecture of Colorectal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timofeeva, Maria N.; Ben Kinnersley, [Unknown; Farrington, Susan M.; Whiffin, Nicola; Palles, Claire; Svinti, Victoria; Lloyd, Amy; Gorman, Maggie; Ooi, Li-Yin; Hosking, Fay; Barclay, Ella; Zgaga, Lina; Dobbins, Sara; Martin, Lynn; Theodoratou, Evropi; Broderick, Peter; Tenesa, Albert; Smillie, Claire; Grimes, Graeme; Hayward, Caroline; Campbell, Archie; Porteous, David; Deary, Ian J.; Harris, Sarah E.; Northwood, Emma L.; Barrett, Jennifer H.; Smith, Gillian; Wolf, Roland; Forman, David; Morreau, Hans; Ruano, Dina; Tops, Carli; Wijnen, Juul; Schrumpf, Melanie; Boot, Arnoud; Vasen, Hans F. A.; Hes, Frederik J.; van Wezel, Tom; Franke, Andre; Lieb, Wolgang; Schafmayer, Clemens; Hampe, Jochen; Buch, Stephan; Propping, Peter; Hemminki, Kari; Foersti, Asta; Westers, Helga; Hofstra, Robert; Pinheiro, Manuela; Pinto, Carla; Teixeira, Manuel; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Fernandez-Rozadilla, Ceres; Carracedo, Angel; Castells, Antoni; Castellvi-Bel, Sergi; Campbell, Harry; Bishop, D. Timothy; Tomlinson, Ian P. M.; Dunlop, Malcolm G.; Houlston, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    Whilst common genetic variation in many non-coding genomic regulatory regions are known to impart risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), much of the heritability of CRC remains unexplained. To examine the role of recurrent coding sequence variation in CRC aetiology, we genotyped 12,638 CRCs cases and 29,0

  4. Recurrent Coding Sequence Variation Explains only A Small Fraction of the Genetic Architecture of Colorectal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.N. Timofeeva (Maria N.); B. Kinnersley (Ben); S.M. Farrington (Susan M.); N. Whiffin (Nicola); C. Palles (Claire); V. Svinti (Victoria); A. Lloyd (Amy); M. Gorman (Maggie); L.-Y. Ooi (Li-Yin); F. Hosking (Fay); E. Barclay (Ella); L. Zgaga (Lina); S.E. Dobbins (Sara E.); L. Martin (Lynn); E. Theodoratou (Evropi); P. Broderick (Peter); A. Tenesa (Albert); C. Smillie (Claire); G. Grimes (Graeme); C. Hayward (Caroline); A. Campbell (Archie); D. Porteous (David); I.J. Deary (Ian J.); S.E. Harris (Sarah); J.B. Northwood (John Blackman); J.H. Barrett (Jennifer H.); G. Smith (Gillian); R. Wolf (Roland); D. Forman (David); H. Morreau (Hans); D. Ruano (Dina); C. Tops (Carli); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); M. Schrumpf (Melanie); A. Boot (Arnoud); H. Vasen (Hans); F.J. Hes (Frederik); T. van Wezel (Tom); A. Franke (Andre); W. Lieb (Wolgang); C. Schafmayer (Clemens); J. Hampe (Jochen); T. Buch (Thorsten); P. Propping (Peter); K. Hemminki (Kari); A. Försti (Asta); H. Westers (Helga); R.M.W. Hofstra (Robert); M. Pinheiro (Manuela); C. Pinto (Carla); P.J. Teixeira; C. Ruiz-Ponte (Clara); C. Fernández-Rozadilla (Ceres); A. Carracedo (Angel); A. Castells; S. Castellví-Bel; H. Campbell (Harry); D.T. Bishop (David Timothy); I. Tomlinson (Ian); M.G. Dunlop (Malcolm); R. Houlston (Richard)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractWhilst common genetic variation in many non-coding genomic regulatory regions are known to impart risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), much of the heritability of CRC remains unexplained. To examine the role of recurrent coding sequence variation in CRC aetiology, we genotyped 12,638 CRCs ca

  5. Recurrent Coding Sequence Variation Explains only A Small Fraction of the Genetic Architecture of Colorectal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.N. Timofeeva (Maria N.); B. Kinnersley (Ben); S.M. Farrington (Susan M.); N. Whiffin (Nicola); C. Palles (Claire); V. Svinti (Victoria); A. Lloyd (Amy); M. Gorman (Maggie); L.-Y. Ooi (Li-Yin); F. Hosking (Fay); E. Barclay (Ella); L. Zgaga (Lina); S.E. Dobbins (Sara E.); L. Martin (Lynn); E. Theodoratou (Evropi); P. Broderick (Peter); A. Tenesa (Albert); C. Smillie (Claire); G. Grimes (Graeme); C. Hayward (Caroline); A. Campbell (Archie); D. Porteous (David); I.J. Deary (Ian J.); S.E. Harris (Sarah); J.B. Northwood (John Blackman); J.H. Barrett (Jennifer H.); G. Smith (Gillian); R. Wolf (Roland); D. Forman (David); H. Morreau (Hans); D. Ruano (Dina); C. Tops (Carli); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); M. Schrumpf (Melanie); A. Boot (Arnoud); H. Vasen (Hans); F.J. Hes (Frederik); T. van Wezel (Tom); A. Franke (Andre); W. Lieb (Wolgang); C. Schafmayer (Clemens); J. Hampe (Jochen); T. Buch (Thorsten); P. Propping (Peter); K. Hemminki (Kari); A. Försti (Asta); H. Westers (Helga); R.M.W. Hofstra (Robert); M. Pinheiro (Manuela); C. Pinto (Carla); P.J. Teixeira; C. Ruiz-Ponte (Clara); C. Fernández-Rozadilla (Ceres); A. Carracedo (Angel); A. Castells; S. Castellví-Bel; H. Campbell (Harry); D.T. Bishop (David Timothy); I. Tomlinson (Ian); M.G. Dunlop (Malcolm); R. Houlston (Richard)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractWhilst common genetic variation in many non-coding genomic regulatory regions are known to impart risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), much of the heritability of CRC remains unexplained. To examine the role of recurrent coding sequence variation in CRC aetiology, we genotyped 12,638 CRCs ca

  6. Recurrent Coding Sequence Variation Explains only A Small Fraction of the Genetic Architecture of Colorectal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.N. Timofeeva (Maria N.); B. Kinnersley (Ben); S.M. Farrington (Susan M.); N. Whiffin (Nicola); C. Palles (Claire); V. Svinti (Victoria); A. Lloyd (Amy); M. Gorman (Maggie); L.-Y. Ooi (Li-Yin); F. Hosking (Fay); E. Barclay (Ella); L. Zgaga (Lina); S.E. Dobbins (Sara E.); L. Martin (Lynn); E. Theodoratou (Evropi); P. Broderick (Peter); A. Tenesa (Albert); C. Smillie (Claire); G. Grimes (Graeme); C. Hayward (Caroline); A. Campbell (Archie); D. Porteous (David); I.J. Deary (Ian J.); S.E. Harris (Sarah); J.B. Northwood (John Blackman); J.H. Barrett (Jennifer H.); G. Smith (Gillian); R. Wolf (Roland); D. Forman (David); H. Morreau (Hans); D. Ruano (Dina); C. Tops (Carli); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); M. Schrumpf (Melanie); A. Boot (Arnoud); H. Vasen (Hans); F.J. Hes (Frederik); T. van Wezel (Tom); A. Franke (Andre); W. Lieb (Wolgang); C. Schafmayer (Clemens); J. Hampe (Jochen); T. Buch (Thorsten); P. Propping (Peter); K. Hemminki (Kari); A. Försti (Asta); H. Westers (Helga); R.M.W. Hofstra (Robert); M. Pinheiro (Manuela); C. Pinto (Carla); P.J. Teixeira; C. Ruiz-Ponte (Clara); C. Fernández-Rozadilla (Ceres); A. Carracedo (Angel); A. Castells; S. Castellví-Bel; H. Campbell (Harry); D.T. Bishop (David Timothy); I. Tomlinson (Ian); M.G. Dunlop (Malcolm); R. Houlston (Richard)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractWhilst common genetic variation in many non-coding genomic regulatory regions are known to impart risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), much of the heritability of CRC remains unexplained. To examine the role of recurrent coding sequence variation in CRC aetiology, we genotyped 12,638 CRCs

  7. RNA-DNA sequence differences spell genetic code ambiguities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentin, Thomas; Nielsen, Michael L

    2013-01-01

    A recent paper in Science by Li et al. 2011(1) reports widespread sequence differences in the human transcriptome between RNAs and their encoding genes termed RNA-DNA differences (RDDs). The findings could add a new layer of complexity to gene expression but the study has been criticized. ...

  8. Nanopore Sequencing: Electrical Measurements of the Code of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timp, Winston; Mirsaidov, Utkur M; Wang, Deqiang; Comer, Jeff; Aksimentiev, Aleksei; Timp, Gregory

    2010-05-01

    Sequencing a single molecule of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) using a nanopore is a revolutionary concept because it combines the potential for long read lengths (>5 kbp) with high speed (1 bp/10 ns), while obviating the need for costly amplification procedures due to the exquisite single molecule sensitivity. The prospects for implementing this concept seem bright. The cost savings from the removal of required reagents, coupled with the speed of nanopore sequencing places the $1000 genome within grasp. However, challenges remain: high fidelity reads demand stringent control over both the molecular configuration in the pore and the translocation kinetics. The molecular configuration determines how the ions passing through the pore come into contact with the nucleotides, while the translocation kinetics affect the time interval in which the same nucleotides are held in the constriction as the data is acquired. Proteins like α-hemolysin and its mutants offer exquisitely precise self-assembled nanopores and have demonstrated the facility for discriminating individual nucleotides, but it is currently difficult to design protein structure ab initio, which frustrates tailoring a pore for sequencing genomic DNA. Nanopores in solid-state membranes have been proposed as an alternative because of the flexibility in fabrication and ease of integration into a sequencing platform. Preliminary results have shown that with careful control of the dimensions of the pore and the shape of the electric field, control of DNA translocation through the pore is possible. Furthermore, discrimination between different base pairs of DNA may be feasible. Thus, a nanopore promises inexpensive, reliable, high-throughput sequencing, which could thrust genomic science into personal medicine.

  9. Correcting sequencing errors in DNA coding regions using a dynamic programming approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y; Mural, R J; Uberbacher, E C

    1995-04-01

    This paper presents an algorithm for detecting and 'correcting' sequencing errors that occur in DNA coding regions. The types of sequencing errors addressed are insertions and deletions (indels) of DNA bases. The goal is to provide a capability which makes single-pass or low-redundancy sequence data more informative, reducing the need for high-redundancy sequencing for gene identification and characterization purposes. This would permit improved sequencing efficiency and reduce genome sequencing costs. The algorithm detects sequencing errors by discovering changes in the statistically preferred reading frame within a putative coding region and then inserts a number of 'neutral' bases at a perceived reading frame transition point to make the putative exon candidate frame consistent. We have implemented the algorithm as a front-end subsystem of the GRAIL DNA sequence analysis system to construct a version which is very error tolerant and also intend to use this as a testbed for further development of sequencing error-correction technology. Preliminary test results have shown the usefulness of this algorithm and also exhibited some of its weakness, providing possible directions for further improvement. On a test set consisting of 68 human DNA sequences with 1% randomly generated indels in coding regions, the algorithm detected and corrected 76% of the indels. The average distance between the position of an indel and the predicted one was 9.4 bases. With this subsystem in place, GRAIL correctly predicted 89% of the coding messages with 10% false message on the 'corrected' sequences, compared to 69% correctly predicted coding messages and 11% falsely predicted messages on the 'corrupted' sequences using standard GRAIL II method (version 1.2).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Current interruption transients calculation

    CERN Document Server

    Peelo, David F

    2014-01-01

    Provides an original, detailed and practical description of current interruption transients, origins, and the circuits involved, and how they can be calculated Current Interruption Transients Calculationis a comprehensive resource for the understanding, calculation and analysis of the transient recovery voltages (TRVs) and related re-ignition or re-striking transients associated with fault current interruption and the switching of inductive and capacitive load currents in circuits. This book provides an original, detailed and practical description of current interruption transients, origins,

  11. The primordial sequence, ribosomes, and the genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, S. W.; Yuki, A.; Waehneldt, T. V.; Lacey, J. C., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    Experimental investigation of the key question of the origin of life concerning the chronological order in the primordial sequence of nucleic acid, protein, and cell. It is pointed out that, when viewed against the background of experiments on the selective reaction of basic homopolyamine acids with mononucleotides (Lacey and Pruitt, 1969; Woese, 1968), the experiments made help to establish a basis for understanding how information originally flowed from proteins to nucleic acids.

  12. A p-Adic Model of DNA Sequence and Genetic Code

    CERN Document Server

    Dragovich, Branko

    2007-01-01

    Using basic properties of p-adic numbers, we consider a simple new approach to describe main aspects of DNA sequence and genetic code. Central role in our investigation plays an ultrametric p-adic information space which basic elements are nucleotides, codons and genes. We show that a 5-adic model is appropriate for DNA sequence. This 5-adic model, combined with 2-adic distance, is also suitable for genetic code and for a more advanced employment in genomics. We find that genetic code degeneracy is related to the p-adic distance between codons.

  13. Divergence of conserved non-coding sequences: rate estimates and relative rate tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Günter P; Fried, Claudia; Prohaska, Sonja J; Stadler, Peter F

    2004-11-01

    In many eukaryotic genomes only a small fraction of the DNA codes for proteins, but the non-protein coding DNA harbors important genetic elements directing the development and the physiology of the organisms, like promoters, enhancers, insulators, and micro-RNA genes. The molecular evolution of these genetic elements is difficult to study because their functional significance is hard to deduce from sequence information alone. Here we propose an approach to the study of the rate of evolution of functional non-coding sequences at a macro-evolutionary scale. We identify functionally important non-coding sequences as Conserved Non-Coding Nucleotide (CNCN) sequences from the comparison of two outgroup species. The CNCN sequences so identified are then compared to their homologous sequences in a pair of ingroup species, and we monitor the degree of modification these sequences suffered in the two ingroup lineages. We propose a method to test for rate differences in the modification of CNCN sequences among the two ingroup lineages, as well as a method to estimate their rate of modification. We apply this method to the full sequences of the HoxA clusters from six gnathostome species: a shark, Heterodontus francisci; a basal ray finned fish, Polypterus senegalus; the amphibian, Xenopus tropicalis; as well as three mammalian species, human, rat and mouse. The results show that the evolutionary rate of CNCN sequences is not distinguishable among the three mammalian lineages, while the Xenopus lineage has a significantly increased rate of evolution. Furthermore the estimates of the rate parameters suggest that in the stem lineage of mammals the rate of CNCN sequence evolution was more than twice the rate observed within the placental amniotes clade, suggesting a high rate of evolution of cis-regulatory elements during the origin of amniotes and mammals. We conclude that the proposed methods can be used for testing hypotheses about the rate and pattern of evolution of putative

  14. Depletion of Shine-Dalgarno Sequences Within Bacterial Coding Regions Is Expression Dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuyue Yang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Efficient and accurate protein synthesis is crucial for organismal survival in competitive environments. Translation efficiency (the number of proteins translated from a single mRNA in a given time period is the combined result of differential translation initiation, elongation, and termination rates. Previous research identified the Shine-Dalgarno (SD sequence as a modulator of translation initiation in bacterial genes, while codon usage biases are frequently implicated as a primary determinant of elongation rate variation. Recent studies have suggested that SD sequences within coding sequences may negatively affect translation elongation speed, but this claim remains controversial. Here, we present a metric to quantify the prevalence of SD sequences in coding regions. We analyze hundreds of bacterial genomes and find that the coding sequences of highly expressed genes systematically contain fewer SD sequences than expected, yielding a robust correlation between the normalized occurrence of SD sites and protein abundances across a range of bacterial taxa. We further show that depletion of SD sequences within ribosomal protein genes is correlated with organismal growth rates, supporting the hypothesis of strong selection against the presence of these sequences in coding regions and suggesting their association with translation efficiency in bacteria.

  15. Extended pseudorandom sequences and two-dimensional coding collimators based on them

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fedorov, G. A.; Tereshchenko, S. A.

    2007-01-01

    A new extensive class of one-dimensional binary sequences, called extended pseudorandom sequences, is proposed which enables a radiation-physics experiment to be optimized more completely and enables problems of planar emission tomography to be solved effectively using integral-code measuring system

  16. Successful Recovery of Nuclear Protein-Coding Genes from Small Insects in Museums Using Illumina Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Kojun; Pflug, James M; Sproul, John S; Dasenko, Mark A; Maddison, David R

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we explore high-throughput Illumina sequencing of nuclear protein-coding, ribosomal, and mitochondrial genes in small, dried insects stored in natural history collections. We sequenced one tenebrionid beetle and 12 carabid beetles ranging in size from 3.7 to 9.7 mm in length that have been stored in various museums for 4 to 84 years. Although we chose a number of old, small specimens for which we expected low sequence recovery, we successfully recovered at least some low-copy nuclear protein-coding genes from all specimens. For example, in one 56-year-old beetle, 4.4 mm in length, our de novo assembly recovered about 63% of approximately 41,900 nucleotides in a target suite of 67 nuclear protein-coding gene fragments, and 70% using a reference-based assembly. Even in the least successfully sequenced carabid specimen, reference-based assembly yielded fragments that were at least 50% of the target length for 34 of 67 nuclear protein-coding gene fragments. Exploration of alternative references for reference-based assembly revealed few signs of bias created by the reference. For all specimens we recovered almost complete copies of ribosomal and mitochondrial genes. We verified the general accuracy of the sequences through comparisons with sequences obtained from PCR and Sanger sequencing, including of conspecific, fresh specimens, and through phylogenetic analysis that tested the placement of sequences in predicted regions. A few possible inaccuracies in the sequences were detected, but these rarely affected the phylogenetic placement of the samples. Although our sample sizes are low, an exploratory regression study suggests that the dominant factor in predicting success at recovering nuclear protein-coding genes is a high number of Illumina reads, with success at PCR of COI and killing by immersion in ethanol being secondary factors; in analyses of only high-read samples, the primary significant explanatory variable was body length, with small beetles

  17. Evaluation of correlation property of linear-frequency-modulated signals coded by maximum-length sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Kota; Hirata, Shinnosuke; Hachiya, Hiroyuki

    2016-07-01

    Ultrasonic distance measurement for obstacles has been recently applied in automobiles. The pulse-echo method based on the transmission of an ultrasonic pulse and time-of-flight (TOF) determination of the reflected echo is one of the typical methods of ultrasonic distance measurement. Improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the echo and the avoidance of crosstalk between ultrasonic sensors in the pulse-echo method are required in automotive measurement. The SNR of the reflected echo and the resolution of the TOF are improved by the employment of pulse compression using a maximum-length sequence (M-sequence), which is one of the binary pseudorandom sequences generated from a linear feedback shift register (LFSR). Crosstalk is avoided by using transmitted signals coded by different M-sequences generated from different LFSRs. In the case of lower-order M-sequences, however, the number of measurement channels corresponding to the pattern of the LFSR is not enough. In this paper, pulse compression using linear-frequency-modulated (LFM) signals coded by M-sequences has been proposed. The coding of LFM signals by the same M-sequence can produce different transmitted signals and increase the number of measurement channels. In the proposed method, however, the truncation noise in autocorrelation functions and the interference noise in cross-correlation functions degrade the SNRs of received echoes. Therefore, autocorrelation properties and cross-correlation properties in all patterns of combinations of coded LFM signals are evaluated.

  18. Highly conserved non-coding sequences are associated with vertebrate development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Woolfe

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In addition to protein coding sequence, the human genome contains a significant amount of regulatory DNA, the identification of which is proving somewhat recalcitrant to both in silico and functional methods. An approach that has been used with some success is comparative sequence analysis, whereby equivalent genomic regions from different organisms are compared in order to identify both similarities and differences. In general, similarities in sequence between highly divergent organisms imply functional constraint. We have used a whole-genome comparison between humans and the pufferfish, Fugu rubripes, to identify nearly 1,400 highly conserved non-coding sequences. Given the evolutionary divergence between these species, it is likely that these sequences are found in, and furthermore are essential to, all vertebrates. Most, and possibly all, of these sequences are located in and around genes that act as developmental regulators. Some of these sequences are over 90% identical across more than 500 bases, being more highly conserved than coding sequence between these two species. Despite this, we cannot find any similar sequences in invertebrate genomes. In order to begin to functionally test this set of sequences, we have used a rapid in vivo assay system using zebrafish embryos that allows tissue-specific enhancer activity to be identified. Functional data is presented for highly conserved non-coding sequences associated with four unrelated developmental regulators (SOX21, PAX6, HLXB9, and SHH, in order to demonstrate the suitability of this screen to a wide range of genes and expression patterns. Of 25 sequence elements tested around these four genes, 23 show significant enhancer activity in one or more tissues. We have identified a set of non-coding sequences that are highly conserved throughout vertebrates. They are found in clusters across the human genome, principally around genes that are implicated in the regulation of development

  19. PrimeIndel: four-prime-number genetic code for indel decryption and sequence read alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Ching-Wan

    2014-09-25

    To decrypt a doubly heterozygous sequence (DHS) in order to define the indel mutation for mutation reporting, an algorithm recursively searching the overlapped nucleotide using an offset of nucleotide positions can decrypt the indel without using a reference sequence. However, as genetic code is letter-based, special computer programs are required to run the decryption algorithm. The previous text-based algorithm was converted to a number-based algorithm by expressing DNA sequence from a 4-letter genetic code to a 4-prime-number genetic code, i.e., converting A, C, G, T to 2, 3, 5, and 7. This algorithm based on prime-number genetic code is called PrimeIndel and is executable by spreadsheet. Using prime number coded DNA sequence, the overlapped nucleotide between any 2 positions of the DHS is represented by the greatest common divisor (GCD) of the multiplication product of 2 prime numbers. This algorithm can also be used for aligning multiple overlapping sequence reads by in-silico DHS formation. The indel size of the in-silico formed DHS indicates the positions in the paired sequences for correct alignment. DHSs were successfully decrypted by the prime number-based algorithm and sequence reads were aligned correctly. DNA sequence expressed in prime numbers can be used for the decryption of DHS and the alignment of sequence reads using a well-known mathematical function GCD of a spreadsheet program. PrimeIndel is a useful tool for mutation reporting in clinical laboratories. The software is downloadable from http://www.patho.hku.hk/staff/list/cwlam.htm. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Topological Pressure and Coding Sequence Density Estimation in the Human Genome

    CERN Document Server

    Koslicki, David

    2011-01-01

    Inspired by concepts from ergodic theory, we give new insight into coding sequence (CDS) density estimation for the human genome. Our approach is based on the introduction and study of topological pressure: a numerical quantity assigned to any finite sequence based on an appropriate notion of `weighted information content'. For human DNA sequences, each codon is assigned a suitable weight, and using a window size of approximately 60,000bp, we obtain a very strong positive correlation between CDS density and topological pressure. The weights are selected by an optimization procedure, and can be interpreted as quantitative data on the relative importance of different codons for the density estimation of coding sequences. This gives new insight into codon usage bias which is an important subject where long standing questions remain open. Inspired again by ergodic theory, we use the weightings on the codons to define a probability measure on finite sequences. We demonstrate that this measure is effective in disti...

  1. A Statistical Method without Training Step for the Classification of Coding Frame in Transcriptome Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carels, Nicolas; Frías, Diego

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the modalities of coding open reading frame (cORF) classification of expressed sequence tags (EST) by using the universal feature method (UFM). The UFM algorithm is based on the scoring of purine bias (Rrr) and stop codon frequencies. UFM classifies ORFs as coding or non-coding through a score based on 5 factors: (i) stop codon frequency; (ii) the product of the probabilities of purines occurring in the three positions of nucleotide triplets; (iii) the product of the probabilities of Cytosine (C), Guanine (G), and Adenine (A) occurring in the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd positions of triplets, respectively; (iv) the probabilities of a G occurring in the 1st and 2nd positions of triplets; and (v) the probabilities of a T occurring in the 1st and an A in the 2nd position of triplets. Because UFM is based on primary determinants of coding sequences that are conserved throughout the biosphere, it is suitable for cORF classification of any sequence in eukaryote transcriptomes without prior knowledge. Considering the protein sequences of the Protein Data Bank (RCSB PDB or more simply PDB) as a reference, we found that UFM classifies cORFs of ≥200 bp (if the coding strand is known) and cORFs of ≥300 bp (if the coding strand is unknown), and releases them in their coding strand and coding frame, which allows their automatic translation into protein sequences with a success rate equal to or higher than 95%. We first established the statistical parameters of UFM using ESTs from Plasmodium falciparum, Arabidopsis thaliana, Oryza sativa, Zea mays, Drosophila melanogaster, Homo sapiens and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in reference to the protein sequences of PDB. Second, we showed that the success rate of cORF classification using UFM is expected to apply to approximately 95% of higher eukaryote genes that encode for proteins. Third, we used UFM in combination with CAP3 to assemble large EST samples into cORFs that we used to analyze transcriptome

  2. Sub-grouping of Plasmodium falciparum 3D7 var genes based on sequence analysis of coding and non-coding regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavstsen, Thomas; Salanti, Ali; Jensen, Anja T R;

    2003-01-01

    and organization of the 3D7 PfEMP1 repertoire was investigated on the basis of the complete genome sequence. METHODS: Using two tree-building methods we analysed the coding and non-coding sequences of 3D7 var and rif genes as well as var genes of other parasite strains. RESULTS: var genes can be sub...

  3. SRComp: short read sequence compression using burstsort and Elias omega coding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy John Selva

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing (NGS technologies permit the rapid production of vast amounts of data at low cost. Economical data storage and transmission hence becomes an increasingly important challenge for NGS experiments. In this paper, we introduce a new non-reference based read sequence compression tool called SRComp. It works by first employing a fast string-sorting algorithm called burstsort to sort read sequences in lexicographical order and then Elias omega-based integer coding to encode the sorted read sequences. SRComp has been benchmarked on four large NGS datasets, where experimental results show that it can run 5-35 times faster than current state-of-the-art read sequence compression tools such as BEETL and SCALCE, while retaining comparable compression efficiency for large collections of short read sequences. SRComp is a read sequence compression tool that is particularly valuable in certain applications where compression time is of major concern.

  4. An SNR improvement of passive SAW tags with 5-bit Barker code sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Hyunchul; Kim, Jaekwon; Burm, Jinwook

    2012-07-01

    Passive surface acoustic wave (SAW) tags require a large signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in order to increase the interrogation range. For the purpose of achieving high SNR for radio frequency identification (RFID) communication systems, Barker codes, a binary phase shift keying (BPSK) modulation technique, have been adopted in this study. Passive SAW RFID tags were designed with 5-bit Barker code sequences to generate BPSK modulated signals. Through the SNR analysis, the improvements in SNR were about 11 dB using Barker codes along with a correlator, which can be further improved by optimisation in the correlator.

  5. A lossless compression method for medical image sequences using JPEG-LS and interframe coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miaou, Shaou-Gang; Ke, Fu-Sheng; Chen, Shu-Ching

    2009-09-01

    Hospitals and medical centers produce an enormous amount of digital medical images every day, especially in the form of image sequences, which requires considerable storage space. One solution could be the application of lossless compression. Among available methods, JPEG-LS has excellent coding performance. However, it only compresses a single picture with intracoding and does not utilize the interframe correlation among pictures. Therefore, this paper proposes a method that combines the JPEG-LS and an interframe coding with motion vectors to enhance the compression performance of using JPEG-LS alone. Since the interframe correlation between two adjacent images in a medical image sequence is usually not as high as that in a general video image sequence, the interframe coding is activated only when the interframe correlation is high enough. With six capsule endoscope image sequences under test, the proposed method achieves average compression gains of 13.3% and 26.3% over the methods of using JPEG-LS and JPEG2000 alone, respectively. Similarly, for an MRI image sequence, coding gains of 77.5% and 86.5% are correspondingly obtained.

  6. Assembly interruptability robustness model with applications to Space Station Freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, James William

    1991-02-01

    Interruptability robustness of a construction project together with its assembly sequence may be measured by calculating the probability of its survival and successful completion in the face of unplanned interruptions of the assembly process. Such an interruption may jeopardize the survival of the structure being assembled, the survival of the support equipment, and/or the safety of the members of the construction crew, depending upon the stage in the assembly sequence when the interruption occurs. The interruption may be due to a number of actors such as: machinery break-downs, environmental damage, worker emergency illness or injury, etc. Each source of interruption has a probability of occurring, and adds an associated probability of loss, schedule delay, and cost to the project. Several options may exist for reducing the consequences of an interruption at a given point in the assembly sequence, including altering the assembly sequence, adding extra components or equipment as interruptability 'insurance', increasing the capability of support facilities, etc. Each option may provide a different overall performance of the project as it relates to success, assembly time, and project cost. The Interruptability Robustness Model was devised and provides a method which allows the overall interruptability robustness of construction of a project design and its assembly sequence to be quantified. In addition, it identifies the susceptibility to interruptions for the assembly sequence at all points within the assembly sequence. The model is applied to the present problem of quantifying and improving interruptability robustness during the construction of Space Station Freedom. This application was used as a touchstone for devising the Interruptability Robustness Model. However, the model may be utilized to assist in the analysis of interruptability robustness for other space-related construction projects such as the lunar base and orbital assembly of the manned Mars

  7. Coding-complete sequencing classifies parrot bornavirus 5 into a novel virus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marton, Szilvia; Bányai, Krisztián; Gál, János; Ihász, Katalin; Kugler, Renáta; Lengyel, György; Jakab, Ferenc; Bakonyi, Tamás; Farkas, Szilvia L

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we determined the sequence of the coding region of an avian bornavirus detected in a blue-and-yellow macaw (Ara ararauna) with pathological/histopathological changes characteristic of proventricular dilatation disease. The genomic organization of the macaw bornavirus is similar to that of other bornaviruses, and its nucleotide sequence is nearly identical to the available partial parrot bornavirus 5 (PaBV-5) sequences. Phylogenetic analysis showed that these strains formed a monophyletic group distinct from other mammalian and avian bornaviruses and in calculations performed with matrix protein coding sequences, the PaBV-5 and PaBV-6 genotypes formed a common cluster, suggesting that according to the recently accepted classification system for bornaviruses, these two genotypes may belong to a new species, provisionally named Psittaciform 2 bornavirus.

  8. Severe accident source term characteristics for selected Peach Bottom sequences predicted by the MELCOR Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbajo, J.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to compare in-containment source terms developed for NUREG-1159, which used the Source Term Code Package (STCP), with those generated by MELCOR to identify significant differences. For this comparison, two short-term depressurized station blackout sequences (with a dry cavity and with a flooded cavity) and a Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) concurrent with complete loss of the Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) were analyzed for the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station (a BWR-4 with a Mark I containment). The results indicate that for the sequences analyzed, the two codes predict similar total in-containment release fractions for each of the element groups. However, the MELCOR/CORBH Package predicts significantly longer times for vessel failure and reduced energy of the released material for the station blackout sequences (when compared to the STCP results). MELCOR also calculated smaller releases into the environment than STCP for the station blackout sequences.

  9. OCPAT: an online codon-preserved alignment tool for evolutionary genomic analysis of protein coding sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grossman Lawrence I

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rapidly accumulating genome sequence data from multiple species offer powerful opportunities for the detection of DNA sequence evolution. Phylogenetic tree construction and codon-based tests for natural selection are the prevailing tools used to detect functionally important evolutionary change in protein coding sequences. These analyses often require multiple DNA sequence alignments that maintain the correct reading frame for each collection of putative orthologous sequences. Since this feature is not available in most alignment tools, codon reading frames often must be checked manually before evolutionary analyses can commence. Results Here we report an online codon-preserved alignment tool (OCPAT that generates multiple sequence alignments automatically from the coding sequences of any list of human gene IDs and their putative orthologs from genomes of other vertebrate tetrapods. OCPAT is programmed to extract putative orthologous genes from genomes and to align the orthologs with the reading frame maintained in all species. OCPAT also optimizes the alignment by trimming the most variable alignment regions at the 5' and 3' ends of each gene. The resulting output of alignments is returned in several formats, which facilitates further molecular evolutionary analyses by appropriate available software. Alignments are generally robust and reliable, retaining the correct reading frame. The tool can serve as the first step for comparative genomic analyses of protein-coding gene sequences including phylogenetic tree reconstruction and detection of natural selection. We aligned 20,658 human RefSeq mRNAs using OCPAT. Most alignments are missing sequence(s from at least one species; however, functional annotation clustering of the ~1700 transcripts that were alignable to all species shows that genes involved in multi-subunit protein complexes are highly conserved. Conclusion The OCPAT program facilitates large-scale evolutionary and

  10. Modeling compositional dynamics based on GC and purine contents of protein-coding sequences

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Zhang

    2010-11-08

    Background: Understanding the compositional dynamics of genomes and their coding sequences is of great significance in gaining clues into molecular evolution and a large number of publically-available genome sequences have allowed us to quantitatively predict deviations of empirical data from their theoretical counterparts. However, the quantification of theoretical compositional variations for a wide diversity of genomes remains a major challenge.Results: To model the compositional dynamics of protein-coding sequences, we propose two simple models that take into account both mutation and selection effects, which act differently at the three codon positions, and use both GC and purine contents as compositional parameters. The two models concern the theoretical composition of nucleotides, codons, and amino acids, with no prerequisite of homologous sequences or their alignments. We evaluated the two models by quantifying theoretical compositions of a large collection of protein-coding sequences (including 46 of Archaea, 686 of Bacteria, and 826 of Eukarya), yielding consistent theoretical compositions across all the collected sequences.Conclusions: We show that the compositions of nucleotides, codons, and amino acids are largely determined by both GC and purine contents and suggest that deviations of the observed from the expected compositions may reflect compositional signatures that arise from a complex interplay between mutation and selection via DNA replication and repair mechanisms.Reviewers: This article was reviewed by Zhaolei Zhang (nominated by Mark Gerstein), Guruprasad Ananda (nominated by Kateryna Makova), and Daniel Haft. 2010 Zhang and Yu; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  11. Genetic characterization of three novel chicken parvovirus strains based on analysis of their coding sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Bon-Sang; Lee, Hae-Rim; Jeon, Eun-Ok; Han, Moo-Sung; Min, Kyeong-Cheol; Lee, Seung-Baek; Bae, Yeon-Ji; Cho, Sun-Hyung; Mo, Jong-Suk; Kwon, Hyuk Moo; Sung, Haan Woo; Kim, Jong-Nyeo; Mo, In-Pil

    2015-01-01

    Chicken parvovirus (ChPV) is one of the causative agents of viral enteritis. Recently, the genome of the ABU-P1 strain of ChPV was fully sequenced and determined to have a distinct genomic composition compared with that of vertebrate parvoviruses. However, no comparative sequence analysis of coding regions of ChPVs was possible because of the lack of other sequence information. In this study, we obtained the nucleotide sequences of all genomic coding regions of three ChPVs by polymerase chain reaction using 13 primer sets, and deduced the amino acid sequences from the nucleotide sequences. The non-structural protein 1 (NS1) gene of the three ChPVs showed 95.0 to 95.5% nucleotide sequence identity and 96.5 to 98.1% amino acid sequence identity to those of NS1 from the ABU-P1 strain, respectively, and even higher nucleotide and amino acid similarities to one another. The viral proteins (VP) gene was more divergent between the three ChPV Korean strains and ABU-P1, with 88.1 to 88.3% nucleotide identity and 93.0% amino acid identity. Analysis of the putative tertiary structure of the ChPV VP2 protein showed that variable regions with less than 80% nucleotide similarity between the three Korean strains and ABU-P1 occurred in large loops of the VP2 protein believed to be involved in antigenicity, pathogenicity, and tissue tropism in other parvoviruses. Based on our analysis of full-length coding sequences, we discovered greater variation in ChPV strains than reported previously, especially in partial regions of the VP2 protein.

  12. Complete coding sequence of Zika virus from Martinique outbreak in 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Piorkowski

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus is an Aedes-borne Flavivirus causing fever, arthralgia, myalgia rash, associated with Guillain–Barré syndrome and suspected to induce microcephaly in the fetus. We report here the complete coding sequence of the first characterized Caribbean Zika virus strain, isolated from a patient from Martinique in December, 2015.

  13. Sigma: multiple alignment of weakly-conserved non-coding DNA sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddharthan Rahul

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Existing tools for multiple-sequence alignment focus on aligning protein sequence or protein-coding DNA sequence, and are often based on extensions to Needleman-Wunsch-like pairwise alignment methods. We introduce a new tool, Sigma, with a new algorithm and scoring scheme designed specifically for non-coding DNA sequence. This problem acquires importance with the increasing number of published sequences of closely-related species. In particular, studies of gene regulation seek to take advantage of comparative genomics, and recent algorithms for finding regulatory sites in phylogenetically-related intergenic sequence require alignment as a preprocessing step. Much can also be learned about evolution from intergenic DNA, which tends to evolve faster than coding DNA. Sigma uses a strategy of seeking the best possible gapless local alignments (a strategy earlier used by DiAlign, at each step making the best possible alignment consistent with existing alignments, and scores the significance of the alignment based on the lengths of the aligned fragments and a background model which may be supplied or estimated from an auxiliary file of intergenic DNA. Results Comparative tests of sigma with five earlier algorithms on synthetic data generated to mimic real data show excellent performance, with Sigma balancing high "sensitivity" (more bases aligned with effective filtering of "incorrect" alignments. With real data, while "correctness" can't be directly quantified for the alignment, running the PhyloGibbs motif finder on pre-aligned sequence suggests that Sigma's alignments are superior. Conclusion By taking into account the peculiarities of non-coding DNA, Sigma fills a gap in the toolbox of bioinformatics.

  14. Hiding message into DNA sequence through DNA coding and chaotic maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guoyan; Liu, Hongjun; Kadir, Abdurahman

    2014-09-01

    The paper proposes an improved reversible substitution method to hide data into deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequence, and four measures have been taken to enhance the robustness and enlarge the hiding capacity, such as encode the secret message by DNA coding, encrypt it by pseudo-random sequence, generate the relative hiding locations by piecewise linear chaotic map, and embed the encoded and encrypted message into a randomly selected DNA sequence using the complementary rule. The key space and the hiding capacity are analyzed. Experimental results indicate that the proposed method has a better performance compared with the competing methods with respect to robustness and capacity.

  15. Systematic analysis of coding and noncoding DNA sequences using methods of statistical linguistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantegna, R. N.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Goldberger, A. L.; Havlin, S.; Peng, C. K.; Simons, M.; Stanley, H. E.

    1995-01-01

    We compare the statistical properties of coding and noncoding regions in eukaryotic and viral DNA sequences by adapting two tests developed for the analysis of natural languages and symbolic sequences. The data set comprises all 30 sequences of length above 50 000 base pairs in GenBank Release No. 81.0, as well as the recently published sequences of C. elegans chromosome III (2.2 Mbp) and yeast chromosome XI (661 Kbp). We find that for the three chromosomes we studied the statistical properties of noncoding regions appear to be closer to those observed in natural languages than those of coding regions. In particular, (i) a n-tuple Zipf analysis of noncoding regions reveals a regime close to power-law behavior while the coding regions show logarithmic behavior over a wide interval, while (ii) an n-gram entropy measurement shows that the noncoding regions have a lower n-gram entropy (and hence a larger "n-gram redundancy") than the coding regions. In contrast to the three chromosomes, we find that for vertebrates such as primates and rodents and for viral DNA, the difference between the statistical properties of coding and noncoding regions is not pronounced and therefore the results of the analyses of the investigated sequences are less conclusive. After noting the intrinsic limitations of the n-gram redundancy analysis, we also briefly discuss the failure of the zeroth- and first-order Markovian models or simple nucleotide repeats to account fully for these "linguistic" features of DNA. Finally, we emphasize that our results by no means prove the existence of a "language" in noncoding DNA.

  16. Systematic analysis of coding and noncoding DNA sequences using methods of statistical linguistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantegna, R. N.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Goldberger, A. L.; Havlin, S.; Peng, C. K.; Simons, M.; Stanley, H. E.

    1995-01-01

    We compare the statistical properties of coding and noncoding regions in eukaryotic and viral DNA sequences by adapting two tests developed for the analysis of natural languages and symbolic sequences. The data set comprises all 30 sequences of length above 50 000 base pairs in GenBank Release No. 81.0, as well as the recently published sequences of C. elegans chromosome III (2.2 Mbp) and yeast chromosome XI (661 Kbp). We find that for the three chromosomes we studied the statistical properties of noncoding regions appear to be closer to those observed in natural languages than those of coding regions. In particular, (i) a n-tuple Zipf analysis of noncoding regions reveals a regime close to power-law behavior while the coding regions show logarithmic behavior over a wide interval, while (ii) an n-gram entropy measurement shows that the noncoding regions have a lower n-gram entropy (and hence a larger "n-gram redundancy") than the coding regions. In contrast to the three chromosomes, we find that for vertebrates such as primates and rodents and for viral DNA, the difference between the statistical properties of coding and noncoding regions is not pronounced and therefore the results of the analyses of the investigated sequences are less conclusive. After noting the intrinsic limitations of the n-gram redundancy analysis, we also briefly discuss the failure of the zeroth- and first-order Markovian models or simple nucleotide repeats to account fully for these "linguistic" features of DNA. Finally, we emphasize that our results by no means prove the existence of a "language" in noncoding DNA.

  17. Statistical analysis of nucleotide runs in coding and noncoding DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprizhitsky YuA; Nechipurenko YuD; Alexandrov, A A; Volkenstein, M V

    1988-10-01

    A statistical analysis of the occurrence of particular nucleotide runs in DNA sequences of different species has been carried out. There are considerable differences of run distributions in DNA sequences of procaryotes, invertebrates and vertebrates. There is an abundance of short runs (1-2 nucleotides long) in the coding sequences and there is a deficiency of such runs in the noncoding regions. However, some interesting exceptions from this rule exist for the run distribution of adenine in procaryotes and for the arrangement of purine-pyrimidine runs in eucaryotes. The similarity in the distributions of such runs in the coding and noncoding regions may be due to some structural features of the DNA molecule as a whole. Runs of guanine (or cytosine) of three to six nucleotides occur predominantly in noncoding DNA regions in eucaryotes, especially in vertebrates.

  18. HMW glutenin subunits in multiploid Aegilops species: composition analysis and molecular cloning of coding sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The Aegilops genus contains species closely related to wheat. Incommon with wheat, Aegilops species accumulate high molecular weight (HMW) glutenin subunits in their endospermic tissue. In this study, we investigated the composition of HMW glutenin subunits in four multiploid Aegilops species using SDS-PAGE analysis. Furthermore, by working with Ae. ventricosa, we established an efficient genomic PCR condition for simultaneous amplification of DNA sequences coding for either x-ory-type HMW glutenin subunits from polyploid Aegilops species. Using the genomic PCR condition, we amplified and subsequently cloned two DNA fragments that may code for HMW glutenin subunits in Ae. ventricosa. Based on an analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences, we concluded that the two cloned sequences encode one x- and one y-type of HMW glutenin subunit, respectively.

  19. Identification of evolutionarily conserved non-AUG-initiated N-terminal extensions in human coding sequences.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ivanov, Ivaylo P

    2011-05-01

    In eukaryotes, it is generally assumed that translation initiation occurs at the AUG codon closest to the messenger RNA 5\\' cap. However, in certain cases, initiation can occur at codons differing from AUG by a single nucleotide, especially the codons CUG, UUG, GUG, ACG, AUA and AUU. While non-AUG initiation has been experimentally verified for a handful of human genes, the full extent to which this phenomenon is utilized--both for increased coding capacity and potentially also for novel regulatory mechanisms--remains unclear. To address this issue, and hence to improve the quality of existing coding sequence annotations, we developed a methodology based on phylogenetic analysis of predicted 5\\' untranslated regions from orthologous genes. We use evolutionary signatures of protein-coding sequences as an indicator of translation initiation upstream of annotated coding sequences. Our search identified novel conserved potential non-AUG-initiated N-terminal extensions in 42 human genes including VANGL2, FGFR1, KCNN4, TRPV6, HDGF, CITED2, EIF4G3 and NTF3, and also affirmed the conservation of known non-AUG-initiated extensions in 17 other genes. In several instances, we have been able to obtain independent experimental evidence of the expression of non-AUG-initiated products from the previously published literature and ribosome profiling data.

  20. Interruptions: Derrida and Hospitality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark W. Westmoreland

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Come in. Welcome. Be my guest and I will be yours. Shall we ask, in accordance with the Derridean question, "Is not hospitality an interruption of the self?" What is the relationship between the interruption and the moment one enters the host's home? Derrida calls us toward a new understanding of hospitality - as an interruption. This paper will illuminate the history of hospitality in the West as well as trace Derrida's discussions of hospitality throughout many of works. The overall goal of this project is to provide readers of Derrida with a sort of reference guide for his discussions on and deconstructive approach to hospitality.

  1. The Evolution of Bony Vertebrate Enhancers at Odds with Their Coding Sequence Landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousaf, Aisha; Sohail Raza, Muhammad; Ali Abbasi, Amir

    2015-08-06

    Enhancers lie at the heart of transcriptional and developmental gene regulation. Therefore, changes in enhancer sequences usually disrupt the target gene expression and result in disease phenotypes. Despite the well-established role of enhancers in development and disease, evolutionary sequence studies are lacking. The current study attempts to unravel the puzzle of bony vertebrates' conserved noncoding elements (CNE) enhancer evolution. Bayesian phylogenetics of enhancer sequences spotlights promising interordinal relationships among placental mammals, proposing a closer relationship between humans and laurasiatherians while placing rodents at the basal position. Clock-based estimates of enhancer evolution provided a dynamic picture of interspecific rate changes across the bony vertebrate lineage. Moreover, coelacanth in the study augmented our appreciation of the vertebrate cis-regulatory evolution during water-land transition. Intriguingly, we observed a pronounced upsurge in enhancer evolution in land-dwelling vertebrates. These novel findings triggered us to further investigate the evolutionary trend of coding as well as CNE nonenhancer repertoires, to highlight the relative evolutionary dynamics of diverse genomic landscapes. Surprisingly, the evolutionary rates of enhancer sequences were clearly at odds with those of the coding and the CNE nonenhancer sequences during vertebrate adaptation to land, with land vertebrates exhibiting significantly reduced rates of coding sequence evolution in comparison to their fast evolving regulatory landscape. The observed variation in tetrapod cis-regulatory elements caused the fine-tuning of associated gene regulatory networks. Therefore, the increased evolutionary rate of tetrapods' enhancer sequences might be responsible for the variation in developmental regulatory circuits during the process of vertebrate adaptation to land. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for

  2. Golay sequences coded coherent optical OFDM for long-haul transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Cui; Ma, Xiangrong; Hua, Tao; Zhao, Jing; Yu, Huilong; Zhang, Jian

    2017-09-01

    We propose to use binary Golay sequences in coherent optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (CO-OFDM) to improve the long-haul transmission performance. The Golay sequences are generated by binary Reed-Muller codes, which have low peak-to-average power ratio and certain error correction capability. A low-complexity decoding algorithm for the Golay sequences is then proposed to recover the signal. Under same spectral efficiency, the QPSK modulated OFDM with binary Golay sequences coding with and without discrete Fourier transform (DFT) spreading (DFTS-QPSK-GOFDM and QPSK-GOFDM) are compared with the normal BPSK modulated OFDM with and without DFT spreading (DFTS-BPSK-OFDM and BPSK-OFDM) after long-haul transmission. At a 7% forward error correction code threshold (Q2 factor of 8.5 dB), it is shown that DFTS-QPSK-GOFDM outperforms DFTS-BPSK-OFDM by extending the transmission distance by 29% and 18%, in non-dispersion managed and dispersion managed links, respectively.

  3. GENERATION OF COMPLEMENTARY CODES AND DOUBLY CO-OPERATIVE TERNARY SEQUENCES AND THEIR COMPARITIVE STUDY IN AMBIGUITY DOMAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. SRIHARI RAO,

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Pulse coding and linear frequency modulation in analog or discrete form are widely used in radar systems for pulse compression to achieve high range resolution. Such coded waveforms are detected by a threshold detector after matched filtering. Complementary codes, which use multiple binary sequences exhibit the most desirable characteristics, so that they achieve perfect side lobe cancellation.Here generation of complementary codes is presented whose sum of autocorrelation functions is double the length of the sequence for zero shift and zero for other shifts and pairs of doubly co-operative ternary sequences which are co-operative not only in the utocorrelation domain but also in the signal domain is presented. Theenergy efficiency of the sequences is found as unity or 100%. The hoice of the selection of the sequence in the case of complementary sequences is restricted to a few number of sequences where as in doubly co-operative sequences, the choice is broader. This is due to the property of the co-operative sequence is slightly relaxedfrom complementary codes as side lobe is relaxed to ±1 from zero in the case of complementary codes. The radar ambiguity function epresents the output of the matched filter used by the radar esigners which provides information about how different waveforms may be suitable for various radar applications. The behaviour of complementary sequences and doubly co-operative sequences is studied in ambiguity domain.

  4. Multiple, non-allelic, intein-coding sequences in eukaryotic RNA polymerase genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Butler Margaret I

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inteins are self-splicing protein elements. They are translated as inserts within host proteins that excise themselves and ligate the flanking portions of the host protein (exteins with a peptide bond. They are encoded as in-frame insertions within the genes for the host proteins. Inteins are found in all three domains of life and in viruses, but have a very sporadic distribution. Only a small number of intein coding sequences have been identified in eukaryotic nuclear genes, and all of these are from ascomycete or basidiomycete fungi. Results We identified seven intein coding sequences within nuclear genes coding for the second largest subunits of RNA polymerase. These sequences were found in diverse eukaryotes: one is in the second largest subunit of RNA polymerase I (RPA2 from the ascomycete fungus Phaeosphaeria nodorum, one is in the RNA polymerase III (RPC2 of the slime mould Dictyostelium discoideum and four intein coding sequences are in RNA polymerase II genes (RPB2, one each from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, the zygomycete fungus Spiromyces aspiralis and the chytrid fungi Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis and Coelomomyces stegomyiae. The remaining intein coding sequence is in a viral relic embedded within the genome of the oomycete Phytophthora ramorum. The Chlamydomonas and Dictyostelium inteins are the first nuclear-encoded inteins found outside of the fungi. These new inteins represent a unique dataset: they are found in homologous proteins that form a paralogous group. Although these paralogues diverged early in eukaryotic evolution, their sequences can be aligned over most of their length. The inteins are inserted at multiple distinct sites, each of which corresponds to a highly conserved region of RNA polymerase. This dataset supports earlier work suggesting that inteins preferentially occur in highly conserved regions of their host proteins. Conclusion The identification of these new inteins

  5. Coding and decoding libraries of sequence-defined functional copolymers synthesized via photoligation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zydziak, Nicolas; Konrad, Waldemar; Feist, Florian; Afonin, Sergii; Weidner, Steffen; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher

    2016-11-01

    Designing artificial macromolecules with absolute sequence order represents a considerable challenge. Here we report an advanced light-induced avenue to monodisperse sequence-defined functional linear macromolecules up to decamers via a unique photochemical approach. The versatility of the synthetic strategy--combining sequential and modular concepts--enables the synthesis of perfect macromolecules varying in chemical constitution and topology. Specific functions are placed at arbitrary positions along the chain via the successive addition of monomer units and blocks, leading to a library of functional homopolymers, alternating copolymers and block copolymers. The in-depth characterization of each sequence-defined chain confirms the precision nature of the macromolecules. Decoding of the functional information contained in the molecular structure is achieved via tandem mass spectrometry without recourse to their synthetic history, showing that the sequence information can be read. We submit that the presented photochemical strategy is a viable and advanced concept for coding individual monomer units along a macromolecular chain.

  6. Widespread Differential Expression of Coding Region and 3' UTR Sequences in Neurons and Other Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocabas, Arif; Duarte, Terence; Kumar, Saranya; Hynes, Mary A

    2015-12-16

    Mature messenger RNAs (mRNAs) consist of coding sequence (CDS) and 5' and 3' UTRs, typically expected to show similar abundance within a given neuron. Examining mRNA from defined neurons, we unexpectedly show extremely common unbalanced expression of cognate 3' UTR and CDS sequences; many genes show high 3' UTR relative to CDS, others show high CDS to 3' UTR. In situ hybridization (19 of 19 genes) shows a broad range of 3' UTR-to-CDS expression ratios across neurons and tissues. Ratios may be spatially graded or change with developmental age but are consistent across animals. Further, for two genes examined, a 3' UTR-to-CDS ratio above a particular threshold in any given neuron correlated with reduced or undetectable protein expression. Our findings raise questions about the role of isolated 3' UTR sequences in regulation of protein expression and highlight the importance of separately examining 3' UTR and CDS sequences in gene expression analyses.

  7. Analysis on Frequency and Density of Microsatellites in Coding Sequences of Several Eukaryotic Genomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Li; Qingyou Xia; Cheng Lu; Zeyang Zhou; Zhonghuai Xiang

    2004-01-01

    Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSRs) have been found in most organisms during the last decade. Since large-scale sequences are being generated, especially those that can be used to search for microsatellites, the development of these markers is getting more convenient. Keeping SSRs in viewing the importance of the application, available CDS (coding sequences) or ESTs (expressed sequence tags) of some eukaryotic species were used to study the frequency and density of various types of microsatellites. On the basis of surveying CDS or EST sequences amounting to 66.6 Mb in silkworm, 37.2 Mb in fly, 20.8 Mb in mosquito, 60.0 Mb in mouse, 34.9 Mb in zebrafish and 33.5 Mb in Caenorhabditis elegans, the frequency of SSRs was 1/1.00 Kb in silkworm, 1/0.77 Kb in fly, 1/1.03 Kb in mosquito, 1/1.21 Kb in mousey 1/1.25 Kb in zebrafish and 1/1.38 Kb in C. Elegans. The overall average SSR frequency of these species is 1/1.07 Kb. Hexanucleotide repeats (64.5%-76.6%) are the most abundant class of SSR in the investigated species, followed by trimeric, dimeric, tetrameric, monomeric and pentameric repeats. Furthermore, the A-rich repeats are predominant in each type of SSRs, whereas G-rich repeats are rare in the coding regions.

  8. PATACSDB—the database of polyA translational attenuators in coding sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Habich

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent additions to the repertoire of gene expression regulatory mechanisms are polyadenylate (polyA tracks encoding for poly-lysine runs in protein sequences. Such tracks stall the translation apparatus and induce frameshifting independently of the effects of charged nascent poly-lysine sequence on the ribosome exit channel. As such, they substantially influence the stability of mRNA and the amount of protein produced from a given transcript. Single base changes in these regions are enough to exert a measurable response on both protein and mRNA abundance; this makes each of these sequences a potentially interesting case study for the effects of synonymous mutation, gene dosage balance and natural frameshifting. Here we present PATACSDB, a resource that contain a comprehensive list of polyA tracks from over 250 eukaryotic genomes. Our data is based on the Ensembl genomic database of coding sequences and filtered with algorithm of 12A-1 which selects sequences of polyA tracks with a minimal length of 12 A’s allowing for one mismatched base. The PATACSDB database is accessible at: http://sysbio.ibb.waw.pl/patacsdb. The source code is available at http://github.com/habich/PATACSDB, and it includes the scripts with which the database can be recreated.

  9. Sequence Prediction With Sparse Distributed Hyperdimensional Coding Applied to the Analysis of Mobile Phone Use Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasanen, Okko J; Saarinen, Jukka P

    2016-09-01

    Modeling and prediction of temporal sequences is central to many signal processing and machine learning applications. Prediction based on sequence history is typically performed using parametric models, such as fixed-order Markov chains ( n -grams), approximations of high-order Markov processes, such as mixed-order Markov models or mixtures of lagged bigram models, or with other machine learning techniques. This paper presents a method for sequence prediction based on sparse hyperdimensional coding of the sequence structure and describes how higher order temporal structures can be utilized in sparse coding in a balanced manner. The method is purely incremental, allowing real-time online learning and prediction with limited computational resources. Experiments with prediction of mobile phone use patterns, including the prediction of the next launched application, the next GPS location of the user, and the next artist played with the phone media player, reveal that the proposed method is able to capture the relevant variable-order structure from the sequences. In comparison with the n -grams and the mixed-order Markov models, the sparse hyperdimensional predictor clearly outperforms its peers in terms of unweighted average recall and achieves an equal level of weighted average recall as the mixed-order Markov chain but without the batch training of the mixed-order model.

  10. Identification of minority resistance mutations in the HIV-1 integrase coding region using next generation sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonager, Jannik; Larsson, Jonas T; Hussing, Christian

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The current widely applied standard method to screen for HIV-1 genotypic resistance is based on Sanger population sequencing (Sseq), which does not allow for the identification of minority variants (MVs) below the limit of detection for the Sseq-method in patients receiving integrase......: raltegravir (RAL), elvitegravir (EVG) and dolutegravir (DTG). STUDY DESIGN: NGS and Sseq were used to analyze RT-PCR products of the HIV-1 integrase coding region from six patients and in serial samples from two patients. NGS sequences were assembled and analyzed using the low frequency variant detection...

  11. Incorporation of the influenza A virus NA segment into virions does not require cognate non-coding sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescenzo-Chaigne, Bernadette; Barbezange, Cyril V. S.; Léandri, Stéphane; Roquin, Camille; Berthault, Camille; van der Werf, Sylvie

    2017-01-01

    For each influenza virus genome segment, the coding sequence is flanked by non-coding (NC) regions comprising shared, conserved sequences and specific, non-conserved sequences. The latter and adjacent parts of the coding sequence are involved in genome packaging, but the precise role of the non-conserved NC sequences is still unclear. The aim of this study is to better understand the role of the non-conserved non-coding sequences in the incorporation of the viral segments into virions. The NA-segment NC sequences were systematically replaced by those of the seven other segments. Recombinant viruses harbouring two segments with identical NC sequences were successfully rescued. Virus growth kinetics and serial passages were performed, and incorporation of the viral segments was tested by real-time RT-PCR. An initial virus growth deficiency correlated to a specific defect in NA segment incorporation. Upon serial passages, growth properties were restored. Sequencing revealed that the replacing 5′NC sequence length drove the type of mutations obtained. With sequences longer than the original, point mutations in the coding region with or without substitutions in the 3′NC region were detected. With shorter sequences, insertions were observed in the 5′NC region. Restoration of viral fitness was linked to restoration of the NA segment incorporation. PMID:28240311

  12. Enhanced Protein Production in Escherichia coli by Optimization of Cloning Scars at the Vector-Coding Sequence Junction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirzadeh, Kiavash; Martinez, Virginia; Toddo, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Protein production in Escherichia coli is a fundamental activity for a large fraction of academic, pharmaceutical, and industrial research laboratories. Maximum production is usually sought, as this reduces costs and facilitates downstream purification steps. Frustratingly, many coding sequences...... are poorly expressed even when they are codon-optimized and expressed from vectors with powerful genetic elements. In this study, we show that poor expression can be caused by certain nucleotide sequences (e.g., cloning scars) at the junction between the vector and the coding sequence. Since these sequences...... lie between the Shine-Dalgarno sequence and the start codon, they are an integral part of the translation initiation region. To identify the most optimal sequences, we devised a simple and inexpensive PCR-based step that generates sequence variants at the vector-coding sequence junction...

  13. Mutation analysis of the coding sequence of the MECP2 gene in infantile autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Kim S; Blasi, Francesca; Bacchelli, Elena; Klauck, Sabine M; Maestrini, Elena; Poustka, Annemarie

    2002-10-01

    Mutations in the coding region of the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 ( MECP2) gene cause Rett syndrome and have also been reported in a number of X-linked mental retardation syndromes. Furthermore, such mutations have recently been described in a few autistic patients. In this study, a large sample of individuals with autism was screened in order to elucidate systematically whether specific mutations in MECP2 play a role in autism. The mutation analysis of the coding sequence of the gene was performed by denaturing high-pressure liquid chromatography and direct sequencing. Taken together, 14 sequence variants were identified in 152 autistic patients from 134 German families and 50 unrelated patients from the International Molecular Genetic Study of Autism Consortium affected relative-pair sample. Eleven of these variants were excluded for having an aetiological role as they were either silent mutations, did not cosegregate with autism in the pedigrees of the patients or represented known polymorphisms. The relevance of the three remaining mutations towards the aetiology of autism could not be ruled out, although they were not localised within functional domains of MeCP2 and may be rare polymorphisms. Taking into account the large size of our sample, we conclude that mutations in the coding region of MECP2 do not play a major role in autism susceptibility. Therefore, infantile autism and Rett syndrome probably represent two distinct entities at the molecular genetic level.

  14. Interruptions disrupt reading comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroughi, Cyrus K; Werner, Nicole E; Barragán, Daniela; Boehm-Davis, Deborah A

    2015-06-01

    Previous research suggests that being interrupted while reading a text does not disrupt the later recognition or recall of information from that text. This research is used as support for Ericsson and Kintsch's (1995) long-term working memory (LT-WM) theory, which posits that disruptions while reading (e.g., interruptions) do not impair subsequent text comprehension. However, to fully comprehend a text, individuals may need to do more than recognize or recall information that has been presented in the text at a later time. Reading comprehension often requires individuals to connect and synthesize information across a text (e.g., successfully identifying complex topics such as themes and tones) and not just make a familiarity-based decision (i.e., recognition). The goal for this study was to determine whether interruptions while reading disrupt reading comprehension when the questions assessing comprehension require participants to connect and synthesize information across the passage. In Experiment 1, interruptions disrupted reading comprehension. In Experiment 2, interruptions disrupted reading comprehension but not recognition of information from the text. In Experiment 3, the addition of a 15-s time-out prior to the interruption successfully removed these negative effects. These data suggest that the time it takes to process the information needed to successfully comprehend text when reading is greater than that required for recognition. Any interference (e.g., an interruption) that occurs during the comprehension process may disrupt reading comprehension. This evidence supports the need for transient activation of information in working memory for successful text comprehension and does not support LT-WM theory. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. The Cipher Code of Simple Sequence Repeats in “Vampire Pathogens”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Geng; Bello-Orti, Bernardo; Aragon, Virginia; Tucker, Alexander W.; Luo, Rui; Ren, Pinxing; Bi, Dingren; Zhou, Rui; Jin, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Blood inside mammals is a forbidden area for the majority of prokaryotic microbes; however, red blood cells tropism microbes, like “vampire pathogens” (VP), succeed in matching scarce nutrients and surviving strong immunity reactions. Here, we found VP of Mycoplasma, Rhizobiales, and Rickettsiales showed significantly higher counts of (AG)n dimeric simple sequence repeats (Di-SSRs) in the genomes, coding and non-coding regions than non Vampire Pathogens (N_VP). Regression analysis indicated a significant correlation between GC content and the span of (AG)n-Di-SSR variation. Gene Ontology (GO) terms with abundance of (AG)3-Di-SSRs shared by the VP strains were associated with purine nucleotide metabolism (FDR < 0.01), indicating an adaptation to the limited availability of purine and nucleotide precursors in blood. Di-amino acids coded by (AG)n-Di-SSRs included all three six-fold code amino acids (Arg, Leu and Ser) and significantly higher counts of Di-amino acids coded by (AG)3, (GA)3, and (TC)3 in VP than N_VP. Furthermore, significant differences (P < 0.001) on the numbers of triplexes formed from (AG)n-Di-SSRs between VP and N_VP in Mycoplasma suggested the potential role of (AG)n-Di-SSRs in gene regulation. PMID:26215592

  16. A novel DNA sequence similarity calculation based on simplified pulse-coupled neural network and Huffman coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xin; Nie, Rencan; Zhou, Dongming; Yao, Shaowen; Chen, Yanyan; Yu, Jiefu; Wang, Quan

    2016-11-01

    A novel method for the calculation of DNA sequence similarity is proposed based on simplified pulse-coupled neural network (S-PCNN) and Huffman coding. In this study, we propose a coding method based on Huffman coding, where the triplet code was used as a code bit to transform DNA sequence into numerical sequence. The proposed method uses the firing characters of S-PCNN neurons in DNA sequence to extract features. Besides, the proposed method can deal with different lengths of DNA sequences. First, according to the characteristics of S-PCNN and the DNA primary sequence, the latter is encoded using Huffman coding method, and then using the former, the oscillation time sequence (OTS) of the encoded DNA sequence is extracted. Simultaneously, relevant features are obtained, and finally the similarities or dissimilarities of the DNA sequences are determined by Euclidean distance. In order to verify the accuracy of this method, different data sets were used for testing. The experimental results show that the proposed method is effective.

