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Sample records for interphase nuclei final

  1. Chromosome mapping by FISH to metaphase and interphase nuclei. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trask, B.

    1997-08-01

    The overall specific aims of this project were: (1) to determine the large-scale structure of interphase and metaphase chromosomes, in order to establish new capabilities for genome mapping by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH); (2) to detect chromosome abnormalities associated with genetic disease and map DNA sequences relative to them in order to facilitate the identification of new genes with disease-causing mutations; (3) to establish medium resolution physical maps of selected chromosomal regions using a combined metaphase and interphase mapping strategy and to corroborate physical and genetic maps and integrate these maps with the cytogenetic map; (4) to analyze the polymorphism and sequence evolution of subtelomeric regions of human chromosomes; (5) to establish a state-of-the-art FISH and image processing facility in the Department of Molecular Biotechnology, University of Washington, in order to map DNA sequences rapidly and accurately to benefit the Human Genome Project.

  2. Bands and chromosome arrangement in interphase nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianchi, N.O.; Bianchi, M.A.; Matayoshi, T.

    1977-01-01

    Chromosomes from the vole mouse Akodon dolores and from laboratory mouse showed the presence of G-bands after 3 minutes digestion with trypsin and Giemsa stain. Simultaneously, 30- to 40% of the interphase nuclei exhibited a dark ring parallel to the nuclear contour and a radial array of the chromatin in the internal and external regions of the ring. The origin and meaning of this ring image was analyzed by combining progressive trypsinizations with other methods such as C-banding procedures, autoradiography with 3 HTdR, staining with quinacrine mustard and 33258 Hoechst fluorochromes. Moreover, the presence of the dark ring was also investigated in cells treated with actinomycin and in control cells not subjected to any treatment. The results obtained allowed to assume that in interphase nuclei the chromosomes have chromatin bridges which connect the dark G-bands and that these bridges are probably involved in maintaining an ordered architecture of the nucleus with fixed chromosome positions in regard to the nuclear envelope and in regard to other chromosomes. Trypsinization produces a disruption of the interphase chromatin arrangement and the subsequent appearance of a dark ring formed by the combination of constitutive heterochromatin and dark G-bands. (auth.)

  3. A repetitive probe for FISH analysis of bovine interphase nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cribiu Edmond

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The purpose of this study was to generate repetitive DNA sequence probes for the analysis of interphase nuclei by fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH. Such probes are useful for the diagnosis of chromosomal abnormalities in bovine preimplanted embryos. Of the seven probes (E1A, E4A, Ba, H1A, W18, W22, W5 that were generated and partially sequenced, five corresponded to previously described Bos taurus repetitive DNA (E1A, E4A, Ba, W18, W5, one probe (W22 shared no homology with other DNA sequences and one (H1A displayed a significant homology with Rattus norvegicus mRNA for secretin receptor transmembrane domain 3. Fluorescent in situ hybridisation was performed on metaphase bovine fibroblast cells and showed that five of the seven probes hybridised most centromeres (E1A, E4A, Ba, W18, W22, one labelled the arms of all chromosomes (W5 and the H1A probe was specific to three chromosomes (ch14, ch20, and ch25. Moreover, FISH with H1A resulted in interpretable signals on interphase nuclei in 88% of the cases, while the other probes yielded only dispersed overlapping signals.

  4. Interphase Chromosome Profiling: A Method for Conventional Banded Chromosome Analysis Using Interphase Nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Ramesh; Van Dyke, Daniel L; Dev, Vaithilingam G; Koduru, Prasad; Rao, Nagesh; Mitter, Navnit S; Liu, Mingya; Fuentes, Ernesto; Fuentes, Sarah; Papa, Stephen

    2018-02-01

    - Chromosome analysis on bone marrow or peripheral blood samples fails in a small proportion of attempts. A method that is more reliable, with similar or better resolution, would be a welcome addition to the armamentarium of the cytogenetics laboratory. - To develop a method similar to banded metaphase chromosome analysis that relies only on interphase nuclei. - To label multiple targets in an equidistant fashion along the entire length of each chromosome, including landmark subtelomere and centromere regions. Each label so generated by using cloned bacterial artificial chromosome probes is molecularly distinct with unique spectral characteristics, so the number and position of the labels can be tracked to identify chromosome abnormalities. - Interphase chromosome profiling (ICP) demonstrated results similar to conventional chromosome analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization in 55 previously studied cases and obtained useful ICP chromosome analysis results on another 29 cases in which conventional methods failed. - ICP is a new and powerful method to karyotype peripheral blood and bone marrow aspirate preparations without reliance on metaphase chromosome preparations. It will be of particular value for cases with a failed conventional analysis or when a fast turnaround time is required.

  5. Topology of genes and nontranscribed sequences in human interphase nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheuermann, Markus O.; Tajbakhsh, Jian; Kurz, Anette; Saracoglu, Kaan; Eils, Roland; Lichter, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Knowledge about the functional impact of the topological organization of DNA sequences within interphase chromosome territories is still sparse. Of the few analyzed single copy genomic DNA sequences, the majority had been found to localize preferentially at the chromosome periphery or to loop out from chromosome territories. By means of dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), immunolabeling, confocal microscopy, and three-dimensional (3D) image analysis, we analyzed the intraterritorial and nuclear localization of 10 genomic fragments of different sequence classes in four different human cell types. The localization of three muscle-specific genes FLNA, NEB, and TTN, the oncogene BCL2, the tumor suppressor gene MADH4, and five putatively nontranscribed genomic sequences was predominantly in the periphery of the respective chromosome territories, independent from transcriptional status and from GC content. In interphase nuclei, the noncoding sequences were only rarely found associated with heterochromatic sites marked by the satellite III DNA D1Z1 or clusters of mammalian heterochromatin proteins (HP1α, HP1β, HP1γ). However, the nontranscribed sequences were found predominantly at the nuclear periphery or at the nucleoli, whereas genes tended to localize on chromosome surfaces exposed to the nuclear interior

  6. Chromosomes as well as chromosomal subdomains constitute distinct units in interphase nuclei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, A. E.; Aten, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization has demonstrated that chromosomes form individual territories in interphase nuclei. However, this technique is not suitable to determine whether territories are mutually exclusive or interwoven. This notion, however, is essential for understanding functional

  7. Laser uv microirradiation of interphase nuclei and post-treatment with caffeine. A new approach to establish the arrangement of interphase chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zorn, C; Cremer, T; Cremer, C; Zimmer, J

    1977-12-29

    Laser uv microirradiation of Chinese hamster interphase cells combined with caffeine post-treatment produced different patterns of chromosome damage in mitosis following irradiation of a small area of the nucleus that may be classified in three categories: (I) intact metaphase figures, (II) chromosome damage confined to a small area of the metaphase spread, (III) mitotic figures with damage on all chromosomes. Category III might be the consequence of a non-localized distortion of nuclear metabolism. By contrast, category II may reflect localized DNA damage induced by microirradiation, which could not be efficiently repaired due to the effect of caffeine. If this interpretation is right, in metaphase figures of category II chromosome damage should occur only at the irradiation site. The effect might then be used to investigate neighbourhood relationships of individual chromosomes in the interphase nucleus.

  8. Simultaneous localization of MLL, AF4 and ENL genes in interphase nuclei by 3D-FISH: MLL translocation revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Jian-Sheng

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Haematological cancer is characterised by chromosomal translocation (e.g. MLL translocation in acute leukaemia and two models have been proposed to explain the origins of recurrent reciprocal translocation. The first, established from pairs of translocated genes (such as BCR and ABL, considers the spatial proximity of loci in interphase nuclei (static "contact first" model. The second model is based on the dynamics of double strand break ends during repair processes (dynamic "breakage first" model. Since the MLL gene involved in 11q23 translocation has more than 40 partners, the study of the relative positions of the MLL gene with both the most frequent partner gene (AF4 and a less frequent partner gene (ENL, should elucidate the MLL translocation mechanism. Methods Using triple labeling 3D FISH experiments, we have determined the relative positions of MLL, AF4 and ENL genes, in two lymphoblastic and two myeloid human cell lines. Results In all cell lines, the ENL gene is significantly closer to the MLL gene than the AF4 gene (with P value loci would indicate a greater probability of the occurrence of t(11;19(q23;p13.3 compared to t(4;11(q21;q23. However this is in contradiction to the epidemiology of 11q23 translocation. Conclusion The simultaneous multi-probe hybridization in 3D-FISH is a new approach in addressing the correlation between spatial proximity and occurrence of translocation. Our observations are not consistent with the static "contact first" model of translocation. The recently proposed dynamic "breakage first" model offers an attractive alternative explanation.

  9. Simultaneous localization of MLL, AF4 and ENL genes in interphase nuclei by 3D-FISH: MLL translocation revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gué, Michaël; Sun, Jian-Sheng; Boudier, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Haematological cancer is characterised by chromosomal translocation (e.g. MLL translocation in acute leukaemia) and two models have been proposed to explain the origins of recurrent reciprocal translocation. The first, established from pairs of translocated genes (such as BCR and ABL), considers the spatial proximity of loci in interphase nuclei (static 'contact first' model). The second model is based on the dynamics of double strand break ends during repair processes (dynamic 'breakage first' model). Since the MLL gene involved in 11q23 translocation has more than 40 partners, the study of the relative positions of the MLL gene with both the most frequent partner gene (AF4) and a less frequent partner gene (ENL), should elucidate the MLL translocation mechanism. Using triple labeling 3D FISH experiments, we have determined the relative positions of MLL, AF4 and ENL genes, in two lymphoblastic and two myeloid human cell lines. In all cell lines, the ENL gene is significantly closer to the MLL gene than the AF4 gene (with P value < 0.0001). According to the static 'contact first' model of the translocation mechanism, a minimal distance between loci would indicate a greater probability of the occurrence of t(11;19)(q23;p13.3) compared to t(4;11)(q21;q23). However this is in contradiction to the epidemiology of 11q23 translocation. The simultaneous multi-probe hybridization in 3D-FISH is a new approach in addressing the correlation between spatial proximity and occurrence of translocation. Our observations are not consistent with the static 'contact first' model of translocation. The recently proposed dynamic 'breakage first' model offers an attractive alternative explanation

  10. Simultaneous scoring of 10 chromosomes (9,13,14,15,16,18,21,22,X, and Y) in interphase nuclei by using spectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Jingly; Weier, Heinz-Ulli G.; Goldberg, James D.; Pedersen, Roger A.

    1999-06-01

    Numerical aberrations involving parts of or entire chromosomes have detrimental effects on mammalian embryonic, and perinatal development. Only few fetuses with chromosomal imbalances survive to term, and their abnormalities lead to stillbirth or cause severely altered phenotypes in the offspring (such as trisomies involving chromosomes 13, 18, 21, and anomalies of X, and Y). Because aneuploidy of any of the 24 chromosomes will have significant consequences, an optimized preimplantation and prenatal genetic diagnosis (PGD) test will score all the chromosomes. Since most cells to be analyzed will be in interphase rather than metaphase, we developed a rapid procedure for the analysis of interphase cells such as lymphocytes, amniocytes, or early embryonic cells (blastomeres). Our approach was based on in situ hybridization of chromosome-specific non-isotopically labeled DNA probes and Spectral Imaging. The Spectral Imaging system uses an interferometer instead of standard emission filters in a fluorescence microscope to record high resolution spectra from fluorescently stained specimens. This bio-imaging system combines the techniques of fluorescence optical microscopy, charged coupled device imaging, Fourier spectroscopy, light microscopy, and powerful analysis software. The probe set used here allowed simultaneous detection of 10 chromosomes (9, 13, 14, 15, 16, 18, 21, 22, X, Y) in interphase nuclei. Probes were obtained commercially or prepared in-house. Following 16 - 40 h hybridization to interphase cells and removal of unbound probes, image spectra (range 450 - 850 nm, resolution 10 nm) were recorded and analyzed using an SD200 Spectral Imaging system (ASI, Carlsbad, CA). Initially some amniocytes were unscoreable due to their thickness, and fixation protocols had to be modified to achieve satisfactory results. In summary, this study shows the simultaneous detection of at least 10 different chromosomes in interphase cells using a novel approach for multi

  11. Nuclear moments of radioactive nuclei. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenlees, G.W.

    1985-01-01

    An unsuccessful attempt was made to study nuclear moments of radioactive nuclear using laser spectroscopy. Although preliminary tests had indicated a sensitivity sufficient to observe signals of fluxes less than one atom/s no resonance fluorescence was detected. Activity measurements showed several hundred nuclei per second were in the beam; therefore it was postulated that, due to the the reactivity of the 126 Ba and sodium used, contaminants were the probable source of negative results. 3 refs., 2 figs

  12. Potential control of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) with Piper aduncum L. (Piperaceae) extracts demonstrated by chromosomal biomarkers and toxic effects on interphase nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafael, M S; Hereira-Rojas, W J; Roper, J J; Nunomura, S M; Tadei, W P

    2008-01-01

    Dillapiol, a phenylpropanoid isolate from essential oils of leaves of Piper aduncum (Piperaceae), has insecticidal, fungicidal and antimicrobial activities. The insecticidal activity of dillapiol was tested in vivo on the larvae and pupae of Aedes aegypti, the mosquito vector of dengue. Specifically, the effect of dillapiol on the formation of micronuclei and chromosome aberrations was analyzed. Dillapiol treatments comprised two concentrations of 200 and 400 micro dissolved in well water, and a pure well water control used to rear four generations of mosquitoes. Micronuclei occurred in mitotic diploid and tetraploid chromosomes of larvae; nuclear abnormalities also occurred in interphase, metaphase, telophase, and single nucleus cells of pupae. Mortality, oviposition, chromosome breakage, and anaphase bridges were significantly greater in the extract treatments than in controls. The genotoxic effects of dillapiol described here suggest that this natural product may be a useful alternative for the control of A. aegypti.

  13. Detection of intranuclear forces by the use of laser optics during the recovery process of elongated interphase nuclei in centrifuged protonemal cells of Adiantum capillus-veneris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wunsch, C.; Kurachi, M.; Kikumoto, M.; Tashiro, H.; Wada, M.

    1998-01-01

    For the direct investigation of intranuclear dynamics in living cells, extremely deformed nuclei of basipetally centrifuged protonemal cells of the fern Adiantum capillusveneris were manipulated by the laser rap and the laser scalpel. Whereas the nucleolus was tightly fixed at the central position inside the non-centrifuged nucleus and proved to be immovable by the optical trap, it could easily be trapped and moved towards three directions inside the bubble-like terminal widening of the basal thread-like extension of centrifuged nuclei. Due to the connection of the nucleolus to the chromatin inside the nuclear thread (NT), moving was not possible against the direction of the nuclear apical main body. Nucleoli in recovered nuclei were again immovable, thus indicating the presence of a dynamic nucleolar anchoring system inside the nucleus. When the nucleolus in the bubble was arrested during the thread shortening process by the optical trap, the acropetal movement of the bubble continued. Probably dye to dragging forces, some nucleoli became stretched, and a thick strand of a still unknown composition stretched between the nucleolus and the insertion site of the shortening NT. To assess whether the shrinking of the nuclear envelop (NE) and the shortening of the chromatin inside the NT were independent processes, the chromatin above the bubble was cut inside the Nt by the laser scalpel. After severance, a gap between the nucleolus and the end of the chromatin strand in the NT indicated the shortening of the chromatin inside the Nt. From these findings it was concluded that a shortening force was existing in the chromatin of the NT and that probably no physical link existed between the chromatin and the NE

  14. nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minkov N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the effects of quadrupole-octupole deformations on the energy and magnetic properties of high-K isomeric states in even-even heavy and superheavy nuclei. The neutron two-quasiparticle (2qp isomeric energies and magnetic dipole moments are calculated within a deformed shell model with the Bardeen-Cooper- Schrieffer (BCS pairing interaction over a wide range of quadrupole and octupole deformations. We found that in most cases the magnetic moments exhibit a pronounced sensitivity to the octupole deformation, while the 2qp energies indicate regions of nuclei in which the presence of high-K isomeric states may be associated with the presence of octupole softness or even with octupole deformation. In the present work we also examine the influence of the BCS pairing strength on the energy of the blocked isomer configuration. We show that the formation of 2qp energy minima in the space of quadrupole-octupole and eventually higher multipolarity deformations is a subtle effect depending on nuclear pairing correlations.

  15. Synaptonemal complexes at premeiotic interphase in the mouse spermatocyte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grell, R.F.; Oakberg, E.F.; Generoso, E.E.

    1980-01-01

    Male mice were injected intraperitoneally with 125 μCi(1 Ci = 3.7 x 10 10 becquerels) of [ 3 H]thymidine at 1-h intervals and killed 1 h after the second injection. Testes were prepared for bright-field and electron microscopic autoradiography. Primary spermatocytes, identified by light microscopy to be at the premeiotic interphase stage, were found to be heavily labeled. Electron microscopic examination disclosed the coincidental occurrence of synaptonemal complexes and label within the nuclei of premeiotic interphase spermatocytes, indicating synapses of homologues had begun during the S phase. The significance of this finding for the traditional view of meiosis is discussed

  16. Final state effects in inclusive quasielastic electron scattering from nuclei: Clues from quantum fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, R.N.; Clark, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    The impulse approximation (IA) predicts that momentum distributions, n/sub k/, in many-body systems should be measurable by inclusive quasielastic scattering at high energy and momentum (w,Q) transfer. The observations that the cross section appears to satisfy ''Y-scaling'' (i.e., is a function not of both w and Q of a single variable, Y) is usually taken as a signature of the IA. In nuclear physics, inelastic electron scattering at GeV energies should reveal the high momentum components of the nuclear wave function. In quantum fluids, neutron scattering at hundreds of MeV energies should measure the Bose condensate in superfluid /sup 4/He and the Fermi surface discontinuity and depletion of the Fermi sea in /sup 3/He. In molecular and condensed matter systems, X-ray Compton scattering at keV energies reveals electronic n/sub k/. Such experiments test many-body wave functions calculated by methods such as Green Function and Path Integral Monte Carlo, and Fermi Hypernetted Chain. However, an outstanding issue has been the corrections to the IA due to the scattering of the recoiling particle from neighboring particles, which are termed ''final state effects'' (FSE). The FSE should be especially important in nuclei and quantum fluids where the potentials have steeply repulsive cores. While there have been a variety of theories proposed for FSE, until now none has been adequately tested by experiment. Recently, the ''hard core perturbation theory'' (HCPT) for FSE in quantum fluids by Silver has been successfully compared to new neutron scattering measurements on /sup 4/He by P. E. Sokol and colleagues. In this paper, we shall discuss the lessons of this success for the extraction of n/sub k/ in nuclei by inclusive ''quasielastic electron-nucleus scattering'' (QENS). 19 refs., 12 figs

  17. The properties of the wood-polystyrene interphase determined by inverse gas chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Simonsen; Zhenqiu Hong; Timothy G. Rials

    1997-01-01

    The properties of the interphase in wood-polymer composites are important determinants of the properties of the final composite. This study used inverse gas chromatography (IGC) to measure interphasal properties of composites of polystyrene and two types of wood fiber fillers and an inoranic substrate (CW) with varying amounts of surface coverage of polystyrene. Glass...

  18. Some clues about the interphase reaction between ZnO and MnO2 oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubio-Marcos, F.; Quesada, A.; Garcia, M.A.; Banares, M.A.; Fierro, J.L.G.; Martin-Gonzalez, M.S.; Costa-Kraemer, J.L.; Fernandez, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is used to evidence both the nature of the interphase reaction between ZnO and MnO 2 particles and its kinetic evolution. Zn cations migrate from the ZnO grains during oxygen vacancies formation process and diffuse into the MnO 2 particles leading to an interphase region with an intermediate valence Mn +3 -O-Mn +4 . Large amounts of desorbed Zn cations promote the formation of ZnMn 2 O 4 structure, in addition to the intermediate valence state. The system evolves towards complete formation of the spinel phase at higher thermal treatment times. The reactivity of the ZnO plays an important role in the formation of this interphase. Low-reactivity ZnO powder, in which the oxygen vacancies are previously produced, shows a stabilization of the intermediate valence state with very limited formation of the spinel phase. A clear correlation between the amount of the intermediate state interphase and the magnetic properties has been established. - Graphical abstract: Recently new room temperature interphase magnetism has been reported to appear in ZnO-MnO 2 system. Raman spectroscopy is used to evidence both the nature of the interphase reaction and the kinetic. The interphase evolved towards complete formation of the spinel phase. The reactivity of the ZnO plays an important role in the formation of this interphase. Finally, a clear correlation between the amount of the intermediate valence state and the interphase magnetic properties has been established.

  19. Sizes and shapes of short-lived nuclei via laser spectroscopy. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, D.A.

    1985-10-01

    This project, a collaboration involving Iowa State University, Argonne National Lab., and the University of Minnesota, was aimed at the determination of properties of short-lived nuclei through their atomic hyperfine structure and optical isotope shifts. The basic approach was to use a cryogenic He-jet system to thermalize, neutralize, and transport radioactive nuclei produced online into a region suitable for laser spectroscopy. The photon burst method was then used for high sensitivity with the resulting continuous atomic beam. The experiment was located on beamline of the ANL superconducting heavy-ion accelerator. The He-jet system developed would reliably transport approx.10 2 nuclei into phase space useful for high resolution laser spectroscopy. The laser system developed could accurately and reproducibly sweep small frequency ranges for periods greater than or equal to1 day and sensitivity limits less than or equal to1 atom/s were achieved. However the nuclei were not transported as free atoms precluding nuclear determinations. Attempts to obtain free atoms by eliminating turbulence and contamination were not successful. Some of the high sensitivity spectroscopy techniques developed in this work are now being applied in a search for nuclear relics of the Big Bang and in studies of the photon statistics of light scattered by a single atom. 3 refs., 4 figs

  20. Nuclear Structure Studies of Exotic Nuclei with Radioactive Ion Beams A Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winger, Jeff Allen [Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States)

    2016-04-21

    Beta-decay spectroscopy provides important information on nuclear structure and properties needed to understand topics as widely varied as fundamental nuclear astrophysics to applied nuclear reactor design. However, there are significant limitations of our knowledge due to an inability to experimentally measure everything. Therefore, it is often necessary to rely on theoretical calculations which need to be vetted with experimental results. The focus of this report will be results from experimental research performed by the Principal Investigator (PI) and his research group at Mississippi State University in which the group played the lead role in proposing, implementing, performing and analyzing the experiment. This research was carried out at both the National Superconduction Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) at Michigan State University and the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The primary emphasis of the research was the use of \\bdec spectroscopy as a tool to understand the evolution of nuclear structure in neutron-rich nuclei which could then be applied to improve theory and to increase the overall knowledge of nuclear structure.

  1. [Theoretical study of pion and kaon photoproduction in nuclei]. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booth, E.C.

    1984-01-01

    The contract work was initiated by J. Epstein. The emphasis of the proposal was on (a) the continuation of DWIA calculations of the (γ,π +- ) reaction in the Δ(1232) region with the extension to the (γ,π 0 ) reaction and (b) the application of the DWIA approach to the (γ,K) reaction. The (γ,π 0 ) work was intended to be in close collaboration with the experimental studies underway at Bates Linear Accelerator and the (γ,K +- ) calculations are relevant to proposed high duty factor electron accelerators in the 1 to 4 GeV region. DWIA calculations were carried out for coherent (γ,π 0 ) reactions in 12 C. Although the DWIA approach seems less fundamental than the current Δ-hole model calculations, we had hopes that it could be more readily applicable to incoherent reactions leaving the target nucleus in the excited state. Epstein hoped to improve the reliability of the DWIA calculations for coherent (γ,π 0 ) production by better treatment of the Δ propagating in the nuclear medium. In parallel with the (γ,π 0 ) work, Epstein carried on an active collaboration with William Donnelly on the (γ,K +- ) problem. They had succeeded in a relatively complete description of the reaction for 12 C, and were beginning to extend the results to heavy nuclei, when Epstein abruptly resigned his academic post at Boston University (in August 1983) and took an industrial position. Justus Koch of NIKEF, working together with Donnelly, and assisted by modest per diem funds from this grant, the γ,K +- calculations were carried forward. A copy of the talk by Donnelly entitled Photo- and Electron-Production of Kaons and the Study of Hypernuclei given October 29, 1984 at Bad Honnef, Germany is enclosed. The talk covers the results of the work initiated by Epstein and Donnelly, and completed by Koch and Donnelly

  2. Marine Ice Nuclei Collections – MAGIC (MAGIC-IN) Final Campaign Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeMott, Paul J. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Hill, Thomas C. J. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    2016-02-01

    This campaign augmented measurements obtained via deployment of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility’s ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) in the Marine ARM GPCI1 Investigation of Clouds (MAGIC) field campaign. The measurements, comprised of shipboard aerosol collections obtained during the five legs of the summer 2013 cruises, were sent for offline processing to measure ice nucleating particle (INP) number concentrations. The forty-three sample periods each represented, nominally, 24-hour segments during outbound and inbound transits of the Horizon Spirit. The samples were collected at locations between Los Angeles and Hawaii. Eight samples have been analyzed for immersion freezing temperature spectra thus far, using funding from other grants. Remaining samples are being frozen until support for further processing is obtained. Future analyses will investigate the inorganic/organic proportions of ice nuclei, in addition to determining the genetic composition of the overall biological community associated with INPs. Resulting correlations will be compared with other archived aerosol quantities, meteorological and ocean data (e.g., temperature, wind speed, sea surface temperature, etc…) and satellite ocean color products. These findings will ultimately aid in parameterizing oceanic (e.g., sea spray) INP emissions in regional and global scale models, when illustrating aerosol connections to cloud phases and properties. Independent future analyses of frozen filter samples, as proposed by collaborating investigators at the time of this report, will include single particle analyses of marine boundary layer aerosol compositions and morphology. The MAGIC-IN data are considered representative of the oligotrophic, low Chlorophyll-a (with the exception of near-shore) ocean regions, which exist along the MAGIC transect. Current analyses suggest that INP numbers in the marine boundary layer over this region are typically low, compared to existing

  3. Biopolymeric nanocomposites with enhanced interphases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yi; Hu, Kesong; Grant, Anise M; Zhang, Yuhong; Tsukruk, Vladimir V

    2015-10-06

    Ultrathin and robust nanocomposite membranes were fabricated by incorporating graphene oxide (GO) sheets into a silk fibroin (SF) matrix by a dynamic spin-assisted layer-by-layer assembly (dSA-LbL). We observed that in contrast to traditional SA-LbL reported earlier fast solution removal during dropping of solution on constantly spinning substrates resulted in largely unfolded biomacromolecules with enhanced surface interactions and suppressed nanofibril formation. The resulting laminated nanocomposites possess outstanding mechanical properties, significantly exceeding those previously reported for conventional LbL films with similar composition. The tensile modulus reached extremely high values of 170 GPa, which have never been reported for graphene oxide-based nanocomposites, the ultimate strength was close to 300 MPa, and the toughness was above 3.4 MJ m(-3). The failure modes observed for these membranes suggested the self-reinforcing mechanism of adjacent graphene oxide sheets with strong 2 nm thick silk interphase composed mostly from individual backbones. This interphase reinforcement leads to the effective load transfer between the graphene oxide components in reinforced laminated nanocomposite materials with excellent mechanical strength that surpasses those known today for conventional flexible laminated carbon nanocomposites from graphene oxide and biopolymer components.

  4. ADP-ribosylation of nonhistone proteins from metaphase and interphase HeLa cells: factors responsible for differences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adolph, K.W.

    1986-01-01

    A striking reduction was previously detected for HeLa metaphase chromosomes, compared to interphase nuclei, in the number of modified nonhistone species. Several factors which could contribute to this cell cycle change in ADP-ribosylation have therefore been examined. In these experiments, mitotic or interphase cells were incubated with [ 32 P]NAD, chromosomes and nuclei were prepared, and the proteins were resolved by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The level of incorporation of 32 P label was found to be substantially influenced by chromosome expansion, DNA nicking, disruption of chromosomes or nuclei, and the growth activity of cells. The level of ADP-ribosylation was not greatly affected by the presence of inhibitors of RNA, DNA, and protein synthesis. NAD concentration influenced the extent of labelling but not the pattern of labeled species. A similar change in the pattern from interphase to mitosis was observed for whole cells as well as for isolated chromosomes and nuclei. The procedure used to arrest cells in mitosis was not artifactually responsible for the results. The difference in metaphase and interphase ADP-ribosylation is not confined to HeLa cells, since comparable patterns were found for chromosomes and nuclei from Novikoff rat hepatoma cells

  5. Combined fluorescent-chromogenic in situ hybridization for identification and laser microdissection of interphase chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nerea Paz

    Full Text Available Chromosome territories constitute the most conspicuous feature of nuclear architecture, and they exhibit non-random distribution patterns in the interphase nucleus. We observed that in cell nuclei from humans with Down Syndrome two chromosomes 21 frequently localize proximal to one another and distant from the third chromosome. To systematically investigate whether the proximally positioned chromosomes were always the same in all cells, we developed an approach consisting of sequential FISH and CISH combined with laser-microdissection of chromosomes from the interphase nucleus and followed by subsequent chromosome identification by microsatellite allele genotyping. This approach identified proximally positioned chromosomes from cultured cells, and the analysis showed that the identity of the chromosomes proximally positioned varies. However, the data suggest that there may be a tendency of the same chromosomes to be positioned close to each other in the interphase nucleus of trisomic cells. The protocol described here represents a powerful new method for genome analysis.

  6. Final-state interaction in semi-inclusive DIS off nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Ciofi degli Atti, C

    2003-01-01

    The Final-State Interaction (FSI) in Deep-Inelastic Scattering (DIS) of leptons off a nucleus A, due to the propagation of the struck nucleon debris and its hadronization in the nuclear environment is considered. The effective cross-section of such a partonic system with the nucleons of the medium and its time dependence are estimated, for different values of the Bjorken scaling variable, on the basis of a model which takes into account both the production of hadrons due to the breaking of the color string, which is formed after a quark is knocked out off a bound nucleon, as well as the production of hadrons originating from gluon radiation. It is shown that the interaction, the evolution and the hadronization of the partonic system in the nuclear environment can be thoroughly investigated by a new type of semi-inclusive process, denoted A(e,e'(A-1))X, in which the scattered lepton is detected in coincidence with a heavy nuclear fragment, namely a nucleus (A-1) in low energy and momentum states. As a matter o...

  7. Interphase and particle dispersion correlations in polymer nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senses, Erkan

    Particle dispersion in polymer matrices is a major parameter governing the mechanical performance of polymer nanocomposites. Controlling particle dispersion and understanding aging of composites under large shear and temperature variations determine the processing conditions and lifetime of composites which are very important for diverse applications in biomedicine, highly reinforced materials and more importantly for the polymer composites with adaptive mechanical responses. This thesis investigates the role of interphase layers between particles and polymer matrices in two bulk systems where particle dispersion is altered upon deformation in repulsive composites, and good-dispersion of particles is retained after multiple oscillatory shearing and aging cycles in attractive composites. We demonstrate that chain desorption and re-adsorption processes in attractive composites under shear can effectively enhance the bulk microscopic mechanical properties, and long chains of adsorbed layers lead to a denser entangled interphase layer. We further designed experiments where particles are physically adsorbed with bimodal lengths of homopolymer chains to underpin the entanglement effect in interphases. Bimodal adsorbed chains are shown to improve the interfacial strength and used to modulate the elastic properties of composites without changing the particle loading, dispersion state or polymer conformation. Finally, the role of dynamic asymmetry (different mobilities in polymer blends) and chemical heterogeneity in the interphase layer are explored in systems of poly(methyl methacrylate) adsorbed silica nanoparticles dispersed in poly(ethylene oxide) matrix. Such nanocomposites are shown to exhibit unique thermal-stiffening behavior at temperatures above glass transitions of both polymers. These interesting findings suggest that the mobility of the surface-bound polymer is essential for reinforcement in polymer nanocomposites, contrary to existing glassy layer theories

  8. Identification of interphase functions for the NIMA kinase involving microtubules and the ESCRT pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meera Govindaraghavan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Never in Mitosis A (NIMA kinase (the founding member of the Nek family of kinases has been considered a mitotic specific kinase with nuclear restricted roles in the model fungus Aspergillus nidulans. By extending to A. nidulans the results of a synthetic lethal screen performed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using the NIMA ortholog KIN3, we identified a conserved genetic interaction between nimA and genes encoding proteins of the Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport (ESCRT pathway. Absence of ESCRT pathway functions in combination with partial NIMA function causes enhanced cell growth defects, including an inability to maintain a single polarized dominant cell tip. These genetic insights suggest NIMA potentially has interphase functions in addition to its established mitotic functions at nuclei. We therefore generated endogenously GFP-tagged NIMA (NIMA-GFP which was fully functional to follow its interphase locations using live cell spinning disc 4D confocal microscopy. During interphase some NIMA-GFP locates to the tips of rapidly growing cells and, when expressed ectopically, also locates to the tips of cytoplasmic microtubules, suggestive of non-nuclear interphase functions. In support of this, perturbation of NIMA function either by ectopic overexpression or through partial inactivation results in marked cell tip growth defects with excess NIMA-GFP promoting multiple growing cell tips. Ectopic NIMA-GFP was found to locate to the plus ends of microtubules in an EB1 dependent manner, while impairing NIMA function altered the dynamic localization of EB1 and the cytoplasmic microtubule network. Together, our genetic and cell biological analyses reveal novel non-nuclear interphase functions for NIMA involving microtubules and the ESCRT pathway for normal polarized fungal cell tip growth. These insights extend the roles of NIMA both spatially and temporally and indicate that this conserved protein kinase could help integrate cell

  9. Pseudomagic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharff-Goldhaber, G.

    1979-01-01

    It was shown previously that, below a critical angular momentum, yrast bands of nonmagic nuclei are well described by the two-parameter variable moment of inertia model. Some striking exceptions to this rule are found in nuclei which have the same mass number as doubly magic nuclei but possess either one (or two) proton pairs beyond a magic number and one (or two) neutron hole pairs, or vice versa. Yrast bands in these pseudomagic nuclei resemble those in magic nuclei. 17 references

  10. Ground level measurement of nuclei from coal development in the northern Great Plains: baseline measurements. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, B. L.; Johnson, L. R.; Sengupta, S.; Yue, P. C.

    1978-11-01

    The Institute of Atmospheric Sciences of the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology has completed 20 months of ambient air sampling at rural and remote sites in a five-state region of the northern Great Plains. Sampling was accomplished by use of a 27-ft motor home laboratory containing living accommodations for a field crew of two. The laboratory was outfitted with a number of instruments for measurement of pollutant parameters: cloud condensation nuclei, ice nuclei, Aitken nuclei, size distribution information for Aitken size particulate, sulfur dioxide, ozone, raindrop size distributions, and pH of precipitation. In addition, an instrumented meteorological tower provided wind speed, wind direction, ambient air temperature, and dew-point temperature. Instruments varied as to durability and success of operation, but better than 90% data retrieval was possible for the entire 20-month sampling study. Analyses of the large quantities of data obtained were not possible under the initial baseline measurement program, but examination of most parameters indicate that the air masses in the northern Great Plains are still relatively clean and are influenced primarily by local sources of contamination rather than large regional sources. Particulate concentrations in these remote areas are representative of mountain stations or clean rural conditions, and sulfur dioxide concentrations are at the threshold of detectability of the instrument. Precipitation is only very slightly acidic, and no significant quantity of amorphous particles (such as coal dust or combustion products) is found in the quantitative analyses of the high-volume filter collections. A summary of ''average'' conditions observed over the study area is tabulated.

  11. Cep192 controls the balance of centrosome and non-centrosomal microtubules during interphase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian P O'Rourke

    Full Text Available Cep192 is a centrosomal protein that contributes to the formation and function of the mitotic spindle in mammalian cells. Cep192's mitotic activities stem largely from its role in the recruitment to the centrosome of numerous additional proteins such as gamma-tubulin and Pericentrin. Here, we examine Cep192's function in interphase cells. Our data indicate that, as in mitosis, Cep192 stimulates the nucleation of centrosomal microtubules thereby regulating the morphology of interphase microtubule arrays. Interestingly, however, cells lacking Cep192 remain capable of generating normal levels of MTs as the loss of centrosomal microtubules is augmented by MT nucleation from other sites, most notably the Golgi apparatus. The depletion of Cep192 results in a significant decrease in the level of centrosome-associated gamma-tubulin, likely explaining its impact on centrosome microtubule nucleation. However, in stark contrast to mitosis, Cep192 appears to maintain an antagonistic relationship with Pericentrin at interphase centrosomes. Interphase cells depleted of Cep192 display significantly higher levels of centrosome-associated Pericentrin while overexpression of Cep192 reduces the levels of centrosomal Pericentrin. Conversely, depletion of Pericentrin results in elevated levels of centrosomal Cep192 and enhances microtubule nucleation at centrosomes, at least during interphase. Finally, we show that depletion of Cep192 negatively impacts cell motility and alters normal cell polarization. Our current working hypothesis is that the microtubule nucleating capacity of the interphase centrosome is determined by an antagonistic balance of Cep192, which promotes nucleation, and Pericentrin, which inhibits nucleation. This in turn determines the relative abundance of centrosomal and non-centrosomal microtubules that tune cell movement and shape.

  12. Heavy-ion interactions of deformed nuclei. Progress report and final report, January 1, 1985-December 31, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberacker, V.E.

    1985-09-01

    This Progress Report describes the main topics that were investigated during the reporting period: (1) a new microscopic approach (many-body theory with two-center shell model basis) to the calculation of heavy-ion interaction potentials, primarily for heavy systems; (2) dynamic alignment of deformed nuclei during heavy-ion collisions; (3) the role of shell effects, static deformation and dynamic alignment in heavy-ion fusion reactions; (4) giant nuclear quasimolecules and the positron problem. The proposed research has direct relevance to experimental programs supported by DOE, e.g. the Holifield Heavy-Ion Research Facility (HHIRF) at Oak Ridge, the ATLAS accelerator at Argonne National Laboratory, the Double MP Tandem at Brookhaven and some of the smaller University-based accelerators. A discussion of a review article on Coulomb fission is presented. 36 refs., 7 figs

  13. Mechanisms of nuclear lamina growth in interphase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zhironkina, O.A.; Kurchashova, S.Y.; Pozharskaia, V.A.; Cherepanynets, V.D.; Strelkova, O.S.; Hozák, Pavel; Kireev, I.I.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 145, č. 4 (2016), s. 419-432 ISSN 0948-6143 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA16-03403S Grant - others:Russian Fund for Basic Research(RU) 13-04-00885; Russian Fund for Basic Research(RU) 15-54-78077 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Nuclear lamina * Microdomains * Interphase * Nucleus * DNA replication * Cell cycle Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.553, year: 2016

  14. Prediction of elastic properties for polymer-particle nanocomposites exhibiting an interphase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Fei; Van Vliet, Krystyn J

    2011-01-01

    Particle-polymer nanocomposites often exhibit mechanical properties described poorly by micromechanical models that include only the particle and matrix phases. Existence of an interfacial region between the particle and matrix, or interphase, has been posited and indirectly demonstrated to account for this effect. Here, we present a straightforward analytical approach to estimate effective elastic properties of composites comprising particles encapsulated by an interphase of finite thickness and distinct elastic properties. This explicit solution can treat nanocomposites that comprise either physically isolated nanoparticles or agglomerates of such nanoparticles; the same framework can also treat physically isolated nanoparticle aggregates or agglomerates of such aggregates. We find that the predicted elastic moduli agree with experiments for three types of particle-polymer nanocomposites, and that the predicted interphase thickness and stiffness of carbon black-rubber nanocomposites are consistent with measured values. Finally, we discuss the relative influence of the particle-polymer interphase thickness and stiffness to identify maximum possible changes in the macroscale elastic properties of such materials.

  15. Exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villari, A.C.C.

    1990-01-01

    The actual tendencies to study exotic nuclei; applications of exotic nuclei beams in material study and medicine; recent results obtained by GANIL and Berkeley Laboratories of measurements of binding energy and radii of light nuclei; the future experiences to be carry out in several international laboratories and; proposal of studies in Brazil using Pelletron-USP accelerator and the LINAC superconductor accelerator, in construction in the same laboratory, are presented. (M.C.K.)

  16. Designer interphases for the lithium-oxygen electrochemical cell

    KAUST Repository

    Choudhury, Snehashis; Wan, Charles Tai-Chieh; Al Sadat, Wajdi I.; Tu, Zhengyuan; Lau, Sampson; Zachman, Michael J.; Kourkoutis, Lena F.; Archer, Lynden A.

    2017-01-01

    An electrochemical cell based on the reversible oxygen reduction reaction: 2Li+ + 2e− + O2 ↔ Li2O2, provides among the most energy dense platforms for portable electrical energy storage. Such Lithium-Oxygen (Li-O2) cells offer specific energies competitive with fossil fuels and are considered promising for electrified transportation. Multiple, fundamental challenges with the cathode, anode, and electrolyte have limited practical interest in Li-O2 cells because these problems lead to as many practical shortcomings, including poor rechargeability, high overpotentials, and specific energies well below theoretical expectations. We create and study in-situ formation of solid-electrolyte interphases (SEIs) based on bromide ionomers tethered to a Li anode that take advantage of three powerful processes for overcoming the most stubborn of these challenges. The ionomer SEIs are shown to protect the Li anode against parasitic reactions and also stabilize Li electrodeposition during cell recharge. Bromine species liberated during the anchoring reaction also function as redox mediators at the cathode, reducing the charge overpotential. Finally, the ionomer SEI forms a stable interphase with Li, which protects the metal in high Gutmann donor number liquid electrolytes. Such electrolytes have been reported to exhibit rare stability against nucleophilic attack by Li2O2 and other cathode reaction intermediates, but also react spontaneously with Li metal anodes. We conclude that rationally designed SEIs able to regulate transport of matter and ions at the electrolyte/anode interface provide a promising platform for addressing three major technical barriers to practical Li-O2 cells.

  17. Designer interphases for the lithium-oxygen electrochemical cell

    KAUST Repository

    Choudhury, Snehashis

    2017-04-20

    An electrochemical cell based on the reversible oxygen reduction reaction: 2Li+ + 2e− + O2 ↔ Li2O2, provides among the most energy dense platforms for portable electrical energy storage. Such Lithium-Oxygen (Li-O2) cells offer specific energies competitive with fossil fuels and are considered promising for electrified transportation. Multiple, fundamental challenges with the cathode, anode, and electrolyte have limited practical interest in Li-O2 cells because these problems lead to as many practical shortcomings, including poor rechargeability, high overpotentials, and specific energies well below theoretical expectations. We create and study in-situ formation of solid-electrolyte interphases (SEIs) based on bromide ionomers tethered to a Li anode that take advantage of three powerful processes for overcoming the most stubborn of these challenges. The ionomer SEIs are shown to protect the Li anode against parasitic reactions and also stabilize Li electrodeposition during cell recharge. Bromine species liberated during the anchoring reaction also function as redox mediators at the cathode, reducing the charge overpotential. Finally, the ionomer SEI forms a stable interphase with Li, which protects the metal in high Gutmann donor number liquid electrolytes. Such electrolytes have been reported to exhibit rare stability against nucleophilic attack by Li2O2 and other cathode reaction intermediates, but also react spontaneously with Li metal anodes. We conclude that rationally designed SEIs able to regulate transport of matter and ions at the electrolyte/anode interface provide a promising platform for addressing three major technical barriers to practical Li-O2 cells.

  18. Frequency of chromosome 17 aneuploidy in primary and recurrent pterygium by interphase-fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamis, Umit; Kerimoglu, Hurkan; Ozkagnici, Ahmet; Acar, Hasan

    2006-01-01

    To investigate chromosome 17 numerical aberrations by using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in pterygia and to find out whether there is any association between chromosome 17 aneuploidy and recurrent pterygia. Pterygium tissue samples were taken from 21 patients by surgical excision. Eighteen of them had primary and 3 had recurrent pterygium. Peripheral whole blood interphase cells obtained from 11 healthy subjects were assigned as control group. The cells from pterygium tissue and peripheral blood were incubated with a hypotonic solution and fixed in order to obtain interphase nuclei. FISH analysis with chromosome-17-specific alpha-satellite DNA probe was performed on both the interphase nuclei of pterygium tissue (of patients) and peripheral whole blood cells of controls. The mean percentage of chromosome 17 aneuploidy was 4.71% for the pterygia group and 4.41% for the controls. No significant difference of chromosome 17 aneuploidy was observed between the patients and the controls. When the group of patients with recurrences was compared with the group without recurrences, there was a significant difference in the frequency of chromosome 17 aneuploidy (U = 17, p = 0.029). Chromosome 17 aneuploidy is probably not an important factor in the formation of pterygium, but it may be related to recurrence.

  19. High-performance analysis of single interphase cells with custom DNA probes spanning translocation break points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weier, Heinz-Ulli G.; Munne, S.; Lersch, Robert A.; Marquez, C.; Wu, J.; Pedersen, Roger A.; Fung, Jingly

    1999-06-01

    The chromatin organization of interphase cell nuclei, albeit an object of intense investigation, is only poorly understood. In the past, this has hampered the cytogenetic analysis of tissues derived from specimens where only few cells were actively proliferating or a significant number of metaphase cells could be obtained by induction of growth. Typical examples of such hard to analyze cell systems are solid tumors, germ cells and, to a certain extent, fetal cells such as amniocytes, blastomeres or cytotrophoblasts. Balanced reciprocal translocations that do not disrupt essential genes and thus do not led to disease symptoms exit in less than one percent of the general population. Since the presence of translocations interferes with homologue pairing in meiosis, many of these individuals experience problems in their reproduction, such as reduced fertility, infertility or a history of spontaneous abortions. The majority of translocation carriers enrolled in our in vitro fertilization (IVF) programs carry simple translocations involving only two autosomes. While most translocations are relatively easy to spot in metaphase cells, the majority of cells biopsied from embryos produced by IVF are in interphase and thus unsuitable for analysis by chromosome banding or FISH-painting. We therefore set out to analyze single interphase cells for presence or absence of specific translocations. Our assay, based on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of breakpoint-spanning DNA probes, detects translocations in interphase by visual microscopic inspection of hybridization domains. Probes are prepared so that they span a breakpoint and cover several hundred kb of DNA adjacent to the breakpoint. On normal chromosomes, such probes label a contiguous stretch of DNA and produce a single hybridization domain per chromosome in interphase cells. The translocation disrupts the hybridization domain and the resulting two fragments appear as physically separated hybridization domains in

  20. Intergranular and inter-phased boundaries in the materials; Joints intergranulaires et interphases dans les materiaux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aslanides, A. [Electricite de France, Dept. CIMA, 77 - Moret sur Loing (France); Backhaus-Ricoult, M. [Centre d' Etudes de Chimie metallurgique, 94 - Vitry-sur-Seine (France); Bayle-Guillemaud, P. [CEA Grenoble, Dept. de Recherche Fondamentale sur la Matiere Condensee, 38 (France)] [and others

    2000-07-01

    This document collects the abstracts of the talks presented during the colloquium J2IM on the intergranular and inter-phased boundaries in the materials. Around the themes of the interfaces behaviour and grain boundaries defects in materials, these days dealt with the microstructure behaviour in many domains such as the interfaces in batteries, the irradiation damages and the special case of the fuel-cladding interactions, the stressed interfaces, the alumina or silicon carbides substrates. (A.L.B.)

  1. Properties predictive modeling through the concept of a hybrid interphase existing between phases in contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portan, D. V.; Papanicolaou, G. C.

    2018-02-01

    From practical point of view, predictive modeling based on the physics of composite material behavior is wealth generating; by guiding material system selection and process choices, by cutting down on experimentation and associated costs; and by speeding up the time frame from the research stage to the market place. The presence of areas with different properties and the existence of an interphase between them have a pronounced influence on the behavior of a composite system. The Viscoelastic Hybrid Interphase Model (VHIM), considers the existence of a non-homogeneous viscoelastic and anisotropic interphase having properties depended on the degree of adhesion between the two phases in contact. The model applies for any physical/mechanical property (e.g. mechanical, thermal, electrical and/or biomechanical). Knowing the interphasial variation of a specific property one can predict the corresponding macroscopic behavior of the composite. Moreover, the model acts as an algorithm and a two-way approach can be used: (i) phases in contact may be chosen to get the desired properties of the final composite system or (ii) the initial phases in contact determine the final behavior of the composite system, that can be approximately predicted. The VHIM has been proven, amongst others, to be extremely useful in biomaterial designing for improved contact with human tissues.

  2. Interphase effects in dental nanocomposites investigated by small-angle neutron scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kristen S; Allen, Andrew J; Washburn, Newell R; Antonucci, Joseph M

    2007-04-01

    Small-angle and ultrasmall-angle neutron scattering (SANS and USANS) were used to characterize silica nanoparticle dispersion morphologies and the interphase in thermoset dimethacrylate polymer nanocomposites. Silica nanoparticle fillers were silanized with varying mass ratios of 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTMS), a silane that interacts with the matrix through covalent and H-bonding, and n-octyltrimethoxysilane (OTMS), a silane that interacts through weak dispersion forces. Interphases with high OTMS mass fractions were found to be fractally rough with fractal dimensions, D(s), between 2.19 and 2.49. This roughness was associated with poor interfacial adhesion and inferior mechanical properties. Mean interparticle distances calculated for composites containing 10 mass % and 25 mass % silica suggest that the nanoparticles treated with more MPTMS than OTMS may be better dispersed than OTMS-rich nanoparticles. The results indicate that the covalent bonding and H-bonding of MPTMS-rich nanoparticles with the matrix are necessary for preparing well-dispersed nanocomposites. In addition, interphases containing equal masses of MPTMS and OTMS may yield composites with overall optimal properties. Finally, the combined SANS/USANS data could distinguish the differences, as a function of silane chemistry, in the nanoparticle/silane and silane/matrix interfaces that affect the overall mechanical properties of the composites. (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Exclusion of NFAT5 from mitotic chromatin resets its nucleo-cytoplasmic distribution in interphase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anaïs Estrada-Gelonch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The transcription factor NFAT5 is a major inducer of osmoprotective genes and is required to maintain the proliferative capacity of cells exposed to hypertonic stress. In response to hypertonicity, NFAT5 translocates to the nucleus, binds to regulatory regions of osmoprotective genes and activates their transcription. Besides stimulus-specific regulatory mechanisms, the activity of transcription factors in cycling cells is also regulated by the passage through mitosis, when most transcriptional processes are downregulated. It was not known whether mitosis could be a point of control for NFAT5. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using confocal microscopy we observed that NFAT5 was excluded from chromatin during mitosis in both isotonic and hypertonic conditions. Analysis of NFAT5 deletions showed that exclusion was mediated by the carboxy-terminal domain (CTD. NFAT5 mutants lacking this domain showed constitutive binding to mitotic chromatin independent of tonicity, which caused them to localize in the nucleus and remain bound to chromatin in the subsequent interphase without hypertonic stimulation. We analyzed the contribution of the CTD, DNA binding, and nuclear import and export signals to the subcellular localization of this factor. Our results indicated that cytoplasmic localization of NFAT5 in isotonic conditions required both the exclusion from mitotic DNA and active nuclear export in interphase. Finally, we identified several regions within the CTD of NFAT5, some of them overlapping with transactivation domains, which were separately capable of causing its exclusion from mitotic chromatin. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results reveal a multipart mechanism regulating the subcellular localization of NFAT5. The transactivating module of NFAT5 switches its function from an stimulus-specific activator of transcription in interphase to an stimulus-independent repressor of binding to DNA in mitosis. This mechanism, together with export

  4. Interphase lymphoid cell death: its importance in the genesis of radiation disease and molecular mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poverennyj, A M; Ryabchenko, N I

    1987-09-01

    An analysis of the data on the effect of lymphoid cells on the proliferation and differentiation of hemopoietic stem cells has led to a conclusion that radiation injury of lymphocytes plays an important role in the pathogenesis of the cerebrospinal syndrome. The molecular mechanisms of lymphocyte interphase death were considered. It was shown that due to some peculiarities in the energy supply of these' cells the appearance of breaks in DNA causes the development of biochemical processes resulting in a decrease in NAD, an increase in the activity of nucleases, a decrease in ATP, and the accumulation of active metabolites of glycolysis. There reactions result in an increase in the disintegration of DNA, chromatin and pyknosis of lymphocyte nuclei.

  5. Superdeformed nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssens, R.V.F.; Khoo, T.L.

    1991-01-01

    Superdeformation was first proposed some twenty years ago to explain the fission isomers observed in some actinide nuclei. It was later realized that superdeformed shapes can occur at high angular momentum in lighter nuclei. The interest in the mechanisms responsible for these exotic shapes has increased enormously with the discovery of a superdeformed band of nineteen discrete lines in 152 Dy (8). At about the same time, evidence for highly deformed nuclei (axis ratio 3:2) was also reported near 132 Ce(9). Striking properties emerged from the first experiments, such as the essentially constant energy spacing between transitions (picket-fence spectra), the unexpectedly strong population of superdeformed bands at high spins, and the apparent lack of a link between the superdeformed states and the yrast levels. These findings were reviewed by Nolan and Twin. The present article follows upon their work and discusses the wealth of information that has since become available. This includes the discovery of a new island of superdeformation near A = 190, the detailed spectroscopy of ground and excited bands in the superdeformed well near A = 150 and A = 190, the surprising occurrence of superdeformed bands with identical transition energies in nuclei differing by one or two mass units, and the improved understanding of mechanisms responsible for the feeding into and the decay out of the superdeformed states

  6. Collisions with nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulamov, K.G.

    1987-01-01

    It is well known that interactions of high energy particles with nuclei, owing to possible intranuclear rescatterings, may provide information about the space-time behaviour of the production process. Therefore the main goals of these investigations are related with the attempts to study the space-time process of hadronization of coloured quarks and gluons produced at the initial stage of an interaction to white final state particles and to clarify the influence of composite quark-gluon structure of both the projectile and target on features of the production mechanisms. Since in both the initial and final states of these reactions the authors have strongly interacting multiparticle systems, it is of importance to study the collective properties of these systems. The questions to the point are: what is the degree of collectivization of particles newly produced in collisions with nuclei and what is the influence of the collective nature of a nucleus itself on the production mechanisms, in particular, what are the manifestations of possible multinucleon (multiquark) configurations in nuclei? It is obvious that the reductability of, say, hadron-nucleus (hA) interaction to hadron-nucleon (hN) collisions is directly related to the above problems. Due to time limitations the author discusses here only a few aspects of low p/sub t/ hA interactions which in his opinion are of importance for better understanding of general regularities of collisions with nuclei and for further investigations of the above problems

  7. Colliding nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balian, Roger; Remaud, Bernard; Suraud, E.; Durand, Dominique; Tamain, Bernard; Gobbi, A.; Cugnon, J.; Drapier, Olivier; Govaerts, Jan; Prieels, Rene

    1995-09-01

    This 14. international school Joliot-Curie of nuclear physic deals with nuclei in collision at high energy. Nine lectures are included in the proceedings of this summer school: 1 - From statistical mechanics outside equilibrium to transport equations (Balian, R.); 2 - Modeling of heavy ions reactions (Remaud, B.); 3 - Kinetic equations in heavy ions physics (Suraud, E.); 4 - Colliding nuclei near the Fermi energy (Durand, D.; Tamain, B.); 5 - From the Fermi to the relativistic energy domain: which observable? For which physics? (Gobbi, A.); 6 - Collisions at relativistic and ultra relativistic energies, Theoretical aspects (Cugnon, J.); 7 - Quark-gluon plasma: experimental signatures (Drapier, O.); 8 - Electroweak interaction: a window on physics beyond the standard model (Govaerts, J.); 9 - Symmetry tests in β nuclear process: polarization techniques (Prieels, R.)