  17. Production of Recombinant Vector Containing the Coding Sequence of Human Hepcidin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keyhanvar, N.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Hepcidin is a cystein-rich antimicrobial peptide,which is secreted by the liver. It fights against wide spectrum of bacteria, virusesand fungi and it is a major regulator of iron homeostasis. Today, scientists havemade many efforts on the production of hepcidin. Baculovirus expression systemis one of the best eukaryotic expression systems for production of recombinanthepcidin and production of the recombinant vector is one of the most importantsteps in this expression system.Material & Methods: First, the total RNA was separated from HepG2 cell lineas a source of hepcidin expression. Then, after synthesis of total cDNA, humanhepcidin sequence was amplified, using specific primers by PCR method. Next,hepcidin sequence was cloned into pTZ57R/T vector. After digestion ofrecombinant vector using ECoRI and BamHI restriction enzymes, recombinantpFastBac HT B vector containing human hepcidin cDNA was produced.Results: Coding sequence of human hepcidin is correctly cloned into pTZ57R/Tvector and sub cloning into pFastBac HT B vector is performed successfully. Thepresence of a clear band near 274 bp resulted from PCR amplification andrestriction enzyme are the confirmation of the cloning of human hepcidin.Conclusion: According to our knowledge, the present study is the first work thatfocuses on recombinant vector containing coding sequence of human prohepcidin.This recombinant vector can be used for human hepcidin production.Keywords: Vector; Hepcidin; Iron

  18. The signal sequence coding region promotes nuclear export of mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzo, Alexander F; Springer, Michael; Shibata, Yoko; Lee, Chung-Sheng; Dias, Anusha P; Rapoport, Tom A

    2007-12-01

    In eukaryotic cells, most mRNAs are exported from the nucleus by the transcription export (TREX) complex, which is loaded onto mRNAs after their splicing and capping. We have studied in mammalian cells the nuclear export of mRNAs that code for secretory proteins, which are targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane by hydrophobic signal sequences. The mRNAs were injected into the nucleus or synthesized from injected or transfected DNA, and their export was followed by fluorescent in situ hybridization. We made the surprising observation that the signal sequence coding region (SSCR) can serve as a nuclear export signal of an mRNA that lacks an intron or functional cap. Even the export of an intron-containing natural mRNA was enhanced by its SSCR. Like conventional export, the SSCR-dependent pathway required the factor TAP, but depletion of the TREX components had only moderate effects. The SSCR export signal appears to be characterized in vertebrates by a low content of adenines, as demonstrated by genome-wide sequence analysis and by the inhibitory effect of silent adenine mutations in SSCRs. The discovery of an SSCR-mediated pathway explains the previously noted amino acid bias in signal sequences and suggests a link between nuclear export and membrane targeting of mRNAs.

  19. Isolation and Analysis of α-Gliadin Gene Coding Sequences from Triticum durum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Han-yan; WEI Yu-ming; ZE Hong-yan; ZHENG You-liang

    2007-01-01

    Three coding sequences of gliadins genes, designed as Gli2_Du1, Gli2_Du2 and Gli2_Du3, were isolated from the genomic DNA of Triticum durum accessions CItr5083. Gli2_Du1 and Gli2_Du2 contain 945 and 864 bp, encoding the mature proteins with 314 and 287 amino acid residues, respectively. Gli2_Du3 is recognized as a pseudogene due to the stop codon occurring in the coding region. The pseudogenes, commonly occurring in gliadins family, are attributed to the single base change C → T. The amino acid sequences deduced from these gene sequences were characterized with the typical structure of α-gliadin proteins, including the toxic sequences (PSQQQP). The peptide fraction PF(Y)PP(Q)is thought to be an extra unit of repetitive domain, slightly diverging from the previous report. Six cysteine residues were observed within two unique domains. Phylogenetic analysis showed Gli2_Du2 and Gli2_Du3 were closely related to the genes on chromosome 6A, whereas Gli2_Du1 seems to be more homologous with the genes on chromosome 6B.

  20. RevTrans: multiple alignment of coding DNA from aligned amino acid sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wernersson, Rasmus; Pedersen, Anders Gorm

    2003-01-01

    The simple fact that proteins are built from 20 amino acids while DNA only contains four different bases, means that the 'signal-to-noise ratio' in protein sequence alignments is much better than in alignments of DNA. Besides this information-theoretical advantage, protein alignments also benefit...... proteins. It is therefore preferable to align coding DNA at the amino acid level and it is for this purpose we have constructed the program RevTrans. RevTrans constructs a multiple DNA alignment by: (i) translating the DNA; (ii) aligning the resulting peptide sequences; and (iii) building a multiple DNA...... alignment by 'reverse translation' of the aligned protein sequences. In the resulting DNA alignment, gaps occur in groups of three corresponding to entire codons, and analogous codon positions are therefore always lined up. These features are useful when constructing multiple DNA alignments for phylogenetic...

  1. An algorithm for the study of DNA sequence evolution based on the genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirakoulis, G Ch; Karafyllidis, I; Sandaltzopoulos, R; Tsalides, Ph; Thanailakis, A

    2004-11-01

    Recent studies of the quantum-mechanical processes in the DNA molecule have seriously challenged the principle that mutations occur randomly. The proton tunneling mechanism causes tautomeric transitions in base pairs resulting in mutations during DNA replication. The meticulous study of the quantum-mechanical phenomena in DNA may reveal that the process of mutagenesis is not completely random. We are still far away from a complete quantum-mechanical model of DNA sequence mutagenesis because of the complexity of the processes and the complex three-dimensional structure of the molecule. In this paper we have developed a quantum-mechanical description of DNA evolution and, following its outline, we have constructed a classical model for DNA evolution assuming that some aspects of the quantum-mechanical processes have influenced the determination of the genetic code. Conversely, our model assumes that the genetic code provides information about the quantum-mechanical mechanisms of mutagenesis, as the current code is the product of an evolutionary process that tries to minimize the spurious consequences of mutagenesis. Based on this model we develop an algorithm that can be used to study the accumulation of mutations in a DNA sequence. The algorithm has a user-friendly interface and the user can change key parameters in order to study relevant hypotheses.

  2. MIMO Radar System for Respiratory Monitoring Using Tx and Rx Modulation with M-Sequence Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, Takashi; Ogiwara, Shun; Yamakoshi, Yoshiki

    The importance of respiratory monitoring systems during sleep have increased due to early diagnosis of sleep apnea syndrome (SAS) in the home. This paper presents a simple respiratory monitoring system suitable for home use having 3D ranging of targets. The range resolution and azimuth resolution are obtained by a stepped frequency transmitting signal and MIMO arrays with preferred pair M-sequence codes doubly modulating in transmission and reception, respectively. Due to the use of these codes, Gold sequence codes corresponding to all the antenna combinations are equivalently modulated in receiver. The signal to interchannel interference ratio of the reconstructed image is evaluated by numerical simulations. The results of experiments on a developed prototype 3D-MIMO radar system show that this system can extract only the motion of respiration of a human subject 2m apart from a metallic rotatable reflector. Moreover, it is found that this system can successfully measure the respiration information of sleeping human subjects for 96.6 percent of the whole measurement time except for instances of large posture change.

  3. Exome sequencing-driven discovery of coding polymorphisms associated with common metabolic phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrechtsen, Anders; Grarup, N; Li, Y

    2013-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Human complex metabolic traits are in part regulated by genetic determinants. Here we applied exome sequencing to identify novel associations of coding polymorphisms at minor allele frequencies (MAFs) >1% with common metabolic phenotypes. METHODS: The study comprised three stages...... (type 2 diabetes: MAF 23.4%, OR 1.10, p¿=¿8.2¿×¿10(-10)). CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: We applied exome sequencing as a basis for finding genetic determinants of metabolic traits and show the existence of low-frequency and common coding polymorphisms with impact on common metabolic traits. Based on our...... metabolic phenotypes covered by 45 unique polymorphisms. In meta-analyses of stage 2 and stage 3 results, we demonstrated robust associations for coding polymorphisms in CD300LG (fasting HDL-cholesterol: MAF 3.5%, p¿=¿8.5¿×¿10(-14)), COBLL1 (type 2 diabetes: MAF 12.5%, OR 0.88, p¿=¿1.2¿×¿10(-11)) and MACF1...

  4. Recurrent Coding Sequence Variation Explains Only A Small Fraction of the Genetic Architecture of Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeeva, Maria N.; Kinnersley, Ben; Farrington, Susan M.; Whiffin, Nicola; Palles, Claire; Svinti, Victoria; Lloyd, Amy; Gorman, Maggie; Ooi, Li-Yin; Hosking, Fay; Barclay, Ella; Zgaga, Lina; Dobbins, Sara; Martin, Lynn; Theodoratou, Evropi; Broderick, Peter; Tenesa, Albert; Smillie, Claire; Grimes, Graeme; Hayward, Caroline; Campbell, Archie; Porteous, David; Deary, Ian J.; Harris, Sarah E.; Northwood, Emma L.; Barrett, Jennifer H.; Smith, Gillian; Wolf, Roland; Forman, David; Morreau, Hans; Ruano, Dina; Tops, Carli; Wijnen, Juul; Schrumpf, Melanie; Boot, Arnoud; Vasen, Hans F A; Hes, Frederik J.; van Wezel, Tom; Franke, Andre; Lieb, Wolgang; Schafmayer, Clemens; Hampe, Jochen; Buch, Stephan; Propping, Peter; Hemminki, Kari; Försti, Asta; Westers, Helga; Hofstra, Robert; Pinheiro, Manuela; Pinto, Carla; Teixeira, Manuel; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Fernández-Rozadilla, Ceres; Carracedo, Angel; Castells, Antoni; Castellví-Bel, Sergi; Campbell, Harry; Bishop, D. Timothy; Tomlinson, Ian P M; Dunlop, Malcolm G.; Houlston, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    Whilst common genetic variation in many non-coding genomic regulatory regions are known to impart risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), much of the heritability of CRC remains unexplained. To examine the role of recurrent coding sequence variation in CRC aetiology, we genotyped 12,638 CRCs cases and 29,045 controls from six European populations. Single-variant analysis identified a coding variant (rs3184504) in SH2B3 (12q24) associated with CRC risk (OR = 1.08, P = 3.9 × 10−7), and novel damaging coding variants in 3 genes previously tagged by GWAS efforts; rs16888728 (8q24) in UTP23 (OR = 1.15, P = 1.4 × 10−7); rs6580742 and rs12303082 (12q13) in FAM186A (OR = 1.11, P = 1.2 × 10−7 and OR = 1.09, P = 7.4 × 10−8); rs1129406 (12q13) in ATF1 (OR = 1.11, P = 8.3 × 10−9), all reaching exome-wide significance levels. Gene based tests identified associations between CRC and PCDHGA genes (P < 2.90 × 10−6). We found an excess of rare, damaging variants in base-excision (P = 2.4 × 10−4) and DNA mismatch repair genes (P = 6.1 × 10−4) consistent with a recessive mode of inheritance. This study comprehensively explores the contribution of coding sequence variation to CRC risk, identifying associations with coding variation in 4 genes and PCDHG gene cluster and several candidate recessive alleles. However, these findings suggest that recurrent, low-frequency coding variants account for a minority of the unexplained heritability of CRC. PMID:26553438

  5. Identification of novel non-coding RNAs using profiles of short sequence reads from next generation sequencing data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makunin Igor V

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increasing interest in small non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs such as microRNAs (miRNAs, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs and Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs and recent advances in sequencing technology have yielded large numbers of short (18-32 nt RNA sequences from different organisms, some of which are derived from small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs and transfer RNAs (tRNAs. We observed that these short ncRNAs frequently cover the entire length of annotated snoRNAs or tRNAs, which suggests that other loci specifying similar ncRNAs can be identified by clusters of short RNA sequences. Results We combined publicly available datasets of tens of millions of short RNA sequence tags from Drosophila melanogaster, and mapped them to the Drosophila genome. Approximately 6 million perfectly mapping sequence tags were then assembled into 521,302 tag-contigs (TCs based on tag overlap. Most transposon-derived sequences, exons and annotated miRNAs, tRNAs and snoRNAs are detected by TCs, which show distinct patterns of length and tag-depth for different categories. The typical length and tag-depth of snoRNA-derived TCs was used to predict 7 previously unrecognized box H/ACA and 26 box C/D snoRNA candidates. We also identified one snRNA candidate and 86 loci with a high number of tags that are yet to be annotated, 7 of which have a particular 18mer motif and are located in introns of genes involved in development. A subset of new snoRNA candidates and putative ncRNA candidates was verified by Northern blot. Conclusions In this study, we have introduced a new approach to identify new members of known classes of ncRNAs based on the features of TCs corresponding to known ncRNAs. A large number of the identified TCs are yet to be examined experimentally suggesting that many more novel ncRNAs remain to be discovered.

  6. Miscarriage: A Dream Interrupted

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trepal, Heather C.; Semivan, Suzanne Gibson; Caley-Bruce, Mary

    2005-01-01

    Pregnancy is a developmental task that requires women to become accustomed to inherent and sometimes profound biological, somatic, and psychological changes. When pregnancy is interrupted by miscarriage, it may become a pivotal crisis point in the development of a woman's maternal identity as well as an issue in family development. This manuscript…

  7. Temporal and Rate Coding for Discrete Event Sequences in the Hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Satoshi; Sakurai, Yoshio; Nakahara, Hiroyuki; Fujisawa, Shigeyoshi

    2017-06-21

    Although the hippocampus is critical to episodic memory, neuronal representations supporting this role, especially relating to nonspatial information, remain elusive. Here, we investigated rate and temporal coding of hippocampal CA1 neurons in rats performing a cue-combination task that requires the integration of sequentially provided sound and odor cues. The majority of CA1 neurons displayed sensory cue-, combination-, or choice-specific (simply, "event"-specific) elevated discharge activities, which were sustained throughout the event period. These event cells underwent transient theta phase precession at event onset, followed by sustained phase locking to the early theta phases. As a result of this unique single neuron behavior, the theta sequences of CA1 cell assemblies of the event sequences had discrete representations. These results help to update the conceptual framework for space encoding toward a more general model of episodic event representations in the hippocampus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A versatile palindromic amphipathic repeat coding sequence horizontally distributed among diverse bacterial and eucaryotic microbes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glass John I

    2010-07-01

    repeat may be disseminated by HGT and intra-genomic shuffling. Conclusions We describe novel features of PARCELs (Palindromic Amphipathic Repeat Coding ELements, a set of widely distributed repeat protein domains and coding sequences that were likely acquired through HGT by diverse unicellular microbes, further mobilized and diversified within genomes, and co-opted for expression in the membrane proteome of some taxa. Disseminated by multiple gene-centric vehicles, ORFs harboring these elements enhance accessory gene pools as part of the "mobilome" connecting genomes of various clades, in taxa sharing common niches.

  9. An Explicit Construction of a sequence of codes attaining the Tsfasman-Vladut-Zink Bound:The first steps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høholdt, Tom; Voss, Cornelia

    1997-01-01

    We present a sequence of codes attaining the Tsfasman-Vladut-Zink bound. The construction is based on the tower of Artin-Schreier extensions described by Garcia and Stichtenoth (1995). We also determine the dual codes. The first steps of the constructions are explicitly given as generator matrices...

  10. Verona Coding Definitions of Emotional Sequences (VR-CoDES): Conceptual framework and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccolo, Lidia Del; Finset, Arnstein; Mellblom, Anneli V; Figueiredo-Braga, Margarida; Korsvold, Live; Zhou, Yuefang; Zimmermann, Christa; Humphris, Gerald

    2017-06-21

    To discuss the theoretical and empirical framework of VR-CoDES and potential future direction in research based on the coding system. The paper is based on selective review of papers relevant to the construction and application of VR-CoDES. VR-CoDES system is rooted in patient-centered and biopsychosocial model of healthcare consultations and on a functional approach to emotion theory. According to the VR-CoDES, emotional interaction is studied in terms of sequences consisting of an eliciting event, an emotional expression by the patient and the immediate response by the clinician. The rationale for the emphasis on sequences, on detailed classification of cues and concerns, and on the choices of explicit vs. non-explicit responses and providing vs. reducing room for further disclosure, as basic categories of the clinician responses, is described. Results from research on VR-CoDES may help raise awareness of emotional sequences. Future directions in applying VR-CoDES in research may include studies on predicting patient and clinician behavior within the consultation, qualitative analyses of longer sequences including several VR-CoDES triads, and studies of effects of emotional communication on health outcomes. VR-CoDES may be applied to develop interventions to promote good handling of patients' emotions in healthcare encounters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Whole-Exome Sequencing Identifies Rare and Low-Frequency Coding Variants Associated with LDL Cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Leslie A.; Hu, Youna; Zhang, He; Xue, Chenyi; Schmidt, Ellen M.; Tang, Zheng-Zheng; Bizon, Chris; Lange, Ethan M.; Smith, Joshua D.; Turner, Emily H.; Jun, Goo; Kang, Hyun Min; Peloso, Gina; Auer, Paul; Li, Kuo-ping; Flannick, Jason; Zhang, Ji; Fuchsberger, Christian; Gaulton, Kyle; Lindgren, Cecilia; Locke, Adam; Manning, Alisa; Sim, Xueling; Rivas, Manuel A.; Holmen, Oddgeir L.; Gottesman, Omri; Lu, Yingchang; Ruderfer, Douglas; Stahl, Eli A.; Duan, Qing; Li, Yun; Durda, Peter; Jiao, Shuo; Isaacs, Aaron; Hofman, Albert; Bis, Joshua C.; Correa, Adolfo; Griswold, Michael E.; Jakobsdottir, Johanna; Smith, Albert V.; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Feitosa, Mary F.; Zhang, Qunyuan; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Crosby, Jacy; Wassel, Christina L.; Do, Ron; Franceschini, Nora; Martin, Lisa W.; Robinson, Jennifer G.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Crosslin, David R.; Rosenthal, Elisabeth A.; Tsai, Michael; Rieder, Mark J.; Farlow, Deborah N.; Folsom, Aaron R.; Lumley, Thomas; Fox, Ervin R.; Carlson, Christopher S.; Peters, Ulrike; Jackson, Rebecca D.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Levy, Daniel; Rotter, Jerome I.; Taylor, Herman A.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Siscovick, David S.; Fornage, Myriam; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Hayward, Caroline; Rudan, Igor; Chen, Y. Eugene; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Sætrom, Pål; Hveem, Kristian; Boehnke, Michael; Groop, Leif; McCarthy, Mark; Meitinger, Thomas; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; Post, Wendy S.; North, Kari E.; Reiner, Alexander P.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Psaty, Bruce M.; Altshuler, David; Kathiresan, Sekar; Lin, Dan-Yu; Jarvik, Gail P.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Kooperberg, Charles; Wilson, James G.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Rich, Stephen S.; Tracy, Russell P.; Willer, Cristen J.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Altshuler, David M.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Allayee, Hooman; Cresci, Sharon; Daly, Mark J.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; DePristo, Mark A.; Do, Ron; Donnelly, Peter; Farlow, Deborah N.; Fennell, Tim; Garimella, Kiran; Hazen, Stanley L.; Hu, Youna; Jordan, Daniel M.; Jun, Goo; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kang, Hyun Min; Kiezun, Adam; Lettre, Guillaume; Li, Bingshan; Li, Mingyao; Newton-Cheh, Christopher H.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Peloso, Gina; Pulit, Sara; Rader, Daniel J.; Reich, David; Reilly, Muredach P.; Rivas, Manuel A.; Schwartz, Steve; Scott, Laura; Siscovick, David S.; Spertus, John A.; Stitziel, Nathaniel O.; Stoletzki, Nina; Sunyaev, Shamil R.; Voight, Benjamin F.; Willer, Cristen J.; Rich, Stephen S.; Akylbekova, Ermeg; Atwood, Larry D.; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Barbalic, Maja; Barr, R. Graham; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Bis, Joshua; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bowden, Donald W.; Brody, Jennifer; Budoff, Matthew; Burke, Greg; Buxbaum, Sarah; Carr, Jeff; Chen, Donna T.; Chen, Ida Y.; Chen, Wei-Min; Concannon, Pat; Crosby, Jacy; Cupples, L. Adrienne; D’Agostino, Ralph; DeStefano, Anita L.; Dreisbach, Albert; Dupuis, Josée; Durda, J. Peter; Ellis, Jaclyn; Folsom, Aaron R.; Fornage, Myriam; Fox, Caroline S.; Fox, Ervin; Funari, Vincent; Ganesh, Santhi K.; Gardin, Julius; Goff, David; Gordon, Ora; Grody, Wayne; Gross, Myron; Guo, Xiuqing; Hall, Ira M.; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Heintz, Nicholas; Herrington, David M.; Hickson, DeMarc; Huang, Jie; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Jacobs, David R.; Jenny, Nancy S.; Johnson, Andrew D.; Johnson, Craig W.; Kawut, Steven; Kronmal, Richard; Kurz, Raluca; Lange, Ethan M.; Lange, Leslie A.; Larson, Martin G.; Lawson, Mark; Lewis, Cora E.; Levy, Daniel; Li, Dalin; Lin, Honghuang; Liu, Chunyu; Liu, Jiankang; Liu, Kiang; Liu, Xiaoming; Liu, Yongmei; Longstreth, William T.; Loria, Cay; Lumley, Thomas; Lunetta, Kathryn; Mackey, Aaron J.; Mackey, Rachel; Manichaikul, Ani; Maxwell, Taylor; McKnight, Barbara; Meigs, James B.; Morrison, Alanna C.; Musani, Solomon K.; Mychaleckyj, Josyf C.; Nettleton, Jennifer A.; North, Kari; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; O’Leary, Daniel; Ong, Frank; Palmas, Walter; Pankow, James S.; Pankratz, Nathan D.; Paul, Shom; Perez, Marco; Person, Sharina D.; Polak, Joseph; Post, Wendy S.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Quinlan, Aaron R.; Raffel, Leslie J.; Ramachandran, Vasan S.; Reiner, Alexander P.; Rice, Kenneth; Rotter, Jerome I.; Sanders, Jill P.; Schreiner, Pamela; Seshadri, Sudha; Shea, Steve; Sidney, Stephen; Silverstein, Kevin; Smith, Nicholas L.; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Srinivasan, Asoke; Taylor, Herman A.; Taylor, Kent; Thomas, Fridtjof; Tracy, Russell P.; Tsai, Michael Y.; Volcik, Kelly A.; Wassel, Chrstina L.; Watson, Karol; Wei, Gina; White, Wendy; Wiggins, Kerri L.; Wilk, Jemma B.; Williams, O. Dale; Wilson, Gregory; Wilson, James G.; Wolf, Phillip; Zakai, Neil A.; Hardy, John; Meschia, James F.; Nalls, Michael; Singleton, Andrew; Worrall, Brad; Bamshad, Michael J.; Barnes, Kathleen C.; Abdulhamid, Ibrahim; Accurso, Frank; Anbar, Ran; Beaty, Terri; Bigham, Abigail; Black, Phillip; Bleecker, Eugene; Buckingham, Kati; Cairns, Anne Marie; Caplan, Daniel; Chatfield, Barbara; Chidekel, Aaron; Cho, Michael; Christiani, David C.; Crapo, James D.; Crouch, Julia; Daley, Denise; Dang, Anthony; Dang, Hong; De Paula, Alicia; DeCelie-Germana, Joan; Drumm, Allen DozorMitch; Dyson, Maynard; Emerson, Julia; Emond, Mary J.; Ferkol, Thomas; Fink, Robert; Foster, Cassandra; Froh, Deborah; Gao, Li; Gershan, William; Gibson, Ronald L.; Godwin, Elizabeth; Gondor, Magdalen; Gutierrez, Hector; Hansel, Nadia N.; Hassoun, Paul M.; Hiatt, Peter; Hokanson, John E.; Howenstine, Michelle; Hummer, Laura K.; Kanga, Jamshed; Kim, Yoonhee; Knowles, Michael R.; Konstan, Michael; Lahiri, Thomas; Laird, Nan; Lange, Christoph; Lin, Lin; Lin, Xihong; Louie, Tin L.; Lynch, David; Make, Barry; Martin, Thomas R.; Mathai, Steve C.; Mathias, Rasika A.; McNamara, John; McNamara, Sharon; Meyers, Deborah; Millard, Susan; Mogayzel, Peter; Moss, Richard; Murray, Tanda; Nielson, Dennis; Noyes, Blakeslee; O’Neal, Wanda; Orenstein, David; O’Sullivan, Brian; Pace, Rhonda; Pare, Peter; Parker, H. Worth; Passero, Mary Ann; Perkett, Elizabeth; Prestridge, Adrienne; Rafaels, Nicholas M.; Ramsey, Bonnie; Regan, Elizabeth; Ren, Clement; Retsch-Bogart, George; Rock, Michael; Rosen, Antony; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Ruczinski, Ingo; Sanford, Andrew; Schaeffer, David; Sell, Cindy; Sheehan, Daniel; Silverman, Edwin K.; Sin, Don; Spencer, Terry; Stonebraker, Jackie; Tabor, Holly K.; Varlotta, Laurie; Vergara, Candelaria I.; Weiss, Robert; Wigley, Fred; Wise, Robert A.; Wright, Fred A.; Wurfel, Mark M.; Zanni, Robert; Zou, Fei; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Rieder, Mark J.; Green, Phil; Shendure, Jay; Akey, Joshua M.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Crosslin, David R.; Eichler, Evan E.; Fox, P. Keolu; Fu, Wenqing; Gordon, Adam; Gravel, Simon; Jarvik, Gail P.; Johnsen, Jill M.; Kan, Mengyuan; Kenny, Eimear E.; Kidd, Jeffrey M.; Lara-Garduno, Fremiet; Leal, Suzanne M.; Liu, Dajiang J.; McGee, Sean; O’Connor, Timothy D.; Paeper, Bryan; Robertson, Peggy D.; Smith, Joshua D.; Staples, Jeffrey C.; Tennessen, Jacob A.; Turner, Emily H.; Wang, Gao; Yi, Qian; Jackson, Rebecca; Peters, Ulrike; Carlson, Christopher S.; Anderson, Garnet; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Auer, Paul L.; Beresford, Shirley; Bizon, Chris; Black, Henry; Brunner, Robert; Brzyski, Robert; Burwen, Dale; Caan, Bette; Carty, Cara L.; Chlebowski, Rowan; Cummings, Steven; Curb, J. David; Eaton, Charles B.; Ford, Leslie; Franceschini, Nora; Fullerton, Stephanie M.; Gass, Margery; Geller, Nancy; Heiss, Gerardo; Howard, Barbara V.; Hsu, Li; Hutter, Carolyn M.; Ioannidis, John; Jiao, Shuo; Johnson, Karen C.; Kooperberg, Charles; Kuller, Lewis; LaCroix, Andrea; Lakshminarayan, Kamakshi; Lane, Dorothy; Lasser, Norman; LeBlanc, Erin; Li, Kuo-Ping; Limacher, Marian; Lin, Dan-Yu; Logsdon, Benjamin A.; Ludlam, Shari; Manson, JoAnn E.; Margolis, Karen; Martin, Lisa; McGowan, Joan; Monda, Keri L.; Kotchen, Jane Morley; Nathan, Lauren; Ockene, Judith; O’Sullivan, Mary Jo; Phillips, Lawrence S.; Prentice, Ross L.; Robbins, John; Robinson, Jennifer G.; Rossouw, Jacques E.; Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh; Sarto, Gloria E.; Shumaker, Sally; Simon, Michael S.; Stefanick, Marcia L.; Stein, Evan; Tang, Hua; Taylor, Kira C.; Thomson, Cynthia A.; Thornton, Timothy A.; Van Horn, Linda; Vitolins, Mara; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Wallace, Robert; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Zeng, Donglin; Applebaum-Bowden, Deborah; Feolo, Michael; Gan, Weiniu; Paltoo, Dina N.; Sholinsky, Phyliss; Sturcke, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is a treatable, heritable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified 157 variants associated with lipid levels but are not well suited to assess the impact of rare and low-frequency variants. To determine whether rare or low-frequency coding variants are associated with LDL-C, we exome sequenced 2,005 individuals, including 554 individuals selected for extreme LDL-C (>98th or <2nd percentile). Follow-up analyses included sequencing of 1,302 additional individuals and genotype-based analysis of 52,221 individuals. We observed significant evidence of association between LDL-C and the burden of rare or low-frequency variants in PNPLA5, encoding a phospholipase-domain-containing protein, and both known and previously unidentified variants in PCSK9, LDLR and APOB, three known lipid-related genes. The effect sizes for the burden of rare variants for each associated gene were substantially higher than those observed for individual SNPs identified from GWASs. We replicated the PNPLA5 signal in an independent large-scale sequencing study of 2,084 individuals. In conclusion, this large whole-exome-sequencing study for LDL-C identified a gene not known to be implicated in LDL-C and provides unique insight into the design and analysis of similar experiments. PMID:24507775

  12. A probabilistic coding based quantum genetic algorithm for multiple sequence alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Hongwei; Xie, Qiaoluan; Shen, Xubang; Stojkovic, Vojislav

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an original Quantum Genetic algorithm for Multiple sequence ALIGNment (QGMALIGN) that combines a genetic algorithm and a quantum algorithm. A quantum probabilistic coding is designed for representing the multiple sequence alignment. A quantum rotation gate as a mutation operator is used to guide the quantum state evolution. Six genetic operators are designed on the coding basis to improve the solution during the evolutionary process. The features of implicit parallelism and state superposition in quantum mechanics and the global search capability of the genetic algorithm are exploited to get efficient computation. A set of well known test cases from BAliBASE2.0 is used as reference to evaluate the efficiency of the QGMALIGN optimization. The QGMALIGN results have been compared with the most popular methods (CLUSTALX, SAGA, DIALIGN, SB_PIMA, and QGMALIGN) results. The QGMALIGN results show that QGMALIGN performs well on the presenting biological data. The addition of genetic operators to the quantum algorithm lowers the cost of overall running time.

  13. Optimization of Mutation Pressure in Relation to Properties of Protein-Coding Sequences in Bacterial Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błażej, Paweł; Miasojedow, Błażej; Grabińska, Małgorzata; Mackiewicz, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    Most mutations are deleterious and require energetically costly repairs. Therefore, it seems that any minimization of mutation rate is beneficial. On the other hand, mutations generate genetic diversity indispensable for evolution and adaptation of organisms to changing environmental conditions. Thus, it is expected that a spontaneous mutational pressure should be an optimal compromise between these two extremes. In order to study the optimization of the pressure, we compared mutational transition probability matrices from bacterial genomes with artificial matrices fulfilling the same general features as the real ones, e.g., the stationary distribution and the speed of convergence to the stationarity. The artificial matrices were optimized on real protein-coding sequences based on Evolutionary Strategies approach to minimize or maximize the probability of non-synonymous substitutions and costs of amino acid replacements depending on their physicochemical properties. The results show that the empirical matrices have a tendency to minimize the effects of mutations rather than maximize their costs on the amino acid level. They were also similar to the optimized artificial matrices in the nucleotide substitution pattern, especially the high transitions/transversions ratio. We observed no substantial differences between the effects of mutational matrices on protein-coding sequences in genomes under study in respect of differently replicated DNA strands, mutational cost types and properties of the referenced artificial matrices. The findings indicate that the empirical mutational matrices are rather adapted to minimize mutational costs in the studied organisms in comparison to other matrices with similar mathematical constraints.

  14. Drosophila 3' UTRs are more complex than protein-coding sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjula Algama

    Full Text Available The 3' UTRs of eukaryotic genes participate in a variety of post-transcriptional (and some transcriptional regulatory interactions. Some of these interactions are well characterised, but an undetermined number remain to be discovered. While some regulatory sequences in 3' UTRs may be conserved over long evolutionary time scales, others may have only ephemeral functional significance as regulatory profiles respond to changing selective pressures. Here we propose a sensitive segmentation methodology for investigating patterns of composition and conservation in 3' UTRs based on comparison of closely related species. We describe encodings of pairwise and three-way alignments integrating information about conservation, GC content and transition/transversion ratios and apply the method to three closely related Drosophila species: D. melanogaster, D. simulans and D. yakuba. Incorporating multiple data types greatly increased the number of segment classes identified compared to similar methods based on conservation or GC content alone. We propose that the number of segments and number of types of segment identified by the method can be used as proxies for functional complexity. Our main finding is that the number of segments and segment classes identified in 3' UTRs is greater than in the same length of protein-coding sequence, suggesting greater functional complexity in 3' UTRs. There is thus a need for sustained and extensive efforts by bioinformaticians to delineate functional elements in this important genomic fraction. C code, data and results are available upon request.

  15. Optimization of Mutation Pressure in Relation to Properties of Protein-Coding Sequences in Bacterial Genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Błażej

    Full Text Available Most mutations are deleterious and require energetically costly repairs. Therefore, it seems that any minimization of mutation rate is beneficial. On the other hand, mutations generate genetic diversity indispensable for evolution and adaptation of organisms to changing environmental conditions. Thus, it is expected that a spontaneous mutational pressure should be an optimal compromise between these two extremes. In order to study the optimization of the pressure, we compared mutational transition probability matrices from bacterial genomes with artificial matrices fulfilling the same general features as the real ones, e.g., the stationary distribution and the speed of convergence to the stationarity. The artificial matrices were optimized on real protein-coding sequences based on Evolutionary Strategies approach to minimize or maximize the probability of non-synonymous substitutions and costs of amino acid replacements depending on their physicochemical properties. The results show that the empirical matrices have a tendency to minimize the effects of mutations rather than maximize their costs on the amino acid level. They were also similar to the optimized artificial matrices in the nucleotide substitution pattern, especially the high transitions/transversions ratio. We observed no substantial differences between the effects of mutational matrices on protein-coding sequences in genomes under study in respect of differently replicated DNA strands, mutational cost types and properties of the referenced artificial matrices. The findings indicate that the empirical mutational matrices are rather adapted to minimize mutational costs in the studied organisms in comparison to other matrices with similar mathematical constraints.

  16. Trellis-Based Iterative Adaptive Blind Sequence Estimation for Uncoded/Coded Systems with Differential Precoding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xiao-Ming

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose iterative, adaptive trellis-based blind sequence estimators, which can be interpreted as reduced-complexity receivers derived from the joint ML data/channel estimation problem. The number of states in the trellis is considered as a design parameter, providing a trade-off between performance and complexity. For symmetrical signal constellations, differential encoding or generalizations thereof are necessary to combat the phase ambiguity. At the receiver, the structure of the super-trellis (representing differential encoding and intersymbol interference is explicitly exploited rather than doing differential decoding just for resolving the problem of phase ambiguity. In uncoded systems, it is shown that the data sequence can only be determined up to an unknown shift index. This shift ambiguity can be resolved by taking an outer channel encoder into account. The average magnitude of the soft outputs from the corresponding channel decoder is exploited to identify the shift index. For frequency-hopping systems over fading channels, a double serially concatenated scheme is proposed, where the inner code is applied to combat the shift ambiguity and the outer code provides time diversity in conjunction with an interburst interleaver.

  17. Comparative sequence analysis of the non-protein-coding mitochondrial DNA of inbred rat strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash Abhyankar

    Full Text Available The proper function of mammalian mitochondria necessitates a coordinated expression of both nuclear and mitochondrial genes, most likely due to the co-evolution of nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. The non-protein coding regions of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA including the D-loop, tRNA and rRNA genes form a major component of this regulated expression unit. Here we present comparative analyses of the non-protein-coding regions from 27 Rattus norvegicus mtDNA sequences. There were two variable positions in 12S rRNA, 20 in 16S rRNA, eight within the tRNA genes and 13 in the D-loop. Only one of the three neutrality tests used demonstrated statistically significant evidence for selection in 16S rRNA and tRNA-Cys. Based on our analyses of conserved sequences, we propose that some of the variable nucleotide positions identified in 16S rRNA and tRNA-Cys, and the D-loop might be important for mitochondrial function and its regulation.

  18. Regulation of Coding and Non-coding Genes : New insights obtained through analysis of high-throughput sequencing data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Rooijers (Koos)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractThe genetic code of a cell is kept in its DNA. However, a vast number of functions of a cell are carried out by proteins. Through gene expression the genetic code can be expressed and give rise to proteins. The expression of genes into proteins follows two steps: transcription of DNA

  19. Regulation of Coding and Non-coding Genes : New insights obtained through analysis of high-throughput sequencing data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Rooijers (Koos)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractThe genetic code of a cell is kept in its DNA. However, a vast number of functions of a cell are carried out by proteins. Through gene expression the genetic code can be expressed and give rise to proteins. The expression of genes into proteins follows two steps: transcription of

  20. Variation in conserved non-coding sequences on chromosome 5q andsusceptibility to asthma and atopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donfack, Joseph; Schneider, Daniel H.; Tan, Zheng; Kurz,Thorsten; Dubchak, Inna; Frazer, Kelly A.; Ober, Carole

    2005-09-10

    Background: Evolutionarily conserved sequences likely havebiological function. Methods: To determine whether variation in conservedsequences in non-coding DNA contributes to risk for human disease, westudied six conserved non-coding elements in the Th2 cytokine cluster onhuman chromosome 5q31 in a large Hutterite pedigree and in samples ofoutbred European American and African American asthma cases and controls.Results: Among six conserved non-coding elements (>100 bp,>70percent identity; human-mouse comparison), we identified one singlenucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in each of two conserved elements and sixSNPs in the flanking regions of three conserved elements. We genotypedour samples for four of these SNPs and an additional three SNPs each inthe IL13 and IL4 genes. While there was only modest evidence forassociation with single SNPs in the Hutterite and European Americansamples (P<0.05), there were highly significant associations inEuropean Americans between asthma and haplotypes comprised of SNPs in theIL4 gene (P<0.001), including a SNP in a conserved non-codingelement. Furthermore, variation in the IL13 gene was strongly associatedwith total IgE (P = 0.00022) and allergic sensitization to mold allergens(P = 0.00076) in the Hutterites, and more modestly associated withsensitization to molds in the European Americans and African Americans (P<0.01). Conclusion: These results indicate that there is overalllittle variation in the conserved non-coding elements on 5q31, butvariation in IL4 and IL13, including possibly one SNP in a conservedelement, influence asthma and atopic phenotypes in diversepopulations.

  1. The role of interruptions in polyQ in the pathology of SCA1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh P Menon

    Full Text Available At least nine dominant neurodegenerative diseases are caused by expansion of CAG repeats in coding regions of specific genes that result in abnormal elongation of polyglutamine (polyQ tracts in the corresponding gene products. When above a threshold that is specific for each disease the expanded polyQ repeats promote protein aggregation, misfolding and neuronal cell death. The length of the polyQ tract inversely correlates with the age at disease onset. It has been observed that interruption of the CAG tract by silent (CAA or missense (CAT mutations may strongly modulate the effect of the expansion and delay the onset age. We have carried out an extensive study in which we have complemented DNA sequence determination with cellular and biophysical models. By sequencing cloned normal and expanded SCA1 alleles taken from our cohort of ataxia patients we have determined sequence variations not detected by allele sizing and observed for the first time that repeat instability can occur even in the presence of CAG interruptions. We show that histidine interrupted pathogenic alleles occur with relatively high frequency (11% and that the age at onset inversely correlates linearly with the longer uninterrupted CAG stretch. This could be reproduced in a cellular model to support the hypothesis of a linear behaviour of polyQ. We clarified by in vitro studies the mechanism by which polyQ interruption slows down aggregation. Our study contributes to the understanding of the role of polyQ interruption in the SCA1 phenotype with regards to age at disease onset, prognosis and transmission.

  2. Both Maintenance and Avoidance of RNA-Binding Protein Interactions Constrain Coding Sequence Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savisaar, Rosina; Hurst, Laurence D

    2017-05-01

    While the principal force directing coding sequence (CDS) evolution is selection on protein function, to ensure correct gene expression CDSs must also maintain interactions with RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Understanding how our genes are shaped by these RNA-level pressures is necessary for diagnostics and for improving transgenes. However, the evolutionary impact of the need to maintain RBP interactions remains unresolved. Are coding sequences constrained by the need to specify RBP binding motifs? If so, what proportion of mutations are affected? Might sequence evolution also be constrained by the need not to specify motifs that might attract unwanted binding, for instance because it would interfere with exon definition? Here, we have scanned human CDSs for motifs that have been experimentally determined to be recognized by RBPs. We observe two sets of motifs-those that are enriched over nucleotide-controlled null and those that are depleted. Importantly, the depleted set is enriched for motifs recognized by non-CDS binding RBPs. Supporting the functional relevance of our observations, we find that motifs that are more enriched are also slower-evolving. The net effect of this selection to preserve is a reduction in the over-all rate of synonymous evolution of 2-3% in both primates and rodents. Stronger motif depletion, on the other hand, is associated with stronger selection against motif gain in evolution. The challenge faced by our CDSs is therefore not only one of attracting the right RBPs but also of avoiding the wrong ones, all while also evolving under selection pressures related to protein structure. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  3. A molecular method for a qualitative analysis of potentially coding sequences of DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Christoffersen

    Full Text Available Total sequence phylogenies have low information content. Ordinary misconceptions are that character quality can be ignored and that relying on computer algorithms is enough. Despite widespread preference for a posteriori methods of character evaluation, a priori methods are necessary to produce transformation series that are independent of tree topologies. We propose a stepwise qualitative method for analyzing protein sequences. Informative codons are selected, alternative amino acid transformation series are analyzed, and most parsimonious transformations are hypothesized. We conduct four phylogenetic analyses of philodryanine snakes. The tree based on all nucleotides produces least resolution. Trees based on the exclusion of third positions, on an asymmetric step matrix, and on our protocol, produce similar results. Our method eliminates noise by hypothesizing explicit transformation series for each informative protein-coding amino acid. This approaches qualitative methods for morphological data, in which only characters successfully interpreted in a phylogenetic context are used in cladistic analyses. The method allows utilizing character information contained in the original sequence alignment and, therefore, has higher resolution in inferring a phylogenetic tree than some traditional methods (such as distance methods.

  4. Two lamprey Hedgehog genes share non-coding regulatory sequences and expression patterns with gnathostome Hedgehogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shungo Kano

    Full Text Available Hedgehog (Hh genes play major roles in animal development and studies of their evolution, expression and function point to major differences among chordates. Here we focused on Hh genes in lampreys in order to characterize the evolution of Hh signalling at the emergence of vertebrates. Screening of a cosmid library of the river lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis and searching the preliminary genome assembly of the sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus indicate that lampreys have two Hh genes, named Hha and Hhb. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that Hha and Hhb are lamprey-specific paralogs closely related to Sonic/Indian Hh genes. Expression analysis indicates that Hha and Hhb are expressed in a Sonic Hh-like pattern. The two transcripts are expressed in largely overlapping but not identical domains in the lamprey embryonic brain, including a newly-described expression domain in the nasohypophyseal placode. Global alignments of genomic sequences and local alignment with known gnathostome regulatory motifs show that lamprey Hhs share conserved non-coding elements (CNE with gnathostome Hhs albeit with sequences that have significantly diverged and dispersed. Functional assays using zebrafish embryos demonstrate gnathostome-like midline enhancer activity for CNEs contained in intron2. We conclude that lamprey Hh genes are gnathostome Shh-like in terms of expression and regulation. In addition, they show some lamprey-specific features, including duplication and structural (but not functional changes in the intronic/regulatory sequences.

  5. CSTminer: a web tool for the identification of coding and noncoding conserved sequence tags through cross-species genome comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castrignanò, Tiziana; Canali, Alessandro; Grillo, Giorgio; Liuni, Sabino; Mignone, Flavio; Pesole, Graziano

    2004-07-01

    The identification and characterization of genome tracts that are highly conserved across species during evolution may contribute significantly to the functional annotation of whole-genome sequences. Indeed, such sequences are likely to correspond to known or unknown coding exons or regulatory motifs. Here, we present a web server implementing a previously developed algorithm that, by comparing user-submitted genome sequences, is able to identify statistically significant conserved blocks and assess their coding or noncoding nature through the measure of a coding potential score. The web tool, available at http://www.caspur.it/CSTminer/, is dynamically interconnected with the Ensembl genome resources and produces a graphical output showing a map of detected conserved sequences and annotated gene features.

  6. Cloning and Sequence Analysis on 3' Coding Region of Wild Boar and Cross Bred Pig Myostatin Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Di; YANG Xiu-qin; YANG Jia-fang

    2004-01-01

    Myostatin, with a highly conservative gene among breeds is a negative regulator of muscle. The 3' coding regions of wild boar and crossbred pig myostatin were cloned by RT-PCR and sequenced respectively. The homology of the nucleotide sequence between wild boar and crossbred pig was 100% and there was no difference in this region compared with pig myostatin gene of Genbank. This indicated that there was not change of gene sequence in this region during the evolution processes.

  7. Phylogenomic Resolution of the Phylogeny of Laurasiatherian Mammals: Exploring Phylogenetic Signals within Coding and Noncoding Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Meng-Yun; Liang, Dan; Zhang, Peng

    2017-08-01

    The interordinal relationships of Laurasiatherian mammals are currently one of the most controversial questions in mammalian phylogenetics. Previous studies mainly relied on coding sequences (CDS) and seldom used noncoding sequences. Here, by data mining public genome data, we compiled an intron data set of 3,638 genes (all introns from a protein-coding gene are considered as a gene) (19,055,073 bp) and a CDS data set of 10,259 genes (20,994,285 bp), covering all major lineages of Laurasiatheria (except Pholidota). We found that the intron data contained stronger and more congruent phylogenetic signals than the CDS data. In agreement with this observation, concatenation and species-tree analyses of the intron data set yielded well-resolved and identical phylogenies, whereas the CDS data set produced weakly supported and incongruent results. Further analyses showed that the phylogeny inferred from the intron data is highly robust to data subsampling and change in outgroup, but the CDS data produced unstable results under the same conditions. Interestingly, gene tree statistical results showed that the most frequently observed gene tree topologies for the CDS and intron data are identical, suggesting that the major phylogenetic signal within the CDS data is actually congruent with that within the intron data. Our final result of Laurasiatheria phylogeny is (Eulipotyphla,((Chiroptera, Perissodactyla),(Carnivora, Cetartiodactyla))), favoring a close relationship between Chiroptera and Perissodactyla. Our study 1) provides a well-supported phylogenetic framework for Laurasiatheria, representing a step towards ending the long-standing "hard" polytomy and 2) argues that intron within genome data is a promising data resource for resolving rapid radiation events across the tree of life. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  8. A quantum-inspired genetic algorithm based on probabilistic coding for multiple sequence alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Hong-Wei; Stojkovic, Vojislav; Xie, Qiao-Luan

    2010-02-01

    Quantum parallelism arises from the ability of a quantum memory register to exist in a superposition of base states. Since the number of possible base states is 2(n), where n is the number of qubits in the quantum memory register, one operation on a quantum computer performs what an exponential number of operations on a classical computer performs. The power of quantum algorithms comes from taking advantages of quantum parallelism. Quantum algorithms are exponentially faster than classical algorithms. Genetic optimization algorithms are stochastic search algorithms which are used to search large, nonlinear spaces where expert knowledge is lacking or difficult to encode. QGMALIGN--a probabilistic coding based quantum-inspired genetic algorithm for multiple sequence alignment is presented. A quantum rotation gate as a mutation operator is used to guide the quantum state evolution. Six genetic operators are designed on the coding basis to improve the solution during the evolutionary process. The experimental results show that QGMALIGN can compete with the popular methods, such as CLUSTALX and SAGA, and performs well on the presenting biological data. Moreover, the addition of genetic operators to the quantum-inspired algorithm lowers the cost of overall running time.

  9. A population genetics-phylogenetics approach to inferring natural selection in coding sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Wilson

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Through an analysis of polymorphism within and divergence between species, we can hope to learn about the distribution of selective effects of mutations in the genome, changes in the fitness landscape that occur over time, and the location of sites involved in key adaptations that distinguish modern-day species. We introduce a novel method for the analysis of variation in selection pressures within and between species, spatially along the genome and temporally between lineages. We model codon evolution explicitly using a joint population genetics-phylogenetics approach that we developed for the construction of multiallelic models with mutation, selection, and drift. Our approach has the advantage of performing direct inference on coding sequences, inferring ancestral states probabilistically, utilizing allele frequency information, and generalizing to multiple species. We use a Bayesian sliding window model for intragenic variation in selection coefficients that efficiently combines information across sites and captures spatial clustering within the genome. To demonstrate the utility of the method, we infer selective pressures acting in Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans from polymorphism and divergence data for 100 X-linked coding regions.

  10. Learning about interruptions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandrup, Morten

    ‘Interruption’ is a well described phenomenon within health-care. This study describes a field study in which nurses at a surgical ward desired to gain insights to what they experienced as interruptions from phone calls of the coordinating nurse. Employing an effects-driven approach data about th...... the frequency and types of phone calls was collected using a tailored experience sampling tool. The data as well as the data became a way for the nurses to learn about the problem and use it as a stepping stone for discussing possible solutions....

  11. Natural selection on coding and noncoding DNA sequences is associated with virulence genes in a plant pathogenic fungus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rech, Gabriel E; Sanz-Martín, José M; Anisimova, Maria; Sukno, Serenella A; Thon, Michael R

    2014-09-04

    Natural selection leaves imprints on DNA, offering the opportunity to identify functionally important regions of the genome. Identifying the genomic regions affected by natural selection within pathogens can aid in the pursuit of effective strategies to control diseases. In this study, we analyzed genome-wide patterns of selection acting on different classes of sequences in a worldwide sample of eight strains of the model plant-pathogenic fungus Colletotrichum graminicola. We found evidence of selective sweeps, balancing selection, and positive selection affecting both protein-coding and noncoding DNA of pathogenicity-related sequences. Genes encoding putative effector proteins and secondary metabolite biosynthetic enzymes show evidence of positive selection acting on the coding sequence, consistent with an Arms Race model of evolution. The 5' untranslated regions (UTRs) of genes coding for effector proteins and genes upregulated during infection show an excess of high-frequency polymorphisms likely the consequence of balancing selection and consistent with the Red Queen hypothesis of evolution acting on these putative regulatory sequences. Based on the findings of this work, we propose that even though adaptive substitutions on coding sequences are important for proteins that interact directly with the host, polymorphisms in the regulatory sequences may confer flexibility of gene expression in the virulence processes of this important plant pathogen. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  12. Real Time PCR to detect hazelnut allergen coding sequences in processed foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iniesto, Elisa; Jiménez, Ana; Prieto, Nuria; Cabanillas, Beatriz; Burbano, Carmen; Pedrosa, Mercedes M; Rodríguez, Julia; Muzquiz, Mercedes; Crespo, Jesús F; Cuadrado, Carmen; Linacero, Rosario

    2013-06-01

    A quantitative RT-PCR method, employing novel primer sets designed on Cor a 9, Cor a 11 and Cor a 13 allergen-coding sequences has been setup and validated. Its specificity, sensitivity and applicability have been compared. The effect of processing on detectability of these hazelnut targets in complex food matrices was also studied. The DNA extraction method based on CTAB-phenol-chloroform was the best for hazelnut. RT-PCR using primers for Cor a 9, 11 and 13 allowed a specific and accurate amplification of these sequences. The limit of detection was 1 ppm of raw hazelnut. The method sensitivity and robustness were confirmed with spiked samples. Thermal treatments (roasting and autoclaving) reduced yield and amplificability of hazelnut DNA, however, high-hydrostatic pressure did not affect. Compared with an ELISA assay, this RT-PCR showed higher sensitivity to detected hazelnut traces in commercial foodstuffs. The RT-PCR method described is the most sensitive of those reported for the detection of hazelnut traces in processed foods.

  13. Detection by real time PCR of walnut allergen coding sequences in processed foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linacero, Rosario; Ballesteros, Isabel; Sanchiz, Africa; Prieto, Nuria; Iniesto, Elisa; Martinez, Yolanda; Pedrosa, Mercedes M; Muzquiz, Mercedes; Cabanillas, Beatriz; Rovira, Mercè; Burbano, Carmen; Cuadrado, Carmen

    2016-07-01

    A quantitative real-time PCR (RT-PCR) method, employing novel primer sets designed on Jug r 1, Jug r 3, and Jug r 4 allergen-coding sequences, was set up and validated. Its specificity, sensitivity, and applicability were evaluated. The DNA extraction method based on CTAB-phenol-chloroform was best for walnut. RT-PCR allowed a specific and accurate amplification of allergen sequence, and the limit of detection was 2.5pg of walnut DNA. The method sensitivity and robustness were confirmed with spiked samples, and Jug r 3 primers detected up to 100mg/kg of raw walnut (LOD 0.01%, LOQ 0.05%). Thermal treatment combined with pressure (autoclaving) reduced yield and amplification (integrity and quality) of walnut DNA. High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) did not produce any effect on the walnut DNA amplification. This RT-PCR method showed greater sensitivity and reliability in the detection of walnut traces in commercial foodstuffs compared with ELISA assays.

  14. Biased gene conversion and GC-content evolution in the coding sequences of reptiles and vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figuet, Emeric; Ballenghien, Marion; Romiguier, Jonathan; Galtier, Nicolas

    2014-12-19

    Mammalian and avian genomes are characterized by a substantial spatial heterogeneity of GC-content, which is often interpreted as reflecting the effect of local GC-biased gene conversion (gBGC), a meiotic repair bias that favors G and C over A and T alleles in high-recombining genomic regions. Surprisingly, the first fully sequenced nonavian sauropsid (i.e., reptile), the green anole Anolis carolinensis, revealed a highly homogeneous genomic GC-content landscape, suggesting the possibility that gBGC might not be at work in this lineage. Here, we analyze GC-content evolution at third-codon positions (GC3) in 44 vertebrates species, including eight newly sequenced transcriptomes, with a specific focus on nonavian sauropsids. We report that reptiles, including the green anole, have a genome-wide distribution of GC3 similar to that of mammals and birds, and we infer a strong GC3-heterogeneity to be already present in the tetrapod ancestor. We further show that the dynamic of coding sequence GC-content is largely governed by karyotypic features in vertebrates, notably in the green anole, in agreement with the gBGC hypothesis. The discrepancy between third-codon positions and noncoding DNA regarding GC-content dynamics in the green anole could not be explained by the activity of transposable elements or selection on codon usage. This analysis highlights the unique value of third-codon positions as an insertion/deletion-free marker of nucleotide substitution biases that ultimately affect the evolution of proteins.

  15. The c-myc coding DNA sequences of cyprinids (Teleostei: Cypriniformes): Implications for phylogeny

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KONG XiangHui; WANG XuZhen; GAN XiaoNi; HE ShunPing

    2007-01-01

    The family Cyprinidae is one of the largest fish families in the world, which is widely distributed in East Asian, with obvious difference in characteristic size among species. The phylogenetic analysis of cyprinid taxa based on the functionally important genes can help to understand the speciation and functional divergence of the Cyprinidae. The c-myc gene is an important gene regulating individual growth.In the present study, the sequence variations of the cyprinid c-myc gene and their phylogenetic significance were analyzed. The 41 complete sequences of the c-myc gene were obtained from cyprinids and outgroups through PCR amplification and clone. The coding DNA sequences of the c-myc gene were used to infer molecular phylogenetic relationships within the Cyprinidae. Myxocyprinus asiaticus (Catostomidae), Misgurnus anguillicaudatus (Cobitidae) and Hemimyzon sinensis (Homalopteridae)were assigned to the outgroup taxa. Phylogenetic analyses using maximum parsimony (MP), maximum likelihood (ML), and Bayesian retrieved similar topology. Within the Cyprinidae, Leuciscini and Barbini formed the monophyletic lineage respectively with high nodal supports. Leuciscini comprises Xenocyprinae, Cultrinae, East Asian species of Leuciscinae and Danioninae, Gobioninae and Acheilognathinae, and Barbini contains Schizothoracinae, Barbinae, Cyprininae and Labeoninae. Danio rerio, D.myersi and Rasbora trilineata were supposed to separate from Leuciscinae and Barbini and to form another lineage. The positions of some Danioninae species were still unresolved. Analyses of both amino acid variation with parsimony information and two high variation regions indicated that there is no correlation between variations of single amino acid or high variation regions and characteristic size of cyprinids. In addition, the species with smaller size were usually found to be basal within clades in the tree, which might be the results of the adaptation to the primitive ecology and survival pressure.

  16. Transduplication resulted in the incorporation of two protein-coding sequences into the Turmoil-1 transposable element of C. elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pupko Tal

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Transposable elements may acquire unrelated gene fragments into their sequences in a process called transduplication. Transduplication of protein-coding genes is common in plants, but is unknown of in animals. Here, we report that the Turmoil-1 transposable element in C. elegans has incorporated two protein-coding sequences into its inverted terminal repeat (ITR sequences. The ITRs of Turmoil-1 contain a conserved RNA recognition motif (RRM that originated from the rsp-2 gene and a fragment from the protein-coding region of the cpg-3 gene. We further report that an open reading frame specific to C. elegans may have been created as a result of a Turmoil-1 insertion. Mutations at the 5' splice site of this open reading frame may have reactivated the transduplicated RRM motif. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Dan Graur and William Martin. For the full reviews, please go to the Reviewers' Reports section.

  17. 硬件中断引入方法及中断深度性能测试%Introducing Method of Hardware Interruption and Depth Performance Test of Interruption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡文斋

    2014-01-01

    讨论了Windows操作系统下硬件中断产生的方法,使用硬件DIO输出卡对设计的中断服务程序作了多种时序下试验,做了Windows系统下中断服务工作时的干扰试验,在中断线程和工作线程内部提出了多种试验方法,深入研究了Windows系统下的内核级调度执行相关代码段所需的时间,测试了多种时钟的精确度,设计了工程实用的中断服务程序。%This paper discusses the generation method of hardware interruption in Windows operation system. The designed interruption service procedure is tested in various time sequences by using hardware DIO output card, and the interference test is carried out when interruption service works in Windows system. Multiple test methods within the interruption threads and work threads are proposed, the required time of implementing the relevant code segment by kernel level scheduling in Windows system is studied intensively, the accuracy of multiple timers is tested, and the interruption service procedure is designed for engineering purpose.

  18. The use of coded PCR primers enables high-throughput sequencing of multiple homolog amplification products by 454 parallel sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Binladen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The invention of the Genome Sequence 20 DNA Sequencing System (454 parallel sequencing platform has enabled the rapid and high-volume production of sequence data. Until now, however, individual emulsion PCR (emPCR reactions and subsequent sequencing runs have been unable to combine template DNA from multiple individuals, as homologous sequences cannot be subsequently assigned to their original sources. METHODOLOGY: We use conventional PCR with 5'-nucleotide tagged primers to generate homologous DNA amplification products from multiple specimens, followed by sequencing through the high-throughput Genome Sequence 20 DNA Sequencing System (GS20, Roche/454 Life Sciences. Each DNA sequence is subsequently traced back to its individual source through 5'tag-analysis. CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrate that this new approach enables the assignment of virtually all the generated DNA sequences to the correct source once sequencing anomalies are accounted for (miss-assignment rate<0.4%. Therefore, the method enables accurate sequencing and assignment of homologous DNA sequences from multiple sources in single high-throughput GS20 run. We observe a bias in the distribution of the differently tagged primers that is dependent on the 5' nucleotide of the tag. In particular, primers 5' labelled with a cytosine are heavily overrepresented among the final sequences, while those 5' labelled with a thymine are strongly underrepresented. A weaker bias also exists with regards to the distribution of the sequences as sorted by the second nucleotide of the dinucleotide tags. As the results are based on a single GS20 run, the general applicability of the approach requires confirmation. However, our experiments demonstrate that 5'primer tagging is a useful method in which the sequencing power of the GS20 can be applied to PCR-based assays of multiple homologous PCR products. The new approach will be of value to a broad range of research areas, such as those of

  19. The use of coded PCR primers enables high-throughput sequencing of multiple homolog amplification products by 454 parallel sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binladen, Jonas; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Bollback, Jonathan P

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The invention of the Genome Sequence 20 DNA Sequencing System (454 parallel sequencing platform) has enabled the rapid and high-volume production of sequence data. Until now, however, individual emulsion PCR (emPCR) reactions and subsequent sequencing runs have been unable to combine ...... be applied to PCR-based assays of multiple homologous PCR products. The new approach will be of value to a broad range of research areas, such as those of comparative genomics, complete mitochondrial analyses, population genetics, and phylogenetics.......BACKGROUND: The invention of the Genome Sequence 20 DNA Sequencing System (454 parallel sequencing platform) has enabled the rapid and high-volume production of sequence data. Until now, however, individual emulsion PCR (emPCR) reactions and subsequent sequencing runs have been unable to combine...... template DNA from multiple individuals, as homologous sequences cannot be subsequently assigned to their original sources. METHODOLOGY: We use conventional PCR with 5'-nucleotide tagged primers to generate homologous DNA amplification products from multiple specimens, followed by sequencing through...