  8. Human interphase chromosomes: a review of available molecular cytogenetic technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurov Yuri B

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human karyotype is usually studied by classical cytogenetic (banding techniques. To perform it, one has to obtain metaphase chromosomes of mitotic cells. This leads to the impossibility of analyzing all the cell types, to moderate cell scoring, and to the extrapolation of cytogenetic data retrieved from a couple of tens of mitotic cells to the whole organism, suggesting that all the remaining cells possess these genomes. However, this is far from being the case inasmuch as chromosome abnormalities can occur in any cell along ontogeny. Since somatic cells of eukaryotes are more likely to be in interphase, the solution of the problem concerning studying postmitotic cells and larger cell populations is interphase cytogenetics, which has become more or less applicable for specific biomedical tasks due to achievements in molecular cytogenetics (i.e. developments of fluorescence in situ hybridization -- FISH, and multicolor banding -- MCB. Numerous interphase molecular cytogenetic approaches are restricted to studying specific genomic loci (regions being, however, useful for identification of chromosome abnormalities (aneuploidy, polyploidy, deletions, inversions, duplications, translocations. Moreover, these techniques are the unique possibility to establish biological role and patterns of nuclear genome organization at suprachromosomal level in a given cell. Here, it is to note that this issue is incompletely worked out due to technical limitations. Nonetheless, a number of state-of-the-art molecular cytogenetic techniques (i.e multicolor interphase FISH or interpahase chromosome-specific MCB allow visualization of interphase chromosomes in their integrity at molecular resolutions. Thus, regardless numerous difficulties encountered during studying human interphase chromosomes, molecular cytogenetics does provide for high-resolution single-cell analysis of genome organization, structure and behavior at all stages of cell cycle.

  9. Primordial nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    The recent detection of intergalactic helium by NASA's Astro-2 mission backs up two earlier measurements by ESA and the University of California, San Diego, using instruments aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. Taken together, these results give strong evidence that this helium is primordial, confirming a key prediction of the Big Bang theory. The amount of helium the results imply could also account for some of the Universe's invisible dark matter - material which affects galactic motion but is otherwise undetectable. According to theory, helium nuclei formed at around 100 seconds after the Big Bang, but the amount of helium depended on even earlier events. Initially, protons turned into neutrons with the same probability that neutrons turned into protons. But after about one second, the Universe had cooled down enough for the weak interaction to freeze out. Neutrons continued to decay into the slightly lighter protons, whilst the opposite reaction became much more scarce. At around 100 seconds, thermonuclear fusion reactions could begin, and all the neutrons that were left became absorbed into helium nuclei, leaving the remaining protons locked up in hydrogen. The ratio of helium to hydrogen was therefore determined by events occurring when the Universe was just one second old. Standard models of primordial nucleosynthesis fix this ratio at slightly less than 2 5% by mass. All heavier elements were cooked up much later in the stars, and amount to less than 1 % of the Universe's mass. These predictions have been borne out remarkably well by observation, although proof of the primordial origins of hydrogen and helium has remained elusive until now. Big Bang nucleosynthesis goes on to estimate that primordial baryonic matter in the form of light nuclei could account for around 10% of the Universe's dark matter. All three recent measurements used the same technique of looking at distant quasars, some of the most luminous objects in the Universe, to

  10. K-bar-mesic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dote, Akinobu; Akaishi, Yoshinori; Yamazaki, Toshimitsu

    2005-01-01

    New nuclei 'K-bar-Mesic Nuclei' having the strangeness are described. At first it is shown that the strongly attractive nature of K-bar N interaction is reasoned inductively from consideration of the relation between Kaonic hydrogen atom and Λ (1405) which is an excited state of hyperon Λ. The K-bar N interactions are reviewed and summarized into three categories: 1. Phenomenological approach with density dependent K-bar N interaction (DD), relativistic mean field (RMF) approach, and hybrid of them (RMF+DD). 2. Boson exchange model. 3. Chiral SU(3) theory. The investigation of some light K-bar-nuclei by Akaishi and Yamazaki using phenomenological K-bar N interaction is explained in detail. Studies by antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD) approach are also presented. From these theoretical researches, the following feature of K-bar-mesic nuclei are revealed: 1) Ground state is discrete and bound by 100 MeV or more. 2) Density is very high in side the K-bar-mesic nuclei. 3) Strange structures develop which are not seen in ordinary nuclei. Finally some recent experiments to explore K-bar-mesic nuclei are reviewed. (S. Funahashi)

  11. Designing solid-liquid interphases for sodium batteries

    KAUST Repository

    Choudhury, Snehashis

    2017-10-06

    Secondary batteries based on earth-abundant sodium metal anodes are desirable for both stationary and portable electrical energy storage. Room-temperature sodium metal batteries are impractical today because morphological instability during recharge drives rough, dendritic electrodeposition. Chemical instability of liquid electrolytes also leads to premature cell failure as a result of parasitic reactions with the anode. Here we use joint density-functional theoretical analysis to show that the surface diffusion barrier for sodium ion transport is a sensitive function of the chemistry of solid–electrolyte interphase. In particular, we find that a sodium bromide interphase presents an exceptionally low energy barrier to ion transport, comparable to that of metallic magnesium. We evaluate this prediction by means of electrochemical measurements and direct visualization studies. These experiments reveal an approximately three-fold reduction in activation energy for ion transport at a sodium bromide interphase. Direct visualization of sodium electrodeposition confirms large improvements in stability of sodium deposition at sodium bromide-rich interphases.

  12. Trichostatin A induced histone acetylation causes decondensation of interphase chromatin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias); M. Wachsmuth (Malte); M. Frank-Stöhr (Monika); M. Stöhr (Michael); C.P. Bacher (Christian); K. Rippe (Karsten)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThe effect of trichostatin A (TSA)-induced histone acetylation on the interphase chromatin structure was visualized in vivo with a HeLa cell line stably expressing histone H2A, which was fused to enhanced yellow fluorescent protein. The globally increased histone acetylation caused a

  13. Alkylation of hydrothiophosphoryl compounds in conditions of interphase catalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aladzheva, I.M.; Odinets, I.L.; Petrovskij, P.V.; Mastryukova, T.A.; Kabachkin, M.I.

    1993-01-01

    A method of interphase catalysis permitted to develop a common method for synthesis of compounds with thiophosphoryl group. The effect of nature of hydrothiophosphoryl compound, alkylating agent, two-phase system and reaction conditions on alkylation product yields was investigated in detail

  14. Three-dimensional organization of the human interphase nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias); C. Münkel (Christian); W. Waldeck (Waldemar); J. Langowski (Jörg)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractDespite the successful linear sequencing of the human genome its three-dimensional structure is widely unknown, although it is important for gene regulation and replication. For a long time the interphase nucleus has been viewed as a 'spaghetti soup' of DNA without much internal

  15. An artificial interphase enables reversible magnesium chemistry in carbonate electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Seoung-Bum; Gao, Tao; Harvey, Steve P.; Steirer, K. Xerxes; Stokes, Adam; Norman, Andrew; Wang, Chunsheng; Cresce, Arthur; Xu, Kang; Ban, Chunmei

    2018-04-02

    Magnesium-based batteries possess potential advantages over their lithium counterparts. However, reversible Mg chemistry requires a thermodynamically stable electrolyte at low potential, which is usually achieved with corrosive components and at the expense of stability against oxidation. In lithium-ion batteries the conflict between the cathodic and anodic stabilities of the electrolytes is resolved by forming an anode interphase that shields the electrolyte from being reduced. This strategy cannot be applied to Mg batteries because divalent Mg2+ cannot penetrate such interphases. Here, we engineer an artificial Mg2+-conductive interphase on the Mg anode surface, which successfully decouples the anodic and cathodic requirements for electrolytes and demonstrate highly reversible Mg chemistry in oxidation-resistant electrolytes. The artificial interphase enables the reversible cycling of a Mg/V2O5 full-cell in the water-containing, carbonate-based electrolyte. This approach provides a new avenue not only for Mg but also for other multivalent-cation batteries facing the same problems, taking a step towards their use in energy-storage applications.

  16. [Chromomeric organization of interphase chromosomes in Drosophila melanogaster].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuimulev, I F; Beliaeva, E S; Zykova, T Iu; Semeshin, V F; Demakov, S A; Demakova, O V; Goncharov, F P; Khoroshko, V A; Boldyreva, L V; Kokoza, E B; Pokholkiova, G V

    2013-01-01

    As a result of treatment of bioinformatic data on the genome localization of structural proteins, histone modifications, DNase-hypersensitive regions, replication origins (taken from modENCODE) and their cytological localization to polytene chromosome structures, it is shown here that two types of interphase chromosomes -polytene chromosomes from salivary glands and from mitotically dividing cells cultures - demonstrate identical pictures of interband/band, i. e. the same localization and length on physical map and the same sets of proteins. In the interbands of both chromosome types we find the proteins that control initiation of transcription (RNA-polymerase II, transcription factors), replication (ORC2) as well as proteins modifying nucleosome structure (WDS, NURF) and proteins of insulators (BEAF). The nucleosome density and H1 histone concentration in the interbands are depleted; localization of DNase-hypersensitive regions corresponds strictly to the interbands. So, we conclude that both polytene and cell line interphase chromosomes are arranged according to general principle and polytene chromosomes represent precise model of interphase chromosomes. The interbands play a critical role in the initiation of transcription and replication. The interbands of interphase chromosomes are the sites of 5' parts of genes, while the 3' gene ends are located in the adjacent bands. The constancy of interbands decondensation results in the conclusion that the "interbands" genes are constantly active, i. e. they contain "house-keeping" genes. The large late replicating bands contain genes that do not have direct contact to the adjoining interbands are usually polygenic and contain tissue-specific genes.

  17. An artificial interphase enables reversible magnesium chemistry in carbonate electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Seoung-Bum; Gao, Tao; Harvey, Steve P.; Steirer, K. Xerxes; Stokes, Adam; Norman, Andrew; Wang, Chunsheng; Cresce, Arthur; Xu, Kang; Ban, Chunmei

    2018-05-01

    Magnesium-based batteries possess potential advantages over their lithium counterparts. However, reversible Mg chemistry requires a thermodynamically stable electrolyte at low potential, which is usually achieved with corrosive components and at the expense of stability against oxidation. In lithium-ion batteries the conflict between the cathodic and anodic stabilities of the electrolytes is resolved by forming an anode interphase that shields the electrolyte from being reduced. This strategy cannot be applied to Mg batteries because divalent Mg2+ cannot penetrate such interphases. Here, we engineer an artificial Mg2+-conductive interphase on the Mg anode surface, which successfully decouples the anodic and cathodic requirements for electrolytes and demonstrate highly reversible Mg chemistry in oxidation-resistant electrolytes. The artificial interphase enables the reversible cycling of a Mg/V2O5 full-cell in the water-containing, carbonate-based electrolyte. This approach provides a new avenue not only for Mg but also for other multivalent-cation batteries facing the same problems, taking a step towards their use in energy-storage applications.

  18. Cell-fusion method to visualize interphase nuclear pore formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeshima, Kazuhiro; Funakoshi, Tomoko; Imamoto, Naoko

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the nucleus is a complex and sophisticated organelle that organizes genomic DNA to support essential cellular functions. The nuclear surface contains many nuclear pore complexes (NPCs), channels for macromolecular transport between the cytoplasm and nucleus. It is well known that the number of NPCs almost doubles during interphase in cycling cells. However, the mechanism of NPC formation is poorly understood, presumably because a practical system for analysis does not exist. The most difficult obstacle in the visualization of interphase NPC formation is that NPCs already exist after nuclear envelope formation, and these existing NPCs interfere with the observation of nascent NPCs. To overcome this obstacle, we developed a novel system using the cell-fusion technique (heterokaryon method), previously also used to analyze the shuttling of macromolecules between the cytoplasm and the nucleus, to visualize the newly synthesized interphase NPCs. In addition, we used a photobleaching approach that validated the cell-fusion method. We recently used these methods to demonstrate the role of cyclin-dependent protein kinases and of Pom121 in interphase NPC formation in cycling human cells. Here, we describe the details of the cell-fusion approach and compare the system with other NPC formation visualization methods. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Condensation of rye chromatin in somatic interphase nuclei of Ph1 and ph1b wheat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kopecký, David; Allen, D.C.; Duchoslav, M.; Doležel, Jaroslav; Lukaszewski, A.J.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 119, 3-4 (2007), s. 263-267 ISSN 1424-8581 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06004 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Source of funding: V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : hexaploid wheat * Ph1 and ph1b * rye chromatin Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.402, year: 2007

  20. Distinct patterns of histone methylation and acetylation in human interphase nuclei

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Skalníková, M.; Bártová, Eva; Ulman, V.; Matula, P.; Svoboda, D.; Harničarová, Andrea; Kozubek, Michal; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 6 (2007), s. 797-806 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA204/06/0978; GA MŠk(CZ) LC535 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : histone methylation * acetylation * X chromosome Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.505, year: 2007

  1. Elementary excitations in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemmer, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    The role of elementary quasi-particle and quasi-hole excitations is reviewed in connection with the analysis of data involving high-lying nuclear states. This article includes discussions on: (i) single quasi-hole excitations in pick-up reactions, (ii) the formation of single quasi-hole and quasi-particle excitations (in different nuclei) during transfer reactions, followed by (iii) quasi-particle quasi-hole excitations in the same nucleus that are produced by photon absorption. Finally, the question of photon absorption in the vicinity of the elementary Δ resonance is discussed, where nucleonic as well as nuclear degrees of freedom can be excited

  2. Static and dynamical properties of hot nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suraud, E.

    1990-01-01

    We briefly review our understanding of the formation of excited/hot nuclei in heavy-ion collisions at some tens of MeV/A. We recall the major theoretical frameworks used for describing as well the entrance channel of the reaction as the structure properties of hot nuclei. We finally focus on multifragmentation within insisting upon the theoretical challenge it does represent

  3. Interphase thermodynamic bond in heterogeneous alloys: effects on alloy properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savchenko, A.M.; Konovalov, Yu.V.; Yuferov, O.I.

    2005-01-01

    Inconsistency between a conventional thermodynamic description of alloys as a mechanical mixture of phases and a real alloys state as a common thermodynamic system in which there is a complicated physical-chemical phases interaction has been considered. It is supposed that in heterogeneous alloys (eutectic ones, for instance), so called interphase thermodynamic bond can become apparent due to a partial electron levels splitting under phase interaction. Thermodynamic description of phase equilibrium in alloys is proposed taking into account a thermodynamic bond for the system with phase diagram of eutectic type, and methods of the value of this bond estimation are presented. Experimental evidence (Al-Cu-Si, Al-Si-Mg-Cu, U-Mo + Al) of the effect of interphase thermodynamic bond on temperature and enthalpy of melting of alloys are produced as well as possibility of its effects on alloys electrical conduction, strength, heat and corrosion resistance is substantiated theoretically [ru

  4. Crystallography and Interphase Boundary of Martensite and Bainite in Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuhara, Tadashi; Chiba, Tadachika; Kaneshita, Takeshi; Wu, Huidong; Miyamoto, Goro

    2017-06-01

    Grain refinements in lath martensite and bainite structures are crucial for strengthening and toughening of high-strength structural steels. Clearly, crystallography of transformation plays an important role in determining the "grain" sizes in these structures. In the present study, crystallography and intrinsic boundary structure of martensite and bainite are described. Furthermore, various extrinsic factors affecting variant selection and growth kinetics, such as elastic/plastic strain and alloying effects on interphase boundary migration, are discussed.

  5. How Solid-Electrolyte Interphase Forms in Aqueous Electrolytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suo, Liumin; Oh, Dahyun; Lin, Yuxiao; Zhuo, Zengqing; Borodin, Oleg; Gao, Tao; Wang, Fei; Kushima, Akihiro; Wang, Ziqiang; Kim, Ho-Cheol; Qi, Yue; Yang, Wanli; Pan, Feng; Li, Ju; Xu, Kang; Wang, Chunsheng

    2017-12-27

    Solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) is the key component that enables all advanced electrochemical devices, the best representative of which is Li-ion battery (LIB). It kinetically stabilizes electrolytes at potentials far beyond their thermodynamic stability limits, so that cell reactions could proceed reversibly. Its ad hoc chemistry and formation mechanism has been a topic under intensive investigation since the first commercialization of LIB 25 years ago. Traditionally SEI can only be formed in nonaqueous electrolytes. However, recent efforts successfully transplanted this concept into aqueous media, leading to significant expansion in the electrochemical stability window of aqueous electrolytes from 1.23 V to beyond 4.0 V. This not only made it possible to construct a series of high voltage/energy density aqueous LIBs with unprecedented safety, but also brought high flexibility and even "open configurations" that have been hitherto unavailable for any LIB chemistries. While this new class of aqueous electrolytes has been successfully demonstrated to support diversified battery chemistries, the chemistry and formation mechanism of the key component, an aqueous SEI, has remained virtually unknown. In this work, combining various spectroscopic, electrochemical and computational techniques, we rigorously examined this new interphase, and comprehensively characterized its chemical composition, microstructure and stability in battery environment. A dynamic picture obtained reveals how a dense and protective interphase forms on anode surface under competitive decompositions of salt anion, dissolved ambient gases and water molecule. By establishing basic laws governing the successful formation of an aqueous SEI, the in-depth understanding presented in this work will assist the efforts in tailor-designing better interphases that enable more energetic chemistries operating farther away from equilibria in aqueous media.

  6. Intergranular and inter-phased boundaries in the materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslanides, A.; Backhaus-Ricoult, M.; Bayle-Guillemaud, P.

    2000-01-01

    This document collects the abstracts of the talks presented during the colloquium J2IM on the intergranular and inter-phased boundaries in the materials. Around the themes of the interfaces behaviour and grain boundaries defects in materials, these days dealt with the microstructure behaviour in many domains such as the interfaces in batteries, the irradiation damages and the special case of the fuel-cladding interactions, the stressed interfaces, the alumina or silicon carbides substrates. (A.L.B.)

  7. Multifunctionality in epoxy/glass fibers composites with graphene interphase

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmood, Haroon

    2017-01-01

    In this project, the synergetic effect of a graphene interphase in epoxy/glass fibers composites was investigated by coating glass fibers (GF) with graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanosheets by an electrophoretic deposition (EPD) technique. Graphite oxide was prepared using modified Hummers method in which raw graphite powder was oxidized using potassium permanganate (KMnO4) in acidic solution. Using ultrasonic technique, the graphite oxide was dispersed homogenously in w...

  8. Nuclear astrophysics of light nuclei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fynbo, Hans Otto Uldall

    2013-01-01

    A review of nuclear astrophysics of light nuclei using radioactive beams or techniques developed for radioactive beams is given. We discuss Big Bang nucleosynthesis, with special focus on the lithium problem, aspects of neutrino-physics, helium-burning and finally selected examples of studies...

  9. Promoters active in interphase are bookmarked during mitosis by ubiquitination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Mansi; Zhang, Jie; Heine, George F.; Ozer, Gulcin; Liu, Hui-wen; Huang, Kun; Parvin, Jeffrey D.

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed modification of chromatin by ubiquitination in human cells and whether this mark changes through the cell cycle. HeLa cells were synchronized at different stages and regions of the genome with ubiquitinated chromatin were identified by affinity purification coupled with next-generation sequencing. During interphase, ubiquitin marked the chromatin on the transcribed regions of ∼70% of highly active genes and deposition of this mark was sensitive to transcriptional inhibition. Promoters of nearly half of the active genes were highly ubiquitinated specifically during mitosis. The ubiquitination at the coding regions in interphase but not at promoters during mitosis was enriched for ubH2B and dependent on the presence of RNF20. Ubiquitin labeling of both promoters during mitosis and transcribed regions during interphase, correlated with active histone marks H3K4me3 and H3K36me3 but not a repressive histone modification, H3K27me3. The high level of ubiquitination at the promoter chromatin during mitosis was transient and was removed within 2 h after the cells exited mitosis and entered the next cell cycle. These results reveal that the ubiquitination of promoter chromatin during mitosis is a bookmark identifying active genes during chromosomal condensation in mitosis, and we suggest that this process facilitates transcriptional reactivation post-mitosis. PMID:22941662

  10. Acoustic profilometry of interphases in epoxy due to segregation and diffusion using Brillouin microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, U; Bactavatchalou, R; Baller, J; Philipp, M; Sanctuary, R; Zielinski, B; Krueger, J K [Laboratoire de Physique des Materiaux, Universite du Luxembourg, 162A, Avenue de la Faiencerie, L-1115 Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Alnot, P; Possart, W [Laboratoire Europeen de Recherche Universitaire Saarland-Lorraine (Germany)], E-mail: mail@tauron.de

    2008-02-15

    Reactive network forming polymer systems like epoxies are of huge technological interest because of their adhesive properties based on specific interactions with a large variety of materials. These specific interactions alter the morphology of the epoxy within areas determined by the correlation length of these interactions. The changed morphology leads to interphases with altered (mechanical) properties. Besides these surface-induced interphases, bulk interphases do occur due to segregation, crystallization, diffusion, etc. A new experimental technique to characterize such mechanical interphases is {mu}-Brillouin spectroscopy ({mu}-BS). With {mu}-BS, we studied interphases and their formation in epoxies due to segregation of the constituent components and due to selective diffusion of one component. In the latter case, we will demonstrate the influence of changing the boundary conditions of the diffusion process on the shape of the interphase.

  11. Characterization of positive electrode/electrolyte interphase in lithium batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupre, N.; Martin, J.F.; Soudan, P.; Guyomard, D. [Inst.des Materiaux Jean Rouxel, Nantes (France)

    2008-07-01

    Lithium batteries appear to be the most viable energy source for portable electronic devices because of their energy density. The solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) between the negative electrode and the electrolyte of a Li-ion battery monitors the overall battery behaviour in terms of irreversible capacity loss, charge transfer kinetics and storage properties. This paper reported on a study that examined the influence of the storage atmosphere and the formation of a protective surface layer on the electrochemical performance. The objective was to better understand the interfacial problems controlling the long term life duration and cyclability. The positive/electrolyte interphase evolution was followed upon aging/cycling using 7Li MAS NMR, XPS and impedance spectroscopy. This very novel and uncommon technique was used to characterize the growth and evolution of the surface of some electrode materials for lithium batteries, due to contact with the ambient atmosphere or electrolyte or along electrochemical cycling. LiFePO4 and LiMn0.5Ni0.5O2 were chosen for the studies because they are among the most promising candidates for positive electrodes for future lithium batteries. The reaction of LiMn0.5Ni0.5O2 with the ambient atmosphere or LiPF6 electrolyte is extremely fast and leads to an important amount of lithium-containing diamagnetic species. The NMR spectra provided valuable structural information on the interaction between the interphase and the active material after contact with electrolyte or along electrochemical cycling. MAS NMR was shown to be a very promising tool to monitor phenomena taking place at the interface between electrode and electrolyte in lithium batteries. The study showed the affect of the potential on the strength of the interaction between the surface layer and the active material and the partial removal of this layer along the electrochemical cycling. 11 refs.

  12. The role of the final state interaction in the ionization of the K- shell during the β-decay of nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drukarev, E.G.; Trzhaskovskaya, M.B.

    1989-01-01

    We have calculated the contribution of the final state interaction to the ionization of the K-shell during the β - and β + decays. The contributions to the spectra of the β particles and to the total probability of the K shell ionization are obtained. The disagreement between the calculated values and the experimental data for the latter is shown to diminish strongly. The influence of the secondary electrons on the distribution is also determined. 27 refs.; 2 figs.; 2 tabs

  13. Actin polymerisation at the cytoplasmic face of eukaryotic nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David-Watine Brigitte

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There exists abundant molecular and ultra-structural evidence to suggest that cytoplasmic actin can physically interact with the nuclear envelope (NE membrane system. However, this interaction has yet to be characterised in living interphase cells. Results Using a fluorescent conjugate of the actin binding drug cytochalasin D (CD-BODIPY we provide evidence that polymerising actin accumulates in vicinity to the NE. In addition, both transiently expressed fluorescent actin and cytoplasmic micro-injection of fluorescent actin resulted in accumulation of actin at the NE-membrane. Consistent with the idea that the cytoplasmic phase of NE-membranes can support this novel pool of perinuclear actin polymerisation we show that isolated, intact, differentiated primary hepatocyte nuclei support actin polymerisation in vitro. Further this phenomenon was inhibited by treatments hindering steric access to outer-nuclear-membrane proteins (e.g. wheat germ agglutinin, anti-nesprin and anti-nucleoporin antibodies. Conclusion We conclude that actin polymerisation occurs around interphase nuclei of living cells at the cytoplasmic phase of NE-membranes.

  14. High-temperature solid electrolyte interphases (SEI) in graphite electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Marco-Tulio F.; Sayed, Farheen N.; Gullapalli, Hemtej; Ajayan, Pulickel M.

    2018-03-01

    Thermal fragility of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) is a major source of performance decay in graphite anodes, and efforts to overcome the issues offered by extreme environments to Li-ion batteries have had limited success. Here, we demonstrate that the SEI can be extensively reinforced by carrying the formation cycles at elevated temperatures. Under these conditions, decomposition of the ionic liquid present in the electrolyte favored the formation of a thicker and more protective layer. Cells in which the solid electrolyte interphase was cast at 90 °C were significantly less prone to self-discharge when exposed to high temperature, with no obvious damages to the formed SEI. This additional resilience was accomplished at the expense of rate capability, as charge transfer became growingly inefficient in these systems. At slower rates, however, cells that underwent SEI formation at 90 °C presented superior performances, as a result of improved Li+ transport through the SEI, and optimal wetting of graphite by the electrolyte. This work analyzes different graphite hosts and ionic liquids, showing that this effect is more pervasive than anticipated, and offering the unique perspective that, for certain systems, temperature can actually be an asset for passivation.

  15. The structure of chromosom 5 in interphase-nucleii of HeLa-cells

    OpenAIRE

    Claussen, Jan

    2010-01-01

    In order to examine the structure of chromosoms during the interphase HeLa-cells were synchronised and preperated. In further steps visulaised we the chromosom5 with help of multicour-banding. It could be showed that the chromosom 5 has a similar structure during the interphase as a metaphase-chromosom.

  16. 3D printing-assisted interphase engineering of polymer composites: Concept and feasibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Szebenyi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We introduced a general concept to create smart, (multifunctional interphases in polymer composites with layered reinforcements, making use of 3D printing. The concept can be adapted for both thermoplastic and thermoset matrix-based composites with either thermoplastic- or thermoset-enriched interphases. We showed feasibility using an example of a composite containing a thermoset matrix/thermoplastic interphase. Carbon fiber unidirectional reinforcing layers were patterned with poly(ε-caprolactone (PCL through 3D printing, then infiltrated with an amine-cured epoxy (EP. The corresponding composites were subjected to static and dynamic flexure tests. The PCL-rich interphase markedly improved the ductility in static tests without deteriorating the flexural properties. Its effect was marginal in Charpy impact tests, which can be explained with effects of specimen and PCL pattern sizes. The PCL-rich interphase ensured self-healing when triggered by heat treatment above the melting temperature of PCL.

  17. Collective excitations in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chomaz, Ph.

    1998-01-01

    The properties of the nucleus cannot be reduced to the properties of its constituents: it is a complex system. The fact that many properties of the nucleus are consequences of the existence of mean-field potential is a manifestation of this complexity. In particular, the nucleons can thus self-organize in collective motions such as giant resonances. Therefore the study of this collective motions is a very good tool to understand the properties of the nucleus itself. The purpose of this article is to stress some aspects of these collective vibrations. We have studied how an ensemble of fermions as the nucleus can self-organize in collective vibrations which are behaving like a gas of bosons in weak interaction. Understanding of these phenomena remains one of the important subjects of actuality in the context of quantal systems in strong interaction. In particular, the study of the states with one or two vibration quanta provides a direct information on the structure of nuclei close to their ground states. Moreover, some collective states appear to be very robust against the onset of chaos. This is the case of the hot giant dipole built on top of a hot nucleus which seems to survive up to rather high temperatures. Their sudden disappearance is still a subject of controversy. It may be that the mean-field and the associated collective states are playing a crucial role also in catastrophic processes such as the phase-transitions. Indeed, when the system is diluted the collective vibrations may become unstable and it seems that these unstable modes provide a natural explanation to the self organization of the system in drops. Finally, considering the diversity of the different structures of exotic nuclei one may expect new vibration types. All these studies are showing the diversity of the collective motions of strongly correlated quantum systems such as the nucleus but many open questions remain to be solved. (authors)

  18. Collective excitations in nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chomaz, Ph. [Grand Accelerateur National d`Ions Lourds (GANIL), 14 - Caen (France); Collaboration: La Direction des Sciences de la Matiere du CEA (FR); Le Fonds National de la Recherche Scientifique de Belgique (BE)

    1998-12-31

    The properties of the nucleus cannot be reduced to the properties of its constituents: it is a complex system. The fact that many properties of the nucleus are consequences of the existence of mean-field potential is a manifestation of this complexity. In particular, the nucleons can thus self-organize in collective motions such as giant resonances. Therefore the study of this collective motions is a very good tool to understand the properties of the nucleus itself. The purpose of this article is to stress some aspects of these collective vibrations. We have studied how an ensemble of fermions as the nucleus can self-organize in collective vibrations which are behaving like a gas of bosons in weak interaction. Understanding of these phenomena remains one of the important subjects of actuality in the context of quantal systems in strong interaction. In particular, the study of the states with one or two vibration quanta provides a direct information on the structure of nuclei close to their ground states. Moreover, some collective states appear to be very robust against the onset of chaos. This is the case of the hot giant dipole built on top of a hot nucleus which seems to survive up to rather high temperatures. Their sudden disappearance is still a subject of controversy. It may be that the mean-field and the associated collective states are playing a crucial role also in catastrophic processes such as the phase-transitions. Indeed, when the system is diluted the collective vibrations may become unstable and it seems that these unstable modes provide a natural explanation to the self organization of the system in drops. Finally, considering the diversity of the different structures of exotic nuclei one may expect new vibration types. All these studies are showing the diversity of the collective motions of strongly correlated quantum systems such as the nucleus but many open questions remain to be solved. (authors) 304 refs., 53 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Studies of exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelique, J.C.; Orr, N.A.

    1997-01-01

    The study of the nuclei far off stability valley is of much interest for testing the nuclear models established for the stable nuclei but also for astrophysics to understand the nucleosynthesis. Experiments aim to measure the mass and lifetime, to build the decay schemes and also to study the structure and the properties of these nuclei. The radioactive beam group focused its research on light neutron-rich nuclei having a halo neutron structure. Mass measurements in N ∼ Z nuclei namely in A ∼ 60-80 proton-rich nuclei, important for understanding the rp process, are mentioned, as well as in nuclei in the 100 Sn region. In the newly obtained 26 O and 28 O nuclei the lifetimes, the probabilities of emission of one for more neutrons were determined. The data analysis has permitted to determine also for the first time the lifetimes of 27,29 F and 30 Ne. Studies of nuclei in the 100 Sn region, near the proton drip line in the ground and isomeric states are now under way. The spectroscopy (energy levels, gamma emissions, etc.) of the neutron-rich nuclei produced by the 36 S fragmentation has been carried out in 31 Ne, 17 B and 29 F. Studies by Coulomb excitation of the 2 + excited states and associated probability B (E2) in O, Ne, Ni and Zn are now analysed

  20. A contribution of glutathione to interphase death of dividing cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rybina, V.V.; Korystov, Yu.N.; Degtyareva, O.V.; Dobrovinskaya, O.R.; Ehjdus, L.Kh.

    1988-01-01

    A study was made of a change in the content of reduced glutathionine (GSH) in Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT) cells after irradiation with doses evoking their interphase death (ID). GSH content was determined in a suspension of EAT cells fixed by hot ethanol. The postirradiation decrease in the GSH content of the suspension was due to its oxidation by hydrogen peroxide resulting from radiochemical reactions after releasing thereof from cells upon fixation. In the absence of an irradiated medium no changes occurred in the GSH content of EAT cells. It is concluded that ID of EAT cells is not associated with the radiation-induced decrease in the content of GSH, an endogenous antioxidant

  1. In situ reacted rare-earth hexaaluminate interphases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cain, M.G.; Cain, R.L.; Lewis, M.H.

    1997-01-01

    A novel in situ reaction between a ceria-doped zirconia interphase coating on Saphikon fibers and an outer alumina coating has resulted in the formation of oriented hexaaluminate platelets which can act as a low fracture energy interface barrier for crack deflection in oxide-oxide ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs). The reaction proceeds only in reducing environments where the reduction of the cerium and zirconium ions to their 3+ valent state causes a destabilization phenomenon consistent with previously reported findings. The diffusion of the cerium from the zirconia into solid solution with the alumina can stabilize the layered hexaaluminate structure. Preferred orientational growth of the hexaaluminate parallel to the coating interface was observed which is the required orientation for enhanced debonding at the fiber/matrix interface in long-fiber-reinforced CMCs

  2. Nuclei and quantum worlds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chomaz, Ph.

    2000-01-01

    This document gathers the slides and their commentaries that have been presented at the conference 'physics and fundamental questions' by P. Chomaz. The author reviews the different quantum aspects of nuclei: tunnel effect, symmetries, magic numbers, wave functions, size, shapes and deformations. The author shows that nuclei are quantum objects of great complexity, their structures are not yet well understood and the study of exotic nuclei will continue bringing valuable information

  3. Pairing correlations in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, C.V.K.

    1988-01-01

    There are many similarities between the properties of nucleons in nuclei and electrons in metals. In addition to the properties explainable in terms of independent particle motion, there are many important co-operative effects suggesting correlated motion. Pairing correlation which leads to superconductivity in metals and several important properties in nuclei , is an exmple of such correlations. An attempt has been made to review the effects of pairing correlations in nuclei. Recent indications of reduction in pairing correlations at high angular momenta is discussed. A comparision between pairing correlations in the cases of nuclei and electrons in metals is attempted. (author). 20 refs., 10 figs

  4. Thermodynamical description of excited nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonche, P.

    1989-01-01

    In heavy ion collisions it has been possible to obtain composite systems at rather high excitation energies corresponding to temperatures of several MeV. The theoretical studies of these systems are based on concepts borrowed from thermodynamics or statistical physics, such as the temperature. In these lectures, we present the concepts of statistical physics which are involved in the physics of heavy ion as they are produced nowadays in the laboratory and also during the final stage of a supernova collapse. We do not attempt to describe the reaction mechanisms which yield such nuclear systems nor their decay by evaporation or fragmentation. We shall only study their static properties. The content of these lectures is organized in four main sections. The first one gives the basic features of statistical physics and thermodynamics necessary to understand quantum mechanics at finite temperature. In the second one, we present a study of the liquid-gas phase transition in nuclear physics. A phenomenological approach of the stability of hot nuclei follows. The microscopic point of view is proposed in the third part. Starting from the basic concepts derived in the first part, it provides a description of excited or hot nuclei which confirms the qualitative results of the second part. Furthermore it gives a full description of most properties of these nuclei as a function of temperature. Finally in the last part, a microscopic derivation of the equation of state of nuclear matter is proposed to study the collapse of a supernova core

  5. Development of nuclear data library for nucleon-induced reactions on heavy nuclei in wide energy region. Final Project Technical Report on the work performed from 01.12.2003 to 30.04.2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yavshits, S G [V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2011-05-15

    The main goal of the project is to the development of nuclear data calculation technique for innovative hybrid nuclear technologies, first at all for technology of radioactive waste transmutation and energy production. Within the framework of the project two main problems were decided: - development of a reliable code enabling for calculation of main characteristics of nuclear reactions induced by nucleons in wide energy range; - development of nuclear data library containing complete transport files for hybrid accelerator- driven systems. The results of the project have both fundamental and applied character. Within the framework of the project the following main results were obtained: The analysis of experimental and theoretical data for all items in question of new data library; The development of new parameterization of global optical potential which is necessary for entrance channel simulation and development of appropriate subroutines for a code realizing method of coupled channels for reaction cross-section calculations; The updating of existing models and codes and the development of new ones for a fast reaction stage (intranuclear cascade model), preequilibrium stage (model with a multiple emission of particles) and final stage (statistical model of fission/particle emission competition) for reactions with intermediate energy nucleons; The development of model for fission barriers and fission products yield calculations; inclusion of the appropriate subroutines in a statistical code; The test calculations with the code system developed and analysis of the results and comparison with existing experimental data; The systematical calculations for reactions with protons and neutrons (20-1000 MeV) for a wide range of targets; For each reaction (fixed target + projectile (proton or neutron) for fixed energy) the nuclear data file in the ENDF-6 format has been developed, including: - total cross section, reaction cross section and cross section of elastic

  6. Symmetry and Phase Transitions in Nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iachello, F.

    2009-01-01

    Phase transitions in nuclei have received considerable attention in recent years, especially after the discovery that, contrary to expectations, systems at the critical point of a phase transition display a simple structure. In this talk, quantum phase transitions (QPT), i.e. phase transitions that occur as a function of a coupling constant that appears in the quantum Hamiltonian, H, describing the system, will be reviewed and experimental evidence for their occurrence in nuclei will be presented. The phase transitions discussed in the talk will be shape phase transitions. Different shapes have different symmetries, classified by the dynamic symmetries of the Interacting Boson Model, U(5), SU(3) and SO(6). Very recently, the concept of Quantum Phase Transitions has been extended to Excited State Quantum Phase Transitions (ESQPT). This extension will be discussed and some evidence for incipient ESQPT in nuclei will be presented. Systems at the critical point of a phase transition are called 'critical systems'. Approximate analytic formulas for energy spectra and other properties of 'critical nuclei', in particular for nuclei at the critical point of the second order U(5)-SO(6) transition, called E(5), and along the line of first order U(5)-SU(3) transitions, called X(5), will be presented. Experimental evidence for 'critical nuclei' will be also shown. Finally, the microscopic derivation of shape phase transitions in nuclei within the framework of density functional methods will be briefly discussed.(author)

  7. Nuclei with exotic constituents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Toshimitsu.

    1990-08-01

    We discuss various interesting features in the behavior of exotic constituents of nuclei such as hyperons and mesons, in particular, with emphases on the aspect of exotic halos which are formed in general by short-range repulsion and long-range attraction. Specifically, Λ and Σ hypernuclei and pionic nuclei are discussed. (author)

  8. Neutron rich nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foucher, R.

    1979-01-01

    If some β - emitters are particularly interesting to study in light, medium, and heavy nuclei, another (and also) difficult problem is to know systematically the properties of these neutron rich nuclei far from the stability line. A review of some of their characteristics is presented. How far is it possible to be objective in the interpretation of data is questioned and implications are discussed

  9. Baryon resonances in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arenhoevel, H.

    1977-01-01

    The field of baryon resonances in nuclei is reviewed. Theoretical developments and experimental evidence as well are discussed. Special emphasis is laid on electromagnetic processes for the two nucleon system. Some aspects of real isobars in nuclei are touched upon. (orig.) [de

  10. Nuclei in high forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szymanski, Z.; Berger, J.F.; Heenen, P.H.; Heyde, K.; Haas, B.; Janssens, R.; Paya, D.; Gogny, D.; Huber, G.; Bjoernholm, S.; Brack, M.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of 1991 Joliot-Curie Summer School is to review the most advances in the understanding of the nuclei physics after the considerable progress in gamma spectroscopy. It covers the following topics: Highly and super-deformed nuclei, nuclear structures, mean-field approach and beyond, fission isomers, nuclear excitations with long lifetime and metal clusters

  11. Pair correlations in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Yoshifumi

    2009-01-01

    Except for the closed shell nuclei, almost all nuclei are in the superconducting state at their ground states. This well-known pair correlation in nuclei causes various interesting phenomena. It is especially to be noted that the pair correlation becomes weak in the excited states of nuclei with high angular momentum, which leads to the pair phase transition to the normal state in the high spin limit. On the other hand, the pair correlation becomes stronger in the nuclei with lower nucleon density than in those with normal density. In the region of neutron halo or skin state of unstable nuclei, this phenomenon is expected to be further enhanced to be observed compared to the ground state of stable nuclei. An overview of those interesting aspects caused via the pair correlation is presented here in the sections titled 'pair correlations in ground states', pair correlations in high spin states' and 'pair correlations in unstable nuclei' focusing on the high spin state. (S. Funahashi)

  12. Eta mesons in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, L.C.

    1987-01-01

    The possibility of producing eta-mesic nuclei by the use of pions is discussed. If these nuclei are observed experimentally, then the binding energies of the eta in this new nuclear matter can be used to extract accurately the eta-N-N* coupling constant in a nucleus. The framework for these calculations is the coupled channel isobar model

  13. Nuclear Computational Low Energy Initiative (NUCLEI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, Sanjay K. [University of Washington

    2017-08-14

    This is the final report for University of Washington for the NUCLEI SciDAC-3. The NUCLEI -project, as defined by the scope of work, will develop, implement and run codes for large-scale computations of many topics in low-energy nuclear physics. Physics to be studied include the properties of nuclei and nuclear decays, nuclear structure and reactions, and the properties of nuclear matter. The computational techniques to be used include Quantum Monte Carlo, Configuration Interaction, Coupled Cluster, and Density Functional methods. The research program will emphasize areas of high interest to current and possible future DOE nuclear physics facilities, including ATLAS and FRIB (nuclear structure and reactions, and nuclear astrophysics), TJNAF (neutron distributions in nuclei, few body systems, and electroweak processes), NIF (thermonuclear reactions), MAJORANA and FNPB (neutrino-less double-beta decay and physics beyond the Standard Model), and LANSCE (fission studies).

  14. Durability of polymer matrix composites for infrastructure: The role of the interphase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verghese, Kandathil Nikhil Eapen

    1999-12-01

    deals with the influence of the sizing material on the fatigue response of cross ply composites made with the help of resin infusion molding. Chapter 2 describes the effects of a controlled set of interphase polymers that have the saine chemical structure but differ from each other in polarity. The importance of the atomic force microscope (AFM) to view and perform nano-indentations on the interphase regions has been demonstrated. Finally, it attempts to tie everything together with the help of the fatigue response of the different composites. Chapter 3 deals only with the vinyl ester resin and examines the influence of network structure on the molecular relaxation behavior (cooperativity) of the glassy polymer. It also tries to make connections between structural features of the glass and fracture toughness as measured in it's glassy state. Chapter 4 extends the results obtained in chapter 3 to examine the cooperativity of pultruded composites made with the different sizings. A correlation between strength and cooperativity is found to exist, with systems having greater cooperativity being stronger. Chapter 5 moves into the area of hygrothermal aging of Derakane 441-400 resin. It looks specifically at identifying a mechanism for the unusual moisture uptake behavior of the polymer subjected to a thermal-spiking environment. This it does by identifying the presence of hydrogen bonding in the resin. Finally, chapters 6 to 8 present experimental and analytical results obtained on PVP K90, Phenoxy and G' sized, AS4/Derakane 411-350 LI vinyl ester composites that were pultruded at Strongwell Inc., on their lab-scale pultruder in Bristol, Virginia.

  15. A novel approach to determine the interphase transformer inductance of 18 pulse rectifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sefa, Ibrahim; Altin, Necmi

    2009-01-01

    The interphase transformer inductance seriously affects the performance of 18 pulse rectifiers. Low inductance values cause non-characteristic harmonics whereas high inductance values increase the rectifier cost and size. Hence, determination of the interphase transformer inductance value is an important problem in the design of 18 pulse rectifiers. In this paper, an approach to determine the optimum inductance value of an interphase transformer is proposed and a practical formula is introduced. The proposed approach has been validated with simulation and experimental studies carried out with designed capacitive loaded autotransformer based 18 pulse rectifier for different IPT inductance values at different load levels. Experimental and simulation results show that cost effective interphase transformer inductance value can be determined with the proposed approach and this value reduces the line current harmonics and improves power factor drastically.

  16. Role of Interphase in the Mechanical Behavior of Silica/Epoxy Resin Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Hua

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A nanoscale representative volume element has been developed to investigate the effect of interphase geometry and property on the mechanical behavior of silica/epoxy resin nanocomposites. The role of interphase–matrix bonding was also examined. Results suggested that interphase modulus and interfacial bonding conditions had significant influence on the effective stiffness of nanocomposites, while its sensitivities with respect to both the thickness and the gradient property of the interphase was minimal. The stiffer interphase demonstrated a higher load-sharing capacity, which also increased the stress distribution uniformity within the resin nanocomposites. Under the condition of imperfect interfacial bonding, the effective stiffness of nanocomposites was much lower, which was in good agreement with the documented experimental observations. This work could shed some light on the design and manufacturing of resin nanocomposites.

  17. Density functional theory of nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terasaki, Jun

    2008-01-01

    The density functional theory of nuclei has come to draw attention of scientists in the field of nuclear structure because the theory is expected to provide reliable numerical data in wide range on the nuclear chart. This article is organized to present an overview of the theory to the people engaged in the theory of other fields as well as those people in the nuclear physics experiments. At first, the outline of the density functional theory widely used in the electronic systems (condensed matter, atoms, and molecules) was described starting from the Kohn-Sham equation derived on the variational principle. Then the theory used in the field of nuclear physics was presented. Hartree-Fock and Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov approximation by using Skyrme interaction was explained. Comparison of the results of calculations and experiments of binding energies and ground state mean square charge radii of some magic number nuclei were shown. The similarity and dissimilarity between the two streams were summarized. Finally the activities of the international project of Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional (UNEDF) which was started recently lead by US scientist was reported. This project is programmed for five years. One of the applications of the project is the calculation of the neutron capture cross section of nuclei on the r-process, which is absolutely necessary for the nucleosynthesis research. (S. Funahashi)

  18. The histone H4 lysine 20 monomethyl mark, set by PR-Set7 and stabilized by L(3mbt, is necessary for proper interphase chromatin organization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayako Sakaguchi

    Full Text Available Drosophila PR-Set7 or SET8 is a histone methyltransferase that specifically monomethylates histone H4 lysine 20 (H4K20. L(3MBT has been identified as a reader of methylated H4K20. It contains several conserved domains including three MBT repeats binding mono- and dimethylated H4K20 peptides. We find that the depletion of PR-Set7 blocks de novo H4K20me1 resulting in the immediate activation of the DNA damage checkpoint, an increase in the size of interphase nuclei, and drastic reduction of cell viability. L(3mbt on the other hand stabilizes the monomethyl mark, as L(3mbt-depleted S2 cells show a reduction of more than 60% of bulk monomethylated H4K20 (H4K20me1 while viability is barely affected. Ploidy and basic chromatin structure show only small changes in PR-Set7-depleted cells, but higher order interphase chromatin organization is significantly affected presumably resulting in the activation of the DNA damage checkpoint. In the absence of any other known functions of PR-Set7, the setting of the de novo monomethyl mark appears essential for cell viability in the presence or absence of the DNA damage checkpoint, but once newly assembled chromatin is established the monomethyl mark, protected by L(3mbt, is dispensable.

  19. The mechanism of radiation-induced interphase death of lymphoid cells: A new hypothesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eidus, L.K.; Korystov, Yu.N.; Dobrovinskaja, O.R.; Shaposhnikova, V.V.

    1990-01-01

    The interphase death of irradiated rat thymocytes depends on their concentration during postirradiation incubation. The kinetics of pycnosis and cell death determined with the trypan blue exclusion test in the samples with the highest cell concentration (1-2 x 10(7) cells/ml) is consistent with the data available in the literature, whereas the samples with the lowest concentration (2 x 10(5) cells/ml) undergo almost no pycnosis and death after irradiation with doses up to 50 Gy. On the basis of these results, we suggest a new mechanism of interphase death involving an interaction between irradiated thymocytes and the fraction of thymus cells possessing cytocidal activity. The observed correlation between the cytocidal activity and interphase death of thymocytes from animals of different ages favors our mechanism. It was found that the inhibitors which prevent the conjugation of killer cells and their targets do not influence interphase death, while the substances which block the secretion of cytotoxic factors or their action on the target membrane do protect from interphase death. Thus we suggest that the irradiation activates the killer cells to secrete some cytotoxic factors which induce pycnosis and interphase death of thymocytes

  20. Highways for ions in polymers - 3D–imaging of electrochemical interphase formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesp, Veronika; Zakel, Julia; Schäfer, Martin; Paulus, Ilka; Greiner, Andreas; Weitzel, Karl-Michael

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted -- Abstract: The formation of a cesium interphase in-between a polymer film and a platinum electrode has been initiated by low energy bombardment induced ion transport. To this end two different samples of a poly(p-xylylene)(PPX) film, deposited on a platinum electrode have been bombarded by a low energy cesium ion beam. Ions are transported through the film according to the laws of electro-diffusion. They are neutralized at the interface between the PPX film and the metal electrode. Consequently, a cesium interphase is formed. 3D imaging of the interphase by means of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) reveals a correlation between structural characteristics of the interphase and conduction properties of the PPX film. The bombardment of PPX films consisting of a homogenous network leads to the formation of a uniform interphase. The bombardment of PPX films with non-intermittent pathways (NIPs) for the transport of ions leads to the formation of cesium islands which ultimately spread out laterally leading to a non-uniform interphase behind the PPX film. This picture is supported by measurements of the ionic conductivity which differs characteristically for the two kinds of PPX films

  1. Nucleons in nuclei, however

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grange, P.; Mathiot, J.F.; Roy-Stephan, M.; Frascaria, R.; Gales, S.

    1990-01-01

    The topics presented at the 1989 Joliot-Curie Lectures are reported. Two main subjects were retained: a simplified description of the N-body motion of particles in the quasi-particle configuration; study of the dynamics of nuclear components which are not described by nucleons in their ground state. The following themes were presented: quasiparticles and the Green functions, relativistic aspects of the quasiparticle concept, the dimensions of nucleons in the nuclei and the EMC effect, quarks and gluons in the nuclei, the delta in the nuclei, the strangeness, quasiparticles far from the Fermi sea, diffusion of electrons, stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis [fr

  2. Dynamic polarisation of nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borghini, M.; Abragam, A.

    1961-01-01

    In magnetic fields of about 13000 gauss, at a temperature of 1.5 deg. K, in samples of about 2 mm 3 , we have obtained by the 'solid effect' (application of a magnetic field at an appropriate frequency around 35000 MHz), nuclear polarizations /I of a few percent: 19 per cent for hydrogen nuclei in single crystals of La 2 Mg 3 (NO 3 ) 12 , 24H 2 O; 5 per cent for hydrogen nuclei in polystyrene; 6 per cent for fluorine nuclei in single crystals of LiF. (author) [fr

  3. Evidence for interphase death in irradiated primate salivary glands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, L.C.; King, G.K.; Peters, L.J.

    1985-01-01

    In radiotherapy patients, exposure of the salivary glands to ionizing radiation produces acute swelling and can result in chronic hypofunction which predisposes to oral infections and dental caries. Because the pathogenesis or the acute reaction is unknown, sequential biopsies were taken from irradiated rhesus monkey parotid and mandibular salivary glands at 1,3,6,9,12,24,48 and 72 hrs postirradiation (PI). Singe /sup 60/Co γ-ray doses of 250,500,750,1000,1250 and 1500 rads were used. At 1-24 hrs PI there was a classical acute inflammatory reaction. This reaction subsided 24-72 hrs PI changing to a lymphoplasmacytic response at the doses of 750 to 1500 rad. At doses above 750 rad there were necrosis of serous acinar cells but relative sparing of mucous cells, ducts and blood vessels. Study at 20 and 40 mos PI confirmed that there was significant serous cell loss in a dose related fashion at 750 through 1500 rad. Below 750 rad no residual damage was evident. Normal tissues with long cell turnover times are usually slow to manifest radiation injury, since this is classically linked to mitotic division. The acute lysis of serous salivary cells is an exception to this rule, and indicates a unique sensitivity of these cells to interphase death

  4. Interphase vs confinement in starch-clay bionanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coativy, Gildas; Chevigny, Chloé; Rolland-Sabaté, Agnès; Leroy, Eric; Lourdin, Denis

    2015-03-06

    Starch-clay bionanocomposites containing 1-10% of natural montmorillonite were elaborated by melt processing in the presence of water. A complex macromolecular dynamics behavior was observed: depending on the clay content, an increase of the glass transition temperature and/or the presence of two overlapped α relaxation peaks were detected. Thanks to a model allowing the prediction of the average interparticle distance, and its comparison with the average size of starch macromolecules, it was possible to associate these phenomena to different populations of macromolecules. In particular, it seems that for high clay content (10%), the slowdown of segmental relaxation due to confinement of the starch macromolecules between the clay tactoïds is the predominant phenomenon. While for lower clay contents (3-5%), a significant modification of chain relaxation seems to occur, due to the formation of an interphase by the starch macromolecules in the vicinity of clay nanoparticles coexisting with the bulk polymer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Glass-water interphase reactivity with calcium rich solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chave, T.; Frugier, P.; Gin, S.; Chave, T.; Ayral, A.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of calcium on synthetic glass alteration mechanisms has been studied. It is known that the higher the calcium content in the glass, the higher the forward rate. However, in a confined medium reaching apparent saturation state and a pH (90 degrees C) around 9, synthetic calcium-bearing glasses are those with the lowest alteration rates. This work brings new and fundamental evidence toward understanding the alteration mechanisms: the rate-decreasing effect of calcium exists even if the calcium comes from the solution. Calcium from solution reacts with silica network in the hydrated layer at the glass surface. The calcium effect on the alteration kinetics is explained by the condensation of a passivating reactive interphase (PRI) whose passivating properties are strongly enhanced when calcium participates in its construction. These experiments provide new evidence of the role of condensation mechanisms in glass alteration. This better understanding of the calcium effect on glass long-term behavior will be useful both for improving glass formulations and for understanding the influence of the water composition. (authors)

  6. Quarks in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, R.G.

    1984-11-01

    The paper concerns the behaviour of quarks in nuclei. Confinement size changes and dynamical rescaling; A dependence; low-x region; gluons and confinement size; and nucleons in a nucleus; are all discussed. (U.K.)