  20. Advantages of a mechanistic codon substitution model for evolutionary analysis of protein-coding sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanzo Miyazawa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A mechanistic codon substitution model, in which each codon substitution rate is proportional to the product of a codon mutation rate and the average fixation probability depending on the type of amino acid replacement, has advantages over nucleotide, amino acid, and empirical codon substitution models in evolutionary analysis of protein-coding sequences. It can approximate a wide range of codon substitution processes. If no selection pressure on amino acids is taken into account, it will become equivalent to a nucleotide substitution model. If mutation rates are assumed not to depend on the codon type, then it will become essentially equivalent to an amino acid substitution model. Mutation at the nucleotide level and selection at the amino acid level can be separately evaluated. RESULTS: The present scheme for single nucleotide mutations is equivalent to the general time-reversible model, but multiple nucleotide changes in infinitesimal time are allowed. Selective constraints on the respective types of amino acid replacements are tailored to each gene in a linear function of a given estimate of selective constraints. Their good estimates are those calculated by maximizing the respective likelihoods of empirical amino acid or codon substitution frequency matrices. Akaike and Bayesian information criteria indicate that the present model performs far better than the other substitution models for all five phylogenetic trees of highly-divergent to highly-homologous sequences of chloroplast, mitochondrial, and nuclear genes. It is also shown that multiple nucleotide changes in infinitesimal time are significant in long branches, although they may be caused by compensatory substitutions or other mechanisms. The variation of selective constraint over sites fits the datasets significantly better than variable mutation rates, except for 10 slow-evolving nuclear genes of 10 mammals. An critical finding for phylogenetic analysis is that

  1. Coding potential and transcript analysis of fowl adenovirus 4: insight into upstream ORFs as common sequence features in adenoviral transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Bryan D; Nagy, Eva

    2011-06-01

    Recombinant fowl adenoviruses (FAdVs) have been successfully used as veterinary vaccine vectors. However, insufficient definitions of the protein-coding and non-coding regions and an incomplete understanding of virus-host interactions limit the progress of next-generation vectors. FAdVs are known to cause several diseases of poultry. Certain isolates of species FAdV-C are the aetiological agent of inclusion body hepatitis/hydropericardium syndrome (IBH/HPS). In this study, we report the complete 45667 bp genome sequence of FAdV-4 of species FAdV-C. Assessment of the protein-coding potential of FAdV-4 was carried out with the Bio-Dictionary-based Gene Finder together with an evaluation of sequence conservation among species FAdV-A and FAdV-D. On this basis, 46 potentially protein-coding ORFs were identified. Of these, 33 and 13 ORFs were assigned high and low protein-coding potential, respectively. Homologues of the ancestral adenoviral genes were, with few exceptions, assigned high protein-coding potential. ORFs that were unique to the FAdVs were differentiated into high and low protein-coding potential groups. Notable putative genes with high protein-coding capacity included the previously unreported fiber 1, hypothetical 10.3K and hypothetical 10.5K genes. Transcript analysis revealed that several of the small ORFs less than 300 nt in length that were assigned low coding potential contributed to upstream ORFs (uORFs) in important mRNAs, including the ORF22 mRNA. Subsequent analysis of the previously reported transcripts of FAdV-1, FAdV-9, human adenovirus 2 and bovine adenovirus 3 identified widespread uORFs in AdV mRNAs that have the potential to act as important translational regulatory elements.

  2. Interrupted Binary Mass Transfer in Star Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, Nathan W. C.; Geller, Aaron M.; Toonen, Silvia

    2016-02-01

    Binary mass transfer (MT) is at the forefront of some of the most exciting puzzles of modern astrophysics, including SNe Ia, gamma-ray bursts, and the formation of most observed exotic stellar populations. Typically, the evolution is assumed to proceed in isolation, even in dense stellar environments such as star clusters. In this paper, we test the validity of this assumption via the analysis of a large grid of binary evolution models simulated with the SeBa code. For every binary, we calculate analytically the mean time until another single or binary star comes within the mean separation of the mass-transferring binary, and compare this timescale to the mean time for stable MT to occur. We then derive the probability for each respective binary to experience a direct dynamical interruption. The resulting probability distribution can be integrated to give an estimate for the fraction of binaries undergoing MT that are expected to be disrupted as a function of the host cluster properties. We find that for lower-mass clusters (≲ {10}4 {M}⊙ ), on the order of a few to a few tens of percent of binaries undergoing MT are expected to be interrupted by an interloping single, or more often binary, star, over the course of the cluster lifetime, whereas in more massive globular clusters we expect \\ll 1% to be interrupted. Furthermore, using numerical scattering experiments performed with the FEWBODY code, we show that the probability of interruption increases if perturbative fly-bys are considered as well, by a factor ˜2.

  3. Unstable microsatellite repeats facilitate rapid evolution of coding and regulatory sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, A; Gemayel, R; Verstrepen, K J

    2012-01-01

    Tandem repeats are intrinsically highly variable sequences since repeat units are often lost or gained during replication or following unequal recombination events. Because of their low complexity and their instability, these repeats, which are also called satellite repeats, are often considered to be useless 'junk' DNA. However, recent findings show that tandem repeats are frequently found within promoters of stress-induced genes and within the coding regions of genes encoding cell-surface and regulatory proteins. Interestingly, frequent changes in these repeats often confer phenotypic variability. Examples include variation in the microbial cell surface, rapid tuning of internal molecular clocks in flies, and enhanced morphological plasticity in mammals. This suggests that instead of being useless junk DNA, some variable tandem repeats are useful functional elements that confer 'evolvability', facilitating swift evolution and rapid adaptation to changing environments. Since changes in repeats are frequent and reversible, repeats provide a unique type of mutation that bridges the gap between rare genetic mutations, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms, and highly unstable but reversible epigenetic inheritance.

  4. Chromosome conformation capture uncovers potential genome-wide interactions between human conserved non-coding sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Robyr

    Full Text Available Comparative analyses of various mammalian genomes have identified numerous conserved non-coding (CNC DNA elements that display striking conservation among species, suggesting that they have maintained specific functions throughout evolution. CNC function remains poorly understood, although recent studies have identified a role in gene regulation. We hypothesized that the identification of genomic loci that interact physically with CNCs would provide information on their functions. We have used circular chromosome conformation capture (4C to characterize interactions of 10 CNCs from human chromosome 21 in K562 cells. The data provide evidence that CNCs are capable of interacting with loci that are enriched for CNCs. The number of trans interactions varies among CNCs; some show interactions with many loci, while others interact with few. Some of the tested CNCs are capable of driving the expression of a reporter gene in the mouse embryo, and associate with the oligodendrocyte genes OLIG1 and OLIG2. Our results underscore the power of chromosome conformation capture for the identification of targets of functional DNA elements and raise the possibility that CNCs exert their functions by physical association with defined genomic regions enriched in CNCs. These CNC-CNC interactions may in part explain their stringent conservation as a group of regulatory sequences.

  5. ICRPfinder: a fast pattern design algorithm for coding sequences and its application in finding potential restriction enzyme recognition sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stafford Phillip

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Restriction enzymes can produce easily definable segments from DNA sequences by using a variety of cut patterns. There are, however, no software tools that can aid in gene building -- that is, modifying wild-type DNA sequences to express the same wild-type amino acid sequences but with enhanced codons, specific cut sites, unique post-translational modifications, and other engineered-in components for recombinant applications. A fast DNA pattern design algorithm, ICRPfinder, is provided in this paper and applied to find or create potential recognition sites in target coding sequences. Results ICRPfinder is applied to find or create restriction enzyme recognition sites by introducing silent mutations. The algorithm is shown capable of mapping existing cut-sites but importantly it also can generate specified new unique cut-sites within a specified region that are guaranteed not to be present elsewhere in the DNA sequence. Conclusion ICRPfinder is a powerful tool for finding or creating specific DNA patterns in a given target coding sequence. ICRPfinder finds or creates patterns, which can include restriction enzyme recognition sites, without changing the translated protein sequence. ICRPfinder is a browser-based JavaScript application and it can run on any platform, in on-line or off-line mode.

  6. A novel all-optical label processing based on multiple optical orthogonal codes sequences for optical packet switching networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chongfu; Qiu, Kun; Xu, Bo; Ling, Yun

    2008-05-01

    This paper proposes an all-optical label processing scheme that uses the multiple optical orthogonal codes sequences (MOOCS)-based optical label for optical packet switching (OPS) (MOOCS-OPS) networks. In this scheme, each MOOCS is a permutation or combination of the multiple optical orthogonal codes (MOOC) selected from the multiple-groups optical orthogonal codes (MGOOC). Following a comparison of different optical label processing (OLP) schemes, the principles of MOOCS-OPS network are given and analyzed. Firstly, theoretical analyses are used to prove that MOOCS is able to greatly enlarge the number of available optical labels when compared to the previous single optical orthogonal code (SOOC) for OPS (SOOC-OPS) network. Then, the key units of the MOOCS-based optical label packets, including optical packet generation, optical label erasing, optical label extraction and optical label rewriting etc., are given and studied. These results are used to verify that the proposed MOOCS-OPS scheme is feasible.

  7. Comparisons between Arabidopsis thaliana and Drosophila melanogaster in relation to Coding and Noncoding Sequence Length and Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Caldwell

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a continuing interest in the analysis of gene architecture and gene expression to determine the relationship that may exist. Advances in high-quality sequencing technologies and large-scale resource datasets have increased the understanding of relationships and cross-referencing of expression data to the large genome data. Although a negative correlation between expression level and gene (especially transcript length has been generally accepted, there have been some conflicting results arising from the literature concerning the impacts of different regions of genes, and the underlying reason is not well understood. The research aims to apply quantile regression techniques for statistical analysis of coding and noncoding sequence length and gene expression data in the plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, and fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, to determine if a relationship exists and if there is any variation or similarities between these species. The quantile regression analysis found that the coding sequence length and gene expression correlations varied, and similarities emerged for the noncoding sequence length (5′ and 3′ UTRs between animal and plant species. In conclusion, the information described in this study provides the basis for further exploration into gene regulation with regard to coding and noncoding sequence length.

  8. Design and performance of Huffman sequences in medical ultrasound coded excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polpetta, Alessandro; Banelli, Paolo

    2012-04-01

    This paper deals with coded-excitation techniques for ultrasound medical echography. Specifically, linear Huffman coding is proposed as an alternative approach to other widely established techniques, such as complementary Golay coding and linear frequency modulation. The code design is guided by an optimization procedure that boosts the signal-to-noise ratio gain (GSNR) and, interestingly, also makes the code robust in pulsed-Doppler applications. The paper capitalizes on a thorough analytical model that can be used to design any linear coded-excitation system. This model highlights that the performance in frequency-dependent attenuating media mostly depends on the pulse-shaping waveform when the codes are characterized by almost ideal (i.e., Kronecker delta) autocorrelation. In this framework, different pulse shapers and different code lengths are considered to identify coded signals that optimize the contrast resolution at the output of the receiver pulse compression. Computer simulations confirm that the proposed Huffman codes are particularly effective, and that there are scenarios in which they may be preferable to the other established approaches, both in attenuating and non-attenuating media. Specifically, for a single scatterer at 150 mm in a 0.7-dB/(MHz·cm) attenuating medium, the proposed Huffman design achieves a main-to-side lobe ratio (MSR) equal to 65 dB, whereas tapered linear frequency modulation and classical complementary Golay codes achieve 35 and 45 dB, respectively.

  9. Nucleotide sequence of the capsid protein gene and 3' non-coding region of papaya mosaic virus RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouhaidar, M G

    1988-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of cDNA clones corresponding to the 3' OH end of papaya mosaic virus RNA have been determined. The 3'-terminal sequence obtained was 900 nucleotides in length, excluding the poly(A) tail, and contained an open reading frame capable of giving rise to a protein of 214 amino acid residues with an Mr of 22930. This protein was identified as the viral capsid protein. The 3' non-coding region of PMV genome RNA was about 121 nucleotides long [excluding the poly(A) tail] and homologous to the complementary sequence of the non-coding region at the 5' end of PMV RNA. A long open reading frame was also found in the predicted 5' end region of the negative strand.

  10. Applying the Verona coding definitions of emotional sequences (VR-CoDES) to code medical students' written responses to written case scenarios: Some methodological and practical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortwein, Heiderose; Benz, Alexander; Carl, Petra; Huwendiek, Sören; Pander, Tanja; Kiessling, Claudia

    2017-02-01

    To investigate whether the Verona Coding Definitions of Emotional Sequences to code health providers' responses (VR-CoDES-P) can be used for assessment of medical students' responses to patients' cues and concerns provided in written case vignettes. Student responses in direct speech to patient cues and concerns were analysed in 21 different case scenarios using VR-CoDES-P. A total of 977 student responses were available for coding, and 857 responses were codable with the VR-CoDES-P. In 74.6% of responses, the students used either a "reducing space" statement only or a "providing space" statement immediately followed by a "reducing space" statement. Overall, the most frequent response was explicit information advice (ERIa) followed by content exploring (EPCEx) and content acknowledgement (EPCAc). VR-CoDES-P were applicable to written responses of medical students when they were phrased in direct speech. The application of VR-CoDES-P is reliable and feasible when using the differentiation of "providing" and "reducing space" responses. Communication strategies described by students in non-direct speech were difficult to code and produced many missings. VR-CoDES-P are useful for analysis of medical students' written responses when focusing on emotional issues. Students need precise instructions for their response in the given test format. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Complete coding sequence, sequence analysis and transmembrane topology modelling of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense putative oligosaccharyl transferase (TbOST II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baticados, Waren N; Inoue, Noboru; Sugimoto, Chihiro; Nagasawa, Hideyuki; Baticados, Abigail M

    2011-01-01

    The partial nucleotide sequence of putative Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense oligosaccharyl transferase gene was previously reported. Here, we describe the determination of its full-length nucleotide sequence by Inverse PCR (IPCR), subsequent biological sequence analysis and transmembrane topology modelling. The full-length DNA sequence has an Open Reading Frame (ORF) of 2406 bp and encodes a polypeptide of 801 amino acid residues. Protein and DNA sequence analyses revealed that homologues within the genome of other kinetoplastid and various origins exist. Protein topology analysis predicted that Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense putative oligosaccharyl transferase clone II (TbOST II) is a transmembrane protein with transmembrane helices in probably an N(cytosol)-C(cytosol) orientation. Data from the GenBank database assembly and sequence analyses in general clearly state that TbOST II is the STT3 subunit of OST in T.b. rhodesiense that necessitates further characterisation and functional studies with RNAi. TbOST II sequence had been deposited in the GenBank (accession number GU245937).

  12. The Coding of Biological Information: From Nucleotide Sequence to Protein Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štambuk, Nikola

    The paper reviews the classic results of Swanson, Dayhoff, Grantham, Blalock and Root-Bernstein, which link genetic code nucleotide patterns to the protein structure, evolution and molecular recognition. Symbolic representation of the binary addresses defining particular nucleotide and amino acid properties is discussed, with consideration of: structure and metric of the code, direct correspondence between amino acid and nucleotide information, and molecular recognition of the interacting protein motifs coded by the complementary DNA and RNA strands.

  13. Unresolved orthology and peculiar coding sequence properties of lamprey genes: the KCNA gene family as test case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuraku Shigehiro

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In understanding the evolutionary process of vertebrates, cyclostomes (hagfishes and lamprey occupy crucial positions. Resolving molecular phylogenetic relationships of cyclostome genes with gnathostomes (jawed vertebrates genes is indispensable in deciphering both the species tree and gene trees. However, molecular phylogenetic analyses, especially those including lamprey genes, have produced highly discordant results between gene families. To efficiently scrutinize this problem using partial genome assemblies of early vertebrates, we focused on the potassium voltage-gated channel, shaker-related (KCNA family, whose members are mostly single-exon. Results Seven sea lamprey KCNA genes as well as six elephant shark genes were identified, and their orthologies to bony vertebrate subgroups were assessed. In contrast to robustly supported orthology of the elephant shark genes to gnathostome subgroups, clear orthology of any sea lamprey gene could not be established. Notably, sea lamprey KCNA sequences displayed unique codon usage pattern and amino acid composition, probably associated with exceptionally high GC-content in their coding regions. This lamprey-specific property of coding sequences was also observed generally for genes outside this gene family. Conclusions Our results suggest that secondary modifications of sequence properties unique to the lamprey lineage may be one of the factors preventing robust orthology assessments of lamprey genes, which deserves further genome-wide validation. The lamprey lineage-specific alteration of protein-coding sequence properties needs to be taken into consideration in tackling the key questions about early vertebrate evolution.

  14. Resolving arthropod phylogeny: exploring phylogenetic signal within 41 kb of protein-coding nuclear gene sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regier, Jerome C; Shultz, Jeffrey W; Ganley, Austen R D; Hussey, April; Shi, Diane; Ball, Bernard; Zwick, Andreas; Stajich, Jason E; Cummings, Michael P; Martin, Joel W; Cunningham, Clifford W

    2008-12-01

    This study attempts to resolve relationships among and within the four basal arthropod lineages (Pancrustacea, Myriapoda, Euchelicerata, Pycnogonida) and to assess the widespread expectation that remaining phylogenetic problems will yield to increasing amounts of sequence data. Sixty-eight regions of 62 protein-coding nuclear genes (approximately 41 kilobases (kb)/taxon) were sequenced for 12 taxonomically diverse arthropod taxa and a tardigrade outgroup. Parsimony, likelihood, and Bayesian analyses of total nucleotide data generally strongly supported the monophyly of each of the basal lineages represented by more than one species. Other relationships within the Arthropoda were also supported, with support levels depending on method of analysis and inclusion/exclusion of synonymous changes. Removing third codon positions, where the assumption of base compositional homogeneity was rejected, altered the results. Removing the final class of synonymous mutations--first codon positions encoding leucine and arginine, which were also compositionally heterogeneous--yielded a data set that was consistent with a hypothesis of base compositional homogeneity. Furthermore, under such a data-exclusion regime, all 68 gene regions individually were consistent with base compositional homogeneity. Restricting likelihood analyses to nonsynonymous change recovered trees with strong support for the basal lineages but not for other groups that were variably supported with more inclusive data sets. In a further effort to increase phylogenetic signal, three types of data exploration were undertaken. (1) Individual genes were ranked by their average rate of nonsynonymous change, and three rate categories were assigned--fast, intermediate, and slow. Then, bootstrap analysis of each gene was performed separately to see which taxonomic groups received strong support. Five taxonomic groups were strongly supported independently by two or more genes, and these genes mostly belonged to the slow

  15. Nucleotide Sequence of the Coat Protein Gene of the Malaysian Passiflora Virus and its 3' Non-Coding Region

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    Norzihan Abdullah

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: In this study, we identified the full length Coat Protein (CP gene of the Malaysian Passiflora Virus (MPV and its 3' non-coding region. The CP gene of the MPV contained 285 amino acid residues. Approach: Pairwise comparison of the MPV CP region with four other potyviruses, namely East Asian Passiflora Virus (EAPV, Passionfruit Woodiness Virus (PWV, Bean Common Mosaic Virus (BCMV and Soyabean Mosaic Virus (SMV revealed amino acid sequence similarities ranging from 72-95%. Results: The 3' non-coding region of the MPV, which consists of 255 nucleotides, showed 69-95% nucleotide sequence identity when compared with the four potyviruses. The highest (95% sequence similarities were detected with PWV and EAPV. An analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences revealed the presence of consensus motifs (DAG tripeptides characteristic of potyviruses. DAG tripeptides had been reported to be essential for aphid transmission. Conclusion: From the amino acid sequence alignment and identity level observed among the four other potyviruses, we concluded that MPV is a member of the genus Potyvirus and was closely related to both PWV and EAPV.

  16. Global Analysis of Non-coding Small RNAs in Arabidopsis in Response to Jasmonate Treatment by Deep Sequencing Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bosen Zhang; Zhiping Jin; Daoxin Xie

    2012-01-01

    In plants,non-coding small RNAs play a vital role in plant development and stress responses.To explore the possible role of non-coding small RNAs in the regulation of the jasmonate (JA) pathway,we compared the non-coding small RNAs between the JA-deficient aos mutant and the JA-treated wild type Arabidopsis via high-throughput sequencing.Thirty new miRNAs and 27 new miRNA candidates were identified through bioinformatics approach.Forty-nine known miRNAs (belonging to 24 families),15 new miRNAs and new miRNA candidates (belonging to 11 families) and 3 tasiRNA families were induced by JA,whereas 1 new miRNA,1 tasiRNA family and 22 known miRNAs (belonging to 9 families) were repressed by JA.

  17. Long non-coding RNA and alternative splicing modulations in Parkinson's leukocytes identified by RNA sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilach Soreq

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The continuously prolonged human lifespan is accompanied by increase in neurodegenerative diseases incidence, calling for the development of inexpensive blood-based diagnostics. Analyzing blood cell transcripts by RNA-Seq is a robust means to identify novel biomarkers that rapidly becomes a commonplace. However, there is lack of tools to discover novel exons, junctions and splicing events and to precisely and sensitively assess differential splicing through RNA-Seq data analysis and across RNA-Seq platforms. Here, we present a new and comprehensive computational workflow for whole-transcriptome RNA-Seq analysis, using an updated version of the software AltAnalyze, to identify both known and novel high-confidence alternative splicing events, and to integrate them with both protein-domains and microRNA binding annotations. We applied the novel workflow on RNA-Seq data from Parkinson's disease (PD patients' leukocytes pre- and post- Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS treatment and compared to healthy controls. Disease-mediated changes included decreased usage of alternative promoters and N-termini, 5'-end variations and mutually-exclusive exons. The PD regulated FUS and HNRNP A/B included prion-like domains regulated regions. We also present here a workflow to identify and analyze long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs via RNA-Seq data. We identified reduced lncRNA expression and selective PD-induced changes in 13 of over 6,000 detected leukocyte lncRNAs, four of which were inversely altered post-DBS. These included the U1 spliceosomal lncRNA and RP11-462G22.1, each entailing sequence complementarity to numerous microRNAs. Analysis of RNA-Seq from PD and unaffected controls brains revealed over 7,000 brain-expressed lncRNAs, of which 3,495 were co-expressed in the leukocytes including U1, which showed both leukocyte and brain increases. Furthermore, qRT-PCR validations confirmed these co-increases in PD leukocytes and two brain regions, the amygdala and substantia

  18. Modelling the ancestral sequence distribution and model frequencies in context-dependent models for primate non-coding sequences

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    Baele Guy

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent approaches for context-dependent evolutionary modelling assume that the evolution of a given site depends upon its ancestor and that ancestor's immediate flanking sites. Because such dependency pattern cannot be imposed on the root sequence, we consider the use of different orders of Markov chains to model dependence at the ancestral root sequence. Root distributions which are coupled to the context-dependent model across the underlying phylogenetic tree are deemed more realistic than decoupled Markov chains models, as the evolutionary process is responsible for shaping the composition of the ancestral root sequence. Results We find strong support, in terms of Bayes Factors, for using a second-order Markov chain at the ancestral root sequence along with a context-dependent model throughout the remainder of the phylogenetic tree in an ancestral repeats dataset, and for using a first-order Markov chain at the ancestral root sequence in a pseudogene dataset. Relaxing the assumption of a single context-independent set of independent model frequencies as presented in previous work, yields a further drastic increase in model fit. We show that the substitution rates associated with the CpG-methylation-deamination process can be modelled through context-dependent model frequencies and that their accuracy depends on the (order of the Markov chain imposed at the ancestral root sequence. In addition, we provide evidence that this approach (which assumes that root distribution and evolutionary model are decoupled outperforms an approach inspired by the work of Arndt et al., where the root distribution is coupled to the evolutionary model. We show that the continuous-time approximation of Hwang and Green has stronger support in terms of Bayes Factors, but the parameter estimates show minimal differences. Conclusions We show that the combination of a dependency scheme at the ancestral root sequence and a context

  19. Sequencing illustrates the transcriptional response of Legionella pneumophila during infection and identifies seventy novel small non-coding RNAs.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Weissenmayer, Barbara A

    2011-01-01

    Second generation sequencing has prompted a number of groups to re-interrogate the transcriptomes of several bacterial and archaeal species. One of the central findings has been the identification of complex networks of small non-coding RNAs that play central roles in transcriptional regulation in all growth conditions and for the pathogen\\'s interaction with and survival within host cells. Legionella pneumophila is a gram-negative facultative intracellular human pathogen with a distinct biphasic lifestyle. One of its primary environmental hosts in the free-living amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii and its infection by L. pneumophila mimics that seen in human macrophages. Here we present analysis of strand specific sequencing of the transcriptional response of L. pneumophila during exponential and post-exponential broth growth and during the replicative and transmissive phase of infection inside A. castellanii. We extend previous microarray based studies as well as uncovering evidence of a complex regulatory architecture underpinned by numerous non-coding RNAs. Over seventy new non-coding RNAs could be identified; many of them appear to be strain specific and in configurations not previously reported. We discover a family of non-coding RNAs preferentially expressed during infection conditions and identify a second copy of 6S RNA in L. pneumophila. We show that the newly discovered putative 6S RNA as well as a number of other non-coding RNAs show evidence for antisense transcription. The nature and extent of the non-coding RNAs and their expression patterns suggests that these may well play central roles in the regulation of Legionella spp. specific traits and offer clues as to how L. pneumophila adapts to its intracellular niche. The expression profiles outlined in the study have been deposited into Genbank\\'s Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database under the series accession GSE27232.

  20. Sequencing illustrates the transcriptional response of Legionella pneumophila during infection and identifies seventy novel small non-coding RNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara A Weissenmayer

    Full Text Available Second generation sequencing has prompted a number of groups to re-interrogate the transcriptomes of several bacterial and archaeal species. One of the central findings has been the identification of complex networks of small non-coding RNAs that play central roles in transcriptional regulation in all growth conditions and for the pathogen's interaction with and survival within host cells. Legionella pneumophila is a gram-negative facultative intracellular human pathogen with a distinct biphasic lifestyle. One of its primary environmental hosts in the free-living amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii and its infection by L. pneumophila mimics that seen in human macrophages. Here we present analysis of strand specific sequencing of the transcriptional response of L. pneumophila during exponential and post-exponential broth growth and during the replicative and transmissive phase of infection inside A. castellanii. We extend previous microarray based studies as well as uncovering evidence of a complex regulatory architecture underpinned by numerous non-coding RNAs. Over seventy new non-coding RNAs could be identified; many of them appear to be strain specific and in configurations not previously reported. We discover a family of non-coding RNAs preferentially expressed during infection conditions and identify a second copy of 6S RNA in L. pneumophila. We show that the newly discovered putative 6S RNA as well as a number of other non-coding RNAs show evidence for antisense transcription. The nature and extent of the non-coding RNAs and their expression patterns suggests that these may well play central roles in the regulation of Legionella spp. specific traits and offer clues as to how L. pneumophila adapts to its intracellular niche. The expression profiles outlined in the study have been deposited into Genbank's Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO database under the series accession GSE27232.

  1. Variation in conserved non-coding sequences on chromosome 5q and susceptibility to asthma and atopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubchak Inna

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evolutionarily conserved sequences likely have biological function. Methods To determine whether variation in conserved sequences in non-coding DNA contributes to risk for human disease, we studied six conserved non-coding elements in the Th2 cytokine cluster on human chromosome 5q31 in a large Hutterite pedigree and in samples of outbred European American and African American asthma cases and controls. Results Among six conserved non-coding elements (>100 bp, >70% identity; human-mouse comparison, we identified one single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP in each of two conserved elements and six SNPs in the flanking regions of three conserved elements. We genotyped our samples for four of these SNPs and an additional three SNPs each in the IL13 and IL4 genes. While there was only modest evidence for association with single SNPs in the Hutterite and European American samples (P IL4 gene (P IL13 gene was strongly associated with total IgE (P = 0.00022 and allergic sensitization to mold allergens (P = 0.00076 in the Hutterites, and more modestly associated with sensitization to molds in the European Americans and African Americans (P Conclusion These results indicate that there is overall little variation in the conserved non-coding elements on 5q31, but variation in IL4 and IL13, including possibly one SNP in a conserved element, influence asthma and atopic phenotypes in diverse populations.

  2. Application of the verona coding definitions of emotional sequences (VR-CoDES) on a pediatric data set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatne, Torun M; Finset, Arnstein; Ørnes, Knut; Ruland, Cornelia M

    2010-09-01

    Adult patients present concerns as defined in the Verona Coding Definitions of Emotional Sequences (VR-CoDES), but we do not know how children express their concerns during medical consultations. This study aimed to evaluate the applicability of VR-CoDES to pediatric oncology consultations. Twenty-eight pediatric consultations were coded with the Verona Coding Definitions of Emotional Sequences (VR-CoDES), and the material was also qualitatively analyzed for descriptive purposes. Five consultations were randomly selected for reliability testing and descriptive statistics were computed. Perfect inter-rater reliability for concerns and moderate reliability for cues were obtained. Cues and/or concerns were present in over half of the consultations. Cues were more frequent than concerns, with the majority of cues being verbal hints to hidden concerns or non-verbal cues. Intensity of expressions, limitations in vocabulary, commonality of statements, and complexity of the setting complicated the use of VR-CoDES. Child-specific cues; use of the imperative, cues about past experiences, and use of onomatopoeia were observed. Children with cancer express concerns during medical consultations. VR-CoDES is a reliable tool for coding concerns in pediatric data sets. For future applications in pediatric settings an appendix should be developed to incorporate the child-specific traits. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Code-Switching in Repair Sequences : Conversations Among First and Second Language Speakers of Japanese

    OpenAIRE

    Momma, Maho; 門馬, 真帆

    2013-01-01

    This thesis focuses on occurrence of code-switching in conversations among Japanese as first language speakers and second language speakers. In this paper, by using Conversation Analysis (CA) (e.g., Sacks, Schegloff and Jefferson, 1974) as an analytical method, I will discuss in what context and what environment code-switching occurs and what participants do when code-switching occurs. The data for this study comes from approximately one hour of audio-recorded interaction and eight hours of v...

  4. Organization of ATPA coding and 3' flanking sequences associated with cytoplasmic male sterility in Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, C D; Ortega, V M

    1992-08-01

    A region of the mitochondrial genome associated with cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) in Phaseolus vulgaris was flanked by two different repeated sequences designated x and y. The DNA sequence of the CMS-unique region and a portion of each flanking repeat was determined. Repeat x contained a complete coding copy of the F1 ATPase subunit A (atpA) gene, as well as an open reading frame (orf) predicting a protein of 209 amino acids. The TGA termination codon of the atpA gene and the ATG initiation codon of orf209 were overlapping. These reading frames were oriented with their 3' ends proximal to the CMS-unique region. The CMS-unique region of 3736 nucleotides contained numerous orfs. The longest of these predicted proteins being of 239, 98 and 97 amino acids. The 3' coding and 3' flanking regions of orf98 were derived from an internal region of the higher plant chloroplast tRNA alanine intron. The region of repeat y immediately adjacent to the CMS-unique region contained the 111 carboxy-terminal coding residues of the apocytochrome b (cob) gene. This segment was oriented with its 5' end proximal to the CMS-unique region, but cob gene sequences were not fused to an initiation codon within the unique region.

  5. Dual-frequency tissue harmonic suppression using phase-coded pulse sequence: proof of concept using a phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Che-Chou; Wang, Hui-Ting

    2013-03-01

    The presence of tissue harmonic generation during acoustic propagation is one major limitation in nonlinear detection of microbubble contrast agents. However, conventional solutions for tissue harmonic suppression are not applicable in dual-frequency (DF) harmonic imaging. In DF harmonic imaging, the second harmonic signal at second harmonic (2f(0)) frequency and the inter-modulation harmonic signal at fundamental (f(0)) frequency are simultaneously generated for imaging and both need to be suppressed to improve contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR). In this study, a novel phase-coded pulse sequence is developed to accomplish DF tissue harmonic suppression. Phase-coded pulse sequence utilizes multiple firings with equidistant transmit phase for harmonic cancellation in the sum of respective echoes. For the f(0) transmit component, the transmit phase comes from the equidistant set of {-2π/3, 0, 2π/3} to suppress the second harmonic signal at 2f(0) frequency. Moreover, in order to provide the inter-modulation harmonic suppression at f(0) frequency, the 2f(0) transmit phase has to be particularly manipulated for the corresponding f(0) transmit phase. The proposed three-pulse sequence can remove not only the second-order harmonic signal but also other higher-order counterparts at both f(0) and 2f(0) frequencies. Measurements were performed at f(0) equal to 2.25 MHz and using hydrophone in water and contrast agents in tissue phantom. Experimental results indicate that the sequence reduces the tissue harmonic magnitude by about 20 dB along the entire axial depths and the corresponding CTR improves at both frequencies. In DF harmonic imaging, the proposed phase-coded sequence can effectively remove the tissue harmonic background at both f(0) and 2f(0) frequencies for improvement of contrast detection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. De novo ORFs in Drosophila are important to organismal fitness and evolved rapidly from previously non-coding sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josephine A Reinhardt

    Full Text Available How non-coding DNA gives rise to new protein-coding genes (de novo genes is not well understood. Recent work has revealed the origins and functions of a few de novo genes, but common principles governing the evolution or biological roles of these genes are unknown. To better define these principles, we performed a parallel analysis of the evolution and function of six putatively protein-coding de novo genes described in Drosophila melanogaster. Reconstruction of the transcriptional history of de novo genes shows that two de novo genes emerged from novel long non-coding RNAs that arose at least 5 MY prior to evolution of an open reading frame. In contrast, four other de novo genes evolved a translated open reading frame and transcription within the same evolutionary interval suggesting that nascent open reading frames (proto-ORFs, while not required, can contribute to the emergence of a new de novo gene. However, none of the genes arose from proto-ORFs that existed long before expression evolved. Sequence and structural evolution of de novo genes was rapid compared to nearby genes and the structural complexity of de novo genes steadily increases over evolutionary time. Despite the fact that these genes are transcribed at a higher level in males than females, and are most strongly expressed in testes, RNAi experiments show that most of these genes are essential in both sexes during metamorphosis. This lethality suggests that protein coding de novo genes in Drosophila quickly become functionally important.

  7. Building and Verifying a Predictive Model of Interruption Resumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    contain gist information. Because these episodic codes decay, the current one will always be the most active ( modulo effects of activation noise), so...Li, A. Blandford, P. Cairns, and R. M. Young , BThe effect of interruptions on postcompletion and other procedural errors: An account based on the

  8. In Silico Mining of Microsatellites in Coding Sequences of the Date Palm (Arecaceae Genome, Characterization, and Transferability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédérique Aberlenc-Bertossi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: To complement existing sets of primarily dinucleotide microsatellite loci from noncoding sequences of date palm, we developed primers for tri- and hexanucleotide microsatellite loci identified within genes. Due to their conserved genomic locations, the primers should be useful in other palm taxa, and their utility was tested in seven other Phoenix species and in Chamaerops, Livistona, and Hyphaene. Methods and Results: Tandem repeat motifs of 3–6 bp were searched using a simple sequence repeat (SSR–pipeline package in coding portions of the date palm draft genome sequence. Fifteen loci produced highly consistent amplification, intraspecific polymorphisms, and stepwise mutation patterns. Conclusions: These microsatellite loci showed sufficient levels of variability and transferability to make them useful for population genetic, selection signature, and interspecific gene flow studies in Phoenix and other Coryphoideae genera.

  9. Distinctive nucleotide sequences of promoters recognized by RNA polymerase containing a phage-coded "sigma-like" protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talkington, C; Pero, J

    1979-11-01

    We report the nucleotide sequences of two promoters for bacteriophage SP01 "middle" genes. These promoters are recognized by a modified form of Bacillus subtilis RNA polymerase that contains a phage-coded "sigma-like" regulatory protein (gp28) in place of the bacterial sigma factor. Both promoters shared the identical hexanucleotide 5'A-G-G-A-G-A at about 35 base pairs preceding the start point of transcription and the identical heptanucleotide 5'-T-T-T-A-T-T-T (T is the thymine analog 5-hydroxymethyluracil in SP01 DNA) located about 10 base pairs preceding the transcriptional start point. The significance of these sequences in comparison with nucleotide sequences of promoters recognized by sigma-containing RNA polymerases is discussed.

  10. Identification of protein-coding sequences using the hybridization of 18S rRNA and mRNA during translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Chuanhua; Bitzer, Donald L; Alexander, Winser E; Vouk, Mladen A; Stomp, Anne-Marie

    2009-02-01

    We introduce a new approach in this article to distinguish protein-coding sequences from non-coding sequences utilizing a period-3, free energy signal that arises from the interactions of the 3'-terminal nucleotides of the 18S rRNA with mRNA. We extracted the special features of the amplitude and the phase of the period-3 signal in protein-coding regions, which is not found in non-coding regions, and used them to distinguish protein-coding sequences from non-coding sequences. We tested on all the experimental genes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The identification was consistent with the corresponding information from GenBank, and produced better performance compared to existing methods that use a period-3 signal. The primary tests on some fly, mouse and human genes suggests that our method is applicable to higher eukaryotic genes. The tests on pseudogenes indicated that most pseudogenes have no period-3 signal. Some exploration of the 3'-tail of 18S rRNA and pattern analysis of protein-coding sequences supported further our assumption that the 3'-tail of 18S rRNA has a role of synchronization throughout translation elongation process. This, in turn, can be utilized for the identification of protein-coding sequences.

  11. Differential effects of high-temperature stress on nuclear topology and transcription of repetitive noncoding and coding rye sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomás, D; Brazão, J; Viegas, W; Silva, M

    2013-01-01

    The plant stress response has been extensively characterized at the biochemical and physiological levels. However, knowledge concerning repetitive sequence genome fraction modulation during extreme temperature conditions is scarce. We studied high-temperature effects on subtelomeric repetitive sequences (pSc200) and 45S rDNA in rye seedlings submitted to 40°C during 4 h. Chromatin organization patterns were evaluated through fluorescent in situ hybridization and transcription levels were assessed using quantitative real-time PCR. Additionally, the nucleolar dynamics were evaluated through fibrillarin immunodetection in interphase nuclei. The results obtained clearly demonstrated that the pSc200 sequence organization is not affected by high-temperature stress (HTS) and proved for the first time that this noncoding subtelomeric sequence is stably transcribed. Conversely, it was demonstrated that HTS treatment induces marked rDNA chromatin decondensation along with nucleolar enlargement and a significant increase in ribosomal gene transcription. The role of noncoding and coding repetitive rye sequences in the plant stress response that are suggested by their clearly distinct behaviors is discussed. While the heterochromatic conformation of pSc200 sequences seems to be involved in the stabilization of the interphase chromatin architecture under stress conditions, the dynamic modulation of nucleolar and rDNA topology and transcription suggest their role in plant stress response pathways.

  12. Sequence and structure of the mouse gene coding for the largest neurofilament subunit.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J-P. Julien (Jean-Pierre); F. Cote; L. Beaudet (Lucille); M. Sidky (Malak); D. Flavell (David); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); W. Mushynski (Walter)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractWe have determined the complete nucleotide sequence of the mouse gene encoding the neurofilament NF-H protein. The C-terminal domain of NF-H is very rich in charged amino acids (aa) and contains a 3-aa sequence, Lys-Ser-Pro, that is repeated 51 times within a stretch of 368 aa. The

  13. Prediction and identification of sequences coding for orphan enzymes using genomic and metagenomic neighbours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamada, Takuji; Waller, Alison S.; Raes, Jeroen

    2012-01-01

    Despite the current wealth of sequencing data, one-third of all biochemically characterized metabolic enzymes lack a corresponding gene or protein sequence, and as such can be considered orphan enzymes. They represent a major gap between our molecular and biochemical knowledge, and consequently a...... Systems Biology 8: 581; published online 8 May 2012; doi:10.1038/msb.2012.13...

  14. Resequencing of the common marmoset genome improves genome assemblies and gene-coding sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kengo; Kuroki, Yoko; Kumita, Wakako; Fujiyama, Asao; Toyoda, Atsushi; Kawai, Jun; Iriki, Atsushi; Sasaki, Erika; Okano, Hideyuki; Sakakibara, Yasubumi

    2015-11-20

    The first draft of the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) genome was published by the Marmoset Genome Sequencing and Analysis Consortium. The draft was based on whole-genome shotgun sequencing, and the current assembly version is Callithrix_jacches-3.2.1, but there still exist 187,214 undetermined gap regions and supercontigs and relatively short contigs that are unmapped to chromosomes in the draft genome. We performed resequencing and assembly of the genome of common marmoset by deep sequencing with high-throughput sequencing technology. Several different sequence runs using Illumina sequencing platforms were executed, and 181 Gbp of high-quality bases including mate-pairs with long insert lengths of 3, 8, 20, and 40 Kbp were obtained, that is, approximately 60× coverage. The resequencing significantly improved the MGSAC draft genome sequence. The N50 of the contigs, which is a statistical measure used to evaluate assembly quality, doubled. As a result, 51% of the contigs (total length: 299 Mbp) that were unmapped to chromosomes in the MGSAC draft were merged with chromosomal contigs, and the improved genome sequence helped to detect 5,288 new genes that are homologous to human cDNAs and the gaps in 5,187 transcripts of the Ensembl gene annotations were completely filled.

  15. Next-Generation Sequencing of Protein-Coding and Long Non-protein-Coding RNAs in Two Types of Exosomes Derived from Human Whole Saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Yuko; Tsujimoto, Masafumi; Yanoshita, Ryohei

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are small extracellular vesicles containing microRNAs and mRNAs that are produced by various types of cells. We previously used ultrafiltration and size-exclusion chromatography to isolate two types of human salivary exosomes (exosomes I, II) that are different in size and proteomes. We showed that salivary exosomes contain large repertoires of small RNAs. However, precise information regarding long RNAs in salivary exosomes has not been fully determined. In this study, we investigated the compositions of protein-coding RNAs (pcRNAs) and long non-protein-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) of exosome I, exosome II and whole saliva (WS) by next-generation sequencing technology. Although 11% of all RNAs were commonly detected among the three samples, the compositions of reads mapping to known RNAs were similar. The most abundant pcRNA is ribosomal RNA protein, and pcRNAs of some salivary proteins such as S100 calcium-binding protein A8 (protein S100-A8) were present in salivary exosomes. Interestingly, lncRNAs of pseudogenes (presumably, processed pseudogenes) were abundant in exosome I, exosome II and WS. Translationally controlled tumor protein gene, which plays an important role in cell proliferation, cell death and immune responses, was highly expressed as pcRNA and pseudogenes in salivary exosomes. Our results show that salivary exosomes contain various types of RNAs such as pseudogenes and small RNAs, and may mediate intercellular communication by transferring these RNAs to target cells as gene expression regulators.

  16. Locating protein-coding sequences under selection for additional, overlapping functions in 29 mammalian genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Michael F; Kheradpour, Pouya; Washietl, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    synonymous constraint in these regions reflects selection on overlapping functional elements including splicing regulatory elements, dual-coding genes, RNA secondary structures, microRNA target sites, and developmental enhancers. Our results show that overlapping functional elements are common in mammalian...

  17. Performance analysis of multiple optical orthogonal codes sequences-based optical labels for optical packet switching networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chongfu; Ma, Chunli; Wang, Zhengsuan; Qiu, Kun

    2011-09-01

    Multiple optical orthogonal codes sequences (MOOCS)-based optical labels for optical packet switching (MOOCS-OPS) were proposed and studied in our previous works. In order to evaluate the performances of the MOOCS-OPS networks resulting from interference of the MOOCS-based optical labels, we utilize a new study method that applies the independent case of multiple optical orthogonal codes to derive the probability function of the MOOCS-OPS networks for the first time. Additionally, the optical label processing time, the utilization efficiency, and the packet loss rate in the MOOCS-OPS networks are also considered. We discuss the performance and efficiency characteristics with a variety of parameters, and compare some characteristics of the system employed by a single optical orthogonal code or MOOCS-based optical labels. The performances of the system are also calculated, and our results verify that the method and the networks are effective. Moreover, it is found that performances of the MOOCS-OPS networks would, negatively, be worsened, compared with the single optical orthogonal code-based optical label for optical packet switching; however, the MOOCS-OPS networks can greatly enlarge the scalability of the optical packet switching networks.

  18. HLA-F coding and regulatory segments variability determined by massively parallel sequencing procedures in a Brazilian population sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Thálitta Hetamaro Ayala; Buttura, Renato Vidal; Donadi, Eduardo Antônio; Veiga-Castelli, Luciana Caricati; Mendes-Junior, Celso Teixeira; Castelli, Erick C

    2016-10-01

    Human Leucocyte Antigen F (HLA-F) is a non-classical HLA class I gene distinguished from its classical counterparts by low allelic polymorphism and distinctive expression patterns. Its exact function remains unknown. It is believed that HLA-F has tolerogenic and immune modulatory properties. Currently, there is little information regarding the HLA-F allelic variation among human populations and the available studies have evaluated only a fraction of the HLA-F gene segment and/or have searched for known alleles only. Here we present a strategy to evaluate the complete HLA-F variability including its 5' upstream, coding and 3' downstream segments by using massively parallel sequencing procedures. HLA-F variability was surveyed on 196 individuals from the Brazilian Southeast. The results indicate that the HLA-F gene is indeed conserved at the protein level, where thirty coding haplotypes or coding alleles were detected, encoding only four different HLA-F full-length protein molecules. Moreover, a same protein molecule is encoded by 82.45% of all coding alleles detected in this Brazilian population sample. However, the HLA-F nucleotide and haplotype variability is much higher than our current knowledge both in Brazilians and considering the 1000 Genomes Project data. This protein conservation is probably a consequence of the key role of HLA-F in the immune system physiology.

  19. Hybridization Capture-Based Next-Generation Sequencing to Evaluate Coding Sequence and Deep Intronic Mutations in the NF1 Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Karin Soares; Oliveira, Nathalia Silva; Fausto, Anna Karoline; de Souza, Carolina Cruz; Gros, Audrey; Bandres, Thomas; Idrissi, Yamina; Merlio, Jean-Philippe; de Moura Neto, Rodrigo Soares; Silva, Rosane; Geller, Mauro; Cappellen, David

    2016-12-17

    Neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) is one of the most common genetic disorders and is caused by mutations in the NF1 gene. NF1 gene mutational analysis presents a considerable challenge because of its large size, existence of highly homologous pseudogenes located throughout the human genome, absence of mutational hotspots, and diversity of mutations types, including deep intronic splicing mutations. We aimed to evaluate the use of hybridization capture-based next-generation sequencing to screen coding and noncoding NF1 regions. Hybridization capture-based next-generation sequencing, with genomic DNA as starting material, was used to sequence the whole NF1 gene (exons and introns) from 11 unrelated individuals and 1 relative, who all had NF1. All of them met the NF1 clinical diagnostic criteria. We showed a mutation detection rate of 91% (10 out of 11). We identified eight recurrent and two novel mutations, which were all confirmed by Sanger methodology. In the Sanger sequencing confirmation, we also included another three relatives with NF1. Splicing alterations accounted for 50% of the mutations. One of them was caused by a deep intronic mutation (c.1260 + 1604A > G). Frameshift truncation and missense mutations corresponded to 30% and 20% of the pathogenic variants, respectively. In conclusion, we show the use of a simple and fast approach to screen, at once, the entire NF1 gene (exons and introns) for different types of pathogenic variations, including the deep intronic splicing mutations.

  20. Hybridization Capture-Based Next-Generation Sequencing to Evaluate Coding Sequence and Deep Intronic Mutations in the NF1 Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Karin Soares; Oliveira, Nathalia Silva; Fausto, Anna Karoline; de Souza, Carolina Cruz; Gros, Audrey; Bandres, Thomas; Idrissi, Yamina; Merlio, Jean-Philippe; de Moura Neto, Rodrigo Soares; Silva, Rosane; Geller, Mauro; Cappellen, David

    2016-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) is one of the most common genetic disorders and is caused by mutations in the NF1 gene. NF1 gene mutational analysis presents a considerable challenge because of its large size, existence of highly homologous pseudogenes located throughout the human genome, absence of mutational hotspots, and diversity of mutations types, including deep intronic splicing mutations. We aimed to evaluate the use of hybridization capture-based next-generation sequencing to screen coding and noncoding NF1 regions. Hybridization capture-based next-generation sequencing, with genomic DNA as starting material, was used to sequence the whole NF1 gene (exons and introns) from 11 unrelated individuals and 1 relative, who all had NF1. All of them met the NF1 clinical diagnostic criteria. We showed a mutation detection rate of 91% (10 out of 11). We identified eight recurrent and two novel mutations, which were all confirmed by Sanger methodology. In the Sanger sequencing confirmation, we also included another three relatives with NF1. Splicing alterations accounted for 50% of the mutations. One of them was caused by a deep intronic mutation (c.1260 + 1604A > G). Frameshift truncation and missense mutations corresponded to 30% and 20% of the pathogenic variants, respectively. In conclusion, we show the use of a simple and fast approach to screen, at once, the entire NF1 gene (exons and introns) for different types of pathogenic variations, including the deep intronic splicing mutations. PMID:27999334

  1. Hybridization Capture-Based Next-Generation Sequencing to Evaluate Coding Sequence and Deep Intronic Mutations in the NF1 Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Soares Cunha

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1 is one of the most common genetic disorders and is caused by mutations in the NF1 gene. NF1 gene mutational analysis presents a considerable challenge because of its large size, existence of highly homologous pseudogenes located throughout the human genome, absence of mutational hotspots, and diversity of mutations types, including deep intronic splicing mutations. We aimed to evaluate the use of hybridization capture-based next-generation sequencing to screen coding and noncoding NF1 regions. Hybridization capture-based next-generation sequencing, with genomic DNA as starting material, was used to sequence the whole NF1 gene (exons and introns from 11 unrelated individuals and 1 relative, who all had NF1. All of them met the NF1 clinical diagnostic criteria. We showed a mutation detection rate of 91% (10 out of 11. We identified eight recurrent and two novel mutations, which were all confirmed by Sanger methodology. In the Sanger sequencing confirmation, we also included another three relatives with NF1. Splicing alterations accounted for 50% of the mutations. One of them was caused by a deep intronic mutation (c.1260 + 1604A > G. Frameshift truncation and missense mutations corresponded to 30% and 20% of the pathogenic variants, respectively. In conclusion, we show the use of a simple and fast approach to screen, at once, the entire NF1 gene (exons and introns for different types of pathogenic variations, including the deep intronic splicing mutations.

  2. Perceptual learning of interrupted speech.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Ruben Benard

    Full Text Available The intelligibility of periodically interrupted speech improves once the silent gaps are filled with noise bursts. This improvement has been attributed to phonemic restoration, a top-down repair mechanism that helps intelligibility of degraded speech in daily life. Two hypotheses were investigated using perceptual learning of interrupted speech. If different cognitive processes played a role in restoring interrupted speech with and without filler noise, the two forms of speech would be learned at different rates and with different perceived mental effort. If the restoration benefit were an artificial outcome of using the ecologically invalid stimulus of speech with silent gaps, this benefit would diminish with training. Two groups of normal-hearing listeners were trained, one with interrupted sentences with the filler noise, and the other without. Feedback was provided with the auditory playback of the unprocessed and processed sentences, as well as the visual display of the sentence text. Training increased the overall performance significantly, however restoration benefit did not diminish. The increase in intelligibility and the decrease in perceived mental effort were relatively similar between the groups, implying similar cognitive mechanisms for the restoration of the two types of interruptions. Training effects were generalizable, as both groups improved their performance also with the other form of speech than that they were trained with, and retainable. Due to null results and relatively small number of participants (10 per group, further research is needed to more confidently draw conclusions. Nevertheless, training with interrupted speech seems to be effective, stimulating participants to more actively and efficiently use the top-down restoration. This finding further implies the potential of this training approach as a rehabilitative tool for hearing-impaired/elderly populations.

  3. Emergence and Evolution of Hominidae-Specific Coding and Noncoding Genomic Sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Saber, Morteza Mahmoudi; Adeyemi Babarinde, Isaac; Hettiarachchi, Nilmini; Saitou, Naruya

    2016-01-01

    Family Hominidae, which includes humans and great apes, is recognized for unique complex social behavior and intellectual abilities. Despite the increasing genome data, however, the genomic origin of its phenotypic uniqueness has remained elusive. Clade-specific genes and highly conserved noncoding sequences (HCNSs) are among the high-potential evolutionary candidates involved in driving clade-specific characters and phenotypes. On this premise, we analyzed whole genome sequences along with g...

  4. Functional divergence of APETALA1 and FRUITFULL is due to changes in both regulation and coding sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth W. McCarthy

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Gene duplications are prevalent in plants, and functional divergence subsequent to duplication may be linked with the occurrence of novel phenotypes in plant evolution. Here, we examine the functional divergence of Arabidopsis thaliana APETALA1 (AP1 and FRUITFULL (FUL, which arose via a duplication correlated with the origin of the core eudicots. Both AP1 and FUL play a role in floral meristem identity, but AP1 is required for the formation of sepals and petals whereas FUL is involved in cauline leaf and fruit development. AP1 and FUL are expressed in mutually exclusive domains but also differ in sequence, with unique conserved motifs in the C-terminal domains of the proteins that suggest functional differentiation. To determine whether the functional divergence of AP1 and FUL is due to changes in regulation or changes in coding sequence, we performed promoter swap experiments, in which FUL was expressed in the AP1 domain in the ap1 mutant and vice versa. Our results show that FUL can partially substitute for AP1, and AP1 can partially substitute for FUL; thus, the functional divergence between AP1 and FUL is due to changes in both regulation and coding sequence. We also mutated AP1 and FUL conserved motifs to determine if they are required for protein function and tested the ability of these mutated proteins to interact in yeast with known partners. We found that these motifs appear to play at best a minor role in protein function and dimerization capability, despite being strongly conserved. Our results suggest that the functional differentiation of these two paralogous key transcriptional regulators involves both differences in regulation and in sequence; however, sequence changes in the form of unique conserved motifs do not explain the differences observed.

  5. Customer interruption cost and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eua-Arporn, B.; Bisarnbutra, S. [Chulalongkorn Univ., Bangkok (Thailand)

    1997-12-31

    Results of a comprehensive study on short-term direct impacts and consumer interruption costs, incurred as a result of power supply interruption, were discussed. The emphasis was on questionnaire development, general responses and the average customer damage function of some selected sectors. The customer damage function was established for each category of customers (agriculture, industry, mining, wholesale, retail merchandising, residential, etc) as well as for different locations. Results showed that the average customer damage function depended mostly on customer category. Size and location were not significant factors. 5 refs., 7 tabs.

  6. Serotype identification and VP1 coding sequence analysis of foot-and-mouth disease virus from outbreaks in Eastern and Northern Uganda in 2008/9

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasambula, L.; Belsham, Graham; Siegismund, H. R.

    2012-01-01

    was to identify the serotype and compare the variable protein (VP)1 coding sequences of the viruses responsible for FMD outbreaks during 2008 and 2009, to trace the transmission pathways of the disease in Uganda. Probang and epithelial swab samples were collected from cattle with clinical signs of FMD in the two...... regions, and the presence of FMDV RNA in these samples was determined using a standard diagnostic RT-PCR assay. From the total of 27 positive samples, the VP1 coding region was amplified and sequenced. Each of these sequences showed >99% identity to each other, and just five distinct sequences were...... identified. BLAST searches and phylogenetic analysis of the complete variable protein (VP)1 coding sequences revealed that they belonged to serotype O, topotype EA-2. The close similarity between the virus sequences suggested introduction from a single source. We therefore conclude that FMD in the northern...

  7. The PRC2-binding long non-coding RNAs in human and mouse genomes are associated with predictive sequence features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Shiqi; Yuan, Guo-Cheng; Shao, Zhen

    2017-01-01

    Recently, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as an important class of molecules involved in many cellular processes. One of their primary functions is to shape epigenetic landscape through interactions with chromatin modifying proteins. However, mechanisms contributing to the specificity of such interactions remain poorly understood. Here we took the human and mouse lncRNAs that were experimentally determined to have physical interactions with Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), and systematically investigated the sequence features of these lncRNAs by developing a new computational pipeline for sequences composition analysis, in which each sequence is considered as a series of transitions between adjacent nucleotides. Through that, PRC2-binding lncRNAs were found to be associated with a set of distinctive and evolutionarily conserved sequence features, which can be utilized to distinguish them from the others with considerable accuracy. We further identified fragments of PRC2-binding lncRNAs that are enriched with these sequence features, and found they show strong PRC2-binding signals and are more highly conserved across species than the other parts, implying their functional importance.

  8. The bioinformatics of nucleotide sequence coding for proteins requiring metal coenzymes and proteins embedded with metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremberger, G.; Dehipawala, Sunil; Cheung, E.; Holden, T.; Sullivan, R.; Nguyen, A.; Lieberman, D.; Cheung, T.

    2015-09-01

    All metallo-proteins need post-translation metal incorporation. In fact, the isotope ratio of Fe, Cu, and Zn in physiology and oncology have emerged as an important tool. The nickel containing F430 is the prosthetic group of the enzyme methyl coenzyme M reductase which catalyzes the release of methane in the final step of methano-genesis, a prime energy metabolism candidate for life exploration space mission in the solar system. The 3.5 Gyr early life sulfite reductase as a life switch energy metabolism had Fe-Mo clusters. The nitrogenase for nitrogen fixation 3 billion years ago had Mo. The early life arsenite oxidase needed for anoxygenic photosynthesis energy metabolism 2.8 billion years ago had Mo and Fe. The selection pressure in metal incorporation inside a protein would be quantifiable in terms of the related nucleotide sequence complexity with fractal dimension and entropy values. Simulation model showed that the studied metal-required energy metabolism sequences had at least ten times more selection pressure relatively in comparison to the horizontal transferred sequences in Mealybug, guided by the outcome histogram of the correlation R-sq values. The metal energy metabolism sequence group was compared to the circadian clock KaiC sequence group using magnesium atomic level bond shifting mechanism in the protein, and the simulation model would suggest a much higher selection pressure for the energy life switch sequence group. The possibility of using Kepler 444 as an example of ancient life in Galaxy with the associated exoplanets has been proposed and is further discussed in this report. Examples of arsenic metal bonding shift probed by Synchrotron-based X-ray spectroscopy data and Zn controlled FOXP2 regulated pathways in human and chimp brain studied tissue samples are studied in relationship to the sequence bioinformatics. The analysis results suggest that relatively large metal bonding shift amount is associated with low probability correlation R

  9. DNA methylation of miRNA coding sequences putatively associated with childhood obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansego, M L; Garcia-Lacarte, M; Milagro, F I; Marti, A; Martinez, J A

    2017-02-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms may be involved in obesity onset and its consequences. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether DNA methylation status in microRNA (miRNA) coding regions is associated with childhood obesity. DNA isolated from white blood cells of 24 children (identification sample: 12 obese and 12 non-obese) from the Grupo Navarro de Obesidad Infantil study was hybridized in a 450 K methylation microarray. Several CpGs whose DNA methylation levels were statistically different between obese and non-obese were validated by MassArray® in 95 children (validation sample) from the same study. Microarray analysis identified 16 differentially methylated CpGs between both groups (6 hypermethylated and 10 hypomethylated). DNA methylation levels in miR-1203, miR-412 and miR-216A coding regions significantly correlated with body mass index standard deviation score (BMI-SDS) and explained up to 40% of the variation of BMI-SDS. The network analysis identified 19 well-defined obesity-relevant biological pathways from the KEGG database. MassArray® validation identified three regions located in or near miR-1203, miR-412 and miR-216A coding regions differentially methylated between obese and non-obese children. The current work identified three CpG sites located in coding regions of three miRNAs (miR-1203, miR-412 and miR-216A) that were differentially methylated between obese and non-obese children, suggesting a role of miRNA epigenetic regulation in childhood obesity. © 2016 World Obesity Federation.

  10. The structural analysis of protein sequences based on the quasi-amino acids code

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Ping; Tang Xu-Qing; Xu Zhen-Yuan

    2009-01-01

    Proteomics is the study of proteins and their interactions in a cell. With the successful completion of the Human Genome Project, it comes the postgenome era when the proteomics technology is emerging. This paper studies protein molecule from the algebraic point of view. The algebraic system (∑, +, *) is introduced, where ∑ is the set of 64 codons. According to the characteristics of (∑,+, *), a novel quasi-amino acids code classification method is introduced and the corresponding algebraic operation table over the set ZU of the 16 kinds of quasi-amino acids is established. The internal relation is revealed about quasi-amino acids. The results show that there exist some very close correlations between the properties of the quasi-amino acids and the codon. All these correlation relationships may play an important part in establishing the logic relationship between codons and the quasi-amino acids during the course of life origination. According to Ma F et al (2003 J. Anhui Agricultural University 30 439), the corresponding relation and the excellent properties about amino acids code are very difficult to observe. The present paper shows that (ZU, +, ×) is a field. Furthermore, the operational results display that the codon tga has different property from other stop codons. In fact, in the mitochondrion from human and ox genomic codon, tga is just tryptophane, is not the stop codon like in other genetic code, it is the case of the Chen W C et al (2002 Acta Biophysica Sinica 18(1) 87). The present theory avoids some inexplicable events of the 20 kinds of amino acids code, in other words it solves the problem of 'the 64 codon assignments of mRNA to amino acids is probably completely wrong' proposed by Yang (2006 Progress in Modern Biomedicine 6 3).

  11. Short Time-Scale Sensory Coding in S1 during Discrimination of Whisker Vibrotactile Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Leah M; Telian, Gregory; Laboy-Juárez, Keven J; Miyashita, Toshio; Lee, Daniel J; Smith, Katherine A; Feldman, Daniel E

    2016-08-01

    Rodent whisker input consists of dense microvibration sequences that are often temporally integrated for perceptual discrimination. Whether primary somatosensory cortex (S1) participates in temporal integration is unknown. We trained rats to discriminate whisker impulse sequences that varied in single-impulse kinematics (5-20-ms time scale) and mean speed (150-ms time scale). Rats appeared to use the integrated feature, mean speed, to guide discrimination in this task, consistent with similar prior studies. Despite this, 52% of S1 units, including 73% of units in L4 and L2/3, encoded sequences at fast time scales (≤20 ms, mostly 5-10 ms), accurately reflecting single impulse kinematics. 17% of units, mostly in L5, showed weaker impulse responses and a slow firing rate increase during sequences. However, these units did not effectively integrate whisker impulses, but instead combined weak impulse responses with a distinct, slow signal correlated to behavioral choice. A neural decoder could identify sequences from fast unit spike trains and behavioral choice from slow units. Thus, S1 encoded fast time scale whisker input without substantial temporal integration across whisker impulses.

  12. Phylum-Level Conservation of Regulatory Information in Nematodes despite Extensive Non-coding Sequence Divergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Kacy L.; Arthur, Robert K.; Ruvinsky, Ilya

    2015-01-01

    Gene regulatory information guides development and shapes the course of evolution. To test conservation of gene regulation within the phylum Nematoda, we compared the functions of putative cis-regulatory sequences of four sets of orthologs (unc-47, unc-25, mec-3 and elt-2) from distantly-related nematode species. These species, Caenorhabditis elegans, its congeneric C. briggsae, and three parasitic species Meloidogyne hapla, Brugia malayi, and Trichinella spiralis, represent four of the five major clades in the phylum Nematoda. Despite the great phylogenetic distances sampled and the extensive sequence divergence of nematode genomes, all but one of the regulatory elements we tested are able to drive at least a subset of the expected gene expression patterns. We show that functionally conserved cis-regulatory elements have no more extended sequence similarity to their C. elegans orthologs than would be expected by chance, but they do harbor motifs that are important for proper expression of the C. elegans genes. These motifs are too short to be distinguished from the background level of sequence similarity, and while identical in sequence they are not conserved in orientation or position. Functional tests reveal that some of these motifs contribute to proper expression. Our results suggest that conserved regulatory circuitry can persist despite considerable turnover within cis elements. PMID:26020930

  13. Phylum-Level Conservation of Regulatory Information in Nematodes despite Extensive Non-coding Sequence Divergence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kacy L Gordon

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Gene regulatory information guides development and shapes the course of evolution. To test conservation of gene regulation within the phylum Nematoda, we compared the functions of putative cis-regulatory sequences of four sets of orthologs (unc-47, unc-25, mec-3 and elt-2 from distantly-related nematode species. These species, Caenorhabditis elegans, its congeneric C. briggsae, and three parasitic species Meloidogyne hapla, Brugia malayi, and Trichinella spiralis, represent four of the five major clades in the phylum Nematoda. Despite the great phylogenetic distances sampled and the extensive sequence divergence of nematode genomes, all but one of the regulatory elements we tested are able to drive at least a subset of the expected gene expression patterns. We show that functionally conserved cis-regulatory elements have no more extended sequence similarity to their C. elegans orthologs than would be expected by chance, but they do harbor motifs that are important for proper expression of the C. elegans genes. These motifs are too short to be distinguished from the background level of sequence similarity, and while identical in sequence they are not conserved in orientation or position. Functional tests reveal that some of these motifs contribute to proper expression. Our results suggest that conserved regulatory circuitry can persist despite considerable turnover within cis elements.

  14. Functional analysis of an intergenic non-coding sequence within mce1 operon of M.tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bose Mridula

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mce operons play an important role in the entry of M. tuberculosis into macrophages and non-phagocytic cells. Their non-redundant function as well as complex regulation is implied by the phenotype of mce mutants. Recently, mce1 operon was found to extend over 13 genes, fadD5 (Rv0166 being the first gene of the operon. The presence of a non-coding sequence of 200 base pairs between Rv0166 and Rv0167 is peculiar to mce1 among the four mce operons of M.tuberculosis. We have examined the function of this region. Results We predicted putative promoter activity of the 200 base pairs of non-coding, intergenic region between Rv0166 and Rv0167 in silico using MEME software and designate it as intergenic promoter, IGPr. We demonstrate both promoter activity and a putative negative regulatory function of this fragment by reporter assays carried out in the surrogate host M.smegmatis. We find that the repressive elements not only control the native promoter but also repress a heterologous promoter of M.smegmatis. The higher activity of the intergenic promoter in a clinical isolate in comparison with the wild type sequence from M.tuberculosis H37Rv could be correlated with a point mutation within the negative element. We have mapped two transcription start sites for mce1 operon both of which are utilized in M.tuberculosis H37Rv as well as the clinical isolate VPCI591. Our studies show that the promoter activity in the non-coding region is relevant not only in reporter gene expression but also in the expression of mce1 operon in M. tuberculosis cells grown in synthetic medium. Conclusion The mce operon of M.tuberculosis H37Rv potentially can be transcribed from two promoters P1 and P2, former mapping upstream of Rv0166 and the latter in the non-coding intergenic region between Rv0166 and Rv0167. The transcription initiation from P1 results in a transcript with Rv0166 while that from P2 will be without it. The sequences between the

  15. Bumpy Application of Utility Code for Genomic Inventions: With Special Reference to Express Sequence Tags

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M R Sreenivasa Murthy

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Genomics, a new bough of biotechnology responsible for gene mapping has acquired a rapid significance in the field of patents. Brisk growth of patent filing in genomic subject matter is raising serious concerns about their utility from the perspective of societal benefit. Though the genomic related patent application qualifies the criterion of invention and non-obviousness in major instances, the inventors are unable to satisfy the utility criterion. Some instances such as patent application for ESTs have no utility at all. The patent regulators constructed various tests to deal with the situation such as specificity, substantiality (real world credibility tests etc. Hoverer, it is noteworthy that an attempt to uniform the standard of utility test for genomic inventions especially in the field of ESTs, cloning and creation of chimeras, has been made by America and Europe through specific regulations. Thus, the objective of this paper is firstly, to explain the importance of biotechnology and genomic inventions for mankind and significance of ESTs for future research. Secondly, to analyze the application of Utility code prior to the emergence of Utility code in America and Europe. Thirdly to scrutinize the Utility code in both countries and their implication on aftermath cases, and. fourthly and finally, to critically evaluate the both countries utility pathways in the light of societal benefit.

  16. Cracking the Code of Human Diseases Using Next-Generation Sequencing: Applications, Challenges, and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenza Precone

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing (NGS technologies have greatly impacted on every field of molecular research mainly because they reduce costs and increase throughput of DNA sequencing. These features, together with the technology’s flexibility, have opened the way to a variety of applications including the study of the molecular basis of human diseases. Several analytical approaches have been developed to selectively enrich regions of interest from the whole genome in order to identify germinal and/or somatic sequence variants and to study DNA methylation. These approaches are now widely used in research, and they are already being used in routine molecular diagnostics. However, some issues are still controversial, namely, standardization of methods, data analysis and storage, and ethical aspects. Besides providing an overview of the NGS-based approaches most frequently used to study the molecular basis of human diseases at DNA level, we discuss the principal challenges and applications of NGS in the field of human genomics.

  17. Episodic sequence memory is supported by a theta-gamma phase code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heusser, Andrew C; Poeppel, David; Ezzyat, Youssef; Davachi, Lila

    2016-10-01

    The meaning we derive from our experiences is not a simple static extraction of the elements but is largely based on the order in which those elements occur. Models propose that sequence encoding is supported by interactions between high- and low-frequency oscillations, such that elements within an experience are represented by neural cell assemblies firing at higher frequencies (gamma) and sequential order is encoded by the specific timing of firing with respect to a lower frequency oscillation (theta). During episodic sequence memory formation in humans, we provide evidence that items in different sequence positions exhibit greater gamma power along distinct phases of a theta oscillation. Furthermore, this segregation is related to successful temporal order memory. Our results provide compelling evidence that memory for order, a core component of an episodic memory, capitalizes on the ubiquitous physiological mechanism of theta-gamma phase-amplitude coupling.

  18. Multi-scale coding of genomic information: From DNA sequence to genome structure and function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arneodo, Alain, E-mail: alain.arneodo@ens-lyon.f [Universite de Lyon, F-69000 Lyon (France); Laboratoire Joliot-Curie and Laboratoire de Physique, CNRS, Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, F-69007 Lyon (France); Vaillant, Cedric, E-mail: cedric.vaillant@ens-lyon.f [Universite de Lyon, F-69000 Lyon (France); Laboratoire Joliot-Curie and Laboratoire de Physique, CNRS, Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, F-69007 Lyon (France); Audit, Benjamin, E-mail: benjamin.audit@ens-lyon.f [Universite de Lyon, F-69000 Lyon (France); Laboratoire Joliot-Curie and Laboratoire de Physique, CNRS, Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, F-69007 Lyon (France); Argoul, Francoise, E-mail: francoise.argoul@ens-lyon.f [Universite de Lyon, F-69000 Lyon (France); Laboratoire Joliot-Curie and Laboratoire de Physique, CNRS, Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, F-69007 Lyon (France); D' Aubenton-Carafa, Yves, E-mail: daubenton@cgm.cnrs-gif.f [Centre de Genetique Moleculaire, CNRS, Allee de la Terrasse, 91198 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Thermes, Claude, E-mail: claude.thermes@cgm.cnrs-gif.f [Centre de Genetique Moleculaire, CNRS, Allee de la Terrasse, 91198 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2011-02-15

    Understanding how chromatin is spatially and dynamically organized in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells and how this affects genome functions is one of the main challenges of cell biology. Since the different orders of packaging in the hierarchical organization of DNA condition the accessibility of DNA sequence elements to trans-acting factors that control the transcription and replication processes, there is actually a wealth of structural and dynamical information to learn in the primary DNA sequence. In this review, we show that when using concepts, methodologies, numerical and experimental techniques coming from statistical mechanics and nonlinear physics combined with wavelet-based multi-scale signal processing, we are able to decipher the multi-scale sequence encoding of chromatin condensation-decondensation mechanisms that play a fundamental role in regulating many molecular processes involved in nuclear functions.

  19. Next-gen sequencing identifies non-coding variation disrupting miRNA-binding sites in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devanna, P; Chen, X S; Ho, J; Gajewski, D; Smith, S D; Gialluisi, A; Francks, C; Fisher, S E; Newbury, D F; Vernes, S C

    2017-03-14

    Understanding the genetic factors underlying neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders is a major challenge given their prevalence and potential severity for quality of life. While large-scale genomic screens have made major advances in this area, for many disorders the genetic underpinnings are complex and poorly understood. To date the field has focused predominantly on protein coding variation, but given the importance of tightly controlled gene expression for normal brain development and disorder, variation that affects non-coding regulatory regions of the genome is likely to play an important role in these phenotypes. Herein we show the importance of 3 prime untranslated region (3'UTR) non-coding regulatory variants across neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders. We devised a pipeline for identifying and functionally validating putatively pathogenic variants from next generation sequencing (NGS) data. We applied this pipeline to a cohort of children with severe specific language impairment (SLI) and identified a functional, SLI-associated variant affecting gene regulation in cells and post-mortem human brain. This variant and the affected gene (ARHGEF39) represent new putative risk factors for SLI. Furthermore, we identified 3'UTR regulatory variants across autism, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder NGS cohorts demonstrating their impact on neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders. Our findings show the importance of investigating non-coding regulatory variants when determining risk factors contributing to neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders. In the future, integration of such regulatory variation with protein coding changes will be essential for uncovering the genetic causes of complex neurological disorders and the fundamental mechanisms underlying health and disease.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 14 March 2017; doi:10.1038/mp.2017.30.

  20. Sequence analysis and identification of new variations in the coding sequence of melatonin receptor gene (MTNR1A of Indian Chokla sheep breed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Kumar Saxena

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin receptor 1A gene is the prime receptor mediating the effect of melatonin at the neuroendocrine level for control of seasonal reproduction in sheep. The aims of this study were to examine the polymorphism pattern of coding sequence of MTNR1A gene in Chokla sheep, a breed of Indian arid tract and to identify new variations in relation to its aseasonal status. Genomic DNAs of 101 Chokla sheep were collected and an 824 bp coding sequence of Exon II was amplified. RFLP was performed with enzyme RsaI and MnlI to assess the presence of polymorphism at position C606T and G612A, respectively. Genotyping revealed significantly higher frequency of M and R alleles than m and r alleles. RR and MM were found to be dominantly present in the group of studied population. Cloning and sequencing of Exon II followed by mutation/polymorphism analysis revealed ten mutations of which three were non-synonymous mutations (G706A, C893A, G931C. G706A leads to substitution of valine by isoleucine Val125I (U14109 in the fifth transmembrane domain. C893A leads to substitution of alanine by aspartic acid in the third extracellular loop. G931C mutation brings about substitution of amino acid alanine by proline in the seventh transmembrane helix, can affect the conformational stability of the molecule. Polyphen-2 analysis revealed that the polymorphism at position 931 is potentially damaging while the mutations at positions 706 and 893 were benign. It is concluded that G931C mutation of MTNR 1A gene, may explain, in part, the importance of melatonin structure integrity in influencing seasonality in sheep.

  1. Rapid in vitro splicing of coding sequences from genomic DNA by isothermal recombination reaction-based PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenxuan Chen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cloning of coding sequence (CDS is an important step for gene function research. Here, we reported a simple and efficient strategy for assembling multiple-exon into an intron-free CDS from genomic DNA (gDNA by an isothermal recombination reaction-based PCR (IRR-PCR method. As an example, a 2067-bp full-length CDS of the anther-specific expression gene OsABCG15, which is composed of seven exons and six introns, was generated by IRR-PCR using genomic DNA of rice leaf as the template. Actually, this approach can be wildly applied to any DNA sequences assembly to achieve CDS cloning, gene fusion and multiple site-directed mutagenesis in functional genomics studies in vitro.

  2. Comparative analysis of protein coding sequences from human, mouse and the domesticated pig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Frank Grønlund; Hobolth, Asger; Hornshøj, Henrik

    2005-01-01

    rubrices in order to investigate 1) the relationships between three major lineages of mammals: rodents, artiodactys and primates, and 2) the rate of evolution and the occurrence of positive Darwinian selection using codon based models of sequence evolution. Results: We provide evidence......Background: The availability of abundant sequence data from key model organisms has made large scale studies of mulecular evolution an exciting possibility. Here we use full length cDNA alignments comprising more than 700,000 nucleotides from human, mouse, pig and the Japanese pufferfish Fugu...

  3. Comparative analysis of protein coding sequences from human, mouse, and the domesticated pig  

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Frank Grønlund; Hobolth, Asger; Hornshøj, H.

    2005-01-01

    rubrices in order to investigate 1) the relationships between three major lineages of mammals: rodents, artiodactyls and primates, and 2) the rate of evolution and the occurrence of positive Darwinian selection using codon based models of sequence evolution. Results We provide evidence......Background The availability of abundant sequence data from key model organisms has made large scale studies of molecular evolution an exciting possibility. Here we use full length cDNA alignments comprising more than 700,000 nucleotides from human, mouse, pig and the Japanese pufferfish Fugu...

  4. Digital Watermarking Applied To MEPG-2 Coded Video Sequences Exploiting Motion Vector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Yuan-jun; ZHANG Li-he; YANG Yi-xian

    2004-01-01

    This paper proposes a video watermarking technology to hide copyright information by a slight modification of the motion vector in MPEG-2 video bitstream. In this method, the watermark is embedded in the motion residual of the large value motion vector, then the motion residual is regularized into a modified bitstream, from which the watermark information can be retrieved easily and exactly. From the experimental results, this technology has the advantage of little influence on the MPEG decoding speed, degrading the perceptive effect little, and the capability to embed watermark in a short video sequence, and can be used to watermark directly on the compressed and uncompressed video sequence.

  5. Perceptual Learning of Interrupted Speech

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benard, Michel Ruben; Başkent, Deniz

    2013-01-01

    The intelligibility of periodically interrupted speech improves once the silent gaps are filled with noise bursts. This improvement has been attributed to phonemic restoration, a top-down repair mechanism that helps intelligibility of degraded speech in daily life. Two hypotheses were investigated u

  6. RevTrans: multiple alignment of coding DNA from aligned amino acid sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wernersson, Rasmus; Pedersen, Anders Gorm

    2003-01-01

    The simple fact that proteins are built from 20 amino acids while DNA only contains four different bases, means that the 'signal-to-noise ratio' in protein sequence alignments is much better than in alignments of DNA. Besides this information-theoretical advantage, protein alignments also benefit...

  7. Analysis of mutations in the entire coding sequence of the factor VIII gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bidichadani, S.I.; Lanyon, W.G.; Connor, J.M. [Glascow Univ. (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Hemophilia A is a common X-linked recessive disorder of bleeding caused by deleterious mutations in the gene for clotting factor VIII. The large size of the factor VIII gene, the high frequency of de novo mutations and its tissue-specific expression complicate the detection of mutations. We have used a combination of RT-PCR of ectopic factor VIII transcripts and genomic DNA-PCRs to amplify the entire essential sequence of the factor VIII gene. This is followed by chemical mismatch cleavage analysis and direct sequencing in order to facilitate a comprehensive search for mutations. We describe the characterization of nine potentially pathogenic mutations, six of which are novel. In each case, a correlation of the genotype with the observed phenotype is presented. In order to evaluate the pathogenicity of the five missense mutations detected, we have analyzed them for evolutionary sequence conservation and for their involvement of sequence motifs catalogued in the PROSITE database of protein sites and patterns.

  8. CpG + CpNpG Analysis of Protein-Coding Sequences from Tomato

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hobolth, Asger; Nielsen, Rasmus; Wang, Ying

    2006-01-01

    We develop codon-based models for simultaneously inferring the mutational effects of CpG and CpNpG methylation in coding regions. In a data set of 369 tomato genes, we show that there is very little effect of CpNpG methylation but a strong effect of CpG methylation affecting almost all genes. We...... further show that the CpNpG and CpG effects are largely uncorrelated. Our results suggest different roles of CpG and CpNpG methylation, with CpNpG methylation possibly playing a specialized role in defense against transposons and RNA viruses....

  9. Non coding RNA: sequence-specific guide for chromatin modification and DNA damage signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia eFrancia

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin conformation shapes the environment in which our genome is transcribed into RNA. Transcription is a source of DNA damage, thus it often occurs concomitantly to DNA damage signaling. Growing amounts of evidence suggest that different types of RNAs can, independently from their protein-coding properties, directly affect chromatin conformation, transcription and splicing, as well as promote the activation of the DNA damage response (DDR and DNA repair. Therefore, transcription paradoxically functions to both threaten and safeguard genome integrity. On the other hand, DNA damage signaling is known to modulate chromatin to suppress transcription of the surrounding genetic unit. It is thus intriguing to understand how transcription can modulate DDR signaling while, in turn, DDR signaling represses transcription of chromatin around the DNA lesion. An unexpected player in this field is the RNA interference (RNAi machinery, which play roles in transcription, splicing and chromatin modulation in several organisms. Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs and several protein factors involved in the RNAi pathway are well known master regulators of chromatin while only recent reports suggest that ncRNAs are involved in DDR signaling and homology-mediated DNA repair. Here, we discuss the experimental evidence supporting the idea that ncRNAs act at the genomic loci from which they are transcribed to modulate chromatin, DDR signaling and DNA repair.

  10. Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging of zebrafish embryo by high-frequency coded excitation sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jinhyoung; Lee, Jungwoo; Lau, Sien Ting; Lee, Changyang; Huang, Ying; Lien, Ching-Ling; Kirk Shung, K

    2012-04-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging has been developed as a non-invasive method for quantitative illustration of tissue stiffness or displacement. Conventional ARFI imaging (2-10 MHz) has been implemented in commercial scanners for illustrating elastic properties of several organs. The image resolution, however, is too coarse to study mechanical properties of micro-sized objects such as cells. This article thus presents a high-frequency coded excitation ARFI technique, with the ultimate goal of displaying elastic characteristics of cellular structures. Tissue mimicking phantoms and zebrafish embryos are imaged with a 100-MHz lithium niobate (LiNbO₃) transducer, by cross-correlating tracked RF echoes with the reference. The phantom results show that the contrast of ARFI image (14 dB) with coded excitation is better than that of the conventional ARFI image (9 dB). The depths of penetration are 2.6 and 2.2 mm, respectively. The stiffness data of the zebrafish demonstrate that the envelope is harder than the embryo region. The temporal displacement change at the embryo and the chorion is as large as 36 and 3.6 μm. Consequently, this high-frequency ARFI approach may serve as a remote palpation imaging tool that reveals viscoelastic properties of small biological samples.

  11. Non-Coding RNA: Sequence-Specific Guide for Chromatin Modification and DNA Damage Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francia, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin conformation shapes the environment in which our genome is transcribed into RNA. Transcription is a source of DNA damage, thus it often occurs concomitantly to DNA damage signaling. Growing amounts of evidence suggest that different types of RNAs can, independently from their protein-coding properties, directly affect chromatin conformation, transcription and splicing, as well as promote the activation of the DNA damage response (DDR) and DNA repair. Therefore, transcription paradoxically functions to both threaten and safeguard genome integrity. On the other hand, DNA damage signaling is known to modulate chromatin to suppress transcription of the surrounding genetic unit. It is thus intriguing to understand how transcription can modulate DDR signaling while, in turn, DDR signaling represses transcription of chromatin around the DNA lesion. An unexpected player in this field is the RNA interference (RNAi) machinery, which play roles in transcription, splicing and chromatin modulation in several organisms. Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) and several protein factors involved in the RNAi pathway are well known master regulators of chromatin while only recent reports show their involvement in DDR. Here, we discuss the experimental evidence supporting the idea that ncRNAs act at the genomic loci from which they are transcribed to modulate chromatin, DDR signaling and DNA repair.

  12. Composition and phylogenetic analysis of vitellogenin coding sequences in the Indonesian coelacanth Latimeria menadoensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canapa, Adriana; Olmo, Ettore; Forconi, Mariko; Pallavicini, Alberto; Makapedua, Monica Daisy; Biscotti, Maria Assunta; Barucca, Marco

    2012-07-01

    The coelacanth Latimeria menadoensis, a living fossil, occupies a key phylogenetic position to explore the changes that have affected the genomes of the aquatic vertebrates that colonized dry land. This is the first study to isolate and analyze L. menadoensis mRNA. Three different vitellogenin transcripts were identified and their inferred amino acid sequences compared to those of other known vertebrates. The phylogenetic data suggest that the evolutionary history of this gene family in coelacanths was characterized by a different duplication event than those which occurred in teleosts, amniotes, and amphibia. Comparison of the three sequences highlighted differences in functional sites. Moreover, despite the presence of conserved sites compared with the other oviparous vertebrates, some sites were seen to have changed, others to be similar only to those of teleosts, and others still to resemble only to those of tetrapods.

  13. Rigid body motion analysis system for off-line processing of time-coded video sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Walter L.; Shortis, Mark R.

    1995-09-01

    Photogrammetry affords the only noncontact means of providing unambiguous six-degree-of- freedom estimates for rigid body motion analysis. Video technology enables convenient off- the-shelf capability for obtaining and storing image data at frame (30 Hz) or field (60 Hz) rates. Videometry combines these technologies with frame capture capability accessible to PCs to allow unavailable measurements critical to the study of rigid body dynamics. To effectively utilize this capability, however, some means of editing, post processing, and sorting substantial amounts of time coded video data is required. This paper discusses a prototype motion analysis system built around PC and video disk technology, which is proving useful in exploring applications of these concepts to rigid body tracking and deformation analysis. Calibration issues and user interactive software development associated with this project will be discussed, as will examples of measurement projects and data reduction.

  14. Oxytocin receptor gene sequences in owl monkeys and other primates show remarkable interspecific regulatory and protein coding variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babb, Paul L; Fernandez-Duque, Eduardo; Schurr, Theodore G

    2015-10-01

    The oxytocin (OT) hormone pathway is involved in numerous physiological processes, and one of its receptor genes (OXTR) has been implicated in pair bonding behavior in mammalian lineages. This observation is important for understanding social monogamy in primates, which occurs in only a small subset of taxa, including Azara's owl monkey (Aotus azarae). To examine the potential relationship between social monogamy and OXTR variation, we sequenced its 5' regulatory (4936bp) and coding (1167bp) regions in 25 owl monkeys from the Argentinean Gran Chaco, and examined OXTR sequences from 1092 humans from the 1000 Genomes Project. We also assessed interspecific variation of OXTR in 25 primate and rodent species that represent a set of phylogenetically and behaviorally disparate taxa. Our analysis revealed substantial variation in the putative 5' regulatory region of OXTR, with marked structural differences across primate taxa, particularly for humans and chimpanzees, which exhibited unique patterns of large motifs of dinucleotide A+T repeats upstream of the OXTR 5' UTR. In addition, we observed a large number of amino acid substitutions in the OXTR CDS region among New World primate taxa that distinguish them from Old World primates. Furthermore, primate taxa traditionally defined as socially monogamous (e.g., gibbons, owl monkeys, titi monkeys, and saki monkeys) all exhibited different amino acid motifs for their respective OXTR protein coding sequences. These findings support the notion that monogamy has evolved independently in Old World and New World primates, and that it has done so through different molecular mechanisms, not exclusively through the oxytocin pathway.

  15. Rare, Low-Frequency, and Common Variants in the Protein-Coding Sequence of Biological Candidate Genes from GWASs Contribute to Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diogo, Dorothee; Kurreeman, Fina; Stahl, Eli A.; Liao, Katherine P.; Gupta, Namrata; Greenberg, Jeffrey D.; Rivas, Manuel A.; Hickey, Brendan; Flannick, Jason; Thomson, Brian; Guiducci, Candace; Ripke, Stephan; Adzhubey, Ivan; Barton, Anne; Kremer, Joel M.; Alfredsson, Lars; Sunyaev, Shamil; Martin, Javier; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Bowes, John; Eyre, Steve; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Worthington, Jane; Klareskog, Lars; Padyukov, Leonid; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Plenge, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    The extent to which variants in the protein-coding sequence of genes contribute to risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is unknown. In this study, we addressed this issue by deep exon sequencing and large-scale genotyping of 25 biological candidate genes located within RA risk loci discovered by genome

  16. Modeling coding-sequence evolution within the context of residue solvent accessibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scherrer Michael P

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein structure mediates site-specific patterns of sequence divergence. In particular, residues in the core of a protein (solvent-inaccessible residues tend to be more evolutionarily conserved than residues on the surface (solvent-accessible residues. Results Here, we present a model of sequence evolution that explicitly accounts for the relative solvent accessibility of each residue in a protein. Our model is a variant of the Goldman-Yang 1994 (GY94 model in which all model parameters can be functions of the relative solvent accessibility (RSA of a residue. We apply this model to a data set comprised of nearly 600 yeast genes, and find that an evolutionary-rate ratio ω that varies linearly with RSA provides a better model fit than an RSA-independent ω or an ω that is estimated separately in individual RSA bins. We further show that the branch length t and the transition-transverion ratio κ also vary with RSA. The RSA-dependent GY94 model performs better than an RSA-dependent Muse-Gaut 1994 (MG94 model in which the synonymous and non-synonymous rates individually are linear functions of RSA. Finally, protein core size affects the slope of the linear relationship between ω and RSA, and gene expression level affects both the intercept and the slope. Conclusions Structure-aware models of sequence evolution provide a significantly better fit than traditional models that neglect structure. The linear relationship between ω and RSA implies that genes are better characterized by their ω slope and intercept than by just their mean ω.

  17. Emergence and Evolution of Hominidae-Specific Coding and Noncoding Genomic Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saber, Morteza Mahmoudi; Adeyemi Babarinde, Isaac; Hettiarachchi, Nilmini; Saitou, Naruya

    2016-07-12

    Family Hominidae, which includes humans and great apes, is recognized for unique complex social behavior and intellectual abilities. Despite the increasing genome data, however, the genomic origin of its phenotypic uniqueness has remained elusive. Clade-specific genes and highly conserved noncoding sequences (HCNSs) are among the high-potential evolutionary candidates involved in driving clade-specific characters and phenotypes. On this premise, we analyzed whole genome sequences along with gene orthology data retrieved from major DNA databases to find Hominidae-specific (HS) genes and HCNSs. We discovered that Down syndrome critical region 4 (DSCR4) is the only experimentally verified gene uniquely present in Hominidae. DSCR4 has no structural homology to any known protein and was inferred to have emerged in several steps through LTR/ERV1, LTR/ERVL retrotransposition, and transversion. Using the genomic distance as neutral evolution threshold, we identified 1,658 HS HCNSs. Polymorphism coverage and derived allele frequency analysis of HS HCNSs showed that these HCNSs are under purifying selection, indicating that they may harbor important functions. They are overrepresented in promoters/untranslated regions, in close proximity of genes involved in sensory perception of sound and developmental process, and also showed a significantly lower nucleosome occupancy probability. Interestingly, many ancestral sequences of the HS HCNSs showed very high evolutionary rates. This suggests that new functions emerged through some kind of positive selection, and then purifying selection started to operate to keep these functions. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  18. Finding of a novel fungal immunomodulatory protein coding sequence in Ganoderma australe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea González Muñoz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Among the most common human diseases with immune system compromise are autoimmune diseases, cancer, and the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS. Many of these diseases still have no treatment or their therapies have undesirable side effects. This has aroused a great interest in the search for new natural products with therapeutic potential and scientifically proven effects, showing minimal side effects. Formal clinical and pharmacological investigation in various medicinal fungi of the genus Ganoderma (Ganodermataceae has shown immunomodulatory effects and tumor growth inhibition in mammals, attributable to the presence of immunomodulatory proteins and other secondary metabolites. To date, six fungal immunomodulatory proteins (FIPs have been reported in Ganoderma. This paper seeks to advance in the discovery of immunomodulatory proteins present in Ganoderma australe, through mycelium transcriptome 454 Roche® pyrosequencing (RNA-seq and bioinformatics analyses. The results suggest the presence of gene sequences related to an immunomodulatory protein which has been reported only once in other fungal species Taiwanofungus camphoratus. The candidate gene sequences found in G. australe exhibit high identity values in their amino acid composition and predicted protein secondary structure with the protein reported for Tai. camphoratus. According to present knowledge about the action mechanisms of these proteins, it is possible to suggest that this is a promising molecule for the treatment and prevention of diseases associated with certain immune deficiencies, cancer, and other diseases with compromised immune systems. Future studies are proposed in order to determine its immunomodulatory potential using in vitro and in vivo assays.

  19. Interruptions during hospital nurses’ medication administration rounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Smeulers

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Medication administration errors are common, costly and the cause of adverse events in clinical practice. Interruptions during medication administration rounds are thought to be a prominent causative factor of these medication errors. In this observational study, data were collected on the number and duration of several different sources of verbal and non-verbal interruptions using unobtrusive structured observations on 32 medication administration rounds. Interruptions occurred very often (6.9 times per nurse each hour, differed in frequency among the medication administration rounds and were from a variety of sources. The most frequent interruptions were caused by nursing colleagues (43% and non-verbal interruptions from the ward environment (25%, such as noises from pagers, conversations in the vicinity of the nurse, the work of cleaners, or stock management by pharmacy staff. The longest durations of interruptions were from nursing colleagues’ verbal interrup- interruptions. When comparing the medication rounds, more and longer interruptions were observed during the morning rounds than those at noon. A comparison between surgical and non-surgical units showed that interruptions occurred more often and lasted longer in non-surgical units than those in surgical units. But the observed differences were not statistically significant. In conclusion, interruptions during medication administration rounds are frequent and originated from different human and environmental sources. Interventions should target not only interruptions by colleagues, but should also consider ways to reduce self-initiated interruptions and those arising from the immediate ward environment.

  20. Deconstruction of archaeal genome depict strategic consensus in core pathways coding sequence assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayon Pal

    Full Text Available A comprehensive in silico analysis of 71 species representing the different taxonomic classes and physiological genre of the domain Archaea was performed. These organisms differed in their physiological attributes, particularly oxygen tolerance and energy metabolism. We explored the diversity and similarity in the codon usage pattern in the genes and genomes of these organisms, emphasizing on their core cellular pathways. Our thrust was to figure out whether there is any underlying similarity in the design of core pathways within these organisms. Analyses of codon utilization pattern, construction of hierarchical linear models of codon usage, expression pattern and codon pair preference pointed to the fact that, in the archaea there is a trend towards biased use of synonymous codons in the core cellular pathways and the Nc-plots appeared to display the physiological variations present within the different species. Our analyses revealed that aerobic species of archaea possessed a larger degree of freedom in regulating expression levels than could be accounted for by codon usage bias alone. This feature might be a consequence of their enhanced metabolic activities as a result of their adaptation to the relatively O2-rich environment. Species of archaea, which are related from the taxonomical viewpoint, were found to have striking similarities in their ORF structuring pattern. In the anaerobic species of archaea, codon bias was found to be a major determinant of gene expression. We have also detected a significant difference in the codon pair usage pattern between the whole genome and the genes related to vital cellular pathways, and it was not only species-specific but pathway specific too. This hints towards the structuring of ORFs with better decoding accuracy during translation. Finally, a codon-pathway interaction in shaping the codon design of pathways was observed where the transcription pathway exhibited a significantly different coding

  1. Lossless Compression Method for Medical Image Sequences Using Super-Spatial Structure Prediction and Inter-frame Coding

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    Mudassar Raza

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Space research organizations, hospitals and military air surveillance activities, among others, produce a huge amountof data in the form of images hence a large storage space is required to record this information. In hospitals, dataproduced during medical examination is in the form of a sequence of images and are very much correlated; becausethese images have great importance, some kind of lossless image compression technique is needed. Moreover, theseimages are often required to be transmitted over the network. Since the availability of storage and bandwidth islimited, a compression technique is required to reduce the number of bits to store these images and take less time totransmit them over the network. For this purpose, there are many state-of the-art lossless image compressionalgorithms like CALIC, LOCO-I, JPEG-LS, JPEG20000; Nevertheless, these compression algorithms take only asingle file to compress and cannot exploit the correlation among the sequence frames of MRI or CE images. Toexploit the correlation, a new algorithm is proposed in this paper. The primary goals of the proposed compressionmethod are to minimize the memory resource during storage of compressed data as well as minimize the bandwidthrequirement during transmission of compressed data. For achieving these goals, the proposed compression methodcombines the single image compression technique called super spatial structure prediction with inter-frame coding toacquire grater compression ratio. An efficient compression method requires elimination of redundancy of data duringcompression; therefore, for elimination of redundancy of data, initially, the super spatial structure prediction algorithmis applied with the fast block matching approach and later Huffman coding is applied for reducing the number of bitsrequired for transmitting and storing single pixel value. Also, to speed up the block-matching process during motionestimation, the proposed method compares those blocks

  2. Experimental demonstration of tunable multiple optical orthogonal codes sequences-based optical label for optical packets switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chongfu; Qiu, Kun; Zhou, Heng; Ling, Yun; Wang, Yawei; Xu, Bo

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, the tunable multiple optical orthogonal codes sequences (MOOCS)-based optical label for optical packet switching (OPS) (MOOCS-OPS) is experimentally demonstrated for the first time. The tunable MOOCS-based optical label is performed by using fiber Bragg grating (FBG)-based optical en/decoders group and optical switches configured by using Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), and the optical label is erased by using Semiconductor Optical Amplifier (SOA). Some waveforms of the MOOCS-based optical label, optical packet including the MOOCS-based optical label and the payloads are obtained, the switching control mechanism and the switching matrix are discussed, the bit error rate (BER) performance of this system is also studied. These experimental results show that the tunable MOOCS-OPS scheme is effective.

  3. A base-sequence-modulated Golay code improves the excitation and measurement of ultrasonic guided waves in long bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaojun; Ta, Dean; Wang, Weiqi

    2012-11-01

    Researchers are interested in using ultrasonic guided waves (GWs) to assess long bones. However, GWs suffer high attenuation when they propagate in long bones, resulting in a low SNR. To overcome this limitation, this paper introduces a base-sequence-modulated Golay code (BSGC) to produce larger amplitude and improve the SNR in the ultrasound evaluation of long bones. A 16-bit Golay code was used for excitation in computer simulation. The decoded GWs and the traditional GWs, which were generated by a single pulse, agreed well after decoding the received signals, and the SNR was improved by 26.12 dB. In the experiments using bovine bones, the BSGC excitation produced the amplitudes which were at least 237 times greater than those produced by a single pulse excitation. The BSGC excitation also allowed the GWs to be received over a longer distance between two transducers. The results suggest the BSGC excitation has the potential to measure GWs and assess long bones.

  4. Consistent levels of A-to-I RNA editing across individuals in coding sequences and non-conserved Alu repeats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osenberg Sivan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adenosine to inosine (A-to-I RNA-editing is an essential post-transcriptional mechanism that occurs in numerous sites in the human transcriptome, mainly within Alu repeats. It has been shown to have consistent levels of editing across individuals in a few targets in the human brain and altered in several human pathologies. However, the variability across human individuals of editing levels in other tissues has not been studied so far. Results Here, we analyzed 32 skin samples, looking at A-to-I editing level in three genes within coding sequences and in the Alu repeats of six different genes. We observed highly consistent editing levels across different individuals as well as across tissues, not only in coding targets but, surprisingly, also in the non evolutionary conserved Alu repeats. Conclusions Our findings suggest that A-to-I RNA-editing of Alu elements is a tightly regulated process and, as such, might have been recruited in the course of primate evolution for post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms.

  5. Observational training in visual half-fields and the coding of movement sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellenbuerger, Thomas; Boutin, Arnaud; Panzer, Stefan; Blandin, Yannick; Fischer, Lennart; Schorer, Joerg; Shea, Charles H

    2012-12-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine if gating information to different hemispheres during observational training facilitates the development of a movement representation. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three observation groups that differed in terms of the type of visual half-field presentation during observation (right visual half-field (RVF), left visual half-field (LVF), or in central position (CE)), and a control group (CG). On Day 1, visual stimuli indicating the pattern of movement to be produced were projected on the respective hemisphere. The task participants observed was a 1300 ms spatial-temporal pattern of elbow flexions and extensions. On Day 2, participants physically performed the task in an inter-manual transfer paradigm with a retention test, and two contralateral transfer tests; a mirror transfer test which required the same pattern of muscle activation and limb joint angles and a non-mirror transfer test which reinstated the visual-spatial pattern of the sequence. The results demonstrated that participants of the CE, RVF and the LVF groups showed superior retention and transfer performance compared to participants of the CG. Participants of the CE- and LVF-groups demonstrated an advantage when the visual-spatial coordinates were reinstated compared to the motor coordinates, while participants of the RVF-group did not promote specific transfer patterns. These results will be discussed in the context of hemisphere specialization.

  6. The Number, Organization, and Size of Polymorphic Membrane Protein Coding Sequences as well as the Most Conserved Pmp Protein Differ within and across Chlamydia Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lent, Sarah; Creasy, Heather Huot; Myers, Garry S A; Vanrompay, Daisy

    2016-01-01

    Variation is a central trait of the polymorphic membrane protein (Pmp) family. The number of pmp coding sequences differs between Chlamydia species, but it is unknown whether the number of pmp coding sequences is constant within a Chlamydia species. The level of conservation of the Pmp proteins has previously only been determined for Chlamydia trachomatis. As different Pmp proteins might be indispensible for the pathogenesis of different Chlamydia species, this study investigated the conservation of Pmp proteins both within and across C. trachomatis,C. pneumoniae,C. abortus, and C. psittaci. The pmp coding sequences were annotated in 16 C. trachomatis, 6 C. pneumoniae, 2 C. abortus, and 16 C. psittaci genomes. The number and organization of polymorphic membrane coding sequences differed within and across the analyzed Chlamydia species. The length of coding sequences of pmpA,pmpB, and pmpH was conserved among all analyzed genomes, while the length of pmpE/F and pmpG, and remarkably also of the subtype pmpD, differed among the analyzed genomes. PmpD, PmpA, PmpH, and PmpA were the most conserved Pmp in C. trachomatis,C. pneumoniae,C. abortus, and C. psittaci, respectively. PmpB was the most conserved Pmp across the 4 analyzed Chlamydia species.

  7. Absence of mutations in the coding sequence of the potential tumor suppressor 3pK in metastatic melanoma

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    Houben Roland

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activation of Ras or Raf contributes to tumorigenesis of melanoma. However, constitutive Raf activation is also a characteristic of the majority of benign melanocytic nevi and high intensity signaling of either Ras or Raf was found to induce growth inhibition and senescence rather than transformation. Since the chromosome 3p kinase (3pK is a target of the Ras/Raf/Mek/Erk signaling pathway which antagonizes the function of the oncogene and anti-differentiation factor Bmi-1, 3pK may function as a tumor suppressor in tumors with constitutive Ras/Raf activation. Consequently, we tested whether inactivating 3pK mutations are present in melanoma. Methods 30 metastatic melanoma samples, which were positive for activating mutations of either BRaf or NRas, were analyzed for possible mutations in the 3pk gene. The 10 coding exons and their flanking intron sequences were amplified by PCR and direct sequencing of the PCR products was performed. Results This analysis revealed that besides the presence of some single nucleotide polymorphisms in the 3pk gene, we could not detect any possible loss of function mutation in any of these 30 metastatic melanoma samples selected for the presence of activating mutations within the Ras/Raf/Mek/Erk signaling pathway. Conclusion Hence, in melanoma with constitutively active Ras/Raf inactivating mutations within the 3pk gene do not contribute to the oncogenic phenotype of this highly malignant tumor.

  8. Novel Low-Power Switched-Current Matched Filter for Direct-Sequence Code-Division-Multiple-Access Wireless Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togura, Kenji; Kubota, Koji; Nakase, Hiroyuki; Masu, Kazuya; Tsubouchi, Kazuo

    2000-04-01

    We have proposed the current-cut switched-current matched filter (CC-SIMF) with a low power consumption of less than 10 mW for mobile terminals in direct-sequence code-division-multiple-access. The parallel SIMF configuration is proposed for the reduction of the current transfer error accumulation in the conventional serial SIMF@. In order to evaluate the fundamental operation of the parallel SIMF, we have designed and fabricated a 32-chip parallel SIMF using 0.8-μm complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology. The autocorrelation performance of a 32-chip orthogonal m-sequence has been clearly observed to be more than 5 Mcps. The measured dynamic range is improved to 12 dB as compared with that of the conventional SIMF, even though each current memory cell has a current transfer error of over 10% per chip. Since the current sources in the parallel SIMF can be reduced to be one-third of those in the serial SIMF, the power consumption of the parallel SIMF can be reduced to one-third of that of the serial SIMF.

  9. Detecting selection in the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus, using DNA sequence data from multiple nuclear protein-coding genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yednock, Bree K; Neigel, Joseph E

    2014-01-01

    The identification of genes involved in the adaptive evolution of non-model organisms with uncharacterized genomes constitutes a major challenge. This study employed a rigorous and targeted candidate gene approach to test for positive selection on protein-coding genes of the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus. Four genes with putative roles in physiological adaptation to environmental stress were chosen as candidates. A fifth gene not expected to play a role in environmental adaptation was used as a control. Large samples (n>800) of DNA sequences from C. sapidus were used in tests of selective neutrality based on sequence polymorphisms. In combination with these, sequences from the congener C. similis were used in neutrality tests based on interspecific divergence. In multiple tests, significant departures from neutral expectations and indicative of positive selection were found for the candidate gene trehalose 6-phosphate synthase (tps). These departures could not be explained by any of the historical population expansion or bottleneck scenarios that were evaluated in coalescent simulations. Evidence was also found for balancing selection at ATP-synthase subunit 9 (atps) using a maximum likelihood version of the Hudson, Kreitmen, and Aguadé test, and positive selection favoring amino acid replacements within ATP/ADP translocase (ant) was detected using the McDonald-Kreitman test. In contrast, test statistics for the control gene, ribosomal protein L12 (rpl), which presumably has experienced the same demographic effects as the candidate loci, were not significantly different from neutral expectations and could readily be explained by demographic effects. Together, these findings demonstrate the utility of the candidate gene approach for investigating adaptation at the molecular level in a marine invertebrate for which extensive genomic resources are not available.

  10. Detecting selection in the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus, using DNA sequence data from multiple nuclear protein-coding genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bree K Yednock

    Full Text Available The identification of genes involved in the adaptive evolution of non-model organisms with uncharacterized genomes constitutes a major challenge. This study employed a rigorous and targeted candidate gene approach to test for positive selection on protein-coding genes of the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus. Four genes with putative roles in physiological adaptation to environmental stress were chosen as candidates. A fifth gene not expected to play a role in environmental adaptation was used as a control. Large samples (n>800 of DNA sequences from C. sapidus were used in tests of selective neutrality based on sequence polymorphisms. In combination with these, sequences from the congener C. similis were used in neutrality tests based on interspecific divergence. In multiple tests, significant departures from neutral expectations and indicative of positive selection were found for the candidate gene trehalose 6-phosphate synthase (tps. These departures could not be explained by any of the historical population expansion or bottleneck scenarios that were evaluated in coalescent simulations. Evidence was also found for balancing selection at ATP-synthase subunit 9 (atps using a maximum likelihood version of the Hudson, Kreitmen, and Aguadé test, and positive selection favoring amino acid replacements within ATP/ADP translocase (ant was detected using the McDonald-Kreitman test. In contrast, test statistics for the control gene, ribosomal protein L12 (rpl, which presumably has experienced the same demographic effects as the candidate loci, were not significantly different from neutral expectations and could readily be explained by demographic effects. Together, these findings demonstrate the utility of the candidate gene approach for investigating adaptation at the molecular level in a marine invertebrate for which extensive genomic resources are not available.

  11. A common class of transcripts with 5′-intron depletion, distinct early coding sequence features, and N1-methyladenosine modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenik, Can; Chua, Hon Nian; Singh, Guramrit; Akef, Abdalla; Snyder, Michael P.; Palazzo, Alexander F.

    2017-01-01

    Introns are found in 5′ untranslated regions (5′UTRs) for 35% of all human transcripts. These 5′UTR introns are not randomly distributed: Genes that encode secreted, membrane-bound and mitochondrial proteins are less likely to have them. Curiously, transcripts lacking 5′UTR introns tend to harbor specific RNA sequence elements in their early coding regions. To model and understand the connection between coding-region sequence and 5′UTR intron status, we developed a classifier that can predict 5′UTR intron status with >80% accuracy using only sequence features in the early coding region. Thus, the classifier identifies transcripts with 5′ proximal-intron-minus-like-coding regions (“5IM” transcripts). Unexpectedly, we found that the early coding sequence features defining 5IM transcripts are widespread, appearing in 21% of all human RefSeq transcripts. The 5IM class of transcripts is enriched for non-AUG start codons, more extensive secondary structure both preceding the start codon and near the 5′ cap, greater dependence on eIF4E for translation, and association with ER-proximal ribosomes. 5IM transcripts are bound by the exon junction complex (EJC) at noncanonical 5′ proximal positions. Finally, N1-methyladenosines are specifically enriched in the early coding regions of 5IM transcripts. Taken together, our analyses point to the existence of a distinct 5IM class comprising ∼20% of human transcripts. This class is defined by depletion of 5′ proximal introns, presence of specific RNA sequence features associated with low translation efficiency, N1-methyladenosines in the early coding region, and enrichment for noncanonical binding by the EJC. PMID:27994090

  12. Sequencing the GRHL3 Coding Region Reveals Rare Truncating Mutations and a Common Susceptibility Variant for Nonsyndromic Cleft Palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangold, Elisabeth; Böhmer, Anne C.; Ishorst, Nina; Hoebel, Ann-Kathrin; Gültepe, Pinar; Schuenke, Hannah; Klamt, Johanna; Hofmann, Andrea; Gölz, Lina; Raff, Ruth; Tessmann, Peter; Nowak, Stefanie; Reutter, Heiko; Hemprich, Alexander; Kreusch, Thomas; Kramer, Franz-Josef; Braumann, Bert; Reich, Rudolf; Schmidt, Gül; Jäger, Andreas; Reiter, Rudolf; Brosch, Sibylle; Stavusis, Janis; Ishida, Miho; Seselgyte, Rimante; Moore, Gudrun E.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Borck, Guntram; Aldhorae, Khalid A.; Lace, Baiba; Stanier, Philip; Knapp, Michael; Ludwig, Kerstin U.

    2016-01-01

    Nonsyndromic cleft lip with/without cleft palate (nsCL/P) and nonsyndromic cleft palate only (nsCPO) are the most frequent subphenotypes of orofacial clefts. A common syndromic form of orofacial clefting is Van der Woude syndrome (VWS) where individuals have CL/P or CPO, often but not always associated with lower lip pits. Recently, ∼5% of VWS-affected individuals were identified with mutations in the grainy head-like 3 gene (GRHL3). To investigate GRHL3 in nonsyndromic clefting, we sequenced its coding region in 576 Europeans with nsCL/P and 96 with nsCPO. Most strikingly, nsCPO-affected individuals had a higher minor allele frequency for rs41268753 (0.099) than control subjects (0.049; p = 1.24 × 10−2). This association was replicated in nsCPO/control cohorts from Latvia, Yemen, and the UK (pcombined = 2.63 × 10−5; ORallelic = 2.46 [95% CI 1.6–3.7]) and reached genome-wide significance in combination with imputed data from a GWAS in nsCPO triads (p = 2.73 × 10−9). Notably, rs41268753 is not associated with nsCL/P (p = 0.45). rs41268753 encodes the highly conserved p.Thr454Met (c.1361C>T) (GERP = 5.3), which prediction programs denote as deleterious, has a CADD score of 29.6, and increases protein binding capacity in silico. Sequencing also revealed four novel truncating GRHL3 mutations including two that were de novo in four families, where all nine individuals harboring mutations had nsCPO. This is important for genetic counseling: given that VWS is rare compared to nsCPO, our data suggest that dominant GRHL3 mutations are more likely to cause nonsyndromic than syndromic CPO. Thus, with rare dominant mutations and a common risk variant in the coding region, we have identified an important contribution for GRHL3 in nsCPO. PMID:27018475

  13. Cloning, sequencing, and expression of the apa gene coding for the Mycobacterium tuberculosis 45/47-kilodalton secreted antigen complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laqueyrerie, A; Militzer, P; Romain, F; Eiglmeier, K; Cole, S; Marchal, G

    1995-01-01

    Effective protection against a virulent challenge with Mycobacterium tuberculosis is induced mainly by previous immunization with living attenuated mycobacteria, and it has been hypothesized that secreted proteins serve as major targets in the specific immune response. To identify and purify molecules present in culture medium filtrate which are dominant antigens during effective vaccination, a two-step selection procedure was used to select antigens able to interact with T lymphocytes and/or antibodies induced by immunization with living bacteria and to counterselect antigens interacting with the immune effectors induced by immunization with dead bacteria. A Mycobacterium bovis BCG 45/47-kDa antigen complex, present in BCG culture filtrate, has been previously identified and isolated (F. Romain, A. Laqueyrerie, P. Militzer, P. Pescher, P. Chavarot, M. Lagranderie, G. Auregan, M. Gheorghiu, and G. Marchal, Infect. Immun. 61:742-750, 1993). Since the cognate antibodies recognize the very same antigens present in M. tuberculosis culture medium filtrates, a project was undertaken to clone, express, and sequence the corresponding gene of M. tuberculosis. An M. tuberculosis shuttle cosmid library was transferred in Mycobacterium smegmatis and screened with a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to detect the clones expressing the proteins. A clone containing a 40-kb DNA insert was selected, and by means of subcloning in Escherichia coli, a 2-kb fragment that coded for the molecules was identified. An open reading frame in the 2,061-nucleotide sequence codes for a secreted protein with a consensus signal peptide of 39 amino acids and a predicted molecular mass of 28,779 Da. The gene was referred to as apa because of the high percentages of proline (21.7%) and alanine (19%) in the purified protein. Southern hybridization analysis of digested total genomic DNA from M. tuberculosis (reference strains H37Rv and H37Ra) indicated that the apa gene was present as a

  14. Evaluation of the Immediate and Subsequent Effects of Response Interruption and Redirection on Vocal Stereotypy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Brittany I.; Rapp, John T.

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated 2 3-component multiple-schedule sequences--a response interruption and redirection (RIRD) treatment sequence and a no-interaction control sequence--using a multielement design. With this design, we were able to evaluate the immediate and subsequent effects of RIRD on 2 participants' vocal stereotypy. For both participants, RIRD…

  15. Executing application function calls in response to an interrupt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almasi, Gheorghe; Archer, Charles J.; Giampapa, Mark E.; Gooding, Thomas M.; Heidelberger, Philip; Parker, Jeffrey J.

    2010-05-11

    Executing application function calls in response to an interrupt including creating a thread; receiving an interrupt having an interrupt type; determining whether a value of a semaphore represents that interrupts are disabled; if the value of the semaphore represents that interrupts are not disabled: calling, by the thread, one or more preconfigured functions in dependence upon the interrupt type of the interrupt; yielding the thread; and if the value of the semaphore represents that interrupts are disabled: setting the value of the semaphore to represent to a kernel that interrupts are hard-disabled; and hard-disabling interrupts at the kernel.

  16. Why there is more to protein evolution than protein function: splicing, nucleosomes and dual-coding sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnecke, Tobias; Weber, Claudia C; Hurst, Laurence D

    2009-08-01

    There is considerable variation in the rate at which different proteins evolve. Why is this? Classically, it has been considered that the density of functionally important sites must predict rates of protein evolution. Likewise, amino acid choice is usually assumed to reflect optimal protein function. In the present article, we briefly review evidence suggesting that this protein function-centred view is too simplistic. In particular, we concentrate on how selection acting during the protein's production history can also affect protein evolutionary rates and amino acid choice. Exploring the role of selection at the DNA and RNA level, we specifically address how the need (i) to specify exonic splice enhancer motifs in pre-mRNA, and (ii) to ensure nucleosome positioning on DNA have an impact on amino acid choice and rates of evolution. For both, we review evidence that sequence affected by more than one coding demand is particularly constrained. Strikingly, in mammals, splicing-related constraints are quantitatively as important as expression parameters in predicting rates of protein evolution. These results indicate that there is substantially more to protein evolution than protein functional constraints.

  17. Mechanisms of Antisense Transcription Initiation from the 3′ End of the GAL10 Coding Sequence In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Shivani; Durairaj, Geetha

    2013-01-01

    In spite of the important regulatory functions of antisense transcripts in gene expression, it remains unknown how antisense transcription is initiated. Recent studies implicated RNA polymerase II in initiation of antisense transcription. However, how RNA polymerase II is targeted to initiate antisense transcription has not been elucidated. Here, we have analyzed the association of RNA polymerase II with the antisense initiation site at the 3′ end of the GAL10 coding sequence in dextrose-containing growth medium that induces antisense transcription. We find that RNA polymerase II is targeted to the antisense initiation site at GAL10 by Reb1p activator as well as general transcription factors (e.g., TFIID, TFIIB, and Mediator) for antisense transcription initiation. Intriguingly, while GAL10 antisense transcription is dependent on TFIID, its sense transcription does not require TFIID. Further, the Gal4p activator that promotes GAL10 sense transcription is dispensable for antisense transcription. Moreover, the proteasome that facilitates GAL10 sense transcription does not control its antisense transcription. Taken together, our results reveal that GAL10 sense and antisense transcriptions are regulated differently and shed much light on the mechanisms of antisense transcription initiation. PMID:23836882

  18. Evolutionary patterns in the sequence and structure of transfer RNA: a window into early translation and the genetic code.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Jie Sun

    Full Text Available Transfer RNA (tRNA molecules play vital roles during protein synthesis. Their acceptor arms are aminoacylated with specific amino acid residues while their anticodons delimit codon specificity. The history of these two functions has been generally linked in evolutionary studies of the genetic code. However, these functions could have been differentially recruited as evolutionary signatures were left embedded in tRNA molecules. Here we built phylogenies derived from the sequence and structure of tRNA, we forced taxa into monophyletic groups using constraint analyses, tested competing evolutionary hypotheses, and generated timelines of amino acid charging and codon discovery. Charging of Sec, Tyr, Ser and Leu appeared ancient, while specificities related to Asn, Met, and Arg were derived. The timelines also uncovered an early role of the second and then first codon bases, identified codons for Ala and Pro as the most ancient, and revealed important evolutionary take-overs related to the loss of the long variable arm in tRNA. The lack of correlation between ancestries of amino acid charging and encoding indicated that the separate discoveries of these functions reflected independent histories of recruitment. These histories were probably curbed by co-options and important take-overs during early diversification of the living world.

  19. Whole-Exome Sequencing of 2,000 Danish Individuals and the Role of Rare Coding Variants in Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohmueller, Kirk E.; Sparsø, Thomas; Li, Qibin;

    2013-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that, in aggregate, rare variants in coding regions of genes explain a substantial fraction of the heritability of common diseases. We sequenced the exomes of 1,000 Danish cases with common forms of type 2 diabetes (including body mass index > 27.5 kg/m2 and hypertension)...

  20. Association of low-frequency and rare coding-sequence variants with blood lipids and Coronary Heart Disease in 56,000 whites and blacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low-frequency coding DNA sequence variants in the proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 gene (PCSK9) lower plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), protect against risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), and have prompted the development of a new class of therapeutics. It is uncerta...

  1. Full-length coding sequence for 12 bovine viral diarrhea virus isolates from persistently infected cattle in a feedyard in Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    We report here the full-length coding sequence of 12 bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) isolates from persistently infected cattle from a feedyard in southwest Kansas, USA. These 12 genomes represent the three major genotypes (BVDV 1a, 1b, and 2a) of BVDV currently circulating in the United States....

  2. Association of low-frequency and rare coding-sequence variants with blood lipids and coronary heart disease in 56,000 whites and blacks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.M. Peloso (Gina); P. Auer (Paul); J.C. Bis (Joshua); J.M. Voorman (Jeanine); A.C. Morrison (Alanna); N.O. Stitziel (Nathan); J. Brody (Jennifer); S.A. Khetarpal (Sumeet); S. Crosby; M. Fornage (Myriam); A.J. Isaacs (Aaron); M. Jakobsdottir (Margret); M.F. Feitosa (Mary Furlan); G. Davies (Gail); J.E. Huffman (Jennifer); A. Manichaikul (Ani); B. Davis (Brian); K. Lohman (Kurt); A.Y. Joon (Aron); G.D. Smith; M.L. Grove (Megan); P. Zanoni (Paolo); V. Redon (Valeska); S. Demissie (Serkalem); K. Lawson (Kim); U. Peters (Ulrike); C.S. Carlson (Christopher); R.D. Jackson (Rebecca); K.K. Ryckman (Kelli); R.H. MacKey (Rachel); J.G. Robinson (Jennifer); D.S. Siscovick (David); P.J. Schreiner (Pamela); J.C. Mychaleckyj (Josyf); J.S. Pankow (James); A. Hofman (Albert); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); T.B. Harris (Tamara); K.D. Taylor (Kent); M. Stafford; L.M. Reynolds (Lindsay); R.E. Marioni (Riccardo); A. Dehghan (Abbas); O.H. Franco (Oscar); A.P. Patel (Aniruddh); Y. Lu (Yingchang); G. Hindy (George); R.F. Gottesman (Rebecca); E.P. Bottinger (Erwin); O. Melander (Olle); M. Orho-Melander (Marju); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); S. Duga (Stefano); P.A. Merlini (Piera); M. Farrall (Martin); A. Goel (Anuj); R. Asselta (Rosanna); D. Girelli (Domenico); N. Martinelli (Nicola); S.H. Shah (Svati); T. Kraus (Thomas); X. Li (Xiaohui); D.J. Rader (Daniel); M.P. Reilly (Muredach); R. McPherson (Ruth); H. Watkins (Hugh); D. Ardissino (Diego); Q. Zhang (Qunyuan); J. Wang (Judy); M.Y. Tsai (Michael); H.A. Taylor (Herman); D.D. Correa; M.D. Griswold (Michael); L.A. Lange (Leslie); J.M. Starr (John); I. Rudan (Igor); G. Eiriksdottir (Gudny); L.J. Launer (Lenore); J.M. Ordovas (Jose); D. Levy (Daniel); Y.-D.I. Chen (Y.-D. Ida); A. Reiner (Alexander); C. Hayward (Caroline); O. Polasek (Ozren); I.J. Deary (Ian); I.B. Borecki (Ingrid); Y. Liu (Yongmei); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); J.G. Wilson (James); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); C. Kooperberg (Charles); S.S. Rich (Stephen); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); J.I. Rotter (Jerome); C.J. O'Donnell (Christopher); K.M. Rice (Kenneth); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); S. Kathiresan (Sekar); L.A. Cupples (Adrienne)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractLow-frequency coding DNA sequence variants in the proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 gene (PCSK9) lower plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), protect against risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), and have prompted the development of a new class of therapeutics. I

  3. A note on conversational interruptions A note on conversational interruptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony F. Deyes

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In their seminal article, Sacks, Schegloff and Jefferson (1974 examine procedures for turn-taking in conversation. Sometimes, they note, a s peaker will select who has the next turn, but more frequently a "self-select" system operates, whereby the participants in a conversation themselves determine when they wish to speak. But how, ask Sacks, Schegloff and Jefferson, do the interlocutors secure a turn in the ongoing flow of another speaker's utterance? To answer this question the authors introduce the notion of "transition relevance place", that is, a point in the turn-holder's utterance where another speaker is most likely to take up a turn. Clearly the most obvious transition relevance place occurs at the end of an utterance sentence, where a pause may be made. However, clause or thersyntactic boundaries also offer opportunities for other speakers to interrupt. As Sacks et al point out, if conversational participants do not take up a turn at a transition relevance place the turn holder will normally continue. In their seminal article, Sacks, Schegloff and Jefferson (1974 examine procedures for turn-taking in conversation. Sometimes, they note, a s peaker will select who has the next turn, but more frequently a "self-select" system operates, whereby the participants in a conversation themselves determine when they wish to speak. But how, ask Sacks, Schegloff and Jefferson, do the interlocutors secure a turn in the ongoing flow of another speaker's utterance? To answer this question the authors introduce the notion of "transition relevance place", that is, a point in the turn-holder's utterance where another speaker is most likely to take up a turn. Clearly the most obvious transition relevance place occurs at the end of an utterance sentence, where a pause may be made. However, clause or thersyntactic boundaries also offer opportunities for other speakers to interrupt. As Sacks et al point out, if conversational participants do not take up

  4. Interrupted Binary Mass Transfer in Star Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Leigh, Nathan W C; Toonen, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Binary mass transfer is at the forefront of some of the most exciting puzzles of modern astrophysics, including Type Ia supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, and the formation of most observed exotic stellar populations. Typically, the evolution is assumed to proceed in isolation, even in dense stellar environments such as star clusters. In this paper, we test the validity of this assumption via the analysis of a large grid of binary evolution models simulated with the SeBa code. For every binary, we calculate analytically the mean time until another single or binary star comes within the mean separation of the mass-transferring binary, and compare this time-scale to the mean time for stable mass transfer to occur. We then derive the probability for each respective binary to experience a direct dynamical interruption. The resulting probability distribution can be integrated to give an estimate for the fraction of binaries undergoing mass transfer that are expected to be disrupted as a function of the host cluster pro...

  5. Human DNA contains sequences homologous to the 5'-non-coding region of hepatitis C virus: characterization with restriction endonucleases reveals individual varieties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Reinhard H Dennin; Jianer Wo

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate a 272 base pair section of the 5'-non-coding region of genomic DNA from the peripheral blood monounuclear cells of healthy hepatitis virus C (HCV)-negative human subjects (not patients). Results The suspected HCV-specific sequence was found in the DNA of each subject tested. The pre-PCR digestion assay reveals individual differences in their pattern of methylation, which may be due to possible epigenetic phenomena.Conclusions The results provide formal proof that these HCV-specific sequences are contained in the genomic or extra chromosomal target DNA, and probably belong to a new class of endogenous sequences.

  6. A 33-GVA Interrupter Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-06-01

    REFERENCES 1. c. E. Swannack, R. A. Haarman, J. D. G. Lindsay, and D. M. Weldon, " HVDC Interrupter Experiments for Large Magnetic Energy...7759-MS, April 1979. 3. E. M. Honig, "Dual 30-kA, HVDC Interrupter Test Facility", Proc• 7th Symp. Eng. Problems of Fusion Res., Knoxville, TN

  7. Interruption and Pausing of Public Display Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feuchtner, Tiare; Walter, Robert; Müller, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    We present a quantitative and qualitative analysis of interruptions of interaction with a public display game, and explore the use of a manual pause mode in this scenario. In previous public display installations we observed users frequently interrupting their interaction. To explore ways of supp...

  8. Nucleotide sequence analyses of the MRP1 gene in four populations suggest negative selection on its coding region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Stephen

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The MRP1 gene encodes the 190 kDa multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1 and effluxes diverse drugs and xenobiotics. Sequence variations within this gene might account for differences in drug response in different individuals. To facilitate association studies of this gene with diseases and/or drug response, exons and flanking introns of MRP1 were screened for polymorphisms in 142 DNA samples from four different populations. Results Seventy-one polymorphisms, including 60 biallelic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, ten insertions/deletions (indel and one short tandem repeat (STR were identified. Thirty-four of these polymorphisms have not been previously reported. Interestingly, the STR polymorphism at the 5' untranslated region (5'UTR occurs at high but different frequencies in the different populations. Frequencies of common polymorphisms in our populations were comparable to those of similar populations in HAPMAP or Perlegen. Nucleotide diversity indices indicated that the coding region of MRP1 may have undergone negative selection or recent population expansion. SNPs E10/1299 G>T (R433S and E16/2012 G>T (G671V which occur at low frequency in only one or two of four populations examined were predicted to be functionally deleterious and hence are likely to be under negative selection. Conclusion Through in silico approaches, we identified two rare SNPs that are potentially negatively selected. These SNPs may be useful for studies associating this gene with rare events including adverse drug reactions.