  7. The shape of nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackintosh, R.S.

    1977-01-01

    For the class of nuclei which are 'strongly deformed' it is possible to introduce the idea of an empirically measurable static nuclear shape. The limitations of this concept as applied to nuclei (fundamentally quantum-mechanical objects) are discussed. These are basically the limitations of the rotational model which must be introduced in order to define and measure nuclear shape. A unified discussion of the ways in which the shape has been parametrized is given with emphasis on the fact that different parametrizations correspond to different nuclear structures. Accounts of the various theoretical procedures for calculating nuclear shapes and of the interaction between nuclear shapes and nuclear spectroscopy are given. A coherent account of a large subset of nuclei (strongly deformed nuclei) can be given by means of a model in which the concept of nuclear shape plays a central role. (author)

  8. Structure of Warm Nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaberg, S.; Uhrenholt, H.

    2009-01-01

    We study the structure of nuclei in the energy region between the ground state and the neutron separation energy, here called warm nuclei. The onset of chaos in the nucleus as excitation energy is increased is briefly reviewed. Chaos implies fluctuations of energies and wave functions qualitatively the same for all chaotic nuclei. On the other hand, large structure effects are seen, e.g. in the level-density function at same excitation energies. A microscopic model for the level density is reviewed and we discuss effects on structure of the total level-density function, parity enhancement, and the spin distribution function. Comparisons to data are performed at the neutron separation energy for all observed nuclei, and structure of the level-density function for a few measured cases. The role of structure effects in the level-density function for fission dynamics is exemplified.

  9. Hot nuclei and fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerreau, D.

    1993-01-01

    A review is made of the present status concerning the production of nuclei above 5 MeV temperature. Considerable progress has been made recently on the understanding of the formation and the fate of such hot nuclei. It appears that the nucleus seems more stable against temperature than predicted by static calculations. However, the occurrence of multifragment production at high excitation energies is now well established. The various experimental features of the fragmentation process are discussed. (author) 59 refs., 12 figs

  10. A novel perspective on the formation of the solid electrolyte interphase on the graphite electrode for lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Jian; Zhang Jian; Su Yuchang; Zhang Xigui; Xia Baojia

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we describe how the mechanism of formation of a protective film [the solid electrolyte interphase (or interface) (SEI)] on a graphite electrode for Li-ion batteries was investigated from the novel perspective of precipitation of the final decomposition products that arise from the reduction of a nonaqueous electrolyte solution in contact with the graphite electrode. Within the framework of this new perspective, we can elegantly account for the compositional and structural differences between the basal-plane and edge-plane SEIs and for the origins of the multi-layer structure and the parabolic growth law of the SEIs on both the edge-plane and basal-plane surfaces of the graphite electrode.

  11. Symmetry energy, unstable nuclei and neutron star crusts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iida, Kei [Kochi University, Department of Natural Science, Kochi (Japan); RIKEN Nishina Center, Saitama (Japan); Oyamatsu, Kazuhiro [RIKEN Nishina Center, Saitama (Japan); Aichi Shukutoku University, Department of Human Informatics, Aichi (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    The phenomenological approach to inhomogeneous nuclear matter is useful to describe fundamental properties of atomic nuclei and neutron star crusts in terms of the equation of state of uniform nuclear matter. We review a series of researches that we have developed by following this approach. We start with more than 200 equations of state that are consistent with empirical masses and charge radii of stable nuclei and then apply them to describe matter radii and masses of unstable nuclei, proton elastic scattering and total reaction cross sections off unstable nuclei, and nuclei in neutron star crusts including nuclear pasta. We finally discuss the possibility of constraining the density dependence of the symmetry energy from experiments on unstable nuclei and even observations of quasi-periodic oscillations in giant flares of soft gamma-ray repeaters. (orig.)

  12. [THE INFLUENCE OF THE PREPARATION PRETREATMENT ON IN SITU DETECTION OF 5-METHYLCYTOSINE IN METAPHASE CHROMOSOMES AND IN INTERPHASE NUCLEI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grudinina, N A; Sasina, L K; Noniashvili, E M; Neronova, E G; Pavlinova, L I; Suchkova, I O; Sofronov, G A; Patkin, E L

    2015-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitate analysis of DNA methylation in situ at the level of cells, chromosomes and chromosomal domains is extremely important for the diagnosis and treatment of various diseases, the study of ageing and the consequences of environmental impacts. An important question arises, whether the revealed in situ methylation pattern reflects DNA methylation per se and (or) availability of the DNA for antibodies, which in turn depends on the peculiarities of chromatin structure and chromosome condensation. These events can lead to an incorrect evaluation of the actual pattern of DNA methylation. To avoid this shortcoming as far as possible, we have modified the most widely used method of revealing 5-methylcytosine in situ with monoclonal antibodies. Here we have shown that the detection of DNA methylation staining of chromosomes including C-heterochromatin, chromosomal arms and sister chromatids is drastically dependent on pretreatment of chromosomal preparations for immunocytochemical study using fluorescent antibodies. Using undifferentiated stem cells of mouse embryonal carcinoma line F9, it has been found that change in preparations storage results in a sharp fluorescence decrease up to complete disappearance of the signal in centromeric heterochromatin. With the help of the method described in the work, we have first revealed the asymmetry of sister chromatids methylation in metaphase chromosomes of F9 cell and lymphocytes of human periphery blood. This may lead to asymmetry of transcriptional signature of daughter cells after division. The proposed here modification of 5-methylcytosine detection in situ provides a more complete characterization of methylation of chromosomes and chromosomal domains, compared to previously published methods.

  13. Non-specific interactions are sufficient to explain the position of heterochromatic chromocenters and nucleoli in interphase nuclei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nooijer, de S.; Wellink, J.; Mulder, B.; Bisseling, T.

    2009-01-01

    The organization of the eukaryote nucleus into functional compartments arises by self-organization both through specific protein–protein and protein–DNA interactions and non-specific interactions that lead to entropic effects, such as e.g. depletion attraction. While many specific interactions have

  14. Multifragmentation of hot nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamain, B.

    1990-10-01

    It is difficult to deposit a large amount (∼ 1 Gev) of excitation energy into a nucleus. And if one wants to deposit large excitation energy values, the best way consists of shooting a given target nucleus with several nucleons, which can be achieved by using intermediate energy (10-100 MeV/nucleon) heavy ions. Such very excited objects were named hot nuclei. The study of hot nuclei has been undertaken only for 7 years because intermediate energy heavy ion facilities were not available before. The game is then to determine the decay properties of such nuclei, their limits of existence. Their study is connected with general properties of nuclear matter: namely its equation of state. Of special interest, is the onset of a new decay mechanism: multifragmentation, which is the non-sequential disassembly of a hot nucleus into several light nuclei (often called intermediate-mass fragments or IMF) or particles. This paper, shows how this mechanism can reflect fundamental properties of nuclear matter, but also how its experimental signature is difficult to establish. Multifragmentation has also been studied by using very energetic projectiles (protons and heavy ions) in the relativistic or ultra-relativistic region. The multifragmentation question of hot nuclei is far from being solved. One knows that IMF production increases when the excitation energy brought into a system is strongly increased, but very little is known about the mechanisms involved and a clear onset for multifragmentation is not established

  15. Cosmology and unstable nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schramm, D.N.

    1995-01-01

    Primordial nucleosynthesis has established itself as one of the three pillars of Big Bang cosmology. Many of the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis reactions involve unstable nuclei. Hence there is a tight relationship hetween the subject of this conference and cosmology. The prime role of unstable nuclei in cosmology is related to lithium synthesis and the lack of cosmological synthesis of Be and B. These nuclei will thus be focused upon. Nucleosynthesis involves comparing calculated abundances with observed abundances. In general, abundance determinations are dominated by systematic rather than statistical errors, and work on bounding systematics is crucial. The quark-hadron inspired inhomogeneous calculations now unanimously agree that only relatively small variations in Ω b are possible vis-a-vis the homogeneous model; hence the robustness of Ω b ∼0.05 is now apparent. (These calculations depend critically on unstable nuclei.) The above argues that the bulk of the baryons in the universe are not producing visible light. A comparison with the ROSAT cluster data is also shown to be consistent with the standard BBN model. Ω b ∼1 seems to be definitely excluded, so if Ω TOTAL =1, as some recent observations may hint, then non-baryonic dark matter is required. The implications of the recently reported halo microlensing events are discussed. In summary, it is argued that the physics of unstable nuclei affects the fundamental dark matter argument. ((orig.))

  16. Metallicity at interphase boundaries due to polar catastrophe induced by charge density discontinuity

    KAUST Repository

    Albar, Arwa

    2018-02-09

    The electronic properties of interphase boundaries are of basic importance for most materials, particularly when those properties deviate strongly from the bulk behavior. We introduce a mechanism that can result in metallicity at stoichiometric interphase boundaries between semiconductors based on the idea of polar catastrophe, which is usually considered only in the context of heterostructures. To this end, we perform ab initio calculations within density functional theory to investigate the electronic states at stoichiometric SnO/SnO2 (110) interphase boundaries. In this system, one would not expect polar catastrophe to have a role according to state-of-the-art theory because the interface lacks formal charge discontinuity. However, we observe the formation of a hole gas between the semiconductors SnO and SnO2. To explain these findings, we provide a generalized theory based on the idea that the charge density discontinuity between SnO and SnO2, a consequence of lattice mismatch, drives a polar catastrophe scenario. As a result, SnO/SnO2 (110) interphase boundaries can develop metallicity depending on the grain size. The concept of metallicity due to polar catastrophe induced by charge density discontinuity is of general validity and applies to many interphase boundaries with lattice mismatch.

  17. Evolution of LiFePO4 thin films interphase with electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupré, N.; Cuisinier, M.; Zheng, Y.; Fernandez, V.; Hamon, J.; Hirayama, M.; Kanno, R.; Guyomard, D.

    2018-04-01

    Many parameters may control the growth and the characteristics of the interphase, such as surface structure and morphology, structural defects, grain boundaries, surface reactions, etc. However, polycrystalline surfaces contain these parameters simultaneously, resulting in a quite complicated system to study. Working with model electrode surfaces using crystallographically oriented crystalline thin films appears as a novel and unique approach to understand contributions of preferential orientation and rugosity of the surface. In order to rebuild the interphase architecture along electrochemical cycling, LiFePO4 epitaxial films offering ideal 2D (100) interfaces are here investigated through the use of non-destructive depth profiling by Angular Resolved X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (ARXPS). The composition and structure of the interphase is then monitored upon cycling for samples stopped at the end of charge and discharge for various numbers of cycles, and discussed in the light of combined XPS and X-ray reflectivity (XRR) measurements. Such an approach allows describing the interphase evolution on a specific model LiFePO4 crystallographic orientation and helps understanding the nature and evolution of the LiFePO4/electrolyte interphase forming on the surface of LiFePO4 poly-crystalline powder.

  18. Critical-point nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, R.M.

    2004-01-01

    It has been suggested that a change of nuclear shape may be described in terms of a phase transition and that specific nuclei may lie close to the critical point of the transition. Analytical descriptions of such critical-point nuclei have been introduced recently and they are described briefly. The results of extensive searches for possible examples of critical-point behavior are presented. Alternative pictures, such as describing bands in the candidate nuclei using simple ΔK = 0 and ΔK = 2 rotational-coupling models, are discussed, and the limitations of the different approaches highlighted. A possible critical-point description of the transition from a vibrational to rotational pairing phase is suggested

  19. Replication labeling patterns and chromosome territories typical of mammalian nuclei are conserved in the early metazoan Hydra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrova, Olga; Solovei, Irina; Cremer, Thomas; David, Charles N

    2003-12-01

    To investigate the evolutionary conservation of higher order nuclear architecture previously described for mammalian cells we have analyzed the nuclear architecture of the simple polyp Hydra. These diploblastic organisms have large nuclei (8-10 microm) containing about 3x10(9) bp of DNA organized in 15 chromosome pairs. They belong to the earliest metazoan phylum and are separated from mammals by at least 600 million years. Single and double pulse labeling with halogenated nucleotides (bromodeoxyuridine, iododeoxyuridine and chlorodeoxyuridine) revealed striking similarities to the known sequence of replication labeling patterns in mammalian nuclei. These patterns reflect a persistent nuclear arrangement of early, mid-, and late replicating chromatin foci that could be identified during all stages of interphase over at least 5-10 cell generations. Segregation of labeled chromatids led after several cell divisions to nuclei with single or a few labeled chromosome territories. In such nuclei distinct clusters of labeled chromatin foci were separated by extended nuclear areas with non-labeled chromatin, which is typical of a territorial arrangement of interphase chromosomes. Our results indicate the conservation of fundamental features of higher order chromatin arrangements throughout the evolution of metazoan animals and suggest the existence of conserved mechanism(s) controlling this architecture.

  20. Exotic light nuclei and nuclei in the lead region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poppelier, N.A.F.M.

    1989-01-01

    Three methods are discussed for modifying, or renormalizing, a truncated nuclear hamiltonian such that the wave functions obtained by diagonalizing this modified or effective hamiltoniandescribe the nucleus as well as possible: deriving the hamiltonian directly from a realistic nucleon-nucleon interaction between free nucleons; parametrizing the hamiltonian in terms of a number of parameters and determining these parameters from a least-squares fit of calculated properties to experimental data; approximating the nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction between two nucleons in a nucleus by a simple analytic expression. An effective hamiltonian derived following the second method is applied in a theoretical study of exotic nuclei in the region of Z=2-9 and A=4-30 and the problem of the neutron halo in 11 Li is discussed. Results of shell-model calculations of 20i Pb and nuclei in its neighbourhood are presented in which an effective hamiltonian was employed derived with the last method. The quenching of M1 strength in 208 Pb, and the spectroscopic factors measured in proton knock-out reactions could be described quite satisfactory. Finally, a method is presented for deriving the effective hamiltonian directly from the realistic NN interaction with algebraic techniques. (H.W.). 114 refs.; 34 figs.; 12 tabs.; schemes

  1. Weak interactions with nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walecka, J.D.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclei provide systems where the strong, electomagnetic, and weak interactions are all present. The current picture of the strong interactions is based on quarks and quantum chromodynamics (QCD). The symmetry structure of this theory is SU(3)/sub C/ x SU(2)/sub W/ x U(1)/sub W/. The electroweak interactions in nuclei can be used to probe this structure. Semileptonic weak interactions are considered. The processes under consideration include beta decay, neutrino scattering and weak neutral-current interactions. The starting point in the analysis is the effective Lagrangian of the Standard Model

  2. Quarks in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rho, M.; CEA Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette

    1983-01-01

    Some features of quark degrees of freedom in nuclei are discussed in the light of recent developments in QCD. The principal aim of this talk is to propose, and give a tentative support to, the motion that one can study through nuclear matter different facets of the vacuum structure implied by quantum chromodynamics (QCD). This will be done using the recent (exciting) results obtained in particle physics, in particular lattice gauge calculations. Relevance of this aspect of problem to quark degrees of freedom as well as meson degrees of freedom in nuclei will be discussed. (orig.)

  3. Disintegration of comet nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksanfomality, Leonid V.

    2012-02-01

    The breaking up of comets into separate pieces, each with its own tail, was seen many times by astronomers of the past. The phenomenon was in sharp contrast to the idea of the eternal and unchangeable celestial firmament and was commonly believed to be an omen of impending disaster, especially for comets with tails stretching across half the sky. It is only now that we have efficient enough space exploration tools to see comet nuclei and even - in the particular case of small comet Hartley-2 in 2010 - to watch their disintegration stage. There are also other suspected candidates for disintegration in the vast family of comet nuclei and other Solar System bodies.

  4. Particles and nuclei, letters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The present collection of letters from JINR, Dubna, contains seven separate records on kinematic separation and mass analysis of heavy recoiling nuclei, dynamical effects prior to heavy ion fusion, VACTIV-DELPHI graphical dialog based program for the analysis of gamma-ray spectra, irradiation of nuclear emulsions in relativistic beams of 6 He and 3 H nuclei, optical and structural investigations of PLZT x/65/35 (x = 4, 8 %) ferroelectric ceramics irradiated by a high-current pulsed electron beam, the oscillating charge and first evidence for neutrinoless double beta decay

  5. Particles and nuclei, letters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The present collection of letters from JINR, Dubna, contains seven separate records on physics from extra dimensions, new physics in the new millennium with GENIUS: double beta decay, dark matter, solar neutrinos, the (μ - , e + ) conversion in nuclei mediated by light Majorana neutrinos, exotic muon-to-positron conversion in nuclei: partial transition sum evaluation by using shell model, solar neutrino problem accounting for self consistent magnetohydrodynamics solution for solar magnetic fields, first neutrino observations from the Sudbury neutrino observatory and status report on BOREXINO and results of the muon-background measurements at CERN

  6. Rotational motion in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohr, A.

    1976-01-01

    Nuclear structure theories are reviewed concerned with nuclei rotational motion. The development of the deformed nucleus model facilitated a discovery of rotational spectra of nuclei. Comprehensive verification of the rotational scheme and a successful classification of corresponding spectra stimulated investigations of the rotational movement dynamics. Values of nuclear moments of inertia proved to fall between two marginal values corresponding to rotation of a solid and hydrodynamic pattern of an unrotating flow, respectively. The discovery of governing role of the deformation and a degree of a symmetry violence for determining rotational degrees of freedon is pointed out to pave the way for generalization of the rotational spectra

  7. Intrachromosomal exchange aberrations predicted on the basis of globular interphase chromosome model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreev, S.G.; Eidelman, Yu.A.

    2002-01-01

    One of the key questions in understanding mechanisms of chromosome aberration production is how does interphase chromosome structure affect aberration formation. To explore this a modelling approach is presented which combines Monte Carlo simulation of both a particle track and interphase chromosome structure. The structural state of interphase chromosome influences a dose-effect relationship for intrachromosomal exchange aberrations (intrachanges). It is shown that intrachanges are induced frequently by both X rays and a particles if the chromosome is in the condensed globular but not in the decondensed coiled state. Truly simple intra-arm intrachanges induced by X rays are dose squared in coiled chromosomes, but exhibit linear dose dependence in globular chromosomes. Experimental data on interarm intrachanges obtained by dual arm chromosome painting are analysed by means of the technique presented. Results of analysis support the conclusion about the arms proximity of chromosome 1 in human lymphocytes. (author)

  8. Low dose irradiation performance of SiC interphase SiC/SiC composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snead, L.L.; Lowden, R.A.; Strizak, J.; More, K.L.; Eatherly, W.S.; Bailey, J.; Williams, A.M.; Osborne, M.C.; Shinavski, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    Reduced oxygen Hi-Nicalon fiber reinforced composite SiC materials were densified with a chemically vapor infiltrated (CVI) silicon carbide (SiC) matrix and interphases of either 'porous' SiC or multilayer SiC and irradiated to a neutron fluence of 1.1 x 10 25 n m -2 (E>0.1 MeV) in the temperature range of 260 to 1060 C. The unirradiated properties of these composites are superior to previously studied ceramic grade Nicalon fiber reinforced/carbon interphase materials. Negligible reduction in the macroscopic matrix microcracking stress was observed after irradiation for the multilayer SiC interphase material and a slight reduction in matrix microcracking stress was observed for the composite with porous SiC interphase. The reduction in strength for the porous SiC interfacial material is greatest for the highest irradiation temperature. The ultimate fracture stress (in four point bending) following irradiation for the multilayer SiC and porous SiC interphase materials was reduced by 15% and 30%, respectively, which is an improvement over the 40% reduction suffered by irradiated ceramic grade Nicalon fiber materials fabricated in a similar fashion, though with a carbon interphase. The degradation of the mechanical properties of these composites is analyzed by comparison with the irradiation behavior of bare Hi-Nicalon fiber and Morton chemically vapor deposited (CVD) SiC. It is concluded that the degradation of these composites, as with the previous generation ceramic grade Nicalon fiber materials, is dominated by interfacial effects, though the overall degradation of fiber and hence composite is reduced for the newer low-oxygen fiber. (orig.)

  9. Electrochemical Interphases for High-Energy Storage Using Reactive Metal Anodes

    KAUST Repository

    Wei, Shuya

    2017-12-11

    Conspectus Stable electrochemical interphases play a critical role in regulating transport of mass and charge in all electrochemical energy storage (EES) systems. In state-of-the-art rechargeable lithium ion batteries, they are rarely formed by design but instead spontaneously emerge from electrochemical degradation of electrolyte and electrode components. High-energy secondary batteries that utilize reactive metal anodes (e.g., Li, Na, Si, Sn, Al) to store large amounts of charge by alloying and/or electrodeposition reactions introduce fundamental challenges that require rational design in order to stabilize the interphases. Chemical instability of the electrodes in contact with electrolytes, morphological instability of the metal–electrolyte interface upon plating and stripping, and hydrodynamic-instability-induced electroconvection of the electrolyte at high currents are all known to cause metal electrode–electrolyte interfaces to continuously evolve in morphology, uniformity, and composition. Additionally, metal anodes undergo large changes in volume during lithiation and delithiation, which means that even in the rare cases where spontaneously formed solid electrode–electrolyte interphases (SEIs) are in thermodynamic equilibrium with the electrode, the SEI is under dynamic strain, which inevitably leads to cracking and/or rupture during extended battery cycling. There is an urgent need for interphases that are able to overcome each of these sources of instability with minimal losses of electrolyte and electrode components. Complementary chemical synthesis strategies are likewise urgently needed to create self-limited and mechanically durable SEIs that are able to flex and shrink to accommodate volume change. These needs are acute for practically relevant cells that cannot utilize large excesses of anode and electrolyte as employed in proof-of-concept-type experiments reported in the scientific literature. This disconnect between practical needs and

  10. Nucleolus degradation and growth induced by uv-microbeam irradiation of interphase cells grown in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakharov, V.N.; Voronkova, N.

    1976-01-01

    In contrast to total cell irradiation, local UV-microbeam irradiation can stimulate a significant diminution in the irradiated mature nucleoli in interphase mammalian cells in culture. This diminution is accompanied by the concomitant expansion of the unirradiated nucleoli within the same nucleus, and the total nucleolar volume per nucleus does not change appreciably. It is suggested that these nucleolar volume changes are the result of the dispersion, migration, and redistribution of the nucleolar material between competitive nucleolar organizer regions of the interphase nucleus

  11. Symmetries and nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henley, E.M.

    1987-01-01

    Nuclei are very useful for testing symmetries, and for studies of symmetry breaking. This thesis is illustrated for two improper space-time transformations, parity and time-reversal and for one internal symmetry: charge symmetry and independence. Recent progress and present interest is reviewed. 23 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Electroweak interactions in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henley, E.M.

    1984-06-01

    Topics include: introduction to electroweak theory; the Weinberg-Salam theory for leptons; the Weinberg-Salam theory for hadrons-the GIM mechanism; electron scattering as a probe of the electroweak interaction (observation of PV, the weak interaction for nucleons, and parity violation in atoms); and time reversed invariance and electric dipole moments of nucleons, nuclei, and atoms. 52 references

  13. Transfer involving deformed nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, J.O.; Guidry, M.W.; Canto, L.F.

    1985-03-01

    Results are reviewed of 1- and 2-neutron transfer reactions at near-barrier energies for deformed nuclei. Rotational angular momentum and excitation patterns are examined. A strong tendency to populating high spin states within a few MeV of the yrast line is noted, and it is interpreted as preferential transfer to rotation-aligned states. 16 refs., 12 figs

  14. Nucleons in nuclei (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laget, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    This summary is a review of our understanding of nuclei in terms of hadrons exchanging mesons. The open problems are: the determination of the high momentum components of nuclear systems, the role of the three-body forces and the nature of the short range correlations. The ways of studying these problems are discussed

  15. Electromagnetic structure of nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, R.G.

    1986-07-01

    A brief review is given of selected topics in the electromagnetic structure of nucleons and nuclei, including nucleon form factors from both quantum chromodynamics and electron scattering data, measurements of the deuteron and triton form factors, quasi-elastic scattering, and the EMC effect. 47 refs., 13 figs

  16. Rotational motion in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohr, A.

    1977-01-01

    History is surveyed of the development of the theory of rotational states in nuclei. The situation in the 40's when ideas formed of the collective states of a nucleus is evoked. The general rotation theory and the relation between the single-particle and rotational motion are briefly discussed. Future prospects of the rotation theory development are indicated. (I.W.)

  17. Mesons and light nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truhlik, E.; Mach, R.

    1992-01-01

    62 papers and one summary talk were presented at the conference, on subject matters in between nuclear physics (mainly light nuclei) and elementary particle physics, as indicated by the session headings (1) Electroweak nuclear interaction (2) Nuclear physics with pions and antiprotons (3) Nuclear physics with strange particles (4) Relativistic nuclear physics (5) Quark degrees of freedom. (Quittner)

  18. Radii of radioactive nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittig, W.; Plagnol, E.; Schutz, Y.

    1989-11-01

    A new simple direct method for the measurement of the total reaction cross section (σ R ) for several light radioactive nuclei (A≤40) is developed. From that, the reduced strong absorption radii (r o 2 ) are obtained. A comparison is made with data obtained by other techniques. A strong isospin dependence of the nuclear radii is observed. (L.C.) [pt

  19. Alpha clustering in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodgson, P.E.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of nucleon clustering in nuclei are described, with reference to both nuclear structure and nuclear reactions, and the advantages of using the cluster formalism to describe a range of phenomena are discussed. It is shown that bound and scattering alpha-particle states can be described in a unified way using an energy-dependent alpha-nucleus potential. (author)

  20. Particles, imaging and nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, J.

    1986-01-01

    The book on particles, imaging and nuclei is one of the Background Readers for the Revised Nuffield Advanced Physics course. The contents contain five educational articles, which extend concepts covered in the course and examine recent developments in physics. Four of the articles on:- particles and the forces of nature, radioisotopes, lasers probe the atomic nucleus, and nuclear history, are indexed separately. (UK)

  1. The decay of hot nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moretto, L.G.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1988-11-01

    The formation of hot compound nuclei in intermediate-energy heavy ion reactions is discussed. The statistical decay of such compound nuclei is responsible for the abundant emission of complex fragments and high energy gamma rays. 43 refs., 23 figs

  2. Isotope shifts in unstable nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebel, H.

    1980-05-01

    Current experimental investigations of isotope shifts in atomic spectra of unstable nuclei and the resulting information about size and shape of nuclei far off stability are discussed with reference to some representative examples. (orig.)

  3. Interferometric measurements of dry mass content in nuclei and cytoplasm in the life cycle of antheridial filaments cells of Chara vulgaris L. in their successive developmental stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Kuran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Interferometric measurements of the nucleus and cytoplasm dry mass during interphase in the successive stages of development of antheridial filaments of Chara vulgaris demonstrated that the dry mass and surface area of cell nuclei double in size in each of the successive generations of the filaments, whereas neither the surface nor the dry mass of the cytoplasm increase in such proportion in the same period. In the successive stages of development of the antheridial filaments the dry mass and surface area of the nuclei and cytoplasm gradually diminish.

  4. Energetic Nuclei, Superdensity and Biomedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldin, A. M.

    1977-01-01

    High-energy, relativistic nuclei were first observed in cosmic rays. Studing these nuclei has provided an opportunity for analyzing the composition of cosmic rays and for experimentally verifying principles governing the behavior of nuclear matter at high and super-high temperatures. Medical research using accelerated nuclei is suggested.…

  5. Particle-rotation coupling in atomic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almberger, J.

    1980-01-01

    Recently an increased interest in the rotational nuclei has been spurred by the new experimental high-spin activities and by the possibilities for lower spins to interpret an impressive amount of experimental data by some comparatively simple model calculations. The author discusses the particle modes of excitation for rotational nuclei in the pairing regime where some puzzles in the theoretical description remain to be resolved. A model comparison is made between the particle-rotor and cranking models which have different definitions of the collective rotation. The cranking model is found to imply a smaller value of the quasiparticle spin alignment than the particle-rotor model. Rotational spectra for both even and odd nuclei are investigated with the use of the many-BCS-quasiparticles plus rotor model. This model gives an accurate description of the ground and S-bands in many even-even rare-earth nuclei. However, the discrepancies for odd-A nuclei between theory and experiments point to the importance of additional physical components. Therefore the rotationally induced quadrupole pair field is considered. This field has an effect on the low spin states in odd-A nuclei, but is not sufficient to account for the experimental data. Another topic considered is the interaction matrix element in crossings for given spin between quasiparticle rotational bands. The matrix elements are found to oscillate as a function of the number of particles, thereby influencing the sharpness of the backbending. Finally the low-spin continuation of the S-band is studied and it is shown that such states can be populated selectively by means of one-particle pickup reactions involving high angular momentum transfer. (Auth.)

  6. Metallicity at interphase boundaries due to polar catastrophe induced by charge density discontinuity

    KAUST Repository

    Albar, Arwa; Tahini, Hassan Ali; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2018-01-01

    the electronic states at stoichiometric SnO/SnO2 (110) interphase boundaries. In this system, one would not expect polar catastrophe to have a role according to state-of-the-art theory because the interface lacks formal charge discontinuity. However, we observe

  7. Three-Dimensional Organization of Chromosome Territories and the Human Interphase Cell Nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias); C. Münkel (Christian); J. Langowski (Jörg)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractTo study the three-dimensional organization of chromosome territories and the human interphase cell nucleus we developed models which could be compared to experiments. Despite the successful linear sequencing of the human genome its 3D-organization is widely unknown. Using Monte

  8. Demonstrating the Effect of Interphase Mass Transfer in a Transparent Fluidized Bed Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saayman, Jean; Nicol, Willie

    2011-01-01

    A demonstration experiment is described that employs the ozone decomposition reaction at ambient conditions on Fe2O3 impregnated Fluidized Catalytic Cracking (FCC) catalyst. Using a two-dimensional see-through column the importance of interphase mass transfer is clearly illustrated by the significant difference in ozone conversion between the…

  9. Three-dimensional organization of the human interphase nucleus: Experiments compared to simulations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias); C. Münkel (Christian); W. Waldeck (Waldemar); J. Langowski (Jörg)

    2000-01-01

    markdownabstractDespite the successful linear sequencing of the human genome its three-dimensional structure is widely unknown, although it is important for gene regulation and replication. For a long time the interphase nucleus has been viewed as a 'spaghetti soup' of DNA without much internal

  10. Control of the interphase interaction and morphology in the organic-inorganic polymer nanocomposites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matějka, Libor; Murias, Piotr

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 10 (2010), s. 45-50 ISSN 1934-8959 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400500701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : organic-inorganic polymer * interphase interaction * nanocomposite Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry http://www.davidpublishing.com

  11. Disintegration of comet nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ksanfomality, Leonid V

    2012-01-01

    The breaking up of comets into separate pieces, each with its own tail, was seen many times by astronomers of the past. The phenomenon was in sharp contrast to the idea of the eternal and unchangeable celestial firmament and was commonly believed to be an omen of impending disaster, especially for comets with tails stretching across half the sky. It is only now that we have efficient enough space exploration tools to see comet nuclei and even - in the particular case of small comet Hartley-2 in 2010 - to watch their disintegration stage. There are also other suspected candidates for disintegration in the vast family of comet nuclei and other Solar System bodies. (physics of our days)

  12. Pions scatter by nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huefner, J.

    1975-01-01

    Are pions a good tool to study nuclei. If the emphasis of this question rests on ''tool'', the answer must be ''not yet.'' The reason: one does not even understand how a pion interacts with a nucleus. This is part of the many-body problem for strongly interacting particles and its study is a basic problem in physics. One must investigate questions like: Can one understand pion-nucleus interactions from pion-nucleon physics. How does a Δ-resonance look in nuclei. Once one has solved those basic problems, there will be spinoffs in medical, technical and nuclear areas. Then pions can be used as a tool to study nuclear properties

  13. Chaos in collective nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whelan, N.D.

    1993-01-01

    Random Matrix Theory successfully describes the statistics of the low-lying spectra of some nuclei but not of others. It is currently believed that this theory applies to systems in which the corresponding classical motion is chaotic. This conjecture is tested for collective nuclei by studying the Interacting Boson Model. Quantum and classical measures of chaos are proposed and found to be in agreement throughout the parameter space of the model. For some parameter values the measures indicate the presence of a previously unknown approximate symmetry. A phenomenon called partial dynamical symmetry is explored and shown to lead to a suppression of chaos. A time dependent function calculated from the quantum spectrum is discussed. This function is sensitive to the extent of chaos and provides a robust method of analyzing experimental spectra

  14. Chaotic behavior in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchel, G.; Shriner, J.

    2005-01-01

    Although the predictions of Random Matrix Theory (RMT) were available by the early 1960s, data of sufficiently high quality to adequately test the theory were only obtained a decade later by Rainwater. It was another decade later that Bohigas, Haq and Pandey combined the best available nuclear resonance data - the Columbia neutron resonances in heavy nuclei and the TUNL proton resonances in lighter nuclei - to form the Nuclear Data Ensemble. They obtained excellent agreement for the level statistics with the RMT predictions. The expected Porter-Thomas (PT) distribution was considered very early. However, since the widths (amplitudes squared) are measured, the predicted Gaussian distribution for the amplitudes was only qualitatively confirmed. A much more sensitive test was performed by measuring two widths and the relative phase between the two amplitudes. By comparison of the width and amplitude correlations, the Gaussian distribution was confirmed at the 1% level. Following the Bohigas conjecture - that quantum analogs of classically chaotic systems obey RMT - there was an explosion of activity utilizing level statistics in many different quantum systems. In nuclei the focus was verifying the range of applicability of RMT. Of particular interest was the effect of collectivity and of excitation energy on statistical properties. The effect of symmetry breaking on level statistics was examined and early predictions by Dyson were confirmed. The effect of symmetry breaking on the width distribution was also measured for the first time. Although heuristic arguments predicted no change from the PT distribution, experimentally there was a large deviation from the PT prediction. Later theoretical efforts were consistent with this result. The stringent conditions placed on the experiments - for eigenvalue tests the data need to be essentially perfect (few or no missing levels or mis assigned quantum numbers) - has limited the amount of suitable experimental data. The

  15. Structures of exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    Discoveries of many different types of nuclear shape coexistence are being found at both low and high excitation energies throughout the periodic table, as documented in recent reviews. Many new types of shape coexistence have been observed at low excitation energies, for examples bands on more than four different overlapping and coexisting shapes are observed in 185 Au, and competing triaxial and prolate shapes in 71 Se and 176 Pt. Discrete states in super-deformed bands with deformations β 2 ∼ 0.4-0.6, coexisting with other shapes, have been seen to high spin up to 60ℎ in 152 Dy, 132 Ce and 135 Nd. Super-deformed nuclei with N and Z both around 38 and around Z = 38, N ≥ 60. These data led to the discovery of new shell gaps and magic numbers of 38 for N and Z and 60 for N but now for deformed shapes. Marked differences in structure are observed at spins of 6 to 20 in nuclei in this region, which differ by only two protons; for example, 68 Ge and 70 Se. The differences are thought to be related to the competing shell gaps in these nuclei

  16. Elusive active galactic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiolino, R.; Comastri, A.; Gilli, R.; Nagar, N. M.; Bianchi, S.; Böker, T.; Colbert, E.; Krabbe, A.; Marconi, A.; Matt, G.; Salvati, M.

    2003-10-01

    A fraction of active galactic nuclei do not show the classical Seyfert-type signatures in their optical spectra, i.e. they are optically `elusive'. X-ray observations are an optimal tool to identify this class of objects. We combine new Chandra observations with archival X-ray data in order to obtain a first estimate of the fraction of elusive active galactic nuclei (AGN) in local galaxies and to constrain their nature. Our results suggest that elusive AGN have a local density comparable to or even higher than optically classified Seyfert nuclei. Most elusive AGN are heavily absorbed in the X-rays, with gas column densities exceeding 1024 cm-2, suggesting that their peculiar nature is associated with obscuration. It is likely that in elusive AGN the nuclear UV source is completely embedded and the ionizing photons cannot escape, which prevents the formation of a classical narrow-line region. Elusive AGN may contribute significantly to the 30-keV bump of the X-ray background.

  17. Actin and Arp2/3 localize at the centrosome of interphase cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubert, Thomas; Vandekerckhove, Joel; Gettemans, Jan, E-mail: jan.gettemans@vib-ugent.be

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Actin was detected at the centrosome with the anti-actin antibody 1C7 that recognizes antiparallel ('lower dimer') actin dimers. {yields} Centrosomal actin was found in interphase but not mitotic MDA-MB-231 cells. {yields} Neither the anti-actin antibody C4 that binds to globular, monomer actin, nor the anti-actin antibody 2G2 that recognizes the nuclear conformation of actin detect actin at the centrosome. {yields} The Arp2/3 complex transiently localizes at the pericentriolar matrix but not at the centrioles of interphase HEK 293T cells. -- Abstract: Although many actin binding proteins such as cortactin and the Arp2/3 activator WASH localize at the centrosome, the presence and conformation of actin at the centrosome has remained elusive. Here, we report the localization of actin at the centrosome in interphase but not in mitotic MDA-MB-231 cells. Centrosomal actin was detected with the anti-actin antibody 1C7 that recognizes antiparallel ('lower dimer') actin dimers. In addition, we report the transient presence of the Arp2/3 complex at the pericentriolar matrix but not at the centrioles of interphase HEK 293T cells. Overexpression of an Arp2/3 component resulted in expansion of the pericentriolar matrix and selective accumulation of the Arp2/3 component in the pericentriolar matrix. Altogether, we hypothesize that the centrosome transiently recruits Arp2/3 to perform processes such as centrosome separation prior to mitotic entry, whereas the observed constitutive centrosomal actin staining in interphase cells reinforces the current model of actin-based centrosome reorientation toward the leading edge in migrating cells.

  18. Actin and Arp2/3 localize at the centrosome of interphase cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubert, Thomas; Vandekerckhove, Joel; Gettemans, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Actin was detected at the centrosome with the anti-actin antibody 1C7 that recognizes antiparallel ('lower dimer') actin dimers. → Centrosomal actin was found in interphase but not mitotic MDA-MB-231 cells. → Neither the anti-actin antibody C4 that binds to globular, monomer actin, nor the anti-actin antibody 2G2 that recognizes the nuclear conformation of actin detect actin at the centrosome. → The Arp2/3 complex transiently localizes at the pericentriolar matrix but not at the centrioles of interphase HEK 293T cells. -- Abstract: Although many actin binding proteins such as cortactin and the Arp2/3 activator WASH localize at the centrosome, the presence and conformation of actin at the centrosome has remained elusive. Here, we report the localization of actin at the centrosome in interphase but not in mitotic MDA-MB-231 cells. Centrosomal actin was detected with the anti-actin antibody 1C7 that recognizes antiparallel ('lower dimer') actin dimers. In addition, we report the transient presence of the Arp2/3 complex at the pericentriolar matrix but not at the centrioles of interphase HEK 293T cells. Overexpression of an Arp2/3 component resulted in expansion of the pericentriolar matrix and selective accumulation of the Arp2/3 component in the pericentriolar matrix. Altogether, we hypothesize that the centrosome transiently recruits Arp2/3 to perform processes such as centrosome separation prior to mitotic entry, whereas the observed constitutive centrosomal actin staining in interphase cells reinforces the current model of actin-based centrosome reorientation toward the leading edge in migrating cells.

  19. Chiral bags, skyrmions and quarks in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rho, M.

    1984-09-01

    Recent developments on an intriguing connection between the quark-bag description of the baryons (nucleons in particular) and the Skyrmion model are discussed in terms of the constraints coming from chiral anomalies. Topics treated are the leaking baryon charge, axial charge and energy density; the role of chiral anomalies; the role of Skyrme's quartic term and the connection to the meson degrees of freedom; and finally some qualitative implications in nuclei. The presentation is purposely descriptive and intuitive instead of mathematically precise

  20. Quantitative Study of Interface/Interphase in Epoxy/Graphene-Based Nanocomposites by Combining STEM and EELS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Hamon, Ann-Lenaig; Haghi-Ashtiani, Paul; Reiss, Thomas; Fan, Benhui; He, Delong; Bai, Jinbo

    2016-12-14

    A quantitative study of the interphase and interface of graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs)/epoxy and graphene oxide (GO)/epoxy was carried out by combining scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). The interphase regions between GNPs and epoxy matrix were clearly identified by the discrepancy of the plasmon peak positions in the low energy-loss spectra due to different valence electron densities. The spectrum acquisitions were carried out along lines across the interface. An interphase thickness of 13 and 12.5 nm was measured for GNPs/epoxy and GO/epoxy, respectively. The density of the GNPs/epoxy interphase was 2.89% higher than that of the epoxy matrix. However, the density of the GO/epoxy interphase was 1.37% lower than that of the epoxy matrix. The interphase layer thickness measured in this work is in good agreement with the transition layer theory, which proposed an area with modulus linearly varying across a finite width. The results provide an insight into the interphase for carbon-based polymer composites that can help to design the functionalization of nanofillers to improve the composite properties.

  1. Structure functions of nucleons and nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bentz, Wolfgang; Ito, Takuya [Department of Physics, Tokai University, Kanagawa (Japan); Cloet, Ian [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle (United States); Thomas, Anthony [Jefferson Lab., Newport News, VA (United States); Yazaki, Koichi [RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama (Japan)

    2009-07-01

    We use an effective chiral quark theory to calculate the quark distributions and structure functions of nucleons and nuclei. The description of the single nucleon is based on the Faddeev framework, and nuclear systems are described in the mean field approximation. Particular amphasis is put on the prediction of the polarized EMC effect in nuclei, and on applications to deep inelastic neutrino-nucleus scattering. Concerning the polarized EMC effect, we discuss the quenching of the quark spin sum in nuclei and its implications for the spin dependent nuclear structure functions, and present results for several nuclei where an experimental observation is feasible. Concerning the case of deep inelastic neutrino-nucleus scattering, we estimate the effect of medium modifications of the quark distribution functions on the measured cross sections, and discuss an interesting resolution of the so called NuTeV anomaly. Finally, we discuss extensions of our model to describe fragmentation functions for semi-inclusive processes. The connection between our effective quark model description and the jet model of Field and Feynman is discussed.

  2. Nuclei transmutation by collisions with fast hadrons and nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strugalski, Z.; Strugalska-Gola, E.; Drzymala, A.

    1998-01-01

    Atomic nuclei change their mass- and charge-numbers if bombarded by fast hadrons and nuclei; the transmutation appears as a complicated process. It proceeds in a definite way - through a few stages or phases. Adequate identification of the nucleons and light nuclear fragments emitted and evaporated in a hadron-nucleus or nucleus-nucleus collisions and in the collision-induced intranuclear reactions allows one to estimate quantitatively the nuclei transmutations in the various stages (phases) of the process

  3. Anomalous carbon nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasparian, A.P.

    1984-01-01

    Results are presented from a bubble chamber experiment to search for anomalous mean free path (MFP) phenomena for secondary multicharged fragments (Zsub(f)=5 and 6) of the beam carbon nucleus at 4.2 GeV/c per nucleon. A total of 50000 primary interactions of carbon with propane (C 3 H 8 ) were created. Approximately 6000 beam tragments with charges Zsub(f)=5 and 6 were analyzed in detail to find out an anomalous decrease of MFP. The anomaly is observed only for secondary 12 C nuclei

  4. Particles and nuclei, letters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The present collection of letters from JINR, Dubna, contains eight separate records on the interaction of high energy Λ 6 He hypernuclear beams with atomic nuclei, the position-sensitive detector of a high spatial resolution on the basis of a multiwire gas electron multiplier, pseudorapidity hadron density at the LHC energy, high precision laser control of the ATLAS tile-calorimeter module mass production at JINR, a new approach to ECG's features recognition involving neural network, subcriticity of a uranium target enriched in 235 U, beam space charge effects in high-current cyclotron injector CI-5, a homogeneous static gravitational field and the principle of equivalence

  5. Active galactic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Beckmann, Volker

    2012-01-01

    This AGN textbook includes phenomena based on new results in the X-Ray domain from new telescopes such as Chandra and XMM Newton not mentioned in any other book. Furthermore, it considers also the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope with its revolutionary advances of unprecedented sensitivity, field of view and all-sky monitoring. Those and other new developments as well as simulations of AGN merging events and formations, enabled through latest super-computing capabilities. The book gives an overview on the current knowledge of the Active Galacitc Nuclei phenomenon. The spectral energy d

  6. Particles and nuclei, letters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The present collection of letters from JINR, Dubna, contains six separate records on the DELPHI experiment at LEP, the Fermi-surface dynamics of rotating nuclei, production of large samples of the silica dioxide aerogel in the 37-litre autoclave and test of its optical properties, preliminary radiation resource results on scintillating fibers, a new algorithm for the direct transformation method of time to digital with the high time resolution and development and design of analogue read-out electronics for HADES drift chamber system

  7. Cumulation of light nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldin, A.M.; Bondarev, V.K.; Golovanov, L.B.

    1977-01-01

    Limit fragmentation of light nuclei (deuterium, helium) bombarded with 8,6 GeV/c protons was investigated. Fragments (pions, protons and deuterons) were detected within the emission angle 50-150 deg with regard to primary protons and within the pulse range 150-180 MeV/c. By the kinematics of collision of a primary proton with a target at rest the fragments observed correspond to a target mass upto 3 GeV. Thus, the data obtained correspond to teh cumulation upto the third order

  8. Active galactic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Blandford, RD; Woltjer, L

    1990-01-01

    Starting with this volume, the Lecture Notes of the renowned Advanced Courses of the Swiss Society for Astrophysics and Astronomy will be published annually. In each course, three extensive lectures given by leading experts in their respective fields cover different and essential aspects of the subject. The 20th course, held at Les Diablerets in April 1990, dealt with current research on active galactic nuclei; it represents the most up-to-date views on the subject, presented with particular regard for clarity. The previous courses considered a wide variety of subjects, beginning with ""Theory

  9. Exotic nuclei and radioactive beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chomaz, P.

    1996-01-01

    The Nuclei called exotic are all the nuclei that it is necessary to recreate in laboratory to study them. Their life time is too short -in relation to earth age- for it remains enough on earth. The researchers are going to have at their s disposal at GANIL (Caen) with the S.P.I.R.A.L. project, exotic nuclei beams and will study new kinds of nuclear reactions to better understand the atom nucleus. (N.C.). 2 refs., 9 figs

  10. Isolation of Nuclei and Nucleoli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendle, Alison F; Shaw, Peter J

    2017-01-01

    Here we describe methods for producing nuclei from Arabidopsis suspension cultures or root tips of Arabidopsis, wheat, or pea. These methods could be adapted for other species and cell types. The resulting nuclei can be further purified for use in biochemical or proteomic studies, or can be used for microscopy. We also describe how the nuclei can be used to obtain a preparation of nucleoli.

  11. Theory of magic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nosov, V.G.; Kamchatnov, A.M.

    A consistent theory of the shell and magic oscillations of the masses of spherical nuclei is developed on the basis of the Fermi liquid concept of the energy spectrum of nuclear matter. A ''magic'' relationship between the system's dimensions and the limiting momentum of the quasi-particle distribution is derived; an integer number of the de Broglie half-waves falls on the nuclear diameter. An expression for the discontinuity in the nucleon binding energy in the vicinity of a magic nucleus is obtained. The role of the residual interaction is analyzed. It is shown that the width of the Fermi-surface diffuseness due to the residual interaction is proportional to the squared vector of the quasi-particle orbital angular momentum. The values of the corresponding proportionality factors (the coupling constant for quasi particles) are determined from the experimental data for 52 magic nuclei. The rapid drop of the residual interaction with increasing nuclear size is demonstrated. (7 figures, 3 tables) (U.S.)

  12. Stability of superheavy nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomorski, K.; Nerlo-Pomorska, B.; Bartel, J.; Schmitt, C.

    2018-03-01

    The potential-energy surfaces of an extended set of heavy and superheavy even-even nuclei with 92 ≤Z ≤126 and isospins 40 ≤N -Z ≤74 are evaluated within the recently developed Fourier shape parametrization. Ground-state and decay properties are studied for 324 different even-even isotopes in a four-dimensional deformation space, defined by nonaxiality, quadrupole, octupole, and hexadecapole degrees of freedom. Nuclear deformation energies are evaluated in the framework of the macroscopic-microscopic approach, with the Lublin-Strasbourg drop model and a Yukawa-folded mean-field potential. The evolution of the ground-state equilibrium shape (and possible isomeric, metastable states) is studied as a function of Z and N . α -decay Q values and half-lives, as well as fission-barrier heights, are deduced. In order to understand the transition from asymmetric to symmetric fission along the Fm isotopic chain, the properties of all identified fission paths are investigated. Good agreement is found with experimental data wherever available. New interesting features about the population of different fission modes for nuclei beyond Fm are predicted.

  13. Cluster structures in light nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiuchi, H.

    2000-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Clustering in neutron-rich nuclei is discussed. To understand the novel features (1,2,3) of the clustering in neutron-rich nuclei, the basic features of the clustering in stable nuclei (4) are briefly reviewed. In neutron-rich nuclei, the requirement of the stability of clusters is questioned and the threshold rule is no more obeyed. Examples of clustering in Be and B isotopes (4,5) are discussed in some detail. Possible existence of novel type of clustering near neutron dripline is suggested (1). (author)

  14. Computational modeling of elastic properties of carbon nanotube/polymer composites with interphase regions. Part II: Mechanical modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Fei; Azdoud, Yan; Lubineau, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    We present two modeling approaches for predicting the macroscopic elastic properties of carbon nanotubes/polymer composites with thick interphase regions at the nanotube/matrix frontier. The first model is based on local continuum mechanics

  15. Mechanical characterization of Si-C(O) fiber/SiC (CVI) matrix composites with a BN-interphase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prouhet, S.; Camus, G.; Labrugere, C.; Guette, A.; Martin, E.

    1994-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of three CVI-processed 2D woven SiC/BN/SiC composite materials with different initial BN interphase thicknesses has been investigated by means of tensile and impact tests. The results have established the efficiency of a BN interphase in promoting a nonlinear/noncatastrophic tensile behavior and high impact resistance. The effect of the initial BN interphase thickness on the resulting mechanical behavior has also been demonstrated. AES and TEM has revealed the presence of a SiO 2 /C double layer at the BN/fiber interface, which might result from a decomposition undergone by the Si-C(O) Nicalon fiber during processing. It has been suggested that the influence of the initial BN interphase thickness on the mechanical properties of the composites results from both changes occurring in the composition and morphology of the interfacial zones and modifications of the interfacial forces due to accommodation of the radial residual clamping stress

  16. Level structures in Yb nuclei far from stable nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashizume, Akira

    1982-01-01

    Applying n-γ, γ-γ coincidence techniques, the excited levels in 158 Yb and in 157 Yb nuclei were studied. Stress is placed ona neutron detection technique to assign (HI,xn) reactions which produce the nuclei far from β stability line. (author)

  17. Simple interphase drag model for numerical two-fluid modeling of two-phase flow systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chow, H.; Ransom, V.H.

    1984-01-01

    The interphase drag model that has been developed for RELAP5/MOD2 is based on a simple formulation having flow regime maps for both horizontal and vertical flows. The model is based on a conventional semi-empirical formulation that includes the product of drag coefficient, interfacial area, and relative dynamic pressure. The interphase drag model is implemented in the RELAP5/MOD2 light water reactor transient analysis code and has been used to simulate a variety of separate effects experiments to assess the model accuracy. The results from three of these simulations, the General Electric Company small vessel blowdown experiment, Dukler and Smith's counter-current flow experiment, and a Westinghouse Electric Company FLECHT-SEASET forced reflood experiment, are presented and discussed

  18. Orientation of nuclei excited by polarized neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lifshits, E.P.

    1986-01-01

    Polarization and radiation angular distribution of oriented nuclei in inelastic scattering of polarized neutrons were investigated. Nucleus orientation in the final state was described by polarization density matrix (PDM). If PDM is known, angular distributions, linear and circular polarization of γ-quanta emitted by a nucleus can be determined. Analytical expression for PDM, conditions of its diagonalization in the case of direct nucleus excitation and excitation by the stage of compound nucleus were obtained. Orientation of 12 C nuclei in the excited state 4.439 MeV, 2 + at energy of incident neutrons in the laboratory system from 4.8 MeV (excitation threshold) upt to 9 MeV was calculated as an example. Neutrons in initial state are completely polarized along Z axis. Calculations showed that excitation proceeds mainly by the stage of compound nucleus formation and 12 C nucleus is highly polarized in excited state

  19. An assessment of the annular flow transition criteria and interphase friction models in RELAP5/MOD2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putney, J.M.

    1989-02-01

    An assessment of the annular flow transition criteria and interphase friction models for two-phase flow in tubes used in RELAP5/MOD2 code is described. The assessment examines the theoretical bases for the criteria and models and considers the results of comparisons with experimental data. Several deficiencies in the transition criteria are identified and appropriate improvements proposed. The interphase friction models are found to be adequate for PWR analyses. (author)

  20. Effect of Interfacial Bonding on Interphase Properties in SiO2/Epoxy Nanocomposite: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhikun; Lv, Qiang; Chen, Shenghui; Li, Chunling; Sun, Shuangqing; Hu, Songqing

    2016-03-23

    Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to explore the effect of interfacial bonding on the interphase properties of a nanocomposite system that consists of a silica nanoparticle and the highly cross-linked epoxy matrix. For the structural properties, results show that interfacial covalent bonding can broaden the interphase region by increasing the radial effect range of fluctuated mass density and oriented chains, as well as strengthen the interphase region by improving the thermal stability of interfacial van der Waals excluded volume and reducing the proportion of cis conformers of epoxy segments. The improved thermal stability of the interphase region in the covalently bonded model results in an increase of ∼21 K in the glass transition temperature (Tg) compared to that of the pure epoxy. It is also found that interfacial covalent bonding mainly restricts the volume thermal expansion of the model at temperatures near or larger than Tg. Furthermore, investigations from mean-square displacement and fraction of immobile atoms point out that interfacial covalent and noncovalent bonding induces lower and higher mobility of interphase atoms than that of the pure epoxy, respectively. The obtained critical interfacial bonding ratio when the interphase and matrix atoms have the same mobility is 5.8%. These results demonstrate that the glass transitions of the interphase and matrix will be asynchronous when the interfacial bonding ratio is not 5.8%. Specifically, the interphase region will trigger the glass transition of the matrix when the ratio is larger than 5.8%, whereas it restrains the glass transition of the matrix when the ratio is smaller than 5.8%.

  1. Ase1p Organizes Antiparallel Microtubule Arrays during Interphase and Mitosis in Fission YeastV⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Loïodice, Isabelle; Staub, Jayme; Setty, Thanuja Gangi; Nguyen, Nam-Phuong T.; Paoletti, Anne; Tran, P. T.

    2005-01-01

    Proper microtubule organization is essential for cellular processes such as organelle positioning during interphase and spindle formation during mitosis. The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe presents a good model for understanding microtubule organization. We identify fission yeast ase1p, a member of the conserved ASE1/PRC1/MAP65 family of microtubule bundling proteins, which functions in organizing the spindle midzone during mitosis. Using fluorescence live cell imaging, we show that ...

  2. Influence of crystallography and bonding on the structure and migration of irrational interphase boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaronson, H. I.

    2006-03-01

    Interphase boundary structure developed during precipitation from solid solution and during massive transformations is considered in diverse alloy systems in the presence of differences in stacking sequence across interphase boundaries. Linear misfit compensating defects, including misfit dislocations, structural disconnections, and misfit disconnections, are present over a wide range of crystallographie when both phases have metallic bonding. Misfit dislocations have also been observed when both phases have covalent bonding ( e.g., US: β US2 by Sole and van der Walt). These defects are also found when one phase is ionic and the other is metallic (Nb∶Al2O3 by Rühle et al.), albeit when the latter is formed by vapor deposition. However, when bonding is metallic in one phase but significantly covalent in the other, the structure of the interphase boundary appears to depend upon the strength of the covalent bonding relative to that in the metallically bonded phase. When this difference is large, growth can take place as if it were occurring at a free surface, resulting in orientation relationships that are irrational and conjugate habit planes that are ill matched ( e.g., ZrN: α Zr-N by Li et al. and Xe(solid):Al-Xe by Kishida and Yamaguchi). At lower levels of bonding directionality and strength, crystallography is again irrational, but now edge-to-edge-based low-energy structures can replace linear misfit compensating defects (γm:TiAl:αTi-Al by Reynolds et al.). In the perhaps still smaller difference case of Widmanstätten cementite precipitated from austenite, one orientation relationship yields plates with linear misfit compensating defects at their broad faces whereas another (presumably nucleated at different types of site) produces laths with poorly defined shapes and interfacial structures. Hence, Hume-Rothery-type bonding considerations can markedly affect interphase boundary structure and thus the mechanisms, kinetics, and morphology of growth.

  3. Influence of the Processing Parameters on the Fiber-Matrix-Interphase in Short Glass Fiber-Reinforced Thermoplastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Katharina Sambale

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The interphase in short fiber thermoplastic composites is defined as a three-dimensional, several hundred nanometers-wide boundary region at the interface of fibers and the polymer matrix, exhibiting altered mechanical properties. This region is of key importance in the context of fiber-matrix adhesion and the associated mechanical strength of the composite material. An interphase formation is caused by morphological, as well as thermomechanical processes during cooling of the plastic melt close to the glass fibers. In this study, significant injection molding processing parameters are varied in order to investigate the influence on the formation of an interphase and the resulting mechanical properties of the composite. The geometry of the interphase is determined using nano-tribological techniques. In addition, the influence of the glass fiber sizing on the geometry of the interphase is examined. Tensile tests are used in order to determine the resulting mechanical properties of the produced short fiber composites. It is shown that the interphase width depends on the processing conditions and can be linked to the mechanical properties of the short fiber composite.

  4. Interphase and magnetotransport of LSMO-PMMA nanocomposites obtained by a sonochemical method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, Mariano [Centro NanoMat/Cryssmat Lab/Cátedra de Física – DETEMA – Facultad de Química – Universidad de la República (Uruguay); Centro Interdisciplinario de Nanotecnología, Química y Física de Materiales – Universidad de la República (Uruguay); Pardo, Helena, E-mail: hpardo@fq.edu.uy [Centro NanoMat/Cryssmat Lab/Cátedra de Física – DETEMA – Facultad de Química – Universidad de la República (Uruguay); Centro Interdisciplinario de Nanotecnología, Química y Física de Materiales – Universidad de la República (Uruguay); Faccio, Ricardo [Centro NanoMat/Cryssmat Lab/Cátedra de Física – DETEMA – Facultad de Química – Universidad de la República (Uruguay); Centro Interdisciplinario de Nanotecnología, Química y Física de Materiales – Universidad de la República (Uruguay); Tumelero, Milton A. [Laboratorio de filmes finos e superficies – Departamento de Física – Universidad Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianópolis (Brazil); and others

    2015-05-15

    In this report, we studied the structural, microstructural and compositional trends in a manganite-polymethylmethacrilate (LSMO-PMMA) nanocomposite prepared by a sonochemical method focusing in the study of its interphase and its correlation with magnetotransport. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Raman scattering and X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) studies showed evidence of PMMA reactivity with partial decomposition at the LSMO nanoparticles interface. Additionally, grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) showed information about the microstructure and the separation between nanoparticles in these nanocomposite materials. An enhancement in the low field magnetoresistance (LFMR) respect to pure LSMO was observed for a 20% weight fraction addition of PMMA in the high temperature regime (205–305 K) probably due to the increase in the magnetic disorder at the grain boundaries caused by the ultrasonic treatment. Nevertheless, lower PMMA weight fraction addition showed no enhancement in LFMR respect to pure LSMO, probably in agreement with the higher decomposition rate observed at the interphase. - Highlights: • We report the synthesis of LSMO-PMMA nanocomposites by a sonochemical method. • Compositional and microstructural trends were obtained from the interphase. • This method showed long-range homogeneity and enhancement of grain boundary disorder. • The enhancement on the LFMR respect to pure manganite was obtained at higher temperatures.

  5. Designable ultra-smooth ultra-thin solid-electrolyte interphases of three alkali metal anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yu; Wang, Wei-Wei; Li, Yi-Juan; Wu, Qi-Hui; Tang, Shuai; Yan, Jia-Wei; Zheng, Ming-Sen; Wu, De-Yin; Fan, Chun-Hai; Hu, Wei-Qiang; Chen, Zhao-Bin; Fang, Yuan; Zhang, Qing-Hong; Dong, Quan-Feng; Mao, Bing-Wei

    2018-04-09

    Dendrite growth of alkali metal anodes limited their lifetime for charge/discharge cycling. Here, we report near-perfect anodes of lithium, sodium, and potassium metals achieved by electrochemical polishing, which removes microscopic defects and creates ultra-smooth ultra-thin solid-electrolyte interphase layers at metal surfaces for providing a homogeneous environment. Precise characterizations by AFM force probing with corroborative in-depth XPS profile analysis reveal that the ultra-smooth ultra-thin solid-electrolyte interphase can be designed to have alternating inorganic-rich and organic-rich/mixed multi-layered structure, which offers mechanical property of coupled rigidity and elasticity. The polished metal anodes exhibit significantly enhanced cycling stability, specifically the lithium anodes can cycle for over 200 times at a real current density of 2 mA cm -2 with 100% depth of discharge. Our work illustrates that an ultra-smooth ultra-thin solid-electrolyte interphase may be robust enough to suppress dendrite growth and thus serve as an initial layer for further improved protection of alkali metal anodes.

  6. Reproductive-phase and interphase lethal cell damage after irradiation and treatment with cytostatics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagemann, G.

    1979-01-01

    After X-ray irradiation of manual cells, two lethal fractions occur due to reproductive and interphase death under low and high radiation doses. The damage kinetics on which this fact is based is compared with hypothetical tumour frequencies and leucemia induction caused in experiments. The reproductive-lethal damage can be manifested by means of colony size spectrometry, with the median colony size class differences (MCD) serving as measure for the damage found. The simultaneous effects of the cytostatics BLEOMYCIN or ICRF 159 and X-rays on reproductive lethal and interphase-lethal damage are measured by means of MCD and survival fraction, and the additive and intensifying effect' is judged with the help of suitably defined terms. This shows that the clinically used ICRF 159 has an additive effect on interphase-lethal and a sub-additive effect on reproductive-lethal cell damage. Thus, favourable results may be expected for the electivity factor in fractionated irradiation and with regard to delayed damage in healthy tissue. (orig.) 891 MG/orig. 892 RDG [de

  7. "Brick-and-Mortar" Nanostructured Interphase for Glass-Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Francois; Sernicola, Giorgio; Shaffer, Milo S P; Bismarck, Alexander

    2018-02-28

    The fiber-matrix interface plays a critical role in determining composite mechanical properties. While a strong interface tends to provide high strength, a weak interface enables extensive debonding, leading to a high degree of energy absorption. Balancing these conflicting requirements by engineering composite interfaces to improve strength and toughness simultaneously still remains a great challenge. Here, a nanostructured fiber coating was realized to manifest the critical characteristics of natural nacre, at a reduced length scale, consistent with the surface curvature of fibers. The new interphase contains a high proportion (∼90 wt %) of well-aligned inorganic platelets embedded in a polymer; the window of suitable platelet dimensions is very narrow, with an optimized platelet width and thickness of about 130 and 13 nm, respectively. An anisotropic, nanostructured coating was uniformly and conformally deposited onto a large number of 9 μm diameter glass fibers, simultaneously, using self-limiting layer-by-layer assembly (LbL); this parallel approach demonstrates a promising strategy to exploit LbL methods at scale. The resulting nanocomposite interphase, primarily loaded in shear, provides new mechanisms for stress dissipation and plastic deformation. The energy released by fiber breakage in tension appear to spread and dissipate within the nanostructured interphase, accompanied by stable fiber slippage, while the interfacial strength was improved up to 30%.

  8. Amorphous/crystal and polymer/filler interphases in biocomposites from poly(butylene succinate)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Signori, Francesca [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche - Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici (CNR-IPCF), Via G. Moruzzi 1, I-56124 Pisa (Italy); Pelagaggi, Martina [Universita di Pisa - Dipartimento di Chimica e Chimica Industriale, Via Risorgimento 35, I-56126 Pisa (Italy); Bronco, Simona [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche - Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici (CNR-IPCF), Via G. Moruzzi 1, I-56124 Pisa (Italy); Righetti, Maria Cristina, E-mail: righetti@ipcf.cnr.it [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche - Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici (CNR-IPCF), Via G. Moruzzi 1, I-56124 Pisa (Italy)

    2012-09-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The existence of intermolecular interactions between poly(butylene succinate) and hemp fibres was proved from specific heat capacities data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Different degrees of mobility of the poly(butylene succinate) amorphous segments were evidenced at the amorphous/crystal interphase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Devitrification of the rigid amorphous fraction in poly(butylene succinate) was found to occur before and simultaneously with the fusion. - Abstract: Poly(butylene succinate)-hemp composites (PBS-hemp), with hemp content in the range 0-40 wt.%, were prepared in the melt and characterized. This paper focuses on the detailed analysis of the thermal behaviour of the PBS-hemp composites, investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), to enlighten the polymer/fibre interphase features. The occurrence of specific intermolecular interactions between PBS and hemp was assessed from specific heat capacity data. Different degrees of mobility of the PBS amorphous segments were found at the amorphous/crystal interphases. A broadening of the bulk glass transition was observed, and attributed to the presence of polymer segments slightly constrained. Moreover, a rigid amorphous fraction that devitrifies at temperatures higher than the bulk glass transition, partly before the melting region and partly simultaneously with the fusion, was observed and quantified, and attributed to the presence of major constraints probably occurring in geometrically restricted areas.

  9. Interphase and magnetotransport of LSMO-PMMA nanocomposites obtained by a sonochemical method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, Mariano; Pardo, Helena; Faccio, Ricardo; Tumelero, Milton A.

    2015-01-01

    In this report, we studied the structural, microstructural and compositional trends in a manganite-polymethylmethacrilate (LSMO-PMMA) nanocomposite prepared by a sonochemical method focusing in the study of its interphase and its correlation with magnetotransport. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Raman scattering and X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) studies showed evidence of PMMA reactivity with partial decomposition at the LSMO nanoparticles interface. Additionally, grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) showed information about the microstructure and the separation between nanoparticles in these nanocomposite materials. An enhancement in the low field magnetoresistance (LFMR) respect to pure LSMO was observed for a 20% weight fraction addition of PMMA in the high temperature regime (205–305 K) probably due to the increase in the magnetic disorder at the grain boundaries caused by the ultrasonic treatment. Nevertheless, lower PMMA weight fraction addition showed no enhancement in LFMR respect to pure LSMO, probably in agreement with the higher decomposition rate observed at the interphase. - Highlights: • We report the synthesis of LSMO-PMMA nanocomposites by a sonochemical method. • Compositional and microstructural trends were obtained from the interphase. • This method showed long-range homogeneity and enhancement of grain boundary disorder. • The enhancement on the LFMR respect to pure manganite was obtained at higher temperatures

  10. Electron scattering off nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gattone, A.O.

    1989-01-01

    Two recently developed aspects related to the scattering of electrons off nuclei are presented. On the one hand, a model is introduced which emphasizes the relativistic aspects of the problem in the impulse approximation, by demanding strict maintenance of the algebra of the Poincare group. On the other hand, the second model aims at a more sophisticated description of the nuclear response in the case of collective excitations. Basically, it utilizes the RPA formalism with a new development which enables a more careful treatment of the states in the continuum as is the case for the giant resonances. Applications of both models to the description of elastic scattering, inelastic scattering to discrete levels, giant resonances and the quasi-elastic region are discussed. (Author) [es

  11. Antideuteron annihilation on nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cugnon, J.

    1992-01-01

    An investigation of antideuteron annihilation on nuclei within an intranuclear cascade (INC) model is presented. Two models are set up to describe the annihilation itself, which either implies the antideuteron as a whole and occurs at a single point, or which may be considered as two independent nucleon-antinucleon annihilation occurring at different points and different times. Particular attention is paid to the energy transferred from the pions issued from the annihilation to the nuclear system and to the possibility of having a multifragmentation of the target. The latter feature is investigated within a percolation model. The pion distribution and the energy distribution are also discussed. Predictions of proton multiplicity distributions are compared with experiment. (orig.)

  12. Particles and nuclei, letters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The present collection of letters from JINR, Dubna, contains ten separate records on Wien filter using in exploring on low-energy radioactive nuclei, memory effects in dissipative nucleus-nucleus collision, topological charge and topological susceptibility in connection with translation and gauge invariance, solutions of the multitime Dirac equation, the maximum entropy technique. System's statistical description, the charged conductor inside dielectric. Solution of boundary condition by means of auxiliary charges and the method of linear algebraic equations, optical constants of the TGS single crystal irradiated by power pulsed electron beam, interatomic pair potential and n-e amplitude from slow neutron scattering by noble gases, the two-coordinate multiwire proportional chamber of the high spatial resolution and neutron drip line in the region of O-Mg isotopes

  13. Particles and nuclei, letters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The present collection of letters from JINR, Dubna, contains seven separate records on the integral representation for structure functions and target mass effects, multiscale properties of DNA primary structure including cross-scale correlations, dissipative evolution of the elementary act, the fine structure of the M T =1 Gamow-Teller resonance in 147g Tb→ 147 Gd β + /EC decay, the behaviour of the TVO temperature sensors in the magnetic fields, a fast method for searching for tracks in multilayer drift chambers of HADES spectrometer, a novel approach to particle track etching including surfactant enhanced control of pore morphology, azimuthal correlations of secondary particles in 32 S induced interactions with Ag(Br) nuclei at 4.5 GeV/ c/ nucleon

  14. Pulsars: gigantic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Renxin

    2011-01-01

    What is the real nature of pulsars? This is essentially a question of the fundamental strong interaction between quarks at low-energy scale and hence of the non-perturbative quantum chromo-dynamics, the solution of which would certainly be meaningful for us to understand one of the seven millennium prize problems (i.e., "Yang-Mills Theory") named by the Clay Mathematical Institute. After a historical note, it is argued here that a pulsar is very similar to an extremely big nucleus, but is a little bit different from the gigantic nucleus speculated 80 years ago by L. Landau. The paper demonstrates the similarity between pulsars and gigantic nuclei from both points of view: the different manifestations of compact stars and the general behavior of the strong interaction. (author)

  15. Clusters in nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Following the pioneering discovery of alpha clustering and of molecular resonances, the field of nuclear clustering is today one of those domains of heavy-ion nuclear physics that faces the greatest challenges, yet also contains the greatest opportunities. After many summer schools and workshops, in particular over the last decade, the community of nuclear molecular physicists has decided to collaborate in producing a comprehensive collection of lectures and tutorial reviews covering the field. This third volume follows the successful Lect. Notes Phys. 818 (Vol. 1) and 848 (Vol. 2), and comprises six extensive lectures covering the following topics:  - Gamma Rays and Molecular Structure - Faddeev Equation Approach for Three Cluster Nuclear Reactions - Tomography of the Cluster Structure of Light Nuclei Via Relativistic Dissociation - Clustering Effects Within the Dinuclear Model : From Light to Hyper-heavy Molecules in Dynamical Mean-field Approach - Clusterization in Ternary Fission - Clusters in Light N...

  16. Pion production in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afnan, I.R.; Thomas, A.W.

    1976-01-01

    A method has been suggested for relating μ-capture in nuclei to pion absorption through partially conserved axial vector current hypothesis. The success of the method relies heavily on the knowledge of the pion absorption amplitude at a momentum transfer equal to the μ-meson mass. That is we need to know the pion absorption amplitude off the mass-shell. The simplest nucleus for which this suggestion can be examined is μ-capture in deuterium. The Koltum-Reitan model is used to determine the pion absorption amplitude off the mass shell. In particular the senstivity of this off-mass-shell extrapolution to details of the N-N interaction is studied. (author)

  17. IBA in deformed nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casten, R.F.; Warner, D.D.

    1982-01-01

    The structure and characteristic properties and predictions of the IBA in deformed nuclei are reviewed, and compared with experiment, in particular for 168 Er. Overall, excellent agreement, with a minimum of free parameters (in effect, two, neglecting scale factors on energy differences), was obtained. A particularly surprising, and unavoidable, prediction is that of strong β → γ transitions, a feature characteristically absent in the geometrical model, but manifest empirically. Some discrepancies were also noted, principally for the K=4 excitation, and the detailed magnitudes of some specific B(E2) values. Considerable attention is paid to analyzing the structure of the IBA states and their relation to geometric models. The bandmixing formalism was studied to interpret both the aforementioned discrepancies and the origin of the β → γ transitions. The IBA states, extremely complex in the usual SU(5) basis, are transformed to the SU(3) basis, as is the interaction Hamiltonian. The IBA wave functions appear with much simplified structure in this way as does the structure of the associated B(E2) values. The nature of the symmetry breaking of SU(3) for actual deformed nuclei is seen to be predominantly ΔK=0 mixing. A modified, and more consistent, formalism for the IBA-1 is introduced which is simpler, has fewer free parameters (in effect, one, neglecting scale factors on energy differences), is in at least as good agreement with experiment as the earlier formalism, contains a special case of the 0(6) limit which corresponds to that known empirically, and appears to have a close relationship to the IBA-2. The new formalism facilitates the construction of contour plots of various observables (e.g., energy or B(E2) ratios) as functions of N and chi/sub Q/ which allow the parameter-free discussion of qualitative trajectories or systematics

  18. Spectroscopy of heavy fissionable nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-08-05

    Aug 5, 2015 ... Nuclei in the actinide chain and beyond are prone to fission owing to ... mass nuclei are typically more difficult, because the intensity is .... j15/2 neutron alignments in a region where shell stablization effects are crucial.

  19. Problem of ''deformed'' superheavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobiczewski, A.; Patyk, Z.; Muntian, I.

    2000-08-01

    Problem of experimental confirmation of deformed shapes of superheavy nuclei situated in the neighbourhood of 270 Hs is discussed. Measurement of the energy E 2+ of the lowest 2+ state in even-even species of these nuclei is considered as a method for this confirmation. The energy is calculated in the cranking approximation for heavy and superheavy nuclei. The branching ratio p 2+ /p 0+ between α decay of a nucleus to this lowest 2+ state and to the ground state 0+ of its daughter is also calculated for these nuclei. The results indicate that a measurement of the energy E 2+ for some superheavy nuclei by electron or α spectroscopy is a promising method for the confirmation of their deformed shapes. (orig.)

  20. Quarks in Few Body Nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holt Roy J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Electron scattering at very high Bjorken x from hadrons provides an excellent test of models, has an important role in high energy physics, and from nuclei, provides a window into short range correlations. Light nuclei have a key role because of the relatively well-known nuclear structure. The development of a novel tritium target for Jefferson Lab has led to renewed interest in the mass three system. For example, deep inelastic scattering experiments in the light nuclei provide a powerful means to determine the neutron structure function. The isospin dependence of electron scattering from mass-3 nuclei provide information on short range correlations in nuclei. The program using the new tritium target will be presented along with a summary of other experiments aimed at revealing the large-x structure of the nucleon.

  1. A novel bi-protein bio-interphase of cytochrome c and glucose oxidase: Electron transfer and electrocatalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Yonghai; Liu, Hongyu; Wang, Yu; Wang, Li

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Glucose oxidase (GOD) and cytochrome c (Cyt c) were co-entrapped in the poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride)–graphene nanosheets–gold nanoparticles (PDDA–Gp–AuNPs) nanocomposites modified glassy carbon electrode. Electron transfer and electrocatalysis of the novel bi-protein bio-interphase were investigated. The bio-interphase developed here not only successfully achieved DET of GOD, but also showed great potential for the fabrication of novel glucose biosensors with linear response up to 18 mM. Highlights: ► A bio-interphase composed of cytochrome c and glucose oxidase was developed. ► The electron transfer in the bio-interphase was investigated. ► Electrocatalytic performances of bio-interphase were explored. ► The bio-interphase exhibited good electrocatalytic response glucose. - Abstract: Glucose oxidase (GOD) and cytochrome c (Cyt c) were co-entrapped in the poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride)–graphene nanosheets–gold nanoparticles (PDDA–Gp–AuNPs) hybrid nanocomposites modified glassy carbon electrode to prepare a novel bi-protein bio-interphase. Electron transfer and electrocatalysis of the bi-protein bio-interphase were investigated in detail. The results showed that the PDDA–Gp–AuNPs nanocomposites accelerated the electron transfer between proteins and electrode. The bi-protein exhibited effective direct electron transfer (DET) reaction with an apparent rate constant (k s ) of 2.36 s −1 . The optimal molar ratio and total amount of Cyt c and GOD in the bio-interphase for DET of GOD was estimated to be about 3:1 and 1.40 nmol, respectively. The bi-protein bio-interphase could be used to detect glucose based on the consumption of O 2 with the oxidation of glucose catalyzed by GOD. The resulted biosensor exhibits wide linear range from 2.0 to 18.0 mM. Thus, this study not only successfully achieved DET of GOD, but also constructed a novel biosensor for glucose detection

  2. RADIO VARIABILITY IN SEYFERT NUCLEI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mundell, C. G.; Ferruit, P.; Nagar, N.; Wilson, A. S.

    2009-01-01

    within the central ∼<50 pc. If flares in radio light curves correspond to ejection of new relativistic components or emergence of shocks in the underlying flow, improved monitoring and high-resolution imaging using VLBI techniques are required to confirm that radio jets are intrinsically non-relativistic during quiescence but that Seyferts, as black-hole-driven active galactic nuclei (AGN), have the capacity to accelerate relativistic jets during radio flares. Finally, we conclude that our results taken together with the increased detection rate of flat spectrum radio nuclei in Seyferts imaged at VLBI resolutions and the detection of variable water megamaser emission support the paradigm of intermittent periods of quiescence and nuclear outburst across the Seyfert population.

  3. Monopole transitions in hot nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sujkowski, Z.

    1994-01-01

    Monopole transitions can be a signature of shape changing in a hot, pulsating nucleus (the low energy E0 mode) and/or a measure of the compressibility of finite nuclei (GMR, the breathing mode). Experimental information pertaining to GMR is reviewed. Recipes for deducing the incompressibility modules for infinite nuclear matter from data on GMR are discussed. Astrophysical implications are outlined. The first attempts at locating the GMR strength in moderately hot nuclei are described. Prospects for improving the experimental techniques to make an observation of this strength in selected nuclei unambiguous are discussed. (author). 46 refs, 8 figs

  4. Monopole transitions in hot nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sujkowski, Z. [Soltan Inst. for Nuclear Studies, Otwock-Swierk (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    Monopole transitions can be a signature of shape changing in a hot, pulsating nucleus (the low energy E0 mode) and/or a measure of the compressibility of finite nuclei (GMR, the breathing mode). Experimental information pertaining to GMR is reviewed. Recipes for deducing the incompressibility modules for infinite nuclear matter from data on GMR are discussed. Astrophysical implications are outlined. The first attempts at locating the GMR strength in moderately hot nuclei are described. Prospects for improving the experimental techniques to make an observation of this strength in selected nuclei unambiguous are discussed. (author). 46 refs, 8 figs.

  5. Electron scattering for exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suda, T.

    2013-01-01

    An electron scattering facility is under construction in RIKEN RI Beam Factory, Japan, which is dedicated to the structure studies of short-lived nuclei. This is the world's first and currently only facility of its type. The construction is nearly completed, and the first electron scattering experiment off short-lived nuclei will be carried out in the beginning of next year. The charge density distributions of short-lived nuclei will be precisely determined by elastic electron scattering for the first time. Physics pursued at this facility including future perspectives are explained

  6. Cavitation inception from bubble nuclei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Knud Aage

    2015-01-01

    , and experimental investigations of bubbles and cavitation inception have been presented. These results suggest that cavitation nuclei in equilibrium are gaseous voids in the water, stabilized by a skin which allows diffusion balance between gas inside the void and gas in solution in the surrounding liquid....... The cavitation nuclei may be free gas bubbles in the bulk of water, or interfacial gaseous voids located on the surface of particles in the water, or on bounding walls. The tensile strength of these nuclei depends not only on the water quality but also on the pressure-time history of the water. A recent model...

  7. Gluon density in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayala, A.L.

    1996-01-01

    In this talk we present our detailed study (theory and numbers) on the shadowing corrections to the gluon structure functions for nuclei. Starting from rather controversial information on the nucleon structure function which is originated by the recent HERA data, we develop the Glauber approach for the gluon density in a nucleus based on Mueller formula and estimate the value of the shadowing corrections in this case. Then we calculate the first corrections to the Glauber approach and show that these corrections are big. Based on this practical observation we suggest the new evolution equation which takes into account the shadowing corrections and solve it. We hope to convince you that the new evolution equation gives a good theoretical tool to treat the shadowing corrections for the gluons density in a nucleus and, therefore, it is able to provide the theoretically reliable initial conditions for the time evolution of the nucleus-nucleus cascade. The initial conditions should be fixed both theoretically and phenomenologically before to attack such complicated problems as the mixture of hard and soft processes in nucleus-nucleus interactions at high energy or the theoretically reliable approach to hadron or/and parton cascades for high energy nucleus-nucleus interaction. 35 refs., 24 figs., 1 tab

  8. Supersymmetry in nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Jolie, J

    2002-01-01

    All the elementary particles that make up matter (as do quarks, electrons, neutrinos....) are fermions, the particles that convey the fundamental interactions (as do photons, gluons, W, Z...) are bosons. Composite particles are either bosons, or fermions according to the number of fermions they contain: if this number is even the particle is a boson, otherwise it is a fermion. According to this rule a proton is a fermion and the He sup 4 atom is a boson. Symmetry plays an important role in the standard model, a symmetry is a transformation that connect bosons with other bosons or fermions with other fermions. Supersymmetry associates a boson with a fermion or a fermion with a boson, in fact supersymmetry connects nuclei that are not generally considered as akin. Supersymmetry has just been observed in low energy levels of Gold sup 1 sup 9 sup 5 sup - sup 1 sup 9 sup 6 and Platinum sup 1 sup 9 sup 4 - sup 1 sup 9 sup 5 , it means that the description of these energy levels is simplified and can be made by a co...

  9. Supersymmetry in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolie, J.

    2002-01-01

    All the elementary particles that make up matter (as do quarks, electrons, neutrinos....) are fermions, the particles that convey the fundamental interactions (as do photons, gluons, W, Z...) are bosons. Composite particles are either bosons, or fermions according to the number of fermions they contain: if this number is even the particle is a boson, otherwise it is a fermion. According to this rule a proton is a fermion and the He 4 atom is a boson. Symmetry plays an important role in the standard model, a symmetry is a transformation that connect bosons with other bosons or fermions with other fermions. Supersymmetry associates a boson with a fermion or a fermion with a boson, in fact supersymmetry connects nuclei that are not generally considered as akin. Supersymmetry has just been observed in low energy levels of Gold 195-196 and Platinum 194 - 195 , it means that the description of these energy levels is simplified and can be made by a common set of quantum numbers. (A.C.)

  10. Photon interactions with nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornton, S.T.; Sealock, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    This document is a progress report for DOE Grant No. FG05-89ER40501, A000. The grant began March, 1989. Our primary research effort has been expended at the LEGS project at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This report will summarize our present research effort at LEGS as well as data analysis and publications from previous experiments performed at SLAC. In addition the principal investigators are heavily involved in the CLAS collaboration in Hall B at CEBAF. We have submitted several letters of intent and proposals and have made commitments to construct experimental equipment for CEBAF. We expect our primary experimental effort to continue at LEGS until CEBAF becomes operational. This report will be divided into separate sections describing our progress at LEGS, SLAC, and CEBAF. We will also discuss our significant efforts in the education and training of both undergraduate and graduate students. Photon detectors are described as well as experiments on delta deformation in nuclei of quasielastic scattering and excitation of the delta by 4 He(e,e')

  11. Parity violation in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, R.G.H.

    1980-01-01

    A summary of parity violating effects in nuclei is given. Thanks to vigorous experimental and theoretical effort, it now appears that a reasonably well-defined value for the weak isovector π-nucleon coupling constant can be obtained. There is one major uncertainty in the analysis, namely the M2/E1 mixing ratio for the 2.79 MeV transition in 21 Ne. This quantity is virtually impossible to calculate reliably and must be measured. If it turns out to be much larger than 1, then a null result in 21 Ne is expected no matter what the weak interaction, so an experimental determination is urgently needed. The most promising approach is perhaps a measurement of the pair internal conversion coefficient. Of course, a direct measurement of a pure isovector case is highly desirable, and it is to be hoped that the four ΔT = 1 experiments will be pushed still further, and that improved calculations will be made for the 6 Li case. Nuclear parity violation seems to be rapidly approaching an interesting and useful synthesis

  12. Fragmentation of relativistic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cork, B.

    1975-06-01

    Nuclei with energies of several GeV/n interact with hadrons and produce fragments that encompass the fields of nuclear physics, meson physics, and particle physics. Experimental results are now available to explore problems in nuclear physics such as the validity of the shell model to explain the momentum distribution of fragments, the contribution of giant dipole resonances to fragment production cross sections, the effective Coulomb barrier, and nuclear temperatures. A new approach to meson physics is possible by exploring the nucleon charge-exchange process. Particle physics problems are explored by measuring the energy and target dependence of isotope production cross sections, thus determining if limiting fragmentation and target factorization are valid, and measuring total cross sections to determine if the factorization relation, sigma/sub AB/ 2 = sigma/sub AA/ . sigma/sub BB/, is violated. Also, new experiments have been done to measure the angular distribution of fragments that could be explained as nuclear shock waves, and to explore for ultradense matter produced by very heavy ions incident on heavy atoms. (12 figures, 2 tables)

  13. Symmetries in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arima, A.

    2003-01-01

    (1) There are symmetries in nature, and the concept of symmetry has been used in art and architecture. The symmetry is evaluated high in the European culture. In China, the symmetry is broken in the paintings but it is valued in the architecture. In Japan, however, the symmetry has been broken everywhere. The serious and interesting question is why these differences happens? (2) In this lecture, I reviewed from the very beginning the importance of the rotational symmetry in quantum mechanics. I am sorry to be too fundamental for specialists of nuclear physics. But for people who do not use these theories, I think that you could understand the mathematical aspects of quantum mechanics and the relation between the angular momentum and the rotational symmetry. (3) To the specialists of nuclear physics, I talked about my idea as follows: dynamical treatment of collective motions in nuclei by IBM, especially the meaning of the degeneracy observed in the rotation bands top of γ vibration and β vibration, and the origin of pseudo-spin symmetry. Namely, if there is a symmetry, a degeneracy occurs. Conversely, if there is a degeneracy, there must be a symmetry. I discussed some details of the observed evidence and this correspondence is my strong belief in physics. (author)

  14. Collective excitations in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chomaz, Ph.

    1997-01-01

    The properties of the nucleus cannot be reduced to the properties of its constituents: it is a complex system. The fact that many properties of the nucleus are consequences of the existence of mean-field potential is a manifestation of this complexity. In particular the nucleons can thus self-organize in collective motions such as giant resonances. Therefore the study of these collective motions is a very good to understand the properties of the nucleus itself. The purpose of this article was to stress some aspects of these collective vibrations. In particular we have studied how an ensemble of fermions as the nucleus can self-organize in collective vibrations which are behaving like a gas of bosons in weak interaction. The understanding of these phenomena remains one of the important subjects of actually in the context of quantal systems in strong interaction. In particular the study of the states with one or two vibration quanta provides a direct information on the structure if nuclei close to their ground states. (author)

  15. Collective excitations in nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chomaz, Ph

    1997-12-31

    The properties of the nucleus cannot be reduced to the properties of its constituents: it is a complex system. The fact that many properties of the nucleus are consequences of the existence of mean-field potential is a manifestation of this complexity. In particular the nucleons can thus self-organize in collective motions such as giant resonances. Therefore the study of these collective motions is a very good to understand the properties of the nucleus itself. The purpose of this article was to stress some aspects of these collective vibrations. In particular we have studied how an ensemble of fermions as the nucleus can self-organize in collective vibrations which are behaving like a gas of bosons in weak interaction. The understanding of these phenomena remains one of the important subjects of actually in the context of quantal systems in strong interaction. In particular the study of the states with one or two vibration quanta provides a direct information on the structure if nuclei close to their ground states. (author) 270 refs.

  16. Rotating bubble and toroidal nuclei and fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Royer, G.; Haddad, F.; Jouault, B.

    1995-01-01

    The energy of rotating bubble and toroidal nuclei predicted to be formed in central heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies is calculated within the generalized rotating liquid drop model. The potential barriers standing in these exotic deformation paths are compared with the three dimensional and plane fragmentation barriers. In the toroidal deformation path of the heaviest systems exists a large potential pocket localised below the plane fragmentation barriers. This might allow the temporary survival of heavy nuclear toroids before the final clusterization induced by the surface and proximity tension. (author)

  17. Dynamic polarization of radioactive nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiselev, Yu.F.; Lyuboshits, V.L.; )

    2001-01-01

    Radioactive nuclei, embedded into a frozen polarized proton target, atr proposed to polarize by means of some dynamic polarization methods. Angular distributions of γ-quanta emitted ny 22 Na(3 + ) in the cascade β-γ-radiation are calculated. It is shown that this distribution does not depend on the spin temperature sing at the Boltzmann distribution of populations among the Zeeman magnetic substates, whereas the tensor polarization of quadrupole nuclei, placed in the electric field of the crystal, causes the considerable sing dependence. The new method promises wide opportunities for the magnetic structure investigations as well as for the study of spin-spin interaction dynamics of rare nuclei in dielectrics. Physical-technical advantages and disadvantages of the given method are discussed for the polarization of heavy nuclei in the on-line implantation mode [ru

  18. The delta in nuclei. Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy-Stephan, M.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental aspects of the Δ excitation will be presented. The Δ excitation in nuclei will be compared to the free Δ excitation. Various probes will be reviewed and their specific features will be underlined [fr

  19. Electron scattering for exotic nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-11-04

    Nov 4, 2014 ... Research Center for Electron-Photon Science, Tohoku University, 1-2-1 ... nuclei precisely determined by elastic scattering [1]. .... In order to fulfill these requirements, a window-frame shaped dipole magnet with a gap.

  20. Collisions between complex atomic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaagen, J. S.

    1977-08-01

    The use of heavy ion accelerators in the study of nuclear structure and states is reviewed. The reactions discussed are the quasielastic reactions in which small amounts of energy and few particles are exchanged between the colliding nuclei. The development of heavy ion accelerators is also discussed, as well as detection equipment. Exotic phenomena, principally the possible existence of superheavy nuclei, are also treated. (JIW)

  1. Particles and nuclei in PANIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1987-07-15

    PANIC is the triennal International Conference on Particles and Nuclei, and judging from the latest PANIC, held in Kyoto from 20-24 April there is no need for panic yet. Faced with two pictures – one of nuclei described in nucleon and meson terms, and another of nucleons containing quarks and gluons – physicists are intrigued to know what new insights from the quark level can tell us about nuclear physics, or vice versa.

  2. Particles and nuclei in PANIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    PANIC is the triennal International Conference on Particles and Nuclei, and judging from the latest PANIC, held in Kyoto from 20-24 April there is no need for panic yet. Faced with two pictures – one of nuclei described in nucleon and meson terms, and another of nucleons containing quarks and gluons – physicists are intrigued to know what new insights from the quark level can tell us about nuclear physics, or vice versa

  3. Comparative study of the temperature and velocity gradients for the interphases obtained during directional solidification of Al-Cu alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ares, Alicia Esther; Gueijman, Sergio Fabian; Schvezov, Carlos E

    2004-01-01

    Previous studies determined that in directionally solidified lead-tin alloys, the position in which the transition occurs from columnar to equiaxial structure depending on the distribution of temperatures in the system, occurs when a minimum and critical thermal gradient value is attained in the liquid before the interphase that separates the (liquid) phase from the (solid + liquid) phase and this critical gradient value is independent from the solute concentration, natural convection, degree of overheating, the mold geometry and the number of columnar and equiaxial grains that form. The study now includes aluminum-copper alloys, for which the temperature gradient test values in the liquid before the (liquid)/(solid + liquid) interphase and the speeds of the (liquid)/(solid+liquid)/(solid) interphases are determined. The values of interphase gradients and velocities contrast with the values predicted by the Hunt model for the same alloy system. The velocities of the interphases are also compared with those calculated with the Lipton equation and used in the Wang and Beckermann model for dendritic equiaxial growth. The results are compared with those obtained previously in the lead-tin system (CW)

  4. Investigation of copper nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delfini, M.G.

    1983-01-01

    An extensive study has been performed on copper isotopes in the mass region A=63-66. The results of a precise measurement are presented on the properties of levels of 64 Cu and 66 Cu. They were obtained by bombarding the 63 Cu and 65 Cu nuclei with neutrons. The gamma spectra collected after capture of thermal, 2-keV, 24-keV neutrons have been analysed and combined to give a rather extensive set of precise level energies and gamma transition strengths. From the angular distribution of the gamma rays it is possible to obtain information concerning the angular momentum J of several low-lying states. The level schemes derived from such measurements have been used as a test for calculations in the framework of the shell model. The spectral distributions of eigenstates in 64 Cu for different configuration spaces are presented and discussed. In this study the relative importance of configurations with n holes in the 1f7/2 shell with n up to 16, are investigated. It is found that the results strongly depend on the values of the single-particle energies. The results of the spectral-distribution method were utilized for shell-model calculations. From the information obtained from the spectral analysis it was decided to adopt a configuration space which includes up to one hole in the 1f7/2 shell and up to two particles in the 1g9/2 shell. Further, restrictions on seniority and on the coupling of the two particles in the 1g9/2 orbit have been applied and their effects have been studied. It is found that the calculated excitation energies reproduce the measured values in a satisfactory way, but that some of the electromagnetic properties are less well in agreement with experimental data. (Auth.)

  5. Quest for superheavy nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heenen, P.H. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Service de Physique Nucleaire Theorique (Belgium); Nazarewicz, W. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics; Warsaw Univ. (Poland). Inst. Fizyki Teoretycznej

    2002-02-01

    This article draws the long history of the discovery of new heavy nuclei since its beginning in 1940 when neptunium was found, and presents the current status of research in this field. The last 3 years have brought a number of experimental surprises which have truly rejuvenated the field. In January 1999, scientists from Dubna (Russia) reported the synthesis of 1 atom of element 114 ({sup 298}Uuq) in a hot fusion reaction between a {sup 48}Ca beam and a {sup 244}Pu target. This discovery was followed by 3 other reports from Dubna. First using the {sup 242}Pu({sup 48}Ca,3n) reaction, they produced {sup 287}Uuq. In 1999 the synthesis of another isotope of Z=114, the even-even {sup 288}Uuq was reported. The element Z=116 ({sup 292}Uuh) was discovered as a product of the {sup 248}Cm({sup 48}Ca,4n) reaction. The GSI (Germany) group found a new even isotope of the element 110: {sup 270}Uun and also {sup 272}Uuu (element 111) and {sup 277}Uub (element 112). 2 new isotopes of the element 107: {sup 266}Bh and {sup 267}Bh have been found at Berkeley (Usa). The synthesis of the new element Z=118 ({sup 293}Uuo) announced in 1999 by the Berkeley group was retracted 2 years later. The lifetimes reported for the elements {sup 284}Uub and {sup 280}Uun are by many orders of magnitude longer than those of the isotopes with Z{<=}112 previously discovered at GSI. (A.C.)

  6. Effects of aneuploidy on genome structure, expression, and interphase organization in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Huettel

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Aneuploidy refers to losses and/or gains of individual chromosomes from the normal chromosome set. The resulting gene dosage imbalance has a noticeable affect on the phenotype, as illustrated by aneuploid syndromes, including Down syndrome in humans, and by human solid tumor cells, which are highly aneuploid. Although the phenotypic manifestations of aneuploidy are usually apparent, information about the underlying alterations in structure, expression, and interphase organization of unbalanced chromosome sets is still sparse. Plants generally tolerate aneuploidy better than animals, and, through colchicine treatment and breeding strategies, it is possible to obtain inbred sibling plants with different numbers of chromosomes. This possibility, combined with the genetic and genomics tools available for Arabidopsis thaliana, provides a powerful means to assess systematically the molecular and cytological consequences of aberrant numbers of specific chromosomes. Here, we report on the generation of Arabidopsis plants in which chromosome 5 is present in triplicate. We compare the global transcript profiles of normal diploids and chromosome 5 trisomics, and assess genome integrity using array comparative genome hybridization. We use live cell imaging to determine the interphase 3D arrangement of transgene-encoded fluorescent tags on chromosome 5 in trisomic and triploid plants. The results indicate that trisomy 5 disrupts gene expression throughout the genome and supports the production and/or retention of truncated copies of chromosome 5. Although trisomy 5 does not grossly distort the interphase arrangement of fluorescent-tagged sites on chromosome 5, it may somewhat enhance associations between transgene alleles. Our analysis reveals the complex genomic changes that can occur in aneuploids and underscores the importance of using multiple experimental approaches to investigate how chromosome numerical changes condition abnormal phenotypes and

  7. [Nuclear protein matrix from giant nuclei of Chironomus plumosus determinates polythene chromosome organization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, M S; Chentsov, Iu S

    2010-01-01

    Giant nuclei from salivary glands of Chironomus plumosus were treated in situ with detergent, 2 M NaCl and nucleases in order to reveal residual nuclear matrix proteins (NMP). It was shown, that preceding stabilization of non-histone proteins with 2 mM CuCl2 allowed to visualize the structure of polythene chromosomes at every stage of the extraction of histones and DNA. Stabilized NPM of polythene chromosomes maintains their morphology and banding patterns, which is observed by light and electron microscopy, whereas internal fibril net or residual nucleoli are not found. In stabilized NPM of polythene chromosomes, topoisomerase IIalpha and SMC1 retain their localization that is typical of untreated chromosomes. NPM of polythene chromosomes also includes sites of DNA replication, visualized with BrDU incubation, and some RNA-components. So, we can conclude that structure of NPM from giant nuclei is equal to NPM from normal interphase nuclei, and that morphological features of polythene chromosomes depend on the presence of NMP.

  8. Field-substance interaction and collective oscillation of nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shermatov, E.N.; Choriev, M.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: In this work a mechanism of formation of collective excitation in a set of particles, including atomic nuclei, is proposed. According to [1] the energy density of cosmic vacuum significantly exceeds the energy density of an atomic nucleus. In [2] the process of formation of the physical vacuum in surrounding cosmic space was considered. We considered the behavior of a system of particles, which possesses transversal and longitudinal oscillation with frequency ω 0 in the physical or cosmic vacuum. The oscillating influence on the physical vacuum and surrounding particles on a single particle leads to inducing the spins with various directions and magnitudes. This process leads to the formation of oscillating response wave function (RWF) of particles. As a result of a phase coherency among RWF of particles an oscillating self-coordinated field in a set of particles is formed. As a result of realization of the phase coherency among harmonics of RWF of particles there occurs a deformation of the character of distribution of the energy structure of the self-coordinated field, which, finally, transforms into a resonant line. At this occurs a collapse of the RWF of particles there. In terms of these ideas we explained the observed regularities in the self-coordinated field in a set of particles, including the atomic nuclei. It was shown that the giant resonance in spectra of atomic nuclei is a result of manifestation of the self-coordinated field of atomic nuclei. As a result of realization of the phase coherency among harmonics of RWF of atomic nuclei there occurs a collapse of the RWF of particles, and the energy structure of the self-coordinated field of nuclei gains a resonant form, and it is manifested as the giant resonance. In deformable nuclei the RWF of particles possesses two oscillation modes, and that is why in the energy spectrum of the self-coordinated field of nuclei they are manifested as two maximum

  9. Interphase transfer kinetics of uranium using the drop method, Lewis cell, and Kenics mixer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horner, D.E.; Mailen, J.C.; Thiel, S.W.; Scott, T.C.; Yates, R.G.

    1979-05-01

    The rate constants for the interphase transfer of uranium between 3.5 M HNO 3 and tributyl phosphate (TBP) - normal hydrocarbon diluent solutions have been measured using the single drop method, Lewis cell method, and a Kenics mixer - centrifugal separator. Rate constants obtained by all methods were the same within experimental error. The variables studied that affect the rate constants include the TBP concentration, the acidity and total neutral nitrate concentrations of the aqueous phase, and temperature. Results of these tests indicate that the rate controlling mechanism is chemical reaction at the interface

  10. Effect of elastic interphase strains on extinction in aging nimonic type alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gitgarts, M.I.; Ivashin, V.V.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of νsup(')-phase separation processes on the variation of (3) CuKsub(α) diffraction line integral intensity in KhN67VMTYu alloy ageing has been investigated, the alloy being characterized by various degrees of volumetric inconsistency between the separation phase and matrix. The ageing of KhN67VMTYu alloy, in which the separation of the νsup(')-phase does not cause interphase strains, is not accompanied by abatement of extinction: the diffraction line intensity is practically the same for both aged and tempered specimens

  11. Control of Regime of Unified Interphase Power Controller by the Use of Rotary Transformer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalinin L.P.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Interphase Power Controller (IPC has some properties of the source of the current. The use of these technical devices in electrical networks, in addition to optimization of the flow distribution, contributes to limiting of short-circuit currents and limits the level of distribution of electromechanical transients between energy systems. The increase of IPC controllability allows assigning some control function upon them and ensuring a more favorable operation of the energy system generators. We have studied a variant of such a device, which is controlled by a rotary phase-shifting transformer using the asynchronous electric machines with locked phase-wound rotor.

  12. Interphase death and repair of radiation injuries to thoracic aorta endothelium of mammals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shcherbova, E.N.; Ivanov, Yu.V.

    1978-01-01

    Using the method of plane preparations injury to the thoracic aorta endothelium of guinea-pigs, rats and rabbits exposed to various doses of γ-rays ( 60 Co) has been studied. The value of the threshold dose, tested by diminution of the endothelial cell quantity, has been found to be 250 R for guinea-pigs, 830 R, for rats and 880 R, for rabbits. It has been shown by means of the fractionated irradiation model that the interphase endothelial cells of guinea-pigs and rats can recover from sublethal radiation injuries

  13. Spectrin-like proteins in plant nuclei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijter, de N.C.A.; Ketelaar, T.; Blumenthal, S.S.D.; Emons, A.M.C.; Schel, J.H.N.

    2000-01-01

    We analysed the presence and localization of spectrin-like proteins in nuclei of various plant tissues, using several anti-erythrocyte spectrin antibodies on isolated pea nuclei and nuclei in cells. Western blots of extracted purified pea nuclei show a cross-reactive pair of bands at 220–240 kDa,

  14. Effect of interaction between inclusions in a gas-liquid mixture on interphase heat and mass transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nigmatulin, B.I.; Kroshilin, A.E.; Kroshilin, V.E.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of interaction between inclusions in a gas-liquid mixture on interphase heat and mass transfer is analyzed. It is taken into account that inclusions (bubbles or drops) are not in a pure carrier phase, but in a disperse medium, mean properties of which are determined by the presence of other inclusions in it and by a temperature field around them. The consideration is carried out in the framework of two model of monodisperse mixture, i.e. that with a chaotic distribution of inclusions, and that with a regular distribution, when the distance between centers of inclusions is fixed. The correlation functions method is shown to be effective for the both models. Mean temperature fields around inclusions are determined along with the intensity of interphase heat and mass transfer. The dependences obtained are in a satisfactory agreement with experimental data. The dependence of interphase heat and mass transfer on the structure of disperse mixture is analyzed

  15. Interphase Chromosome Conformation and Chromatin-Chromatin Interactions in Human Epithelial Cells Cultured Under Different Gravity Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Wong, Michael; Hada, Megumi; Wu, Honglu

    2015-01-01

    Microgravity has been shown to alter global gene expression patterns and protein levels both in cultured cells and animal models. It has been suggested that the packaging of chromatin fibers in the interphase nucleus is closely related to genome function, and the changes in transcriptional activity are tightly correlated with changes in chromatin folding. This study explores the changes of chromatin conformation and chromatin-chromatin interactions in the simulated microgravity environment, and investigates their correlation to the expression of genes located at different regions of the chromosome. To investigate the folding of chromatin in interphase under various culture conditions, human epithelial cells, fibroblasts, and lymphocytes were fixed in the G1 phase. Interphase chromosomes were hybridized with a multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) probe for chromosome 3 which distinguishes six regions of the chromosome as separate colors. After images were captured with a laser scanning confocal microscope, the 3-dimensional structure of interphase chromosome 3 was reconstructed at multi-mega base pair scale. In order to determine the effects of microgravity on chromosome conformation and orientation, measures such as distance between homologous pairs, relative orientation of chromosome arms about a shared midpoint, and orientation of arms within individual chromosomes were all considered as potentially impacted by simulated microgravity conditions. The studies revealed non-random folding of chromatin in interphase, and suggested an association of interphase chromatin folding with radiation-induced chromosome aberration hotspots. Interestingly, the distributions of genes with expression changes over chromosome 3 in cells cultured under microgravity environment are apparently clustered on specific loci and chromosomes. This data provides important insights into how mammalian cells respond to microgravity at molecular level.

  16. The morphology of cometary nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, H. U.; Jorda, L.

    comets display residual activity or clouds of dust grains around their nuclei. Taking the residual signal into account (mostly using simple models for the brightness distribution) the size estimates of the nuclei could be improved. The (nuclear) magnitude of a comet depends on the product of its albedo and cross-section. Only in a few cases could the albedo and size of a cometary nucleus be separated by additional observation of its thermal emission at infrared wavelengths. By comparison with outer Solar System asteroids Cruikshank et al. (1985) derived a surprisingly low albedo of about 0.04. A value in clear contradiction to the perception of an icy surface but fully confirmed by the first resolved images of a cometary nucleus during the flybys of the Vega and Giotto spacecraft of comet Halley (Sagdeev et al. 1986, Keller et al. 1986). The improvements of radar techniques led to the detection of reflected signals and finally to the derivation of nuclear dimensions and rotation rates. The observations, however, are also model dependent (rotation and size are similarly interwoven as are albedo and size) and sensitive to large dust grains in the vicinity of a nucleus. As an example, Kamoun et al. (1982) determined the radius of comet Encke to 1.5 (2.3, 1.0) km using the spin axis determination of Whipple and Sekanina (1979). The superb spatial resolution of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is not quite sufficient to resolve a cometary nucleus. The intensity distribution of the inner coma, however, can be observed and extrapolated toward the nucleus based on models of the dust distribution. If this contribution is subtracted from the central brightness the signal of the nucleus can be derived and hence its product of albedo times cross-section (Lamy and Toth 1995, Rembor 1998, Keller and Rembor 1998; Section 4.3). It has become clear that cometary nuclei are dark, small, often irregular bodies with dimensions ranging from about a kilometre (comet Wirtanen, the target of

  17. From heavy nuclei to super-heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theisen, Ch.

    2003-01-01

    The existence of super-heavy nuclei has been predicted nearly fifty years ago. Due to the strong coulomb repulsion, the stabilisation of these nuclei is possible only through shell effects. The reasons for this fragile stability, as well as the theoretical predictions concerning the position of the island of stability are presented in the first part of this lecture. In the second part, experiments and experimental techniques which have been used to synthesize or search for super-heavy elements are described. Spectroscopic studies performed in very heavy elements are presented in the following section. We close this lecture with techniques that are currently being developed in order to reach the superheavy island and to study the structure of very-heavy nuclei. (author)

  18. Complete destruction of heavy nuclei by hadrons and nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolstov, K.D.

    1980-01-01

    The total disintegration is considered of Ag and Pb nuclei and 4 He, 12 C nuclei With a momentum of 4.5 GeV/c per nucleon. It is shown that nucleons are mainly emitted, and there is no residual nUcleus the mass of which is comparable to that of the primary nucleus. The probability of total nucleus disintegration is considered as a function of projectile energy and the mass. The multiplicity, energy and emission angle of particles are considerred as well. It is shown that the density of nuclear matter in the overlap zone of colliding nuclei exceeds the usual one by a factor of approximately 4. A comparison is made with interaction models. A conclusion is drawn of the collective interaction mechanism (perhaps, of the shock wave type) of particle ejection from the target nucleus at the first stage of interaction and of explosive decay of the residual nucleus at the next one

  19. Stable cycling of double-walled silicon nanotube battery anodes through solid–electrolyte interphase control

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Hui

    2012-03-25

    Although the performance of lithium ion-batteries continues to improve, their energy density and cycle life remain insufficient for applications in consumer electronics, transport and large-scale renewable energy storage 1-5. Silicon has a large charge storage capacity and this makes it an attractive anode material, but pulverization during cycling and an unstable solid-electrolyte interphase has limited the cycle life of silicon anodes to hundreds of cycles 6-11. Here, we show that anodes consisting of an active silicon nanotube surrounded by an ion-permeable silicon oxide shell can cycle over 6,000 times in half cells while retaining more than 85% of their initial capacity. The outer surface of the silicon nanotube is prevented from expansion by the oxide shell, and the expanding inner surface is not exposed to the electrolyte, resulting in a stable solid-electrolyte interphase. Batteries containing these double-walled silicon nanotube anodes exhibit charge capacities approximately eight times larger than conventional carbon anodes and charging rates of up to 20C (a rate of 1C corresponds to complete charge or discharge in one hour). © 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  20. Interphase and magnetotransport of LSMO-PMMA nanocomposites obtained by a sonochemical method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Mariano; Pardo, Helena; Faccio, Ricardo; Tumelero, Milton A.; Plá Cid, Cristiani Campos; Castiglioni, Jorge; Pasa, André A.; Mombrú, Álvaro W.