  9. Construction of the coding sequence of the transcription variant 2 of the human Renalase gene and its expression in the prokaryotic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedchenko, Valerii I; Kaloshin, Alexei A; Mezhevikina, Lyudmila M; Buneeva, Olga A; Medvedev, Alexei E

    2013-06-19

    Renalase is a recently discovered protein, involved in regulation of blood pressure in humans and animals. Although several splice variants of human renalase mRNA transcripts have been recognized, only one protein product, hRenalase1, has been found so far. In this study, we have used polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based amplification of individual exons of the renalase gene and their joining for construction of full-length hRenalase2 coding sequence followed by expression of hRenalase2 as a polyHis recombinant protein in Escherichia coli cells. To date this is the first report on synthesis and purification of hRenalase2. Applicability of this approach was verified by constructing hRenalase1 coding sequence, its sequencing and expression in E. coli cells. hRenalase1 was used for generation of polyclonal antiserum in sheep. Western blot analysis has shown that polyclonal anti-renalase1 antibodies effectively interact with the hRenalase2 protein. The latter suggests that some functions and expression patterns of hRenalase1 documented by antibody-based data may be attributed to the presence of hRenalase2. The realized approach may be also used for construction of coding sequences of various (especially weakly expressible) genes, their transcript variants, etc.

  10. Construction of the Coding Sequence of the Transcription Variant 2 of the Human Renalase Gene and Its Expression in the Prokaryotic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexei E. Medvedev

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Renalase is a recently discovered protein, involved in regulation of blood pressure in humans and animals. Although several splice variants of human renalase mRNA transcripts have been recognized, only one protein product, hRenalase1, has been found so far. In this study, we have used polymerase chain reaction (PCR-based amplification of individual exons of the renalase gene and their joining for construction of full-length hRenalase2 coding sequence followed by expression of hRenalase2 as a polyHis recombinant protein in Escherichia coli cells. To date this is the first report on synthesis and purification of hRenalase2. Applicability of this approach was verified by constructing hRenalase1 coding sequence, its sequencing and expression in E. coli cells. hRenalase1 was used for generation of polyclonal antiserum in sheep. Western blot analysis has shown that polyclonal anti-renalase1 antibodies effectively interact with the hRenalase2 protein. The latter suggests that some functions and expression patterns of hRenalase1 documented by antibody-based data may be attributed to the presence of hRenalase2. The realized approach may be also used for construction of coding sequences of various (especially weakly expressible genes, their transcript variants, etc.

  11. Optical Cutting Interruption Sensor for Fiber Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedikt Adelmann

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We report on an optical sensor system attached to a 4 kW fiber laser cutting machine to detect cutting interruptions. The sensor records the thermal radiation from the process zone with a modified ring mirror and optical filter arrangement, which is placed between the cutting head and the collimator. The process radiation is sensed by a Si and InGaAs diode combination with the detected signals being digitalized with 20 kHz. To demonstrate the function of the sensor, signals arising during fusion cutting of 1 mm stainless steel and mild steel with and without cutting interruptions are evaluated and typical signatures derived. In the recorded signals the piercing process, the laser switch on and switch off point and waiting period are clearly resolved. To identify the cutting interruption, the signals of both Si and InGaAs diodes are high pass filtered and the signal fluctuation ranges being subsequently calculated. Introducing a correction factor, we identify that only in case of a cutting interruption the fluctuation range of the Si diode exceeds the InGaAs diode. This characteristic signature was successfully used to detect 80 cutting interruptions of 83 incomplete cuts (alpha error 3.6% and system recorded no cutting interruption from 110 faultless cuts (beta error of 0. This particularly high detection rate in combination with the easy integration of the sensor, highlight its potential for cutting interruption detection in industrial applications.

  12. Factors influencing recognition of interrupted speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Humes, Larry E

    2010-10-01

    This study examined the effect of interruption parameters (e.g., interruption rate, on-duration and proportion), linguistic factors, and other general factors, on the recognition of interrupted consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC) words in quiet. Sixty-two young adults with normal-hearing were randomly assigned to one of three test groups, "male65," "female65" and "male85," that differed in talker (male/female) and presentation level (65/85 dB SPL), with about 20 subjects per group. A total of 13 stimulus conditions, representing different interruption patterns within the words (i.e., various combinations of three interruption parameters), in combination with two values (easy and hard) of lexical difficulty were examined (i.e., 13×2=26 test conditions) within each group. Results showed that, overall, the proportion of speech and lexical difficulty had major effects on the integration and recognition of interrupted CVC words, while the other variables had small effects. Interactions between interruption parameters and linguistic factors were observed: to reach the same degree of word-recognition performance, less acoustic information was required for lexically easy words than hard words. Implications of the findings of the current study for models of the temporal integration of speech are discussed.

  13. Development of the Verona coding definitions of emotional sequences to code health providers' responses (VR-CoDES-P) to patient cues and concerns.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piccolo, L. del; Haes, H. de; Heaven, C.; Jansen, J.; Verheul, W.; Bensing, J.; Bergvik, S.; Deveugele, M.; Eide, H.; Fletcher, I.; Goss, C.; Humphris, G.; Young-Mi, K.; Langewitz, W.; Mazzi, M.A.; Mjaaland, T.; Moretti, F.; Nübling, M.; Rimondini, M.; Salmon, P.; Sibbern, T.; Skre, I.; Dulmen, S. van; Wissow, L.; Young, B.; Zandbelt, L.; Zimmermann, C.; Finset, A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To present a method to classify health provider responses to patient cues and concerns according to the VR-CoDES-CC (Del Piccolo et al. (2009) [2] and Zimmermann et al. (submitted for publication) [3]). The system permits sequence analysis and a detailed description of how providers handl

  14. Cloning, sequence analysis, and expression of cDNA coding for the major house dust mite allergen, Der f 1, in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Cui

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Our objective was to clone, express and characterize adult Dermatophagoides farinae group 1 (Der f 1 allergens to further produce recombinant allergens for future clinical applications in order to eliminate side reactions from crude extracts of mites. Based on GenBank data, we designed primers and amplified the cDNA fragment coding for Der f 1 by nested-PCR. After purification and recovery, the cDNA fragment was cloned into the pMD19-T vector. The fragment was then sequenced, subcloned into the plasmid pET28a(+, expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 and identified by Western blotting. The cDNA coding for Der f 1 was cloned, sequenced and expressed successfully. Sequence analysis showed the presence of an open reading frame containing 966 bp that encodes a protein of 321 amino acids. Interestingly, homology analysis showed that the Der p 1 shared more than 87% identity in amino acid sequence with Eur m 1 but only 80% with Der f 1. Furthermore, phylogenetic analyses suggested that D. pteronyssinus was evolutionarily closer to Euroglyphus maynei than to D. farinae, even though D. pteronyssinus and D. farinae belong to the same Dermatophagoides genus. A total of three cysteine peptidase active sites were found in the predicted amino acid sequence, including 127-138 (QGGCGSCWAFSG, 267-277 (NYHAVNIVGYG and 284-303 (YWIVRNSWDTTWGDSGYGYF. Moreover, secondary structure analysis revealed that Der f 1 contained an a helix (33.96%, an extended strand (17.13%, a ß turn (5.61%, and a random coil (43.30%. A simple three-dimensional model of this protein was constructed using a Swiss-model server. The cDNA coding for Der f 1 was cloned, sequenced and expressed successfully. Alignment and phylogenetic analysis suggests that D. pteronyssinus is evolutionarily more similar to E. maynei than to D. farinae.

  15. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of the gene coding for the 57kDa soluble antigen of the salmonid fish pathogen Renibacterium salmoninarum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Maw-Sheng; Gilbert , Teresa L.; Huang, Chienjin; Landolt, Marsha L.; O'Hara, Patrick J.; Winton, James R.

    1992-01-01

    The complete sequence coding for the 57-kDa major soluble antigen of the salmonid fish pathogen, Renibacterium salmoninarum, was determined. The gene contained an opening reading frame of 1671 nucleotides coding for a protein of 557 amino acids with a calculated Mr value of 57190. The first 26 amino acids constituted a signal peptide. The deduced sequence for amino acid residues 27–61 was in agreement with the 35 N-terminal amino acid residues determined by microsequencing, suggesting the protein in synthesized as a 557-amino acid precursor and processed to produce a mature protein of Mr 54505. Two regions of the protein contained imperfect direct repeats. The first region contained two copies of an 81-residue repeat, the second contained five copies of an unrelated 25-residue repeat. Also, a perfect inverted repeat (including three in-frame UAA stop codons) was observed at the carboxyl-terminus of the gene.

  16. A case for a CUG-initiated coding sequence overlapping torovirus ORF1a and encoding a novel 30 kDa product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atkins John F

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The genus Torovirus (order Nidovirales includes a number of species that infect livestock. These viruses have a linear positive-sense ssRNA genome of ~25-30 kb, encoding a large polyprotein that is expressed from the genomic RNA, and several additional proteins expressed from a nested set of 3'-coterminal subgenomic RNAs. In this brief report, we describe the bioinformatic discovery of a new, apparently coding, ORF that overlaps the 5' end of the polyprotein coding sequence, ORF1a, in the +2 reading frame. The new ORF has a strong coding signature and, in fact, is more conserved at the amino acid level than the overlapping region of ORF1a. We propose that the new ORF utilizes a non-AUG initiation codon - namely a conserved CUG codon in a strong Kozak context - upstream of the ORF1a AUG initiation codon, resulting in a novel 258 amino acid protein, dubbed '30K'.

  17. A type of recurring relation on sequences and efficient decoding of a class of algebraic-geometric codes (Ⅱ)——An efficient decoding algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李宝; 周林芳; 肖国镇

    1999-01-01

    For a class of algebraic-geometric codes, a type of recurring relation is introduced on the syndrome sequence of an error vector. Then, a new majority yoting scheme is developed. By applying the generalized Berlekamp-Massey algorithm, and incorporating the majority voting scheme, an efficient decoding algorithm up to half the Feng-Rao bound is developed for a class of algebraic-geometric codes, the complexity of which is O ( γo1n2), where n is the code length, and γ is the genus of curve. On different algebraic curves, the complexity of the algorithm can be lowered by choosing base functions suitably. For example, on Hermitian curves the complexity is O(n7/3.

  18. Rare, Low-Frequency, and Common Variants in the Protein-Coding Sequence of Biological Candidate Genes from GWASs Contribute to Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diogo, Dorothée; Kurreeman, Fina; Stahl, Eli A.; Liao, Katherine P.; Gupta, Namrata; Greenberg, Jeffrey D.; Rivas, Manuel A.; Hickey, Brendan; Flannick, Jason; Thomson, Brian; Guiducci, Candace; Ripke, Stephan; Adzhubey, Ivan; Barton, Anne; Kremer, Joel M.; Alfredsson, Lars; Sunyaev, Shamil; Martin, Javier; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Bowes, John; Eyre, Steve; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Worthington, Jane; Klareskog, Lars; Padyukov, Leonid; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Plenge, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    The extent to which variants in the protein-coding sequence of genes contribute to risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is unknown. In this study, we addressed this issue by deep exon sequencing and large-scale genotyping of 25 biological candidate genes located within RA risk loci discovered by genome-wide association studies (GWASs). First, we assessed the contribution of rare coding variants in the 25 genes to the risk of RA in a pooled sequencing study of 500 RA cases and 650 controls of European ancestry. We observed an accumulation of rare nonsynonymous variants exclusive to RA cases in IL2RA and IL2RB (burden test: p = 0.007 and p = 0.018, respectively). Next, we assessed the aggregate contribution of low-frequency and common coding variants to the risk of RA by dense genotyping of the 25 gene loci in 10,609 RA cases and 35,605 controls. We observed a strong enrichment of coding variants with a nominal signal of association with RA (p A [p.His266Gln]), and a noncoding variant, rs624988, reside on distinct haplotypes and independently contribute to the risk of RA (p = 4.6 × 10−6). Overall, our results indicate that variants (distributed across the allele-frequency spectrum) within the protein-coding portion of a subset of biological candidate genes identified by GWASs contribute to the risk of RA. Further, we have demonstrated that very large sample sizes will be required for comprehensively identifying the independent alleles contributing to the missing heritability of RA. PMID:23261300

  19. Characterization of the FoxL2 proximal promoter and coding sequence from the common snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lei; Rhen, Turk

    2017-10-01

    Sex is determined by temperature during embryogenesis in snapping turtles, Chelydra serpentina. Previous studies in this species show that dihydrotestosterone (DHT) induces ovarian development at temperatures that normally produce males or mixed sex ratios. The feminizing effect of DHT is associated with increased expression of FoxL2, suggesting that androgens regulate transcription of FoxL2. To test this hypothesis, we cloned the proximal promoter (1.6kb) and coding sequence for snapping turtle FoxL2 (tFoxL2) in frame with mCherry to produce a fluorescent reporter. The tFoxL2-mCherry fusion plasmid or mCherry control plasmid were stably transfected into mouse KK1 granulosa cells. These cells were then treated with 0, 1, 10, or 100nM DHT to assess androgen effects on tFoxL2-mCherry expression. In contrast to the main hypothesis, DHT did not alter expression of the tFoxL2-mCherry reporter. However, normal serum increased expression of tFoxL2-mCherry when compared to charcoal-stripped serum, indicating that the cloned region of tFoxL2 contains cis regulatory elements. We also used the tFoxL2-mCherry plasmid as an expression vector to test the hypothesis that DHT and tFoxL2 interact to regulate expression of endogenous genes in granulosa cells. While tFoxL2-mCherry and DHT had independent effects on mouse FoxL2, FshR, GnRHR, and StAR expression, tFoxL2-mCherry potentiated low concentration DHT effects on mouse aromatase expression. Further studies will be required to determine whether synergistic regulation of aromatase by DHT and FoxL2 also occurs in turtle gonads during the sex-determining period, which would explain the feminizing effect of DHT in this species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Interruption and Pausing of Public Display Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feuchtner, Tiare; Walter, Robert; Müller, Jörg

    We present a quantitative and qualitative analysis of interruptions of interaction with a public display game, and explore the use of a manual pause mode in this scenario. In previous public display installations we observed users frequently interrupting their interaction. To explore ways...... of supporting such behavior, we implemented a gesture controlled multiuser game with four pausing techniques. We evaluated them in a field study analyzing 704 users and found that our pausing techniques were eagerly explored, but rarely used with the intention to pause the game. Our study shows...... that interactions with public displays are considerably intermissive, and that users mostly interrupt interaction to socialize and mainly approach public displays in groups. We conclude that, as a typical characteristic of public display interaction, interruptions deserve consideration. However, manual pause modes...

  1. Practice increases procedural errors after task interruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmann, Erik M; Hambrick, David Z

    2017-05-01

    Positive effects of practice are ubiquitous in human performance, but a finding from memory research suggests that negative effects are possible also. The finding is that memory for items on a list depends on the time interval between item presentations. This finding predicts a negative effect of practice on procedural performance under conditions of task interruption. As steps of a procedure are performed more quickly, memory for past performance should become less accurate, increasing the rate of skipped or repeated steps after an interruption. We found this effect, with practice generally improving speed and accuracy, but impairing accuracy after interruptions. The results show that positive effects of practice can interact with architectural constraints on episodic memory to have negative effects on performance. In practical terms, the results suggest that practice can be a risk factor for procedural errors in task environments with a high incidence of task interruption. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Book Review: Haberkorn, Tyrell, Revolution Interrupted: ...

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Drahmoune

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Book Review of the monograph: Haberkorn, Tyrell (2011, Revolution Interrupted: Farmers, Students, Law and Violence in Northern Thailand Madison, Wisconsin: University of Wisconsin Press, ISBN: 978 0 299 28184 7, 256 pages

  3. Vacuum interrupters and thyratrons as opening switches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honig, E. M.

    High power opening switches for inductive storage for large scale energy storage applications are described. The triggered vacuum interrupter and the magnetically quenched thyratrons are discussed. By electrically retriggering the discharge in the vacuum interrupter between pulses, the dependence on mechanical motion is eliminated. This should enable repetition rate operation at 10 to 15 kHz while still maintaining the vacuum interrupter's proven interrupting performance of tens of kiloamps at tens of kilovolts. The magnetically quenched thyratron uses a cross magnetic field to raise the switch impedance by decreasing the electron mobility and driving the discharge into an arc chute wall where it is quenched. Attempts to understand the basic mechanisms involved and to increase the switch, ratings, and particularly the conduction time, are discussed.

  4. Combining DGE and RNA-sequencing data to identify new polyA+ non-coding transcripts in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, Nicolas; Bou Samra, Elias; Boureux, Anthony; Mancheron, Alban; Rufflé, Florence; Bai, Qiang; De Vos, John; Rivals, Eric; Commes, Thérèse

    2014-03-01

    Recent sequencing technologies that allow massive parallel production of short reads are the method of choice for transcriptome analysis. Particularly, digital gene expression (DGE) technologies produce a large dynamic range of expression data by generating short tag signatures for each cell transcript. These tags can be mapped back to a reference genome to identify new transcribed regions that can be further covered by RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq) reads. Here, we applied an integrated bioinformatics approach that combines DGE tags, RNA-Seq, tiling array expression data and species-comparison to explore new transcriptional regions and their specific biological features, particularly tissue expression or conservation. We analysed tags from a large DGE data set (designated as 'TranscriRef'). We then annotated 750,000 tags that were uniquely mapped to the human genome according to Ensembl. We retained transcripts originating from both DNA strands and categorized tags corresponding to protein-coding genes, antisense, intronic- or intergenic-transcribed regions and computed their overlap with annotated non-coding transcripts. Using this bioinformatics approach, we identified ∼34,000 novel transcribed regions located outside the boundaries of known protein-coding genes. As demonstrated using sequencing data from human pluripotent stem cells for biological validation, the method could be easily applied for the selection of tissue-specific candidate transcripts. DigitagCT is available at http://cractools.gforge.inria.fr/softwares/digitagct.

  5. Complete interruption of the aortic arch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sung Hak; Park, In Kyu; Lee, Won Hwa; Kim, Yong Joo; Kang, Duk Sik; Lee, Jong Tae [Kyungpook National University College of Medicine, Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1984-09-15

    Complete interrupture of the aortic arch is one of the least common cardiac malformation. In this condition, continuity between the ascending and descending protions of the aorta is not present, and the descending aorta is supplied through a reversing patent ductus arteriosus. In the majority of the patients a ventricular septal defect is present. Authors have experienced a case of the complete interruption of aortic arch, interruption between the left carotid and the left subclavian artery.

  6. Patient validation of cues and concerns identified according to Verona coding definitions of emotional sequences (VR-CoDES): a video- and interview-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eide, Hilde; Eide, Tom; Rustøen, Tone; Finset, Arnstein

    2011-02-01

    A challenging but main task for clinicians is to identify patients' concerns related to their medical conditions. The study aim was to validate a new coding scheme for identifying patients' cues and concerns. 12 videotaped consultations between nurses and pain patients were coded according to the Verona Coding Scheme for Emotional Sequences (VR-CoDES). During a metainterview each patient watched his/her own video interview with the researcher to confirm or disconfirm the identified cues and concerns. A directive or an open format was applied. Quantitative and qualitative data analyses were performed. Patients' confirmation in relation to the coding gave a sensitivity of 0.95 and specificity of 0.99 in the directive format and a sensitivity of 0.99 and specificity of 0.70 applying the open format. Through a qualitative analysis 83% of researcher-identified cues and concerns were validated. 17% were not confirmed or uncertain. The VR-CoDES seems to capture what are experienced as real concerns to patients, and proves to be a coding scheme with a high degree of ecological validity. The VR-CoDES provides a valid framework for detecting patients' cues and concerns, and should be explored as a training tool to develop clinicians' empathic accuracy. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Development of the Verona coding definitions of emotional sequences to code health providers' responses (VR-CoDES-P) to patient cues and concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Piccolo, Lidia; de Haes, Hanneke; Heaven, Cathy; Jansen, Jesse; Verheul, William; Bensing, Jozien; Bergvik, Svein; Deveugele, Myriam; Eide, Hilde; Fletcher, Ian; Goss, Claudia; Humphris, Gerry; Kim, Young-Mi; Langewitz, Wolf; Mazzi, Maria Angela; Mjaaland, Trond; Moretti, Francesca; Nübling, Matthias; Rimondini, Michela; Salmon, Peter; Sibbern, Tonje; Skre, Ingunn; van Dulmen, Sandra; Wissow, Larry; Young, Bridget; Zandbelt, Linda; Zimmermann, Christa; Finset, Arnstein

    2011-02-01

    To present a method to classify health provider responses to patient cues and concerns according to the VR-CoDES-CC (Del Piccolo et al. (2009) [2] and Zimmermann et al. (submitted for publication) [3]). The system permits sequence analysis and a detailed description of how providers handle patient's expressions of emotion. The Verona-CoDES-P system has been developed based on consensus views within the "Verona Network of Sequence Analysis". The different phases of the creation process are described in detail. A reliability study has been conducted on 20 interviews from a convenience sample of 104 psychiatric consultations. The VR-CoDES-P has two main classes of provider responses, corresponding to the degree of explicitness (yes/no) and space (yes/no) that is given by the health provider to each cue/concern expressed by the patient. The system can be further subdivided into 17 individual categories. Statistical analyses showed that the VR-CoDES-P is reliable (agreement 92.86%, Cohen's kappa 0.90 (±0.04) pVR-CoDES-P should be applied to develop research-based approaches to maximize appropriate responses to patients' indirect and overt expressions of emotional needs. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Conformational effects of Gly-X-Gly interruptions in the collagen triple helix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bella, Jordi; Liu, Jingsong; Kramer, Rachel; Brodsky, Barbara; Berman, Helen M

    2006-09-15

    The collagen model peptide with sequence (Pro-Hyp-Gly)4-Pro-Gly-(Pro-Hyp-Gly)5 contains a central Gly-Pro-Gly interruption in the consensus collagen sequence. Its high-resolution crystal structure defines the molecular consequences of such an interruption for the collagen triple-helical conformation, and provides insight into possible structural and biological roles of similar interruptions in the -Gly-X-Y- repeating pattern found in non-fibrillar collagens. The peptide (denoted as the Hyp minus peptide or Hyp-) forms a rod-like triple helix structure without any bend or kink, and crystallizes in a quasi-hexagonal lattice. The two Pro-Hyp-Gly zones adopt the typical triple-helical collagen conformation with standard Rich and Crick II hydrogen bonding topology. Notably, the central zone containing the Gly-Pro-Gly interruption deviates from the standard structure in terms of hydrogen bonding topology, torsion angles, helical, and superhelical parameters. These deviations are highly localized, such that the standard features are regained within one to two residues on either side. Conformational variations and high temperature factors seen for the six chains of the asymmetric unit in the zone around the interruption point to the presence of a local region of considerable plasticity and flexibility embedded within two highly rigid and ordered standard triple-helical segments. The structure suggests a role for Gly-X-Gly interruptions as defining regions of flexibility and molecular recognition in the otherwise relatively uniform repeating collagen conformation.

  9. Interruptions between the triple helix peptides can promote the formation of amyloid-like fibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Avanish; Hwang, Eileen; Brodsky, Barbara

    2010-03-01

    It has been reported that collagen can initiate or accelerate the formation of amyloid fibrils. Non-fibrillar collagen types have sites where the repeating (Gly-Xaa-Yaa)n sequences are interrupted by non- Gly-Xaa-Yaa sequences, and we are investigating the hypothesis that some of these interruptions can promote amyloid formation. Our experimental data show that model peptides containing an 8 or 9 residue interruption sequence between (Gly-Pro-Hyp)n domains have a strong propensity for self association to form fibrous structures. A peptide containing only the 9-residue interruption sequence forms amyloid like fibrils with anti-parallel β sheet. Computational analysis predicts that 33 out of 374 naturally occurring human non-fibrillar collagen sequences within or between triple-helical sequences have significant cross-β aggregation potential, including the 8 and 9 residue sequences studied in peptides. Further studies are in progress to investigate whether a triple-helix peptide promotes amyloidogenesis and whether amyloid interferes with collagen fibrillogenesis.

  10. Phylogenetic analyses of the polyprotein coding sequences of serotype O foot-and-mouth disease viruses in East Africa: evidence for interserotypic recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balinda Sheila N

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD is endemic in East Africa with the majority of the reported outbreaks attributed to serotype O virus. In this study, phylogenetic analyses of the polyprotein coding region of serotype O FMD viruses from Kenya and Uganda has been undertaken to infer evolutionary relationships and processes responsible for the generation and maintenance of diversity within this serotype. FMD virus RNA was obtained from six samples following virus isolation in cell culture and in one case by direct extraction from an oropharyngeal sample. Following RT-PCR, the single long open reading frame, encoding the polyprotein, was sequenced. Results Phylogenetic comparisons of the VP1 coding region showed that the recent East African viruses belong to one lineage within the EA-2 topotype while an older Kenyan strain, K/52/1992 is a representative of the topotype EA-1. Evolutionary relationships between the coding regions for the leader protease (L, the capsid region and almost the entire coding region are monophyletic except for the K/52/1992 which is distinct. Furthermore, phylogenetic relationships for the P2 and P3 regions suggest that the K/52/1992 is a probable recombinant between serotypes A and O. A bootscan analysis of K/52/1992 with East African FMD serotype A viruses (A21/KEN/1964 and A23/KEN/1965 and serotype O viral isolate (K/117/1999 revealed that the P2 region is probably derived from a serotype A strain while the P3 region appears to be a mosaic derived from both serotypes A and O. Conclusions Sequences of the VP1 coding region from recent serotype O FMDVs from Kenya and Uganda are all representatives of a specific East African lineage (topotype EA-2, a probable indication that hardly any FMD introductions of this serotype have occurred from outside the region in the recent past. Furthermore, evidence for interserotypic recombination, within the non-structural protein coding regions, between FMDVs of serotypes A

  11. Assembly of the Complete Sitka Spruce Chloroplast Genome Using 10X Genomics’ GemCode Sequencing Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombe, Lauren; Jackman, Shaun D.; Yang, Chen; Vandervalk, Benjamin P.; Moore, Richard A.; Pleasance, Stephen; Coope, Robin J.; Bohlmann, Joerg; Holt, Robert A.; Jones, Steven J. M.; Birol, Inanc

    2016-01-01

    The linked read sequencing library preparation platform by 10X Genomics produces barcoded sequencing libraries, which are subsequently sequenced using the Illumina short read sequencing technology. In this new approach, long fragments of DNA are partitioned into separate micro-reactions, where the same index sequence is incorporated into each of the sequencing fragment inserts derived from a given long fragment. In this study, we exploited this property by using reads from index sequences associated with a large number of reads, to assemble the chloroplast genome of the Sitka spruce tree (Picea sitchensis). Here we report on the first Sitka spruce chloroplast genome assembled exclusively from P. sitchensis genomic libraries prepared using the 10X Genomics protocol. We show that the resulting 124,049 base pair long genome shares high sequence similarity with the related white spruce and Norway spruce chloroplast genomes, but diverges substantially from a previously published P. sitchensis- P. thunbergii chimeric genome. The use of reads from high-frequency indices enabled separation of the nuclear genome reads from that of the chloroplast, which resulted in the simplification of the de Bruijn graphs used at the various stages of assembly. PMID:27632164

  12. Identification of a Coding Sequence and Structure Modeling of a Glycine-Rich RNA-Binding Protein (CmGRP1) from Chelidonium majus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawrot, Robert; Tomaszewski, Lukasz; Czerwoniec, Anna; Goździcka-Józefiak, Anna

    2013-01-01

    The family of glycine-rich plant proteins (GRPs) is a large and complex group of proteins that share, as a common feature, the presence of glycine-rich domains arranged in (Gly)n-X repeats that are suggested to be involved in protein-protein interactions, RNA binding, and nucleolar targeting. These proteins are implicated in several independent physiological processes. Some are components of cell walls of many higher plants, while others are involved in molecular responses to environmental stress, and mediated by post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. The goals of this study are to identify the coding sequence of a novel glycine-rich RNA-binding protein from Chelidonium majus and to propose its structural model. DNA fragments obtained using degenerate PCR primers showed high sequence identities with glycine-rich RNA-binding protein coding sequences from different plant species. A 439-bp nucleotide sequence is identified coding for a novel polypeptide composed of 146 amino acids, designated as CmGRP1 (C. majus glycine-rich protein 1), with a calculated MW of 14,931 Da (NCBI GenBank accession no. HM173636). Using NCBI CDD and GeneSilico MetaServer, a single conserved domain, the RNA recognition motif (RRM), was detected in CmGRP1. The C-terminal region of CmGRP1 is a glycine-rich motif (GGGGxxGxGGGxxG), and it is predicted to be disordered. Based on a 1fxl crystal structure, a 3D model of CmGRP1 is proposed. CmGRP1 can be classified as a class IVa plant GRP, implicated to play a role in plant defense.

  13. Cost-effective screening of DNMT3A coding sequence identifies somatic mutation in pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szarzyńska-Zawadzka, Bronisława; Kosmalska, Maria; Sędek, Łukasz; Sonsala, Alicja; Twardoch, Magdalena; Kowalczyk, Jerzy R; Szczepański, Tomasz; Witt, Michał; Dawidowska, Małgorzata

    2017-09-14

    In pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) risk assignment schemes preclude reliable prediction of outcome and thus new prognostic factors are needed. Mutations in DNMT3A are candidate prognostic and classification markers in adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and T-ALL and thus were considered as candidates prognostic markers in pediatric T-ALL. DNMT3A mutational status was investigated in 74 pediatric T-ALL samples collected at diagnosis. We applied high resolution melt (HRM) analysis and Sanger sequencing to study the hotspot position (R882) within catalytic MTase domain and exons coding for other functional domains of the protein, known to be mutated in the wide spectrum of hematological malignancies. We demonstrate a low frequency of mutations in DNMT3A coding sequence in pediatric T-ALL (1.4%, n=1/74). We identified missense mutation, p.Ala644Thr, which has not been described previously in pediatric T-ALL, but is recurrent in adults with T-ALL and AML. Low frequency of DNMT3A mutations in pediatric T-ALL is in striking contrast to adult T-ALL and renders the necessity for the search of other candidate prognostic markers. Combined Sanger sequencing-HRM approach offers a cost-effective option for genotyping DNMT3A coding sequence, with potential clinical application in other hematological malignancies. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. The Culture Contributing to Interruptions in the Nursing Work Environment: An Ethnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkinson, Susan G; Wiegand, Debra L

    2017-08-22

    The purpose of this study was to understand the occurrence of interruptions within the culture of the medical nursing unit work environment. Interruptions may lead to errors in nursing work. Little is known about how the culture of the nursing work environment contributes to interruptions. A micro-focused ethnographic study was conducted. Data collection involved extensive observation of a nursing unit, 1:1 observations of nurses and follow-up interviews with the nurses. Data were analyzed from unstructured field notes and interview transcripts. The definitions of interruption and culture guided coding, categorizing and identification of themes. A framework was developed that describes the medical nursing unit as a complex culture full of unpredictable, non-linear changes that affect the entire interconnected system, often in the form of an interruption. The cultural elements contributing to interruptions included a) the value placed on excellence in patient care and meeting personal needs, b) the beliefs that the nurses had to do everything by themselves and that every phone call was important, c) the patterns of changing patients, patient transport, and coordination of resources, and d) the normative practices of communicating and adapting. Interruptions are an integral part of the culture of a medical nursing unit. Uniformly decreasing interruptions may disrupt current practices, such as communication to coordinate care, that are central to nursing work. In future research, the nursing work environment must be looked at through the lens of a complex system. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. MicroRNA-200c modulates the expression of MUC4 and MUC16 by directly targeting their coding sequences in human pancreatic cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Radhakrishnan

    Full Text Available Transmembrane mucins, MUC4 and MUC16 are associated with tumor progression and metastatic potential in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma. We discovered that miR-200c interacts with specific sequences within the coding sequence of MUC4 and MUC16 mRNAs, and evaluated the regulatory nature of this association. Pancreatic cancer cell lines S2.028 and T3M-4 transfected with miR-200c showed a 4.18 and 8.50 fold down regulation of MUC4 mRNA, and 4.68 and 4.82 fold down regulation of MUC16 mRNA compared to mock-transfected cells, respectively. A significant reduction of glycoprotein expression was also observed. These results indicate that miR-200c overexpression regulates MUC4 and MUC16 mucins in pancreatic cancer cells by directly targeting the mRNA coding sequence of each, resulting in reduced levels of MUC4 and MUC16 mRNA and protein. These data suggest that, in addition to regulating proteins that modulate EMT, miR-200c influences expression of cell surface mucins in pancreatic cancer.

  16. Computational performance of SequenceL coding of the lattice Boltzmann method for multi-particle flow simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Başağaoğlu, Hakan; Blount, Justin; Blount, Jarred; Nelson, Bryant; Succi, Sauro; Westhart, Phil M.; Harwell, John R.

    2017-04-01

    This paper reports, for the first time, the computational performance of SequenceL for mesoscale simulations of large numbers of particles in a microfluidic device via the lattice-Boltzmann method. The performance of SequenceL simulations was assessed against the optimized serial and parallelized (via OpenMP directives) FORTRAN90 simulations. At present, OpenMP directives were not included in inter-particle and particle-wall repulsive (steric) interaction calculations due to difficulties that arose from inter-iteration dependencies between consecutive iterations of the do-loops. SequenceL simulations, on the other hand, relied on built-in automatic parallelism. Under these conditions, numerical simulations revealed that the parallelized FORTRAN90 outran the performance of SequenceL by a factor of 2.5 or more when the number of particles was 100 or less. SequenceL, however, outran the performance of the parallelized FORTRAN90 by a factor of 1.3 when the number of particles was 300. Our results show that when the number of particles increased by 30-fold, the computational time of SequenceL simulations increased linearly by a factor of 1.5, as compared to a 3.2-fold increase in serial and a 7.7-fold increase in parallelized FORTRAN90 simulations. Considering SequenceL's efficient built-in parallelism that led to a relatively small increase in computational time with increased number of particles, it could be a promising programming language for computationally-efficient mesoscale simulations of large numbers of particles in microfluidic experiments.

  17. ON CHANNEL ESTIMATION USING OPTIMAL TRAINING SEQUENCES IN CYCLIC-PREFIX-BASED SINGLE-CARRIER SYSTEMS WITH SPACE-TIME BLOCK-CODING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a new scheme that combines Space-Time Block-Coding (STBC) based on an Alamouti-like scheme and the Least Squares (LS) channel estimation using optimal training sequences in Cyclic-Prefix-based (CP)\\Single-Carrier (SC) systems is proposed. With two transmit antennas, based on Cramer-Rao lower bound for channel estimation, it is shown that the Periodic Complementary Set (PCS) is optimal over frequency-selective fading channels. Compared with the normal scheme without STBC, 3dB Mean Square Error (MSE) performance gains and fewer restrictions on the length of channel impulse response are demonstrated.

  18. An Analysis of Station Blackout Sequences Using MELCOR1.8.5 Code for the Severe Accident Analysis DB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Y. M.; Ahn, K. I. [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been constructing severe accident analysis database (DB) under a National Nuclear R and D Program. Especially, MAAP (commercial code being widely used for industries) DB for many scenarios including station blackout (SBO) has been completed up to now. This report shows the analysis results for SBO scenarios using MELCOR code. These results will be used for the degree of completion after being compared with MAAP results. The developing strategy of MELCOR code is the same with that of MAAP DB. For the generation of data set, the Korean standard nuclear power plant (KSNP) has been selected as a reference plant and the eight SBO scenarios are chosen to be analyzed based on the PSA results (these eight scenarios accounted for 99 percent of occurrence frequency of total 197 SBO scenarios). Both thermal hydraulics (T/H) and source term analysis have been performed using MELCOR version 1.8.5 for the chosen scenarios. But only major T/H variables treated in the MAAP report are listed among the generated data set, which shows the characteristics of each scenario. These SBO results together with those of the other initiating events (to be analyzed in the future) will be used as inputs for DB construction and special value will be found in the comparing and complimentary process with MAAP DB

  19. Nucleotide sequence of the GDH gene coding for the NADP-specific glutamate dehydrogenase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasu, T; Hall, B D

    1985-01-01

    The isolation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene for NADP-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP-GDH) by cross hybridization to the Neurospora crassa am gene, known to encode for NADP-GDH is described. Two DNA fragments selected from a yeast genomic library in phage lambda gt11 were shown by restriction analysis to share 2.5 kb of common sequence. A yeast shuttle vector (CV13) carrying either to the cloned fragments complements the gdh- strain of S. cerevisiae and directs substantial overproduction of NADP-GDH. One of the cloned fragments was sequenced, and the deduced amino acid (aa) sequence of the yeast NADP-GDH is 64% homologous to N. crassa, 51% to Escherichia coli and 24% to bovine NADP-GDHs.

  20. Nucleotide sequence of cDNA coding for dianthin 30, a ribosome inactivating protein from Dianthus caryophyllus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legname, G; Bellosta, P; Gromo, G; Modena, D; Keen, J N; Roberts, L M; Lord, J M

    1991-08-27

    Rabbit antibodies raised against dianthin 30, a ribosome inactivating protein from carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus) leaves, were used to identify a full length dianthin precursor cDNA clone from a lambda gt11 expression library. N-terminal amino acid sequencing of purified dianthin 30 and dianthin 32 confirmed that the clone encoded dianthin 30. The cDNA was 1153 basepairs in length and encoded a precursor protein of 293 amino acid residues. The first 23 N-terminal amino acids of the precursor represented the signal sequence. The protein contained a carboxy-terminal region which, by analogy with barley lectin, may contain a vacuolar targeting signal.

  1. Evaluation of the Genetic Variation of Non Coding Control Region of BK Virus Using Nested-PCR Sequencing Method in Renal Graft Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Emami

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Polyomaviruses (BK is a comprehensive infection with more than of 80% prevalence in the world. One of the most important reasons of BK virus nephropathy is in the renal transplant recipients and rejection of transplanted tissue between them. Non Coding region of this virus play a regulatory role in replication and amplification of the virus. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genetic patterns of this area in renal graft at Namazi Transplantation Center, Shiraz, Iran. Methods: In the present experimental study, 380 renal allograft serums were collected. DNAs of 129 eligible samples were extracted and evaluated using a virus genome. The presence of the virus was determined by qualitative and sequencing. Of these, 129 samples were tested for the presence of virus according to the condition study, using quantitative, qualitative genomic amplification and sequencing. Results: The study showed symptoms of nephropathy, 76 (58.9% of them were males and 46 (35.7% were females with the mean age 38.0±.089 years of age. In general, 46 patients (35.7% percent were positive for BK Polyomaviruses. After comparing the genomic sequence with applications of molecular they were categorized in three groups and then recorded in gene bank. Conclusion: About 35% of renal transplant recipients with high creatinine levels were positive for the presence of BK virus. Non-coding region of respondents in the sample survey revealed that among patients with the most common genotypes were rearranged the entire transplant patients were observed at this tranplant center. Examination of these sequences indicated that this rearrangments had a specific pattern, different from the standard strain of archaea type.

  2. PolyQ repeat expansions in ATXN2 associated with ALS are CAA interrupted repeats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenming Yu

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a devastating, rapidly progressive disease leading to paralysis and death. Recently, intermediate length polyglutamine (polyQ repeats of 27-33 in ATAXIN-2 (ATXN2, encoding the ATXN2 protein, were found to increase risk for ALS. In ATXN2, polyQ expansions of ≥ 34, which are pure CAG repeat expansions, cause spinocerebellar ataxia type 2. However, similar length expansions that are interrupted with other codons, can present atypically with parkinsonism, suggesting that configuration of the repeat sequence plays an important role in disease manifestation in ATXN2 polyQ expansion diseases. Here we determined whether the expansions in ATXN2 associated with ALS were pure or interrupted CAG repeats, and defined single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs rs695871 and rs695872 in exon 1 of the gene, to assess haplotype association. We found that the expanded repeat alleles of 40 ALS patients and 9 long-repeat length controls were all interrupted, bearing 1-3 CAA codons within the CAG repeat. 21/21 expanded ALS chromosomes with 3CAA interruptions arose from one haplotype (GT, while 18/19 expanded ALS chromosomes with <3CAA interruptions arose from a different haplotype (CC. Moreover, age of disease onset was significantly earlier in patients bearing 3 interruptions vs fewer, and was distinct between haplotypes. These results indicate that CAG repeat expansions in ATXN2 associated with ALS are uniformly interrupted repeats and that the nature of the repeat sequence and haplotype, as well as length of polyQ repeat, may play a role in the neurological effect conferred by expansions in ATXN2.

  3. The oligodeoxynucleotide sequences corresponding to never-expressed peptide motifs are mainly located in the non-coding strand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bickis Mik

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We study the usage of specific peptide platforms in protein composition. Using the pentapeptide as a unit of length, we find that in the universal proteome many pentapeptides are heavily repeated (even thousands of times, whereas some are quite rare, and a small number do not appear at all. To understand the physico-chemical-biological basis underlying peptide usage at the proteomic level, in this study we analyse the energetic costs for the synthesis of rare and never-expressed versus frequent pentapeptides. In addition, we explore residue bulkiness, hydrophobicity, and codon number as factors able to modulate specific peptide frequencies. Then, the possible influence of amino acid composition is investigated in zero- and high-frequency pentapeptide sets by analysing the frequencies of the corresponding inverse-sequence pentapeptides. As a final step, we analyse the pentadecamer oligodeoxynucleotide sequences corresponding to the never-expressed pentapeptides. Results We find that only DNA context-dependent constraints (such as oligodeoxynucleotide sequence location in the minus strand, introns, pseudogenes, frameshifts, etc. provide a coherent mechanistic platform to explain the occurrence of never-expressed versus frequent pentapeptides in the protein world. Conclusions This study is of importance in cell biology. Indeed, the rarity (or lack of expression of specific 5-mer peptide modules implies the rarity (or lack of expression of the corresponding n-mer peptide sequences (with n

  4. Series and parallel arc-fault circuit interrupter tests.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Jay Dean; Fresquez, Armando J.; Gudgel, Bob; Meares, Andrew

    2013-07-01

    While the 2011 National Electrical Codeª (NEC) only requires series arc-fault protection, some arc-fault circuit interrupter (AFCI) manufacturers are designing products to detect and mitigate both series and parallel arc-faults. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has extensively investigated the electrical differences of series and parallel arc-faults and has offered possible classification and mitigation solutions. As part of this effort, Sandia National Laboratories has collaborated with MidNite Solar to create and test a 24-string combiner box with an AFCI which detects, differentiates, and de-energizes series and parallel arc-faults. In the case of the MidNite AFCI prototype, series arc-faults are mitigated by opening the PV strings, whereas parallel arc-faults are mitigated by shorting the array. A range of different experimental series and parallel arc-fault tests with the MidNite combiner box were performed at the Distributed Energy Technologies Laboratory (DETL) at SNL in Albuquerque, NM. In all the tests, the prototype de-energized the arc-faults in the time period required by the arc-fault circuit interrupt testing standard, UL 1699B. The experimental tests confirm series and parallel arc-faults can be successfully mitigated with a combiner box-integrated solution.

  5. Cloning, nucleotide sequence, and overexpression of the gene coding for delta 5-3-ketosteroid isomerase from Pseudomonas putida biotype B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S W; Kim, C Y; Benisek, W F; Choi, K Y

    1994-11-01

    The structural gene coding for the delta 5-3-ketosteroid isomerase (KSI) of Pseudomonas putida biotype B has been cloned, and its entire nucleotide sequence has been determined by a dideoxynucleotide chain termination method. A 2.1-kb DNA fragment containing the ksi gene was cloned from a P. putida biotype B genomic library in lambda gt11. The open reading frame of ksi encodes 393 nucleotides, and the amino acid sequence deduced from the nucleotide sequence agrees with the directly determined amino acid sequence (K. Linden and W. F. Benisek, J. Biol. Chem. 261:6454-6460, 1986). A putative purine-rich ribosome binding site was found 8 bp upstream of the ATG start codon. Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) transformed with the pKK-KSI plasmid containing the ksi gene expressed a high level of isomerase activity when induced by isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside. KSI was purified to homogeneity by a simple and rapid procedure utilizing fractional precipitation and an affinity column of deoxycholate-ethylenediamine-agarose as a major chromatographic step. The molecular weight of KSI was 14,535 (calculated, 14,536) as determined by electrospray mass spectrometry. The purified KSI showed a specific activity (39,807 mumol min-1 mg-1) and a Km (60 microM) which are close to those of KSI originally obtained from P. putida biotype B.

  6. Isolated sleep paralysis elicited by sleep interruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, T; Miyasita, A; Sasaki, Y; Inugami, M; Fukuda, K

    1992-06-01

    We elicited isolated sleep paralysis (ISP) from normal subjects by a nocturnal sleep interruption schedule. On four experimental nights, 16 subjects had their sleep interrupted for 60 minutes by forced awakening at the time when 40 minutes of nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep had elapsed from the termination of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep in the first or third sleep cycle. This schedule produced a sleep onset REM period (SOREMP) after the interruption at a high rate of 71.9%. We succeeded in eliciting six episodes of ISP in the sleep interruptions performed (9.4%). All episodes of ISP except one occurred from SOREMP, indicating a close correlation between ISP and SOREMP. We recorded verbal reports about ISP experiences and recorded the polysomnogram (PSG) during ISP. All of the subjects with ISP experienced inability to move and were simultaneously aware of lying in the laboratory. All but one reported auditory/visual hallucinations and unpleasant emotions. PSG recordings during ISP were characterized by a REM/W stage dissociated state, i.e. abundant alpha electroencephalographs and persistence of muscle atonia shown by the tonic electromyogram. Judging from the PSG recordings, ISP differs from other dissociated states such as lucid dreaming, nocturnal panic attacks and REM sleep behavior disorders. We compare some of the sleep variables between ISP and non-ISP nights. We also discuss the similarities and differences between ISP and sleep paralysis in narcolepsy.

  7. Coordinating the interruption of assembly workers in manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbeinsson, Ari; Thorvald, Peter; Lindblom, Jessica

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines how interruptions from information and communications technology systems affect errors and the time to complete tasks for assembly workers. Interruptions have previously been examined in laboratory experiments and office environments, but not much work has been performed in other authentic environments. This paper contains the results of an experiment that was performed in a simulated manufacturing assembly environment, which tested the effects of interruptions on a manual assembly task. The experiment used existing interruption coordination methods as a basis, and the results showed a difference in the effect of interruptions and interruption coordination between cognitively complex laboratory tasks and manual assembly tasks in an authentic environment. Most notably, the negative effects of interruptions delivered without consideration were smaller in this experiment. Based on these findings, recommendations were developed for designing interruption systems for minimizing the costs (errors and time) imposed by interruptions during assembly tasks in manufacturing.

  8. A LTR copia retrotransposon and Mutator transposons interrupt Pgip genes in cultivated and wild wheats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giovanni, Michela; Cenci, Alberto; Janni, Michela; D'Ovidio, Renato

    2008-04-01

    Polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) are leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins involved in plant defence. Wheat pgip genes have been isolated from the B (Tapgip1) and D (Tapgip2) genomes, and now we report the identification of pgip genes from the A genomes of wild and cultivated wheats. By Southern blots and sequence analysis of BAC clones we demonstrated that wheat contains a single copy pgip gene per genome and the one from the A genome, pgip3, is inactivated by the insertion of a long terminal repeat copia retrotranspon within the fourth LRR. We demonstrated also that this retrotransposon insertion is present in Triticum urartu and all the polyploidy wheats assayed, but is absent in T. monococcum (Tmpgip3), suggesting that this insertion took place after the divergence between T. monococcum and T. urartu, but before the formation of the polyploid wheats. We identified also two independent insertion events of new Class II transposable elements, Vacuna, belonging to the Mutator superfamily, that interrupted the Tdipgip1 gene of T. turgidum ssp. dicoccoides. The occurrence of these transposons within the coding region of Tdipgip1 facilitated the mapping of the Pgip locus in the pericentric region of the short arm of chromosome group 7. We speculate that the inactivation of pgip genes are tolerated because of redundancy of PGIP activities in the wheat genome.

  9. Variation in seed fatty acid composition and sequence divergence in the FAD2 gene coding region between wild and cultivated sesame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhenbang; Tonnis, Brandon; Morris, Brad; Wang, Richard B; Zhang, Amy L; Pinnow, David; Wang, Ming Li

    2014-12-03

    Sesame germplasm harbors genetic diversity which can be useful for sesame improvement in breeding programs. Seven accessions with different levels of oleic acid were selected from the entire USDA sesame germplasm collection (1232 accessions) and planted for morphological observation and re-examination of fatty acid composition. The coding region of the FAD2 gene for fatty acid desaturase (FAD) in these accessions was also sequenced. Cultivated sesame accessions flowered and matured earlier than the wild species. The cultivated sesame seeds contained a significantly higher percentage of oleic acid (40.4%) than the seeds of the wild species (26.1%). Nucleotide polymorphisms were identified in the FAD2 gene coding region between wild and cultivated species. Some nucleotide polymorphisms led to amino acid changes, one of which was located in the enzyme active site and may contribute to the altered fatty acid composition. Based on the morphology observation, chemical analysis, and sequence analysis, it was determined that two accessions were misnamed and need to be reclassified. The results obtained from this study are useful for sesame improvement in molecular breeding programs.

  10. [Analysis of the molecular characteristics and cloning of full-length coding sequence of interleukin-2 in tree shrews].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiao-Yan; Li, Ming-Li; Xu, Juan; Gao, Yue-Dong; Wang, Wen-Guang; Yin, An-Guo; Li, Xiao-Fei; Sun, Xiao-Mei; Xia, Xue-Shan; Dai, Jie-Jie

    2013-04-01

    While the tree shrew (Tupaia belangeri chinensis) is an excellent animal model for studying the mechanisms of human diseases, but few studies examine interleukin-2 (IL-2), an important immune factor in disease model evaluation. In this study, a 465 bp of the full-length IL-2 cDNA encoding sequence was cloned from the RNA of tree shrew spleen lymphocytes, which were then cultivated and stimulated with ConA (concanavalin). Clustal W 2.0 was used to compare and analyze the sequence and molecular characteristics, and establish the similarity of the overall structure of IL-2 between tree shrews and other mammals. The homology of the IL-2 nucleotide sequence between tree shrews and humans was 93%, and the amino acid homology was 80%. The phylogenetic tree results, derived through the Neighbour-Joining method using MEGA5.0, indicated a close genetic relationship between tree shrews, Homo sapiens, and Macaca mulatta. The three-dimensional structure analysis showed that the surface charges in most regions of tree shrew IL-2 were similar to between tree shrews and humans; however, the N-glycosylation sites and local structures were different, which may affect antibody binding. These results provide a fundamental basis for the future study of IL-2 monoclonal antibody in tree shrews, thereby improving their utility as a model.

  11. Testing Of Choiced Ceramics Cutting Tools At Irregular Interrupted Cut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyncl, Ladislav; Malotová, Šárka; Nováček, Pavel; Nicielnik, Henryk; Šoková, Dagmar; Hemžský, Pavel; Pitela, David; Holubjak, Jozef

    2015-12-01

    This article discusses the test of removable ceramic cutting inserts during machining irregular interrupted cut. Tests were performed on a lathe, with the preparation which simulated us the interrupted cut. By changing the number of plates mounted in a preparation it simulate us a regular or irregular interrupted cut. When with four plates it was regular interrupted cut, the remaining three variants were already irregular cut. It was examined whether it will have the irregular interrupted cutting effect on the insert and possibly how it will change life of inserts during irregular interrupted cut (variable delay between shocks).

  12. Research of direct sequence spread spectrum signal code element synchronization%直序扩频信号码元的同步方法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱冬冬; 鲁新龙; 杜建尧; 金华松

    2012-01-01

    The spread spectrum technology is a form of information transmitting in which the RF bandwidth is much larger than the bandwidth of the information itself, two kinds of capture methods of direct sequence spread spectrum system code element synchronization were introduced in this paper;they were the full parallel capture method and the serial capture method. Then,classification and principles of the serial capture method were introduced in detail,and they were compared. Finally,code element tracking in code element synchronization was introduced,a general working' model of code element tracking loop-delay locked loop was put forward,and it was simulated by System View.%扩频通信技术是指用来传输信息的射频带宽远大于信息本身带宽的一种信息传输方式,介绍了直接序列扩频系统码元同步的两种捕获方法:全并行捕获方法和串行捕获方法.详细讲述了串行捕获方法的分类和原理,并对它们作了比较,最后,就码元同步中的码元跟踪进行了介绍,给出了码跟踪环—延迟锁定环(DLL)的一般工作模型,并使用System View对其进行了仿真.

  13. RNA sequencing and functional analysis implicate the regulatory role of long non-coding RNAs in tomato fruit ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Benzhong; Yang, Yongfang; Li, Ran; Fu, Daqi; Wen, Liwei; Luo, Yunbo; Zhu, Hongliang

    2015-08-01

    Recently, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been shown to play critical regulatory roles in model plants, such as Arabidopsis, rice, and maize. However, the presence of lncRNAs and how they function in fleshy fruit ripening are still largely unknown because fleshy fruit ripening is not present in the above model plants. Tomato is the model system for fruit ripening studies due to its dramatic ripening process. To investigate further the role of lncRNAs in fruit ripening, it is necessary and urgent to discover and identify novel lncRNAs and understand the function of lncRNAs in tomato fruit ripening. Here it is reported that 3679 lncRNAs were discovered from wild-type tomato and ripening mutant fruit. The lncRNAs are transcribed from all tomato chromosomes, 85.1% of which came from intergenic regions. Tomato lncRNAs are shorter and have fewer exons than protein-coding genes, a situation reminiscent of lncRNAs from other model plants. It was also observed that 490 lncRNAs were significantly up-regulated in ripening mutant fruits, and 187 lncRNAs were down-regulated, indicating that lncRNAs could be involved in the regulation of fruit ripening. In line with this, silencing of two novel tomato intergenic lncRNAs, lncRNA1459 and lncRNA1840, resulted in an obvious delay of ripening of wild-type fruit. Overall, the results indicated that lncRNAs might be essential regulators of tomato fruit ripening, which sheds new light on the regulation of fruit ripening.

  14. Structure of the gene for the F allele of complement receptor type 1 and sequence of the coding region unique to the S allele

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vik, D.P. (Univ. of New Mexico School of Medicine, Alburquerque, NM (United States)); Wong, W.W. (BASF Bioresearch Corporation, Worcester, MA (United States))

    1993-12-01

    The genes for human complement receptor type 1 (CR1) F and S alleles have been cloned and span a region of 133-160 kb on chromosome 1. The F allele was found to comprise 39 exons and the S allele contain and additional 8 exons. The leader sequence and 5[prime]-untranslated region are contained in one exon. Each of the long homologous repeats (LHR), which contain seven short consensus repeats (SCR), is composed of 8 exons. Within a LHR, SCR 1,5, and 7 are each encoded by a single exon, SCR 2 and 6 are each encoded by 2 exons, and a single exon codes for SCR 3 and 4. The transmembrane region is encoded by 2 exons and the cytoplasmic domain and the 3[prime]-untranslated regions are coded for by separate exons. The sequences of the eight S allele-specific exons were very similar to those from LHR-A and -B, as was predicted by comparison of the genomic restriction maps. It had previously been suggested that the alleles of CR1 have arisen by a mechanism of unequal crossover. A comparison of intron sequences from LHR-A, -B, -C indicated that the crossover event between LHR-A and -C that gave rise to LHR-B probably occurred within the fourth exon of these LHR. Likewise, the crossover event between LHR-A and -B that produced LHR-S probably occurred within a 383 bp region around the sixth exon. Analysis of RNA from peripheral blood cells by the S1 nuclease assay indicated that the transcription start site is 111 bp upstream of the translation initiation codon ATG. The 5[prime] rapid amplification of cDNA ends confirmed this position as a transcription start site and revealed another possible start site 29 bp further upstream. 46 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. The walnut (Juglans regia) genome sequence reveals diversity in genes coding for the biosynthesis of non-structural polyphenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-García, Pedro J; Crepeau, Marc W; Puiu, Daniela; Gonzalez-Ibeas, Daniel; Whalen, Jeanne; Stevens, Kristian A; Paul, Robin; Butterfield, Timothy S; Britton, Monica T; Reagan, Russell L; Chakraborty, Sandeep; Walawage, Sriema L; Vasquez-Gross, Hans A; Cardeno, Charis; Famula, Randi A; Pratt, Kevin; Kuruganti, Sowmya; Aradhya, Mallikarjuna K; Leslie, Charles A; Dandekar, Abhaya M; Salzberg, Steven L; Wegrzyn, Jill L; Langley, Charles H; Neale, David B

    2016-09-01

    The Persian walnut (Juglans regia L.), a diploid species native to the mountainous regions of Central Asia, is the major walnut species cultivated for nut production and is one of the most widespread tree nut species in the world. The high nutritional value of J. regia nuts is associated with a rich array of polyphenolic compounds, whose complete biosynthetic pathways are still unknown. A J. regia genome sequence was obtained from the cultivar 'Chandler' to discover target genes and additional unknown genes. The 667-Mbp genome was assembled using two different methods (SOAPdenovo2 and MaSuRCA), with an N50 scaffold size of 464 955 bp (based on a genome size of 606 Mbp), 221 640 contigs and a GC content of 37%. Annotation with MAKER-P and other genomic resources yielded 32 498 gene models. Previous studies in walnut relying on tissue-specific methods have only identified a single polyphenol oxidase (PPO) gene (JrPPO1). Enabled by the J. regia genome sequence, a second homolog of PPO (JrPPO2) was discovered. In addition, about 130 genes in the large gallate 1-β-glucosyltransferase (GGT) superfamily were detected. Specifically, two genes, JrGGT1 and JrGGT2, were significantly homologous to the GGT from Quercus robur (QrGGT), which is involved in the synthesis of 1-O-galloyl-β-d-glucose, a precursor for the synthesis of hydrolysable tannins. The reference genome for J. regia provides meaningful insight into the complex pathways required for the synthesis of polyphenols. The walnut genome sequence provides important tools and methods to accelerate breeding and to facilitate the genetic dissection of complex traits.

  16. Cloning and nucleotide sequence of the gene coding for enzymatically active fragments of the Bacillus polymyxa beta-amylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawazu, T; Nakanishi, Y; Uozumi, N; Sasaki, T; Yamagata, H; Tsukagoshi, N; Udaka, S

    1987-01-01

    The gene encoding beta-amylase was cloned from Bacillus polymyxa 72 into Escherichia coli HB101 by inserting HindIII-generated DNA fragments into the HindIII site of pBR322. The 4.8-kilobase insert was shown to direct the synthesis of beta-amylase. A 1.8-kilobase AccI-AccI fragment of the donor strain DNA was sufficient for the beta-amylase synthesis. Homologous DNA was found by Southern blot analysis to be present only in B. polymyxa 72 and not in other bacteria such as E. coli or B. subtilis. B. polymyxa, as well as E. coli harboring the cloned DNA, was found to produce enzymatically active fragments of beta-amylases (70,000, 56,000, or 58,000, and 42,000 daltons), which were detected in situ by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the cloned 3.1-kilobase DNA revealed that it contains one open reading frame of 2,808 nucleotides without a translational stop codon. The deduced amino acid sequence for these 2,808 nucleotides encoding a secretory precursor of the beta-amylase protein is 936 amino acids including a signal peptide of 33 or 35 residues at its amino-terminal end. The existence of a beta-amylase of larger than 100,000 daltons, which was predicted on the basis of the results of nucleotide sequence analysis of the gene, was confirmed by examining culture supernatants after various cultivation periods. It existed only transiently during cultivation, but the multiform beta-amylases described above existed for a long time. The large beta-amylase (approximately 160,000 daltons) existed for longer in the presence of a protease inhibitor such as chymostatin, suggesting that proteolytic cleavage is the cause of the formation of multiform beta-amylases. Images PMID:2435707

  17. Method for constructing QC-LDPC codes using the dayan sequence%利用大衍数列构造QC-LDPC码的方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱磊基; 汪涵; 施玉松; 邢涛; 王营冠

    2012-01-01

    For the purpose of constructing a channel coding solution with excellent performance, we present a method to construct Quasi-Cyclic Low-Density Parity-Check Codes based on the Dayan Sequence by analysing its characteristic. By making use of the feature that the fixed sequence difference in the Dayan Sequence has a steady increase value, this method is used to construct a parity check matrix that has no circle of length four, with the structure of quasi cyclic, and needs little storage space. Simulation results show that, under 10-5 BER, in the Additive White Gaussian Noise channel and Rayleigh fading channel, QC-LDPC based on the Dayan Sequence has a gain nearly 1 dB more than that by QC-LDPC based on the Fibonacci Sequence. Also, in the Additive White Gaussian Noise channel, it has a gain almost 3dB more than that by array LDPC.%提出了一种基于大衍数列构造准循环低密度校验码的方法.该方法利用大衍数列固定项差对应的值单调递增的特点,构造出的校验矩阵不含有长度为4的环,具有准循环结构,节省了校验矩阵的存储空间.仿真表明,取10-5误码率,在高斯白噪声信道和瑞利衰落信道下,基于大衍数列构造的准循环低密度奇偶校验(QC-LDPC)码比基于斐波那契数列构造的QC-LDPC码有接近1 dB的增益;在高斯白噪声信道下,基于大衍数列构造的QC-LDPC码比阵列低密度奇偶校验码有接近3dB的增益.