    2015-05-01

    In this report, we studied the structural, microstructural and compositional trends in a manganite-polymethylmethacrilate (LSMO-PMMA) nanocomposite prepared by a sonochemical method focusing in the study of its interphase and its correlation with magnetotransport. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Raman scattering and X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) studies showed evidence of PMMA reactivity with partial decomposition at the LSMO nanoparticles interface. Additionally, grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) showed information about the microstructure and the separation between nanoparticles in these nanocomposite materials. An enhancement in the low field magnetoresistance (LFMR) respect to pure LSMO was observed for a 20% weight fraction addition of PMMA in the high temperature regime (205-305 K) probably due to the increase in the magnetic disorder at the grain boundaries caused by the ultrasonic treatment. Nevertheless, lower PMMA weight fraction addition showed no enhancement in LFMR respect to pure LSMO, probably in agreement with the higher decomposition rate observed at the interphase.

  1. Evolution of interphase and intergranular stresses in Zr-2.5Nb during room temperature deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, S.; Daymond, M.R.; Holt, R.A.; Gharghouri, M.A.; Oliver, E.C.

    2009-01-01

    Both in situ tension and compression tests have been carried out on textured Zr-2.5Nb plate material at room temperature. Deformation along all the three principle plate directions has been studied and the evolution of interphase and intergranular strains along the loading and the principle Poisson's directions has been investigated by neutron diffraction. The evolution of interphase and intergranular strain was determined by the relative phase properties, crystal properties and texture distribution. The average phase behaviors are similar during tension and compression, where the β-phase in this material is stronger than the α-phase. The asymmetric yielding of the α-{0 0 0 2} grain family results in a relatively large intergranular strain in the loading direction during compression and different dependence of strength during tension and compression on texture. The combination of the thermal residual stress and the asymmetric CRSS in the axis gives the {0 0 0 2} grain family a higher strength in compression than in tension

  2. Quantitative comparison of a human cancer cell surface proteome between interphase and mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özlü, Nurhan; Qureshi, Mohammad H; Toyoda, Yusuke; Renard, Bernhard Y; Mollaoglu, Gürkan; Özkan, Nazlı E; Bulbul, Selda; Poser, Ina; Timm, Wiebke; Hyman, Anthony A; Mitchison, Timothy J; Steen, Judith A

    2015-01-13

    The cell surface is the cellular compartment responsible for communication with the environment. The interior of mammalian cells undergoes dramatic reorganization when cells enter mitosis. These changes are triggered by activation of the CDK1 kinase and have been studied extensively. In contrast, very little is known of the cell surface changes during cell division. We undertook a quantitative proteomic comparison of cell surface-exposed proteins in human cancer cells that were tightly synchronized in mitosis or interphase. Six hundred and twenty-eight surface and surface-associated proteins in HeLa cells were identified; of these, 27 were significantly enriched at the cell surface in mitosis and 37 in interphase. Using imaging techniques, we confirmed the mitosis-selective cell surface localization of protocadherin PCDH7, a member of a family with anti-adhesive roles in embryos. We show that PCDH7 is required for development of full mitotic rounding pressure at the onset of mitosis. Our analysis provided basic information on how cell cycle progression affects the cell surface. It also provides potential pharmacodynamic biomarkers for anti-mitotic cancer chemotherapy. © 2014 The Authors.

  3. The Effect of 1-Pentylamine as Solid Electrolyte Interphase Precursor on Lithium Metal Anodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Markus S.; Koch, Stephan L.; Passerini, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Manufacturing of a well-controlled artificial SEI on lithium metal electrodes. • Native SEI-free lithium electrodes. • Lithium electrodes with decreased impedance and overpotential due to artificial SEI. • Process development to remove influence of native SEI. • 1-pentylamine in n-pentane as artificial SEI precursor for lithium metal. - Abstract: In this study, the formation of an artificial primary solid electrolyte interphase on a fresh Li surface, via reaction with 1-pentylamine (PA), is reported, allowing removing the influence of the metal electrode’s prior history. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, galvanostatic cycling, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) are used in order to investigate the effect of PA as solid electrolyte interphase precursor on Li metal. It is shown that pretreating native SEI-free Li metal surfaces with 1 M PA in n-pentane sharply decreases the electrode impedance and overpotential with respect to the treatment with only n-pentane. The treatment with 1 M PA in n-pentane results in surface roughening, but no increase of dendrite formation upon cycling. However, the use of higher PA concentration (5 M) increases impedance and overpotential and leads to dendrite growth.

  4. Subgroup report on grain boundary and interphase boundary structure and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balluffi, R.W.; Cannon, R.M.; Clarke, D.R.; Heuer, A.H.; Ho, P.S.; Kear, B.H.; Vitek, V.; Weertman, J.R.; White, C.L.

    1979-01-01

    In many high temperature structural applications, the performance characteristics of a materials system are largely controlled by the properties of its grain and interphase boundaries. Failure in creep and fatigue frequently occurs by cavitation, or cracking along grain boundaries. In a few special cases, this failure problem has been overcome by directional alignment of grain and interphase boundaries by various types of metallurgical processing such as directional solidification and directional recrystallization. A good example is to be found in the application of directionally aligned structures in high performance gas-turbine airfoils. However, where fine, equiaxed grain structures are desirable, other methods of controlling grain boundary properties have been developed. Important among these has been the introduction of improvements in primary melting practices, designed to control important impurities. This is of decisive importance because even traces of certain impurity elements present in grain boundaries in high temperature materials can seriously affect properties. Impurities are deleterious and need to be removed. However, in certain cases, (e.g., creep fracture) controlled impurity additions can be beneficial and result in improved properties

  5. Detection of beta-tubulin in the cytoplasm of the interphasic Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Conde, Eduardo; Vargas-Mejía, Miguel Ángel; Díaz-Orea, María Alicia; Hernández-Rivas, Rosaura; Cárdenas-Perea, María Elena; Guerrero-González, Tayde; González-Barrios, Juan Antonio; Montiel-Jarquín, Álvaro José

    2016-08-01

    It is known that the microtubules (MT) of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites form an intranuclear mitotic spindle. However, electron microscopy studies and the employment of anti-beta-tubulin (β-tubulin) antibodies have not exhibited these cytoskeletal structures in the cytoplasm of these parasites. The purpose of this work was to detect β-tubulin in the cytoplasm of interphasic E. histolytica trophozoites. Activated or non-activated HMI-IMSS-strain E. histolytica trophozoites were used and cultured for 72 h at 37 °C in TYI-S-33 medium, and then these were incubated with the anti-β-tubulin antibody of E. histolytica. The anti-β-tubulin antibody reacted with the intranuclear mitotic spindle of E. histolytica-activated trophozoites as control. In contrast, in non-activated interphasic parasites, anti-β-tubulin antibody reacted with diverse puntiform structures in the cytoplasm and with ring-shaped structures localized in the cytoplasm, cellular membrane and endocytic stomas. In this work, for the first time, the presence of β-tubulin is shown in the cytoplasm of E. histolytica trophozoites. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Imaging the interphase of carbon fiber composites using transmission electron microscopy: Preparations by focused ion beam, ion beam etching, and ultramicrotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Qing

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Three sample preparation techniques, focused ion beam (FIB, ion beam (IB etching, and ultramicrotomy (UM were used in comparison to analyze the interphase of carbon fiber/epoxy composites using transmission electron microscopy. An intact interphase with a relatively uniform thickness was obtained by FIB, and detailed chemical analysis of the interphase was investigated by electron energy loss spectroscopy. It shows that the interphase region is 200 nm wide with an increasing oxygen-to-carbon ratio from 10% to 19% and an almost constant nitrogen-to-carbon ratio of about 3%. However, gallium implantation of FIB tends to hinder fine structure analysis of the interphase. For IB etching, the interphase region is observed with transition morphology from amorphous resin to nano-crystalline carbon fiber, but the uneven sample thickness brings difficulty for quantitative chemical analysis. Moreover, UM tends to cause damage and/or deformation on the interphase. These results are meaningful for in-depth understanding on the interphase characteristic of carbon fiber composites.

  7. Reflection asymmetric shapes in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, I.; Carpenter, M.P.; Emling, H.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental data show that there is no even-even nucleus with a reflection asymmetric shape in its ground state. Maximum octupole- octupole correlations occur in nuclei in the mass 224 (N∼134, Z∼88) region. Parity doublets, which are the characteristic signature of octupole deformation, have been observed in several odd mass Ra, Ac and Pa nuclei. Intertwined negative and positive parity levels have been observed in several even-even Ra and Th nuclei above spin ∼8ℎ. In both cases, the opposite parity states are connected by fast El transitions. In some medium-mass nuclei intertwined negative and positive parity levels have also been observed above spin ∼7ℎ. The nuclei which exhibit octupole deformation in this mass region are 144 Ba, 146 Ba and 146 Ce; 142 Ba, 148 Ce, 150 Ce and 142 Xe do not show these characteristics. No case of parity doublet has been observed in the mass 144 region. 32 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab

  8. QCD, hadrons and nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yazaki, K.

    1995-01-01

    The nuclear or color transparency in initial and final state interactions of protons, involved in high energy semi-exclusive processes such as (, e ' p) and (p, 2 p) reactions, is discussed first in the conventional Glauber approach and then in models taking account of the proton internal dynamics. The conventional approach includes nuclear many-body effects as well as multiple scattering effects and serves as a reference for finding the roles of the internal dynamics in the observed transparency. The models predict non-trivial effects on the transparency. (author)

  9. Neutrino interactions with nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Martini, M; Ericson, M; Marteau, J

    2009-01-01

    We present a model for neutrino-nucleus scattering in the energy region relevant for present and forthcoming neutrino-oscillation experiments. The model is based on the RPA treatment of the nuclear responses in the quasi-elastic and Delta-resonance region. It includes also in a phenomenological way nucleon knock-out. It aims at the description, within a single framework, of several final state channels i.e. quasi-elastic, incoherent and coherent one-pion production and two- or several-nucleon knock-out.

  10. Protonic decay of oriented nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadmensky, S.G.

    2002-01-01

    On the basis of the multiparticle theory of protonic decay, the angular distributions of protons emitted by oriented spherical and deformed nuclei in the laboratory frame and in the internal coordinate frame of deformed parent nuclei are constructed with allowance for symmetry with respect to time inversion. It is shown that, because of the deep-subbarrier character of protonic decay, the adiabatic approximation is not applicable to describing the angular distributions of protons emitted by oriented deformed nuclei and that the angular distribution of protons in the laboratory frame does not coincide with that in the internal coordinate frame. It is demonstrated that these angular distributions coincide only if the adiabatic and the semiclassical approximation are simultaneously valid

  11. Nuclei in a neutron star

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyamatsu, K.; Yamada, M.

    1994-01-01

    We report on the recent progress in understanding the matter in the crust of a neutron star. For nuclides in the outer crust, recently measured masses of neutron-rich nuclei enable us to determine more accurately the stable nuclide as a function of the matter density. In the inner crust, the compressible liquid-drop model predicts successive change of the nuclear shape, from sphere to cylinder, slab, cylindrical hole and spherical hole at densities just before the transition to uniform matter. In order to go beyond the liquiddrop model, we performed the Thomas-Fermi calculation paying special attention to the surface diffuseness, and have recently calculated the shell energies of the non-spherical nuclei. We have found from these studies that all these non-spherical nuclei exist stably in the above order even if we include the surface diffuseness and shell energies. (author)

  12. Neutron scattering on deformed nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, L.F.; Haight, R.C.; Pohl, B.A.; Wong, C.; Lagrange, C.

    1984-09-01

    Measurements of neutron elastic and inelastic differential cross sections around 14 MeV for 9 Be, C, 181 Ta, 232 Th, 238 U and 239 Pu have been analyzed using a coupled channel (CC) formalism for deformed nuclei and phenomenological global optical model potentials (OMP). For the actinide targets these results are compared with the predictions of a semi-microscopic calculation using Jeukenne, Lejeune and Mahaux (JLM) microscopic OMP and a deformed ground state nuclear density. The overall agreement between calculations and the measurements is reasonable good even for the very light nuclei, where the quality of the fits is better than those obtained with spherical OMP

  13. Nuclei, hadrons, and elementary particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bopp, F.W.

    1989-01-01

    This book is a short introduction to the physics of the nuclei, hadrons, and elementary particles for students of physics. Important facts and model imaginations on the structure, the decay, and the scattering of nuclei, the 'zoology' of the hadrons and basic facts of hadronic scattering processes, a short introduction to quantum electrodynamics and quantum chromodynamics and the most important processes of lepton and parton physics, as well as the current-current approach of weak interactions and the Glashow-Weinberg-Salam theory are presented. (orig.) With 153 figs., 10 tabs [de

  14. Octupole shapes in heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, I.

    1994-01-01

    Theoretical calculations and measurements show the presence of strong octupole correlations in thecyround states and low-lying states of odd-mass and odd-odd nuclei in the RaPa region. Evidence for octupole correlations is provided by the observation of parity doublets and reductions in M1 matrix elements, decoupling parameters, and Coriolis matrix elements Involving high-j states. Enhancement of E1 transition rates has also been observed for some of the octupole deformed nuclei. The most convincing argument for octupole deformation is provided by the similarities of the reduced alpha decay rates to the two members of parity doublets

  15. Exotic Nuclei Arena in JHP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, T.

    1991-12-01

    The Exotic Nuclei Arena planned in Japanese Hadron Project aims to accelerate various unstable nuclei produced in 1-GeV proton-induced reactions up to 6.5 MeV/u by means of heavy-ion linacs. The present status of research and development for the Earena is briefly reported. The construction of the prototype facility to accelerate unstable beams up to 0.8 MeV/u is planned in 1992-94, in which the existing cyclotron in INS is used as the primary accelerator. (author)

  16. Spinodal decomposition of atomic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chomaz, P. [Grand Accelerateur National d`Ions Lourds (GANIL), 14 - Caen (France); Colonna, M.; Guarnera, A. [Grand Accelerateur National d`Ions Lourds (GANIL), 14 - Caen (France)]|[LNS, Catania (Italy)

    1996-12-31

    Multifragmentation of atomic nuclei is discussed. It is shown that this description of the dynamics of first order phase transitions in infinite and finite system is now partially achieved. An important conclusion is that in some specific cases well-defined collective motions were initiating the self-organisation of the unstable matter in fragments. In the case of finite systems the possible signals kept from this early fragmentation stage can inform on the possible occurrence of a liquid-gas phase transition in nuclei. (K.A.). 21 refs.

  17. Spinodal decomposition of atomic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chomaz, P.; Colonna, M.; Guarnera, A.

    1996-01-01

    Multifragmentation of atomic nuclei is discussed. It is shown that this description of the dynamics of first order phase transitions in infinite and finite system is now partially achieved. An important conclusion is that in some specific cases well-defined collective motions were initiating the self-organisation of the unstable matter in fragments. In the case of finite systems the possible signals kept from this early fragmentation stage can inform on the possible occurrence of a liquid-gas phase transition in nuclei. (K.A.)

  18. Are there superheavy atomic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, G.

    1982-04-01

    The author presents a populary introduction to the formation of nuclei with special regards to superheavy nuclei. After a general description of the methods of physics the atomic hypothesis is considered. Thereafter the structure of the nucleus is discussed, and the different isotopes are considered. Then radioactivity is described as an element transmutation. Thereafter the thermonuclear reactions in the sun are considered. Then the synthesis of elements using heavy ion reactions is described. In this connection the transuranium elements and the superheavy elements are considered. (orig./HSI) [de

  19. The mechanism of total disintegration of heavy nuclei by fast hadrons and nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strugalska-Gola, E.; Strugalski, Z.

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism of the total disintegration of atomic nuclei by fast hadrons and nuclei is considered. The passage of energetic hadrons through layers of intranuclear matter, accompanied by emission of fast nucleons with kinetic energies from about 20 up to about 500 MeV from definite local small regions in the nuclei around projectile courses in them, allows one to explain simply the occurrence of the total destruction of nuclei involved in the collisions. Light nuclei may be totally disintegrated by fast hadrons and nuclei; heavier nuclei may be totally disintegrated only in central collisions of nuclei with similar mass numbers

  20. Temperatures of exploding nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serfling, V.; Schwarz, C.; Begemann-Blaich, M.; Fritz, S.; Gross, C.; Kleinevoss, U.; Kunze, W.D; Lynen, U.; Mahi, M.; Mueller, W.F.J.; Odeh, T.; Schnittker, M.; Trautmann, W.; Woerner, A.; Xi, H. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Bassini, R.; Iori, I.; Moroni, A.; Petruzzelli, F. [Milan Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Scienze Fisiche]|[Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Milan (Italy); Gaff, S.J.; Kunde, G.J. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy]|[Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab.; Imme, G.; Maddalena, V.; Nociforo, C.; Raciti, G.; Riccobene, G.; Romano, F.P.; Saija, A.; Sfienti, C.; Verde, G. [Catania Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica]|[Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy); Moehlenkamp, T.; Seidel, W. [Forschungszentrum Rossendorf e.V. (FZR), Dresden (Germany); Ocker, B.; Schuettauf, A. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik; Pochodzalla, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Trzcinski, A.; Zwieglinski, B. [Soltan Inst. for Nuclear Studies, Warsaw (Poland)

    1998-01-01

    Breakup temperatures in central collisions of {sup 197}Au+{sup 197}Au at bombarding energies E/A=50 to 200 MeV were determined with two methods. Isotope temperatures, deduced from double ratios of hydrogen, helium, and lithium isotopic yields, increase monotonically with bombarding energy from 5 MeV to 12 MeV, in qualitative agreement with a scenario of chemical freeze-out after adiabatic expansion. Excited-state temperatures, derived from yield ratios of states in {sup 4}He, {sup 5,6}Li, and {sup 8}Be, are about 5 MeV, independent of the projectile energy, and seem to reflect the internal temperature of fragments at their final separation from the system. (orig.)

  1. Particles and Nuclei, Letters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The present collection of letters from JINR, Dubna, contains eight separate letters on analysis of experimental data on relativistic nuclear collisions in the Lobachevski space, relativistic contribution of the final-state interaction to deuteron photodisintegration, on the charge asymmetry of the like-sign lepton pairs induced by B - B bar - production asymmetry, limits on the ν e → ν e neutrino oscillation parameters from an experiment at the IHEP-JINR neutrino detector, excitation of high spin isomers in photonuclear reactions, study of product formation in proton-nuclear reactions on the 129 I target induced by 660-MeV protons, application of jet pumps in the cryogenic system of the Nuclotron - superconducting accelerator of relativistic particles and study of the silicon drift detector performance with inclined tracks

  2. Particles and nuclei, letters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The present collection of letters from JINR, Dubna, contains eight separate records on status of 116 Cd double β decay study with 116 CdWO 4 scintillators, new limits on 2β processes in 40 Ca and 46 Ca by using low radioactive CaF 2 (Eu) crystal scintillators, the single state dominance in 2νββ-decay transitions to excited 0 + and 2 + final states, present status of the MONOLITH project, technique of neutrino-induced muon detection on the Earth surface, high-sensitive spectrometer of fast neutrons and the results of fast neutron background flux measurements at the gallium-germanium solar neutrino experiment (SAGE), new experimental limits on the electron stability and excitation of nuclear levels in 23 Na, 127 I and 129 Xe induced by the electron decay on the atomic shell and element-loaded organic scintillators for neutron and neutrino physics

  3. Cytoskeletal dynamics in interphase, mitosis and cytokinesis analysed through Agrobacterium-mediated transient transformation of tobacco BY-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschmann, H; Green, P; Sambade, A; Doonan, J H; Lloyd, C W

    2011-04-01

    Transient transformation with Agrobacterium is a widespread tool allowing rapid expression analyses in plants. However, the available methods generate expression in interphase and do not allow the routine analysis of dividing cells. Here, we present a transient transformation method (termed 'TAMBY2') to enable cell biological studies in interphase and cell division. Agrobacterium-mediated transient gene expression in tobacco BY-2 was analysed by Western blotting and quantitative fluorescence microscopy. Time-lapse microscopy of cytoskeletal markers was employed to monitor cell division. Double-labelling in interphase and mitosis enabled localization studies. We found that the transient transformation efficiency was highest when BY-2/Agrobacterium co-cultivation was performed on solid medium. Transformants produced in this way divided at high frequency. We demonstrated the utility of the method by defining the behaviour of a previously uncharacterized microtubule motor, KinG, throughout the cell cycle. Our analyses demonstrated that TAMBY2 provides a flexible tool for the transient transformation of BY-2 with Agrobacterium. Fluorescence double-labelling showed that KinG localizes to microtubules and to F-actin. In interphase, KinG accumulates on microtubule lagging ends, suggesting a minus-end-directed function in vivo. Time-lapse studies of cell division showed that GFP-KinG strongly labels preprophase band and phragmoplast, but not the metaphase spindle. © 2010 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2010 New Phytologist Trust.

  4. Organization of an interphase system for the coupling of WINS-D4 and SNAP-3D programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frias Suarez, D.

    1989-01-01

    In this report a modular system developed for the CC-1 critical assembly's physical calculation is described. It was based upon the WINS-D4 and SNAP-3D codes, which are coupled by means of an interphase module and a groups diffusion cross sections library

  5. Dynamic behaviour of interphases and its implication on high-energy-density cathode materials in lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wangda; Dolocan, Andrei; Oh, Pilgun; Celio, Hugo; Park, Suhyeon; Cho, Jaephil; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2017-01-01

    Undesired electrode–electrolyte interactions prevent the use of many high-energy-density cathode materials in practical lithium-ion batteries. Efforts to address their limited service life have predominantly focused on the active electrode materials and electrolytes. Here an advanced three-dimensional chemical and imaging analysis on a model material, the nickel-rich layered lithium transition-metal oxide, reveals the dynamic behaviour of cathode interphases driven by conductive carbon additives (carbon black) in a common nonaqueous electrolyte. Region-of-interest sensitive secondary-ion mass spectrometry shows that a cathode-electrolyte interphase, initially formed on carbon black with no electrochemical bias applied, readily passivates the cathode particles through mutual exchange of surface species. By tuning the interphase thickness, we demonstrate its robustness in suppressing the deterioration of the electrode/electrolyte interface during high-voltage cell operation. Our results provide insights on the formation and evolution of cathode interphases, facilitating development of in situ surface protection on high-energy-density cathode materials in lithium-based batteries. PMID:28443608

  6. The effect of the inter-phase delay interval in the spontaneous object recognition test for pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek; Thygesen, Kristin Sjølie; Nielsen, Thomas Rune

    2007-01-01

    In the neuroscience community interest for using the pig is growing. Several disease models have been developed creating a need for validation of behavioural paradigms in these animals. Here, we report the effect of different inter-phase delay intervals on the performance of Göttingen minipigs...

  7. Interphase death of dividing cells. Kinetics of death of cultured Chinese hamster fibroblasts after irradiation with various doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kublik, L.N.; Veksler, A.M.; Ehjdus, L.Kh.

    1989-01-01

    In studying the kinetics of interphase death (ID) of cultured Chinese hamster cells after irradiation with doses of 100 to 800 Gy the authors showed an increase in the ID rate with increasing radiation dose; the presence of serum in the medium both during and after irradiation prevents the cell death

  8. Radiation-induced interphase death observed in human T-cell lymphoma cells established as a nude mouse tumor line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, T.; Yoshida, S.; Miyamoto, T.

    1990-01-01

    Interphase death of cells occurs physiologically in healthy animal tissues as well as in tissues pathologically injured by radiation or drugs. An active self-destruction process has been found to play a major role in the interphase death of highly radiosensitive cells. However, the mechanism of this radiation-induced interphase death in human lymphoma has not yet been studied in detail. In the present study, we examined a lymphoma derived from a child lymphoblastic lymphoma bearing CD1, CD4, and CD8 antigens and established in nude mice. Low-dose x-irradiation of this lymphoma induced interphase cell death with characteristic morphological and biological changes of an active self-destruction process, i.e., changes in cell surface appearance seen using scanning electron microscopy and nuclear fragmentation accompanied with an increase in free DNA. The process was proved to require protein synthesis. It was concluded that the radiosensitivity of this T-cell lymphoma of common thymic type is mainly due to the occurrence of the active self-destruction process

  9. Studies of nuclei using radioactive beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piercey, R.B.

    1989-07-01

    The 12 month period from May 1988 to July 1989 represents the first full year of our 18 month pilot program in nuclear structure research. In this period, research was initiated to develop a capability for radioactive secondary beams at Argonne National Laboratory using the Atlas and the new Fragment Mass Analyzer (FMA), which is currently under construction. Two major new detector facilities are currently in the final stages of design and testing. The Large-Area, Scintillator Telescope (LAST) detector is fully operational and will be shipped to Argonne National Laboratory in August for fit-tests and in-beam calibrations. The first segments of a new sixteen-segment neutron multiplicity detector have been built and tested. The remaining segments are currently being constructed. Research was continued in the areas of (1) Coulomb excitation studies of rare earth and actinide nuclei; (2) In-beam, gamma-ray spectroscopy of nuclei in the mass 100 region, and (3) Advanced detector design. Several journal articles and abstracts were published or submitted for publication in the reporting period, and others are currently in preparation. Three graduate students participated in the program, one from the University of Florida and two from the Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden

  10. Transitional nuclei near shell closures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, G. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Pai, H. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064, India and Present Address: Institut für Kernphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstrasse 9, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-08-14

    High spin states in Bismuth and Thallium nuclei near the Z = 82 shell closure and Cesium nuclei near the N = 82 shell closure in A = 190 and A = 130 regions, respectively, have been experimentally investigated using heavy-ion fusion evaporation reaction and by detecting the gamma rays using the Indian National Gamma Array (INGA). Interesting shape properties in these transitional nuclei have been observed. The results were compared with the neighboring nuclei in these two regions. The total Routhian surface (TRS) calculations have been performed for a better understanding of the observed properties. In mass region A = 190, a change in shape from spherical to deformed has been observd around neutron number N = 112 for the Bi (Z = 83) isotopes with proton number above the magic gap Z = 82, whereas, the shape of Tl (Z = 81) isotopes with proton number below the magic gap Z = 82 remains stable as a function of neutron number. An important transition from aplanar to planar configuration of angular momentum vectors leading to the occurance of nuclar chirality and magnetic rotation, respectively, has been proposed for the unique parity πh{sub 11/2}⊗νh{sub 11/2} configuration in Cs isotopes in the mass region A ∼ 130 around neutron number N = 79. These results are in commensurate with the TRS calculations.

  11. Cluster structure in Cf nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Shailesh K.; Biswal, S.K.; Bhuyan, M.; Patra, S.K.; Gupta, R.K.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the availability of advance experimental facilities, it is possible to probe the nuclei upto their nucleon level very precisely and analyzed the internal structure which will help us to resolve some mysterious problem of the decay of nuclei. Recently, the relativistic nuclear collision, confirmed the α cluster type structure in the 12 C which is the mile stone for the cluster structure in nuclei. The clustering phenomena in light and intermediate elements in nuclear chart is very interesting. There is a lot of work done by our group in the clustering behaviour of the nuclei. In this paper, the various prospectus of clustering in the isotopes of Cf nucleus including fission state is discussed. Here, 242 Cf isotope for the analysis, which is experimentally known is taken. The relativistic mean field model with well established NL3 parameter set is taken. For getting the exact ground state configuration of the isotopes, the calculation for minimizing the potential energy surface is performed by constraint method. The clustering structure of other Cf isotopes is discussed

  12. Particle detection from oriented nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wouters, J.; Moor, P. de; Schuurmans, P.; Severijns, N.; Vanderpoorten, W.; Vanneste, L.

    1992-01-01

    A survey is given of particle emission from nuclei that have been spin oriented by cryogenical means. Experiments and recent developments with detectors in the low temperature environment and their on-line application are reviewed. The most recent results are mentioned. Some phenomena to be unraveled in future studies are pointed out. (orig.)

  13. Rotational damping motion in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egido, J.L.; Faessler, A.

    1991-01-01

    The recently proposed model to explain the mechanism of the rotational motion damping in nuclei is exactly solved. When compared with the earlier approximative solution, we find significative differences in the low excitation energy limit (i.e. Γ μ 0 ). For the strength functions we find distributions going from the Wigner semicircle through gaussians to Breit-Wigner shapes. (orig.)

  14. Percolation and multifragmentation of nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shmakov, S.Yu.; Uzhinskij, V.V.

    1989-01-01

    A method to build the 'cold' nuclei as percolation clusters is suggested. Within the framework of definite assumptions of the character of nucleon-nucleon couplings breaking resulting from the nuclear reactions as description of the multifragmentation process in the hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus reactions at high energies is obtained. 19 refs.; 6 figs

  15. Octupole correlation effects in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chasman, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    Octupole correlation effects in nuclei are discussed from the point of view of many-body wavefunctions as well as mean-field methods. The light actinides, where octupole effects are largest, are considered in detail. Comparisons of theory and experiment are made for energy splittings of parity doublets; E1 transition matrix elements and one-nucleon transfer reactions

  16. Electron scattering for exotic nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-11-04

    Nov 4, 2014 ... A brand-new electron scattering facility, the SCRIT Electron Scattering Facility, will soon start its operation at RIKEN RI Beam Factory, Japan. This is the world's first electron scattering facility dedicated to the structure studies of short-lived nuclei. The goal of this facility is to determine the charge density ...

  17. A new look at the steel cord-rubber adhesive interphase by chemical depth profiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, G.E.

    2001-01-01

    The adhesive interphase formed between brass plated steel cord and sulfur crosslinked rubber is known to be a complex layer of metal oxides, sulfides, and rubber. Hostile aging of this system produces changes in the structure, morphology, thickness, and mechanical properties of this layer. In a previous publication it has been shown that the overall thickness of the sulfide layer as measured by depth profiling with Auger electron spectroscopy could be used to characterize the degradation of the adhesive bond [G. E. Hammer et al., J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 12, 2388 (1994)]. In this work multivariate statistical analysis of the sulfur Auger electron spectra was used to produce chemical depth profiles of the individual copper and zinc sulfide layers. These chemical depth profiles give new insight into the adhesion degradation mechanism on the nanometer scale. Particularly, the percentage of copper sulfide in the layer was found to be an accurate predictor of adhesion degradation

  18. Biological dosimetry of absorbed radiation by C-banding of interphase chromosomes in peripheral blood lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantelias, G.E.

    1993-01-01

    In the present report a C-banding procedure, refined to avoid swelling and chromosome distortion of freshly prepared prematurely condensed chromosomes (PCCs) spreads, is used to identify aberrations in non-stimulated human lymphocytes. The method allows immediate banding of the centromeric regions and enables scoring of aberrations within a time interval (3-4h after blood sample withdrawal) that is only a fraction of that normally required when cells stimulated to proliferate are analysed at metaphase. The dose-response for dicentrics and centric rings measured in interphase lymphocytes was found to be similar to that obtained at metaphase. Measurement of dicentrics and centric rings in prematurely condensed chromosomes of human lymphocytes would provide valuable information on radiation dose estimates, especially in cases of extreme urgency. (Author)

  19. Analysis of the Interphase on Carbon Black Formed in High Voltage Batteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Younesi, Reza; Christiansen, Ane Sælland; Scipioni, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Carbon black (CB) additives commonly used to increase the electrical conductivity of electrodes in Li-ion batteries are generally believed to be electrochemically inert additives in cathodes. Decomposition of electrolyte in the surface region of CB in Li-ion cells at high voltages up to 4.9 V...... is here studied using electrochemical measurements as well as structural and surface characterizations. LiPF6 and LiClO4 dissolved in ethylene carbonate:diethylene carbonate (1:1) were used as the electrolyte to study irreversible charge capacity of CB cathodes when cycled between 4.9 V and 2.5 V....... Synchrotron-based soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (SOXPES) results revealed spontaneous partial decomposition of the electrolytes on the CB electrode, without applying external current or voltage. Depth profile analysis of the electrolyte/cathode interphase indicated that the concentration of decomposed...

  20. Interphases, gelation, vitrification, porous glasses and the generalized Cauchy relation: epoxy/silica nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philipp, M; Mueller, U; Jimenez Rioboo, R J; Baller, J; Sanctuary, R; Krueger, J K [Laboratoire de Physique des Materiaux, University of Luxembourg, 162A avenue de la Faiencerie, L-1511 Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Possart, W [Fachbereich Werkstoffwissenschaften, Universitaet des Saarlandes, D-66123 Saarbruecken (Germany)], E-mail: martine.philipp@uni.lu

    2009-02-15

    The generalized Cauchy relation (gCR) of epoxy/silica nano-composites does not show either the chemically induced sol-gel transition or the chemically induced glass transition in the course of polymerization. Astonishingly, by varying the silica nanoparticles' concentration between 0 and 25 vol% in the composites, the Cauchy parameter A of the gCR remains universal and can be determined from the pure epoxy's elastic moduli. Air-filled porous silica glasses are considered as models for percolated silica particles. A longitudinal modulus versus density representation evidences the aforementioned transition phenomena during polymerization of the epoxy/silica nanocomposites. The existence of optically and mechanically relevant interphases is discussed.

  1. Interphases, gelation, vitrification, porous glasses and the generalized Cauchy relation: epoxy/silica nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philipp, M; Mueller, U; Jimenez Rioboo, R J; Baller, J; Sanctuary, R; Krueger, J K; Possart, W

    2009-01-01

    The generalized Cauchy relation (gCR) of epoxy/silica nano-composites does not show either the chemically induced sol-gel transition or the chemically induced glass transition in the course of polymerization. Astonishingly, by varying the silica nanoparticles' concentration between 0 and 25 vol% in the composites, the Cauchy parameter A of the gCR remains universal and can be determined from the pure epoxy's elastic moduli. Air-filled porous silica glasses are considered as models for percolated silica particles. A longitudinal modulus versus density representation evidences the aforementioned transition phenomena during polymerization of the epoxy/silica nanocomposites. The existence of optically and mechanically relevant interphases is discussed.

  2. Nanoscale multilayered and porous carbide interphases prepared by pressure-pulsed reactive chemical vapor deposition for ceramic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, S.; Jouanny, I.; Ledain, O.; Maillé, L.; Weisbecker, P.

    2013-06-01

    In Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) reinforced by continuous fibers, a good toughness is achieved by adding a thin film called "interphase" between the fiber and the brittle matrix, which acts as a mechanical fuse by deflecting the matrix cracks. Pyrocarbon (PyC), with or without carbide sub-layers, is typically the material of choice to fulfill this role. The aim of this work was to study PyC-free nanoscale multilayered carbide coatings as interphases for CMCs. Nanoscale multilayered (SiC-TiC)n interphases were deposited by pressure-Pulsed Chemical Vapor Deposition (P-CVD) on single filament Hi-Nicalon fibers and embedded in a SiC matrix sheath. The thicknesses of the carbide interphase sub-layers could be made as low as a few nanometers as evidenced by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. By using the P-ReactiveCVD method (P-RCVD), in which the TiC growth involves consumption of SiC, it was not only possible to obtain multilayered (SiC-TiC)n films but also TiC films with a porous multilayered microstructure as a result of the Kirkendall effect. The porosity in the TiC sequences was found to be enhanced when some PyC was added to SiC prior to total RCVD consumption. Because the porosity volume fraction was still not high enough, the role of mechanical fuse of the interphases could not be evidenced from the tensile curves, which remained fully linear even when chemical attack of the fiber surface was avoided.

  3. Generation of micronuclei during interphase by coupling between cytoplasmic membrane blebbing and nuclear budding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koh-ichi Utani

    Full Text Available Micronucleation, mediated by interphase nuclear budding, has been repeatedly suggested, but the process is still enigmatic. In the present study, we confirmed the previous observation that there are lamin B1-negative micronuclei in addition to the positive ones. A large cytoplasmic bleb was found to frequently entrap lamin B1-negative micronuclei, which were connected to the nucleus by a thin chromatin stalk. At the bottom of the stalk, the nuclear lamin B1 structure appeared broken. Chromatin extrusion through lamina breaks has been referred to as herniation or a blister of the nucleus, and has been observed after the expression of viral proteins. A cell line in which extrachromosomal double minutes and lamin B1 protein were simultaneously visualized in different colors in live cells was established. By using these cells, time-lapse microscopy revealed that cytoplasmic membrane blebbing occurred simultaneously with the extrusion of nuclear content, which generated lamin B1-negative micronuclei during interphase. Furthermore, activation of cytoplasmic membrane blebbing by the addition of fresh serum or camptothecin induced nuclear budding within 1 to 10 minutes, which suggested that blebbing might be the cause of the budding. After the induction of blebbing, the frequency of lamin-negative micronuclei increased. The budding was most frequent during S phase and more efficiently entrapped small extrachromosomal chromatin than the large chromosome arm. Based on these results, we suggest a novel mechanism in which cytoplasmic membrane dynamics pulls the chromatin out of the nucleus through the lamina break. Evidence for such a mechanism was obtained in certain cancer cell lines including human COLO 320 and HeLa. The mechanism could significantly perturb the genome and influence cancer cell phenotypes.

  4. Drug-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) protocols: cytogenetic approaches in mitotic chromosome and interphase chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoh, Eisuke

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome analysis is a fundamental technique which is used in wide areas of cytogenetic study including karyotyping species, hereditary diseases diagnosis, or chromosome biology study. Chromosomes are usually prepared from mitotic cells arrested by colcemid block protocol. However, obtaining mitotic chromosomes is often hampered under several circumstances. As a result, cytogenetic analysis will be sometimes difficult or even impossible in such cases. Premature chromosome condensation (PCC) (see Note 1) is an alternative method that has proved to be a unique and useful way in chromosome analysis. Former, PCC has been achieved following cell fusion method (cell-fusion PCC) mediated either by fusogenic viruses (e.g., Sendai virus) or cell fusion chemicals (e.g., polyethylene glycol), but the cell fusion PCC has several drawbacks. The novel drug-induced PCC using protein phosphatase inhibitors was introduced about 20 years ago. This method is much simpler and easier even than the conventional mitotic chromosome preparation protocol use with colcemid block and furthermore obtained PCC index (equivalent to mitotic index for metaphase chromosome) is usually much higher than colcemid block method. Moreover, this method allows the interphase chromatin to be condensed to visualize like mitotic chromosomes. Therefore drug-induced PCC has opened the way for chromosome analysis not only in metaphase chromosomes but also in interphase chromatin. The drug-induced PCC has thus proven the usefulness in cytogenetics and other cell biology fields. For this second edition version, updated modifications/changes are supplemented in Subheadings 2, 3, and 4, and a new section describing the application of PCC in chromosome science fields is added with citation of updated references.

  5. Southern Great Plains Ice Nuclei Characterization Experiment Final Campaign Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeMott, PJ [Colorado State University; Suski, KJ [Colorado State University; Hill, TCJ [Colorado State University; Levin, EJT [Colorado State University

    2015-03-01

    The first ever ice nucleating particle (INP) measurements to be collected at the Southern Great Plains site were made during a period from late April to June 2014, as a trial for possible longer-term measurements at the site. These measurements will also be used to lay the foundation for understanding and parameterizing (for cloud resolving modeling) the sources of these climatically important aerosols as well as to augment the existing database containing this knowledge. Siting the measurements during the spring was intended to capture INP sources in or to this region from plant, soil, dust transported over long distances, biomass burning, and pollution aerosols at a time when they may influence warm-season convective clouds and precipitation. Data have been archived of real-time measurements of INP number concentrations as a function of processing conditions (temperature and relative humidity) during 18 days of sampling that spanned two distinctly different weather situations: a warm, dry and windy period with regional dust and biomass burning influences in early May, and a cooler period of frequent precipitation during early June. Precipitation delayed winter wheat harvesting, preventing intended sampling during that perturbation on atmospheric aerosols. INP concentrations were highest and most variable at all temperatures in the dry period, where we attribute the INP activity primarily to soil dust emissions. Additional offline INP analyses are underway to extend the characterization of INP to cover the entire mixed phase cloud regime from -5°C to -35°C during the full study. Initial comparisons between methods on four days show good agreement and excellent future promise. The additional offline immersion freezing data will be archived as soon as completed under separate funding. Analyses of additional specialized studies for specific attribution of INP to biological and smoke sources are continuing via the National Science Foundation and National Aeronautics and Space Administration funding that helped support instrumentation used for the measurements described herein. Aerosol Observing System aerosol data will be vital to the interpretation and parameterization of results as part of analyses for publications in preparation.

  6. Robust nuclei segmentation in cyto-histopathological images using statistical level set approach with topology preserving constraint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri, Shaghayegh; Fevens, Thomas; Bui, Tien D.

    2017-02-01

    Computerized assessments for diagnosis or malignancy grading of cyto-histopathological specimens have drawn increased attention in the field of digital pathology. Automatic segmentation of cell nuclei is a fundamental step in such automated systems. Despite considerable research, nuclei segmentation is still a challenging task due noise, nonuniform illumination, and most importantly, in 2D projection images, overlapping and touching nuclei. In most published approaches, nuclei refinement is a post-processing step after segmentation, which usually refers to the task of detaching the aggregated nuclei or merging the over-segmented nuclei. In this work, we present a novel segmentation technique which effectively addresses the problem of individually segmenting touching or overlapping cell nuclei during the segmentation process. The proposed framework is a region-based segmentation method, which consists of three major modules: i) the image is passed through a color deconvolution step to extract the desired stains; ii) then the generalized fast radial symmetry transform is applied to the image followed by non-maxima suppression to specify the initial seed points for nuclei, and their corresponding GFRS ellipses which are interpreted as the initial nuclei borders for segmentation; iii) finally, these nuclei border initial curves are evolved through the use of a statistical level-set approach along with topology preserving criteria for segmentation and separation of nuclei at the same time. The proposed method is evaluated using Hematoxylin and Eosin, and fluorescent stained images, performing qualitative and quantitative analysis, showing that the method outperforms thresholding and watershed segmentation approaches.

  7. Production of spin-polarized unstable nuclei by using polarized electron capture process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, S.

    1998-01-01

    Measurements of emitted radiation from spin polarized nuclei are used to get information on electromagnetic moment of ground state unstable nuclei together with spin or parity state of excited states of their decayed (daughter) nuclei. These data are known to be useful for experimental investigation into the structure of unstable nuclei far from the stability line. The present study aims to establish a general method applicable to 11 Be and 16 N nuclei. To produce spin polarization, a new method in which the electron spin polarization of Rb is firstly produced by laser pumping, then the electron is transferred to the unstable nuclear beam (RNB) when they passes through the Rb vapor is proposed. Finally the polarized RNB will be implanted into superfluid helium to remain with a long spin-relaxation time. Future experimental set up for the above measurement adopted in the available radioactive nuclear beam facilities is briefly described. (Ohno, S.)

  8. Nuclei far from stability. Individual and collective excitations at low energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, M.

    1984-01-01

    The low energy structure of exotic nuclei is discussed in terms of self-consistent microscopic models. The experimental striking features of the spectroscopy of these nuclei are briefly surveyed and the schematic steps performed to obtain from effective N-N interactions their spectroscopic properties are presented. Their saturation and deformation properties are given by the Hartree-Fock approximation (HF). Then it is shown how to describe the dynamics of even-even exotic nuclei excited states by solving the complete Bohr Hamiltonian, built microscopically using the HF approximation and the adiabatic limit (and its derivatives) of the time-dependent HF approximation (ATDHF). The structure of odd and doubly odd nuclei is discussed in the framework of the unified model, ie the microscopic rotor + quasiparticles model. Finally possible future directions of experimental research concerning exotic nuclei are described and improvements or new theoretical approaches discussed [fr

  9. Reactions with fast radioactive beams of neutron-rich nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aumann, T. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2005-11-01

    The neutron dripline has presently been reached only for the lightest nuclei up to the element oxygen. In this region of light neutron-rich nuclei, scattering experiments are feasible even for dripline nuclei by utilizing high-energy secondary beams produced by fragmentation. In the present article, reactions of high-energy radioactive beams will be exemplified using recent experimental results mainly derived from measurements of breakup reactions performed at the LAND and FRS facilities at GSI and at the S800 spectrometer at the NSCL. Nuclear and electromagnetically induced reactions allow probing different aspects of nuclear structure at the limits of stability related to the neutron-proton asymmetry and the weak binding close to the dripline. Properties of the valence-neutron wave functions are studied in the one-neutron knockout reaction, revealing the changes of shell structure when going from the beta-stability line to more asymmetric loosely bound neutron-rich systems. The vanishing of the N=8 shell gap for neutron-rich systems like {sup 11}Li and {sup 12}Be, or the new closed N=14, 16 shells for the oxygen isotopes are examples. The continuum of weakly bound nuclei and halo states can be studied by inelastic scattering. The dipole response, for instance, is found to change dramatically when going away from the valley of stability. A redistribution of the dipole strength towards lower excitation energies is observed for neutron-rich nuclei, which partly might be due to a new collective excitation mode related to the neutron-proton asymmetry. Halo nuclei in particular show strong dipole transitions to the continuum at the threshold, being directly related to the ground-state properties of the projectile. Finally, an outlook on future experimental prospects is given. (orig.)

  10. Reactions with fast radioactive beams of neutron-rich nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aumann, T.

    2005-11-01

    The neutron dripline has presently been reached only for the lightest nuclei up to the element oxygen. In this region of light neutron-rich nuclei, scattering experiments are feasible even for dripline nuclei by utilizing high-energy secondary beams produced by fragmentation. In the present article, reactions of high-energy radioactive beams will be exemplified using recent experimental results mainly derived from measurements of breakup reactions performed at the LAND and FRS facilities at GSI and at the S800 spectrometer at the NSCL. Nuclear and electromagnetically induced reactions allow probing different aspects of nuclear structure at the limits of stability related to the neutron-proton asymmetry and the weak binding close to the dripline. Properties of the valence-neutron wave functions are studied in the one-neutron knockout reaction, revealing the changes of shell structure when going from the beta-stability line to more asymmetric loosely bound neutron-rich systems. The vanishing of the N=8 shell gap for neutron-rich systems like 11 Li and 12 Be, or the new closed N=14, 16 shells for the oxygen isotopes are examples. The continuum of weakly bound nuclei and halo states can be studied by inelastic scattering. The dipole response, for instance, is found to change dramatically when going away from the valley of stability. A redistribution of the dipole strength towards lower excitation energies is observed for neutron-rich nuclei, which partly might be due to a new collective excitation mode related to the neutron-proton asymmetry. Halo nuclei in particular show strong dipole transitions to the continuum at the threshold, being directly related to the ground-state properties of the projectile. Finally, an outlook on future experimental prospects is given. (orig.)

  11. Cavitation nuclei measurements - A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billet, M.L.

    1985-01-01

    The measurement of cavitation nuclei has been the goal of many cavitation research laboratories and has resulted in the development of many methods. Two significantly different approaches have been developed. One is to measure the particulate-microbubble distribution by utilizing acoustical, electrical or optical methods. The other approach measures a liquid tension and a rate of cavitation events for a liquid in order to establish a cavitation susceptibility. Comparisons between various methods indicate that most methods are capable of giving an indication of the nuclei distribution. Measurements obtained in the ocean environment indicate an average of three bubbles per cubic centimeter are present; whereas, water tunnel bubble distributions vary from much less than one to over a hundred per cubic centimeter

  12. Phonon operators in deformed nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soloviev, V.G.

    1981-01-01

    For the description of the excited states in deformed nuclei new phonon operators are introduced, which depend on the sign of the angular momentum projection onto the symmetry axis of a deformed nucleus. In the calculations with new phonons the Pauli principle is correctly taken into account in the two-phonon components of the wave functions. There is a difference in comparison with the calculation with phonons independent of the sign of the angular momentum projection. The new phonons should be used in deformed nuclei if the Pauli principle is consistently taken into account and in the calculations with the excited state wave functions having the components with more than one phonon operator [ru

  13. Phonon operators for deformed nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solov'ev, V.G.

    1982-01-01

    The mathematical formalism with the phonon operators independent of the signature of the angular momentum projection turns out to be inadequate for describing excited states of deformed nuclei. New phonon operators are introduced which depend on the signature of the angular momentum projection on the symmetry axis of a deformed nucleus. It is shown that the calculations with the new phonons take correctly into account the Pauli principle in two-phonon components of wave functions. The results obtained differ from those given by the phonons independent of the signature of the angular momentum projection. The new phonons must be used in deformed nuclei at taking systematically the Pauli principle into account and in calculations involving wave functions of excited states having components with more than one-phonon operator

  14. Nuclear treasure island [superheavy nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    1999-01-01

    Summary form only given. Soon after the experiments at Dubna, which synthesized element 114 and made the first footprints on the beach of the "island of nuclear stability", two new superheavy elements have been discovered at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Element 118 and its immediate decay product, element 116, were manufactured at Berkeley's 88 inch cyclotron by fusing targets of lead-208 with an intense beam of 449 MeV krypton-86 ions. Although both new nuclei almost instantly decay into lighter ones, the decay sequence is consistent with theories that have long predicted the island of stability for nuclei with approximately 114 protons and 184 neutrons. Theorist Robert Smolanczuk, visiting from the Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies in Poland, had calculated that this reaction should have particularly favourable production rates. Now that this route has been signposted, similar reactions could be possible: new elements and isotopes, tests of nuclear stability and mass models, and a new under...

  15. Moessbauer effects on oriented nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayouti, E.H.

    1984-01-01

    Standard nuclear orientation methods (not sensitive to the polarization) do not give information on the sign of the magnetic moment. Mossbauer effect separates right-hand and left-hand circularly polarized components, thus its detection on oriented nuclei (T approximately 10 mK) gives the sign of the magnetic moment of oriented state. In this thesis we applied this method to study the 3/2 - ground states of 191 Pt and 193 Os, which are in the prolate-oblate transition region, where assignement of experimental levels to theoretical states is often umbiguous. We show that for those nuclei the sign of the magnetic moment is the signature of the configuration, and its determination establishes the correspondance between experimental and theoretical levels [fr

  16. Clusters in nuclei. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Following the pioneering discovery of alpha clustering and of molecular resonances, the field of nuclear clustering is presently one of the domains of heavy-ion nuclear physics facing both the greatest challenges and opportunities. After many summer schools and workshops, in particular over the last decade, the community of nuclear molecular physics decided to team up in producing a comprehensive collection of lectures and tutorial reviews covering the field. This first volume, gathering seven extensive lectures, covers the follow topics: - Cluster Radioactivity - Cluster States and Mean Field Theories - Alpha Clustering and Alpha Condensates - Clustering in Neutron-rich Nuclei - Di-neutron Clustering - Collective Clusterization in Nuclei - Giant Nuclear Molecules By promoting new ideas and developments while retaining a pedagogical nature of presentation throughout, these lectures will both serve as a reference and as advanced teaching material for future courses and schools in the fields of nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics. (orig.)

  17. Mesons and quarks in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oset, E.

    1980-01-01

    A short review of the topic of mesons in nuclei is exposed paying particular attention to the relationship between several mesonic processes. Special emphasis is put into the microscopic pictures that can ultimately relate all these processes with the elementary coupling of mesons to the nuclear hadronic components. The importance of the short range part of the nuclear interaction opens the doors to a more basic understanding in terms of the quark components of nucleons and isobars. (orig.)

  18. Exclusive photoreactions on light nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, K.

    1989-08-01

    The mechanism of photon absorption on light nuclei in the Δ-resonance region is discussed. The present status of experimental results is briefly summarized. A recent data from 1.3-GeV Tokyo ES using a π sr spectrometer is introduced. Exclusive measurements of the photodisintegration of 3 He and 4 He may be a clear way to identify 2N, 3N and 4N absorptions. (author)

  19. Fission barriers of light nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grotowski, K.; Planeta, R.; Blann, M.; Komoto, T.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental fission excitation functions for compound nuclei /sup 52/Fe, /sup 49/Cr, /sup 46/V, and /sup 44/Ti formed in heavy-ion reactions are analyzed in the Hauser-Feshbach/Bohr-Wheeler formalism using fission barriers based on the rotating liquid drop model of Cohen et al. and on the rotating finite range model of Sierk. We conclude that the rotating finite range approach gives better reproduction of experimental fission yields, consistent with results found for heavier systems

  20. The creation of new nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armbruster, P.; Hessberger, F.P.

    1998-01-01

    In the last 60 years physicists have created 20 artificial elements beyond uranium. In 1934 Enrico Fermi predicted the creation of new elements by bombarding atoms with neutrons. This method led to the discovery of neptunium (Z=93), plutonium, americium, curium, berkelium, californium, einsteinium and fermium (Z=100). In fact the capture of a neutron is followed by a beta-decay which increases the atomic number (Z) by one unit. Beyond Z=100 beta-decay no more occurs so a new approach was necessary. Between the American Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and the Russian Dubna Institute a fierce competition broke out to produce new elements by bombarding transuranium nuclei with light elements such as helium, carbon, nitrogen. This new method required heavy equipment: ion accelerator and detectors but led to the creation of all the elements from Z=101 to Z=106. A new idea was to provoke the fusion of heavy nuclei such as lead and bismuth with colliding argon, nickel or zinc ion beams. This method called 'cold fusion' opened the way to reach the nuclei beyond Z=107. In 1996 the element Z=112 was the last discovered. The next step could be the element Z=114 for which a particular stability is expected. (A.C.)

  1. Radii of nuclei off stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Kenzo

    1982-01-01

    An experiment is proposed to determine systematically the radii of the nuclei produced through the projectile fragmentation process in high energy heavy-ion collision. The measurement of total reaction cross section using the projectile fragments of a single nuclide on a target give information about nuclear radii. The production cross section of the fragments is appreciable for many nuclides. Therefore, it is possible to map systematically the reaction radii of the nuclei which can be produced as the projectile fragments. In an experiment using the projectile fragments as the incident beam, the cross section can be expressed as a function of the radii of a projectile and a target. An experiment with He-8 produced by the fragmentation of C-12 is proposed. The He-8 has four neutrons in the p-3/2 orbit outside the He-4 core. Proton and neutron distributions for He isotopes were calculated on the basis of the Hartree-Fock method. The information related to this kind of distribution can be obtained by the proposed experiment. The nuclear structure effect is seen in the nuclear radii of other unstable nuclei. The experimental examples of the isotope shift measurement and the excitation energy are presented. (Kato, T.)

  2. Exotic Nuclei and Yukawa's Forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Takaharu; Suzuki, Toshio; Utsuno, Yutaka

    2008-01-01

    In this plenary talk, we will overview the evolution of the shell structure in stable and exotic nuclei as a new paradigm of nuclear structure physics. This shell evolution is primarily due to the tensor force. The robust mechanism and some examples will be presented. Such examples include the disappearance of existing magic numbers and the appearance of new ones. The nuclear magic numbers have been believed, since Mayer and Jensen, to be constants as 2, 8, 20, 28, 50, ... This turned out to be changed, once we entered the regime of exotic nuclei. This shell evolution develops at many places on the nuclear chart in various forms. For example, superheavy magic numbers may be altered. Thus, we are led to a new paradigm as to how and where the nuclear shell evolves, and what consequences arise. The evolution of the shell affects weak process transitions, and plays a crucial role in deformation. The π and ρ mesons generate tensor forces, and are the fundamental elements of such intriguing phenomena. Thus, physics of exotic nuclei arises as a manifestation of Yukawa's forces

  3. The colours of Hubble Sc galaxy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskudaryan, S.G.

    1975-01-01

    The colorimetric data on the nuclei of the Sc galaxies are given. Comparison of the following parameters: color of a nucleus, integral color of a galaxy, Byurakan class, and spectral type of normal spirals gives the possibility to conclude: (1) The colors of the nuclei of the Sc galaxies have a high dispersion in its values. In all Byurakan classes the galaxies with intensely red and blue nuclei occur; (2) Some Sc galaxies exhibit a discrepancy between the spectral and morphological types. The results of colorimetry of nuclei indicate that almost all such Sc galaxies have intensely red nuclei which, naturally, provide for these late spectral types. It can be assumed that the intensely red color of the nuclei of such Sc galaxies is a result of a new type of activity of these nuclei; and (3) some Sc galaxies show the characteristics of the Markarian objects

  4. The Initial Stages of Colliding Nuclei and Hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tribedy, Prithwish

    2017-01-01

    The final day of the Hot Quarks 2016 conference was focused on the discussions of the initial stages of colliding nuclei and hadrons. In this conference proceedings we give a brief overview of a few selective topics discussed at the conference that include latest developments in the theoretical description of the initial state towards understanding a number of recent experimental results from RHIC and LHC. (paper)

  5. Superdeformation in the A = 190 region. The lead nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry, E A; Becker, J A; Brinkman, M J; Kuhnert, A; Stoyer, M A; Wang, T F; Yates, S W [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Azaiez, F A; Beausang, C W; Burde, J; Deleplanque, M A; Diamond, R M; Draper, J E; Kelly, W H; Korton, W; Macchiavelli, A O; Oliveira, J; Rubel, E; Stephens, F S [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Cizewski, J A [Rutgers--the State Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States)

    1992-08-01

    Superdeformed (SD) bands have been identified in the four even-even lead nuclei {sup 192}Pb, {sup 194}Pb, {sup 196}Pb, and {sup 198}Pb. The discovery of SD bands in these nuclei extended the region of superdeformation in the A = 190 region to Z = 82, and to neutron numbers up to N = 116. All of the SD bands in these nuclei are observed with transition energies ranging from about 250 keV to about 600 keV, with the lowest energy SD band transition for the entire region of 169 keV in {sup 194}Pb. The spins deduced for the lowest levels in the SD bands are 6, 8, and 12 for {sup 192,194,196,198}Pb, respectively. The dynamic moments of inertia of {sup 192}Pb and {sup 194}Pb are similar to each other, and to those of many other SD bands in this mass region. The dynamic moments of inertia of {sup 1}`9{sup 6}Pb and {sup 198}Pb are somewhat lower than those of {sup 192,194}Pb at a given frequency. The experimental lifetimes in {sup 194}Pb and the deduced transition quadrupole moments (Qt {approx} 20 eb) are equal to those of other nuclei in the region within errors. While SD bands have been observed in the odd-neutron Hg and Tl nuclei, SD bands have not been reported for the odd-neutron Pb nuclei. In this contribution we discuss briefly three topics on superdeformation in the lead nuclei. First, we have recent experimental data on {sup 196}Pb that extends our knowledge of the SD band in that nucleus. Next we review briefly the population of low-lying yrast levels from the decay of the SD bands in {sup 192,194,196}Pb. Finally, we summarize our efforts to identify superdeformation in the odd-A Pb nuclei. All of the experiments described here were performed using the HERA spectrometer at the 88-Inch Cyclotron facility located at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. (author) 9 refs., 4 figs.

  6. The Correlation of Interphase Chromatin Structure with the Radiation-Induced Inter- and Intrachromosome Exchange Hotspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Mangala, Lingegowda S.; Purgason, Ashley M.; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between chromosome aberrations induced by radiation and chromatin folding, we reconstructed three dimensional structure of chromosome 3 and measured the physical distances between different regions of the chromosome. Previously, we have investigated the location of breaks involved in inter- and intrachromosomal type exchange events in human chromosome 3, using the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique. In human epithelial cells exposed to both low- and high-LET radiations in vitro, we reported that intra-chromosome exchanges occurred preferentially between a break in the 3p21 and one in the 3q11 regions, and the breaks involving in inter-chromosome exchanges occurred in two regions towards the telomeres of the chromosome. Exchanges were also observed between a break in 3p21 and one in 3q26, but few exchanges were observed between breaks in 3q11 and 3q26, even though the two regions are located on the same arm of the chromosome. In this study, human epithelial cells were fixed at G1 phase and the interphase cells were hybridized using the XCyte3 mBAND kit from MetaSystems. The z-section images of chromosome 3 were captured with a Leica and an LSM 510 Meta laser scanning confocal microscopes. A total of 100 chromosomes were analyzed. The reconstruction of three dimensional structure of interphase chromosome 3 with six different colored regions was achieved using the Imaris software. The relative distance between different regions was measured as well. We further analyzed fragile sites on the chromosome that have been identified in various types of cancers. The data showed that, in majority of the cells, the regions containing 3p21 and 3q11 are colocalized in the center of the chromosome, whereas, the regions towards the telomeres of the chromosome are either physically wrapping outside the chromosome center or with arms sticking out. Our results demonstrated that the distribution of breaks involved in radiation

  7. Influence of helium atoms on the shear behavior of the fiber/matrix interphase of SiC/SiC composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Enze; Du, Shiyu; Li, Mian; Liu, Chen; He, Shihong; He, Jian; He, Heming

    2016-10-01

    Silicon carbide has many attractive properties and the SiC/SiC composite has been considered as a promising candidate for nuclear structural materials. Up to now, a computational investigation on the properties of SiC/SiC composite varying in the presence of nuclear fission products is still missing. In this work, the influence of He atoms on the shear behavior of the SiC/SiC interphase is investigated via Molecular Dynamics simulation following our recent paper. Calculations are carried out on three dimensional models of graphite-like PyC/SiC interphase and amorphous PyC/SiC interphase with He atoms in different regions (the SiC region, the interface region and the PyC region). In the graphite-like PyC/SiC interphase, He atoms in the SiC region have little influence on the shear strength of the material, while both the shear strength and friction strength may be enhanced when they are in the PyC region. Low concentration of He atoms in the interface region of the graphite-like PyC/SiC interphase increases the shear strength, while there is a reduction of shear strength when the He concentration is high due to the switch of sliding plane. In the amorphous PyC/SiC interphase, He atoms can cause the reduction of the shear strength regardless of the regions that He atoms are located. The presence of He atoms may significantly alter the structure of SiC/SiC in the interface region. The influence of He atoms in the interface region is the most significant, leading to evident shear strength reduction of the amorphous PyC/SiC interphase with increasing He concentration. The behaviors of the interphases at different temperatures are studied as well. The dependence of the shear strengths of the two types of interphases on temperatures is studied as well. For the graphite-like PyC/SiC interphase, it is found strongly related to the regions He atoms are located. Combining these results with our previous study on pure SiC/SiC system, we expect this work may provide new insight

  8. Influence of helium atoms on the shear behavior of the fiber/matrix interphase of SiC/SiC composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Enze [State Nuclear Power Research Institute, Beijing, 100029 (China); Du, Shiyu, E-mail: dushiyu@nimte.ac.cn [Engineering Laboratory of Specialty Fibers and Nuclear Energy Materials, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo, Zhejiang, 315201 (China); Li, Mian [Engineering Laboratory of Specialty Fibers and Nuclear Energy Materials, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo, Zhejiang, 315201 (China); Liu, Chen [Beijing Research Institute of Chemical Engineering and Metallurgy (China); He, Shihong [State Nuclear Power Research Institute, Beijing, 100029 (China); Engineering Laboratory of Specialty Fibers and Nuclear Energy Materials, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo, Zhejiang, 315201 (China); He, Jian [Center for Translational Medicine, Department of Biotechnology, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian, Liaoning, 116023 (China); He, Heming, E-mail: heheming@snptc.com.cn [State Nuclear Power Research Institute, Beijing, 100029 (China)

    2016-10-15

    Silicon carbide has many attractive properties and the SiC/SiC composite has been considered as a promising candidate for nuclear structural materials. Up to now, a computational investigation on the properties of SiC/SiC composite varying in the presence of nuclear fission products is still missing. In this work, the influence of He atoms on the shear behavior of the SiC/SiC interphase is investigated via Molecular Dynamics simulation following our recent paper. Calculations are carried out on three dimensional models of graphite-like PyC/SiC interphase and amorphous PyC/SiC interphase with He atoms in different regions (the SiC region, the interface region and the PyC region). In the graphite-like PyC/SiC interphase, He atoms in the SiC region have little influence on the shear strength of the material, while both the shear strength and friction strength may be enhanced when they are in the PyC region. Low concentration of He atoms in the interface region of the graphite-like PyC/SiC interphase increases the shear strength, while there is a reduction of shear strength when the He concentration is high due to the switch of sliding plane. In the amorphous PyC/SiC interphase, He atoms can cause the reduction of the shear strength regardless of the regions that He atoms are located. The presence of He atoms may significantly alter the structure of SiC/SiC in the interface region. The influence of He atoms in the interface region is the most significant, leading to evident shear strength reduction of the amorphous PyC/SiC interphase with increasing He concentration. The behaviors of the interphases at different temperatures are studied as well. The dependence of the shear strengths of the two types of interphases on temperatures is studied as well. For the graphite-like PyC/SiC interphase, it is found strongly related to the regions He atoms are located. Combining these results with our previous study on pure SiC/SiC system, we expect this work may provide new insight

  9. Influence of helium atoms on the shear behavior of the fiber/matrix interphase of SiC/SiC composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Enze; Du, Shiyu; Li, Mian; Liu, Chen; He, Shihong; He, Jian; He, Heming

    2016-01-01

    Silicon carbide has many attractive properties and the SiC/SiC composite has been considered as a promising candidate for nuclear structural materials. Up to now, a computational investigation on the properties of SiC/SiC composite varying in the presence of nuclear fission products is still missing. In this work, the influence of He atoms on the shear behavior of the SiC/SiC interphase is investigated via Molecular Dynamics simulation following our recent paper. Calculations are carried out on three dimensional models of graphite-like PyC/SiC interphase and amorphous PyC/SiC interphase with He atoms in different regions (the SiC region, the interface region and the PyC region). In the graphite-like PyC/SiC interphase, He atoms in the SiC region have little influence on the shear strength of the material, while both the shear strength and friction strength may be enhanced when they are in the PyC region. Low concentration of He atoms in the interface region of the graphite-like PyC/SiC interphase increases the shear strength, while there is a reduction of shear strength when the He concentration is high due to the switch of sliding plane. In the amorphous PyC/SiC interphase, He atoms can cause the reduction of the shear strength regardless of the regions that He atoms are located. The presence of He atoms may significantly alter the structure of SiC/SiC in the interface region. The influence of He atoms in the interface region is the most significant, leading to evident shear strength reduction of the amorphous PyC/SiC interphase with increasing He concentration. The behaviors of the interphases at different temperatures are studied as well. The dependence of the shear strengths of the two types of interphases on temperatures is studied as well. For the graphite-like PyC/SiC interphase, it is found strongly related to the regions He atoms are located. Combining these results with our previous study on pure SiC/SiC system, we expect this work may provide new insight

  10. Otolith-Canal Convergence In Vestibular Nuclei Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickman, J. David; Si, Xiao-Hong

    2002-01-01

    The current final report covers the period from June 1, 1999 to May 31, 2002. The primary objective of the investigation was to determine how information regarding head movements and head position relative to gravity is received and processed by central vestibular nuclei neurons in the brainstem. Specialized receptors in the vestibular labyrinths of the inner ear function to detect angular and linear accelerations of the head, with receptors located in the semicircular canals transducing rotational head movements and receptors located in the otolith organs transducing changes in head position relative to gravity or linear accelerations of the head. The information from these different receptors is then transmitted to central vestibular nuclei neurons which process the input signals, then project the appropriate output information to the eye, head, and body musculature motor neurons to control compensatory reflexes. Although a number of studies have reported on the responsiveness of vestibular nuclei neurons, it has not yet been possible to determine precisely how these cells combine the information from the different angular and linear acceleration receptors into a correct neural output signal. In the present project, rotational and linear motion stimuli were separately delivered while recording responses from vestibular nuclei neurons that were characterized according to direct input from the labyrinth and eye movement sensitivity. Responses from neurons receiving convergent input from the semicircular canals and otolith organs were quantified and compared to non-convergent neurons.

  11. Large acceptance spectrometers for invariant mass spectroscopy of exotic nuclei and future developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, T.; Kondo, Y.

    2016-06-01

    Large acceptance spectrometers at in-flight RI separators have played significant roles in investigating the structure of exotic nuclei. Such spectrometers are in particular useful for probing unbound states of exotic nuclei, using invariant mass spectroscopy with reactions at intermediate and high energies. We discuss here the key characteristic features of such spectrometers, by introducing the recently commissioned SAMURAI facility at the RIBF, RIKEN. We also investigate the issue of cross talk in the detection of multiple neutrons, which has become crucial for exploring further unbound states and nuclei beyond the neutron drip line. Finally we discuss future perspectives for large acceptance spectrometers at the new-generation RI-beam facilities.

  12. Glucose regulated proteins 78 and 75 bind to the receptor for hyaluronan mediated motility in interphase microtubules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuwabara, Hiroko; Yoneda, Masahiko; Hayasaki, Hana; Nakamura, Toshiya; Mori, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01

    The receptor for hyaluronan mediated motility (RHAMM), which is a hyaluronan-binding protein, is a centrosomal and microtubal protein. Here, we have identified two RHAMM-binding proteins, glucose regulated protein (GRP) 78 and GRP75, using co-immunoprecipitation analysis. These two proteins directly bound to glutathione-S-transferase-RHAMM fusion proteins. By double immunostaining, GRP78 and GRP75 colocalized with RHAMM in interphase microtubules, but were separated in mitotic spindles. Prevention of microtubule polymerization by TN-16 and vincristine sulfate induced RHAMM overexpression without a significant change in GRP78/75. Taken together, GRP78/75 and RHAMM complexes may stabilize microtubules in the interphase, associated with a downregulation of RHAMM. These results reveal a new biochemical activity of RHAMM

  13. Experimental evidence of structural transition at the crystal-amorphous interphase boundary between Al and Al2O3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Z.Q.; He, L.L.; Zhao, S.J.; Ye, H.Q.

    2002-01-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy observations on the structure of the interphase boundary between crystalline Al and amorphous Al 2 O 3 coating reveal that an interfacial melting transition of Al occurs at 833 K, which is distinctly lower than the bulk melting point of Al. The crystalline lattice planes of Al near the interface bend or small segments of crystalline Al deviated from the matrix Al grains are formed. Stand-off dislocations formed at the interphase boundary are also observed. The amorphous Al 2 O 3 coating plays an important role in retaining the evidence for structural transition at high temperature to room temperature, which makes it possible to make experimental observations. (author)

  14. Results and simulations on γ-spectroscopy of deformed nuclei: cases of isomers and tetrahedral nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vancraeyenest, A.

    2010-10-01

    The major part of this work is about the realization and complete analysis of an experiment for studying isomeric states in 138,139,140 Nd nuclei. This was performed at Jyvaeskylae laboratory (Finland) using a fusion-evaporation reaction with 48 Ca beam on a thin 96 Zr target. Experimental setup consisted in the target position gamma ray detector Jurogam II which was coupled with the RITU recoil separator and the GREAT focal plane detector array. This particularly well adapted setup permit to manage γ spectroscopy of the interest nuclei around isomeric states. Indeed, we used prompt-delayed matrices to separate rays that come onto isomeric states and these who decay from them. Then, the correlations between the two components permit to establish feeding transitions of isomeric states. Thanks to this experiment, a new isomeric state was also highlighted in 139 Nd with spin 23/2+, which was predicted and interpreted in Cranked-Nilsson-Strutinsky calculation. Finally, very clean time spectra allow to determine precisely life-time of four states in four nuclei. This Ph.d. is also made of a part of the analysis of the first experimental search for fingerprints of tetrahedral symmetry in 156 Gd using high fold gamma ray spectroscopy. Thanks to a large number of triple coincidence events, we managed a detailed spectroscopy of this nucleus. Particularly, we found out 13 new transitions in positive parity bands. As a complement of this work, we have done GEANT4 simulations about the detection limits of low intensity transitions by Agata multidetector. Indeed, tetrahedral symmetry predicts vanishing of E2 transitions at lower spin states and simulations permit to determine observation limit of these transitions with different version of Agata. (author)

  15. Modulation of Higher Order Chromatin Conformation in Mammalian Cell Nuclei Can Be Mediated by Polyamines and Divalent Cations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwat Visvanathan

    Full Text Available The organisation of the large volume of mammalian genomic DNA within cell nuclei requires mechanisms to regulate chromatin compaction involving the reversible formation of higher order structures. The compaction state of chromatin varies between interphase and mitosis and is also subject to rapid and reversible change upon ATP depletion/repletion. In this study we have investigated mechanisms that may be involved in promoting the hyper-condensation of chromatin when ATP levels are depleted by treating cells with sodium azide and 2-deoxyglucose. Chromatin conformation was analysed in both live and permeabilised HeLa cells using FLIM-FRET, high resolution fluorescence microscopy and by electron spectroscopic imaging microscopy. We show that chromatin compaction following ATP depletion is not caused by loss of transcription activity and that it can occur at a similar level in both interphase and mitotic cells. Analysis of both live and permeabilised HeLa cells shows that chromatin conformation within nuclei is strongly influenced by the levels of divalent cations, including calcium and magnesium. While ATP depletion results in an increase in the level of unbound calcium, chromatin condensation still occurs even in the presence of a calcium chelator. Chromatin compaction is shown to be strongly affected by small changes in the levels of polyamines, including spermine and spermidine. The data are consistent with a model in which the increased intracellular pool of polyamines and divalent cations, resulting from depletion of ATP, bind to DNA and contribute to the large scale hyper-compaction of chromatin by a charge neutralisation mechanism.

  16. Nanoscale multilayered and porous carbide interphases prepared by pressure-pulsed reactive chemical vapor deposition for ceramic matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacques, S.; Jouanny, I.; Ledain, O.; Maillé, L.; Weisbecker, P.

    2013-01-01

    In Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) reinforced by continuous fibers, a good toughness is achieved by adding a thin film called “interphase” between the fiber and the brittle matrix, which acts as a mechanical fuse by deflecting the matrix cracks. Pyrocarbon (PyC), with or without carbide sub-layers, is typically the material of choice to fulfill this role. The aim of this work was to study PyC-free nanoscale multilayered carbide coatings as interphases for CMCs. Nanoscale multilayered (SiC–TiC) n interphases were deposited by pressure-Pulsed Chemical Vapor Deposition (P-CVD) on single filament Hi-Nicalon fibers and embedded in a SiC matrix sheath. The thicknesses of the carbide interphase sub-layers could be made as low as a few nanometers as evidenced by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. By using the P-ReactiveCVD method (P-RCVD), in which the TiC growth involves consumption of SiC, it was not only possible to obtain multilayered (SiC–TiC) n films but also TiC films with a porous multilayered microstructure as a result of the Kirkendall effect. The porosity in the TiC sequences was found to be enhanced when some PyC was added to SiC prior to total RCVD consumption. Because the porosity volume fraction was still not high enough, the role of mechanical fuse of the interphases could not be evidenced from the tensile curves, which remained fully linear even when chemical attack of the fiber surface was avoided.

  17. Status and perspectives of the M1 scissors mode in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, A.

    1988-07-01

    The present status of the M1 scissors mode which is now known in deformed nuclei ranging from 46 Ti to 238 U is summarized. Particular emphasis is placed on a discussion of the structure, the excitation energy, the transition strength, the form factor and the spin to orbit ratio in the strength of the mode. Finally it is demonstrated how strongly this mode contributes to the magnetic dipole polarizability of nuclei. (orig.)

  18. Analysis of the extent of interphase precipitation in V-HSLA steels through in-situ characterization of the γ/α transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, Samuel; Janik, Vit; Rijkenberg, Arjan; Sridhar, Seetharaman

    2016-01-01

    In-situ characterization techniques have been applied to elucidate the influence of γ/α transformation upon the extent of interphase precipitation in a low-carbon, vanadium-HSLA steel. Electron Back-scattered diffraction analyses of the γ/α orientation relationship with continuous cooling at 2 and 10 K/s suggest that the proportion of ferrite likely to hold interphase precipitation varies little with cooling rate. However, TEM analyses show that the interphase precipitation refines with increasing cooling rate in this cooling range. With cooling rates in excess of 20 K/s, interphase precipitation is increasingly suppressed due to the increasingly diffusional-displacive nature of the Widmanstätten γ/α transformation that is activated. The present study illustrates that the extent and dimensions of interphase precipitation can be controlled through controlled cooling. - Highlights: • In-situ characterization of γ/α transformation • EBSD characterization of γ/α transformation orientation relationship • Extent of interphase precipitation can be controlled through controlled cooling

  19. Online Structural-Health Monitoring of Glass Fiber-Reinforced Thermoplastics Using Different Carbon Allotropes in the Interphase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Thomas Müller

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available An electromechanical response behavior is realized by nanostructuring the glass fiber interphase with different highly electrically conductive carbon allotropes like carbon nanotubes (CNT, graphene nanoplatelets (GNP, or conductive carbon black (CB. The operational capability of these multifunctional glass fibers for an online structural-health monitoring is demonstrated in endless glass fiber-reinforced polypropylene. The electromechanical response behavior, during a static or dynamic three-point bending test of various carbon modifications, shows qualitative differences in the signal quality and sensitivity due to the different aspect ratios of the nanoparticles and the associated electrically conductive network densities in the interphase. Depending on the embedding position within the glass fiber-reinforced composite compression, shear and tension loadings of the fibers can be distinguished by different characteristics of the corresponding electrical signal. The occurrence of irreversible signal changes during the dynamic loading can be attributed to filler reorientation processes caused by polymer creeping or by destruction of electrically conductive paths by cracks in the glass fiber interphase.

  20. A time-series method for automated measurement of changes in mitotic and interphase duration from time-lapse movies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederic D Sigoillot

    Full Text Available Automated time-lapse microscopy can visualize proliferation of large numbers of individual cells, enabling accurate measurement of the frequency of cell division and the duration of interphase and mitosis. However, extraction of quantitative information by manual inspection of time-lapse movies is too time-consuming to be useful for analysis of large experiments.Here we present an automated time-series approach that can measure changes in the duration of mitosis and interphase in individual cells expressing fluorescent histone 2B. The approach requires analysis of only 2 features, nuclear area and average intensity. Compared to supervised learning approaches, this method reduces processing time and does not require generation of training data sets. We demonstrate that this method is as sensitive as manual analysis in identifying small changes in interphase or mitotic duration induced by drug or siRNA treatment.This approach should facilitate automated analysis of high-throughput time-lapse data sets to identify small molecules or gene products that influence timing of cell division.

  1. Interphase APC/C-Cdc20 inhibition by cyclin A2-Cdk2 ensures efficient mitotic entry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hein, Jamin B; Nilsson, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    Proper cell-cycle progression requires tight temporal control of the Anaphase Promoting Complex/Cyclosome (APC/C), a large ubiquitin ligase that is activated by one of two co-activators, Cdh1 or Cdc20. APC/C and Cdc20 are already present during interphase but APC/C-Cdc20 regulation during...... this window of the cell cycle, if any, is unknown. Here we show that cyclin A2-Cdk2 binds and phosphorylates Cdc20 in interphase and this inhibits APC/C-Cdc20 activity. Preventing Cdc20 phosphorylation results in pre-mature activation of the APC/C-Cdc20 and several substrates, including cyclin B1 and A2......, are destabilized which lengthens G2 and slows mitotic entry. Expressing non-degradable cyclin A2 but not cyclin B1 restores mitotic entry in these cells. We have thus uncovered a novel positive feedback loop centred on cyclin A2-Cdk2 inhibition of interphase APC/C-Cdc20 to allow further cyclin A2 accumulation...

  2. Isospin mixing in light nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, E.J.; Clegg, T.B.; Fauber, R.E.; Karwowski, H.J.; Mooney, T.M.; Thompson, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    This program has provided accurate measurements of isospin mixing (ΔT = 1,2) in proton elastic scattering on even-even target nuclei up to A = 40. In order to improve experimental results and to test the hypothesis that isospin mixing is dominated by mixing in the target ground state (as opposed to mixing in the compound system) the authors have undertaken to (1) extend the proton scattering results to additional T = 3/2 states in certain compound systems and (2) examine processes which can proceed by only isotensor mixing (ΔT = 2) in order to isolate the effects of that contribution

  3. Nucleon transfer between heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Oertzen, W.

    1984-02-01

    Nucleon transfer reactions between heavy nuclei are characterized by the classical behaviour of the scattering orbits. Thus semiclassical concepts are well suited for the description of these reactions. In the present contribution the characteristics of single and multinucleon transfer reactions at energies below and above the Coulomb barrier are shown for systems like Sn+Sn, Xe+U and Ni+Pb. The role of the pairing interaction in the transfer of nucleon pairs is illustrated. For strong transitions the coupling of channels and the absorption into more complicated channels is taken into account in a coupled channels calculation

  4. Microscopic structure for light nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, V.K.

    1995-01-01

    The microscopic structure for light nuclei e.g. 4 He, 7 Li and 8 Be is considered in the frame work of the generator coordinate method (GCM). The physical interpretation of our GCM is also discussed. The GC amplitudes are used to calculate the various properties like charge and magnetic RMS radii, form factors, electromagnetic moments, astrophysical S-factor, Bremsstrahlung weighted cross sections, relative wavefunctions and vertex functions etc. All the calculated quantities agree well with the values determined experimentally. (author). 30 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Microscopic properties of superdeformed nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlsson, Lennart B

    1999-04-01

    Many high spin rotational bands in superdeformed nuclei have been found in the A 140 - 150 region, but so far no linking transitions to known normal-deformed states have been found in these nuclei. Therefore, configuration and spin assignments have to be based on indirect spectroscopic information. Identical bands were first discovered in this region of superdeformed states. At present, some identical bands have also been found at normal deformation, but such bands are more common at superdeformation. Recently lifetime measurements have given relative quadrupole moments with high accuracy. Spectroscopic quantities are calculated using the configuration constrained cranked Nilsson-Strutinsky model with the modified oscillator potential. In a statistical study the occurrence of identical bands is tested. Comparing superdeformed and normal deformed nuclei, the higher possibility for identical bands at superdeformation is understood from calculated reduced widths of the E{sub {gamma}} and J{sup (2)} distributions. The importance of high-N orbitals for identical bands is also discussed. Additivity of electric quadrupole moment contributions in the superdeformed A - 150 region is discussed with the nucleus {sup 152}Dy as a `core`. In analytic harmonic oscillator calculations, the effective electric quadrupole moment q{sub eff}, i.e. the change in the total quadrupole moment caused by the added particle, is expressed as a simple function of the single-particle mass, quadrupole moment q{sub {nu}}. Also in realistic calculations, simple relations between q{sub eff} and q{sub {nu}} can be used to estimate the total electric quadrupole moment, e.g. for the nucleus {sup 142}Sm, by adding the effect of 10 holes, to the total electric quadrupole moment of {sup 152}Dy. Furthermore, tools are given for estimating the quadrupole moment for possible configurations in the superdeformed A - 150 region. For the superdeformed region around {sup 143}Eu, configuration and spin assignments

  6. Degradation of the solid electrolyte interphase induced by the deposition of manganese ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hosop; Park, Jonghyun; Sastry, Ann Marie; Lu, Wei

    2015-06-01

    The deposition of manganese ions dissolved from the cathode onto the interface between the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) and graphite causes severe capacity fading in manganese oxide-based cells. The evolution of the SEI layer containing these Mn compounds and the corresponding instability of the layer are thoroughly investigated by artificially introducing soluble Mn ions into a 1 mol L-1 LiPF6 electrolyte solution. Deposition of dissolved Mn ions induces an oxygen-rich SEI layer that results from increased electrolyte decomposition, accelerating SEI growth. The spatial distribution of Mn shows that dissolved Mn ions diffuse through the porous layer and are deposited mostly at the inorganic layer/graphite interface. The Mn compound deposited on the anode, identified as MnF2, originates from a metathesis reaction between LiF and dissolved Mn ion. It is confirmed that ion-exchange reaction occurs in the inorganic layer, converting SEI species to Mn compounds. Some of the Mn is observed inside the graphite; this may cause surface structural disordering in the graphite, limiting lithium-ion intercalation. The continuous reaction that occurs at the inorganic layer/graphite interfacial regions and the modification of the original SEI layer in the presence of Mn ions are critically related to capacity fade and impedance rise currently plaguing Li-ion cells.

  7. Prediction of battery storage ageing and solid electrolyte interphase property estimation using an electrochemical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwin, T. R.; Barai, A.; Uddin, K.; Somerville, L.; McGordon, A.; Marco, J.

    2018-05-01

    Ageing prediction is often complicated due to the interdependency of ageing mechanisms. Research has highlighted that storage ageing is not linear with time. Capacity loss due to storing the battery at constant temperature can shed more light on parametrising the properties of the Solid Electrolyte Interphase (SEI); the identification of which, using an electrochemical model, is systematically addressed in this work. A new methodology is proposed where any one of the available storage ageing datasets can be used to find the property of the SEI layer. A sensitivity study is performed with different molecular mass and densities which are key parameters in modelling the thickness of the SEI deposit. The conductivity is adjusted to fine tune the rate of capacity fade to match experimental results. A correlation is fitted for the side reaction variation to capture the storage ageing in the 0%-100% SoC range. The methodology presented in this paper can be used to predict the unknown properties of the SEI layer which is difficult to measure experimentally. The simulation and experimental results show that the storage ageing model shows good accuracy for the cases at 50% and 90% and an acceptable agreement at 20% SoC.

  8. Review on modeling of the anode solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Aiping; Kadam, Sanket; Li, Hong; Shi, Siqi; Qi, Yue

    2018-03-01

    A passivation layer called the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) is formed on electrode surfaces from decomposition products of electrolytes. The SEI allows Li+ transport and blocks electrons in order to prevent further electrolyte decomposition and ensure continued electrochemical reactions. The formation and growth mechanism of the nanometer thick SEI films are yet to be completely understood owing to their complex structure and lack of reliable in situ experimental techniques. Significant advances in computational methods have made it possible to predictively model the fundamentals of SEI. This review aims to give an overview of state-of-the-art modeling progress in the investigation of SEI films on the anodes, ranging from electronic structure calculations to mesoscale modeling, covering the thermodynamics and kinetics of electrolyte reduction reactions, SEI formation, modification through electrolyte design, correlation of SEI properties with battery performance, and the artificial SEI design. Multi-scale simulations have been summarized and compared with each other as well as with experiments. Computational details of the fundamental properties of SEI, such as electron tunneling, Li-ion transport, chemical/mechanical stability of the bulk SEI and electrode/(SEI/) electrolyte interfaces have been discussed. This review shows the potential of computational approaches in the deconvolution of SEI properties and design of artificial SEI. We believe that computational modeling can be integrated with experiments to complement each other and lead to a better understanding of the complex SEI for the development of a highly efficient battery in the future.

  9. Enhanced mechanical properties of chitosan/nanodiamond composites by improving interphase using thermal oxidation of nanodiamond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delavar, Zahra; Shojaei, Akbar

    2017-07-01

    Polymer composite films based on chitosan (CS) and nanodimaond (ND) were prepared using solution casting method. ND with variable contents of carboxylic functional group was prepared using thermal oxidation at temperature of 420°C under air atmosphere at various durations of 1.5 and 4.5h. The interfacial interaction between NDs and CS and morphological evolution of CS in presence of NDs were investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses. A significant improvement in tensile strength (∼85%) and tensile modulus (∼125%) of CS was achieved by oxidized ND (OND) obtained at higher oxidation time of 4.5 at low concentrations (below 1.5wt%). Theoretical analyses based on micromechanical models showed that the ND with higher degree of carboxylic functionality provided thicker and stronger interphase region which was reflected in higher mechanical properties. The equilibrium water uptake of CS decreased by incorporating ND and increasing its degree of carboxyl functionality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Highly Quantitative Electrochemical Characterization of Non-Aqueous Electrolytes & Solid Electrolyte Interphases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sergiy V. Sazhin; Kevin L. Gering; Mason K. Harrup; Harry W. Rollins

    2012-10-01

    The methods to measure solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) electrochemical properties and SEI formation capability of non-aqueous electrolyte solutions are not adequately addressed in the literature. And yet, there is a strong demand in new electrolyte generations that promote stabilized SEIs and have an influence to resolve safety, calendar life and other limitations of Li-ion batteries. To fill this gap, in situ electrochemical approach with new descriptive criteria for highly quantitative characterization of SEI and electrolytes is proposed. These criteria are: SEI formation capacity, SEI corrosion rate, SEI maintenance rate, and SEI kinetic stability. These criteria are associated with battery parameters like irreversible capacity, self-discharge, shelf-life, power, etc. Therefore, they are especially useful for electrolyte development and standard fast screening, allowing a skillful approach to narrow down the search for the best electrolyte. The characterization protocol also allows retrieving information on interfacial resistance for SEI layers and the electrochemical window of electrolytes, the other important metrics of characterization. The method validation was done on electrolyte blends containing phosphazenes, developed at Idaho National Laboratory, as 1.2M LiPF6 [80 % EC-MEC (2:8) (v/v) + 20% Phosphazene variety] (v/v), which were targeted for safer electrolyte variations.

  11. Accuracy Assessment of Interphase Fluorescence In-Situ Hybridization on Uncultured Amniotic Fluid Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamideh Karimi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Parental anxiety while waiting for the results of amniocentesis has been investigatedby many authors. It seems that the implementation of faster techniques such as fluorescence in-situhybridization (FISH will have some benefits in reducing this anxiety. Besides the patients' attitudesto choosing this method, gynecologists who are the persons responsible for treatment, must feelcomfortable about prescribing FISH techniques.Materials and Methods: This study, using a simple methodology, was undertaken to evaluate theresults of FISH tests on the amniotic fluid from 40 pregnant women undergoing cesarean surgery.Two sets of probes including X/Y cocktail and 13, 21 and 18 were applied on different slides.Results: The results of FISH tests were compared with the reports of the pediatrician about thehealth condition of the newborn. Complete conformity between the two sets of findings, haveconvinced our gynecologists of the benefit of prescribing this method to reduce the anxiety ofpatients at risk of having abnormal offspring due to chromosomal anuploidies.Conclusion: As has been documented by many authors, conventional chromosome analysis hasgreat advantages over fluorescence in situ hybridization of interphase amniocytes, but reducing theanxiety of parents is a good reason for employing the FISH technique.

  12. Lithium dendrite and solid electrolyte interphase investigation using OsO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zier, Martin; Scheiba, Frieder; Oswald, Steffen; Thomas, Jürgen; Goers, Dietrich; Scherer, Torsten; Klose, Markus; Ehrenberg, Helmut; Eckert, Jürgen

    2014-11-01

    Osmium tetroxide (OsO4) staining, commonly used to enhance scattering contrast in electron microscopy of biologic tissue and polymer blends, has been adopted for studies of graphite anodes in lithium-ion batteries. OsO4 shows a coordinated reaction with components of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) and lithium dendrites, thereby increasing material contrast for scanning electron microscopy investigations. Utilizing the high affinity of lithium metal to react with osmium tetroxide it was possible to localize even small lithium deposits on graphite electrodes. In spite of their reaction with the OsO4 fume, the lithium dendrite morphology remains almost untouched by the staining procedure, offering information on the dendrite growth process. Correlating the quantity of osmium detected with the amount of residual ("dead") lithium of a discharged electrode, it was possible to obtain a practical measure for lithium plating and stripping efficiencies. EDX mappings allowed for a localization of electrochemically stripped lithium dendrites by their residual stained SEI shells. Cross sections, prepared by focused ion beam (FIB) of cycled graphite electrodes treated with OsO4, revealed important information about deposition and distribution of metallic lithium and the electrolyte reduction layer across the electrode.

  13. A Flexible Solid Electrolyte Interphase Layer for Long-Life Lithium Metal Anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nian-Wu; Shi, Yang; Yin, Ya-Xia; Zeng, Xian-Xiang; Li, Jin-Yi; Li, Cong-Ju; Wan, Li-Jun; Wen, Rui; Guo, Yu-Guo

    2018-02-05

    Lithium (Li) metal is a promising anode material for high-energy density batteries. However, the unstable and static solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) can be destroyed by the dynamic Li plating/stripping behavior on the Li anode surface, leading to side reactions and Li dendrites growth. Herein, we design a smart Li polyacrylic acid (LiPAA) SEI layer high elasticity to address the dynamic Li plating/stripping processes by self-adapting interface regulation, which is demonstrated by in situ AFM. With the high binding ability and excellent stability of the LiPAA polymer, the smart SEI can significantly reduce the side reactions and improve battery safety markedly. Stable cycling of 700 h is achieved in the LiPAA-Li/LiPAA-Li symmetrical cell. The innovative strategy of self-adapting SEI design is broadly applicable, providing opportunities for use in Li metal anodes. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Evidence of Chromosomal Instability in Prostate Cancer Determined by Spectral Karyotyping (SKY and Interphase FISH Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Beheshti

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The way in which cytogenetic aberrations develop in prostate cancer (Cap is poorly understood. Spectral karyotype (SKY analysis of Cap cell lines has shown that they have unstable karyotypes and also have features associated with chromosomal instability (CIN. To accurately determine the incidence of de novo structural and numerical aberrations in vitro in Cap, we performed SKY analysis of three independent clones derived from one representative cell line, DU145. The frequent generation of new chromosomal rearrangements and a wide variation in the number of structural aberrations within two to five passages suggested that this cell line exhibited some of the features associated with a CIN phenotype. To study numerical cell-to-cell variation, chromosome 8 aneusomy was assessed in the LNCaP, DU145, and PC-3 cell lines and a patient cohort of 15 Cap primary tumors by interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH. This analysis showed that a high frequency of numerical alteration affecting chromosome 8 was present in both in vitro and in Cap tissues. In comparison to normal controls, the patient cohort had a statistically significant (P<.05, greater frequency of cells with one and three centromere 8 copies. These data suggest that a CIN-like process may be contributing towards the generation of de novo numerical and structural chromosome abnormalities in Cap.

  15. Low-cost, environmentally friendly route for producing CFRP laminates with microfibrillated cellulose interphase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. E. B. Uribe

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a cost-effective and eco-friendly method to improve mechanical performance in continuous carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP matrix composites is presented. Unsized fiber fabric preforms are coated with self-assembling sugarcane bagasse microfibrillated cellulose, and undergo vacuum-assisted liquid epoxy resin infusion to produce solid laminates after curing at ambient temperature. Quasi-static tensile, flexural and short beam testing at room temperature indicated that the stiffness, ultimate strength and toughness at ultimate load of the brand-new two-level hierarchical composite are substantially higher than in baseline, unsized fiber-reinforced epoxy laminate. Atomic force microscopy for height and phase imaging, along with scanning electron microscopy for the fracture surface survey, revealed a 400 nm-thick fiber/matrix interphase wherein microfibrillated cellulose exerts strengthening and toughening roles in the hybrid laminate. Market expansion of this class of continuous fiber-reinforced-polymer matrix composites exhibiting remarkable mechanical performance/cost ratios is thus conceivable.

  16. Tuning the Solid Electrolyte Interphase for Selective Li- and Na-Ion Storage in Hard Carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto, Fernando A. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station TX 77843-3122 USA; Yan, Pengfei [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA; Engelhard, Mark H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA; Marzouk, Asma [Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute, Hamad Bin Khalifa University, P.O. Box 5825 Doha Qatar; Wang, Chongmin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA; Xu, Guiliang [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne IL 60439 USA; Chen, Zonghai [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne IL 60439 USA; Amine, Khalil [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne IL 60439 USA; Liu, Jun [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA; Sprenkle, Vincent L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa [Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute, Hamad Bin Khalifa University, P.O. Box 5825 Doha Qatar; Balbuena, Perla B. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station TX 77843-3122 USA; Li, Xiaolin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA

    2017-03-07

    Solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) films with controllable properties are highly desirable for improving battery performance. In this paper, a combined experimental and theoretical approach is used to study SEI films formed on hard carbon in Li- and Na-ion batteries. It is shown that a stable SEI layer can be designed by precycling an electrode in a desired Li- or Na-based electrolyte, and that ionic transport can be kinetically controlled. Selective Li- and Na-based SEI membranes are produced using Li- or Na-based electrolytes, respectively. The Na-based SEI allows easy transport of Li ions, while the Li-based SEI shuts off Na-ion transport. Na-ion storage can be manipulated by tuning the SEI layer with film-forming electrolyte additives, or by preforming an SEI layer on the electrode surface. The Na specific capacity can be controlled to < 25 mAh g(-1); approximate to 1/10 of the normal capacity (250 mAh g(-1)). Unusual selective/ preferential transport of Li ions is demonstrated by preforming an SEI layer on the electrode surface and corroborated with a mixed electrolyte. This work may provide new guidance for preparing good ion-selective conductors using electrochemical approaches.

  17. Tuning the Solid Electrolyte Interphase for Selective Li- and Na-Ion Storage in Hard Carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto, Fernando A. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station TX 77843-3122 USA; Yan, Pengfei [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA; Engelhard, Mark H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA; Marzouk, Asma [Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute, Hamad Bin Khalifa University, P.O. Box 5825 Doha Qatar; Wang, Chongmin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA; Xu, Guiliang [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne IL 60439 USA; Chen, Zonghai [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne IL 60439 USA; Amine, Khalil [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne IL 60439 USA; Liu, Jun [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA; Sprenkle, Vincent L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa [Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute, Hamad Bin Khalifa University, P.O. Box 5825 Doha Qatar; Balbuena, Perla B. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station TX 77843-3122 USA; Li, Xiaolin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA

    2017-03-07

    Solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) with controllable properties are highly desirable to improve battery performance. In this paper, we use a combined experimental and simulation approach to study the SEI formation on hard carbon in Li and Na-ion batteries. We show that with proper additives, stable SEI can be formed on hard carbon by pre-cycling the electrode materials in Li or Na-ion electrolyte. Detailed mechanistic studies suggest that the ion transport in the SEI layer is kinetically controlled and can be tuned by the applied voltage. Selective Na and Li-ion SEI membranes are produced using the Na or Li-ion based electrolytes respectively. The large Na ion SEI allows easy transport of Li ions, while the small Li ion SEI shuts off the Na-ion transport. Na-ion storage can be manipulated by tuning the SEI with film-forming electrolyte additives or preforming a SEI on the electrodes’ surface. The Na specific capacity can be controlled to <25 mAh/g, ~1/10 of the normal capacity (250 mAh/g). Unusual selective/preferential transport of Li-ion is demonstrated by preforming a SEI on the electrode’s surface and corroborated with a mixed electrolyte. This work may provide new guidance for preparing good ion selective conductors using electrochemical approaches in the future.

  18. Active Mechanism of the Interphase Film-Forming Process for an Electrolyte Based on a Sulfolane Solvent and a Chelato-Borate Complexe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunlei; Wang, Peng; Li, Shiyou; Zhao, Dongni; Zhao, Qiuping; Liu, Haining; Cui, Xiao-Ling

    2018-06-14

    Electrolytes based on sulfolane (SL) solvents and lithium bis(oxalato)borate (LiBOB) chelato-borate complexes have been reported many times for use in advanced lithium-ion batteries due to their many advantages. This study aims to clarify the active mechanism of the interphase film-forming process to optimize the properties of these batteries by experimental analysis and theoretical calculations. The results indicate that the self-repairing film-forming process during the first cycle is divided into three stages: the initial film formation with an electric field force of ~1.80 V, the further growth of the preformation solid electrolyte interface (SEI) film at ~1.73 V, and the final formation of a complete SEI film at a potential below 0.7 V. Additionally, we can deduce that the decomposition of LiBOB and SL occurs throughout nearly the entire process of the formation of the SEI film. The decomposition product of BOB- anions tends to form films with an irregular structure, while the decomposition product of SL is in favor of the formation of a uniform SEI film.

  19. Exotic nuclei: another aspect of nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobaczewski, J.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Flocard, H.; Garcia Borge, M.J.; Nowacki, F.; Rombouts, S.; Theisen, Ch.; Marques, F.M.; Lacroix, D.; Dessagne, P.; Gaeggeler, H.

    2002-01-01

    This document gathers the lectures made at the Joliot Curie international summer school in 2002 whose theme that year was exotic nuclei. There were 11 contributions whose titles are: 1) interactions, symmetry breaking and effective fields from quarks to nuclei; 2) status and perspectives for the study of exotic nuclei: experimental aspects; 3) the pairing interaction and the N = Z nuclei; 4) borders of stability region and exotic decays; 5) shell structure of nuclei: from stability to decay; 6) variational approach of system with a few nucleons; 7) from heavy to super-heavy nuclei; 8) halos, molecules and multi-neutrons; 9) macroscopic approaches for fusion reactions; 10) beta decay: a tool for spectroscopy; 11) the gas phase chemistry of super-heavy elements

  20. On the distribution of quarks in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldin, A.M.; Panebrattsev, V.S.; Stavinskij, V.S.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of the data on cumulative proton, deuteron and nuclear fragment production in hadr on-nucleon reactions and deep inelastic muon-nucleon scattering quark distributions in light, intemediate and heavy nuclei have been investigated. Conditions of limiting fragmentation of hadrons and nuclei in the studied processes have been investigated to obtain quark-parton structure functions (Gs 2 ) of the studied hadrons or nuclei. Invariant differential cross sections of π + , π - , K + meson production on aluminium, deuterium and lead nuclei and their dependence on scale variable at the transverse momentum value Psub(T) approximately 0 have been obtained. Properties of structure functions G 2 and behaviour of different nuclei differential cross sections of limiting fragmentation have been investigated. It is concluded that considered regularities testify to the presence of multiquark states in nuclei, different by its structure from nUcleons

  1. Barriers in the energy of deformed nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Yu. Denisov

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Interaction energy between two nuclei considering to their deformations is studied. Coulomb and nuclear in-teraction energies, as well as the deformation energies of both nuclei, are taken into account at evaluation of the interaction energy. It is shown that the barrier related to the interaction energy of two nuclei depends on the de-formations and the height of the minimal barrier is evaluated. It is obtained that the heavier nucleus-nucleus sys-tems have large deformation values at the lowest barrier. The difference between the barrier between spherical nuclei and the lowest barrier between deformed nuclei increases with the mass and the charge of the interacting nuclei.

  2. Laser method of free atom nuclei orientation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barabanov, A.L.

    1987-01-01

    Orientation process of free atom (atoms in beams) nuclei, scattering quanta of circularly polarized laser radiation is considered. A method for the evaluation of nuclei orientation parameters is developed. It is shown that in the process of pumping between the ground and first excited atomic states with electron shell spins J 1 and J 2 , so that J 2 = J 1 + 1, a complete orientation of nuclei can be attained

  3. Are there multiquark bags in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondratyuk, L.A.; Scmatkov, M.Zh.

    1983-01-01

    Arguments are presented favouring the idea that multiquark bags do eXist in nuclei. Such hypothesis makes possible to reveal the relationship among three different scopes of phenomena: deep inelastic scattering of leptons by nUclei, large q 2 (where q 2 is a square of momentum transfer) behaviour of the form factors of light nuclei and yield of cumulative proton.s

  4. Understanding Nuclei in the upper sd - shell

    OpenAIRE

    Sarkar, M. Saha; Bisoi, Abhijit; Ray, Sudatta; Kshetri, Ritesh; Sarkar, S.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclei in the upper-$sd$ shell usually exhibit characteristics of spherical single particle excitations. In the recent years, employment of sophisticated techniques of gamma spectroscopy has led to observation of high spin states of several nuclei near A$\\simeq$ 40. In a few of them multiparticle, multihole rotational states coexist with states of single particle nature. We have studied a few nuclei in this mass region experimentally, using various campaigns of the Indian National Gamma Array...

  5. Possible existence of backbending in actinide nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudek, J.; Nazarewicz, W.; Szymanski, Z.

    1982-01-01

    The possibilities for the backbending effect to occur in actinide nuclei are studied using the pairing-self-consistent independent quasiparticle method. The Hamiltonian used is that of the deformed Woods-Saxon potential plus monopole pairing term. The results of the calculations explain why there is no backbending in most actinide nuclei and simultaneously suggest that in some light neutron deficient nuclei around Th and 22 Ra a backbending effect may occur

  6. Nuclei quadrupole coupling constants in diatomic molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, A.I.; Rebane, T.K.

    1993-01-01

    An approximate relationship between the constants of quadrupole interaction of nuclei in a two-atom molecule is found. It enabled to establish proportionality of oscillatory-rotation corrections to these constants for both nuclei in the molecule. Similar results were obtained for the factors of electrical dipole-quadrupole screening of nuclei. Applicability of these relationships is proven by the example of lithium deuteride molecule. 4 refs., 1 tab

  7. Nuclei at the limits of particle stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, A.C.

    1993-01-01

    The properties and synthesis of nuclei at the limits of particle stability are reviewed. Nuclear reactions were induced and studied by means of the 'exotic' nuclear beams, i.e. beams of radioactive drip-line nuclei. The beams are mostly generated in heavy-ion projectile fragmentation. The cases of both neutron-rich and proton-rich nuclei are discussed. (K.A.) 270 refs.; 13 figs.; 1 tab

  8. Mecanobiología de la interfase hueso-implante dental Mechanobiology of bone-dental implant interphase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Vanegas Acosta

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available La osteointegración es la conexión estructural y funcional entre el hueso y un implante. Cuando un implante se inserta en el hueso, se crea la denominada interfase hueso-implante, una zona de unión entre la superficie del biomaterial del implante y el hueso circundante. La cicatrización de esta interfase depende de las condiciones biológicas del hueso, las características de diseño del implante y la distribución de cargas entre hueso e implante. En este artículo se hace una revisión del proceso de cicatrización de la interfase hueso-implante para el caso de un implante dental. El objetivo es describir la secuencia de eventos biológicos iniciados con la lesión causada por la inserción del implante y que concluyen con la formación de nuevo hueso en la interfase. Esta descripción incluye una novedosa clasificación de los fenómenos mecánicos que intervienen durante el proceso de cicatrización de los tejidos lesionados. Esta descripción mecanobiológica de la interfase hueso-implante dental se utiliza para determinar las características más relevantes a tener en cuenta en la formulación de un modelo matemático de la osteointegración de implantes dentales.The osteointegration is the structural and functional connection between bone and implant. When an implant is inserted in bone, it creates the so-called bone-implant interphase, a joint zone between implant biomaterial surface and the surrounding bone. The healing of this interphase depends on bone biological conditions, characteristic of implant design and the distribution of loads between bone and implant. The aim of present article is to review of healing process of bone-implant interphase for a dental implant and also to describe the sequence of biological events beginning with lesion caused by implant insertion and leading to the formation of a new bone in the interphase. This description includes a novel classification of mechanical phenomena present in the healing

  9. Selfconsistent calculations for hyperdeformed nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molique, H.; Dobaczewski, J.; Dudek, J.; Luo, W.D. [Universite Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg (France)

    1996-12-31

    Properties of the hyperdeformed nuclei in the A {approximately} 170 mass range are re-examined using the self-consistent Hartree-Fock method with the SOP parametrization. A comparison with the previous predictions that were based on a non-selfconsistent approach is made. The existence of the {open_quotes}hyper-deformed shell closures{close_quotes} at the proton and neutron numbers Z=70 and N=100 and their very weak dependence on the rotational frequency is suggested; the corresponding single-particle energy gaps are predicted to play a role similar to that of the Z=66 and N=86 gaps in the super-deformed nuclei of the A {approximately} 150 mass range. Selfconsistent calculations suggest also that the A {approximately} 170 hyperdeformed structures have neglegible mass asymmetry in their shapes. Very importantly for the experimental studies, both the fission barriers and the {open_quotes}inner{close_quotes} barriers (that separate the hyperdeformed structures from those with smaller deformations) are predicted to be relatively high, up to the factor of {approximately}2 higher than the corresponding ones in the {sup 152}Dy superdeformed nucleus used as a reference.

  10. Mass-23 nuclei in astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraser, P R; Amos, K; Van der Kniff, D; Canton, L; Karataglidis, S; Svenne, J P

    2015-01-01

    The formation of mass-23 nuclei by radiative capture is of great interest in astrophysics. A topical problem associated with these isobars is the so-called 22 Na puzzle of ONe white dwarf novae, where the abundance of 22 Na observed is not as is predicted by current stellar models, indicating there is more to learn about how the distribution of elements in the universe occurred. Another concerns unexplained variations in elements abundance on the surface of aging red giant stars. One method for theoretically studying nuclear scattering is the Multi-Channel Algebraic Scattering (MCAS) formalism. Studies to date have used a simple collective-rotor prescription to model the target states which couple to projectile nucleons. While, in general, the target states considered all belong to the ground state rotor band, for some systems it is necessary to include coupling to states outside of this band. Herein we discuss an extension of MCAS to allow coupling of different strengths between such states and the ground state band. This consideration is essential when studying the scattering of neutrons from 22 Ne, a necessary step in studying the mass-23 nuclei mentioned above. (paper)

  11. Three-body halo nuclei in an effective theory framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canham, David L.

    2009-05-20

    The universal properties and structure of halo nuclei composed of two neutrons (2n) and a core are investigated within an effective quantum mechanics framework. We construct an effective interaction potential that exploits the separation of scales in halo nuclei and treat the nucleus as an effective three-body system, which to leading order is described by the large S-wave scattering lengths in the underlying two-body subsystems. The uncertainty from higher orders in the expansion is quantified through theoretical error bands. First, we investigate the possibility to observe excited Efimov states in 2n halo nuclei. Based on the experimental data, {sup 20}C is the only halo nucleus candidate to possibly have an Efimov excited state, with an energy less than 7 keV below the scattering threshold. Second, we study the structure of {sup 20}C and other 2n halo nuclei. In particular, we calculate their matter density form factors, radii, and two-neutron opening angles. We then make a systematic improvement upon these calculations by extending the effective potential to the next-to-leading order. To this order, we require an additional two-body parameter, which we tune to the effective range of the interaction. In addition to range corrections to the 2n halo nuclei results, we show corrections to the Efimov effect in the three-boson system. Furthermore, we explore universality in the linear range corrections to the Efimov spectrum. Finally, we study the scattering of D{sup 0} and D{sup *0} mesons and their antiparticles off the X(3872) in an effective field theory for short-range interactions. We present results for the S-wave scattering amplitude, total interaction cross section and S-wave scattering length. (orig.)