  18. In silico Coding Sequence Analysis of Walnut GAI and PIP2 Genes and Comparison with Different Plant Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Mohseniazar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dwarfism is one of the important traits in breeding of crops and horticulture plants. A dwarfing rootstock will produce trees with 15-50% of standard trees size. In modern intensive fruit tree orchards, dwarfing rootstocks are commonly used to reduce trees size, enabling high-density planting and easy management, thus achieving higher yield. Trees on dwarfing rootstocks can also exhibit other economically important traits, such as precocious flowering, increased yield and increased disease resistance. Dwarf rootstocks have been extensively studied and released in stone and pome fruits, because of presence of genetic materials and the simplicity of budding methods. Control of tree size using genetically dwarf rootstocks for achievement to higher density and mechanized orchard systems is now very important for walnut production in the world especially in Iran. Many different genes can be involved in appear of this. Mutations in GAI and PIP2 genes cause dwarf trait by two different mechanisms in some plant species. In this case, we study in silico analysis of GAI and PIP2 genes consist of conserved sequences and domains, exon and intron number, function of their proteins, targeting, secondary and tertiary structure, and post translational modification. Materials and methods: The GAI and PIP2 mRNA and protein sequences (FASTA format belonging to 17 monocotyledon and dicotyledon were downloaded from NCBI (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov accessed, on September 2014. Several online web services and software were used for analysis of GAI and PIP2 mRNA and Proteins in plants. Comparative and bioinformatics analyses of PIP2 and GAI proteins were performed online at two websites NCBI (http://www.ncbi.nih.gov and EXPASY (http://expasy.org/tools. Molecular Evolutionary Genetics Analysis (MEGA; version 4 program and CLUSTAL-W with default parameters were used for multiple alignments of sequences. The phylogenetic analysis of GAI and PIP2 protein was

  19. Brief Lags in Interrupted Sequential Performance: Evaluating a Model and Model Evaluation Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-05

    Task interruption Sequence errors Cognitive modeling Goodness-of-fit testing a b s t r a c t We examined effects of adding brief (1 second ) lags...should decay faster than pred2, such that after a lag there is increased probability of an intrusion by pred2 and thus an error at offset 1. The second ...For example, language production requires that words be produced in the correct order, and research in this domain has examined sequence errors at the

  20. Anderson's disease/chylomicron retention disease in a Japanese patient with uniparental disomy 7 and a normal SAR1B gene protein coding sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okada Tomoo

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anderson's Disease (AD/Chylomicron Retention Disease (CMRD is a rare hereditary hypocholesterolemic disorder characterized by a malabsorption syndrome with steatorrhea, failure to thrive and the absence of chylomicrons and apolipoprotein B48 post-prandially. All patients studied to date exhibit a mutation in the SAR1B gene, which codes for an essential component of the vesicular coat protein complex II (COPII necessary for endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi transport. We describe here a patient with AD/CMRD, a normal SAR1B gene protein coding sequence and maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 7 (matUPD7. Methods and Results The patient, one of two siblings of a Japanese family, had diarrhea and steatorrhea beginning at five months of age. There was a white duodenal mucosa upon endoscopy. Light and electron microscopy showed that the intestinal villi were normal but that they had lipid laden enterocytes containing accumulations of lipid droplets in the cytoplasm and lipoprotein-size particles in membrane bound structures. Although there were decreased amounts in plasma of total- and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, apolipoproteins AI and B and vitamin E levels, the triglycerides were normal, typical of AD/CMRD. The presence of low density lipoproteins and apolipoprotein B in the plasma, although in decreased amounts, ruled out abetalipoproteinemia. The parents were asymptomatic with normal plasma cholesterol levels suggesting a recessive disorder and ruling out familial hypobetalipoproteinemia. Sequencing of genomic DNA showed that the 8 exons of the SAR1B gene were normal. Whole genome SNP analysis and karyotyping revealed matUPD7 with a normal karyotype. In contrast to other cases of AD/CMRD which have shown catch-up growth following vitamin supplementation and a fat restricted diet, our patient exhibits continued growth delay and other aspects of the matUPD7 and Silver-Russell Syndrome phenotypes. Conclusions This

  1. New insights into flavivirus evolution, taxonomy and biogeographic history, extended by analysis of canonical and alternative coding sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Moureau

    Full Text Available To generate the most diverse phylogenetic dataset for the flaviviruses to date, we determined the genomic sequences and phylogenetic relationships of 14 flaviviruses, of which 10 are primarily associated with Culex spp. mosquitoes. We analyze these data, in conjunction with a comprehensive collection of flavivirus genomes, to characterize flavivirus evolutionary and biogeographic history in unprecedented detail and breadth. Based on the presumed introduction of yellow fever virus into the Americas via the transatlantic slave trade, we extrapolated a timescale for a relevant subset of flaviviruses whose evolutionary history, shows that different Culex-spp. associated flaviviruses have been introduced from the Old World to the New World on at least five separate occasions, with 2 different sets of factors likely to have contributed to the dispersal of the different viruses. We also discuss the significance of programmed ribosomal frameshifting in a central region of the polyprotein open reading frame in some mosquito-associated flaviviruses.

  2. Coding sequences and levels of expression of Hsc70t are identical in mice with different Orch-1 alleles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snoek, M.; Vugt, H. van [Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Olavesen, M.G.; Milner, C.M.; Campbell, R.D. [MCR Immunochemistry Unit, Oxford (United Kingdom); Teuscher, C. [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Experimental allergic orchitis (EAO) is an autoimmune disease of the testis that is controlled by multple genes. The use of recombinant mouse strains has defined the map position of the H-2-associated locus controlling disease susceptibility, Orch-1, within the H-2S/H-2D interval. Over the last few years the definition of the structural organization of the C4-H-2D segment and identification of the recombination sites of the various intra-H-2 recombinations has reduced the map position of Orch-1 to the Hsp70.1-G7 interval. Three Hsp70 genes, Hsp70.1, Hsp70.3, and Hsc70t, and the genes G7b and G7a are located in this segment of DNA. In order to investigate whether Hsc70t is a suitable candidate for Orch-1 we have compared the sequence of the gene from a susceptible and a resistant haplotype.

  3. RNA-sequencing reveals previously unannotated protein- and microRNA-coding genes expressed in aleurone cells of rice seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kenneth A; Ringler, Patricia; Gu, Lingkun; Shen, Qingxi J

    2014-01-01

    The rice genome annotation has been greatly improved in recent years, largely due to the availability of full length cDNA sequences derived from many tissues. Among those yet to be studied is the aleurone layer, which produces hydrolases for mobilization of seed storage reserves during seed germination and post germination growth. Herein, we report transcriptomes of aleurone cells treated with the hormones abscisic acid, gibberellic acid, or both. Using a comprehensive approach, we identified hundreds of novel genes. To minimize the number of false positives, only transcripts that did not overlap with existing annotations, had a high level of expression, and showed a high level of uniqueness within the rice genome were considered to be novel genes. This approach led to the identification of 553 novel genes that encode proteins and/or microRNAs. The transcriptome data reported here will help to further improve the annotation of the rice genome.

  4. Ressox Control of QZSS During Communication Interruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    model, Cr=1.2, 30 m2Solar radiation pressure model Moon , Sun, Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter , Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, Pluto Other bodies x...QZSS During Communication Interruption 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR( S ) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK...NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology

  5. Interrupting long periods of sitting: good STUFF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rutten Geert M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There is increasing evidence that sedentary behaviour is in itself a health risk, regardless of the daily amount of moderate to vigorous physical activity. Therefore, sedentary behaviour should be targeted as important health behaviour. It is known that even relatively small changes of health behaviour often require serious efforts from an individual and from people in their environment to become part of their lifestyle. Therefore, interventions to promote healthy behaviours should ideally be simple, easy to perform and easily available. Since sitting is likely to be highly habitual, confrontation with an intervention should almost automatically elicit a reaction of getting up, and thus break up and reduce sitting time. One important prerequisite for successful dissemination of such an intervention could be the use of a recognisable term relating to sedentary behaviour, which should have the characteristics of an effective brand name. To become wide spread, this term may need to meet three criteria: the “Law of the few”, the “Stickiness factor”, and the “Power of context”. For that purpose we introduce STUFF: Stand Up For Fitness. STUFF can be defined as “interrupting long sitting periods by short breaks”, for instance, interrupting sitting every 30 min by standing for at least five minutes. Even though we still need evidence to test the health-enhancing effects of interrupted sitting, we hope that the introduction of STUFF will facilitate the testing of the social, psychological and health effects of interventions to reduce sitting time.

  6. Analysing how negative emotions emerge and are addressed in veterinary consultations, using the Verona Coding Definitions of Emotional Sequences (VR-CoDES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijfhuizen, Malou; Bok, Harold; Matthew, Susan M; Del Piccolo, Lidia; McArthur, Michelle

    2017-04-01

    To explore the applicability, need for modifications and reliability of the VR-CoDES in a veterinary setting while also gaining a deeper understanding of clients' expressions of negative emotion and how they are addressed by veterinarians. The Verona Coding Definitions of Emotional Sequences for client cues and concerns (VR-CoDES-CC) and health provider responses (VR-CoDES-P) were used to analyse 20 audiotaped veterinary consultations. Inter-rater reliability was established. The applicability of definitions of the VR-CoDES was identified, together with the need for specific modifications to suit veterinary consultations. The VR-CoDES-CC and VR-CoDES-P generally applied to veterinary consultations. Cue and concern reliability was found satisfactory for most types of cues, but not for concerns. Response reliability was satisfactory for explicitness, and for providing and reducing space for further disclosure. Modifications to the original coding system were necessary to accurately reflect the veterinary context and included minor additions to the VR-CoDES-CC. Using minor additions to the VR-CoDES including guilt, reassurance and cost discussions it can be reliably adopted to assess clients' implicit expressions of negative emotion and veterinarians' responses. The modified VR-CoDES could be of great value when combined with existing frameworks used for teaching and researching veterinary communication. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Older persons' expressions of emotional cues and concerns during home care visits. Application of the Verona coding definitions of emotional sequences (VR-CoDES) in home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundler, Annelie J; Höglander, Jessica; Eklund, Jakob Håkansson; Eide, Hilde; Holmström, Inger K

    2017-02-01

    This study aims to a) explore to what extent older persons express emotional cues and concerns during home care visits; b) describe what cues and concerns these older persons expressed, and c) explore who initiated these cues and concerns. A descriptive and cross-sectional study was conducted. Data consisted of 188 audio recorded home care visits with older persons and registered nurses or nurse assistants, coded with the Verona coding definitions on emotional sequences (VR-CoDES). Emotional expressions of cues and concerns occurred in 95 (51%) of the 188 recorded home care visits. Most frequent were implicit expressions of cues (n=292) rather than explicit concerns (n=24). Utterances with hints to hidden concerns (63,9%, n=202) were most prevalent, followed by vague or unspecific expressions of emotional worries (15,8%, n=50). Most of these were elicited by the nursing staff (63%, n=200). Emotional needs expressed by the older persons receiving home care were mainly communicated implicitly. To be attentive to such vaguely expressed emotions may demand nursing staff to be sensitive and open. The VR-CoDES can be applied on audio recorded home care visits to analyse verbal and emotional communication, and may allow comparative research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The impact of concurrent visual feedback on coding of on-line and pre-planned movement sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinen, Peter; Shea, Charles H; Panzer, Stefan

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which participants could effectively switch from on-line (OL) to pre-planned (PP) control (or vice versa) depending on previous practice conditions and whether concurrent visual feedback was available during transfer testing. The task was to reproduce a 2000 ms spatial-temporal pattern of a sequence of elbow flexions and extensions. Participants were randomly assigned to one of two practice conditions termed OL or PP. In the OL condition the criterion waveform and the cursor were provided during movement production while this information was withheld during movement production for the PP condition. A retention test and two effector transfer tests were administered to half of the participants in each acquisition conditions under OL conditions and the other half under PP conditions. The mirror effector transfer test required the same pattern of muscle activation and limb joint angles as required during acquisition. The non-mirror transfer test required movements to the same visual-spatial locations as experienced during acquisition. The results indicated that when visual information was available during the transfer tests performers could switch from PP to OL. When visual information was withdrawn, they shifted from the OL to the PP-control mode. This finding suggests that performers adopt a mode of control consistent with the feedback conditions provided during testing.

  9. Identification of the 3' and 5' terminal sequences of the 8 rna genome segments of european and north american genotypes of infectious salmon anemia virus (an orthomyxovirus and evidence for quasispecies based on the non-coding sequences of transcripts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riveroll Angela

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infectious salmon anemia (ISA virus (ISAV is a pathogen of marine-farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar; a disease first diagnosed in Norway in 1984. This virus, which was first characterized following its isolation in cell culture in 1995, belongs to the family Orthomyxoviridae, genus, Isavirus. The Isavirus genome consists of eight single-stranded RNA segments of negative sense, each with one to three open reading frames flanked by 3' and 5' non-coding regions (NCRs. Although the terminal sequences of other members of the family Orthomyxoviridae such as Influenzavirus A have been extensively analyzed, those of Isavirus remain largely unknown, and the few reported are from different ISAV strains and on different ends of the different RNA segments. This paper describes a comprehensive analysis of the 3' and 5' end sequences of the eight RNA segments of ISAV of both European and North American genotypes, and evidence of quasispecies of ISAV based on sequence variation in the untranslated regions (UTRs of transcripts. Results Two different ISAV strains and two different RNA preparations were used in this study. ISAV strain ADL-PM 3205 ISAV-07 (ADL-ISAV-07 of European genotype was the source of total RNA extracted from ISAV-infected TO cells, which contained both viral mRNA and cRNA. ISAV strain NBISA01 of North American genotype was the source of vRNA extracted from purified virus. The NCRs of each segment were identified by sequencing cDNA prepared by three different methods, 5' RACE (Rapid amplification of cDNA ends, 3' RACE, and RNA ligation mediated PCR. Sequence analysis of five clones each derived from one RT-PCR product from each NCR of ISAV transcripts of segments 1 to 8 revealed significant heterogeneity among the clones of the same segment end, providing unequivocal evidence for presence of intra-segment ISAV quasispecies. Both RNA preparations (mRNA/cRNA and vRNA yielded complementary sequence information, allowing the

  10. HLA-E coding and 3' untranslated region variability determined by next-generation sequencing in two West-African population samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelli, Erick C; Mendes-Junior, Celso T; Sabbagh, Audrey; Porto, Iane O P; Garcia, André; Ramalho, Jaqueline; Lima, Thálitta H A; Massaro, Juliana D; Dias, Fabrício C; Collares, Cristhianna V A; Jamonneau, Vincent; Bucheton, Bruno; Camara, Mamadou; Donadi, Eduardo A

    2015-12-01

    HLA-E is a non-classical Human Leucocyte Antigen class I gene with immunomodulatory properties. Whereas HLA-E expression usually occurs at low levels, it is widely distributed amongst human tissues, has the ability to bind self and non-self antigens and to interact with NK cells and T lymphocytes, being important for immunosurveillance and also for fighting against infections. HLA-E is usually the most conserved locus among all class I genes. However, most of the previous studies evaluating HLA-E variability sequenced only a few exons or genotyped known polymorphisms. Here we report a strategy to evaluate HLA-E variability by next-generation sequencing (NGS) that might be used to other HLA loci and present the HLA-E haplotype diversity considering the segment encoding the entire HLA-E mRNA (including 5'UTR, introns and the 3'UTR) in two African population samples, Susu from Guinea-Conakry and Lobi from Burkina Faso. Our results indicate that (a) the HLA-E gene is indeed conserved, encoding mainly two different protein molecules; (b) Africans do present several unknown HLA-E alleles presenting synonymous mutations; (c) the HLA-E 3'UTR is quite polymorphic and (d) haplotypes in the HLA-E 3'UTR are in close association with HLA-E coding alleles. NGS has proved to be an important tool on data generation for future studies evaluating variability in non-classical MHC genes.

  11. Identification of Potential Key Long Non-Coding RNAs and Target Genes Associated with Pneumonia Using Long Non-Coding RNA Sequencing (lncRNA-Seq): A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sai; Feng, Cong; Chen, Li; Huang, Zhi; Zhou, Xuan; Li, Bei; Wang, Li-li; Chen, Wei; Lv, Fa-qin; Li, Tan-shi

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to identify the potential key long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) and target genes associated with pneumonia using lncRNA sequencing (lncRNA-seq). Material/Methods A total of 9 peripheral blood samples from patients with mild pneumonia (n=3) and severe pneumonia (n=3), as well as volunteers without pneumonia (n=3), were received for lncRNA-seq. Based on the sequencing data, differentially expressed lncRNAs (DE-lncRNAs) were identified by the limma package. After the functional enrichment analysis, target genes of DE-lncRNAs were predicted, and the regulatory network was constructed. Results In total, 99 DE-lncRNAs (14 upregulated and 85 downregulated ones) were identified in the mild pneumonia group and 85 (72 upregulated and 13 downregulated ones) in the severe pneumonia group, compared with the control group. Among these DE-lncRNAs, 9 lncRNAs were upregulated in both the mild and severe pneumonia groups. A set of 868 genes were predicted to be targeted by these 9 DE-lncRNAs. In the network, RP11-248E9.5 and RP11-456D7.1 targeted the majority of genes. RP11-248E9.5 regulated several genes together with CTD-2300H10.2, such as QRFP and EPS8. Both upregulated RP11-456D7.1 and RP11-96C23.9 regulated several genes, such as PDK2. RP11-456D7.1 also positively regulated CCL21. Conclusions These novel lncRNAs and their target genes may be closely associated with the progression of pneumonia. PMID:27663962

  12. Hybrid high direct current circuit interrupter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockot, J.H.; Mikesell, H.E.; Jha, K.N.

    1998-08-11

    A device and a method are disclosed for interrupting very high direct currents (greater than 100,000 amperes) and simultaneously blocking high voltages (greater than 600 volts). The device utilizes a mechanical switch to carry very high currents continuously with low loss and a silicon controlled rectifier (SCR) to bypass the current around the mechanical switch while its contacts are separating. A commutation circuit, connected in parallel with the SCR, turns off the SCR by utilizing a resonant circuit to divert the SCR current after the switch opens. 7 figs.

  13. 牙龈卟啉单胞菌编码基因重注释研究%Re-annotation of Porphyromonas gingivalis coding-sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐晓捷; 计得伟; 张欣悦; 张无忌; 张会雄

    2015-01-01

    为了确保牙龈卟啉单胞菌生物大分子信息的准确性,对NCBI数据库中的3株牙龈卟啉单胞菌的注释信息进行研究。首先,准备好蛋白质编码与非编码序列正负样本,用基于Z曲线理论的Fisher判别法对正负样本集进行训练,确定一个判断ORF编码或非编码的阈值t0,由阈值作为判别条件来识别所有的ORFs,判断基因片段是否具有编码蛋白质的功能,由此阈值为判别标准排除掉3株牙龈卟啉单胞菌基因组中错误的基因注释信息。然后,用Prodigal基因预测软件对牙龈卟啉单胞菌进行基因预测,基因预测结果与原始功能已知基因进行比对,挑选出具有不同5’终端的ORFs,将这些具有不同5’终端的ORFs与功能已知的基因片段进行比对,找到重叠率小于20%的候选基因。最后,对这些候选基因用Blast进行序列比对找到满足条件的新基因,并为这些新基因添加功能注释信息。基于以上方法共排除了117个非编码的开放式阅读框,并找到了30个NCBI数据库中缺失的编码蛋白质的新基因。%To ensure accuracy of P.gingivalis biological macromolecules information,we investigated the annotations of the 3 P. gingivalis based on NCBI database. Firstly, we prepared protein⁃coding and non⁃coding sequences as positive and negative samples, respectively, and used Fisher Discriminant which was designed based on Z curve theory to determine the threshold t0,which was used as the criterion to determine whether the gene encoding the protein or not. We firstly excluded the wrong annotation information from three stains of P. gingivalis based on the threshold. Secondly, the P. gingivalis were predicted with the prodigal gene prediction software. We used the predicted genes compared to the original known⁃function genes and selected the ORFs with different 5’ terminals, identified the candidate genes with overlapping rate of less than 20

  14. Treatment interruptions in HIV-infected subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongiovanni, Marco; Casana, Maddalena; Tincati, Camilla; d'Arminio Monforte, Antonella

    2006-09-01

    Despite a high antiviral efficacy, the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in clinical practice is often impaired by the long-term toxicity of antiretroviral treatment, the increased rate of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) drug resistance in treated patients and the cost of therapies, so that possible interruption of HAART has to be considered as part of the current clinical practice. However, this strategy is usually followed by a rapid viral rebound with a substantial loss of CD4 T lymphocytes because the HIV suppression with HAART does not result in reconstitution of the HIV-specific immune response. Structured treatment interruption (STI) has already been investigated in HIV-infected subjects with well-controlled viral replication (initiating treatment during primary or chronic HIV infection) and in those with multiple treatment failures. A clear benefit of STI in patients with chronic infection remains controversial and these benefits are more often observed in patients starting treatment during primary HIV infection.

  15. Interrupting the Interruption: Neoliberalism and the Challenges of an Antiracist School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshulam, Assaf; Apple, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    The article examines a US public elementary bilingual, multicultural school that attempts to interrupt the reproduction of existing relations of dominance and subordination across a variety of differences. The school's experiences illuminate the complex reality of schools as a site of struggle and compromise between at times contradictory…

  16. Multislice CT angiography of interrupted aortic arch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Dong Hyun; Goo, Hyun Woo [Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Seo, Dong-Man; Yun, Tae-Jin; Park, Jeong-Jun [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Paediatric Cardiac Surgery, Seoul (Korea); Park, In-Sook; Ko, Jae Kon; Kim, Young Hwee [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Paediatric Cardiology, Seoul (Korea)

    2008-01-15

    Interrupted aortic arch (IAA) is defined as complete luminal and anatomic discontinuity between the ascending and descending aorta. Because almost all patients with IAA become critically ill during the neonatal period, they should undergo urgent corrective surgery. This clinical urgency necessitates a fast and accurate noninvasive diagnostic method. Although echocardiography remains the primary imaging tool for this purpose, it is not always sufficient for planning surgical correction of IAA, principally due to a limited acoustic window and the inexperience of imagers. In this context, multislice CT angiography is regarded as an appropriate imaging technique complementary to echocardiography because it is fast, accurate, and objective for the diagnosis of IAA. In this article we describe what cardiac radiologists should know about IAA in their clinical practice, including clinicopathological features, CT features with contemporary surgical methods and postoperative complications, and differentiation from coarctation of the aorta and aortic arch atresia. (orig.)

  17. Information technology - Telecommunications and information exchange between systems - Private integrated services network - Specification, functional model and information flows - Call priority interruption and call priority interruption protection supplementary services

    CERN Document Server

    International Organization for Standardization. Geneva

    2003-01-01

    Information technology - Telecommunications and information exchange between systems - Private integrated services network - Specification, functional model and information flows - Call priority interruption and call priority interruption protection supplementary services

  18. Information technology - Telecommunications and information exchange between systems - Private integrated services network - Inter-exchange signalling protocol - Call priority interruption and call priority interruption protection supplementary services

    CERN Document Server

    International Organization for Standardization. Geneva

    2003-01-01

    Information technology - Telecommunications and information exchange between systems - Private integrated services network - Inter-exchange signalling protocol - Call priority interruption and call priority interruption protection supplementary services

  19. Microsatellite interruptions stabilize primate genomes and exist as population-specific single nucleotide polymorphisms within individual human genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananda, Guruprasad; Hile, Suzanne E; Breski, Amanda; Wang, Yanli; Kelkar, Yogeshwar; Makova, Kateryna D; Eckert, Kristin A

    2014-07-01

    Interruptions of microsatellite sequences impact genome evolution and can alter disease manifestation. However, human polymorphism levels at interrupted microsatellites (iMSs) are not known at a genome-wide scale, and the pathways for gaining interruptions are poorly understood. Using the 1000 Genomes Phase-1 variant call set, we interrogated mono-, di-, tri-, and tetranucleotide repeats up to 10 units in length. We detected ∼26,000-40,000 iMSs within each of four human population groups (African, European, East Asian, and American). We identified population-specific iMSs within exonic regions, and discovered that known disease-associated iMSs contain alleles present at differing frequencies among the populations. By analyzing longer microsatellites in primate genomes, we demonstrate that single interruptions result in a genome-wide average two- to six-fold reduction in microsatellite mutability, as compared with perfect microsatellites. Centrally located interruptions lowered mutability dramatically, by two to three orders of magnitude. Using a biochemical approach, we tested directly whether the mutability of a specific iMS is lower because of decreased DNA polymerase strand slippage errors. Modeling the adenomatous polyposis coli tumor suppressor gene sequence, we observed that a single base substitution interruption reduced strand slippage error rates five- to 50-fold, relative to a perfect repeat, during synthesis by DNA polymerases α, β, or η. Computationally, we demonstrate that iMSs arise primarily by base substitution mutations within individual human genomes. Our biochemical survey of human DNA polymerase α, β, δ, κ, and η error rates within certain microsatellites suggests that interruptions are created most frequently by low fidelity polymerases. Our combined computational and biochemical results demonstrate that iMSs are abundant in human genomes and are sources of population-specific genetic variation that may affect genome stability. The

  20. Superimposed Code Theorectic Analysis of DNA Codes and DNA Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Bounds for DNA Codes Based on Fibonacci Ensembles of DNA Sequences ”, 2008 IEEE Proceedings of International Symposium on Information Theory, pp. 2292...5, June 2008, pp. 525-34. 32 28. A. Macula, et al., “Random Coding Bounds for DNA Codes Based on Fibonacci Ensembles of DNA Sequences ”, 2008...combinatorial method of bio-memory design and detection that encodes item or process information as numerical sequences represented in DNA. ComDMem is a

  1. Sequence variability in the HC-Pro coding regions of Korean soybean mosaic virus isolates is associated with differences in RNA silencing suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mei-Jia; Kim, Jung-Kyu; Seo, Eun-Young; Hong, Seok Myeong; Hwang, Eui-Il; Moon, Jung-Kyung; Domier, Leslie L; Hammond, John; Youn, Young-Nam; Lim, Hyoun-Sub

    2014-06-01

    Soybean mosaic virus (SMV), a member of the family Potyviridae, is an important viral pathogen affecting soybean production in Korea. Variations in helper component proteinase (HC-Pro) sequences and the pathogenicity of SMV samples from seven Korean provinces were compared with those of previously characterized SMV isolates from China, Korea and the United States. Phylogenetic analysis separated 16 new Korean SMV isolates into two groups. Fourteen of the new Korean SMV samples belonged to group II and were very similar to U.S. strain SMV G7 and Chinese isolate C14. One isolate in group II, A297-13, differed at three amino acid positions (L54F, N286D, D369N) in the HC-Pro coding sequence from severe isolates and SMV 413, showed very weak silencing suppressor activity, and produced only mild symptoms in soybean. To test the role of each amino acid substitution in RNA silencing and viral RNA accumulation, a series of point mutations was constructed. Substitution of N for D at position 286 in HC-Pro of SMV A297-12 significantly reduced silencing suppression activity. When the mutant HC-Pro of A297-13 was introduced into an infectious clone of SMV 413, accumulation of viral RNA was reduced to less than 3 % of the level of SMV 413 containing HC-Pro of A297-12 at 10 days post-inoculation (dpi) but increased to 40 % of SMV 413(HC-Pro A297-12) at 40 dpi. At 50 dpi RNA accumulation of SMV 413(HC-Pro A297-13) was similar to that of SMV 413(HC-Pro A297-12). However, at 50 dpi, the D at position 286 of HC-Pro in SMV 413(HC-Pro A297-13) was found to have reverted to N. The results showed that 1) a naturally occurring mutation in HC-Pro significantly reduced silencing suppression activity and accumulation of transgene and viral RNAs, and 2) that there was strong selection for revision to wild type when the mutation was introduced into an infectious clone of SMV.

  2. 14 CFR 135.417 - Mechanical interruption summary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mechanical interruption summary report. 135.417 Section 135.417 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Maintenance, Preventive Maintenance, and Alterations § 135.417 Mechanical interruption summary report....

  3. Interrupter resistance and wheezing phenotypes at 4 years of age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brussee, JE; Smit, HA; Koopman, LP; Wijga, AH; Kerkhof, M; Corver, K; Vos, APH; Gerritsen, J; Grobbee, DE; Brunekreef, B; Merkus, PJFM; Jongste, JCC

    2004-01-01

    It is difficult to distinguish young children with respiratory symptoms who will develop asthma from those with transient symptoms only. Measurement of interrupter resistance may help to identify children at high risk of asthma. The aim of this study is to compare interrupter resistance in 4-year-ol

  4. Evolutionary changes in gene expression, coding sequence and copy-number at the Cyp6g1 locus contribute to resistance to multiple insecticides in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W R Harrop

    Full Text Available Widespread use of insecticides has led to insecticide resistance in many populations of insects. In some populations, resistance has evolved to multiple pesticides. In Drosophila melanogaster, resistance to multiple classes of insecticide is due to the overexpression of a single cytochrome P450 gene, Cyp6g1. Overexpression of Cyp6g1 appears to have evolved in parallel in Drosophila simulans, a sibling species of D. melanogaster, where it is also associated with insecticide resistance. However, it is not known whether the ability of the CYP6G1 enzyme to provide resistance to multiple insecticides evolved recently in D. melanogaster or if this function is present in all Drosophila species. Here we show that duplication of the Cyp6g1 gene occurred at least four times during the evolution of different Drosophila species, and the ability of CYP6G1 to confer resistance to multiple insecticides exists in D. melanogaster and D. simulans but not in Drosophila willistoni or Drosophila virilis. In D. virilis, which has multiple copies of Cyp6g1, one copy confers resistance to DDT and another to nitenpyram, suggesting that the divergence of protein sequence between copies subsequent to the duplication affected the activity of the enzyme. All orthologs tested conferred resistance to one or more insecticides, suggesting that CYP6G1 had the capacity to provide resistance to anthropogenic chemicals before they existed. Finally, we show that expression of Cyp6g1 in the Malpighian tubules, which contributes to DDT resistance in D. melanogaster, is specific to the D. melanogaster-D. simulans lineage. Our results suggest that a combination of gene duplication, regulatory changes and protein coding changes has taken place at the Cyp6g1 locus during evolution and this locus may play a role in providing resistance to different environmental toxins in different Drosophila species.

  5. Sequence analysis of Epstein-Barr virus EBNA-2 gene coding amino acid 148-487 in nasopharyngeal and gastric carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xinying

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA-2 plays a key role in the B-cell growth transformation by initiating and maintaining the proliferation of infected B-cell upon EBV infection in vitro. Most studies about EBNA-2 have focused on its functions yet little is known for its intertypic polymorphisms. Results Coding region for amino acid (aa 148-487 of the EBNA-2 gene was sequenced in 25 EBV-associated gastric carcinomas (EBVaGCs, 56 nasopharyngeal carcinomas (NPCs and 32 throat washings (TWs from healthy donors in Northern China. Three variations (g48991t, c48998a, t49613a were detected in all of the samples (113/113, 100%. EBNA-2 could be classified into four distinct subtypes: E2-A, E2-B, E2-C and E2-D based on the deletion status of three aa (294Q, 357K and 358G. Subtypes E2-A and E2-C were detected in 56/113 (49.6%, 38/113 (33.6% samples, respectively. E2-A was observed more in EBVaGCs samples and subtype E2-D was only detected in the NPC samples. Variation analysis in EBNA-2 functional domains: the TAD residue (I438L and the NLS residues (E476G, P484H and I486T were only detected in NPC samples which located in the carboxyl terminus of EBNA-2 gene. Conclusions The subtypes E2-A and E2-C were the dominant genotypes of the EBNA-2 gene in Northern China. The subtype E2-D may be associated with the tumorigenesis of NPC. The NPC isolates were prone harbor to more mutations than the other two groups in the functional domains.

  6. Servicing a globally broadcast interrupt signal in a multi-threaded computer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attinella, John E.; Davis, Kristan D.; Musselman, Roy G.; Satterfield, David L.

    2015-12-29

    Methods, apparatuses, and computer program products for servicing a globally broadcast interrupt signal in a multi-threaded computer comprising a plurality of processor threads. Embodiments include an interrupt controller indicating in a plurality of local interrupt status locations that a globally broadcast interrupt signal has been received by the interrupt controller. Embodiments also include a thread determining that a local interrupt status location corresponding to the thread indicates that the globally broadcast interrupt signal has been received by the interrupt controller. Embodiments also include the thread processing one or more entries in a global interrupt status bit queue based on whether global interrupt status bits associated with the globally broadcast interrupt signal are locked. Each entry in the global interrupt status bit queue corresponds to a queued global interrupt.

  7. INTERRUPTED STELLAR ENCOUNTERS IN STAR CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geller, Aaron M. [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Leigh, Nathan W. C., E-mail: a-geller@northwestern.edu, E-mail: nleigh@amnh.org [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West and 79th Street, New York, NY 10024 (United States)

    2015-07-20

    Strong encounters between single stars and binaries play a pivotal role in the evolution of star clusters. Such encounters can also dramatically modify the orbital parameters of binaries, exchange partners in and out of binaries, and are a primary contributor to the rate of physical stellar collisions in star clusters. Often, these encounters are studied under the approximation that they happen quickly enough and within a small enough volume to be considered isolated from the rest of the cluster. In this paper, we study the validity of this assumption through the analysis of a large grid of single–binary and binary–binary scattering experiments. For each encounter we evaluate the encounter duration, and compare this with the expected time until another single or binary star will join the encounter. We find that for lower-mass clusters, similar to typical open clusters in our Galaxy, the percent of encounters that will be “interrupted” by an interloping star or binary may be 20%–40% (or higher) in the core, though for typical globular clusters we expect ≲1% of encounters to be interrupted. Thus, the assumption that strong encounters occur in relative isolation breaks down for certain clusters. Instead, many strong encounters develop into more complex “mini-clusters,” which must be accounted for in studying, for example, the internal dynamics of star clusters, and the physical stellar collision rate.

  8. Interrupted Stellar Encounters in Star Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Geller, Aaron M

    2015-01-01

    Strong encounters between single stars and binaries play a pivotal role in the evolution of star clusters. Such encounters can also dramatically modify the orbital parameters of binaries, exchange partners in and out of binaries, and are a primary contributor to the rate of physical stellar collisions in star clusters. Often, these encounters are studied under the approximation that they happen quickly enough and within a small enough volume to be considered isolated from the rest of the cluster. In this paper, we study the validity of this assumption through the analysis of a large grid of single - binary and binary - binary scattering experiments. For each encounter we evaluate the encounter duration, and compare this with the expected time until another single or binary star will join the encounter. We find that for lower-mass clusters, similar to typical open clusters in our Galaxy, the percent of encounters that will be "interrupted" by an interloping star or binary may be 20-40% (or higher) in the core,...

  9. Interrupting characteristics of puffer and suction type SF/sub 6/ gas interrupter especially in thermal breakdown region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natsui, K.; Hirasawa, K.; Hirata, K.; Nakamura, I.; Takasuna, T.; Yoshioka, Y.

    1984-04-01

    Interrupting characteristics in thermal region within the range of 30-60kA current levels have been examined with an experimental model breaker under some SF/sub 6/ gas pressures of 4.5-15 bars. The interrupter tested with the breaker was designed to shorten the arcing time based on the puffer principle with the aid of a suction chamber. Arcing time was shortened with the fastly established gas-flow into the suction chamber in comparison with conventional puffer type interrupters. Interrupting characteristics in short arcing time region were much influenced by interrupter structures, interrupting currents, filling gas pressures and rates of rise of recovery voltage (rrrV). Particularly, in large current region over 50kA, the minimum arcing time was sensitively affected by moving side interrupter structures. Using a newly developed interrupter characterized by a follower type insulating nozzle, it has demonstrated a minimum arcing time of 0.37 cycles for the 63kA 90% short line fault (SLF) condition for two breaks per pole under an SF/sub 6/ gas pressure of 10 bars, and also has demonstrated 0.33 cycles for the 50kA 90% SLF condition under a pressure of 6 bars.

  10. Identification by sequencing based typing and complete coding region analysis of three new HLA class II alleles: DRB3*0210, DRB3*0211 and DQB1*0310.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balas, A; Santos, S; Aviles, M J; Garcia-Sanchez, F; Lillo, R; Vicario, J L

    2000-10-01

    The study of HLA class II polymorphism by direct exon 2 DNA sequencing analysis has been established to be a reliable and accurate high-resolution typing procedure. This approach shows some advantages in relation to previous methods, polymerase chain reaction using sequence-specific oligonucleotides (PCR-SSO) and sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP), basically due to the capability of analysis for the complete sequenced genomic region, including non-polymorphic motifs. DRB3 and DQB1 sequencing based typing (SBT) in unrelated bone marrow donor searching allowed us to detect three new alleles. The complete coding region sequences were characterised from cDNA. Two new DRB3 alleles, DRB3*0210 and DRB3*0211, were described in two Caucasian bone marrow donors. Both sequences showed single point mutations regarding DRB3*0202, producing amino acid replacements at positions 51 (Asp to Thr) and 67 (Leu to Ile), respectively. These two point mutations can be found in other DRB alleles, and suggest that gene conversion would be involved in the origin of both alleles. A new DQB1 sequence was found in a Spanish patient that showed two nucleotide differences, positions 134 and 141, with regard to its close similar DQB1*03011 allele. Only substitution at position 134 provoked amino acid replacement at residue 45, Glu to Gly. This single amino acid change would be involved in the lack of serologic recognition of this new molecule by DQ7-specific reagents.

  11. A Multiple-Reception Access Protocol with Interruptions with Mixed Priorities in CDMA Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Xiaowen; Zhu Jinkang

    2003-01-01

    A novel access protocol called Multiple-Reception Access Protocol (MRAP) and its modification MRAP/WI are proposed. In this protocol, all colliding users with a common code can be identified by the base station due to the offset of arrival time Thus they can retransmit access requests under the base station's control. Furthermore new arrivals with higher priority level can interrupt the lower retransmission in order to reduce its access delay although it increases the lower priority's delay. Simulation results of MRAP and MRAP/WI are given in order to highlight the superior performance of the proposed approach.

  12. Interruptions in gene expression drive highly expressed operons to the leading strand of DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Morgan N; Alm, Eric J; Arkin, Adam P

    2005-01-01

    In bacteria, most genes are on the leading strand of replication, a phenomenon attributed to collisions between the DNA and RNA polymerases. In Escherichia coli, these collisions slow the movement of the replication fork through actively transcribed genes only if they are coded on the lagging strand. For genes on both strands, however, these collisions sever nascent transcripts and interrupt gene expression. Based on these observations, we propose a new theory to explain strand bias: genes whose expression is important for fitness are selected to the leading strand because this reduces the duration of these interruptions. Our theory predicts that multi-gene operons, which are subject to longer interruptions, should be more strongly selected to the leading strand than singleton transcripts. We show that this is true even after controlling for the tendency for essential genes, which are strongly biased to the leading strand, to occur in operons. Our theory also predicts that other factors that are associated with strand bias should have stronger effects for genes that are in operons. We find that expression level and phylogenetic ubiquity are correlated with strand bias for both essential and non-essential genes, but only for genes in operons.

  13. Static Checking of Interrupt-driven Software

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brylow, Dennis; Damgaard, Niels; Palsberg, Jens

    2001-01-01

    in a few seconds on a standard PC. Our tool is one of the first to give an efficient and useful static analysis of assembly code. It enables increased confidence in correctness, significantly reduced testing requirements, and support for maintenance throughout the system life-cycle....... require extensive brute-force testing, making development and maintenance costly. This is particularly true for system components that are written in assembly language. Static checking has the potential of alleviating these problems, but until now there has been little tool support for programming...... fundamental safety and liveness properties. Our approach is based on a known algorithm for model checking of pushdown systems, and produces a control-flow graph annotated with information about time, space, safety, and liveness. Each benchmark is approximately 1000 lines of code, and the checking is done...

  14. Neurocognition and quality of life after reinitiating antiretroviral therapy in children randomized to planned treatment interruption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ananworanich, J.; Melvin, D.; Amador, J.T.; Childs, T.; Medin, G.; Boscolo, V.; Compagnucci, A.; Kanjanavanit, S.; Montero, S.; Gibb, D.M.; Burger, D.M.; Groot, R. de

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Understanding the effects of antiretroviral treatment (ART) interruption on neurocognition and quality of life (QoL) are important for managing unplanned interruptions and planned interruptions in HIV cure research. DESIGN: Children previously randomized to continuous (continuous ART, n =

  15. Deformation of contact surfaces in a vacuum interrupter after high-current interruptions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Haoran; Wang, Zhenxing, E-mail: zxwang@xjtu.edu.cn; Zhou, Zhipeng; Jiang, Yanjun; Wang, Jianhua; Geng, Yingsan; Liu, Zhiyuan [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2016-08-07

    In a high-current interruption, the contact surface in a vacuum interrupter might be severely damaged by constricted vacuum arcs causing a molten area on it. As a result, a protrusion will be initiated by a transient recovery voltage after current zero, enhancing the local electric field and making breakdowns occur easier. The objective of this paper is to simulate the deformation process on the molten area under a high electric field by adopting the finite element method. A time-dependent Electrohydrodynamic model was established, and the liquid-gas interface was tracked by the level-set method. From the results, the liquid metal can be deformed to a Taylor cone if the applied electric field is above a critical value. This value is correlated to the initial geometry of the liquid metal, which increases as the size of the liquid metal decreases. Moreover, the buildup time of a Taylor cone obeys the power law t = k × E{sup −3}, where E is the initial electric field and k is a coefficient related to the material property, indicating a temporal self-similar characteristic. In addition, the influence of temperature has little impact on the deformation but has great impact on electron emission. Finally, the possible reason to initiate a delayed breakdown is associated with the deformation. The breakdown does not occur immediately when the voltage is just applied upon the gap but is postponed to several milliseconds later when the tip is formed on the liquid metal.

  16. Deformation of contact surfaces in a vacuum interrupter after high-current interruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haoran; Wang, Zhenxing; Zhou, Zhipeng; Jiang, Yanjun; Wang, Jianhua; Geng, Yingsan; Liu, Zhiyuan

    2016-08-01

    In a high-current interruption, the contact surface in a vacuum interrupter might be severely damaged by constricted vacuum arcs causing a molten area on it. As a result, a protrusion will be initiated by a transient recovery voltage after current zero, enhancing the local electric field and making breakdowns occur easier. The objective of this paper is to simulate the deformation process on the molten area under a high electric field by adopting the finite element method. A time-dependent Electrohydrodynamic model was established, and the liquid-gas interface was tracked by the level-set method. From the results, the liquid metal can be deformed to a Taylor cone if the applied electric field is above a critical value. This value is correlated to the initial geometry of the liquid metal, which increases as the size of the liquid metal decreases. Moreover, the buildup time of a Taylor cone obeys the power law t = k × E-3, where E is the initial electric field and k is a coefficient related to the material property, indicating a temporal self-similar characteristic. In addition, the influence of temperature has little impact on the deformation but has great impact on electron emission. Finally, the possible reason to initiate a delayed breakdown is associated with the deformation. The breakdown does not occur immediately when the voltage is just applied upon the gap but is postponed to several milliseconds later when the tip is formed on the liquid metal.

  17. Approximator: Predicting Interruptibility in Software Development with Commodity Computers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tell, Paolo; Jalaliniya, Shahram; Andersen, Kristian S. M.

    2015-01-01

    Assessing the presence and availability of a remote colleague is key in coordination in global software development but is not easily done using existing computer-mediated channels. Previous research has shown that automated estimation of interruptibility is feasible and can achieve a precision...... laptops. Experimental results show that the information aggregated from several activity monitors (i.e., Key-logger, mouse-logger, and face-detection) provide useful data, which, once combined with machine learning techniques, can automatically estimate the interruptibility of users with a 78% accuracy...... closer to, or even better than, human judgment. However, existing approaches to assess interruptibility have been designed to rely on external sensors. In this paper, we present Approximator, a system that estimates the interruptibility of a user based exclusively on the sensing ability of commodity...

  18. Instant Messaging Usage and Interruptions in the Workplace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui‐Jung Chang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the present study is to explore IM interruption by relating it to media choices and purposes of IM use in the workplace. Two major media choice concepts were: media richness and social influence; while four purposes of IM use were: organization work, knowledge work, socializing, and boundary spanning activities. Data (N = 283 were collected via a combination of convenience and snowball sampling of “computer‐using workers” in Taiwan, based on the Standard Occupational Classification system published by the Taiwan government. Results indicated that media choice works better than purpose of IM use to explain IM interruption. Among them, social influence was the best predictor to IM interruption in the workplace. In addition, instant feedback and personalization provided by IM, and IM usage for the purposes of knowledge work and socializing, also relate to IM interruption in the workplace.

  19. HIV models for treatment interruption: Adaptation and comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillmann, Andreas; Crane, Martin; Ruskin, Heather J.

    2017-10-01

    In recent years, Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) has become commonplace for treating HIV infections, although a cure remains elusive, given reservoirs of replicating latently-infected cells, which are resistant to normal treatment regimes. Treatment interruptions, whether ad hoc or structured, are known to cause a rapid increase in viral production to detectable levels, but numerous clinical trials remain inconclusive on the dangers inherent in this resurgence. In consequence, interest in examining interruption strategies has recently been rekindled. This overview considers modelling approaches, which have been used to explore the issue of treatment interruption. We highlight their purpose and the formalisms employed and examine ways in which clinical data have been used. Implementation of selected models is demonstrated, illustrative examples provided and model performance compared for these cases. Possible extensions to bottom-up modelling techniques for treatment interruptions are briefly discussed.

  20. A case of neonatal arterial thrombosis mimicking interrupted aortic arch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürsu, Hazım Alper; Varan, Birgül; Oktay, Ayla; Özkan, Murat

    2015-06-01

    Neonatal arterial thrombosis is a very rare entity with clinical findings resembling coarctation of aorta or interrupted aortic arch. A two day-old male newborn was admitted to a different hospital with difficulty in sucking and sleepiness. On echocardiographic examination, a diagnosis of interrupted aortic arch was made and he was treated with prostoglandin E2. When the patient presented to our center, physical examination revealed that his feet were bilaterally cold. The pulses were not palpable and there were ecchymotic regions in the lower extremities. Echocardiography ruled out interrupted aortic arch. Computerized tomographic angiography revealed a large thrombosis and total occlusion of the abdominal aorta. Since there was no response to treatment with tissue plasminogen activator, we performed thrombectomy. Homozygous Factor V Leiden and Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase mutations were found in this patient. Neonatal aortic thrombosis which is observed very rarely and fatal should be considered in the differential diagnosis of coarctation of aorta and interrupted aortic arch.

  1. Trends of Development of Interruption Technologies in DC Circuit Breaker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, B.Y.; Chung, J.K.; Shin, Y.J.; Park, K.Y. [Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute (Korea)

    1999-05-01

    This paper describes the necessity and the history of the development of DC circuit breaker and the trends of the development of interruption technologies in DC circuit breaker. (author). 8 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. A Wrist-Worn Thermohaptic Device for Graceful Interruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolton, Frank; Jalaliniya, Shahram; Pederson, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Thermal haptics is a potential system output modality for wearable devices that promises to function at the periphery of human attention. When adequately combined with existing attention-governing mechanisms of the human mind, it could be used for interrupting the human agent at a time when......-Aware-systems-inspired approach “Egocentric Interaction” aimed at supporting the design of envisioned Wearable Personal Assistants intended to, among other things, help human perception and cognition with the management of interruptions....

  3. Conceptual Design for Permutation Coding with Direct Chaotic Sequence Spread Spectrum%一类直接混沌序列扩频通信置换编码方案

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹波; 周学广

    2015-01-01

    直接序列扩频通信需要大线性复杂度的序列用作扩频调制码,混沌序列可以胜任。为实现一类扩频通信编码方案,提出基于“天书”模型的混沌序列发生器,对其进行了置换编码,随后分析了置换编码的保密强度,最后给出了该编码的应用途径和理由。%Chaotic sequence could be competent for the need of very large linear complexity sequence ,which modulated for spread spectrum for Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum (DSSS) .Firstly a skytale‐based chaotic sequence generator was proposed ,and spread spectrum communication was encoded with permutation ,then the security level of permutation coding was analyzed .At last ,the application and account was provided for the new chaotic coding design .

  4. Molecular phylogeny of 21 tropical bamboo species reconstructed by integrating non-coding internal transcribed spacer (ITS1 and 2) sequences and their consensus secondary structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Jayadri Sekhar; Bhattacharya, Samik; Pal, Amita

    2017-06-01

    The unavailability of the reproductive structure and unpredictability of vegetative characters for the identification and phylogenetic study of bamboo prompted the application of molecular techniques for greater resolution and consensus. We first employed internal transcribed spacer (ITS1, 5.8S rRNA and ITS2) sequences to construct the phylogenetic tree of 21 tropical bamboo species. While the sequence alone could grossly reconstruct the traditional phylogeny amongst the 21-tropical species studied, some anomalies were encountered that prompted a further refinement of the phylogenetic analyses. Therefore, we integrated the secondary structure of the ITS sequences to derive individual sequence-structure matrix to gain more resolution on the phylogenetic reconstruction. The results showed that ITS sequence-structure is the reliable alternative to the conventional phenotypic method for the identification of bamboo species. The best-fit topology obtained by the sequence-structure based phylogeny over the sole sequence based one underscores closer clustering of all the studied Bambusa species (Sub-tribe Bambusinae), while Melocanna baccifera, which belongs to Sub-Tribe Melocanneae, disjointedly clustered as an out-group within the consensus phylogenetic tree. In this study, we demonstrated the dependability of the combined (ITS sequence+structure-based) approach over the only sequence-based analysis for phylogenetic relationship assessment of bamboo.

  5. Decoder for Nonbinary CWS Quantum Codes

    CERN Document Server

    Melo, Nolmar; Portugal, Renato

    2012-01-01

    We present a decoder for nonbinary CWS quantum codes using the structure of union codes. The decoder runs in two steps: first we use a union of stabilizer codes to detect a sequence of errors, and second we build a new code, called union code, that allows to correct the errors.

  6. NMR studies demonstrate a unique AAB composition and chain register for a heterotrimeric type IV collagen model peptide containing a natural interruption site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jianxi; Sun, Xiuxia; Madhan, Balaraman; Brodsky, Barbara; Baum, Jean

    2015-10-02

    All non-fibrillar collagens contain interruptions in the (Gly-X-Y)n repeating sequence, such as the more than 20 interruptions found in chains of basement membrane type IV collagen. Two selectively doubly labeled peptides are designed to model a site in type IV collagen with a GVG interruption in the α1(IV) and a corresponding GISLK sequence within the α2(IV) chain. CD and NMR studies on a 2:1 mixture of these two peptides support the formation of a single-component heterotrimer that maintains the one-residue staggering in the triple-helix, has a unique chain register, and contains hydrogen bonds at the interruption site. Formation of hydrogen bonds at interruption sites may provide a driving force for self-assembly and chain register in type IV and other non-fibrillar collagens. This study illustrates the potential role of interruptions in the structure, dynamics, and folding of natural collagen heterotrimers and forms a basis for understanding their biological role.

  7. Code length limit in phase-sensitive OTDR using ultralong (>1M bits) pulse sequences due to fading induced by fiber optical path drifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, H. F.; Shi, K.; Thomsen, B. C.; Martin-Lopez, S.; Gonzalez-Herraez, M.; Savory, S. J.

    2017-04-01

    Recently, it has been demonstrated that by recovering the amplitude and phase of the backscattered optical signal, a ΦOTDR using pulse coding can be treated as a fully linear system in terms of trace coding/decoding, thus allowing for the use of tens of thousands of bits with a dramatic improvement of the system performance. In this communication, as a continuation of previous work by the same authors, a preliminary study aiming at characterizing the limits of the system in terms of maximum usable code length is presented. Using a code exceeding 1million bits over a duration of 0.26ms, it is observed that fiber optical path variations exceeding ≍π occurring over a time inferior to the pulse code length can lead to localized fading in the ΦOTDR trace. The occurrence, positions and form of the fading points along the ΦOTDR trace is observed to be strongly dependent on the type, frequency and amplitude of the perturbations applied to the fiber.

  8. The coding region of the human c-mos pseudogene contains Alu repeat insertions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabarovsky, E R; Chumakov, I M; Prassolov, V S; Kisselev, L L

    1984-10-01

    We have determined the nucleotide sequence of an 841-bp fragment derived from a segment of the human genome previously cloned by Chumakov et al. [Gene 17 (1982) 19-26] and Zabarovsky et al. [Gene 23 (1983) 379-384] and containing regions homologous to the viral mos gene probe. This sequence displays homology with part of the coding region of the human and murine c-mos genes, contains several termination codons, and is interrupted by two Alu-family elements flanked by short direct repeats. Probably, the progenitor of the human c-mos gene was duplicated approximately at the time of mammalian divergence, was converted to a pseudogene, and acquired insertions of two Alu elements.

  9. Phylogenetic analyses of the polyprotein coding sequences of serotype O foot-and-mouth disease viruses in East Africa: evidence for interserotypic recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balinda, Sheila; Siegismund, Hans; Muwanika, Vincent;

    2010-01-01

    Background Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is endemic in East Africa with the majority of the reported outbreaks attributed to serotype O virus. In this study, phylogenetic analyses of the polyprotein coding region of serotype O FMD viruses from Kenya and Uganda has been undertaken to infer evolutio...

  10. Cloning and sequencing of the genes coding for the A and B subunits of vacuolar-type Na(+)-ATPase from Enterococcus hirae. Coexistence of vacuolar- and F0F1-type ATPases in one bacterial cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takase, K; Yamato, I; Kakinuma, Y

    1993-06-05

    The eubacterium Enterococcus hirae ATCC 9790 possesses a H(+)-translocating ATPase, and the deduced amino acid sequences of the genes coding for this enzyme have indicated that it is a typical F0F1-type ATPase (Shibata, C., Ehara, T., Tomura, K., Igarashi, K., and Kobayashi, H. (1992) J. Bacteriol. 174, 6117-6124). We cloned the ntpA and ntpB genes coding for the A and B subunits, respectively, of Na(+)-translocating ATPase from the same bacterium, and the full amino acid sequences of the two subunits were deduced from the nucleotide sequence. The A (593 amino acid residues) and B (458 amino acid residues) subunits were highly homologous (48-60% identical) to the A (large or alpha) and the B (small or beta) subunits, respectively, of vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPases which have been found in eukaryotic endomembrane systems (Neurospora crassa, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Arabidopsis thaliana, and carrot) and archaebacterial cell membranes (Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and Methanosarcina barkeri). The A and B subunits of Na(+)-ATPase showed about 23-28% identities with the beta and alpha subunits of E. hirae F1-ATPase and of Escherichia coli F1-ATPase, respectively. These results indicate that E. hirae Na(+)-ATPase belongs to the vacuolar-type ATPase. This is the first demonstration that both genes for V- and F-type ATPases are functionally expressed in one bacterial cell.

  11. Reconsideration of systematic relationships within the order Euplotida (Protista, Ciliophora) using new sequences of the gene coding for small-subunit rRNA and testing the use of combined data sets to construct phylogenies of the Diophrys-complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Zhenzhen; Song, Weibo; Clamp, John C; Chen, Zigui; Gao, Shan; Zhang, Qianqian

    2009-03-01

    Comprehensive molecular analyses of phylogenetic relationships within euplotid ciliates are relatively rare, and the relationships among some families remain questionable. We performed phylogenetic analyses of the order Euplotida based on new sequences of the gene coding for small-subunit RNA (SSrRNA) from a variety of taxa across the entire order as well as sequences from some of these taxa of other genes (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region and histone H4) that have not been included in previous analyses. Phylogenetic trees based on SSrRNA gene sequences constructed with four different methods had a consistent branching pattern that included the following features: (1) the "typical" euplotids comprised a paraphyletic assemblage composed of two divergent clades (family Uronychiidae and families Euplotidae-Certesiidae-Aspidiscidae-Gastrocirrhidae), (2) in the family Uronychiidae, the genera Uronychia and Paradiophrys formed a clearly outlined, well-supported clade that seemed to be rather divergent from Diophrys and Diophryopsis, suggesting that the Diophrys-complex may have had a longer and more separate evolutionary history than previously supposed, (3) inclusion of 12 new SSrRNA sequences in analyses of Euplotidae revealed two new clades of species within the family and cast additional doubt on the present classification of genera within the family, and (4) the intraspecific divergence among five species of Aspidisca was far greater than those of closely related genera. The ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 coding regions and partial histone H4 genes of six morphospecies in the Diophrys-complex were sequenced along with their SSrRNA genes and used to compare phylogenies constructed from single data sets to those constructed from combined sets. Results indicated that combined analyses could be used to construct more reliable, less ambiguous phylogenies of complex groups like the order Euplotida, because they provide a greater amount and diversity of information.

  12. Current interruption measurement and analysis for PEM fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, J.C.; Yuan, X.; Wang, H. [National Research Council of Canada, Vancouver, BC (Canada). Inst. for Fuel Cell Innovation

    2007-07-01

    The ohmic resistance, charge transfer resistance and the capacity discharge limit of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells can be evaluated and characterized by a newly developed, low cost, current interruption measuring method. This paper presented the results of a study in which the current interruption measurement for a PEM fuel cell was set up and proven through measurements with a dummy cell. The current interruption characteristics of a 500 W PEM fuel cell stack with an active area of 280 cm{sup 2} was measured using the National Instrument PCI data acquisition unit combined with a TDI electronics load-bank and a FuelCon test station, at different load currents. The ohmic loss of the stack determined by current interruption measurements was in good agreement with that determined by AC impedance spectroscopy. The same setup was shown to be effective for single cell measurements of a small PEM fuel cell and for a PEM fuel cell stack with a load bank. It was concluded that the current interruption measurement is much faster than the AC impedance method, but has lower accuracy, particularly for a signal with high noise. 1 ref., 10 figs.

  13. Comparative sequence analysis of the P-, M- and L-coding region of the measles virus CAM-70 live attenuated vaccine strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.R. Santos

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Measles virus is a highly contagious agent which causes a major health problem in developing countries. The viral genomic RNA is single-stranded, nonsegmented and of negative polarity. Many live attenuated vaccines for measles virus have been developed using either the prototype Edmonston strain or other locally isolated measles strains. Despite the diverse geographic origins of the vaccine viruses and the different attenuation methods used, there was remarkable sequence similarity of H, F and N genes among all vaccine strains. CAM-70 is a Japanese measles attenuated vaccine strain widely used in Brazilian children and produced by Bio-Manguinhos since 1982. Previous studies have characterized this vaccine biologically and genomically. Nevertheless, only the F, H and N genes have been sequenced. In the present study we have sequenced the remaining P, M and L genes (approximately 1.6, 1.4 and 6.5 kb, respectively to complete the genomic characterization of CAM-70 and to assess the extent of genetic relationship between CAM-70 and other current vaccines. These genes were amplified using long-range or standard RT-PCR techniques, and the cDNA was cloned and automatically sequenced using the dideoxy chain-termination method. The sequence analysis comparing previously sequenced genotype A strains with the CAM-70 Bio-Manguinhos strain showed a low divergence among them. However, the CAM-70 strains (CAM-70 Bio-Manguinhos and a recently sequenced CAM-70 submaster seed strain were assigned to a specific group by phylogenetic analysis using the neighbor-joining method. Information about our product at the genomic level is important for monitoring vaccination campaigns and for future studies of measles virus attenuation.

  14. The Effects of Interruptions on Oncologists' Patient Assessment and Medication Ordering Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia L. Trbovich

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Interruptions are causal factors in medication errors. Although researchers have assessed the nature and frequency of interruptions during medication administration, there has been little focus on understanding their effects during medication ordering. The goal of this research was to examine the nature, frequency, and impact of interruptions on oncologists' ordering practices. Direct observations were conducted at a Canadian cancer treatment facility to (1 document the nature, frequency, and timing of interruptions during medication ordering, and (2 quantify the use of coping mechanisms by oncologists. On average, oncologists were interrupted 17 % of their time, and were frequently interrupted during safety-critical stages of medication ordering. When confronted with interruptions, oncologists engaged/multitasked more often than resorting to deferring/blocking. While some interruptions are necessary forms of communication, efforts must be made to reduce unnecessary interruptions during safety-critical tasks, and to develop interventions that increase oncologists' resiliency to inevitable interruptions.

  15. Coding Partitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Burderi

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by the study of decipherability conditions for codes weaker than Unique Decipherability (UD, we introduce the notion of coding partition. Such a notion generalizes that of UD code and, for codes that are not UD, allows to recover the ``unique decipherability" at the level of the classes of the partition. By tacking into account the natural order between the partitions, we define the characteristic partition of a code X as the finest coding partition of X. This leads to introduce the canonical decomposition of a code in at most one unambiguouscomponent and other (if any totally ambiguouscomponents. In the case the code is finite, we give an algorithm for computing its canonical partition. This, in particular, allows to decide whether a given partition of a finite code X is a coding partition. This last problem is then approached in the case the code is a rational set. We prove its decidability under the hypothesis that the partition contains a finite number of classes and each class is a rational set. Moreover we conjecture that the canonical partition satisfies such a hypothesis. Finally we consider also some relationships between coding partitions and varieties of codes.

  16. Using the verona coding definitions of emotional sequences (VR-CoDES) and health provider responses (VR-CoDES-P) in the dental context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Alice; Humphris, Gerry; Wanyonyi, Kristina L; Freeman, Ruth

    2012-10-01

    To show if cues, concerns and provider responses (defined in VR-CoDES and VR-CoDES-P manuals) are present, can be reliably coded and require additional advice for adoption in a dental context. Thirteen patients in a dental practice setting were videoed with either their dentist or hygienist and dental nurse present in routine treatment sessions. All utterances were coded using the Verona systems: VR-CoDES and the VR-CoDES-P. Rates of cue, concerns and provider responses described and reliability tested. The VR-CoDES and VR-CoDES-P were successfully applied in the dental context. The intra-rater ICCs for the detection of cues and concerns and provider response were acceptable and above 0.75. A similar satisfactory result was found for the inter-rater reliability. The VR-CoDES and the VR-CoDES-P are applicable in the dental setting with minor supporting guidelines and show evidence of reliable coding. The VR-CoDES and the VR-CoDES-P may be helpful tools for analysing patient cues and concerns and the dental professionals' responses in the dental context. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Thinking aloud in the presence of interruptions and time constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Holmegaard, Kristin Due

    2013-01-01

    Thinking aloud is widely used for usability evaluation and its reactivity is therefore important to the quality of evaluation results. This study investigates whether thinking aloud (i.e., verbalization at levels 1 and 2) affects the behaviour of users who perform tasks that involve interruptions...... and time constraints, two frequent elements of real-world activities. We find that the presence of auditory, visual, audiovisual, or no interruptions interacts with thinking aloud for task solution rate, task completion time, and participants’ fixation rate. Thinking-aloud participants also spend longer...... responding to interruptions than control participants. Conversely, the absence or presence of time constraints does not interact with thinking aloud, suggesting that time pressure is less likely to make thinking aloud reactive than previously assumed. Our results inform practitioners faced with the decision...

  18. Interruptions de grossesse dans le canton de Vaud en 2007

    OpenAIRE

    Balthasar, Hugues; Spencer, Brenda

    2008-01-01

    En 2007, un total de 1439 interruptions de grossesse ont été pratiquées dans le canton de Vaud, dont 89% concernaient des femmes domiciliées dans le canton. Rapporté à la population féminine en âge de procréer (15-49 ans), le taux d'interruption de grossesse est estimé à 7,6 pour mille (15-44 ans : 9,4 pour mille). Le taux d'interruptions de grossesses pour 1000 résidentes âgée de 15 à 49 ans marque une légère progression, passant de 6,8 pour mille en 2004 à 7,6 pour mille en 2007. Un écart i...

  19. Interruptions de grossesse dans le canton de Vaud en 2006

    OpenAIRE

    Balthasar, Hugues; Spencer, Brenda

    2007-01-01

    En 2006, un total de 1306 interruptions de grossesse ont été pratiquées dans le canton de Vaud, soit 89 (7%) de plus que l'année précédente. La grande majorité (93%) de ces interruptions de grossesse concernent des femmes résidant dans le canton de Vaud. Si le nombre absolu d'interruptions de grossesse est en nette augmentation, le taux pour 1000 résidentes âgées de 15 à 49 ans ne marque qu'une légère progression, passant de 6,7 pour-mille en 2004 à 7,2 pour-mille en 2006. Un écart important ...

  20. Linux0.01键盘中断的C语言实现%Implementation of Linux 0. 01 Keyboard Interrupt Functions in C

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于江涛; 曲波

    2011-01-01

    The paper describes the main techniques of adapting keyboard interrupt functions of Linux O. O1 in C, including programming methods and key codes of ASCII map tables, routines calling table, keyboard manipulating routines, keyboard interrupt handler, etc.%文章阐述了用C语言改写Linux0.01键盘模块的技术要点,包括ASCⅡ码映射表、键盘处理子程序跳转表、键盘处理程序、键盘中断程序的编程方法及关键代码.

  1. Accurate discrimination of conserved coding and non-coding regions through multiple indicators of evolutionary dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pesole Graziano

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The conservation of sequences between related genomes has long been recognised as an indication of functional significance and recognition of sequence homology is one of the principal approaches used in the annotation of newly sequenced genomes. In the context of recent findings that the number non-coding transcripts in higher organisms is likely to be much higher than previously imagined, discrimination between conserved coding and non-coding sequences is a topic of considerable interest. Additionally, it should be considered desirable to discriminate between coding and non-coding conserved sequences without recourse to the use of sequence similarity searches of protein databases as such approaches exclude the identification of novel conserved proteins without characterized homologs and may be influenced by the presence in databases of sequences which are erroneously annotated as coding. Results Here we present a machine learning-based approach for the discrimination of conserved coding sequences. Our method calculates various statistics related to the evolutionary dynamics of two aligned sequences. These features are considered by a Support Vector Machine which designates the alignment coding or non-coding with an associated probability score. Conclusion We show that our approach is both sensitive and accurate with respect to comparable methods and illustrate several situations in which it may be applied, including the identification of conserved coding regions in genome sequences and the discrimination of coding from non-coding cDNA sequences.

  2. Approximator: Predicting Interruptibility in Software Development with Commodity Computers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tell, Paolo; Jalaliniya, Shahram; Andersen, Kristian S. M.;

    2015-01-01

    Assessing the presence and availability of a remote colleague is key in coordination in global software development but is not easily done using existing computer-mediated channels. Previous research has shown that automated estimation of interruptibility is feasible and can achieve a precision...... laptops. Experimental results show that the information aggregated from several activity monitors (i.e., Key-logger, mouse-logger, and face-detection) provide useful data, which, once combined with machine learning techniques, can automatically estimate the interruptibility of users with a 78% accuracy...

  3. 混合信道下LDPC码稳定条件分析及度序列优化%Analysis of stability condition for LDPC codes and optimizing degree sequences over mixed channel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙康宁; 马林华; 茹乐; 范文同; 胡星; 黄绍城

    2016-01-01

    在高斯噪声和随机删除同时存在的背景下,提出LDPC码度序列的稳定收敛条件,理论证明了高斯信道下阈值较高的度序列不适用于混合信道,并仿真验证了该结论。将随机粒子群算法和模拟退火算法相结合,不同删除概率下寻找到了一些高阈值混合信道的度序列,删除概率为40%时,度序列信噪比阈值最大可提高1.6159 dB,适用于光记录、伴随窄带阻塞干扰的跳频通信等混合信道环境。%Under the circumstance that white Gaussian noise and random erasures exist all at once, the stability condition for LDPC codes over mixed channel was proposed. And it was proved that a good degree sequence of LDPC codes was not optimized over mixed channel. It can also be proved by simulation. The random particle swarm optimization (RPSO) and simulated annealing (SA) algorithm were combined to find some capacity-approaching degree sequences over mixed channel with different erasure probabilities. The threshold of signal-to-noise ratio improves 1.615 9 dB than that of the classical degree sequences calculated by Gaussian approximation over mixed channel. These degree sequences are opti-mal for optical recording and frequency-hopping communication with narrow-band interference.

  4. Characterisation of Toxoplasma gondii isolates using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the non-coding Toxoplasma gondii (TGR)-gene sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgdall, Estrid; Vuust, Jens; Lind, Peter;

    2000-01-01

    of using TGR gene variants as markers to distinguish among T. gondii isolates from different animals and different geographical sources. Based on the band patterns obtained by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified TGR sequences, the T...

  5. Blind recognition of punctured convolutional codes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Peizhong; LI Shen; ZOU Yan; LUO Xiangyang

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents an algorithm for blind recognition of punctured convolutional codes which is an important problem in adaptive modulation and coding. For a given finite sequence of convolutional code, the parity check matrix of the convolutional code is first computed by solving a linear system with adequate error tolerance. Then a minimal basic encoding matrix of the original convolutional code and its puncturing pattern are determined according to the known parity check matrix of the punctured convolutional code.

  6. A reflection of the coding of meaning in patient-physician interaction: Jürgen Habermas' theory of communication applied to sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skirbekk, Helge

    2004-08-01

    This paper introduces parts of Jürgen Habermas' theory of communication in an attempt to understand how meaning is coded in patient-physician communication. By having a closer look at how patients and physicians make assertions with their utterances, light will be shed on difficult aspects of reaching understanding in the clinical encounter. Habermas' theory will be used to differentiate assertions into validity claims referring to truth, truthfulness and rightness. An analysis of hypothetical physician-replies to a patient suffering from back pains will substantiate the necessity for such a theory.

  7. Microcollinearity in an ethylene receptor coding gene region of the Coffea canephora genome is extensively conserved with Vitis vinifera and other distant dicotyledonous sequenced genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campa Claudine

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coffea canephora, also called Robusta, belongs to the Rubiaceae, the fourth largest angiosperm family. This diploid species (2x = 2n = 22 has a fairly small genome size of ≈ 690 Mb and despite its extreme economic importance, particularly for developing countries, knowledge on the genome composition, structure and evolution remain very limited. Here, we report the 160 kb of the first C. canephora Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC clone ever sequenced and its fine analysis. Results This clone contains the CcEIN4 gene, encoding an ethylene receptor, and twenty other predicted genes showing a high gene density of one gene per 7.8 kb. Most of them display perfect matches with C. canephora expressed sequence tags or show transcriptional activities through PCR amplifications on cDNA libraries. Twenty-three transposable elements, mainly Class II transposon derivatives, were identified at this locus. Most of these Class II elements are Miniature Inverted-repeat Transposable Elements (MITE known to be closely associated with plant genes. This BAC composition gives a pattern similar to those found in gene rich regions of Solanum lycopersicum and Medicago truncatula genomes indicating that the CcEIN4 regions may belong to a gene rich region in the C. canephora genome. Comparative sequence analysis indicated an extensive conservation between C. canephora and most of the reference dicotyledonous genomes studied in this work, such as tomato (S. lycopersicum, grapevine (V. vinifera, barrel medic M. truncatula, black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa and Arabidopsis thaliana. The higher degree of microcollinearity was found between C. canephora and V. vinifera, which belong respectively to the Asterids and Rosids, two clades that diverged more than 114 million years ago. Conclusion This study provides a first glimpse of C. canephora genome composition and evolution. Our data revealed a remarkable conservation of the microcollinearity

  8. Sequence of the intron/exon junctions of the coding region of the human androgen receptor gene and identification of a point mutation in a family with complete androgen insensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lubahn, D.B.; Simental, J.A.; Higgs, H.N.; Wilson, E.M.; French, F.S. (Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (USA)); Brown, T.R.; Migeon, C.J. (Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1989-12-01

    Androgens act through a receptor protein (AR) to mediate sex differentiation and development of the male phenotype. The authors have isolated the eight exons in the amino acid coding region of the AR gene from a human X chromosome library. Nucleotide sequences of the AR gene intron/exon boundaries were determined for use in designing synthetic oligonucleotide primers to bracket coding exons for amplification by the polymerase chain reaction. Genomic DNA was amplified from 46, XY phenotypic female siblings with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome. AR binding affinity for dihydrotestosterone in the affected siblings was lower than in normal males, but the binding capacity was normal. Sequence analysis of amplified exons demonstrated within the AR steroid-binding domain (exon G) a single guanine to adenine mutation, resulting in replacement of valine with methionine at amino acid residue 866. As expected, the carrier mother had both normal and mutant AR genes. Thus, a single point mutation in the steroid-binding domain of the AR gene correlated with the expression of an AR protein ineffective in stimulating male sexual development.

  9. Applying the Verona coding definitions of emotional sequences (VR-CoDES) in the dental context involving patients with complex communication needs: An exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuefang; Black, Rolf; Freeman, Ruth; Herron, Daniel; Humphris, Gerry; Menzies, Rachel; Quinn, Sandra; Scott, Lesley; Waller, Annalu

    2014-11-01

    The VR-CoDES has been previously applied in the dental context. However, we know little about how dental patients with intellectual disabilities (ID) and complex communication needs express their emotional distress during dental visits. This is the first study explored the applicability of the VR-CoDES to a dental context involving patients with ID. Fourteen dental consultations were video recorded and coded using the VR-CoDES, assisted with the additional guidelines for the VR-CoDES in a dental context. Both inter- and intra-coder reliabilities were checked on the seven consultations where cues were observed. Sixteen cues (eight non-verbal) were identified within seven of the 14 consultations. Twenty responses were observed (12 reducing space) with four multiple responses. Cohen's Kappa were 0.76 (inter-coder) and 0.88 (intra-coder). With the additional guidelines, cues and responses were reliably identified. Cue expression was exhibited by non-verbal expression of emotion with people with ID in the literature. Further guidance is needed to improve the coding accuracy on multiple providers' responses and to investigate potential impacts of conflicting responses on patients. The findings provided a useful initial step towards an ongoing exploration of how healthcare providers identify and manage emotional distress of patients with ID. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Diversity of antisense and other non-coding RNAs in Archaea revealed by comparative small RNA sequencing in four Pyrobaculum species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L Bernick

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A great diversity of small, non-coding RNA molecules with roles in gene regulation and RNA processing have been intensely studied in eukaryotic and bacterial model organisms, yet our knowledge of possible parallel roles for small RNAs in archaea is limited. We employed RNA-seq to identify novel small RNA across multiple species of the hyperthermophilic genus Pyrobaculum, known for unusual RNA gene characteristics. By comparing transcriptional data collected in parallel among four species, we were able to identify conserved RNA genes fitting into known and novel families. Among our findings, we highlight three novel cis-antisense small RNAs encoded opposite to key regulatory (ferric uptake regulator, metabolic (triose-phosphate isomerase, and core transcriptional apparatus genes (transcription factor B. We also found a large increase in the number of conserved C/D box small RNA genes over what had been previously recognized; many of these genes are encoded antisense to protein coding genes. The conserved opposition to orthologous genes across the Pyrobaculum genus suggests similarities to other cis-antisense regulatory systems. Furthermore, the genus-specific nature of these small RNAs indicates they are relatively recent, stable adaptations.

  11. La interrupcion voluntaria e informada del embarazo Voluntary and informed interruption of pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Mary Madden Arias

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo trata la interrupción voluntaria del embarazo desde la perspectiva feminista, y con un enfoque legal, y parte del hecho que una de las formas de violencia contra las mujeres, y en particular, del ejercicio pleno de sus derechos reproductivos, es la imposibilidad legal, cultural, social o religiosa de decidir voluntaria e informada la interrupción del embarazo. Así, el artículo analiza la normativa recogida en el Código Penal sobre el aborto y cómo estos tipos penales son formas de violencia contra las mujeres.This article analyses the voluntary interruption of pregnancy from the feminist, along with a legal, point of view, parting from the fact that one of the forms of violence against women, and particularly, against their reproductive rights, is the legal, cultural, social, or religious impossibilities to decide informed and voluntarily the interruption of pregnancy. This way, the article studies the regulations imposed by the Penal Code regarding abortion and how they are forms of violence against women.

  12. Approximator: Predicting Interruptibility in Software Development with Commodity Computers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tell, Paolo; Jalaliniya, Shahram; Andersen, Kristian S. M.

    2015-01-01

    Assessing the presence and availability of a remote colleague is key in coordination in global software development but is not easily done using existing computer-mediated channels. Previous research has shown that automated estimation of interruptibility is feasible and can achieve a precision...

  13. Children and Career Interruptions: The Family Gap in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gupta, Nabanita Datta; Smith, Nina

    2002-01-01

    Abstract: The effect of children and career interruptions on the family gap is analysed based on longitudinal data covering the years 1980-1995. The estimated model controls for unobserved time-constant heterogeneity. The results show that when controlling for unobserved heterogeneity, the negative...

  14. Bisimilarity is not finitely based over BPA with interrupt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aceto, Luca; Fokkink, Wan; Ingolfsdottir, Anna;

    2005-01-01

    This paper shows that bisimulation equivalence does not afford a finite equational axiomatization over the language obtained by enriching Bergstra and Klop's Basic Process Algebra with the interrupt operator. Moreover, it is shown that the collection of closed equations over this language is also...

  15. Bisimilarity is not finitely based over BPA with interrupt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aceto, Luca; Fokkink, Wan; Ingolfsdottir, Anna

    2005-01-01

    This paper shows that bisimulation equivalence does not afford a finite equational axiomatization over the language obtained by enriching Bergstra and Klop's Basic Process Algebra with the interrupt operator. Moreover, it is shown that the collection of closed equations over this language is also...

  16. User Assistance for Multitasking with Interruptions on a Mobile Device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagata, S.F.

    2006-01-01

    Issues users have with use of the web on a mobile device can be attributed to difficulties with the mobile interface. A major challenge that we address is improving the user experience for handling of interruptions and multitasking when using the web in a mobile context. The usability issues with a

  17. User assistance for multitasking with interruptions on a mobile device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagata, S.F.

    2006-01-01

    Issues users have with use of the web on a mobile device can be attributed to difficulties with the mobile interface. A major challenge that we address is improving the user experience for handling of interruptions and multitasking when using the web in a mobile context. The usability issues with a

  18. Institutional Narcissism, Arrogant Organization Disorder and Interruptions in Organizational Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godkin, Lynn; Allcorn, Seth

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This article aims to present an alternative approach to diagnosing behavioral barriers to organizational learning. Design/methodology/approach: The paper juxtaposes interruptions in organizational learning with characteristics of narcissism and arrogant organization disorder. Psychoanalytically informed theory and DSM-IV criteria are…

  19. User Assistance for Multitasking with Interruptions on a Mobile Device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagata, S.F.

    2006-01-01

    Issues users have with use of the web on a mobile device can be attributed to difficulties with the mobile interface. A major challenge that we address is improving the user experience for handling of interruptions and multitasking when using the web in a mobile context. The usability issues with a

  20. User assistance for multitasking with interruptions on a mobile device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagata, S.F.

    2006-01-01

    Issues users have with use of the web on a mobile device can be attributed to difficulties with the mobile interface. A major challenge that we address is improving the user experience for handling of interruptions and multitasking when using the web in a mobile context. The usability issues with a

  1. A Wrist-Worn Thermohaptic Device for Graceful Interruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahram Jalaliniya

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Thermal haptics is a potential system output modality for wearable devices that promises to function at the periphery of human attention. When adequately combined with existing attention-governing mechanisms of the human mind, it could be used for interrupting the human agent at a time when the negative influence on the ongoing activity is minimal. In this article we present our self-mitigated interruption concept (essentially a symbiosis of artificial external stimuli tuned to existing human attention management mechanisms and perform a pilot study laying the ground for using a wrist-worn thermohaptic actuator for self-mitigating interruption. We then develope a prototype and perform an insightful pilot study. We frame our empirical thermohaptic experimental work in terms of Peripheral Interaction concepts and show how this new approach to Human-Computer Interaction relates to the Context-Aware-systems-inspired approach “Egocentric Interaction” aimed at supporting the design of envisioned Wearable Personal Assistants intended to, among other things, help human perception and cognition with the management of interruptions.

  2. Institutional Narcissism, Arrogant Organization Disorder and Interruptions in Organizational Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godkin, Lynn; Allcorn, Seth

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This article aims to present an alternative approach to diagnosing behavioral barriers to organizational learning. Design/methodology/approach: The paper juxtaposes interruptions in organizational learning with characteristics of narcissism and arrogant organization disorder. Psychoanalytically informed theory and DSM-IV criteria are…

  3. Characterization of tissue expression and full-length coding sequence of a novel human gene mapping at 3q12.1 and transcribed in oligodendrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayein, Nicole-Adeline; Stankoff, Bruno; Auffray, Charles; Devignes, Marie-Dominique

    2002-05-01

    Macro-array differential hybridization of a collection of 5058 human gene transcripts represented in an IMAGE infant brain cDNA library has led to the identification of transcripts displaying preferential or specific expression in brain (Genome Res. 9 (1999) 195; http://idefix.upr420.vjf.cnrs.fr/IMAGE). Most of these genes correspond to as yet undescribed functions. Detailed characterization of the expression, sequence, and genome assignment of one of these genes named C3orf4, is reported here. The full-length sequence of the transcript was obtained by 5' extension RT-PCR. The gene transcript (2.8 kb) encodes a 253 amino acid long protein, with four transmembrane domains. The position of the C3orf4 gene was determined at 3q12.1 thanks to the draft sequence of the human genome. It is composed of five exons spanning more than 7 kb. No TATAA box but a CpG island was found upstream of the beginning of the gene. Northern blot analysis and in situ hybridization revealed a predominant expression in myelinated structures such as corpus callosum and spinal cord. RT-PCR showed expression of the C3orf4 gene in rat optic nerve and cultured oligodendrocytes, the myelinating cells of the central nervous system, but not in astrocytes. This work supports further investigations aimed at determining the role of the C3orf4 gene in myelinating cells.

  4. De Novo Assembly of Coding Sequences of the Mangrove Palm (Nypa fruticans Using RNA-Seq and Discovery of Whole-Genome Duplications in the Ancestor of Palms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziwen He

    Full Text Available Nypa fruticans (Arecaceae is the only monocot species of true mangroves. This species represents the earliest mangrove fossil recorded. How N. fruticans adapts to the harsh and unstable intertidal zone is an interesting question. However, the 60 gene segments deposited in NCBI are insufficient for solving this question. In this study, we sequenced, assembled and annotated the transcriptome of N. fruticans using next-generation sequencing technology. A total of 19,918,800 clean paired-end reads were de novo assembled into 45,368 unigenes with a N50 length of 1,096 bp. A total of 41.35% unigenes were functionally annotated using Blast2GO. Many genes annotated to "response to stress" and 15 putative positively selected genes were identified. Simple sequence repeats were identified and compared with other palms. The divergence time between N. fruticans and other palms was estimated at 75 million years ago using the genomic data, which is consistent with the fossil record. After calculating the synonymous substitution rate between paralogs, we found that two whole-genome duplication events were shared by N. fruticans and other palms. These duplication events provided a large amount of raw material for the more than 2,000 later speciation events in Arecaceae. This study provides a high quality resource for further functional and evolutionary studies of N. fruticans and palms in general.

  5. De Novo Assembly of Coding Sequences of the Mangrove Palm (Nypa fruticans) Using RNA-Seq and Discovery of Whole-Genome Duplications in the Ancestor of Palms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ziwen; Zhang, Zhang; Guo, Wuxia; Zhang, Ying; Zhou, Renchao; Shi, Suhua

    2015-01-01

    Nypa fruticans (Arecaceae) is the only monocot species of true mangroves. This species represents the earliest mangrove fossil recorded. How N. fruticans adapts to the harsh and unstable intertidal zone is an interesting question. However, the 60 gene segments deposited in NCBI are insufficient for solving this question. In this study, we sequenced, assembled and annotated the transcriptome of N. fruticans using next-generation sequencing technology. A total of 19,918,800 clean paired-end reads were de novo assembled into 45,368 unigenes with a N50 length of 1,096 bp. A total of 41.35% unigenes were functionally annotated using Blast2GO. Many genes annotated to "response to stress" and 15 putative positively selected genes were identified. Simple sequence repeats were identified and compared with other palms. The divergence time between N. fruticans and other palms was estimated at 75 million years ago using the genomic data, which is consistent with the fossil record. After calculating the synonymous substitution rate between paralogs, we found that two whole-genome duplication events were shared by N. fruticans and other palms. These duplication events provided a large amount of raw material for the more than 2,000 later speciation events in Arecaceae. This study provides a high quality resource for further functional and evolutionary studies of N. fruticans and palms in general.

  6. Autocatalysis, information and coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, P R

    2001-01-01

    Autocatalytic self-construction in macromolecular systems requires the existence of a reflexive relationship between structural components and the functional operations they perform to synthesise themselves. The possibility of reflexivity depends on formal, semiotic features of the catalytic structure-function relationship, that is, the embedding of catalytic functions in the space of polymeric structures. Reflexivity is a semiotic property of some genetic sequences. Such sequences may serve as the basis for the evolution of coding as a result of autocatalytic self-organisation in a population of assignment catalysts. Autocatalytic selection is a mechanism whereby matter becomes differentiated in primitive biochemical systems. In the case of coding self-organisation, it corresponds to the creation of symbolic information. Prions are present-day entities whose replication through autocatalysis reflects aspects of biological semiotics less obvious than genetic coding.

  7. The long-term costs of career interruptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketsche, Patricia G; Branscomb, Lisette

    2003-01-01

    This article is based on a study that analyzed the long-term salary implications of career choices made by healthcare administrators. The study used a cohort of graduates from a single health administration program; these individuals had comparable levels of human capital at the outset of their careers. We estimated the effect of periods of part-time employment and job interruptions--voluntary and involuntary--on long-term salary progression. We also estimated the impact of other career choices, such as membership in a professional organization or the decision to relocate. After controlling for these choices, we estimated the residual effect of gender on salary. We found that voluntary interruptions had a greater effect on long-term salary growth than did involuntary interruptions of the same length or periods of part-time employment. Individuals evaluating options for balancing career and family constraints should understand the long-term cost of choosing a career interruption rather than part-time employment during periods of heightened responsibilities outside the workplace. Healthcare administrators should also be educated about the positive association between professional memberships and career advancement to make informed decisions about participation in such organizations. Surprisingly, after controlling for all choice variables, gender had no measurable effect on long-term salary growth. Half of those who indicated a voluntary interruption for dependent care reasons preferred part-time or flexible-hour work if it had been available. These results suggest that a pool of healthcare administrators might compete for positions if more part-time opportunities were available.

  8. Holographic codes

    CERN Document Server

    Latorre, Jose I

    2015-01-01

    There exists a remarkable four-qutrit state that carries absolute maximal entanglement in all its partitions. Employing this state, we construct a tensor network that delivers a holographic many body state, the H-code, where the physical properties of the boundary determine those of the bulk. This H-code is made of an even superposition of states whose relative Hamming distances are exponentially large with the size of the boundary. This property makes H-codes natural states for a quantum memory. H-codes exist on tori of definite sizes and get classified in three different sectors characterized by the sum of their qutrits on cycles wrapped through the boundaries of the system. We construct a parent Hamiltonian for the H-code which is highly non local and finally we compute the topological entanglement entropy of the H-code.

  9. Sharing code

    OpenAIRE

    Kubilius, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    Sharing code is becoming increasingly important in the wake of Open Science. In this review I describe and compare two popular code-sharing utilities, GitHub and Open Science Framework (OSF). GitHub is a mature, industry-standard tool but lacks focus towards researchers. In comparison, OSF offers a one-stop solution for researchers but a lot of functionality is still under development. I conclude by listing alternative lesser-known tools for code and materials sharing.

  10. Effect of 5' and 3' terminal sequences, overall length, and coding capacity on the accumulation of defective RNAs associated with broad bean mottle bromovirus in planta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogany, J; Romero, J; Bujarski, J J

    1997-02-17

    Broad bean mottle bromovirus (BBMV) was shown to accumulate RNA2-derived defective interfering (DI) RNAs [Romero et al., Virology 194, 576-584 (1993); Pogany et al., Virology 212, 574-586 (1995)]. In this work, we utilize three sets of BBMV RNA2-derived artificial DI RNA constructs to determine factors that affect the accumulation of defective RNAs in planta. One set of deletion constructs was used to localize sequences required for efficient accumulation within the 5' 883 nt and the 3' 387 nt of the DI RNAs. The second set had a gradually increasing size of 3' nested deletions to determine the minimal length required for efficient DI RNA accumulation. The smallest DI RNA still accumulating in plants was found to be 1712 nt long. The third set consisted of frameshift mutants which showed that at least 64.4% of BBMV DI RNA sequences must have the 5' portion of the 2a open reading frame to ensure efficient accumulation. The importance of these factors in the selection of DI RNAs is discussed.

  11. Full-length RAG1 promotes contact with coding and intersignal sequences in RAG protein complexes bound to recombination signals paired in cis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sushil; Swanson, Patrick C

    2009-04-01

    The RAG proteins initiate V(D)J recombination by mediating synapsis and cleavage of two different antigen receptor gene segments through interactions with their flanking recombination signal sequences (RSS). The protein-DNA complexes that support this process have mainly been studied using RAG-RSS complexes assembled using oligonucleotide substrates containing a single RSS that are paired in trans to promote synapsis. How closely these complexes model those formed on longer, more physiologically relevant substrates containing RSSs on the same DNA molecule (in cis) remains unclear. To address this issue, we characterized discrete core and full-length RAG protein complexes bound to RSSs paired in cis. We find these complexes support cleavage activity regulated by V(D)J recombination's '12/23 rule' and exhibit plasticity in RSS usage dependent on partner RSS composition. DNA footprinting studies suggest that the RAG proteins in these complexes mediate more extensive contact with sequences flanking the RSS than previously observed, some of which are enhanced by full-length RAG1, and associated with synapsis and efficient RSS cleavage. Finally, we demonstrate that the RAG1 C-terminus facilitates hairpin formation on long DNA substrates, and full-length RAG1 promotes hairpin retention in the post-cleavage RAG complex. These results provide new insights into the mechanism of physiological V(D)J recombination.

  12. Report number codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, R.N. (ed.)

    1985-05-01

    This publication lists all report number codes processed by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information. The report codes are substantially based on the American National Standards Institute, Standard Technical Report Number (STRN)-Format and Creation Z39.23-1983. The Standard Technical Report Number (STRN) provides one of the primary methods of identifying a specific technical report. The STRN consists of two parts: The report code and the sequential number. The report code identifies the issuing organization, a specific program, or a type of document. The sequential number, which is assigned in sequence by each report issuing entity, is not included in this publication. Part I of this compilation is alphabetized by report codes followed by issuing installations. Part II lists the issuing organization followed by the assigned report code(s). In both Parts I and II, the names of issuing organizations appear for the most part in the form used at the time the reports were issued. However, for some of the more prolific installations which have had name changes, all entries have been merged under the current name.

  13. Identification and characterization of wheat long non-protein coding RNAs responsive to powdery mildew infection and heat stress by using microarray analysis and SBS sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Huiru

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biotic and abiotic stresses, such as powdery mildew infection and high temperature, are important limiting factors for yield and grain quality in wheat production. Emerging evidences suggest that long non-protein coding RNAs (npcRNAs are developmentally regulated and play roles in development and stress responses of plants. However, identification of long npcRNAs is limited to a few plant species, such as Arabidopsis, rice and maize, no systematic identification of long npcRNAs and their responses to abiotic and biotic stresses is reported in wheat. Results In this study, by using computational analysis and experimental approach we identified 125 putative wheat stress responsive long npcRNAs, which are not conserved among plant species. Among them, some were precursors of small RNAs such as microRNAs and siRNAs, two long npcRNAs were identified as signal recognition particle (SRP 7S RNA variants, and three were characterized as U3 snoRNAs. We found that wheat long npcRNAs showed tissue dependent expression patterns and were responsive to powdery mildew infection and heat stress. Conclusion Our results indicated that diverse sets of wheat long npcRNAs were responsive to powdery mildew infection and heat stress, and could function in wheat responses to both biotic and abiotic stresses, which provided a starting point to understand their functions and regulatory mechanisms in the future.

  14. Speaking Code

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, Geoff

    Speaking Code begins by invoking the “Hello World” convention used by programmers when learning a new language, helping to establish the interplay of text and code that runs through the book. Interweaving the voice of critical writing from the humanities with the tradition of computing and software...

  15. Polar Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    QPSK Gaussian channels . .......................................................................... 39 vi 1. INTRODUCTION Forward error correction (FEC...Capacity of BSC. 7 Figure 5. Capacity of AWGN channel . 8 4. INTRODUCTION TO POLAR CODES Polar codes were introduced by E. Arikan in [1]. This paper...Under authority of C. A. Wilgenbusch, Head ISR Division EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This report describes the results of the project “More reliable wireless

  16. Nucleotide sequence of a cDNA coding for the barley seed protein CMa: an inhibitor of insect α-amylase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Søren Kjærsgård; Johansson, A.

    1992-01-01

    The primary structure of the insect alpha-amylase inhibitor CMa of barley seeds was deduced from a full-length cDNA clone pc43F6. Analysis of RNA from barley endosperm shows high levels 15 and 20 days after flowering. The cDNA predicts an amino acid sequence of 119 residues preceded by a signal...... peptide of 25 amino acids. Ala and Leu account for 55% of the signal peptide. CMa is 60-85% identical with alpha-amylase inhibitors of wheat, but shows less than 50% identity to trypsin inhibitors of barley and wheat. The 10 Cys residues are located in identical positions compared to the cereal inhibitor...

  17. The gene coding for the DOPA dioxygenase involved in betalain biosynthesis in Amanita muscaria and its regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinz, U G; Fivaz, J; Girod, P A; Zyrd, J P

    1997-09-01

    Genomic and cDNA clones derived from the gene (dodA) coding for DOPA dioxygenase, a key enzyme in the betalain pathway, were obtained from the basidiomycete Amanita muscaria. A cDNA library was established in the phage lambda ZapII and dodA clones were isolated using polyclonal antibodies raised against the purified enzyme. Their identity was confirmed by comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence with the sequence of several tryptic peptide fragments of DOPA dioxygenase. The gene coded for a 228-amino acid protein that showed no homology to published sequences. The coding region was interrupted by five short introns. Regulation was shown to occur at the transcriptional level; the mRNA accumulated to high levels only in the coloured cap tissue. dodA was found to be a single-copy gene in A. muscaria. To our knowledge, this is the first gene from the betalain pathway to be cloned. It encodes a type of aromatic ring-cleaving dioxygenase that has not been previously described.

  18. A cryptic promoter in potato virus X vector interrupted plasmid construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schultz Ronald D

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Potato virus X has been developed into an expression vector for plants. It is widely used to express foreign genes. In molecular manipulation, the foreign genes need to be sub-cloned into the vector. The constructed plasmid needs to be amplified. Usually, during amplification stage, the foreign genes are not expressed. However, if the foreign gene is expressed, the construction work could be interrupted. Two different viral genes were sub-cloned into the vector, but only one foreign gene was successfully sub-cloned. The other foreign gene, canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2 VP1 could not be sub-cloned into the vector and amplified without mutation (frame shift mutation. Results A cryptic promoter in the PVX vector was discovered with RT-PCR. The promoter activity was studied with Northern blots and Real-time RT-PCR. Conclusion It is important to recognize the homologous promoter sequences in the vector when a virus is developed as an expression vector. During the plasmid amplification stage, an unexpected expression of the CPV-2 VP1 gene (not in the target plants, but in E. coli can interrupt the downstream work.

  19. Large number of rebounding/founder HIV variants emerge from multifocal infection in lymphatic tissues after treatment interruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenberger, Meghan K; Keele, Brandon F; Wietgrefe, Stephen W; Fletcher, Courtney V; Beilman, Gregory J; Chipman, Jeffrey G; Khoruts, Alexander; Estes, Jacob D; Anderson, Jodi; Callisto, Samuel P; Schmidt, Thomas E; Thorkelson, Ann; Reilly, Cavan; Perkey, Katherine; Reimann, Thomas G; Utay, Netanya S; Nganou Makamdop, Krystelle; Stevenson, Mario; Douek, Daniel C; Haase, Ashley T; Schacker, Timothy W

    2015-03-10

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) suppresses HIV replication in most individuals but cannot eradicate latently infected cells established before ART was initiated. Thus, infection rebounds when treatment is interrupted by reactivation of virus production from this reservoir. Currently, one or a few latently infected resting memory CD4 T cells are thought be the principal source of recrudescent infection, but this estimate is based on peripheral blood rather than lymphoid tissues (LTs), the principal sites of virus production and persistence before initiating ART. We, therefore, examined lymph node (LN) and gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) biopsies from fully suppressed subjects, interrupted therapy, monitored plasma viral load (pVL), and repeated biopsies on 12 individuals as soon as pVL became detectable. Isolated HIV RNA-positive (vRNA+) cells were detected by in situ hybridization in LTs obtained before interruption in several patients. After interruption, multiple foci of vRNA+ cells were detected in 6 of 12 individuals as soon as pVL was measureable and in some subjects, in more than one anatomic site. Minimal estimates of the number of rebounding/founder (R/F) variants were determined by single-gene amplification and sequencing of viral RNA or DNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and plasma obtained at or just before viral recrudescence. Sequence analysis revealed a large number of R/F viruses representing recrudescent viremia from multiple sources. Together, these findings are consistent with the origins of recrudescent infection by reactivation from many latently infected cells at multiple sites. The inferred large pool of cells and sites to rekindle recrudescent infection highlights the challenges in eradicating HIV.

  20. The 5'-flanking region of the RP58 coding sequence shows prominent promoter activity in multipolar cells in the subventricular zone during corticogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtaka-Maruyama, C; Hirai, S; Miwa, A; Takahashi, A; Okado, H

    2012-01-10

    Pyramidal neurons of the neocortex are produced from progenitor cells located in the neocortical ventricular zone (VZ) and subventricular zone (SVZ) during embryogenesis. RP58 is a transcriptional repressor that is strongly expressed in the developing brain and plays an essential role in corticogenesis. The expression of RP58 is strictly regulated in a time-dependent and spatially restricted manner. It is maximally expressed in E15-16 embryonic cerebral cortex, localized specifically to the cortical plate and SVZ of the neocortex, hippocampus, and parts of amygdala during brain development, and found in glutamatergic but not GABAergic neurons. Identification of the promoter activity underlying specific expression patterns provides important clues to their mechanisms of action. Here, we show that the RP58 gene promoter is activated prominently in multipolar migrating cells, the first in vivo analysis of RP58 promoter activity in the brain. The 5.3 kb 5'-flanking genomic DNA of the RP58 coding region demonstrates promoter activity in neurons both in vitro and in vivo. This promoter is highly responsive to the transcription factor neurogenin2 (Ngn2), which is a direct upstream activator of RP58 expression. Using in utero electroporation, we demonstrate that RP58 gene promoter activity is first detected in a subpopulation of pin-like VZ cells, then prominently activated in migrating multipolar cells in the multipolar cell accumulation zone (MAZ) located just above the VZ. In dissociated primary cultured cortical neurons, RP58 promoter activity mimics in vivo expression patterns from a molecular standpoint that RP58 is expressed in a fraction of Sox2-positive progenitor cells, Ngn2-positive neuronal committed cells, and Tuj1-positive young neurons, but not in Dlx2-positive GABAergic neurons. Finally, we show that Cre recombinase expression under the control of the RP58 gene promoter is a feasible tool for conditional gene switching in post-mitotic multipolar migrating

  1. Understanding interruptions in the mathematics classroom: Implications for equity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planas, Núria; Civil, Marta

    2002-12-01

    The article is based on an extensive microethnographic study (Planas, 2001) that was focused on students aged 15-16 years who exhibited a high number of interruptions in their participation in the mathematics classroom. Our research points to the importance of considering how the students construe normative meanings for the classroom episodes, and how they value others and the knowledge construed. We argue that some interruptions in the students' participation can be understood as an active contestation to the classroom norms and to the perceived valorisations. Broadening the understanding of the learning opportunities for all the students requires studying further how the classroom sociocultural context and participants' valorisations mediate both the participation processes and the construction of mathematical knowledge.

  2. Compensability index for compensation radiotherapy after treatment interruptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putora Paul

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The goal of our work was to develop a simple method to evaluate a compensation treatment after unplanned treatment interruptions with respect to their tumour- and normal tissue effect. Methods We developed a software tool in java programming language based on existing recommendations to compensate for treatment interruptions. In order to express and visualize the deviations from the originally planned tumour and normal tissue effects we defined the compensability index. Results The compensability index represents an evaluation of the suitability of compensatory radiotherapy in a single number based on the number of days used for compensation and the preference of preserving the originally planned tumour effect or not exceeding the originally planned normal tissue effect. An automated tool provides a method for quick evaluation of compensation treatments. Conclusions The compensability index calculation may serve as a decision support system based on existing and established recommendations.

  3. Realistically Rendering SoC Traffic Patterns with Interrupt Awareness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angiolini, Frederico; Mahadevan, Sharkar; Madsen, Jan;

    2005-01-01

    traffic generators have been used to overcome such an issue. However, target applications increasingly present non-trivial execution flows and synchronization patterns, especially in presence of underlying operating systems and when exploiting interrupt facilities. This property makes it very difficult...... to generate realistic test traffic. This paper presents a selection of applications using interrupt-based synchronization; a reference methodology to split such applications in execution subflows and to adjust the overall execution stream based upon hardware events; a reactive simulation device capable......In Multi-Processor System-on-Chip (MPSoC) design stages, accurate modeling of IP behaviour is crucial to analyze interconnect effectiveness. However, parallel development of components may cause IP core models to be still unavailable when tuning communication performance. Traditionally, synthetic...

  4. Antenatal evaluation of fetal interrupted aortic arch type B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Babacan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Interruption of the aortic arch (IAA is a rare, severe form of congenital heart defect characterized by complete anatomical discontinuity between two adjacent segments of the aortic arch. The data on the features and outcomes of fetal IAA are limited. Three anatomical types have been described according to the site of interruption. The current recommendations for screening on the obstetric fetal anomaly scan include identification of a 4-chamber view, all 4 valves, and the outflow tracts, all of which can appear to be normal to the ultrasonographer in fetuses with conotruncal anomalies. Although the identification of IAA on a prenatal echocardiogram can be challenging, a number of anatomic features can facilitate the diagnosis. We aim to present the features and outcome of a case of IAA type B referred to our centre in the light of literatures.

  5. Mathematic principles of interrupted-sampling repeater jamming (ISRJ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG XueSong; LIU JianCheng; ZHANG WenMing; FU QiXiang; LIU Zhong; XIE XiaoXia

    2007-01-01

    Coherent jamming is one of the important trends in modern radar electronic warfare. High-speed sampling of wideband radio frequency (RF) signals and high isolation of two receive-transmit antennas are key technologies for the realization of coherent jamming. However, these technologies present significant challenges to engineering application. In this paper, a novel repeater jamming based on interrupted sampling technique is presented. For a jammer with a receive-transmit time-sharing antenna, a radar signal is sampled with a low rate by the jammer. Then, a train of false targets will be achieved after the jamming signal feed the matched filter of a pulse compression radar. For the case of the linear frequency modulated (LFM) pulse compression radars, mathematic principles of the interrupted-sam- pling repeater jamming is developed, and then the efficiency of the jamming is described and stated as expressions of key parameters which are also beneficial to the jamming design for other coherent radars.

  6. Axonal transport interruption and anatomy at the lamina cribrosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radius, R L; Bade, B

    1982-10-01

    Pressure-induced, focal axonal transport abnormalities were studied in 14 cat eyes by the examination of serial step-section tissue radioautogram. Although the patterns of the transport interruption at the lamina cribrosa varied from eye to eye, the temporal sectors of the nerve head were most often involved by this abnormality. The anatomy at the lamina cribrosa was studied in adjacent (6 micrometers) cross-sectional specimens. The thickness of the extra-bundle trabeculae and the nerve fiber bundle dimensions including the cross-sectional area and the number and the shape (the ratio of the major and the minor axis diameters) of the laminar pores were measured by computer-assisted perimeter analysis. There was no correlation between the location of the transport interruption and any of these anatomic measurements.

  7. Interrupting the transmission of wild polioviruses with vaccines: immunological considerations.

    OpenAIRE

    Ghendon, Y.; Robertson, S. E.

    1994-01-01

    In 1988 the World Health Assembly set the goal of global poliomyelitis eradication by the year 2000. Substantial progress has been made, and 143 countries reported no poliomyelitis cases associated with the wild virus in 1993. This article reviews the immunological considerations relevant to interrupting the transmission of wild polioviruses with vaccines. Although serum immunity prevents poliomyelitis in the individual, it is local immunity that is important in preventing the transmission of...

  8. Stress Analysis and Calculation of Flow Interruption Capability Test Loop

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG; Bo; QI; Xiao-guang; CHENG; Dao-xi

    2012-01-01

    <正>A stress-analysis and calculation has been done for the flow interruption capability test loop (Fig. 1). In the design condition, the test loop is operated on 350 ℃ and 20MPa. By reasonably simplifying and modeling, a stress-analysis program named Triflex was used to analyze the piping stress and optimize the piping supports, which meet the compliance. The work will provide the necessary basis for the construction of the loop and operation security.

  9. Interrupted innovation : innovation system dynamics in latecomer aerospace industries

    OpenAIRE

    Vertesy, D.; Szirmai, A.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we analyse the role of sectoral innovation systems in the emergence and catch-up of aerospace industries in latecomer economies. We argue that the aerospace sector is characterized by a process of interrupted innovation. Competitive pressures and the cyclical nature of the industry not only require shifts in the direction of innovation and changes in the production system, but also periodical restructuring of the whole sectoral system of innovation. Aerospace manufacturing requi...

  10. Partition of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in two different structural classes dating back to early metabolism: implications for the origin of the genetic code and the nature of protein sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delarue, M

    1995-12-01

    We describe, on the molecular level, a possible fuzzy and primordial translation apparatus capable of synthesizing polypeptides from nucleic acids in a world containing a mixture of coevolving molecules of RNA and proteins already arranged in metabolic cycles (including cofactors). Close attention is paid to template-free systems because they are believed to be the immediate ancestors of this primordial translation apparatus. The two classes of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs), as seen today, are considered as the remnants of such a simple imprecise translation apparatus and are used as guidelines for the construction of the model. Earlier theoretical work by Bedian on a related system is invoked to show how specificity and stability could have been achieved automatically and rather quickly, starting from such an imprecise system, i.e., how the encoded synthesis of proteins could have appeared. Because of the binary nature of the underlying proto-code, the first genetically encoded proteins would then have been alternating copolymers with a high degree of degeneracy, but not random. Indeed, a clear signal for alternating hydrophobic and hydrophilic residues in present-day protein sequences can be detected. Later evolution of the genetic code would have proceeded along lines already discussed by Crick. However, in the initial stages, the translation apparatus proposed here is in fact very similar to the one postulated by Woese, only here it is given a molecular framework. This hypothesis departs from the paradigm of the RNA world in that it supposes that the origin of the genetic code occurred after the apparition of some functional (statistical) proteins first. Implications for protein design are also discussed.

  11. Interruption Phenomenon in Intermediate-Frequency Vacuum Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yuan; Wu, Jianwen

    2016-03-01

    In the condition of the 3 mm gap, experiments for 360 Hz intermediate-frequency vacuum arc are carried out in interrupters with the diameters being 41 mm and with the contact materials being CuCr50 and Cu-W-WC alloy respectively. The results indicate that the contacts material is closely related to the breaking capacity of the vacuum interrupters and characteristics of an intermediate-frequency vacuum arc. For contacts with the same diameter, the breaking capacity of CuCr50 is better than that of Cu-W-WC. When the current fails to be interrupted, the arcs overflow the gap and present irregular performances in the first half wave. Consequently a voltage spike appears. More macroscopic metal droplets can be seen in the arc column between CuCr50 contacts because of the lower melting point. It is observed that the droplet emission is much more severe during arc reignition than that in the first half wave. It is much more conspicuous that the high frequency arc voltage noises appear in Cu-W-WC contacts when the vacuum arcs reignite, for higher temperature and stronger electronic emission ability of Cu-W-WC contacts. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51377007), Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (No. 20131102130006), and Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China

  12. 40 CFR 53.54 - Test for proper sampler operation following power interruptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., excluding the periods of electrical power interruption. Verify that the elapsed sample time reported by the... following power interruptions. 53.54 Section 53.54 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... interruptions. (a) Overview. (1) This test procedure is designed to test certain performance parameters of the...

  13. Distinct Copy Number, Coding Sequence, and Locus Methylation Patterns Underlie Rhg1-Mediated Soybean Resistance to Soybean Cyst Nematode1[W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, David E.; Bayless, Adam M.; Wang, Kai; Guo, Xiaoli; Song, Qijian; Jiang, Jiming; Bent, Andrew F.

    2014-01-01

    Copy number variation of kilobase-scale genomic DNA segments, beyond presence/absence polymorphisms, can be an important driver of adaptive traits. Resistance to Heterodera glycines (Rhg1) is a widely utilized quantitative trait locus that makes the strongest known contribution to resistance against soybean cyst nematode (SCN), Heterodera glycines, the most damaging pathogen of soybean (Glycine max). Rhg1 was recently discovered to be a complex locus at which resistance-conferring haplotypes carry up to 10 tandem repeat copies of a 31-kb DNA segment, and three disparate genes present on each repeat contribute to SCN resistance. Here, we use whole-genome sequencing, fiber-FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization), and other methods to discover the genetic variation at Rhg1 across 41 diverse soybean accessions. Based on copy number variation, transcript abundance, nucleic acid polymorphisms, and differentially methylated DNA regions, we find that SCN resistance is associated with multicopy Rhg1 haplotypes that form two distinct groups. The tested high-copy-number Rhg1 accessions, including plant introduction (PI) 88788, contain a flexible number of copies (seven to 10) of the 31-kb Rhg1 repeat. The identified low-copy-number Rhg1 group, including PI 548402 (Peking) and PI 437654, contains three copies of the Rhg1 repeat and a newly identified allele of Glyma18g02590 (a predicted α-SNAP [α-soluble N-ethylmaleimide–sensitive factor attachment protein]). There is strong evidence for a shared origin of the two resistance-conferring multicopy Rhg1 groups and subsequent independent evolution. Differentially methylated DNA regions also were identified within Rhg1 that correlate with SCN resistance. These data provide insights into copy number variation of multigene segments, using as the example a disease resistance trait of high economic importance. PMID:24733883

  14. The microRNAs in an ancient protist repress the variant-specific surface protein expression by targeting the entire coding sequence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashesh A Saraiya

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available microRNAs (miRNA have been detected in the deeply branched protist, Giardia lamblia, and shown to repress expression of the family of variant-specific surface proteins (VSPs, only one of which is expressed in Giardia trophozoite at a given time. Three next-generation sequencing libraries of Giardia Argonaute-associated small RNAs were constructed and analyzed. Analysis of the libraries identified a total of 99 new putative miRNAs with a size primarily in the 26 nt range similar to the size previously predicted by the Giardia Dicer crystal structure and identified by our own studies. Bioinformatic analysis identified multiple putative miRNA target sites in the mRNAs of all 73 VSPs. The effect of miRNA target sites within a defined 3'-region were tested on two vsp mRNAs. All the miRNAs showed partial repression of the corresponding vsp expression and were additive when the targeting sites were separately located. But the combined repression still falls short of 100%. Two other relatively short vsp mRNAs with 15 and 11 putative miRNA target sites identified throughout their ORFs were tested with their corresponding miRNAs. The results indicate that; (1 near 100% repression of vsp mRNA expression can be achieved through the combined action of multiple miRNAs on target sites located throughout the ORF; (2 the miRNA machinery could be instrumental in repressing the expression of vsp genes in Giardia; (3 this is the first time that all the miRNA target sites in the entire ORF of a mRNA have been tested and shown to be functional.

  15. Detection of Multiple Budding Yeast Cells and a Partial Sequence of 43-kDa Glycoprotein Coding Gene of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis from a Case of Lacaziosis in a Female Pacific White-Sided Dolphin (Lagenorhynchus obliquidens).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minakawa, Tomoko; Ueda, Keiichi; Tanaka, Miyuu; Tanaka, Natsuki; Kuwamura, Mitsuru; Izawa, Takeshi; Konno, Toshihiro; Yamate, Jyoji; Itano, Eiko Nakagawa; Sano, Ayako; Wada, Shinpei

    2016-08-01

    Lacaziosis, formerly called as lobomycosis, is a zoonotic mycosis, caused by Lacazia loboi, found in humans and dolphins, and is endemic in the countries on the Atlantic Ocean, Indian Ocean and Pacific Ocean of Japanese coast. Susceptible Cetacean species include the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus), the Indian Ocean bottlenose dolphin (T. aduncus), and the estuarine dolphin (Sotalia guianensis); however, no cases have been recorded in other Cetacean species. We diagnosed a case of Lacaziosis in a Pacific white-sided dolphin (Lagenorhynchus obliquidens) nursing in an aquarium in Japan. The dolphin was a female estimated to be more than 14 years old at the end of June 2015 and was captured in a coast of Japan Sea in 2001. Multiple, lobose, and solid granulomatous lesions with or without ulcers appeared on her jaw, back, flipper and fluke skin, in July 2014. The granulomatous skin lesions from the present case were similar to those of our previous cases. Multiple budding and chains of round yeast cells were detected in the biopsied samples. The partial sequence of 43-kDa glycoprotein coding gene confirmed by a nested PCR and sequencing, which revealed a different genotype from both Amazonian and Japanese lacaziosis in bottlenose dolphins, and was 99 % identical to those derived from Paracoccidioides brasiliensis; a sister fungal species to L. loboi. This is the first case of lacaziosis in Pacific white-sided dolphin.

  16. P-adic arithmetic coding

    CERN Document Server

    Rodionov, Anatoly

    2007-01-01

    A new incremental algorithm for data compression is presented. For a sequence of input symbols algorithm incrementally constructs a p-adic integer number as an output. Decoding process starts with less significant part of a p-adic integer and incrementally reconstructs a sequence of input symbols. Algorithm is based on certain features of p-adic numbers and p-adic norm. p-adic coding algorithm may be considered as of generalization a popular compression technique - arithmetic coding algorithms. It is shown that for p = 2 the algorithm works as integer variant of arithmetic coding; for a special class of models it gives exactly the same codes as Huffman's algorithm, for another special model and a specific alphabet it gives Golomb-Rice codes.

  17. A class of constacyclic BCH codes and new quantum codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    liu, Yang; Li, Ruihu; Lv, Liangdong; Ma, Yuena

    2017-03-01

    Constacyclic BCH codes have been widely studied in the literature and have been used to construct quantum codes in latest years. However, for the class of quantum codes of length n=q^{2m}+1 over F_{q^2} with q an odd prime power, there are only the ones of distance δ ≤ 2q^2 are obtained in the literature. In this paper, by a detailed analysis of properties of q2-ary cyclotomic cosets, maximum designed distance δ _{max} of a class of Hermitian dual-containing constacyclic BCH codes with length n=q^{2m}+1 are determined, this class of constacyclic codes has some characteristic analog to that of primitive BCH codes over F_{q^2}. Then we can obtain a sequence of dual-containing constacyclic codes of designed distances 2q^2 2q^2 can be constructed from these dual-containing codes via Hermitian Construction. These newly obtained quantum codes have better code rate compared with those constructed from primitive BCH codes.

  18. The effect of interruption probability in lattice model of two-lane traffic flow with passing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Guanghan

    2016-11-01

    A new lattice model is proposed by taking into account the interruption probability with passing for two-lane freeway. The effect of interruption probability with passing is investigated about the linear stability condition and the mKdV equation through linear stability analysis and nonlinear analysis, respectively. Furthermore, numerical simulation is carried out to study traffic phenomena resulted from the interruption probability with passing in two-lane system. The results show that the interruption probability with passing can improve the stability of traffic flow for low reaction coefficient while the interruption probability with passing can destroy the stability of traffic flow for high reaction coefficient on two-lane highway.

  19. Sequencing of a 9.9 kb segment on the right arm of yeast chromosome VII reveals four open reading frames, including PFK1, the gene coding for succinyl-CoA synthetase (beta-chain) and two ORFs sharing homology with ORFs of the yeast chromosome VIII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreiro, P; Azevedo, D; Barreiros, T; Rodrigues-Pousada, C

    1997-03-15

    A 9.9 kb DNA fragment from the right arm of chromosome VII of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been sequenced and analysed. The sequence contains four open reading frames (ORFs) longer than 100 amino acids. One gene, PFK1, has already been cloned and sequenced and the other one is the probable yeast gene coding for the beta-subunit of the succinyl-CoA synthetase. The two remaining ORFs share homology with the deduced amino acid sequence (and their physical arrangement is similar to that) of the YHR161c and YHR162w ORFs from chromosome VIII.

  20. High-capacity single-pressure SF/sub 6/ interrupters. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rostron, J R; Berkebile, L E; Spindle, H E

    1983-05-01

    The object of this project was to design and develop a high-voltage, single-pressure, SF/sub 6/ interrupter with an interrupting capability of 120 kA at 145 kV with a continuous current rating of 5000 A and an interrupting time of 1.5 cycles or less. A second objective of 100 kA at 242 kV was added during the project. Mathematical models were used to extrapolate design requirements from existing data for 63 and 80 kA. Two model puffers, one liquid and the other gas, were designed and tested to obtain data at 100 kA. An interrupter, optimized on the basis of total prospective breaker cost, was designed using the mathematical models. A study was made of the construction materials to operate under the high-stress conditions in this interrupter. Existing high-speed movies of high-current arcs under double-flow conditions were analyzed to obtain more information for modeling the interrupter. The optimized interrupter design was built and tested. The interrupting capability confirmed calculations of predicted performance near current zero; however, the dielectric strength after interrupting these high-current arcs was not adequate for the 145-kV or the 242-kV ratings. The dielectric strength was reduced by hot gases flowing out of the interrupter. Valuable data have been obtained for modeling the SF/sub 6/ puffer interrupter for high currents.

  1. Speech coding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravishankar, C., Hughes Network Systems, Germantown, MD

    1998-05-08

    Speech is the predominant means of communication between human beings and since the invention of the telephone by Alexander Graham Bell in 1876, speech services have remained to be the core service in almost all telecommunication systems. Original analog methods of telephony had the disadvantage of speech signal getting corrupted by noise, cross-talk and distortion Long haul transmissions which use repeaters to compensate for the loss in signal strength on transmission links also increase the associated noise and distortion. On the other hand digital transmission is relatively immune to noise, cross-talk and distortion primarily because of the capability to faithfully regenerate digital signal at each repeater purely based on a binary decision. Hence end-to-end performance of the digital link essentially becomes independent of the length and operating frequency bands of the link Hence from a transmission point of view digital transmission has been the preferred approach due to its higher immunity to noise. The need to carry digital speech became extremely important from a service provision point of view as well. Modem requirements have introduced the need for robust, flexible and secure services that can carry a multitude of signal types (such as voice, data and video) without a fundamental change in infrastructure. Such a requirement could not have been easily met without the advent of digital transmission systems, thereby requiring speech to be coded digitally. The term Speech Coding is often referred to techniques that represent or code speech signals either directly as a waveform or as a set of parameters by analyzing the speech signal. In either case, the codes are transmitted to the distant end where speech is reconstructed or synthesized using the received set of codes. A more generic term that is applicable to these techniques that is often interchangeably used with speech coding is the term voice coding. This term is more generic in the sense that the

  2. Superimposed Code Theoretic Analysis of Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA) Codes and DNA Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    DNA Codes Based on Fibonacci Ensembles of DNA Sequences ”, 2008 IEEE Proceedings of International Symposium on Information Theory, pp. 2292 – 2296...2008, pp. 525-34. 28. A. Macula, et al., “Random Coding Bounds for DNA Codes Based on Fibonacci Ensembles of DNA Sequences ”, 2008 IEEE...component of this innovation is the combinatorial method of bio-memory design and detection that encodes item or process information as numerical sequences

  3. What Interrupts Suicide Attempts in Men: A Qualitative Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Player

    Full Text Available Despite higher rates of suicide in men, there is a dearth of research examining the perspectives and experiences of males at risk of suicide, particularly in terms of understanding how interventions can be tailored to men's specific needs. The current study aimed to examine factors assisting, complicating or inhibiting interventions for men at risk, as well as outlining the roles of family, friends and others in male suicide prevention. Thirty-five male suicide survivors completed one-to-one interviews, and forty-seven family and friends of male suicide survivors participated in eight focus groups. Thematic analysis revealed five major themes: (1 development of suicidal behaviours tends to follow a common path associated with specific types of risk factors (disrupted mood, unhelpful stoic beliefs and values, avoidant coping strategies, stressors, (2 men at risk of suicide tend to systematically misinterpret changes in their behaviour and thinking, (3 understanding mood and behavioural changes in men enables identification of opportunities to interrupt suicide progression, (4 distraction, provision of practical and emotional supports, along with professional intervention may effectively interrupt acute risk of harm, and (5 suicidal ideation may be reduced through provision of practical help to manage crises, and helping men to focus on obligations and their role within families. Findings suggest that interventions for men at risk of suicidal behaviours need to be tailored to specific risk indicators, developmental factors, care needs and individuals' preferences. To our knowledge this is the first qualitative study to explore the experiences of both suicidal men and their family/friends after a suicide attempt, with the view to improve understanding of the processes which are effective in interrupting suicide and better inform interventions for men at risk.

  4. Speaking Code

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, Geoff

    ; alternatives to mainstream development, from performances of the live-coding scene to the organizational forms of commons-based peer production; the democratic promise of social media and their paradoxical role in suppressing political expression; and the market’s emptying out of possibilities for free...... development, Speaking Code unfolds an argument to undermine the distinctions between criticism and practice, and to emphasize the aesthetic and political aspects of software studies. Not reducible to its functional aspects, program code mirrors the instability inherent in the relationship of speech...... expression in the public realm. The book’s line of argument defends language against its invasion by economics, arguing that speech continues to underscore the human condition, however paradoxical this may seem in an era of pervasive computing....

  5. Two perspectives on the origin of the standard genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Supratim; Aggarwal, Neha; Bandhu, Ashutosh Vishwa

    2014-12-01

    The origin of a genetic code made it possible to create ordered sequences of amino acids. In this article we provide two perspectives on code origin by carrying out simulations of code-sequence coevolution in finite populations with the aim of examining how the standard genetic code may have evolved from more primitive code(s) encoding a small number of amino acids. We determine the efficacy of the physico-chemical hypothesis of code origin in the absence and presence of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) by allowing a diverse collection of code-sequence sets to compete with each other. We find that in the absence of horizontal gene transfer, natural selection between competing codes distinguished by differences in the degree of physico-chemical optimization is unable to explain the structure of the standard genetic code. However, for certain probabilities of the horizontal transfer events, a universal code emerges having a structure that is consistent with the standard genetic code.

  6. A reevaluation of the interrupter technique for airway resistance measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, A. C.; Milhorn, H. T., Jr.; Norman, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    An attempt was made to obtain a better insight into the actual transient response of airway opening pressure (Pao) following rapid occlusion. With this knowledge it was hoped to be able to clarify the reason for the overestimations found by other investigators, and possibly to obtain a more accurate method of estimating alveolar pressure just prior to interruption. This would result in an improved method for estimating airway resistance. Use of an extrapolation method was found to provide an improved correlation between resistances determined by the interruptor technique and those found by the plethysmograph in normal subjects.

  7. Asynchronous Broadcast on the Intel SCC using Interrupts

    OpenAIRE

    Petrović, Darko; Shahmirzadi, Omid; Ropars, Thomas; Schiper, André

    2012-01-01

    International audience; This paper focuses on the design of an asynchronous broadcast primitive on the Intel SCC. Our solution is based on OC-Bcast, a state-of-the-art k-ary tree synchronous broadcast algorithm that leverages the parallelism provided by on-chip Remote Memory Accesses to Message Passing Buffers. In the paper, we study the use of parallel inter-core interrupts as a means to implement an efficient asynchronous group communication primitive, and present the userspace library we d...

  8. The Aster code; Code Aster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delbecq, J.M

    1999-07-01

    The Aster code is a 2D or 3D finite-element calculation code for structures developed by the R and D direction of Electricite de France (EdF). This dossier presents a complete overview of the characteristics and uses of the Aster code: introduction of version 4; the context of Aster (organisation of the code development, versions, systems and interfaces, development tools, quality assurance, independent validation); static mechanics (linear thermo-elasticity, Euler buckling, cables, Zarka-Casier method); non-linear mechanics (materials behaviour, big deformations, specific loads, unloading and loss of load proportionality indicators, global algorithm, contact and friction); rupture mechanics (G energy restitution level, restitution level in thermo-elasto-plasticity, 3D local energy restitution level, KI and KII stress intensity factors, calculation of limit loads for structures), specific treatments (fatigue, rupture, wear, error estimation); meshes and models (mesh generation, modeling, loads and boundary conditions, links between different modeling processes, resolution of linear systems, display of results etc..); vibration mechanics (modal and harmonic analysis, dynamics with shocks, direct transient dynamics, seismic analysis and aleatory dynamics, non-linear dynamics, dynamical sub-structuring); fluid-structure interactions (internal acoustics, mass, rigidity and damping); linear and non-linear thermal analysis; steels and metal industry (structure transformations); coupled problems (internal chaining, internal thermo-hydro-mechanical coupling, chaining with other codes); products and services. (J.S.)

  9. Optimal codes as Tanner codes with cyclic component codes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høholdt, Tom; Pinero, Fernando; Zeng, Peng

    2014-01-01

    In this article we study a class of graph codes with cyclic code component codes as affine variety codes. Within this class of Tanner codes we find some optimal binary codes. We use a particular subgraph of the point-line incidence plane of A(2,q) as the Tanner graph, and we are able to describe...... the codes succinctly using Gröbner bases....

  10. The interrupted power law and the size of shadow banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiaschi, Davide; Kondor, Imre; Marsili, Matteo; Volpati, Valerio

    2014-01-01

    Using public data (Forbes Global 2000) we show that the asset sizes for the largest global firms follow a Pareto distribution in an intermediate range, that is "interrupted" by a sharp cut-off in its upper tail, where it is totally dominated by financial firms. This flattening of the distribution contrasts with a large body of empirical literature which finds a Pareto distribution for firm sizes both across countries and over time. Pareto distributions are generally traced back to a mechanism of proportional random growth, based on a regime of constant returns to scale. This makes our findings of an "interrupted" Pareto distribution all the more puzzling, because we provide evidence that financial firms in our sample should operate in such a regime. We claim that the missing mass from the upper tail of the asset size distribution is a consequence of shadow banking activity and that it provides an (upper) estimate of the size of the shadow banking system. This estimate-which we propose as a shadow banking index-compares well with estimates of the Financial Stability Board until 2009, but it shows a sharper rise in shadow banking activity after 2010. Finally, we propose a proportional random growth model that reproduces the observed distribution, thereby providing a quantitative estimate of the intensity of shadow banking activity.

  11. Effects-Driven Participatory Design: Learning from Sampling Interruptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandrup, Morten; Østergaard, Kija Lin; Hertzum, Morten; Karasti, Helena; Simonsen, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    Participatory design (PD) can play an important role in obtaining benefits from healthcare information technologies, but we contend that to fulfil this role PD must incorporate feedback from real use of the technologies. In this paper we describe an effects-driven PD approach that revolves around a sustained focus on pursued effects and uses the experience sampling method (ESM) to collect real-use feedback. To illustrate the use of the method we analyze a case that involves the organizational implementation of electronic whiteboards at a Danish hospital to support the clinicians' intra- and interdepartmental coordination. The hospital aimed to reduce the number of phone calls involved in coordinating work because many phone calls were seen as unnecessary interruptions. To learn about the interruptions we introduced an app for capturing quantitative data and qualitative feedback about the phone calls. The investigation showed that the electronic whiteboards had little potential for reducing the number of phone calls at the operating ward. The combination of quantitative data and qualitative feedback worked both as a basis for aligning assumptions to data and showed ESM as an instrument for triggering in-situ reflection. The participant-driven design and redesign of the way data were captured by means of ESM is a central contribution to the understanding of how to conduct effects-driven PD.