  12. Three-body halo nuclei in an effective theory framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canham, David L.

    2009-01-01

    The universal properties and structure of halo nuclei composed of two neutrons (2n) and a core are investigated within an effective quantum mechanics framework. We construct an effective interaction potential that exploits the separation of scales in halo nuclei and treat the nucleus as an effective three-body system, which to leading order is described by the large S-wave scattering lengths in the underlying two-body subsystems. The uncertainty from higher orders in the expansion is quantified through theoretical error bands. First, we investigate the possibility to observe excited Efimov states in 2n halo nuclei. Based on the experimental data, 20 C is the only halo nucleus candidate to possibly have an Efimov excited state, with an energy less than 7 keV below the scattering threshold. Second, we study the structure of 20 C and other 2n halo nuclei. In particular, we calculate their matter density form factors, radii, and two-neutron opening angles. We then make a systematic improvement upon these calculations by extending the effective potential to the next-to-leading order. To this order, we require an additional two-body parameter, which we tune to the effective range of the interaction. In addition to range corrections to the 2n halo nuclei results, we show corrections to the Efimov effect in the three-boson system. Furthermore, we explore universality in the linear range corrections to the Efimov spectrum. Finally, we study the scattering of D 0 and D *0 mesons and their antiparticles off the X(3872) in an effective field theory for short-range interactions. We present results for the S-wave scattering amplitude, total interaction cross section and S-wave scattering length. (orig.)

  13. Accounting for the Effect of Noncondensing Gases on Interphasic Heat and Mass Transfer in the Two-Fluid Model Used in the KORSAR Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudov, Yu. V.

    2018-03-01

    A model is presented of the interphasic heat and mass transfer in the presence of noncondensable gases for the KORSAR/GP design code. This code was developed by FGUP NITI and the special design bureau OKB Gidropress. It was certified by Rostekhnadzor in 2009 for numerical substantiation of the safety of reactor installations with VVER reactors. The model is based on the assumption that there are three types of interphasic heat and mass transfer of the vapor component: vapor condensation or evaporation on the interphase under any thermodynamic conditions of the phases, pool boiling of the liquid superheated above the saturation temperature at the total pressure, and spontaneous condensation in the volume of gas phase supercooled below the saturation temperature at the vapor partial pressure. Condensation and evaporation on the interphase continuously occur in a two-phase flow and control the time response of the interphase heat and mass transfer. Boiling and spontaneous condensation take place only at the metastable condition of the phases and run at a quite high speed. The procedure used for calculating condensation and evaporation on the interphase accounts for the combined diffusion and thermal resistance of mass transfer in all regimes of the two-phase flow. The proposed approach accounts for, in a natural manner, a decrease in the rate of steam condensation (or generation) in the presence of noncondensing components in the gas phase due to a decrease (or increase) in the interphase temperature relative to the saturation temperature at the vapor partial pressure. The model of the interphase heat transfer also accounts for the processes of dissolution or release of noncondensing components in or from the liquid. The gas concentration at the interphase and on the saturation curve is calculated by the Henry law. The mass transfer coefficient in gas dissolution is based on the heat and mass transfer analogy. Results are presented of the verification of the

  14. The asymptotic hadron spectrum, anti-nuclei, hyper-nuclei and quark phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glendenning, N.K.

    1978-01-01

    The only hope of determining the hadronic spectrum in the high mass region is through a study of matter produced in very high energy nuclear collisions. Along the way, exotic nuclei, i.e., anti-nuclei and hyper-nuclei may be produced in appreciable numbers, and the detection of a quark phase may be possible. (orig.) [de

  15. Gamow-Teller decay of T = 1 nuclei to odd-odd N = Z nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisetskiy, A F [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, MSU, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Gelberg, A [Institute for Nuclear Physics, University of Cologne, 50937 Cologne (Germany); Institute of Physical and Chemical Reasearch (RIKEN), Wako, 351-0198 (Japan); Brentano, P von [Institute for Nuclear Physics, University of Cologne, 50937 Cologne (Germany)

    2005-01-01

    Transition strengths of Gamow-Teller decay of T{sub z} = {+-}1 nuclei to N = Z odd-odd nuclei have been calculated in a two-nucleon approximation for spherical and deformed nuclei. The results obtained for the latter are quite close to the values obtained by full-space shell-model calculations and to the experiment.

  16. Radiation-induced cytogenetic damage in relation to changes in interphase chromosome conformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantelias, G.E.

    1986-01-01

    The premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique was used to study several factors that determine the yield of chromosome fragments as observed in interphase cells after irradiation. In addition to absorbed dose and the extent of chromosome condensation at the time of irradiation, changes in chromosome conformation as cells progressed through the cell cycle after irradiation affected dramatically the yield of chromosome fragments observed. As a test of the effect of chromosome decondensation, irradiated metaphase Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were allowed to divide, and the prematurely condensed chromosomes in the daughter cells were analyzed in their G1 phase. The yield of chromosome fragments increased as the daughter cells progressed toward S phase and chromosome decondensation occurred. When early G1 CHO cells were irradiated and analyzed at later times in G1 phase, an increase in chromosome fragmentation again followed the gradual increase in chromosome decondensation. As a test of the effect of chromosome condensation, G0 human lymphocytes were irradiated and analyzed at various times after fusion with mitotic CHO cells, i.e., as condensation proceeded. The yield of fragments observed was directly related to the amount of chromosome condensation allowed to take place after irradiation and inversely related to the extent of chromosome condensation at the time of irradiation. It can be concluded that changes in chromosome conformation interfered with rejoining processes. In contrast, resting chromosomes (as in G0 lymphocytes irradiated before fusion) showed efficient rejoining. These results support the hypothesis that cytogenetic lesions become observable chromosome breaks when chromosome condensation or decondensation occurs during the cell cycle

  17. Composite hadrons and relativistic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blankenbecler, R.

    1978-01-01

    Lectures are presented describing a model of hadronic scattering at large momentum transfer, either transverse or longitudinal. This model emphasizes in this regime the importance of forces involving the interchange of constituents of the hadrons, hence its name, the constituent interchange model CIM. The CIM is a rearrangement of standard perturbation theory to take into account the fact that the binding force is very strong in color singlet states (singlet dominance). The hard scattering expansion, incoherence problems, nuclear wave functions and counting rules, interaction between nuclei, pion and proton yields and form factors, structure functions and nonscaling, massive lepton pairs, hadrons at large transverse momentum, and quark-quark scattering are treated. 49 references

  18. Neutron halo in deformed nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Shangui; Meng Jie; Ring, P.; Zhao Enguang

    2010-01-01

    Halo phenomena in deformed nuclei are investigated within a deformed relativistic Hartree Bogoliubov (DRHB) theory. These weakly bound quantum systems present interesting examples for the study of the interdependence between the deformation of the core and the particles in the halo. Contributions of the halo, deformation effects, and large spatial extensions of these systems are described in a fully self-consistent way by the DRHB equations in a spherical Woods-Saxon basis with the proper asymptotic behavior at a large distance from the nuclear center. Magnesium and neon isotopes are studied and detailed results are presented for the deformed neutron-rich and weakly bound nucleus 44 Mg. The core of this nucleus is prolate, but the halo has a slightly oblate shape. This indicates a decoupling of the halo orbitals from the deformation of the core. The generic conditions for the occurrence of this decoupling effects are discussed.

  19. Order against chaos in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soloviev, V.G.

    1995-01-01

    Order and chaos and order-to-chaos transition are treated in terms of nuclear wave functions. A quasiparticle-phonon interaction is responsible for the fragmentation of one- and many-quasiparticle and phonon states and for the mixing of closely spaced states. Complete damping of one-quasiparticle states cannot be considered as a transition to chaos due to large many-quasiparticle or quasiparticle-phonon terms in their wave functions. An experimental investigation of the strength distribution of many-quasiparticle and quasiparticle-phonon states should uncover a new region of a regularity in nuclei at intermediate excitation energy. A chaotic behaviour of nuclear states can be shifted to higher excitation energies. ((orig.))

  20. Relativistic description of atomic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krutov, V.A.

    1985-01-01

    Papers on the relativistic description of nuclei are reviewed. The Brown and Rho ''small'' bag'' model is accepted for hardrons. Meson exchange potentials of the nucleon-nucleon interaction have been considered. Then the transition from a system of two interacting nucleons has been performed to the relativistic nucleus description as a multinucleon system on the basis of OBEP (one-boson exchange potential). The proboem of OPEP (one-pion-exchange potential) inclusion to a relativistic scheme is discussed. Simplicity of calculations and attractiveness of the Walecka model for specific computations and calculations was noted. The relativistic model of nucleons interacting through ''effective'' scalar and vector boson fields was used in the Walacka model for describing neutronaand nuclear mater matters

  1. Electric quadrupole strength in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirson, M.W.

    1979-01-01

    Isoscalar electric quadrupole strength distributions in nuclei are surveyed, and it is concluded that the strength is shared, in most cases, roughly equally between low-lying transitions and the giant quadrupole state. The same is not true of the isovector case. A simple extension of the schematic model gives a remarkably successul description of the data, and emphasizes the vital importance of the coupling between high-lying and low-lying quadrupole modes. The standadrd simple representation of the giant quadrupole resonance as produced by operating on the nuclear ground state with the quadrupole transition operator is not applicable to the isoscalar case. It is suggested that giant resonances fall into broad classes of similar states, with considerable qualitative differences between the distinct classes. (author)

  2. Cavitation Nuclei: Experiments and Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Knud Aage

    2009-01-01

    The Swedish astrophysicist and Nobel Prize winner Hannes Alfven said: Theories come and go - the experiment is here forever. Often a theory, which we set up to describe an observed physical phenomenon, suffers from the lack of knowledge of decisive parameters, and therefore at best the theory...... becomes insufficient. Contrary, the experiment always reveals nature itself, though at prevailing experimental conditions. With essential parameters being out of control and even maybe unidentified, apparently similar experiments may deviate way beyond our expectations. However, these discrepancies offer...... us a chance to reflect on the character of the unknown parameters. In this way non-concordant experimental results may hold the key to the development of better theories - and to new experiments for the testing of their validity. Cavitation and cavitation nuclei are phenomena of that character....

  3. Femtometer toroidal structures in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forest, J.L.; Pandharipande, V.R.; Pieper, S.C.; Wiringa, R.B.; Schiavilla, R.; Arriaga, A.

    1996-01-01

    The two-nucleon density distributions in states with isospin T=0, spin S=1, and projection M S =0 and ±1 are studied in 2 H, 3,4 He, 6,7 Li, and 16 O. The equidensity surfaces for M S =0 distributions are found to be toroidal in shape, while those of M S =±1 have dumbbell shapes at large density. The dumbbell shapes are generated by rotating tori. The toroidal shapes indicate that the tensor correlations have near maximal strength at r 3 He, 4 He, and 6 Li. The toroidal distribution has a maximum-density diameter of ∼1 fm and a half-maximum density thickness of ∼0.9 fm. Many realistic models of nuclear forces predict these values, which are supported by the observed electromagnetic form factors of the deuteron, and also predicted by classical Skyrme effective Lagrangians, related to QCD in the limit of infinite colors. Due to the rather small size of this structure, it could have a revealing relation to certain aspects of QCD. Experiments to probe this structure and its effects in nuclei are suggested. Pair distribution functions in other T,S channels are also discussed; those in T,S=1,1 have anisotropies expected from one-pion-exchange interactions. The tensor correlations in T,S=0,1 states are found to deplete the number of T,S=1,0 pairs in nuclei and cause a reduction in nuclear binding energies via many-body effects. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  4. Quarks and mesons in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rho, M.

    1981-01-01

    Quantum chromodynamics is believed to be candidate theory for the strong interactions and contains as its ingredients spinor quark fields and vector gluons, none of which can perhaps be ever liberated and detected in laboratories. A nucleus consists of nucleons bound by nuclear force which are however separately observable and which seem to preserve their identities even under extreme conditions. An intriguing question is: when compressed to high densities or heated to high temperature, at what point does a nuclear matter cease to be describable in terms of nucleon and meson degrees of freedom, but become a plasma of quarks and gluons; and how does this transition occur. This is not an idle question. If quarks and gluons are never to be observed isolated, then it may be that at low energies (or at low densities) they are not the right variables to do physics with. Instead hadrons must be. On the other hand, asymptotic freedom - the unique property of non-abelian gauge theories to which QCD belongs that quark-gluon and gluon-gluon interactions get weaker at short distances - tells us that at some large matter density the matter must necessarily be in the form of quark gas interacting only weakly. This means that a change in degrees of freedom must take place. We would like to know where this occurs and how. In this talk, I would like to address to this question by discussing first the large success we have had in understanding the role that mesons play in finite nuclei and nuclear matter and then attempting to correlate nucleon and meson degrees of freedom to quark-gluon degrees of freedom. In my opinion we are now at a stage where we feel fairly confident in our understanding of nucleon-meson structure of nuclei and nuclear matter and any further progress in deeper understanding of nuclear dynamics - and strong interactions - must come from QCD or its effective version, bags or strings. (orig.)

  5. Mean-field models and exotic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, M; Buervenich, T; Maruhn, J A; Greiner, W [Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik, Univ. Frankfurt (Germany); Rutz, K [Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik, Univ. Frankfurt (Germany); [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Reinhard, P G [Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik, Univ. Erlangen (Germany)

    1998-06-01

    We discuss two widely used nuclear mean-field models, the relativistic mean-field model and the (nonrelativistic) Skyrme-Hartree-Fock model, and their capability to describe exotic nuclei. Test cases are superheavy nuclei and neutron-rich Sn isotopes. New information in this regime helps to fix hitherto loosely determined aspects of the models. (orig.)

  6. High-spin excitations of atomic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Furong; National Laboratory of Heavy Ion Physics, Lanzhou; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing

    2004-01-01

    The authors used the cranking shell model to investigate the high-spin motions and structures of atomic nuclei. The authors focus the collective rotations of the A∼50, 80 and 110 nuclei. The A∼50 calculations show complicated g spectroscopy, which can have significant vibration effects. The A≅80 N≅Z nuclei show rich shape coexistence with prolate and oblate rotational bands. The A≅110 nuclei near the r-process path can have well-deformed oblate shapes that become yrast and more stable with increasing rotational frequency. As another important investigation, the authors used the configuration-constrained adiabatic method to calculate the multi-quasiparticle high-K states in the A∼130, 180 and superheavy regions. The calculations show significant shape polarizations due to quasi-particle excitations for soft nuclei, which should be considered in the investigations of high-K states. The authors predicted some important high-K isomers, e.g., the 8 - isomers in the unstable nuclei of 140 Dy and 188 Pb, which have been confirmed in experiments. In superheavy nuclei, our calculations show systematic existence of high-K states. The high-K excitations can increase the productions of synthesis and the survival probabilities of superheavy nuclei. (authors)

  7. Microscopic Cluster Theory for Exotic Nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomaselli, M; Kuehl, T; Ursescu, D; Fritzsche, S

    2006-01-01

    For a better understanding of the dynamics of complex exotic nuclei it is of crucial importance to develop a practical microscopic theory easy to be applied to a wide range of masses. In this paper we propose to calculate the structure of neutron-rich nuclei within a dynamic model based on the EoM theory

  8. Reentrainment of radioactive nuclei from filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dincklage, R.-D. von

    1982-01-01

    The possible relevance of atomic phenomena for the reentrainment of radioactive nuclei is discussed. The considerations are based on the coulombic fragmentation mechanism. Nuclei of potential interest in reprocessing technology are identified. Future experiments have been shown to be of definite need in this field. (author)

  9. Thermodynamics of pairing phase transition in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karim, Afaque; Ahmad, Shakeb

    2014-01-01

    The pairing gaps, pairing energy, heat capacity and entropy are calculated within BCS (Bardeen- Cooper-Schrieffer) based quasi particle approach, including thermal fluctuations on pairing field within pairing model for all nuclei (light, medium, heavy and super heavy nuclei). Quasi particles approach in BCS theory was introduced and reformulated to study various properties. For thermodynamic behavior of nuclei at finite temperatures, the anomalous averages of creation and annihilation operators are introduced. It is solved self consistently at finite temperatures to obtain BCS Hamiltonian. After doing unitary transformation, we obtained the Hamiltonian in the diagonal form. Thus, one gets temperature dependence gap parameter and pairing energy for nuclei. Moreover, the energy at finite temperatures is the sum of the condensation energy and the thermal energy of fermionic quasi particles. With the help of BCS Hamiltonian, specific heat, entropy and free energy are calculated for different nuclei. In this paper the gap parameter occupation number and pairing energy as a function of temperature which is important for all the light, medium, heavy and super heavy nuclei is calculated. Moreover, the various thermo dynamical quantities like specific heat, entropy and free energy is also obtained for different nuclei. Thus, the thermodynamics of pairing phase transition in nuclei is studied

  10. Mean-field models and exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, M.; Buervenich, T.; Maruhn, J.A.; Greiner, W.; Rutz, K.; Reinhard, P.G.

    1998-01-01

    We discuss two widely used nuclear mean-field models, the relativistic mean-field model and the (nonrelativistic) Skyrme-Hartree-Fock model, and their capability to describe exotic nuclei. Test cases are superheavy nuclei and neutron-rich Sn isotopes. New information in this regime helps to fix hitherto loosely determined aspects of the models. (orig.)

  11. Masses of nuclei close to the dripline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herfurth, F.; Blaum, K.; Audi, G.; Lunney, D.; Beck, D.; Kluge, H.J.; Rodriguez, D.; Sikler, G.; Weber, C.; Bollen, G.; Schwarz, S.; Kellerbauer, A.

    2003-01-01

    Mass measurements of radioactive nuclides are one of the cornerstones of our understanding of the nucleus. The Penning trap spectrometer ISOLTRAP performs direct mass measurements far away from the valley of stability, as well as high-precision measurements of key nuclei to anchor long decay chains. Both schemes provide valuable information on the dripline itself and on nuclei in its close vicinity. (orig.)

  12. Quasars, Seyfert galaxies and active galactic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osterbrock, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    This chapter is devoted to the spectroscopic methods for analyzing the observed plasma in the nuclei of quasars, Seyfert galazies, and active galactic nuclei. Both the narrow-line region and the broad-line region are discussed. Physical models are presented

  13. Single Particle Entropy in Heated Nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guttormsen, M.; Chankova, R.; Hjorth-Jensen, M.; Rekstad, J.; Siem, S.; Sunde, A. C.; Syed, N. U. H.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Schiller, A.; Voinov, A.

    2006-01-01

    The thermal motion of single particles represents the largest contribution to level density (or entropy) in atomic nuclei. The concept of single particle entropy is presented and shown to be an approximate extensive (additive) quantity for mid-shell nuclei. A few applications of single particle entropy are demonstrated

  14. Quantum phase transitions in atomic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamfir, N.V.

    2005-01-01

    Studies of quantum phase transitions in mesoscopic systems and applications to atomic nuclei are presented. Analysis in terms of the Interacting Boson Model shows that the main features persist even for moderate number of particles. Experimental evidence in rare-earth nuclei is discussed. New order and control parameters for systems with the same number of particles are proposed. (author)

  15. Automated segmentation and isolation of touching cell nuclei in cytopathology smear images of pleural effusion using distance transform watershed method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Win, Khin Yadanar; Choomchuay, Somsak; Hamamoto, Kazuhiko

    2017-06-01

    The automated segmentation of cell nuclei is an essential stage in the quantitative image analysis of cell nuclei extracted from smear cytology images of pleural fluid. Cell nuclei can indicate cancer as the characteristics of cell nuclei are associated with cells proliferation and malignancy in term of size, shape and the stained color. Nevertheless, automatic nuclei segmentation has remained challenging due to the artifacts caused by slide preparation, nuclei heterogeneity such as the poor contrast, inconsistent stained color, the cells variation, and cells overlapping. In this paper, we proposed a watershed-based method that is capable to segment the nuclei of the variety of cells from cytology pleural fluid smear images. Firstly, the original image is preprocessed by converting into the grayscale image and enhancing by adjusting and equalizing the intensity using histogram equalization. Next, the cell nuclei are segmented using OTSU thresholding as the binary image. The undesirable artifacts are eliminated using morphological operations. Finally, the distance transform based watershed method is applied to isolate the touching and overlapping cell nuclei. The proposed method is tested with 25 Papanicolaou (Pap) stained pleural fluid images. The accuracy of our proposed method is 92%. The method is relatively simple, and the results are very promising.

  16. Cell nuclei segmentation in fluorescence microscopy images using inter- and intra-region discriminative information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yang; Cai, Weidong; Feng, David Dagan; Chen, Mei

    2013-01-01

    Automated segmentation of cell nuclei in microscopic images is critical to high throughput analysis of the ever increasing amount of data. Although cell nuclei are generally visually distinguishable for human, automated segmentation faces challenges when there is significant intensity inhomogeneity among cell nuclei or in the background. In this paper, we propose an effective method for automated cell nucleus segmentation using a three-step approach. It first obtains an initial segmentation by extracting salient regions in the image, then reduces false positives using inter-region feature discrimination, and finally refines the boundary of the cell nuclei using intra-region contrast information. This method has been evaluated on two publicly available datasets of fluorescence microscopic images with 4009 cells, and has achieved superior performance compared to popular state of the art methods using established metrics.

  17. Structure and clusters of light unstable nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    En'yo, Yoshiko

    2010-01-01

    As it is known, cluster structures are often observed in light nuclei. In the recent evolution of unstable nuclear research (on nuclei having unbalanced number of neutron and proton) further new types of clusters are coming to be revealed. In this report, structures of light unstable nuclei and some of the theoretical models to describe them are reviewed. The following topics are picked up. 1. Cluster structure and theoretical models, 2. Cluster structure of unstable nuclei (low excited state). 3. Cluster structure of neutron excess beryllium isotopes. 4. Cluster gas like state in C isotope. 5. Dineutron structure of He isotopes. Numbers of strange nuclear structures of light nuclei are illustrated. Antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD) is the recently developed theoretical framework which has been successfully used in heavy ion reactions and nuclear structure studies. Successful application of AMD to the isotopes of Be, B and C are illustrated. (S. Funahashi)

  18. Structure of Light Neutron-rich Nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dlouhy, Zdenek

    2007-01-01

    In this contribution we searched for irregularities in various separation energies in the frame of mass measurement of neutron-rich nuclei at GANIL. On this basis we can summarize that the new doubly magic nuclei are 8 He, 22 O and 24 O. They are characterized by extra stability and, except 24 O, they cannot accept and bind additional neutrons. However, if we add to these nuclei a proton we obtain 9 Li and 25 F which are the core for two-neutron halo nucleus 11 Li and enables that fluorine can bound even 6 more neutrons, respectively. In that aspect the doubly magic nuclei in the neutron-rich region can form the basis either for neutron halo or very neutron-rich nuclei. (Author)

  19. Cold transfer between deformed, Coulomb excited nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, H.

    1998-01-01

    The scattering system 162 Dy → 116 Sn has been examined at energies in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier using the Heidelberg-Darmstadt Crystal Ball spectrometer combined with 5 Germanium-CLUSTER detectors. In order to study pairing correlations as a function of angular momentum cold events were selected in the 2n stripping channel by identifying and suppressing the dominant hot part of the transfer with the Crystal Ball. The CLUSTER detectors with their high γ-efficiency were used to identify the transfer channel and to resolve individual final states. Cross sections for the population of individual yrast states in a cold transfer reaction have been measured for the first time indicating the strong influence of higher transfer multipolarities. At small surface distances Coulomb-nuclear interferences were found to be responsible for the stronger decline of the population of higher yrast states in the transfer channel as compared to the Coulex channel. As a preparatory study for 2n transfer measurements between high spin yrast states in the backbending region of deformed nuclei the Coulomb excitation process in the crossing region of two bands in 162 Dy has been analyzed. The gross properties of the measured population probabilities could be interpreted in a simple band mixing model. (orig.)

  20. Strength of Coriolis Coupling in actinide nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peker, L.K.; Rasmussen, J.O.; Hamilton, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    Coriolis Coupling V/sub cor/ plays an important role in deformed nuclei. V/sub cor/ is proportional to h 2 /J[j (j + 1) -Ω (Ω + 1)]/sup 1/2/ and therefore is particularly significant in the nuclei with large j and low Ω Nilsson levels close to Fermi surface: n(i/sub 13/2/) in A = 150 to 170 rare-earth nuclei and p(i/sub 13/2/) and n(j/sub 15/2/) in A greater than or equal to 224 actinide nuclei. Because of larger j (n(j/sub 15/2/) versus n(i/sub 13/2/)) and smaller deformations (β approx. = 0.22 versus β 0.28) it was reasonable to expect that in actinide nuclei Coriolis effects are stronger than in the rare earth nuclei. Recently it was realized that the strength of observed Coriolis effects depends not only on the genuine Coriolis Coupling but also on the interplay between Coriolis ad pairing forces which leads to an interference between the wave functions of two mixing rotational bands. As a consequence the effective interaction V/sub eff/ of both bands is an oscillating function of the degree of shell filling (or chemical potential lambda F). It was shown that in the rare earth nuclei this interference strongly influenced conclusions about the trends in the Coriolis coupling strength and explained many of the observed band-mixing features (the sharpness of back banding curves, details of the blocking effect etc.). From theoretical analysis it was concluded that in the majority of actinide nuclei the effective interaction V/sub eff/ is strong, and therefore the Coriolis band-mixing have to be very strong. In this paper we would like to demonstrate that contrary to these predictions experimental data suggest that Coriolis band mixing in studied actinide nuclei is relatively weak and possibly significantly weaker than in rare earth nuclei

  1. Environmental properties related to active galactic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzer, Lianne H.

    There continues to be significant controversy regarding the mechanisms responsible for the initiation of activity in galactic nuclei. It is well understood that the non-thermal energy produced by an AGN is due to accretion onto a supermassive black hole. It has not yet been determined, however, what leads particular galaxies to become active. An accurate exploration into what triggers an AGN demands an analysis of a large sample of galaxies across a diverse set of environments. In this work, we investigate possible environmental influences by carrying out a statistical investigation of galaxy groups. Using the catalogue of Yang et al. (2007), in which groups of galaxies containing between 2 and 20 members with redshifts between 0.01 -- 0.20 were taken from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we investigate the fraction of active galactic nuclei (AGN) within these groups and compare it to the sample of isolated galaxies also obtained from Yang et al. (2007). After correcting our spectroscopic data for extinction and underlying stellar absorption, we classify the galaxy sample using relevant emission-line ratios. We propose an alternate method for classifying emission-line galaxies, including AGN, which builds upon standard diagnostic utilities used for optical classification and includes uncertainties. Such classification probabilities offer a more robust and consistent method of investigating the effect of group environments with galaxy type. We find our sample to be a fair representation of the local universe by comparing the luminosity function of our entire data set to that of Blanton et al. (2001), Blanton et al. (2003b), and Montero-Dorta & Prada (2009). The evidence also suggests that the luminosity function of galaxies differs between isolated galaxies and galaxies in groups. We find a significant increase in the fraction of AGNs identified in grouped environments. On the other hand, we find a higher fraction of starforming galaxies within isolated systems. We

  2. Protein kinase C zeta suppresses low- or high-grade colorectal cancer (CRC) phenotypes by interphase centrosome anchoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deevi, Ravi Kiran; Javadi, Arman; McClements, Jane; Vohhodina, Jekaterina; Savage, Kienan; Loughrey, Maurice Bernard; Evergren, Emma; Campbell, Frederick Charles

    2018-04-01

    Histological grading provides prognostic stratification of colorectal cancer (CRC) by scoring heterogeneous phenotypes. Features of aggressiveness include aberrant mitotic spindle configurations, chromosomal breakage, and bizarre multicellular morphology, but pathobiology is poorly understood. Protein kinase C zeta (PKCz) controls mitotic spindle dynamics, chromosome segregation, and multicellular patterns, but its role in CRC phenotype evolution remains unclear. Here, we show that PKCz couples genome segregation to multicellular morphology through control of interphase centrosome anchoring. PKCz regulates interdependent processes that control centrosome positioning. Among these, interaction between the cytoskeletal linker protein ezrin and its binding partner NHERF1 promotes the formation of a localized cue for anchoring interphase centrosomes to the cell cortex. Perturbation of these phenomena induced different outcomes in cells with single or extra centrosomes. Defective anchoring of a single centrosome promoted bipolar spindle misorientation, multi-lumen formation, and aberrant epithelial stratification. Collectively, these disturbances induce cribriform multicellular morphology that is typical of some categories of low-grade CRC. By contrast, defective anchoring of extra centrosomes promoted multipolar spindle formation, chromosomal instability (CIN), disruption of glandular morphology, and cell outgrowth across the extracellular matrix interface characteristic of aggressive, high-grade CRC. Because PKCz enhances apical NHERF1 intensity in 3D epithelial cultures, we used an immunohistochemical (IHC) assay of apical NHERF1 intensity as an indirect readout of PKCz activity in translational studies. We show that apical NHERF1 IHC intensity is inversely associated with multipolar spindle frequency and high-grade morphology in formalin-fixed human CRC samples. To conclude, defective PKCz control of interphase centrosome anchoring may underlie distinct categories of

  3. SAP-like domain in nucleolar spindle associated protein mediates mitotic chromosome loading as well as interphase chromatin interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verbakel, Werner, E-mail: werner.verbakel@chem.kuleuven.be [Laboratory of Biomolecular Dynamics, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200G, Bus 2403, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Carmeliet, Geert, E-mail: geert.carmeliet@med.kuleuven.be [Laboratory of Experimental Medicine and Endocrinology, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Herestraat 49, Bus 902, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Engelborghs, Yves, E-mail: yves.engelborghs@fys.kuleuven.be [Laboratory of Biomolecular Dynamics, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200G, Bus 2403, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium)

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} The SAP-like domain in NuSAP is a functional DNA-binding domain with preference for dsDNA. {yields} This SAP-like domain is essential for chromosome loading during early mitosis. {yields} NuSAP is highly dynamic on mitotic chromatin, as evident from photobleaching experiments. {yields} The SAP-like domain also mediates NuSAP-chromatin interaction in interphase nucleoplasm. -- Abstract: Nucleolar spindle associated protein (NuSAP) is a microtubule-stabilizing protein that localizes to chromosome arms and chromosome-proximal microtubules during mitosis and to the nucleus, with enrichment in the nucleoli, during interphase. The critical function of NuSAP is underscored by the finding that its depletion in HeLa cells results in various mitotic defects. Moreover, NuSAP is found overexpressed in multiple cancers and its expression levels often correlate with the aggressiveness of cancer. Due to its localization on chromosome arms and combination of microtubule-stabilizing and DNA-binding properties, NuSAP takes a special place within the extensive group of spindle assembly factors. In this study, we identify a SAP-like domain that shows DNA binding in vitro with a preference for dsDNA. Deletion of the SAP-like domain abolishes chromosome arm binding of NuSAP during mitosis, but is not sufficient to abrogate its chromosome-proximal localization after anaphase onset. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments revealed the highly dynamic nature of this NuSAP-chromatin interaction during mitosis. In interphase cells, NuSAP also interacts with chromatin through its SAP-like domain, as evident from its enrichment on dense chromatin regions and intranuclear mobility, measured by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. The obtained results are in agreement with a model where NuSAP dynamically stabilizes newly formed microtubules on mitotic chromosomes to enhance chromosome positioning without immobilizing these microtubules. Interphase Nu

  4. SAP-like domain in nucleolar spindle associated protein mediates mitotic chromosome loading as well as interphase chromatin interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verbakel, Werner; Carmeliet, Geert; Engelborghs, Yves

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The SAP-like domain in NuSAP is a functional DNA-binding domain with preference for dsDNA. → This SAP-like domain is essential for chromosome loading during early mitosis. → NuSAP is highly dynamic on mitotic chromatin, as evident from photobleaching experiments. → The SAP-like domain also mediates NuSAP-chromatin interaction in interphase nucleoplasm. -- Abstract: Nucleolar spindle associated protein (NuSAP) is a microtubule-stabilizing protein that localizes to chromosome arms and chromosome-proximal microtubules during mitosis and to the nucleus, with enrichment in the nucleoli, during interphase. The critical function of NuSAP is underscored by the finding that its depletion in HeLa cells results in various mitotic defects. Moreover, NuSAP is found overexpressed in multiple cancers and its expression levels often correlate with the aggressiveness of cancer. Due to its localization on chromosome arms and combination of microtubule-stabilizing and DNA-binding properties, NuSAP takes a special place within the extensive group of spindle assembly factors. In this study, we identify a SAP-like domain that shows DNA binding in vitro with a preference for dsDNA. Deletion of the SAP-like domain abolishes chromosome arm binding of NuSAP during mitosis, but is not sufficient to abrogate its chromosome-proximal localization after anaphase onset. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments revealed the highly dynamic nature of this NuSAP-chromatin interaction during mitosis. In interphase cells, NuSAP also interacts with chromatin through its SAP-like domain, as evident from its enrichment on dense chromatin regions and intranuclear mobility, measured by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. The obtained results are in agreement with a model where NuSAP dynamically stabilizes newly formed microtubules on mitotic chromosomes to enhance chromosome positioning without immobilizing these microtubules. Interphase NuSAP-chromatin interaction

  5. The collective model of nuclei and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank H, A.; Castanos G, O.H.

    1975-01-01

    The concepts of collective coordinates, the establishment of Hamiltonian collectives through the model of the drop of liquid or through the symmetry arguments and of the operators in these variables are discussed in this study. The passage of the laboratory system to the principal axis system is discussed thoroughly with the symmetries produced by this transformation, considering a drop in two dimensions. It is also observed that the deformed nuclei have some properties that can be described through the rotation-vibration and symmetric rotor models. The rotation-vibration model concerns the nuclei with axially symmetric deformations in the basic state and its importance is due to the fact that it can predict the nuclear spectrum at low energies. The asymmetric rotor model assumes the existence of triaxial nuclei and considers their collective movements. This model can be modified taking into consideration that vibrations β can also appear. Finally there is a comparison between the two models and the models are also compared with the experiment. (author)

  6. A new spin on nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, R.; Wadsworth, B.

    1998-01-01

    Magnetic rotation is a new phenomenon that is forcing physicists to rethink their understanding of what goes on inside the nucleus The rotation of quantum objects has a long and distinguished history in physics. In 1912 the Danish scientist Niels Bjerrum was the first to recognize that the rotation of molecules is quantized. In 1938 Edward Teller and John Wheeler observed similar features in the spectra of excited nuclei, and suggested that this was caused by the nucleus rotating. But a more complete explanation had to wait until 1951, when Aage Bohr (the son of Niels) pointed out that rotation was a consequence of the nucleus deforming from its spherical shape. We owe much of our current understanding of nuclear rotation to the work of Bohr and Ben Mottelson, who shared the 1975 Nobel Prize for Physics with James Rainwater for developing a model of the nucleus that combined the individual and collective motions of the neutrons and protons inside the nucleus. What makes it possible for a nucleus to rotate? Quantum mechanically, a perfect sphere cannot rotate because it appears the same when viewed from any direction and there is no point of reference against which its change in position can be detected. To see the rotation the spherical symmetry must be broken to allow an orientation in space to be defined. For example, a diatomic molecule, which has a dumbbell shape, can rotate about the two axes perpendicular to its axis of symmetry. A quantum mechanical treatment of a diatomic molecule leads to a very simple relationship between rotational energy, E, and angular momentum. This energy is found to be proportional to J(J + 1), where J is the angular momentum quantum number. The molecule also has a magnetic moment that is proportional to J. These concepts can be applied to the atomic nucleus. If the distribution of mass and/or charge inside the nucleus becomes non-spherical then the nucleus will be able to rotate. The rotation is termed ''collective'' because many

  7. About dynamic model of limiting fragmentation of heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuchin, I.A.

    2001-01-01

    production (mainly of mesons) and 'knock out' of fragments under the scheme of the internuclear cascade due to inclusion of nuclear forces on small distances happens. (An one body intermediate state). The principal result of this stage - fast growth of n-dimensionality of a phase space of the process. On a final stage the free dispersion of particles, jets and fragments is observed and formed a tree body final state: spectators-1, participants and spectators-2. The process is obtaining features of a classical character as a result offending to zero of an effective M.Planck's constant ℎ→0, and operation of the laws of propagation of an excitation energy in dissipative mediums. (A realization of S -, LS - and HS - regimes according to A. Samarskiy et al.) General conclusion - the phenomenon of the massive nuclei limiting fragmentation during their high-energy interaction can be considered as an actual example of a passage of quantum chaos to classical one due to growth of a phase space N-regularity of the process under consideration, i.e. as the actual prototype of dynamic evolution of a generic type systems in direction from quantum chaos state to classical one mathematically researched by M. Robnik and others

  8. Evolution of interphase and intergranular strain in zirconium-niobium alloys during deformation at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Song

    Zr-2.5Nb is currently used for pressure tubes in the CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uranium) reactor. A complete understanding of the deformation mechanism of Zr-2.5Nb is important if we are to accurately predict the in-reactor performance of pressure tubes and guarantee normal operation of the reactors. This thesis is a first step in gaining such an understanding; the deformation mechanism of ZrNb alloys at room temperature has been evaluated through studying the effect of texture and microstructure on deformation. In-situ neutron diffraction was used to monitor the evolution of the lattice strain of individual grain families along both the loading and Poisson's directions and to track the development of interphase and intergranular strains during deformation. The following experiments were carried out with data interpreted using elasto-plastic modeling techniques: (1) Compression tests of a 100%betaZr material at room temperature. (2) Tension and compression tests of hot rolled Zr-2.5Nb plate material. (3) Compression of annealed Zr-2.5Nb. (4) Cyclic loading of the hot rolled Zr-2.5Nb. (5) Compression tests of ZrNb alloys with different Nb and oxygen contents. The experimental results were interpreted using a combination of finite element (FE) and elasto-plastic self-consistent (EPSC) models. The phase properties and phase interactions well represented by the FE model, the EPSC model successfully captured the evolution of intergranular constraint during deformation and provided reasonable estimates of the critical resolved shear stress and hardening parameters of different slip systems under different conditions. The consistency of the material parameters obtained by the EPSC model allows the deformation mechanism at room temperature and the effect of textures and microstructures of ZrNb alloys to be understood. This work provides useful information towards manufacturing of Zr-2.5Nb components and helps in producing ideal microstructures and material properties for

  9. Neutron rich nuclei around 132Sn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, Sarmishtha

    2016-01-01

    The neutron rich nuclei with few particles or holes in 132 Sn have various experimental and theoretical interest to understand the evolution of nuclear structure around the doubly magic shell closure Z=50 and N=82. Some of the exotic neutron rich nuclei in this mass region are situated near waiting points in the r-process path and are of special astrophysical interest. Neutron rich nuclei near 132 Sn have been studied using fission fragment spectroscopy. The lifetime of low lying isomeric states have been precisely measured and the beta decay from the ground and isomeric states have been characterized using gamma-ray spectroscopy

  10. Collective models of transition nuclei Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dombradi, Zs.

    1982-01-01

    The models describing the even-odd and odd-odd transition nuclei (nuclei of moderate ground state deformation) are reviewed. The nuclear core is described by models of even-even nuclei, and the interaction of a single particle and the core is added. Different models of particle-core coupling (phenomenological models, collective models, nuclear field theory, interacting boson-fermion model, vibration nucleon cluster model) and their results are discussed. New developments like dynamical supersymmetry and new research trends are summarized. (D.Gy.)

  11. Coulomb energy differences in mirror nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenzi, Silvia M

    2006-01-01

    By comparing the excitation energies of analogue states in mirror nuclei, several nuclear structure properties can be studied as a function of the angular momentum up to high spin states. They can be described in the shell model framework by including electromagnetic and nuclear isospin-non-conserving interactions. Calculations for the mirror energy differences in nuclei of the f 7/2 shell are described and compared with recent experimental data. These studies are extended to mirror nuclei in the upper sd and fp shells

  12. Bound states of Θ+ in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oset, E.; Cabrera, D.; Li, Q.B.; Magas, V.K.; Vicente Vacas, M.J.

    2005-01-01

    We study the binding energy and the width of the Θ + in nuclei, associated to the KN and KπN components. The first one leads to negligible contributions while the second one leads to a sizeable attraction, enough to bind the Θ + in nuclei. Pauli blocking and binding effects on the KN decay reduce considerably the Θ + decay width in nuclei and medium effects associated to the KπN component also lead to a very small width, as a consequence of which one finds separation between the bound levels considerably larger than the width of the states

  13. Is there chirality in atomic nuclei?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng Jie

    2009-01-01

    Static chiral symmetries are common in nature, for example, the macroscopic spirals of snail shells, the microscopic handedness of certain molecules, and human hands. The concept of chirality in atomic nuclei was first proposed in 1997, and since then many efforts have been made to understand chiral symmetry and its spontaneous breaking in atomic nuclei. Recent theoretical and experimental progress in the verification of chirality in atomic nuclei will be reviewed, together with a discussion of the problems that await to be solved in the future. (authors)

  14. Bubble nuclei in relativistic mean field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, A.; Aberg, S.; Patra, S.K.

    2011-01-01

    Bubble nuclei are characterized by a depletion of their central density, i.e. the formation of the proton or neutron void and subsequently forming proton or neutron bubble nuclei. Possibility of the formation of bubble nuclei has been explored through different nuclear models and in different mass regions. Advancements in experimental nuclear physics has led our experimental access to many new shapes and structures, which were inaccessible hitherto. In the present paper, the possibility of observing nuclear bubble in oxygen isotopes, particularly for 22 O has been studied

  15. Formation and decay of hot nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamain, B.

    1992-09-01

    The mechanisms involved in hot nuclei formation and decay and their eventual connexion with fundamental properties of nuclear matter are discussed, i.e. its equation of state is considered. After a brief review of the reactions in which hot nuclei can be formed, the variables which are used to describe them, the corresponding theoretical descriptions and their limits when extreme states are reached are discussed. Experimental evidences for hot nuclei formation are presented, with the corresponding decay properties used as signatures. (R.P.) 64 refs.; 25 figs.; 2 tabs

  16. Hot nuclei: high temperatures, high angular momenta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerreau, D.

    1991-01-01

    A review is made of the present status concerning the production of hot nuclei above 5 MeV temperature, concentrating mainly on the possible experimental evidences for the attainment of a critical temperature, on the existence of dynamical limitations to the energy deposition and on the experimental signatures for the formation of hot spinning nuclei. The data strongly suggest a nuclear disassembly in collisions involving very heavy ions at moderate incident velocities. Furthermore, hot nuclei seem to be quite stable against rotation on a short time scale. (author) 26 refs.; 12 figs

  17. Evolution of planetary nebula nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    The evolution of planetary nebula nuclei (PNNs) is examined with the aid of the most recent available stellar evolution calculations and new observations of these objects. Their expected distribution in the log L-log T plane is calculated based upon the stellar evolutionary models of Paczynski, Schoenberner and Iben, the initial mass function derived by Miller and Scalo, and various assumptions concerning mass loss during post-main sequence evolution. The distribution is found to be insensitive both to the assumed range of main-sequence progenitor mass and to reasonable variations in the age and the star forming history of the galactic disk. Rather, the distribution is determined by the strong dependence of the rate of stellar evolution upon core mass, the steepness of the initial mass function, and to a lesser extent the finite lifetime of an observable planetary nebula. The theoretical distributions are rather different than any of those inferred from earlier observations. Possible observational selection effects that may be responsible are examined, as well as the intrinsic uncertainties associated with the theoretical model predictions. An extensive photometric and smaller photographic survey of southern hemisphere planetary nebulae (PNs) is presented

  18. Shape nuclei and nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yushkov, A.V.

    1975-01-01

    Experimental methods for obtaining the nucleus shape parameters are reviewed throughout the period of 1955-1975. Spatial properties of a nucleus, which can be directly or indirectly measured, are determined. They include: parameters of nucleus localization in space; parameters characterizing the nucleus nonsphericity; parameters of the nucleus nonaxiality. Dimensional parameters of a nucleus, namely, radius R and surface ΔR are derived from electron scattering. The deformation sign is indirectly obtained in the experiments. Parameters of the nucleus shape, namely, the sign and magnitude of nuclear deformation are derived from the mean energy proton scattering by a coupled channels method. The only direct way of deriving the nucleus surface deformation signs is the method of the Blaire phase shift. Results on scattering of electrons, protons, and α-particles on light and medium nuclei are reported. Data on the nucleus shape can be also obtained from reactions with heavy ions. A difference between strong absorptions of incident particles of high and average energy by a nucleus is noted. Numerous diagrams illustrate experimental and theoretical results

  19. Clusters in Nuclei. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Following the pioneering discovery of alpha clustering and of molecular resonances, the field of nuclear clustering is today one of those domains of heavy-ion nuclear physics that faces the greatest challenges, yet also contains the greatest opportunities. After many summer schools and workshops, in particular over the last decade, the community of nuclear molecular physicists has decided to collaborate in producing a comprehensive collection of lectures and tutorial reviews covering the field. This second volume follows the successful Lect. Notes Phys. 818 (Vol.1), and comprises six extensive lectures covering the following topics: - Microscopic cluster models - Neutron halo and break-up reactions - Break-up reaction models for two- and three-cluster projectiles - Clustering effects within the di-nuclear model - Nuclear alpha-particle condensates - Clusters in nuclei: experimental perspectives By promoting new ideas and developments while retaining a pedagogical style of presentation throughout, these lectures will serve as both a reference and an advanced teaching manual for future courses and schools in the fields of nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics. (orig.)

  20. Clusters in Nuclei. Vol. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, Christian (ed.) [Strasbourg Univ. (France). Inst. Pluridiciplinaire Hubert Curien

    2012-07-01

    Following the pioneering discovery of alpha clustering and of molecular resonances, the field of nuclear clustering is today one of those domains of heavy-ion nuclear physics that faces the greatest challenges, yet also contains the greatest opportunities. After many summer schools and workshops, in particular over the last decade, the community of nuclear molecular physicists has decided to collaborate in producing a comprehensive collection of lectures and tutorial reviews covering the field. This second volume follows the successful Lect. Notes Phys. 818 (Vol.1), and comprises six extensive lectures covering the following topics: - Microscopic cluster models - Neutron halo and break-up reactions - Break-up reaction models for two- and three-cluster projectiles - Clustering effects within the di-nuclear model - Nuclear alpha-particle condensates - Clusters in nuclei: experimental perspectives By promoting new ideas and developments while retaining a pedagogical style of presentation throughout, these lectures will serve as both a reference and an advanced teaching manual for future courses and schools in the fields of nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics. (orig.)

  1. Hypersensitive responses of cells in the thymus, spleen, and intestinal crypt of mice to interphase death after treatment with x rays and chemical mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinuta, Masakatsu

    1986-01-01

    Upon whole-body exposure of mice to X rays or administration of chemical mutagens, cells in thymus, spleen and intestinal crypt undergo sensitive response to interphase death. We developed an effective method for detecting dead cells in the interphase by scoring stained cells in situ in exposed tissues after staining frozen section with erythrosin B. Cell killing was detected at doses as low as 1 % of lethal doses after treatment with X rays and chemicals. Strain N4 was highly sensitive to interphase-cell-death and hybrids of N4 and resistant strain HT or C3H were also sensitive to cell-death, indicating a dominant trait of the sensitive cell-death response. (author)

  2. Computational modeling of elastic properties of carbon nanotube/polymer composites with interphase regions. Part I: Micro-structural characterization and geometric modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Fei

    2014-01-01

    A computational strategy to predict the elastic properties of carbon nanotube-reinforced polymer composites is proposed in this two-part paper. In Part I, the micro-structural characteristics of these nano-composites are discerned. These characteristics include networks/agglomerations of carbon nanotubes and thick polymer interphase regions between the nanotubes and the surrounding matrix. An algorithm is presented to construct three-dimensional geometric models with large amounts of randomly dispersed and aggregated nanotubes. The effects of the distribution of the nanotubes and the thickness of the interphase regions on the concentration of the interphase regions are demonstrated with numerical results. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Proton-gamma coincidence experiment on medium mass nuclei at 400MeV and study of reaction mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldit, Alain.

    1981-01-01

    Previous γ ray production experiments produced by proton on nuclei show important cross sections for residual nuclei corresponding to a four nucleon (2p + 2n) removal. With our (p - γ) coincidence experiment the forward emitted proton reflects the primary interaction and the γ spectra characterizes the final state of the reaction. Protons are detected with a magnetic spectrometer and γ rays are selected with a Ge(Li) diode. Angular and momentum analysis of scattered protons demonstrate a primary quasi free process on nucleons. No indication of knock out reactions on clusters has been seen. The residual nuclei are mainly produced by evaporation processes. A theoretical calculation involving intranuclear cascades and evaporation processes has been performed. The nucleus model is based upon a Fermi gas and nuclear density agrees with diffusion electron experiments. Residual nuclei far from target are well described with a such model. Residual nuclei near the target are sensitive to the nuclear structure [fr

  4. Path integral theory and deep inelastic scattering of nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neto, J.L.

    1981-10-01

    A formalism, based on Feynman's path integral, is developed and used in the theory of deep inelastic collisions of nuclei. Having shown how to express the propagator of the Wigner function of an isolated system as a (double) path integral in phase space, random processes are considered and the influence functional in interacting systems is discussed. A semi-classical description for the reduced Wigner and a generalized Langevin equation are given. Finally, the formalism is used in a random matrix model for deep inelastic collisions. (U.K.)

  5. Characteristic functions of inclusive processes with participation of light nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omboo, Z.; Pak, A.S.; Saakyan, S.B.; Tarasov, A.V.; Uzhinskij, V.V.

    1981-01-01

    The problem of calculation of impulse spectra in the pA→pX reaction with participation of light nuclei is considered. Explicit expression for characteristic functions of inclusive processes taking into account the centre of mass correlations of a target-nucleus are obtained. It is assumed that the ground state of target-nucleus is described by the wave function of harmonic oscillator ground state which depend on Jacobi relative coordinates, and the final state is described by the plane wave system [ru

  6. Neutron emission study after muon capture by nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouyssy, Alain.

    1974-01-01

    Muon capture by nuclei, used in the beginning for checking the weak interaction, is now a method of investigation of nuclear structure. Study of spectrum, asymmetry and polarization of emitted neutrons after polarized muon capture has been done in three directions: weak coupling constants, final state interaction, nuclear wave functions. The neutron intensity and helicity are very dependent of the neutron - residual nucleus interaction, while the asymmetry is sensitive to the wave functions used for the proton. Moreover if the induced tensor coupling constant is different from zero the asymmetry is increased. Longitudinal polarization experiments, with those for neutron intensity, would be of great interest to give informations on neutron asymmetry [fr

  7. Using nuclei to probe space-time properties of hadronization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliseev, S.M.

    1998-01-01

    Many of the key issues in understanding quantum chromodynamics (QCD) involve the interactions with many particles in the final state. We discuss, in an introductory fashion, some latest developments in the study of particle production in high energy collisions. We introduce and briefly discuss a model for propagation of quark and gluon jets in nuclear matter, taking into account the Landau- Pomeranchuk-Migdal (LPM) effect and cascading of soft particles in a nucleus. Calculations were performed by the Monte Carlo method. The hadrons, including cumulative nucleons produced in neutrino interactions with nuclei were investigated and the formation zone length was obtained

  8. [Automated morphometric evaluation of the chromatin structure of liver cell nuclei after vagotomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butusova, N N; Zhukotskiĭ, A V; Sherbo, I V; Gribkov, E N; Dubovaia, T K

    1989-05-01

    The morphometric analysis of the interphase chromatine structure of the hepatic cells nuclei was carried out on the automated TV installation for the quantitative analysis of images "IBAS-2" (by the OPTON firm, the FRG) according to 50 optical and geometric parameters during various periods (1.2 and 4 weeks) after the vagotomy operation. It is determined that upper-molecular organisation of chromatine undergoes the biggest changes one week after operation, and changes of granular component are more informative than changes of the nongranular component (with the difference 15-20%). It was also revealed that chromatine components differ in tinctorial properties, which are evidently dependent on physicochemical characteristics of the chromatine under various functional conditions of the cell. As a result of the correlation analysis the group of morphometric indices of chromatine structure was revealed, which are highly correlated with level of transcription activity of chromatine during various terms after denervation. The correlation quotient of these parameters is 0.85-0.97. The summing up: vagus denervation of the liver causes changes in the morphofunctional organisation of the chromatine.

  9. TONNEAU2/FASS Regulates the Geometry of Microtubule Nucleation and Cortical Array Organization in Interphase Arabidopsis Cells[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirik, Angela; Ehrhardt, David W.; Kirik, Viktor

    2012-01-01

    Organization of microtubules into ordered arrays involves spatial and temporal regulation of microtubule nucleation. Here, we show that acentrosomal microtubule nucleation in plant cells involves a previously unknown regulatory step that determines the geometry of microtubule nucleation. Dynamic imaging of interphase cortical microtubules revealed that the ratio of branching to in-bundle microtubule nucleation on cortical microtubules is regulated by the Arabidopsis thaliana B′′ subunit of protein phosphatase 2A, which is encoded by the TONNEAU2/FASS (TON2) gene. The probability of nucleation from γ-tubulin complexes localized at the cell cortex was not affected by a loss of TON2 function, suggesting a specific role of TON2 in regulating the nucleation geometry. Both loss of TON2 function and ectopic targeting of TON2 to the plasma membrane resulted in defects in cell shape, suggesting the importance of TON2-mediated regulation of the microtubule cytoskeleton in cell morphogenesis. Loss of TON2 function also resulted in an inability for cortical arrays to reorient in response to light stimulus, suggesting an essential role for TON2 and microtubule branching nucleation in reorganization of microtubule arrays. Our data establish TON2 as a regulator of interphase microtubule nucleation and provide experimental evidence for a novel regulatory step in the process of microtubule-dependent nucleation. PMID:22395485

  10. The use of premature chromosome condensation to study in interphase cells the influence of environmental factors on human genetic material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasiliki I. Hatzi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, there is a constantly increasing concern regarding the mutagenic and carcinogenic potential of a variety of harmful environmental factors to which humans are exposed in their natural and anthropogenic environment. These factors exert their hazardous potential in humans' personal (diet, smoking, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics and occupational environment that constitute part of the anthropogenic environment. It is well known that genetic damage due to these factors has dramatic implications for human health. Since most of the environmental genotoxic factors induce arrest or delay in cell cycle progression, the conventional analysis of chromosomes at metaphase may underestimate their genotoxic potential. Premature Chromosome Condensation (PCC induced either by means of cell fusion or specific chemicals, enables the microscopic visualization of interphase chromosomes whose morphology depends on the cell cycle stage, as well as the analysis of structural and numerical aberrations at the G1 and G2 phases of the cell cycle. The PCC has been successfully used in problems involving cell cycle analysis, diagnosis and prognosis of human leukaemia, assessment of interphase chromosome malformations resulting from exposure to radiation or chemicals, as well as elucidation of the mechanisms underlying the conversion of DNA damage into chromosomal damage. In this report, particular emphasis is given to the advantages of the PCC methodology used as an alternative to conventional metaphase analysis in answering questions in the fields of radiobiology, biological dosimetry, toxicogenetics, clinical cytogenetics and experimental therapeutics.