  12. Effect of Redundant Haptic Information on Task Performance during Visuo-Tactile Task Interruption and Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Hee-Seung; Baek, Jongsoo; Seo, Jiwon

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have revealed that interruption induces disruptive influences on the performance of cognitive tasks. While much research has focused on the use of multimodal channels to reduce the cost of interruption, few studies have utilized haptic information as more than an associative cue. In the present study, we utilized a multimodal task interruption scenario involving the simultaneous presentation of visual information and haptic stimuli in order to investigate how the combined stimuli affect performance on the primary task (cost of interruption). Participants were asked to perform a two-back visuo-tactile task, in which visual and haptic stimuli were presented simultaneously, which was interrupted by a secondary task that also utilized visual and haptic stimuli. Four experimental conditions were evaluated: (1) paired information (visual stimulus + paired haptic stimulus) with interruption; (2) paired information without interruption; (3) non-paired information (visual stimulus + non-paired haptic stimulus) with interruption; and (4) non-paired information without interruption. Our findings indicate that, within a visuo-tactile task environment, redundant haptic information may not only increase accuracy on the primary task but also reduce the cost of interruption in terms of accuracy. These results suggest a new way of understanding the task recovery process within a multimodal environment.

  13. Effect of Redundant Haptic Information on Task Performance During Visuo-Tactile Task Interruption and Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee-Seung Moon

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have revealed that interruption induces disruptive influences on the performance of cognitive tasks. While much research has focused on the use of multimodal channels to reduce the cost of interruption, few studies have utilized haptic information as more than an associative cue. In the present study, we utilized a multimodal task interruption scenario involving the simultaneous presentation of visual information and haptic stimuli in order to investigate how the combined stimuli affect performance on the primary task (cost of interruption. Participants were asked to perform a two-back visuo-tactile task, in which visual and haptic stimuli were presented simultaneously, which was interrupted by a secondary task that also utilized visual and haptic stimuli. Four experimental conditions were evaluated: (1 paired information (visual stimulus + paired haptic stimulus with interruption; (2 paired information without interruption; (3 non-paired information (visual stimulus + non-paired haptic stimulus with interruption; and (4 non-paired information without interruption. Our findings indicate that, within a visuo-tactile task environment, redundant haptic information may not only increase accuracy on the primary task but also reduce the cost of interruption in terms of accuracy. These results suggest a new way of understanding the task recovery process within a multimodal environment.

  14. Mutation rates of TGFBR2 and ACVR2 coding microsatellites in human cells with defective DNA mismatch repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heekyung Chung

    Full Text Available Microsatellite instability promotes colonic tumorigenesis through generating frameshift mutations at coding microsatellites of tumor suppressor genes, such as TGFBR2 and ACVR2. As a consequence, signaling through these TGFbeta family receptors is abrogated in DNA Mismatch repair (MMR-deficient tumors. How these mutations occur in real time and mutational rates of these human coding sequences have not previously been studied. We utilized cell lines with different MMR deficiencies (hMLH1-/-, hMSH6-/-, hMSH3-/-, and MMR-proficient to determine mutation rates. Plasmids were constructed in which exon 3 of TGFBR2 and exon 10 of ACVR2 were cloned +1 bp out of frame, immediately after the translation initiation codon of an enhanced GFP (EGFP gene, allowing a -1 bp frameshift mutation to drive EGFP expression. Mutation-resistant plasmids were constructed by interrupting the coding microsatellite sequences, preventing frameshift mutation. Stable cell lines were established containing portions of TGFBR2 and ACVR2, and nonfluorescent cells were sorted, cultured for 7-35 days, and harvested for flow cytometric mutation detection and DNA sequencing at specific time points. DNA sequencing revealed a -1 bp frameshift mutation (A9 in TGFBR2 and A7 in ACVR2 in the fluorescent cells. Two distinct fluorescent populations, M1 (dim, representing heteroduplexes and M2 (bright, representing full mutants were identified, with the M2 fraction accumulating over time. hMLH1 deficiency revealed 11 (5.91 x 10(-4 and 15 (2.18 x 10(-4 times higher mutation rates for the TGFBR2 and ACVR2 microsatellites compared to hMSH6 deficiency, respectively. The mutation rate of the TGFBR2 microsatellite was approximately 3 times higher in both hMLH1 and hMSH6 deficiencies than the ACVR2 microsatellite. The -1 bp frameshift mutation rates of TGFBR2 and ACVR2 microsatellite sequences are dependent upon the human MMR background.

  15. Program Synthesizes UML Sequence Diagrams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Matthew R.; Osborne, Richard N.

    2006-01-01

    A computer program called "Rational Sequence" generates Universal Modeling Language (UML) sequence diagrams of a target Java program running on a Java virtual machine (JVM). Rational Sequence thereby performs a reverse engineering function that aids in the design documentation of the target Java program. Whereas previously, the construction of sequence diagrams was a tedious manual process, Rational Sequence generates UML sequence diagrams automatically from the running Java code.

  16. Poly(T) variation within mitochondrial protein-coding genes in Globodera (Nematoda: Heteroderidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riepsamen, Angelique H; Blok, Vivian C; Phillips, Mark; Gibson, Tracey; Dowton, Mark

    2008-03-01

    We sequenced a mitochondrial subgenome from the nematode Globodera rostochiensis, in two overlapping pieces. The subgenome was 9210 bp and contained four protein-coding genes (ND4, COIII, ND3, Cytb) and two tRNA genes (tRNA(Thr), tRNA(Gln)). Genome organization was similar to that of Globodera pallida, which is multipartite. Together with the small number of genes on this subgenome, this suggests that the mitochondrial genome of G. rostochiensis is also multipartite. In the initial clones sequenced, COIII and ND3 were full-length, while ND4 and Cytb were interrupted by premature stop codons and contained point indels that disrupted the reading frame. However, sequencing of multiple clones, from DNA extracted both from multiple individuals and from single cysts, revealed a predominant source of variation-in the length of polythymidine tracts. Comparison of our genomic sequences with ESTs similarly revealed variation in the length of polythymidine tracts. We subsequently sequenced both genomic DNA and mRNA from populations of G. pallida. In each case, variation in the length of polythymidine tracts was observed. The levels of expression of mitochondrial genes in G. pallida were representative of the subgenomes present: little evidence of differential expression was observed. These observations are consistent with the operation of posttranscriptional editing in Globodera mitochondria, although this is difficult to show conclusively in the presence of intraindividual gene sequence variation. Further, alternative explanations cannot be discounted; these include the operation of slippage during translation or that genomic copies of most genes are pseudogenes with a small proportion of full-length sequences able to maintain mitochondrial function.

  17. Jamming transitions and the effect of interruption probability in a lattice traffic flow model with passing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redhu, Poonam; Gupta, Arvind Kumar

    2015-03-01

    A new lattice hydrodynamic model is proposed by considering the interruption probability effect on traffic flow with passing and analyzed both theoretically and numerically. From linear and non-linear stability analysis, the effect of interruption probability on the phase diagram is investigated and the condition of existence for kink-antikink soliton solution of mKdV equation is derived. The stable region is enhanced with interruption probability and the jamming transition occurs from uniform flow to kink flow through chaotic flow for higher and intermediate values of non-interruption effect of passing. It is also observed that there exists conventional jamming transition between uniform flow and kink flow for lower values of non-interruption effect of passing. Numerical simulations are carried out and found in accordance with the theoretical findings which confirm that the effect of interruption probability plays an important role in stabilizing traffic flow when passing is allowed.

  18. ON THE COMPLETION TIME AND THE INTERRUPTION TIME OF A JOB PROCESSED ON AN UNRELIABLE MACHINE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUE Dequan; TU Fengsheng

    2005-01-01

    This paper considers the completion time and the interruption time of a job processed on an unreliable machine.By using the general theory of stochastic orderings,we obtain the closure properties of the distribution of the completion time and the interruption time on L+ and PH life distribution classes.We get an exponential bound for the tail probability of the interruption time.

  19. Critical Causes and Consequences of Construction Project Interruption: Client, Contractor, Consultant and External Factors Standpoints

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    It should be pointed out that the dilemma of interruption and stoppage in the construction industry is a large-scale trend. Construction interruption and stoppage is considered one of the most recurring problems in the construction industry. Construction Interruption and stoppage is always measured as costly to all parties concerned in the projects and very often it will result in clash, claims, total desertion and much difficult for the feasibility and it slows the growth o...

  20. Improving Catastrophe Modeling for Business Interruption Insurance Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Adam; Huyck, Charles K

    2016-10-01

    While catastrophe (CAT) modeling of property damage is well developed, modeling of business interruption (BI) lags far behind. One reason is the crude nature of functional relationships in CAT models that translate property damage into BI. Another is that estimating BI losses is more complicated because it depends greatly on public and private decisions during recovery with respect to resilience tactics that dampen losses by using remaining resources more efficiently to maintain business function and to recover more quickly. This article proposes a framework for improving hazard loss estimation for BI insurance needs. Improved data collection that allows for analysis at the level of individual facilities within a company can improve matching the facilities with the effectiveness of individual forms of resilience, such as accessing inventories, relocating operations, and accelerating repair, and can therefore improve estimation accuracy. We then illustrate the difference this can make in a case study example of losses from a hurricane.

  1. 41 CFR 302-6.106 - May I interrupt occupancy of temporary quarters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... SUBSISTENCE AND TRANSPORTATION EXPENSES 6-ALLOWANCE FOR TEMPORARY QUARTERS SUBSISTENCE EXPENSES Actual TQSE... necessary interruption such as hospitalization, approved sick leave, or other reason beyond your control and...

  2. Successful interruption of transmission of Onchocerca volvulus in the Escuintla-Guatemala focus, Guatemala

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gonzalez, Rodrigo J; Cruz-Ortiz, Nancy; Rizzo, Nidia; Richards, Jane; Zea-Flores, Guillermo; Domínguez, Alfredo; Sauerbrey, Mauricio; Catú, Eduardo; Oliva, Orlando; Richards, Frank O; Lindblade, Kim A

    2009-01-01

    .... We evaluated whether transmission of onchocerciasis has been interrupted in the endemic focus of Escuintla-Guatemala in Guatemala, based on World Health Organization criteria for the certification...

  3. The Flutter Shutter Code Calculator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohann Tendero

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the flutter shutter is to make uniform motion blur invertible, by a"fluttering" shutter that opens and closes on a sequence of well chosen sub-intervals of the exposure time interval. In other words, the photon flux is modulated according to a well chosen sequence calledflutter shutter code. This article provides a numerical method that computes optimal flutter shutter codes in terms of mean square error (MSE. We assume that the observed objects follow a known (or learned random velocity distribution. In this paper, Gaussian and uniform velocity distributions are considered. Snapshots are also optimized taking the velocity distribution into account. For each velocity distribution, the gain of the optimal flutter shutter code with respectto the optimal snapshot in terms of MSE is computed. This symmetric optimization of theflutter shutter and of the snapshot allows to compare on an equal footing both solutions, i.e. camera designs. Optimal flutter shutter codes are demonstrated to improve substantially the MSE compared to classic (patented or not codes. A numerical method that permits to perform a reverse engineering of any existing (patented or not flutter shutter codes is also describedand an implementation is given. In this case we give the underlying velocity distribution fromwhich a given optimal flutter shutter code comes from. The combination of these two numerical methods furnishes a comprehensive study of the optimization of a flutter shutter that includes a forward and a backward numerical solution.

  4. Embedded interruptions and task complexity influence schema-related cognitive load progression in an abstract learning task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirzberger, Maria; Esmaeili Bijarsari, Shirin; Rey, Günter Daniel

    2017-09-01

    Cognitive processes related to schema acquisition comprise an essential source of demands in learning situations. Since the related amount of cognitive load is supposed to change over time, plausible temporal models of load progression based on different theoretical backgrounds are inspected in this study. A total of 116 student participants completed a basal symbol sequence learning task, which provided insights into underlying cognitive dynamics. Two levels of task complexity were determined by the amount of elements within the symbol sequence. In addition, interruptions due to an embedded secondary task occurred at five predefined stages over the task. Within the resulting 2x5-factorial mixed between-within design, the continuous monitoring of efficiency in learning performance enabled assumptions on relevant resource investment. From the obtained results, a nonlinear change of learning efficiency over time seems most plausible in terms of cognitive load progression. Moreover, different effects of the induced interruptions show up in conditions of task complexity, which indicate the activation of distinct cognitive mechanisms related to structural aspects of the task. Findings are discussed in the light of evidence from research on memory and information processing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Schrödinger's code-script: not a genetic cipher but a code of development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsby, A E; Hodge, M J S

    2017-06-01

    In his book What is Life? Erwin Schrödinger coined the term 'code-script', thought by some to be the first published suggestion of a hereditary code and perhaps a forerunner of the genetic code. The etymology of 'code' suggests three meanings relevant to 'code-script which we distinguish as 'cipher-code', 'word-code' and 'rule-code'. Cipher-codes and word-codes entail translation of one set of characters into another. The genetic code comprises not one but two cipher-codes: the first is the DNA 'base-pairing cipher'; the second is the 'nucleotide-amino-acid cipher', which involves the translation of DNA base sequences into amino-acid sequences. We suggest that Schrödinger's code-script is a form of 'rule-code', a set of rules that, like the 'highway code' or 'penal code', requires no translation of a message. Schrödinger first relates his code-script to chromosomal genes made of protein. Ignorant of its properties, however, he later abandons 'protein' and adopts in its place a hypothetical, isomeric 'aperiodic solid' whose atoms he imagines rearranged in countless different conformations, which together are responsible for the patterns of ontogenetic development. In an attempt to explain the large number of combinations required, Schrödinger referred to the Morse code (a cipher) but in doing so unwittingly misled readers into believing that he intended a cipher-code resembling the genetic code. We argue that the modern equivalent of Schrödinger's code-script is a rule-code of organismal development based largely on the synthesis, folding, properties and interactions of numerous proteins, each performing a specific task. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. NOVEL BIPHASE CODE -INTEGRATED SIDELOBE SUPPRESSION CODE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Feixue; Ou Gang; Zhuang Zhaowen

    2004-01-01

    A kind of novel binary phase code named sidelobe suppression code is proposed in this paper. It is defined to be the code whose corresponding optimal sidelobe suppression filter outputs the minimum sidelobes. It is shown that there do exist sidelobe suppression codes better than the conventional optimal codes-Barker codes. For example, the sidelobe suppression code of length 11 with filter of length 39 has better sidelobe level up to 17dB than that of Barker code with the same code length and filter length.

  7. Loss less DNA Solidity Using Huffman and Arithmetic Coding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi Mythri Dasari

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available DNA Sequences making up any bacterium comprise the blue print of that bacterium so that understanding and analyzing different genes with in sequences has become an exceptionally significant mission. Naturalists are manufacturing huge volumes of DNA Sequences every day that makes genome sequence catalogue emergent exponentially. The data bases such as Gen-bank represents millions of DNA Sequences filling many thousands of gigabytes workstation storing capability. Solidity of Genomic sequences can decrease the storage requirements, and increase the broadcast speed. In this paper we compare two lossless solidity algorithms (Huffman and Arithmetic coding. In Huffman coding, individual bases are coded and assigned a specific binary number. But for Arithmetic coding entire DNA is coded in to a single fraction number and binary word is coded to it. Solidity ratio is compared for both the methods and finally we conclude that arithmetic coding is the best.

  8. From concatenated codes to graph codes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Jørn; Høholdt, Tom

    2004-01-01

    We consider codes based on simple bipartite expander graphs. These codes may be seen as the first step leading from product type concatenated codes to more complex graph codes. We emphasize constructions of specific codes of realistic lengths, and study the details of decoding by message passing...

  9. A Pixel Domain Video Coding based on Turbo code and Arithmetic code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyrine Lahsini

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, with emerging applications such as multimedia sensors networks, wirelesslow-power surveillance and mobile camera phones, the traditional video coding architecture in beingchallenged. In fact, these applications have different requirements than those of the broadcast videodelivery systems: a low power consumption at the encoder side is essential.In this context, we propose a pixel-domain video coding scheme which fits well in these senarios.In this system, both the arithmetic and turbo codes are used to encode the video sequence's frames.Simulations results show significant gains over Pixel-domain Wyner-Ziv video codeingr.

  10. Detecting non-coding selective pressure in coding regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanchette Mathieu

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparative genomics approaches, where orthologous DNA regions are compared and inter-species conserved regions are identified, have proven extremely powerful for identifying non-coding regulatory regions located in intergenic or intronic regions. However, non-coding functional elements can also be located within coding region, as is common for exonic splicing enhancers, some transcription factor binding sites, and RNA secondary structure elements affecting mRNA stability, localization, or translation. Since these functional elements are located in regions that are themselves highly conserved because they are coding for a protein, they generally escaped detection by comparative genomics approaches. Results We introduce a comparative genomics approach for detecting non-coding functional elements located within coding regions. Codon evolution is modeled as a mixture of codon substitution models, where each component of the mixture describes the evolution of codons under a specific type of coding selective pressure. We show how to compute the posterior distribution of the entropy and parsimony scores under this null model of codon evolution. The method is applied to a set of growth hormone 1 orthologous mRNA sequences and a known exonic splicing elements is detected. The analysis of a set of CORTBP2 orthologous genes reveals a region of several hundred base pairs under strong non-coding selective pressure whose function remains unknown. Conclusion Non-coding functional elements, in particular those involved in post-transcriptional regulation, are likely to be much more prevalent than is currently known. With the numerous genome sequencing projects underway, comparative genomics approaches like that proposed here are likely to become increasingly powerful at detecting such elements.

  11. Efficacy Improvement of PCR Amplification of CAG Trinucleotide Repeats in the Coding Sequence of Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type II Gene%提高SCA2编码区CAG三核苷酸重复的PCR扩增效率

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汤熙翔; 夏家辉

    2000-01-01

    To improve the efficacy of PCR amplification of CAG trinucleotide repeats in the coding sequence of spinocerebellar ataxia type II gene(69.2% G+C), hot-start PCR, base-replacement PCR, and the addition of enhancers(1%~12.5% DMSO , 1%~25% glycerol ,1%~12.5% formamide) were performed and compared with normal PCR . The results showed that hot-start PCR, base-replacement PCR and the addition of enhancers(1%~10% DMSO , 5%~20% glycerol , 1%~10% formamide) improved the amplification efficacy of the GC rich region. Gene diagnosis in 70 SCA pedgrees and 60 spontaneous SCA patients were also conducted.%以遗传性脊髓小脑共济失调II型基因(spinocerebellar ataxia type II gene SCA2)编码区内的CAG三核苷酸重复为研究对象(G+C含量为69.2%),比较了热启动PCR、碱基替代PCR、添加增效剂(1%~12.5%二甲亚砜、1%~25%甘油、1%~12.5%甲酰胺)与常规PCR的扩增效率,发现热启动PCR、碱基替代PCR及添加增效剂(1%~10%二甲亚砜、5%~20%甘油、1%~10%甲酰胺)能提高该GC富集区的扩增效率,并对70个SCA家系及60个散发SCA患者进行了SCA2的基因诊断。

  12. Good Codes From Generalised Algebraic Geometry Codes

    CERN Document Server

    Jibril, Mubarak; Ahmed, Mohammed Zaki; Tjhai, Cen

    2010-01-01

    Algebraic geometry codes or Goppa codes are defined with places of degree one. In constructing generalised algebraic geometry codes places of higher degree are used. In this paper we present 41 new codes over GF(16) which improve on the best known codes of the same length and rate. The construction method uses places of small degree with a technique originally published over 10 years ago for the construction of generalised algebraic geometry codes.

  13. Combining social strategies and workload: a new design to reduce the negative effects of task interruptions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, R.A.J.; Lohse, M.; Winterboer, Andi; Groen, Frans C.A.; Evers, Vanessa

    2013-01-01

    Being interrupted by notifications and reminders is common while working. In this study we consider whether system politeness reduces (negative) effects of being interrupted by system requests. We carried out a 2 (polite vs. neutral system request) x 2 (high vs. low mental load) between-participants

  14. INFLUENCE OF INTERRUPTED PULMONARY LYMPH-DRAINAGE ON ANTIBODY-RESPONSES IN HILAR-STRIPPED LUNGS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WANG, FZ; WINTER, JB; WILDEVUUR, CRH; PROP, J

    1992-01-01

    Lung transplantation interrupts hilar lymphatics. This may have an impact on immune responses to antigens entering the lung because the antigens cannot reach the lung-associated lymph nodes where the immune response is generated. We investigated the interruption and regeneration of lymphatics and th

  15. Unemployment and Work Interruption among African American Single Mothers: Effects on Parenting and Adolescent Socioemotional Functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLoyd, Vonnie C.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Using interview data from 241 single African American mothers and their seventh- and eighth-grade children, this study tested a model of how 2 economic stressors, maternal unemployment and work interruption, influenced adolescent socioemotional functioning. Found that current unemployment, but not past work interruption, contributed to depressive…

  16. Recognition of temporally interrupted and spectrally degraded sentences with additional unprocessed low-frequency speech

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baskent, Deniz; Chatterjeec, Monita

    2010-01-01

    Recognition of periodically interrupted sentences (with an interruption rate of 1.5 Hz, 50% duty cycle) was investigated under conditions of spectral degradation, implemented with a noiseband vocoder, with and without additional unprocessed low-pass filtered speech (cutoff frequency 500 Hz).

  17. Changes in lipids and lipoprotein particle concentrations after interruption of antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lampe, Fiona C; Duprez, Daniel A; Kuller, Lewis H

    2010-01-01

    The effect of interruption of antiretroviral therapy (ART) on lipoprotein particle subclasses has not been studied. We examined short-term changes in lipids and lipoprotein particles among 332 HIV-infected individuals randomized to interrupt or continue ART in the "Strategies for Management...... of Antiretroviral Therapy" trial....

  18. How Speakers Interrupt Themselves in Managing Problems in Speaking: Evidence from Self-Repairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfeddinipur, Mandana; Kita, Sotaro; Indefrey, Peter

    2008-01-01

    When speakers detect a problem in what they are saying, they must decide whether or not to interrupt themselves and repair the problem, and if so, when. Speakers will maximize accuracy if they interrupt themselves as soon as they detect a problem, but they will maximize fluency if they go on speaking until they are ready to produce the repair.…

  19. Discourse Markers in Turn-Initial Positions in Interruptive Speech in a Malaysian Radio Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nor, Siti Nurbaya Mohd

    2012-01-01

    Discourse markers play significant roles in any spoken interaction. This research examines the functions of the discourse markers (DMs) well, now and and used as turn-initial interruptive devices in a Malaysian radio discourse. Using Schegloff's (2002) framework of what constitutes an interruption in turn-taking and previous studies on the…

  20. How Speakers Interrupt Themselves in Managing Problems in Speaking: Evidence from Self-Repairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfeddinipur, Mandana; Kita, Sotaro; Indefrey, Peter

    2008-01-01

    When speakers detect a problem in what they are saying, they must decide whether or not to interrupt themselves and repair the problem, and if so, when. Speakers will maximize accuracy if they interrupt themselves as soon as they detect a problem, but they will maximize fluency if they go on speaking until they are ready to produce the repair.…

  1. Auditory training of speech recognition with interrupted and continuous noise maskers by children with hearing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Jessica R; Thibodeau, Linda M; Assmann, Peter F

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that individuals with normal hearing (NH) experience a perceptual advantage for speech recognition in interrupted noise compared to continuous noise. In contrast, adults with hearing impairment (HI) and younger children with NH receive a minimal benefit. The objective of this investigation was to assess whether auditory training in interrupted noise would improve speech recognition in noise for children with HI and perhaps enhance their utilization of glimpsing skills. A partially-repeated measures design was used to evaluate the effectiveness of seven 1-h sessions of auditory training in interrupted and continuous noise. Speech recognition scores in interrupted and continuous noise were obtained from pre-, post-, and 3 months post-training from 24 children with moderate-to-severe hearing loss. Children who participated in auditory training in interrupted noise demonstrated a significantly greater improvement in speech recognition compared to those who trained in continuous noise. Those who trained in interrupted noise demonstrated similar improvements in both noise conditions while those who trained in continuous noise only showed modest improvements in the interrupted noise condition. This study presents direct evidence that auditory training in interrupted noise can be beneficial in improving speech recognition in noise for children with HI.

  2. Unemployment and Work Interruption among African American Single Mothers: Effects on Parenting and Adolescent Socioemotional Functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLoyd, Vonnie C.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Using interview data from 241 single African American mothers and their seventh- and eighth-grade children, this study tested a model of how 2 economic stressors, maternal unemployment and work interruption, influenced adolescent socioemotional functioning. Found that current unemployment, but not past work interruption, contributed to depressive…

  3. Recognition of temporally interrupted and spectrally degraded sentences with additional unprocessed low-frequency speech

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baskent, Deniz; Chatterjeec, Monita

    2010-01-01

    Recognition of periodically interrupted sentences (with an interruption rate of 1.5 Hz, 50% duty cycle) was investigated under conditions of spectral degradation, implemented with a noiseband vocoder, with and without additional unprocessed low-pass filtered speech (cutoff frequency 500 Hz). Intelli

  4. Anticipating Interruptions. Security and risk in a liberalized electricity infrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silvast, A.

    2013-11-01

    During the past ten years, a number of social scientists have emphasized the importance of material infrastructures like electricity supply as a research topic for the social sciences. The developing of such new perspectives concerning infrastructures also includes uncertainties and risks. This research analyzes the management of uncertainties in the Finnish electricity infrastructure by posing the following research question: how are electricity interruptions, or blackouts, anticipated in Finland and how are these interruptions managed as risks? The main research methodology of the work is multi-sited field work. The empirical materials include interviews with experts and lay people (33 interviews); participant observation in two electricity control rooms; an electricity consumer survey (115 respondents); and also a number of infrastructure and security policy documents and observations from electricity security seminars. The materials were primarily gathered between 2004 and 2008. Social science research often links risks with major current social changes or socio-cultural risk perceptions. In recent international social science discussions, however, a new research topic has emerged - those styles of reasoning and techniques of governance that are deployed to manage risk as a practical matter. My study explores these themes empirically by focusing on the specific habitual practices of risk management in the Finnish electricity infrastructure. The work develops various also semi-ethnographic inquiries into infrastructure risk techniques like monitor screening of real-time risks in electricity control rooms; the management of risks in a liberalized electricity market; the emergence of Finnish reasoning about blackouts from a specific historical background; and the ways in which electricity consumers respond to blackouts in their homes. In addition, the work reflects upon the position of a risk researcher in those situations when the research subjects do not define

  5. Some possible codes for encrypting data in DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Geoff C; Fiddes, Ceridwyn C; Hawkins, Jonathan P; Cox, Jonathan P L

    2003-07-01

    Three codes are reported for storing written information in DNA. We refer to these codes as the Huffman code, the comma code and the alternating code. The Huffman code was devised using Huffman's algorithm for constructing economical codes. The comma code uses a single base to punctuate the message, creating an automatic reading frame and DNA which is obviously artificial. The alternating code comprises an alternating sequence of purines and pyrimidines, again creating DNA that is clearly artificial. The Huffman code would be useful for routine, short-term storage purposes, supposing--not unrealistically--that very fast methods for assembling and sequencing large pieces of DNA can be developed. The other two codes would be better suited to archiving data over long periods of time (hundreds to thousands of years).

  6. Two sides to every story: The Dual Perspectives Method for examining interruptions in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCurdie, Tara; Sanderson, Penelope; Aitken, Leanne M; Liu, David

    2017-01-01

    Interruptions are widely considered a problem in healthcare. Results from observation and experimental studies have guided extensive mitigation efforts, but the effectiveness of interventions remains mixed. We have built on current theories and methods for studying interruptions to develop a novel observational approach - the Dual Perspectives Method - for examining interruptions from the perspectives of the different work functions in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU). We detail the method and provide representative examples of the insights it offers, such as why interruptions happen, the role they play, and the consequences of preserving them or eliminating them. We anticipate that the Dual Perspectives Method will help us to arrive at a better basis on which to draw conclusions about interruptions, and will lead to the development of appropriate and sustainable interventions to ensure the effective and safe functioning of the work system under examination.

  7. Interface requirements to couple thermal hydraulics codes to severe accident codes: ICARE/CATHARE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camous, F.; Jacq, F.; Chatelard, P. [IPSN/DRS/SEMAR CE-Cadarache, St Paul Lez Durance (France)] [and others

    1997-07-01

    In order to describe with the same code the whole sequence of severe LWR accidents, up to the vessel failure, the Institute of Protection and Nuclear Safety has performed a coupling of the severe accident code ICARE2 to the thermalhydraulics code CATHARE2. The resulting code, ICARE/CATHARE, is designed to be as pertinent as possible in all the phases of the accident. This paper is mainly devoted to the description of the ICARE2-CATHARE2 coupling.

  8. De-coding and re-coding RNA recognition by PUF and PPR repeat proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Traci M Tanaka

    2016-02-01

    PUF and PPR proteins are two families of α-helical repeat proteins that recognize single-stranded RNA sequences. Both protein families hold promise as scaffolds for designed RNA-binding domains. A modular protein RNA recognition code was apparent from the first crystal structures of a PUF protein in complex with RNA, and recent studies continue to advance our understanding of natural PUF protein recognition (de-coding) and our ability to engineer specificity (re-coding). Degenerate recognition motifs make de-coding specificity of individual PPR proteins challenging. Nevertheless, re-coding PPR protein specificity using a consensus recognition code has been successful.

  9. [Ethical dilemmas in medicine. The interruption of pregnancy in woman].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gual-Castro, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy interruption or abortion may be spontaneous or induced for medical, legal, demographic, and personal reasons. Different events that are present during the woman´s gravid period were described, paying attention to the differences in between fertilization and conception. These issues are very important because people or institutions mix these concepts and posit that pregnancy or conception starts at fertilization in opposition to the actual medical and scientific knowledge. In Mexico there are several millions of spontaneous and induced abortions without medical care, responsible for the high maternal-infant mortality rates. To avoid this undesirable situation, it has been proposed to follow the established WHO guidelines and adopt national health policies to re-orientate population goals on life quality, gender equity, universal public health services, and to promote the new holistic concepts of reproductive and sexual health such as: family planning, use of anti-fertility methods, adolescent reproductive health, sexually transmitted diseases, maternal and newborn health, peri- and post-menopausal women's health, and prevention, diagnosis, and opportune treatment of mammary, cervical-uterine, and ovarian cancers. Finally, it is recommended to revise our national health policies and existing laws on abortion de-penalization.

  10. Interruption of Onchocerca volvulus transmission in Northern Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convit, Jacinto; Schuler, Harland; Borges, Rafael; Olivero, Vimerca; Domínguez-Vázquez, Alfredo; Frontado, Hortencia; Grillet, María E

    2013-10-07

    Onchocerciasis is caused by Onchocerca volvulus and transmitted by Simulium species (black flies). In the Americas, the infection has been previously described in 13 discrete regional foci distributed among six countries (Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Guatemala, Mexico and Venezuela) where more than 370,000 people are currently considered at risk. Since 2001, disease control in Venezuela has relied on the mass drug administration to the at-risk communities. This report provides empirical evidence of interruption of Onchocerca volvulus transmission by Simulium metallicum in 510 endemic communities from two Northern foci of Venezuela, after 10-12 years of 6-monthly Mectizan (ivermectin) treatment to all the eligible residents. In-depth entomologic and epidemiologic surveys were serially conducted from 2001-2012 in selected (sentinel and extra-sentinel) communities from the North-central (NC) and North-east (NE) onchocerciasis foci of Venezuela in order to monitor the impact of ivermectin treatment. From 2007-2009, entomological indicators in both foci confirmed that 0 out of 112,637 S. metallicum females examined by PCR contained L3 infection in insect heads. The upper bound of the 95% confidence intervals of the infective rate of the vector reached values below 1% by 2009 (NC) and 2012 (NE). Additionally, after 14 (NC) and 22 (NE) rounds of treatment, the seasonal transmission potential (±UL CIs) of S. metallicum was under the critical threshold of 20 L3 per person per season. Serological analysis in school children Venezuela.

  11. Measurement and repeatability of interrupter resistance in unsedated newborn infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, A M; Olden, C; Wertheim, D; Ives, A; Bridge, P D; Lenton, J; Seddon, P

    2009-12-01

    Interrupter resistance (R(int)) is a useful measure of airway caliber in young children, but has not been well characterized in infants-in whom there are concerns about the accurate measurement of driving pressure. This study aimed to assess the feasibility and repeatability of measuring R(int) in unsedated newborn infants, and to explore alternative algorithms for calculating driving pressure. R(int) measurement was attempted in 28 healthy term newborn infants during natural sleep using the MicroRint device. Paired R(int) measurements were achieved in 24 infants, but after screening of waveforms only 15 infants had at least 5 technically acceptable waveforms on both measurements. R(int) values obtained were comparable with reported values for airflow resistance in newborns using other methods. However, the repeatability coefficient (CR) was much higher than reported values in preschool children using standard back-extrapolation algorithms, with CR 2.47 KPa L(-1) sec (unscreened) and 2.93 KPa L(-1) sec (screened). Other algorithms gave only marginally better repeatability, with all CR values over 50% of the mean R(int) value. Using current commercially available equipment, R(int) is too poorly repeatable to be a reliable measurement of airflow resistance in newborn infants. Lower deadspace equipment is needed, but anatomical and physiological factors in the infant are also important.

  12. Power spectra for both interrupted and perennial aging processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukovic, Mirko; Grigolini, Paolo

    2008-11-01

    We study the power spectrum of a random telegraphic noise with the distribution density of waiting times τ given by ψ(τ )∝1/τμ, with μ ≈2. The condition μ power spectrum obeys the prescription S(f )=K/fη, with η =3-μ, namely, the 1/f noise lives at border between the ergodic μ >2 and nonergodic μ legitimate by two different kinds of truncation effects: the physical and observation-induced effect. In the former case ψ(τ ) is truncated at τ ≈Tmax and L ≫Tmax ensures the condition of interrupted aging. In this case, we find that K is a number independent of L. The latter case, L ≪Tmax, is more challenging. It was already solved by Margolin and Barkai, who used time asymptotic arguments based on the ergodicity breakdown and obtained K ∝1/L2-μ, proving that the out-of-equilibrium nature of the condition μ 2. We do not limit our treatment to the time asymptotic case, thereby producing a prediction that accounts for the transition from the 1/fη to the 1/f2 regime, recently observed in an experiment on blinking quantum dots. Our theoretical approach allows us to discuss some other recent experiments on molecular intermittent fluorescence and affords indications that should help to assess whether the spectrum is determined by the L ≪Tmax or by the L ≫Tmax condition.

  13. Progress toward interruption of wild poliovirus transmission - worldwide, 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-14

    In 1988, an estimated 350,000 cases of poliomyelitis were occurring annually worldwide. By 2005, because of global vaccination efforts, indigenous transmission of wild poliovirus (WPV) types 1 and 3 (WPV1 and WPV3) had been eliminated from all but four countries (Afghanistan, India, Nigeria, and Pakistan). No cases of WPV type 2 have been reported since 1999. This report describes progress toward global WPV eradication during 2009 and updates previous reports. During 2009 a total of 1,606 cases of WPV infection were reported, compared with 1,651 in 2008. WPV3 incidence increased 67%, to 1,124 cases, compared with 675 in 2008. However, WPV1 incidence decreased 51%, to 482 cases in 2009, compared with 976 cases in 2008. In India, nearly all polio cases in 2009 were reported in high-risk districts in western Uttar Pradesh and central Bihar. In Afghanistan and Pakistan, WPV circulation in high-risk districts continued because of difficulties vaccinating children in conflict-affected areas and operational limitations in parts of Pakistan. In Nigeria, cases decreased by 51%, to 388 cases in 2009, compared with 798 in 2008. During 2009, outbreaks from importation of WPV affected 19 previously polio-free African countries. Two key steps are needed to make further progress in polio eradication: 1) addressing local barriers to interrupting transmission, and 2) using bivalent oral poliovirus vaccine (bOPV) broadly for WPV 1 and 3 in supplemental immunization activities (SIAs).

  14. Development of distribution and subtransmission SF/sub 6/ circuit breaker and hybrid transmission interrupter. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Votta, G.A.

    1978-06-01

    This project covered the development of a new generation of SF/sub 6/ arc spinner interrupters, a 15-kV circuit breaker (distribution) using this interrupter, and investigated the feasibility of a high voltage (transmission) hybrid interrupter using the arc-spinner and a vacuum interrupter in series. The arc spinner interrupter concept uses a self-generated magnetic field to drive an arc, on a circular path in an atmosphere of SF/sub 6/ gas, to achieve interruption. Test models of the arc spinner interrupter were built and tested to determine the component requirements and arrangements necessary for the desired performance. A single-phase laboratory model of this interrupter was successfully tested up through 25 kA at 13.5 kV. Interruption of 40 kA at 13.5 kV was demonstrated; however, satisfactory performance was not obtained at significant current levels during this program when tested at higher voltages. A full-scale model of a three-phase outdoor distribution power circuit breaker rated 18 kA at 15.5 kV was built and successfully tested to standards. The hybrid interrupter concept (transmission) uses an arc spinner and a vacuum interrupter in series. The vacuum interrupter handles the high initial rate of rise of recovery voltage associated with short line faults, and the arc spinner interrupter handles the high peak transient recovery voltage. The hybrid interrupter demonstrated an ability to handle the initial high rate of rise recovery voltage but encountered dielectric failures at relatively low current levels. This feasibility investigation was limited by the unavailability of a suitable rating of vacuum interrupters and by limitations inherent to an early model arc spinner interrupter for the tests. The investigation of the hybrid was discontinued until further development of a higher voltage arc spinner interrupter could be accomplished.

  15. Interrupted and Isothermal Solidification Studies of Low and Medium Carbon Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pottore, N. S.; Garcia, C. I.; Deardo, A. J.

    1991-08-01

    Low and medium carbon steels experience multiple phase transformations during solidification and subsequent cooling. The sequence, extent, and nature of the different transformations have a significant bearing on the microstructural evolution that occurs in the steel. The change in microstructure with temperature is very important, since it may influence the hot ductility of the steel during casting and/or rolling and the subsequent response of the material to thermoprocessing. The aim of this investigation was to gain a better understanding of the development of the as-cast structure in low and medium carbon steels. Of particular interest is the origin of the large austenite grains frequently associated with poor hot ductility. Interrupted and isothermal solidification experiments were therefore conducted to study the nonequilibrium and near-equilibrium structures which form at different stages of the freezing process. The results of the investigation established delta-ferrite as the primary solidifying phase in low carbon steels. Austenite forms as the secondary phase by nucleation at the solidification (delta-ferrite) boundaries. While excessive austenite grain coarsening is suppressed by the coexistence of the second phases delta-ferrite or liquid, this suppression occurs over only a limited temperature range, just below the peritectic temperature. Subsequent cooling leads to very large austenite grains, ranging up to 5 mm in diameter, in steels of low carbon content.

  16. Interruption of Electrical Conductivity of Titanium Dental Implants Suggests a Path Towards Elimination Of Corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozhitkov, Alex E; Daubert, Diane; Brochwicz Donimirski, Ashley; Goodgion, Douglas; Vagin, Mikhail Y; Leroux, Brian G; Hunter, Colby M; Flemmig, Thomas F; Noble, Peter A; Bryers, James D

    2015-01-01

    Peri-implantitis is an inflammatory disease that results in the destruction of soft tissue and bone around the implant. Titanium implant corrosion has been attributed to the implant failure and cytotoxic effects to the alveolar bone. We have documented the extent of titanium release into surrounding plaque in patients with and without peri-implantitis. An in vitro model was designed to represent the actual environment of an implant in a patient's mouth. The model uses actual oral microbiota from a volunteer, allows monitoring electrochemical processes generated by biofilms growing on implants and permits control of biocorrosion electrical current. As determined by next generation DNA sequencing, microbial compositions in experiments with the in vitro model were comparable with the compositions found in patients with implants. It was determined that the electrical conductivity of titanium implants was the key factor responsible for the biocorrosion process. The interruption of the biocorrosion current resulted in a 4-5 fold reduction of corrosion. We propose a new design of dental implant that combines titanium in zero oxidation state for osseointegration and strength, interlaid with a nonconductive ceramic. In addition, we propose electrotherapy for manipulation of microbial biofilms and to induce bone healing in peri-implantitis patients.

  17. Interruption of Electrical Conductivity of Titanium Dental Implants Suggests a Path Towards Elimination Of Corrosion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex E Pozhitkov

    Full Text Available Peri-implantitis is an inflammatory disease that results in the destruction of soft tissue and bone around the implant. Titanium implant corrosion has been attributed to the implant failure and cytotoxic effects to the alveolar bone. We have documented the extent of titanium release into surrounding plaque in patients with and without peri-implantitis. An in vitro model was designed to represent the actual environment of an implant in a patient's mouth. The model uses actual oral microbiota from a volunteer, allows monitoring electrochemical processes generated by biofilms growing on implants and permits control of biocorrosion electrical current. As determined by next generation DNA sequencing, microbial compositions in experiments with the in vitro model were comparable with the compositions found in patients with implants. It was determined that the electrical conductivity of titanium implants was the key factor responsible for the biocorrosion process. The interruption of the biocorrosion current resulted in a 4-5 fold reduction of corrosion. We propose a new design of dental implant that combines titanium in zero oxidation state for osseointegration and strength, interlaid with a nonconductive ceramic. In addition, we propose electrotherapy for manipulation of microbial biofilms and to induce bone healing in peri-implantitis patients.

  18. Space Time Codes from Permutation Codes

    CERN Document Server

    Henkel, Oliver

    2006-01-01

    A new class of space time codes with high performance is presented. The code design utilizes tailor-made permutation codes, which are known to have large minimal distances as spherical codes. A geometric connection between spherical and space time codes has been used to translate them into the final space time codes. Simulations demonstrate that the performance increases with the block lengths, a result that has been conjectured already in previous work. Further, the connection to permutation codes allows for moderate complex en-/decoding algorithms.

  19. Fundamentals of convolutional coding

    CERN Document Server

    Johannesson, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Fundamentals of Convolutional Coding, Second Edition, regarded as a bible of convolutional coding brings you a clear and comprehensive discussion of the basic principles of this field * Two new chapters on low-density parity-check (LDPC) convolutional codes and iterative coding * Viterbi, BCJR, BEAST, list, and sequential decoding of convolutional codes * Distance properties of convolutional codes * Includes a downloadable solutions manual

  20. Safe interruption of maintenance therapy against previous infection with four common HIV-associated opportunistic pathogens during potent antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, Ole; Reiss, Peter; Uberti-Foppa, Caterina;

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The safety of interrupting maintenance therapy for previous opportunistic infections other than Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia among patients with HIV infection who respond to potent antiretroviral therapy has not been well documented. OBJECTIVE: To assess the safety of interrupting m...

  1. Mouth-to-mouth ventilation reduces interruptions in chest compressions during lifeguard CPR: A randomized manikin study,

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løfgren, Bo; Adelborg, Kasper; Dalgas, Christian

    Mouth-to-mouth ventilation reduces interruptions in chest compressions during lifeguard CPR: A randomized manikin study.......Mouth-to-mouth ventilation reduces interruptions in chest compressions during lifeguard CPR: A randomized manikin study....

  2. Safe interruption of maintenance therapy against previous infection with four common HIV-associated opportunistic pathogens during potent antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, Ole; Reiss, Peter; Uberti-Foppa, Caterina

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The safety of interrupting maintenance therapy for previous opportunistic infections other than Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia among patients with HIV infection who respond to potent antiretroviral therapy has not been well documented. OBJECTIVE: To assess the safety of interrupting m...

  3. Optimality Of Variable-Length Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Pen-Shu; Miller, Warner H.; Rice, Robert F.

    1994-01-01

    Report presents analysis of performances of conceptual Rice universal noiseless coders designed to provide efficient compression of data over wide range of source-data entropies. Includes predictive preprocessor that maps source data into sequence of nonnegative integers and variable-length-coding processor, which adapts to varying entropy of source data by selecting whichever one of number of optional codes yields shortest codeword.

  4. Complete sequence and analysis of plastid genomes of two economically important red algae: Pyropia haitanensis and Pyropia yezoensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pyropia haitanensis and P. yezoensis are two economically important marine crops that are also considered to be research models to study the physiological ecology of intertidal seaweed communities, evolutionary biology of plastids, and the origins of sexual reproduction. This plastid genome information will facilitate study of breeding, population genetics and phylogenetics. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have fully sequenced using next-generation sequencing the circular plastid genomes of P. hatanensis (195,597 bp and P. yezoensis (191,975 bp, the largest of all the plastid genomes of the red lineage sequenced to date. Organization and gene contents of the two plastids were similar, with 211-213 protein-coding genes (including 29-31 unknown-function ORFs, 37 tRNA genes, and 6 ribosomal RNA genes, suggesting a largest coding capacity in the red lineage. In each genome, 14 protein genes overlapped and no interrupted genes were found, indicating a high degree of genomic condensation. Pyropia maintain an ancient gene content and conserved gene clusters in their plastid genomes, containing nearly complete repertoires of the plastid genes known in photosynthetic eukaryotes. Similarity analysis based on the whole plastid genome sequences showed the distance between P. haitanensis and P. yezoensis (0.146 was much smaller than that of Porphyra purpurea and P. haitanensis (0.250, and P. yezoensis (0.251; this supports re-grouping the two species in a resurrected genus Pyropia while maintaining P. purpurea in genus Porphyra. Phylogenetic analysis supports a sister relationship between Bangiophyceae and Florideophyceae, though precise phylogenetic relationships between multicellular red alage and chromists were not fully resolved. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that Pyropia have compact plastid genomes. Large coding capacity and long intergenic regions contribute to the size of the largest plastid genomes reported for the red lineage. Possessing

  5. Genomic analysis of Pseudomonas putida phage tf with localized single-strand DNA interruptions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoly S Glukhov

    Full Text Available The complete sequence of the 46,267 bp genome of the lytic bacteriophage tf specific to Pseudomonas putida PpG1 has been determined. The phage genome has two sets of convergently transcribed genes and 186 bp long direct terminal repeats. The overall genomic architecture of the tf phage is similar to that of the previously described Pseudomonas aeruginosa phages PaP3, LUZ24 and phiMR299-2, and 39 out of the 72 products of predicted tf open reading frames have orthologs in these phages. Accordingly, tf was classified as belonging to the LUZ24-like bacteriophage group. However, taking into account very low homology levels between tf DNA and that of the other phages, tf should be considered as an evolutionary divergent member of the group. Two distinguishing features not reported for other members of the group were found in the tf genome. Firstly, a unique end structure--a blunt right end and a 4-nucleotide 3'-protruding left end--was observed. Secondly, 14 single-chain interruptions (nicks were found in the top strand of the tf DNA. All nicks were mapped within a consensus sequence 5'-TACT/RTGMC-3'. Two nicks were analyzed in detail and were shown to be present in more than 90% of the phage population. Although localized nicks were previously found only in the DNA of T5-like and phiKMV-like phages, it seems increasingly likely that this enigmatic structural feature is common to various other bacteriophages.

  6. Causes of unplanned interruption of radiotherapy; Causas da interrupcao nao programada da radioterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diegues, Sylvia Suelotto [Hospital AlemAo Oswaldo Cruz, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Div. of Oncology]. E-mail: ssdiegues@terra.com.br; Ciconelli, Rozana Mesquita [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. of Medicine. Centro de Economia da Saude; Segreto, Roberto Araujo [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. of Medicine

    2008-03-15

    Objective: To evaluate the occurrence and causes of unplanned interruption of radiotherapy. Materials and methods: Retrospective study developed in the Division of Radiotherapy of Hospital Alemao Oswaldo Cruz in Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil, with data collected from 560 dossiers of patients submitted to radiotherapy in the period between January 1, 2005 and December 31, 2005. Chi-squared and Student t tests were utilized in the data analysis, and p < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: Interruption of treatment was identified in 350 cases, corresponding to 62.5% of the patients. The reasons for treatment interruption were the following: preventive device maintenance (55%), patient's own private reasons (13%), adverse reactions to the treatment or to combined radiotherapy/chemotherapy (6%), clinical worsening (3%), two or more combined reasons (23%). The interruption time interval ranged between 1 and 24 days (mean 1.4 day). One-day interruption was mostly due to preventive device maintenance (84.4%); two-five-day interruption was due to combined reasons (48.28%). Conclusion: The most frequent cause of interruption was preventive device maintenance, with maximum two-day time interval. (author)

  7. Identifying biological pathway interrupting toxins using multi-tree ensembles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gergo Barta

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The pharmaceutical industry constantly seeks new ways to improve current methods that scientists use to evaluate environmental chemicals and develop new medicines. Various automated steps are involved in the process as testing hundreds of thousands of chemicals manually would be infeasible. Our research effort and the Toxicology in the 21st Century Data Challenge focused on cost-effective automation of toxicological testing, a chemical substance screening process looking for possible toxic effects caused by interrupting biological pathways. The computational models we propose in this paper successfully combine various publicly available substance fingerprinting tools with advanced machine learning techniques. In our paper, we explore the significance and utility of assorted feature selection methods as the structural analyzers generate a plethora of features for each substance. Machine learning models were carefully selected and evaluated based on their capability to cope with the high-dimensional high-variety data with multi-tree ensemble methods coming out on top. Techniques like Random forests and Extra trees combine numerous simple tree models and proved to produce reliable predictions on toxic activity while being nearly non-parametric and insensitive to dimensionality extremes. The Tox21 Data Challenge contest offered a great platform to compare a wide range of solutions in a controlled and orderly manner. The results clearly demonstrate that the generic approach presented in this paper is comparable to advanced deep learning and domain-specific solutions. Even surpassing the competition in some nuclear receptor signaling and stress pathway assays and achieving an accuracy of up to 94 percent.

  8. Assessing the measurement of airway resistance by the interrupter technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuriarrain Reyna, Yolanda; López Neyra, Alejandro; Sanz Santiago, Verónica; Almería Gil, Esmeralda; Villa Asensi, José Ramón

    2013-12-01

    Pulmonary function tests allow an objective assessment of the degree of bronchial obstruction in collaborative subjects. The measurement of airway resistance using passive methods is very helpful in non-collaborative subjects. The objective of this study was to assess the applicability of measuring airway resistance by the interrupter technique (Rint) in pediatric subjects, determining its reproducibility, reliability and accuracy versus other techniques to measure airway resistance. Cross-sectional study in healthy children and in children with an obstructive airway disease, all aged 2-18 years old. The Rint was measured using a portable device and results were compared to airway resistance measured by oscillometry and plethysmography. The reproducibility of measurements and the infuence of the different outcome measures (use of mask or mouthpiece, cheek support, or nose clip) were assessed. Valid measurements were obtained in 82.6% of 460 children (47.6% younger than 7 years old). Reproducibility was very good (ICC= 0.9412; p measurements obtained at separate time intervals (0.75 ± 0.3 versus 0.74 ± 0.28; p= 0.435). None of the factors indicated before had an effect on the reproducibility of measurements. Resistance values obtained by plethysmography and oscillometry were higher than those obtained using the Rint, with a positive correlation between them. The higher the degree of airway obstruction, the worse the correlation with plethysmography. The Rint measurement is a plausible and reproducible technique, and has an adequate correlation with the resistance measurements obtained using oscillometry or plethysmography, thus making it useful for non-collaborative patients. In patients with airway obstruction, this technique could underestimate resistance, so it would be a hurdle to use it to follow-up subjects with a moderate to severe obstructive disease or in bronchial challenge tests.

  9. Progress toward interruption of wild poliovirus transmission--worldwide, 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    Since 1988, when the Global Polio Eradication Initiative was established, the incidence of polio has decreased from an estimated 350,000 cases annually to 1,655 reported in 2008. Cases of wild poliovirus (WPV) type 2 were last reported in October 1999, and indigenous WPV types 1 and 3 (WPV1 and WPV3) have been eliminated from all but four countries worldwide (Afghanistan, India, Nigeria, and Pakistan). This report updates previous reports and describes overall progress toward global eradication in 2008. Despite accelerated efforts, polio cases increased 26%, from 1,315 cases in 2007 to 1,655 in 2008. This increase primarily resulted from an increase in Nigeria from 285 cases in 2007 to 801 cases in 2008. Resurgent WPV1 transmission in northern states of Nigeria spread to polio-free southern states and eight neighboring countries in 2008. In India, repeated use of monovalent oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) type 1 (mOPV1) during 2005--2008 interrupted WPV1 transmission in the western districts of the northern state of Uttar Pradesh for >12 months during 2007--2008; however, in mid-2008, WPV1 imported from the neighboring state of Bihar caused renewed transmission. In Afghanistan and Pakistan, problems in accessing children in conflict-affected areas increased, and an upsurge in WPV1 and WPV3 cases occurred, including an outbreak of WPV1 in Punjab Province, Pakistan. In Africa, during 2008, sustained WPV transmission for >12 months after importation continued in Angola, Chad, the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Niger, and southern Sudan. Increased political oversight and accountability and improved vaccination outreach to insecure areas are needed to achieve the eradication goal.

  10. Strong Trinucleotide Circular Codes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian J. Michel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, we identified a hierarchy relation between trinucleotide comma-free codes and trinucleotide circular codes (see our previous works. Here, we extend our hierarchy with two new classes of codes, called DLD and LDL codes, which are stronger than the comma-free codes. We also prove that no circular code with 20 trinucleotides is a DLD code and that a circular code with 20 trinucleotides is comma-free if and only if it is a LDL code. Finally, we point out the possible role of the symmetric group ∑4 in the mathematical study of trinucleotide circular codes.

  11. Study on the Cloning of Coding Sequence and Ontogenetic mRNA Expression of Ovine UCP4 Gene%绵羊UCP4基因编码序列的克隆和mRNA表达研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周沙沙; 刘宝凤; 魏琳琳; 王景霖; 刘建华; 梁琛; 乔利英; 刘文忠

    2013-01-01

    [Objective] This study aims to clone the coding sequence (CDS) of ovine UCP4 gene,to analyze the CDS and its coding protein structures,and to profile the ontogenetic mRNA expression so that to lay a theoretical foundation for future research on the structure and function of this gene.[Method] The CDS was amplified from ovine cerebrum tissue by reverse transcriptionpolymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).Physicochemical features and structural characteristics of ovine UCP4 were analyzed by bioinformatics methods.Ninety-six animals from two sheep breeds with significant differences in tail types (Guangling Large Tailedand Small Tailed-Han Sheep) were used to study the ontogenetic mRNA expression by real-time quantitative PCR in eight tissues (cerebrum,cerebellum,hypothalamus,pituitary,and subcutaneous fat,perirenal fat,mesenteric fat and tail fat) from 2-to 12-month old age at two-month interval.[Result] The sequencing data showed that the length of complete CDS was 972 bp encoding a protein of 323 amino acids.The isoelectric point (pI) of the protein was 9.43,and the molecular weight was 35.73 kDa.The percentages of helix,strand and loop were 56.04%,7.12% and 36.84%,respectively,in the secondary structure.This transmembrane protein had no signal peptide but with two predicted glycosylation sites and 15 potential phosphorylation sites.The UCP4 mRNA expressed in all these tissues,but overexpressed in brain tissue other than in adipose tissue.Generally,breed,tissue and the months of age had significant influences on the UCP4 mRNA expression.[Conclusion] The obtained whole CDS of ovine UCP4 gene,expression profile and its limiting factors are of scientific significance to further studies on the relationship between the gene structure and energy metabolism.%[目的]克隆绵羊UCP4基因的编码序列(CDS),分析CDS及其编码蛋白结构特点,并探讨其mRNA的发育性表达规律,以期为该基因的结构和功能研究奠定理论基础.[方法]利用RT-PCR

  12. Cardiogenic shock due to coronary artery disease associated with interrupted aortic arch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Alberto Oliveira Dallan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute pulmonary edema is a serious event. Its occurrence in association with interrupted aortic arch and coronary heart disease is rare. Recently, an old patient developed cardiogenic shock and acute pulmonary edema due to acute coronary insufficiency, associated with interrupted aortic arch. The coronary angiography revealed occlusion of the right coronary artery and 95% obstruction in the left main coronary artery, associated with interruption of the descending aorta. Coronary artery bypass graft was performed, without extracorporeal circulation, to the anterior descending coronary artery. We discuss the initial management, given the seriousness of the case.

  13. Interview interruption and responses to questions about domestic violence in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabel, Brenna V; Cunningham, Solveig A; Stephenson, Rob

    2014-08-01

    This article uses the National Family Health Survey 2005-2006 (NFHS-3) of India to examine the relationship between interview interruption and the reporting of domestic violence. A sample of 65,610 currently married women was used to compare reported acts of physical and sexual violence among women who had been interrupted during their interview and those who had not. Logistic regression analyses indicated that women whose interviews were interrupted by either an adult man or woman were significantly more likely to report intimate partner violence. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Semi-polling based interrupt mitigation for high performance packet processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Interrupt-driven systems can be collapsed due to frequent NIC interrupts under heavy network traffic. To mitigate this problem, a high-performance communication mechanism SBIM based on real-time OS RTLinux is designed and implemented. A new concept of semi-polling is presented. With state-based semi-polling mechanism and lightweight buffering algorithm, interrupt frequency is reduced and the performance for short packet is significantly ameliorated. The experimental results indicate that the throughputs of SBIM for 64byte and 1500byte packets are 394Mbps and 895Mbps in Gigabit Ethernet environments, which show that the performance of SBIM surpasses that of other mechanisms.

  15. Joint source channel coding using arithmetic codes

    CERN Document Server

    Bi, Dongsheng

    2009-01-01

    Based on the encoding process, arithmetic codes can be viewed as tree codes and current proposals for decoding arithmetic codes with forbidden symbols belong to sequential decoding algorithms and their variants. In this monograph, we propose a new way of looking at arithmetic codes with forbidden symbols. If a limit is imposed on the maximum value of a key parameter in the encoder, this modified arithmetic encoder can also be modeled as a finite state machine and the code generated can be treated as a variable-length trellis code. The number of states used can be reduced and techniques used fo

  16. Reduction of maternal mortality due to preeclampsia in Colombia-an interrupted time-series analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Medina, Rodolfo; Herrera-Escobar, Juan Pablo; Nieto-Díaz, Aníbal

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Preeclampsia is the most important cause of maternal mortality in developing countries. A comprehensive prenatal care program including bio-psychosocial components was developed and introduced at a national level in Colombia. We report on the trends in maternal mortality rates and their related causes before and after implementation of this program. Methods: General and specific maternal mortality rates were monitored for nine years (1998-2006). An interrupted time-series analysis was performed with monthly data on cases of maternal mortality that compared trends and changes in national mortality rates and the impact of these changes attributable to the introduction of a bio-psychosocial model. Multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate correlations between the interventions. Results: Five years after (2002 - 2006) its introduction the general maternal mortality rate was significantly reduced to 23% (OR=0.77, CI 95% 0.71-0.82).The implementation of BPSM also reduced the incidence of preeclampsia in 22% (OR= 0.78, CI 95% 0.67-0.88), as also the labor complications by hemorrhage in 25% (OR=0.75, CI 95% 0.59-0.90) associated with the implementation of red code. The other causes of maternal mortality did not reveal significant changes. Biomedical, nutritional, psychosocial assessments, and other individual interventions in prenatal care were not correlated to maternal mortality (p= 0.112); however, together as a model we observed a significant association (p= 0.042). Conclusions: General maternal mortality was reduced after the implementation of a comprehensive national prenatal care program. Is important the evaluation of this program in others populations. PMID:24970956

  17. Reduction of maternal mortality due to preeclampsia in Colombia-an interrupted time-series analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Alberto Herrera

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction.  Preeclampsia is the most important cause of maternal mortality in developing countries. A comprehensive prenatal care program including bio-psychosocial components was developed and introduced at a national level in Colombia. We report on the trends in maternal mortality rates and their related causes before and after implementation of this program. Methods: General and specific maternal mortality rates were monitored for nine years (1998-2006. An interrupted time-series analysis was performed with monthly data on cases of maternal mortality that compared trends and changes in national mortality rates and the impact of these changes attributable to the introduction of a bio-psychosocial model. Multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate correlations between the interventions. Results: Five years after (2002–2006 its introduction the general maternal mortality rate was significantly reduced to 23% (OR= 0.77, CI 95% 0.71-0.82.The implementation of BPSM also reduced the incidence of preeclampsia in 22%  (OR= 0.78, CI 95% 0.67-0.88, as also the labor complications by hemorrhage in 25%  (OR= 0.75, CI 95% 0.59-0.90 associated with the implementation of red code. The other causes of maternal mortality did not reveal significant changes. Biomedical, nutritional, psychosocial assessments, and other individual interventions in prenatal care were not correlated to maternal mortality (p= 0.112; however, together as a model we observed a significant association (p= 0.042. Conclusions: General maternal mortality was reduced after the implementation of a comprehensive national prenatal care program. Is important the evaluation of this program in others populations. 

  18. A FINE GRANULAR JOINT SOURCE CHANNEL CODING METHOD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhuo Li; Shen Lansun; Zhu Qing

    2003-01-01

    An improved FGS (Fine Granular Scalability) coding method is proposed in this letter, which is based on human visual characteristics. This method adjusts FGS coding frame rate according to the evaluation of video sequences so as to improve the coding efficiency and subject perceived quality of reconstructed images. Finally, a fine granular joint source channel coding is proposed based on the source coding method, which not only utilizes the network resources efficiently, but guarantees the reliable transmission of video information.

  19. Functional expression of SCL/TAL1 interrupting locus (Stil) protects retinal dopaminergic cells from neurotoxin-induced degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingling; Li, Ping; Carr, Aprell; Wang, Xiaokai; DeLaPaz, April; Sun, Lei; Lee, Eric; Tomei, Erika; Li, Lei

    2013-01-11

    We previously isolated a dominant mutation, night blindness b (nbb), which causes a late onset of retinal dopaminergic cell degeneration in zebrafish. In this study, we cloned the zebrafish nbb locus. Sequencing results revealed that nbb is a homolog of the vertebrate SCL/TAL1 interrupting locus (Stil). The Stil gene has been shown to play important roles in the regulation of vertebrate embryonic neural development and human cancer cell proliferation. In this study, we demonstrate that functional expression of Stil is also required for neural survival. In zebrafish, decreased expression of Stil resulted in increased toxic susceptibility of retinal dopaminergic cells to 6-hydroxydopamine. Increases in Stil-mediated Shh signaling transduction (i.e. by knocking down the Shh repressor Sufu) prevented dopaminergic cell death induced by neurotoxic insult. The data suggest that the oncogene Stil also plays important roles in neural protection.

  20. Coding technique with progressive reconstruction based on VQ and entropy coding applied to medical images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Fernandez, Marcos; Alberola-Lopez, Carlos; Guerrero-Rodriguez, David; Ruiz-Alzola, Juan

    2000-12-01

    In this paper we propose a novel lossless coding scheme for medical images that allows the final user to switch between a lossy and a lossless mode. This is done by means of a progressive reconstruction philosophy (which can be interrupted at will) so we believe that our scheme gives a way to trade off between the accuracy needed for medical diagnosis and the information reduction needed for storage and transmission. We combine vector quantization, run-length bit plane and entropy coding. Specifically, the first step is a vector quantization procedure; the centroid codes are Huffman- coded making use of a set of probabilities that are calculated in the learning phase. The image is reconstructed at the coder in order to obtain the error image; this second image is divided in bit planes, which are then run-length and Huffman coded. A second statistical analysis is performed during the learning phase to obtain the parameters needed in this final stage. Our coder is currently trained for hand-radiographs and fetal echographies. We compare our results for this two types of images to classical results on bit plane coding and the JPEG standard. Our coder turns out to outperform both of them.