  11. Understanding nuclei in the upper sd - shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, M. Saha; Bisoi, Abhijit; Ray, Sudatta [Nuclear Physics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata 700064 (India); Kshetri, Ritesh [Nuclear Physics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata 700064, India and Sidho-Kanho-Birsha University, Purulia - 723101 (India); Sarkar, S. [Indian Institute of Engineering Science and Technology, Shibpur, Howrah - 711103 (India)

    2014-08-14

    Nuclei in the upper-sd shell usually exhibit characteristics of spherical single particle excitations. In the recent years, employment of sophisticated techniques of gamma spectroscopy has led to observation of high spin states of several nuclei near A ≃ 40. In a few of them multiparticle, multihole rotational states coexist with states of single particle nature. We have studied a few nuclei in this mass region experimentally, using various campaigns of the Indian National Gamma Array setup. We have compared and combined our empirical observations with the large-scale shell model results to interpret the structure of these nuclei. Indication of population of states of large deformation has been found in our data. This gives us an opportunity to investigate the interplay of single particle and collective degrees of freedom in this mass region.

  12. Perspectives of production of superheavy nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V., E-mail: antonenk@theor.jinr.ru; Bezbakh, A. N.; Sargsyan, V. V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, RU–141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Scheid, W. [Institut für Theoretische Physik der Justus-Liebig-Universität, D–35392 Giessen (Germany)

    2016-07-07

    Possible ways of production of superheavies are discussed. Impact of nuclear structure on the production of superheavy nuclei in complete fusion reactions is discussed. The proton shell closure at Z = 120 is discussed.

  13. Infrared Observations of Cometary Dust and Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisse, Carey

    2004-01-01

    This bibliography lists citations for publications published under the grant. Subjects of the publications include cometary dust, instellar and interplanetary dust, comet nuclei and comae, Comet Hale-Bopp, infrared observations of comets, mass loss, and comet break-up.

  14. Superheavy nuclei: a relativistic mean field outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afanasjev, A.V.

    2006-01-01

    The analysis of quasi-particle spectra in the heaviest A∼250 nuclei with spectroscopic data provides an additional constraint for the choice of effective interaction for the description of superheavy nuclei. It strongly suggests that only the parametrizations which predict Z = 120 and N = 172 as shell closures are reliable for superheavy nuclei within the relativistic mean field theory. The influence of the central depression in the density distribution of spherical superheavy nuclei on the shell structure is studied. A large central depression produces large shell gaps at Z = 120 and N = 172. The shell gaps at Z = 126 and N = 184 are favoured by a flat density distribution in the central part of the nucleus. It is shown that approximate particle number projection (PNP) by means of the Lipkin-Nogami (LN) method removes pairing collapse seen at these gaps in the calculations without PNP

  15. Searching for dual active galactic nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K. Rubinur

    2018-02-09

    Feb 9, 2018 ... Abstract. Binary or dual active galactic nuclei (DAGN) are expected from galaxy formation theories. How- ... cuss results from the multi-frequency Expanded Very .... mid-IR color using WISE observations where they have.

  16. Lipkin-Nogami method for rotating nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magierski, P.

    1993-01-01

    The extension of Lipkin-Nogami method to the case of rotating nuclei, where the short-range attraction acting between the nucleus (pairing free) plays a significant role for the coupling scheme is discussed. 7 refs, 6 figs

  17. Collisions on relativistic nuclei: shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudima, K.K.; Toneev, V.D.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments are analysed which indicate the possible generation of shock waves in collisions of two nuclei. Another interpretation of these data is proposed and the concerned new experiments are discussed

  18. Non-equilibrium entropy in excited nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betak, E.

    1991-06-01

    The time-dependent behaviour of entropy in excited nuclei is investigated. In distinction to recent claims, it is shown that no self-organization is involved in pre-equilibrium nuclear reactions. (author). 9 refs.; 4 figs

  19. ULTRA-RELATIVISTIC NUCLEI: A NEW FRONTIER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MCLERRAN, L.

    1999-01-01

    The collisions of ultra-relativistic nuclei provide a window on the behavior of strong interactions at asymptotically high energies. They also will allow the authors to study the bulk properties of hadronic matter at very high densities

  20. Intermediate/high energy probes and the structure of nuclei. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vary, J.P.

    1984-01-01

    Quarks and gluons in nuclei are essential to a complete understanding of the response of nuclei to high energy probes. We propose to obtain evidence of the behavior of quarks in nuclei through theoretical analyses of recent data. Deep inelastic lepton scattering on nuclei provides the least ambiguous signature of quark behavior and recent data from SLAC and CERN show some remarkable features. According to our latest analyses, the quark cluster model we indroduced in1981 provides a framework to explain much of the existing data. We propose to improve the model by eliminating a number of approximations and to incorporate more information from QCD regarding the properties of six and nine quark clusters. We also propose to apply the model to predict results for particle production in hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions. Finally, we propose a series of investigations into the quantum statistical properties of nuclei using microscopic many body theory with the goal to obtain the equation of state of finite nuclei

  1. High energy particle interactions with nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czyz, W.

    1978-01-01

    The recent interest in multiparticle production processes on nuclei was triggered by re-discovering their 'enigmatic simplicity' which has been known to cosmic ray physicists for over 20 years: the mean multiplicity and angular distributions of relativistic secondaries produced on nuclei do not differ markedly from what emerges from p-p collisions. The author considers how such reactions may provide a way of obtaining details of hadron structure. (Auth.)

  2. Electro-magnetic properties of heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Takaharu

    1989-01-01

    Two topics of electro-magnetic properties of heavy nuclei are discussed. The first topic is the M1 excitation from well-deformed heavy nuclei, and the other is the sudden increase of the isotope shift as a function of N in going away from the closed shell. These problems are considered in terms of the particle-number projected (Nilsson-) BCS calculation. (author)

  3. Hot nuclei, limiting temperatures and excitation energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peter, J.

    1986-09-01

    Hot fusion nuclei are produced in heavy ion collisions at intermediate energies (20-100 MeV/U). Information on the maximum excitation energy per nucleon -and temperatures- indicated by the experimental data is compared to the predictions of static and dynamical calculations. Temperatures around 5-6 MeV are reached and seem to be the limit of formation of thermally equilibrated fusion nuclei

  4. Electron scattering and collective excitations in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goutte, D.

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear collective degrees of freedom are investigated through the study of the radial dependance of their wave function. Inelastic electron scattering is shown to be the appropriate tool to extract such a detailed information. Some recent results on spherical as well as deformed nuclei are discussed and the most recent extensions to the mean field approach are compared to these data in order to clarify the present status of our understanding of the dynamical properties of complex nuclei

  5. Proton radioactivity from proton-rich nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzman, F.; Goncalves, M.; Tavares, O.A.P.; Duarte, S.B.; Garcia, F.; Rodriguez, O.

    1999-03-01

    Half-lives for proton emission from proton-rich nuclei have been calculated by using the effective liquid drop model of heavy-particle decay of nuclei. It is shown that this model is able to offer results or spontaneous proton-emission half-life-values in excellent agreement with the existing experimental data. Predictions of half-life-values for other possible proton-emission cases are present for null orbital angular momentum. (author)

  6. Determining properties of baryon resonances in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, M.B.; Chen, C.M.; Ernst, D.J.; Jiang, M.F.

    1996-01-01

    Meson-nucleus and photon-nucleus interactions are important sources of information about the medium modifications of baryon resonances in nuclei. Indications of how large the medium effects are for resonances above the Δ 33 (1232) are provided by it combined analysis of photonuclear and pion cross sections in the GeV range of energies. Tile existing data indicate a possible 10-20% renormalization of the pion coupling to higher-lying resonances in nuclei

  7. Nuclei far off the stability line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenyes, T.

    1978-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental aspects of the formation of some ''exotic'' nuclei far off the stability line were reviewed in addition to the relevant results of research in this field. Results in beta- and gamma-ray spectroscopy, heavy-ion-spectroscopy, achievements in the fields of measuring the atomic mass, the moment, and the radius of the nuclei as well as some astronomical aspects were described. (Z.P.)

  8. Thomas Fermi model of finite nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boguta, J.; Rafelski, J.

    1977-01-01

    A relativistic Thomas-Fermi model of finite-nuclei is considered. The effective nuclear interaction is mediated by exchanges of isoscalar scalar and vector mesons. The authors include also a self-interaction of the scalar meson field and the Coulomb repulsion of the protons. The parameters of the model are constrained by the average nuclear properties. The Thomas-Fermi equations are solved numerically for finite, stable nuclei. The particular case of 208 82 Pb is considered in more detail. (Auth.)

  9. Structure of neutron-rich nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazarewicz, W.

    2000-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The uncharted regions of the (N,Z) plane contain information that can answer many questions of fundamental importance for science: How many protons and neutrons can be clustered together by the strong interaction to form a bound nucleus? What are the proton and neutron magic numbers of the exotic nuclei? What are the properties of very short-lived exotic nuclei with extreme neutron-to-proton ratios? What is the effective nucleon-nucleon interaction in a nucleus that has a very large neutron excess? Nuclear life far from stability is different from that around the stability line; the promised access to completely new combinations of proton and neutron numbers offers prospects for new structural phenomena. The main objective of this talk is to discuss some of the challenges and opportunities of research with exotic nuclei. The covered topics will include: Theoretical challenges; Skins and halos in heavy nuclei; Shape coexistence in exotic nuclei; Beta-decays of neutron-rich nuclei. (author)

  10. Major new sources of biological ice nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffett, B. F.; Hill, T.; Henderson-Begg, S. K.

    2009-12-01

    Almost all research on biological ice nucleation has focussed on a limited number of bacteria. Here we characterise several major new sources of biogenic ice nuclei. These include mosses, hornworts, liverworts and cyanobacteria. Ice nucleation in the eukaryotic bryophytes appears to be ubiquitous. The temperature at which these organisms nucleate is that at which the difference in vapour pressure over ice and water is at or close to its maximum. At these temperatures (-8 to -18 degrees C) ice will grow at the expense of supercooled water. These organisms are dependent for their water on occult precipitation - fog, dew and cloudwater which by its nature is not collected in conventional rain gauges. Therefore we suggest that these organism produce ice nuclei as a water harvesting mechanism. Since the same mechanism would also drive the Bergeron-Findeisen process, and as moss is known to become airborne, these nuclei may have a role in the initiation of precipitation. The properties of these ice nuclei are very different from the well characterised bacterial nuclei. We will also present DNA sequence data showing that, although related, the proteins responsible are only very distantly related to the classical bacterial ice nuclei.

  11. Inelastic J/Ψ photoproduction off nuclei: Gluon enhancement or double color exchange?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huefner, J.; Zamolodchikov, A.

    1996-01-01

    The nuclear enhancement observed in inelastic photoproduction of J/Ψ should not be interpreted as evidence for an increased gluon density in nuclei. The nuclear suppression of the production rate due to initial and final state interactions is calculated and a novel two-step color exchange process is proposed, which is able to explain the data. (orig.)

  12. Nuclear data evaluation for medium and heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizumoto, Motoharu

    1988-01-01

    Present status of nuclear data evaluation works for medium and heavy nuclei is described in this paper. These data are being prepared for JENDL-3 (Japanese Evaluated Nuclear Data Library-Version 3). At present, about a half of the data files, which are expected to be stored in the final library, has been brought into a temporary library called JENDL-3T. The remaining works and additional revisions are still needed to be made in order to finalize the data library as JENDL-3. Special emphases have been put on the high energy neutron data for which the previous JENDL-2 had some inadequacies, and gamma-ray production cross sections have been newly evaluated. Systematic and consistent evaluations have been intended for the new evaluations. (author)

  13. Diffraction scattering and disintegration of 3He nuclei by atomic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koval'chuk, V.I.

    2006-01-01

    Within diffraction model framework a method of cross sections calculation for scattering and disintegration of weakly-bounded two-clustered nuclei by nuclei when both of its clusters are changed has been proposed. The experimental elastic scattering cross sections of 3 He by 40 Ca, 90 Zr and coincidence spectra of disintegration products from 28 Si( 3 He,dp) have been described

  14. Depth profiling the solid electrolyte interphase on lithium titanate (Li4Ti5O12) using synchrotron-based photoelectron spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordh, Tim; Younesi, Reza; Brandell, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The presence of a surface layer on lithium titanate (Li4Ti5O12, LTO) anodes, which has been a topic of debate in scientific literature, is here investigated with tunable high surface sensitive synchrotron-based photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) to obtain a reliable depth profile of the interphase...

  15. Approaches leading to the Three-Dimensional Organization of the Human Interphase Nucleus: Simulations, FISH, Chromatin Labelling in vivo, Fractal Analysis, Carbon Ion Irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias); J. Langowski (Jörg)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractDespite the successful linear sequencing of the human genome its three-dimensional structure is widely unknown, although it is important for gene regulation and replication. For a long time the interphase nucleus has been viewed as a 'spaghetti soup' of DNA without much internal

  16. Nuclear structure for the crust of neutron stars and exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goegelein, Peter

    2007-01-01

    In this work the Skyrme Hartree-Fock and Relativistic Hartree--Fock approaches have been considered to describe the structure of nuclear systems ranging from finite nuclei, structures in the crust of neutron stars to homogeneous matter. Effects of pairing correlations and finite temperature are also taken into account. The numerical procedure in the cubic box is described for the Skyrme Hartree-Fock as well as the relativistic Hartree-Fock approach. And finally, results for the crust of neutron stars and exotic nuclei are presented and discussed. (orig.)

  17. Charged current cross section for massive cosmological neutrinos impinging on radioactive nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazauskas, R.; Volpe, C. [Institut de Physique Nuclueaire, 91 - Orsay (France); Vogel, P. [Kellogg Radiation Lab., Caltech, Pasadena, California (United States)

    2007-07-01

    We discuss the cross section formula both for massless and massive neutrinos on stable and radioactive nuclei. The latter could be of interest for the detection of cosmological neutrinos whose observation is one of the main challenges of modern cosmology. We analyze the signal to background ratio as a function of the ratio m{nu}/{delta}, i.e. the neutrino mass over the detector resolution and show that an energy resolution {delta} {<=} 0.5 eV would be required for sub-eV neutrino masses, independently of the gravitational neutrino clustering. Finally we mention the non-resonant character of neutrino capture on radioactive nuclei. (authors)

  18. Nuclear structure for the crust of neutron stars and exotic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goegelein, Peter

    2007-07-01

    In this work the Skyrme Hartree-Fock and Relativistic Hartree--Fock approaches have been considered to describe the structure of nuclear systems ranging from finite nuclei, structures in the crust of neutron stars to homogeneous matter. Effects of pairing correlations and finite temperature are also taken into account. The numerical procedure in the cubic box is described for the Skyrme Hartree-Fock as well as the relativistic Hartree-Fock approach. And finally, results for the crust of neutron stars and exotic nuclei are presented and discussed. (orig.)

  19. Stability and production of superheavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, P.; Los Alamos National Lab., NM; Nix, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    Beyond uranium heavy elements rapidly become increasingly unstable with respect to spontaneous fission as the proton number Z increases, because of the disruptive effect of the long-range Coulomb force. However, in the region just beyond Z = 100 magic proton and neutron numbers and the associated shell structure enhances nuclear stability sufficient to allow observation of additional nuclei. Some thirty years ago it was speculated that an island of spherical, relatively stable superheavy nuclei would exist near the next doubly magic proton-neutron combination beyond 208 Pb, that is, at proton number Z 114 and neutron number N = 184. Theory and experiment now show that there also exists a rock of stability in the vicinity of Z = 110 and N = 162 between the actinide region, which previously was the end of the peninsula of known elements, and the predicted island of spherical superheavy nuclei slightly southwest of the magic numbers Z = 114 and N = 184. The authors review here the stability properties of the heavy region of nuclei. Just as the decay properties of nuclei in the heavy region depend strongly on shell structure, this structure also dramatically affects the fusion entrance channel. The six most recently discovered new elements were all formed in cold-fusion reactions. They discuss here the effect of the doubly magic structure of the target in cold-fusion reactions on the fusion barrier and on dissipation

  20. Electron scattering and reactions from exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karataglidis, S.

    2017-01-01

    The SCRIT and FAIR/ELISe experiments are the first to attempt to measure directly electron scattering form factors from nuclei far from stability. This will give direct information for the (one-body) charge densities of those systems, about which there is little information available. The SCRIT experiment will be taking data for medium-mass exotic nuclei, while the electron-ion collider at ELISe, when constructed, will be able to measure form factors for a wide range of exotic nuclei, as available from the radioactive ion beams produced by the FAIR experiment. Other facilities are now being proposed, which will also consider electron scattering from exotic nuclei at higher energies, to study short-range correlations in exclusive reactions. This review will consider all available information concerning the current status (largely theoretical) of electron scattering from exotic nuclei and, where possible, complement such information with equivalent information concerning the neutron densities of those exotic systems, as obtained from intermediate energy proton scattering. The issue of long- and short-range correlations will be discussed, and whether extending such studies to the exotic sector will elicit new information. (orig.)

  1. Relativistic mean field theory for unstable nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toki, Hiroshi

    2000-01-01

    We discuss the properties of unstable nuclei in the framework of the relativistic mean field (RMF) theory. We take the RMF theory as a phenomenological theory with several parameters, whose form is constrained by the successful microscopic theory (RBHF), and whose values are extracted from the experimental values of unstable nuclei. We find the outcome with the newly obtained parameter sets (TM1 and TMA) is promising in comparison with various experimental data. We calculate systematically the ground state properties of even-even nuclei up to the drip lines; about 2000 nuclei. We find that the neutron magic shells (N=82, 128) at the standard magic numbers stay at the same numbers even far from the stability line and hence provide the feature of the r-process nuclei. However, many proton magic numbers disappear at the neutron numbers far away from the magic numbers due to the deformations. We discuss how to describe giant resonances for the case of the non-linear coupling terms for the sigma and omega mesons in the relativistic RPA. We mention also the importance of the relativistic effect on the spin observables as the Gamow-Teller strength and the longitudinal and transverse spin responses. (author)

  2. Flavanol binding of nuclei from tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feucht, W; Treutter, D; Polster, J

    2004-01-01

    Light microscopy was used to examine the nuclei of five tree species with respect to the presence of flavanols. Flavanols develop a blue colouration in the presence of a special p-dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde (DMACA) reagent that enables those nuclei loaded with flavanols to be recognized. Staining of the nuclei was most pronounced in both Tsuga canadensis and Taxus baccata, variable in Metasequoia glyptostroboides, faint in Coffea arabica and minimal in Prunus avium. HPLC analysis showed that the five species contained substantial amounts of different flavanols such as catechin, epicatechin and proanthocyanidins. Quantitatively, total flavanols were quite different among the species. The nuclei themselves, as studied in Tsuga seed wings, were found to contain mainly catechin, much lower amounts of epicatechin and traces of proanthocyanidins. Blue-coloured nuclei located centrally in small cells were often found to maximally occupy up to 90% of a cell's radius, and the surrounding small rim of cytoplasm was visibly free of flavanols. A survey of 34 gymnosperm and angiosperm species indicated that the first group has much higher nuclear binding capacities for flavanols than the second group.

  3. Chaos in nuclei: Theory and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, L.; Molina, R. A.; Gómez, J. M. G.

    2018-05-01

    During the last three decades the quest for chaos in nuclei has been quite intensive, both with theoretical calculations using nuclear models and with detailed analyses of experimental data. In this paper we outline the concept and characteristics of quantum chaos in two different approaches, the random matrix theory fluctuations and the time series fluctuations. Then we discuss the theoretical and experimental evidence of chaos in nuclei. Theoretical calculations, especially shell-model calculations, have shown a strongly chaotic behavior of bound states in regions of high level density. The analysis of experimental data has shown a strongly chaotic behavior of nuclear resonances just above the one-nucleon emission threshold. For bound states, combining experimental data of a large number of nuclei, a tendency towards chaotic motion is observed in spherical nuclei, while deformed nuclei exhibit a more regular behavior associated to the collective motion. On the other hand, it had never been possible to observe chaos in the experimental bound energy levels of any single nucleus. However, the complete experimental spectrum of the first 151 states up to excitation energies of 6.20 MeV in the 208Pb nucleus have been recently identified and the analysis of its spectral fluctuations clearly shows the existence of chaotic motion.

  4. Training nuclei detection algorithms with simple annotations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henning Kost

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Generating good training datasets is essential for machine learning-based nuclei detection methods. However, creating exhaustive nuclei contour annotations, to derive optimal training data from, is often infeasible. Methods: We compared different approaches for training nuclei detection methods solely based on nucleus center markers. Such markers contain less accurate information, especially with regard to nuclear boundaries, but can be produced much easier and in greater quantities. The approaches use different automated sample extraction methods to derive image positions and class labels from nucleus center markers. In addition, the approaches use different automated sample selection methods to improve the detection quality of the classification algorithm and reduce the run time of the training process. We evaluated the approaches based on a previously published generic nuclei detection algorithm and a set of Ki-67-stained breast cancer images. Results: A Voronoi tessellation-based sample extraction method produced the best performing training sets. However, subsampling of the extracted training samples was crucial. Even simple class balancing improved the detection quality considerably. The incorporation of active learning led to a further increase in detection quality. Conclusions: With appropriate sample extraction and selection methods, nuclei detection algorithms trained on the basis of simple center marker annotations can produce comparable quality to algorithms trained on conventionally created training sets.

  5. Electron scattering and reactions from exotic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karataglidis, S. [University of Johannesburg, Department of Physics, Auckland Park (South Africa); University of Melbourne, School of Physics, Victoria (Australia)

    2017-04-15

    The SCRIT and FAIR/ELISe experiments are the first to attempt to measure directly electron scattering form factors from nuclei far from stability. This will give direct information for the (one-body) charge densities of those systems, about which there is little information available. The SCRIT experiment will be taking data for medium-mass exotic nuclei, while the electron-ion collider at ELISe, when constructed, will be able to measure form factors for a wide range of exotic nuclei, as available from the radioactive ion beams produced by the FAIR experiment. Other facilities are now being proposed, which will also consider electron scattering from exotic nuclei at higher energies, to study short-range correlations in exclusive reactions. This review will consider all available information concerning the current status (largely theoretical) of electron scattering from exotic nuclei and, where possible, complement such information with equivalent information concerning the neutron densities of those exotic systems, as obtained from intermediate energy proton scattering. The issue of long- and short-range correlations will be discussed, and whether extending such studies to the exotic sector will elicit new information. (orig.)

  6. Fundamental Physics with Electroweak Probes of Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastore, Saori

    2018-02-01

    The past decade has witnessed tremendous progress in the theoretical and computational tools that produce our understanding of nuclei. A number of microscopic calculations of nuclear electroweak structure and reactions have successfully explained the available experimental data, yielding a complex picture of the way nuclei interact with electroweak probes. This achievement is of great interest from the pure nuclear-physics point of view. But it is of much broader interest too, because the level of accuracy and confidence reached by these calculations opens up the concrete possibility of using nuclei to address open questions in other sub-fields of physics, such as, understanding the fundamental properties of neutrinos, or the particle nature of dark matter. In this talk, I will review recent progress in microscopic calculations of electroweak properties of light nuclei, including electromagnetic moments, form factors and transitions in between lowlying nuclear states along with preliminary studies for single- and double-beta decay rates. I will illustrate the key dynamical features required to explain the available experimental data, and, if time permits, present a novel framework to calculate neutrino-nucleus cross sections for A > 12 nuclei.

  7. Theory of superplastic flow in two-phase materials: roles of interphase-boundary dislocations, ledges, and diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gittus, J.H.

    1977-01-01

    A new theory is developed to explain superplastic flow in two-phase materials. It is postulated that boundary-dislocations, piled up in dislocation-Interphase-Boundaries (IPBs) climb away into disordered regions of the IPB. Sliding then occurs at an IPB as dislocations glide toward the head of the pile up to replace those which have climbed into disordered regions of the boundary. An energy barrier which would otherwise render sliding virtually impossible on dislocation-IPBs can, it is shown, be largely eliminated if the dislocations glide in pairs. The disorder (actually an antiphase domain boundary) which is created by the passage of the leading dislocation is then repaired by passage of its successor. The threshold stress for superplastic flow is provisionally identified with the stress which pins IPB dislocations to boundary ledges. The activation energy is theoretically that for IPB diffusion. Good agreement is obtained between the theoretical equation for superplastic flow and the results of published experiments

  8. Computational modeling of elastic properties of carbon nanotube/polymer composites with interphase regions. Part II: Mechanical modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Fei

    2014-01-01

    We present two modeling approaches for predicting the macroscopic elastic properties of carbon nanotubes/polymer composites with thick interphase regions at the nanotube/matrix frontier. The first model is based on local continuum mechanics; the second one is based on hybrid local/non-local continuum mechanics. The key computational issues, including the peculiar homogenization technique and treatment of periodical boundary conditions in the non-local continuum model, are clarified. Both models are implemented through a three-dimensional geometric representation of the carbon nanotubes network, which has been detailed in Part I. Numerical results are shown and compared for both models in order to test convergence and sensitivity toward input parameters. It is found that both approaches provide similar results in terms of homogenized quantities but locally can lead to very different microscopic fields. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Determination of the Solid Electrolyte Interphase Structure Grown on a Silicon Electrode Using a Fluoroethylene Carbonate Additive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veith, Gabriel M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science & Technology Division; Doucet, Mathieu [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Neutron Data Analysis and Visualization Division; Sacci, Robert L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science & Technology Division; Vacaliuc, Bogdan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Research Accelerator Division; Baldwin, J. Kevin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Browning, James F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Chemical and Engineering Materials Division

    2017-07-24

    In this work we explore how an electrolyte additive (fluorinated ethylene carbonate – FEC) mediates the thickness and composition of the solid electrolyte interphase formed over a silicon anode in situ as a function of state-of-charge and cycle. We show the FEC condenses on the surface at open circuit voltage then is reduced to C-O containing polymeric species around 0.9 V (vs. Li/Li+). The resulting film is about 50 Å thick. Upon lithiation the SEI thickens to 70 Å and becomes more organic-like. With delithiation the SEI thins by 13 Å and becomes more inorganic in nature, consistent with the formation of LiF. This thickening/thinning is reversible with cycling and shows the SEI is a dynamic structure. We compare the SEI chemistry and thickness to 280 Å thick SEI layers produced without FEC and provide a mechanism for SEI formation using FEC additives.

  10. Modulation of solid electrolyte interphase of lithium-ion batteries by LiDFOB and LiBOB electrolyte additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shiqiang; Wang, Shuwei; Hu, Guohong; Cheong, Ling-Zhi; Shen, Cai

    2018-05-01

    Solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer is an organic-inorganic composite layer that allows Li+ transport across but blocks electron flow across and prevents solvent diffusing to electrode surface. Morphology, thickness, mechanical and chemical properties of SEI are important for safety and cycling performance of lithium-ion batteries. Herein, we employ a combination of in-situ AFM and XPS to investigate the effects of two electrolyte additives namely lithium difluoro(oxalate)borate (LiDFOB) and lithium bis(oxalato)borate (LiBOB) on SEI layer. LiDFOB is found to result in a thin but hard SEI layer containing more inorganic species (LiF and LiCO3); meanwhile LiBOB promotes formation of a thick but soft SEI layer containing more organic species such as ROCO2Li. Findings from present study will help development of electrolyte additives that promote formation of good SEI layer.

  11. Mapping residual organics and carbonate at grain boundaries and in the amorphous interphase in mouse incisor enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyle M Gordon

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Dental enamel has evolved to resist the most grueling conditions of mechanical stress, fatigue, and wear. Adding insult to injury, it is exposed to the frequently corrosive environment of the oral cavity. While its hierarchical structure is unrivaled in its mechanical resilience, heterogeneity in the distribution of magnesium ions and the presence of Mg-substituted amorphous calcium phosphate (Mg-ACP as an intergranular phase have recently been shown to increase the susceptibility of mouse enamel to acid attack. Herein we investigate the distribution of two important constituents of enamel, residual organic matter and inorganic carbonate. We find that organics, carbonate, and possibly water show distinct distribution patterns in the mouse enamel crystallites, at simple grain boundaries, and in the amorphous interphase at multiple grain boundaries. This has implications for the resistance to acid corrosion, mechanical properties, and the mechanism by which enamel crystals grow during amelogenesis.

  12. Chromosomal imbalances detected in primary bone tumors by comparative genomic hybridization and interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Razera Baruffi

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We applied a combination of comparative genomic hybridization (CGH and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH, to characterize the genetic aberrations in three osteosarcomas (OS and one Ewing's sarcoma. CGH identified recurrent chromosomal losses at 10p14-pter and gains at 8q22.3-24.1 in OS. Interphase FISH allowed to confirm 8q gain in two cases. A high amplification level of 11q12-qter was detected in one OS. The Ewing's sarcoma showed gain at 1p32-36.1 as the sole chromosome alteration. These studies demonstrate the value of molecular cytogenetic methods in the characterization of recurrent genomic alterations in bone tumor tissue.

  13. Unraveling the sub-nanoscopic structure at interphase in a poly(vinyl alcohol)-MOF nanocomposite, and its role in thermo-mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, S K; Sudarshan, K; Pujari, P K

    2016-09-14

    A microscopic model of the interfacial region is required to improve understanding of the role of local structure in bulk physical properties in metal organic framework-based polymer nanocomposites. A zeolitic imidazolate framework (ZIF-8)-based (loading 2-30 wt%) composite of poly vinyl alcohol (PVA) is studied as a model system to investigate the role of interfacial interaction in molecular packing, glass transition process and tensile properties. Attractive interfacial interaction between the surface of ZIF particles and PVA chains is established by Fourier transform infra red (FTIR) measurements. The morphology of the nanocomposites is characterized using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), showing that aggregation of particles started from 5 wt% of ZIF-8. At low loadings, occurrence of two glass transitions measured using differential scanning calorimetry indicates two spatial zones, viz. interphase and bulk layers, of different packing density in the PVA matrix. With increase in loading, molecular packing throughout the polymer matrix is changed as the interparticle distance and interphase width become comparable. At the highest loading, PVA shows bulk glass transition temperature because of the non-significant volume fraction of interphase resulting from aggregation of ZIF. Molecular packing (free volume structure) of PVA in the nanocomposites is investigated using ortho-positronium lifetime distributions, which show that large vacant spaces are created at the interfacial region leading to a low-density interphase. The existence of a low-density interphase is also supported by bulk-density measurements of the nanocomposites. Tensile testing measurements show a decrease in ductility of the nanocomposites, indicating enhancement in rigidity of polymer chains at the interfacial region because of attractive interfacial interaction. This study indicates that the polymer chain framework at the interfacial region in PVA-MOF nanocomposites can

  14. Validation of interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (iFISH for multiple myeloma using CD138 positive cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Kiyomi Kishimoto

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Multiple myeloma is a plasma cell neoplasm with acquired genetic abnormalities of clinical and prognostic importance. Multiple myeloma differs from other hematologic malignancies due to a high fraction of low proliferating malignant plasma cells and the paucity of plasma cells in bone marrow aspiration samples, making cytogenetic analysis a challenge. An abnormal karyotype is found in only one-third of patients with multiple myeloma and interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization is the most useful test for studying the chromosomal abnormalities present in almost 90% of cases. However, it is necessary to study the genetic abnormalities in plasma cells after their identification or selection by morphology, immunophenotyping or sorting. Other challenges are the selection of the most informative FISH panel and determining cut-off levels for FISH probes. This study reports the validation of interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization using CD138 positive cells, according to proposed guidelines published by the European Myeloma Network (EMN in 2012. METHOD: Bone marrow samples from patients with multiple myeloma were used to standardize a panel of five probes [1q amplification, 13q14 deletion, 17p deletion, t(4;14, and t(14;16] in CD138+ cells purified by magnetic cell sorting. RESULTS: This test was validated with a low turnaround time and good reproducibility. Five of six samples showed genetic abnormalities. Monosomy/deletion 13 plus t(4;14 were found in two cases. CONCLUSION: This technique together with magnetic cell sorting is effective and can be used in the routine laboratory practice. In addition, magnetic cell sorting provides a pure plasma cell population that allows other molecular and genomic studies.

  15. Rheology at the Interface and the Role of the Interphase in Reactive Functionalized Multilayer Polymers in Coextrusion Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamnawar, Khalid; Maazouz, Abderrahim

    2008-07-01

    Coextrusion technologies are commonly used to produce multilayered composite sheets or films for a large range of applications from food packaging to optics. The contrast of rheological properties between layers can lead to interfacial instabilities during flow. Important theoretical and experimental advances regarding the stability of compatible and incompatible polymers have, during the last decades, been made using a mechanical approach. However, few research efforts have been dedicated to the physicochemical affinity between the neighboring layers. The present study deals with the influence of this affinity on interfacial instabilities for functionalized incompatible polymers. Polyamide (PA6)/polyethylene grafted with glycidyl methacrylate (PE-GMA) was used as a reactive system and PE/PA6 as a non reactive one. Two grades of polyamide (PA6) were used in order to change the viscosity and elasticity ratios between PE (or PE-GMA) and PA6. It was experimentally confirmed, in this case, that weak disturbance can be predicted by considering an interphase of non-zero thickness (corresponding to an interdiffusion/reaction zone) instead of a purely geometrical interface between the two reactive layers. According to the rheological investigations from previous work which the interphase effect can be probed, an experimental strategy was here formulated to optimize the process by listing the parameters that controlled the stability of the reactive multilayer flows. Hence, based on this analysis, guidelines for a stable coextrusion of reactive functionalized polymers can be provided coupling the classical parameters (viscosity, elasticity and layer ratios) and the physicochemical affinity at the polymer/polymer interface.

  16. Effects of copper amine treatments on mechanical, biological and surface/interphase properties of poly (vinyl chloride)/wood composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Haihong

    2005-11-01

    The copper ethanolamine (CuEA) complex was used as a wood surface modifier and a coupling agent for wood-PVC composites. Mechanical properties of composites, such as unnotched impact strength, flexural strength and flexural toughness, were significantly increased, and fungal decay weight loss was dramatically decreased by wood surface copper amine treatments. It is evident that copper amine was a very effective coupling agent and decay inhibitor for PVC/wood flour composites, especially in high wood flour loading level. A DSC study showed that the heat capacity differences (DeltaCp) of composites before and after PVC glass transition were reduced by adding wood particles. A DMA study revealed that the movements of PVC chain segments during glass transition were limited and obstructed by the presence of wood molecule chains. This restriction effect became stronger by increasing wood flour content and by using Cu-treated wood flour. Wood flour particles acted as "physical cross-linking points" inside the PVC matrix, resulting in the absence of the rubbery plateau of PVC and higher E', E'' above Tg, and smaller tan delta peaks. Enhanced mechanical performances were attributed to the improved wetting condition between PVC melts and wood surfaces, and the formation of a stronger interphase strengthened by chemical interactions between Cu-treated wood flour and the PVC matrix. Contact angles of PVC solution drops on Cu-treated wood surfaces were decreased dramatically compared to those on the untreated surfaces. Acid-base (polar), gammaAB, electron-acceptor (acid) (gamma +), electron-donor (base) (gamma-) surface energy components and the total surface energies increased after wood surface Cu-treatments, indicating a strong tendency toward acid-base or polar interactions. Improved interphase and interfacial adhesion were further confirmed by measuring interfacial shear strength between wood and the PVC matrix.

  17. Production and de excitation of hot nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auger, F.; Faure, B.; Wirleczki, J.P.; Cunsolo, A.; Foti, A.; Plagnol, E.

    1988-01-01

    We studied Kr induced reactions on C, Al and Ti at 26.4, 34.4 and 45.4 MeV/nucleon. The aims of these experiments were to learn about the influence of the incident energy and asymmetry of the system on the incomplete fusion mechanism, that is on the characteristics (E,l) of the nuclei formed in the reactions and on the competition between massive transfer and preequilibrium emission. We also wanted to study the influence of excitation energy and angular momentum of the nuclei on their deexcitation modes, specially on the competition between light particles (n, p, α) and complex fragments (M>4). Considering the available energies (2.8 < ε < 10.5 MeV/nucleon), the grazing and the total masses (96 ≤ M ≤ 132), nuclei with masses around 100 are likely to be formed with very different excitation energies and angular momenta

  18. Critical and shape-unstable nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Cailliau, M; Husson, J P; Letessier, J; Mang, H J

    1973-01-01

    The authors' experimental work on the decay of neutron deficient mercury osmium nuclei, some other studies at ISOLDE (CERN) and their first theoretical analysis show that the nuclei around /sup 186/Pt (Z=78, N=108) are at the limit of spherical, oblate, prolate nuclei, have (the even one) their first 0/sup +/ excited states at very low energy; quasi- rotational bands are associated to these states. The energy of this O/sup +/ state in /sup 186-/Pt deviate from the Kumar value: angular shape instability is not enough to explain this result. The authors look at radial shape and pairing fluctuations. The position of the 4p-4n state must also be known. (0 refs).

  19. Reflections on cavitation nuclei in water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Knud Aage

    2007-01-01

    to explaining why the tensile strength of water varies so dramatically between the experiments reported. A model for calculation of the critical pressure of skin-covered free gas bubbles as well as that of interfacial gaseous nuclei covered by a skin is presented. This model is able to bridge the apparently......The origin of cavitation bubbles, cavitation nuclei, has been a subject of debate since the early years of cavitation research. This paper presents an analysis of a representative selection of experimental investigations of cavitation inception and the tensile strength of water. At atmospheric...... pressure, the possibility of stabilization of free gas bubbles by a skin has been documented, but only within a range of bubble sizes that makes them responsible for tensile strengths up to about 1.5 bar, and values reaching almost 300 bar have been measured. However, cavitation nuclei can also be harbored...

  20. Accretion disks in active galactic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shields, G.A.

    1989-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) have taunted astrophysicists for a quarter century. How do these objects produce huge luminosities---in some cases, far outshining our galaxy---from a region perhaps no larger than the solar system? Accretion onto supermassive black holes has been widely considered the best buy in theories of AGN. Much work has gone into accretion disk theory, searches for black holes in galactic nuclei, and observational tests. These efforts have not proved the disk model, but there is progress. Evidence for black holes in the nuclei of nearby galaxies is provided by observations of stellar velocities, and radiation from the disk's hot surface may be observed in the ultraviolet (UV) and neighboring spectral bands. In the review, the author describe some of the recent work on accretion disks in AGN, with an emphasis on points of contact between theory and observation

  1. Search for supermassive nuclei in nature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polikanov, S.; Sastri, C.S.; Herrmann, G.; Luetzenkirchen, K.; Overbeck, M.; Trautmann, N.

    1990-11-01

    We report on a search for supermassive nuclei in nature with masses up to 10 7 amu. Such exotic nuclei might consist, for example, of stable strange matter, which comprises a mixture of up, down, and strange quarks, or of relic particles from the early Universe. The experiments are based on Rutherford backscattering of heavy ions, preferably 238 U, from various target samples. The measured parameters of a deteced particle are its time-of-flight, scattering angle, and specific ionization. From this information the mass of the target nucleus can be inferred. Upper limits for the abundance of strange supermassive nuclei with masses A ≅ 4x10 2 to 10 7 amu relative to the number of nucleons were found to be in the range 10 -11 to 10 -15 . For the narrower mass range A ≅ 10 3 to 10 4 amu the limit is 2x10 -17 . (orig.)

  2. Effects of tensor forces in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanihata, Isao

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies of nuclei far from the stability line have revealed drastic changes in nuclear orbitals and reported the appearance of new magic numbers and the disappearance of magic numbers observed at the stability line. One of the important reasons for such changes is considered to be because of the effect of tensor forces on nuclear structure. Although the role of tensor forces in binding very light nuclei such as deuterons and 4 He has been known, direct experimental evidence for the effect on nuclear structure is scarce. In this paper, I review known effects of tensor forces in nuclei and then discuss the recently raised question of s–p wave mixing in a halo nucleus of 11 Li. Following these reviews, the development of a new experiment to see the high-momentum components due to the tensor forces is discussed and some of the new data are presented. (paper)

  3. Effective forces in near-magic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artamonov, S.A.; Isakov, V.I.; Ogloblin, S.G.

    1984-01-01

    Characteristics of 146 Gd, 206 Hg, sup(206, 208)Tl, sup(206, 208, 210)Pb, sup(208, 210)Bi, 210 Po nuclei are calculated on the base of representations on universal effective interaction of finite range. Discrepancy with the experiment for 210 Bi nucleus disappears if the method of ''penalty'' functions is used for search of optimum parameters. New parameters of effective interaction common for all the considered two-quasi-particle nuclei are determined. Parameters of tensor forces undergo most noticeable danges as compared with other calculations. Descriptions of lowest levels not only 210 Bi but also 206 Tl as well as collective states of 208 Pb and a new magic nucleus 146 Gd are improved. The calculated probabilities of electric transitions between ground and one-phonon states in core nuclei also agree with the experiment

  4. A practical approach to diseases affecting dentate nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khadilkar, S.; Jaggi, S.; Patel, B.; Yadav, R.; Hanagandi, P.; Faria do Amaral, L.L.

    2016-01-01

    A wide variety of diseases affect the dentate nuclei. When faced with the radiological demonstration of signal changes in the dentate nuclei, radiologists and clinical neurologists have to sieve through the many possibilities, which they do not encounter on a regular basis. This task can be challenging, and therefore, developing a clinical, radiological, and laboratory approach is important. Information on the topic is scattered and the subject has not yet been reviewed. In this review, a combined clinicoradiological approach is presented. The signal changes in T1, T2, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), diffusion, susceptibility weighted, and gadolinium-enhanced images can give specific or highly suggestive patterns, which are illustrated. The role of computed tomography (CT) in the diagnostic process is discussed. Specific radiological patterns do not exist in a significant proportion of patients where the clinical and laboratory analysis becomes important. In this review, we group the clinical constellations to narrow down the differential diagnosis and highlight the diagnostic clinical signs, such as tendon xanthomas and Kayser–Fleischer rings. As will be seen, a number of these conditions are potentially reversible, and hence, their early diagnosis is desirable. Finally, key diagnostic tests and available therapies are outlined. The practical approach thus begins with the radiologist and winds its way through the clinician, towards carefully selected diagnostic tests defining the therapy options. - Highlights: • Dentate nuclei are affected in leukodystrophies, metabolic, toxic, neurodegenerative, inflammatory and infectious diseases. • A number of these diseases are modifiable or reversible and hence it is important to diagnose them early. • Clinical or radiological tell-tale markers are present in a proportion of them. • In others, a practical approach beginning with radiology and taking help of clinical and laboratory features helps the

  5. Magnetic resonance on oriented 131I nuclei in iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visser, D.

    1981-01-01

    In this thesis experiments are described on 131 I implanted into iron single crystals. It is shown that the magnetization behaviour of iron single crystals in an external magnetic field agrees with the macroscopic theory of domain structure in ferromagnets. This knowledge is used to give the influence of the external field on NMR measurements on the iodine. The iodine atoms that end up in regular lattice sites after the implantation give rise to a strong resonance. The discovery of much smaller satelite resonance, due to I nuclei experiencing a hyperfine field of 92% of that of atoms in regular lattice sites is reported. The splitting of this resonance by quadrupole interaction has enabled it to be identified as due to an implanted iodine atom with a missing nearest neighbour iron atom. The author has measured the relaxation of the iodine nuclei in iron single crystals for different crystallographic orientations. For the first time it is shown that the relaxation rate depends strongly on the magneto-crystalline anisotropy; a high rate results at a low external field. This behaviour can not be explained with the relaxation mechanisms discussed in the literature up till now. It is very likely that the low-field spin-lattice relaxation is largely determined by spin wave interactions, which are strongly field dependent. The anisotropic dispersion relation for these waves are derived, including the dependence on the state of magnetization of the sample. Finally a simple method is given to measure the power saturation of an NMR-ON resonance, from which the fraction of nuclei contributing to this resonance can be derived. (Auth.)

  6. Anti-symmetrized molecular dynamics: a new insight into the structure of nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshiko, Kanada-En'yo; Masaaki, Kimura; Hisashi, Horiuchi

    2003-01-01

    The AMD (anti-symmetrized molecular dynamics) theory for nuclear structure is explained by showing its actual applications. First the formulation of AMD including various refined versions is briefly presented and its characteristics are discussed, putting a stress on its nature as an 'ab initio' theory. Then we demonstrate fruitful applications to various structure problems in stable nuclei, in order to explicitly verify the 'ab initio' nature of AMD, especially the ability to describe both mean-field-type structure and cluster structure. Finally, we show the results of applications of AMD to unstable nuclei, from which we see that AMD is powerful in elucidating and understanding various types of nuclear structure of unstable nuclei. (authors)

  7. Scattering, diffraction and multiparticle production on hadron and nuclei at high energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ter-Martirosyan, K.A.; Zoller, V.R.

    1988-01-01

    The cross sections for different types of interactions of hadronic with hadrons and nuclei at high energy are obtained in the simple form in the supercritical pomeron theory. Diffraction desintegration (DD) of hadrons both in the intermediate states, between rescatterings on pomerons, and in the final states is taken into account. With the same accuracy the cross sections δ n for production of n pomeron jets on hadrons and nuclei are also obtained. They determine the whole dynamics of the multiple particle productions, i.e. the spectra and multiplicities of produced particles, the cross sections for DD of colliding hadrons and nucleons inside the target nuclei. The numerical results for δ tot , δ el and for dδ el /dp tr 2 with the set of the pomeron and f, ω-reggeons pole parameters obtained early are presented. 19 refs.; 6 figs

  8. 138th International School of Physics "Enrico Fermi" : Unfolding the Matter of Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Ricci, R A

    1998-01-01

    The nucleus and its constituents are a challenging problem. The lectures collected in this book present a broad and comprehensive review of the current knowledge about nuclei.They cover topics such as searching for signatures of the quarks in nuclei with electromagnetic probes and, at much higher energies, for signatures of the quark-gluon plasma in ultrarelativistic nuclear collisions. The attempts to obtain new nuclei in the laboratory are also discussed, as well as the central role played by nuclear physics in the development of weak interactions. Progress in all these areas rests on a deeper theoretical handling of the nuclear and nucleon’s structure. The latter can also be addressed by relying on numerical solutions of QCD on a discrete space-time lattice. The advancement of computational capabilities has spurred a growing interest in this approach. Finally, the book deals with different paths toward solving non-perturbative QCD.

  9. Symmetry structure in neutron deficient xenon nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Govil, I. M.

    1998-01-01

    The paper describes the measurements of the lifetimes of the excited states in the ground state band of the Neutron deficient Xe nuclei ( 122,124 Xe) by recoil Distance Method (RDM). The lifetimes of the 2 + state in 122 Xe agrees with the RDM measurements but for 124 Xe it does not agree the RDM measurements but agrees with the earlier Coulomb-excitation experiment. The experimental results are compared with the existing theories to understand the changes in the symmetry structure of the Xe-nuclei as the Neutron number decreases from N=76( 130 Xe) to N=64( 118 Xe)

  10. Symmetry structure in neutron deficient xenon nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govil, I. M.

    1998-12-01

    The paper describes the measurements of the lifetimes of the excited states in the ground state band of the Neutron deficient Xe nuclei (122,124Xe) by recoil Distance Method (RDM). The lifetimes of the 2+ state in 122Xe agrees with the RDM measurements but for 124Xe it does not agree the RDM measurements but agrees with the earlier Coulomb-excitation experiment. The experimental results are compared with the existing theories to understand the changes in the symmetry structure of the Xe-nuclei as the Neutron number decreases from N=76(130Xe) to N=64(118Xe).

  11. MAGIC NUCLEI: Tin-100 turns up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    In the same way as the Periodic Table of chemical elements reflects the successive filling of orbital electron shells, in nuclear physics the socalled 'magic' numbers correspond to closed shells of 2, 8, 20, 28, 50, 82, 126,... neutrons and/or protons. More tightly bound than other nuclei, these are the nuclear analogues of the inert gases. 'Doubly magic' nuclei have closed shells of both neutrons and protons. Examples in nature are helium-4 (2 protons and 2 neutrons), oxygen-16 (8 and 8), calcium-40 (20 and 20) and calcium-48 (20 and 28). Radioactive tin-132 (50+82) has been widely studied

  12. Virtual photon spectra for finite nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolynec, E.; Martins, M.N.

    1988-01-01

    The experimental results of an isochromat of the virtual photon spectrum, obtained by measuring the number of ground-state protons emitted by the 16.28 MeV isobaric analogue state in 90 Zr as a function of electron incident energy in the range 17-105 MeV, are compared with the values predicted by a calculation of the E1 DWBA virtual photon spectra for finite nuclei. It is found that the calculations are in excellent agreement with the experimental results. The DWBA virtual photon spectra for finite nuclei for E2 and M1 multipoles are also assessed. (author) [pt

  13. Dynamical symmetries for odd-odd nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balantekin, A.B.

    1986-01-01

    Recent work for developing dynamical symmetries and supersymmetries is reviewed. An accurate description of odd-odd nuclei requires inclusion of the fermion-fermion force (the residual interaction) and the distinguishing of fermion configurations which are particle like and those which are hole like. A parabolic dependence of the proton-neutron multiplet in odd-odd nuclei is demonstrated. It is shown that a group structure for Bose-Fermi symmetries can be embedded in a supergroup. These methods are used to predict level schemes for Au-196 and Au-198. 11 refs., 3 figs

  14. Medium energy hadron scattering from nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginocchio, J.N.; Wenes, G.

    1986-01-01

    The Glauber approximation for medium energy scattering of hadronic projectiles from nuclei is combined with the interacting boson model of nuclei to produce a transition matrix for elastic and inelastic scattering in algebraic form which includes coupling to all the intermediate states. We present closed form analytic expresions for the transition matrix elements for the three dynamical symmetries of the interacting boson model; that is for, a spherical quadrupole vibrator, a γ unstable rotor, and both prolate and oblate axially symmetric rotors. We give examples of application of this formalism to proton scattering from 154 Sm and 154 Gd. 27 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  15. Monte Carlo approaches to light nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, J.

    1990-01-01

    Significant progress has been made recently in the application of Monte Carlo methods to the study of light nuclei. We review new Green's function Monte Carlo results for the alpha particle, Variational Monte Carlo studies of 16 O, and methods for low-energy scattering and transitions. Through these calculations, a coherent picture of the structure and electromagnetic properties of light nuclei has arisen. In particular, we examine the effect of the three-nucleon interaction and the importance of exchange currents in a variety of experimentally measured properties, including form factors and capture cross sections. 29 refs., 7 figs

  16. Monte Carlo approaches to light nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, J.

    1990-01-01

    Significant progress has been made recently in the application of Monte Carlo methods to the study of light nuclei. We review new Green's function Monte Carlo results for the alpha particle, Variational Monte Carlo studies of {sup 16}O, and methods for low-energy scattering and transitions. Through these calculations, a coherent picture of the structure and electromagnetic properties of light nuclei has arisen. In particular, we examine the effect of the three-nucleon interaction and the importance of exchange currents in a variety of experimentally measured properties, including form factors and capture cross sections. 29 refs., 7 figs.

  17. Measurement of recoil nuclei of Ta photofission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amroyan, K.A.; Barsegyan, S.A.; Demekhina, N.A.

    1993-01-01

    The results of measuring the characteristics of nuclei leaving the Ta target bombarded by 4,5 GeV bremsstrahlung photons are presented. The thick-target-trap technique is used. The radioactive residual nuclei were detected by the induced activity with the help of the Ge(Li) detector. The forward-backward nucleus ratio is measured, and the kinematical characteristics are calculated in the framework of the two-step vector model of velocities. The data analysis and systematization is carried out in comparison with the results of hardon-nuclear interactions

  18. Static and dynamic deformations of actinide nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozmej, P.

    1985-09-01

    The zero-point quadrupole-hexadecapole vibrations have been taken into account to calculate dynamical deformations for even-even actinide nuclei. The collective and intrinsic motions are separated according to the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. The collective Hamiltonian is constructed using the macroscopic-microscopic method in the potential energy part and the cranking model in the kinetic energy part. The BCS theory with a modified oscillator potential is applied to describe the intrinsic motion of nucleons. A new set of Nilsson potential parameters, which produces a much better description of the properties of light actinide nuclei, has also been found. (orig.)

  19. Selfconsistent theory of Coulomb mixing in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyatov, N.I.

    1978-01-01

    The theory of isobaric states is considered according to the Coulomb mixing in nuclei. For a given form of the isovestor potential the separable residual interactions are constructed by means of the isotopic invariance principle. The strength parameter of the force is found from a selfconsistency condition. The charge dependent force is represented by the Coulomb effective potential. The theory of the isobaric states is developed using the random phase approximation. The Coulomb mixing effects in the ground and isobaric 0 + states of even-mass nuclei are investigated

  20. On the semiclassical description of rotating nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, M.; Kunz, J.; Schuck, P.

    1983-01-01

    The technique of partial h-resummation is used to obtain semiclassical, i.e. average current distributions in the body fixed system of heavy nuclei. It thereby turns out that this average intrinsic current only flows in the nuclear surface. A Strutinsky smoothing of the current is also performed and gives nice agreement with the semiclassical results. We also show how one can incorporate superfluidity into the semiclassical treatment. To lowest order in h we find that the moment of inertia of superfluid nuclei is zero. The same result is obtained by a quantum mechanical calculation if the gap goes to infinity. The importance of including n-corrections is pointed out

  1. Hadronic interaction and structure of exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Takaharu

    2009-01-01

    I will overview recent studies on the evolution of the shell structure in stable and exotic nuclei, and will show its relevance to hadronic interaction, including nuclear forces. This shell evolution is primarily due to the tensor force. The robust mechanism and some examples will be presented. Such examples include the disappearance of existing magic numbers and the appearance of new ones. The shell structure and existing limit of nuclei depend also on the three-body interaction in a specific way. I will sketch how the Δ-hole excitation induced three-body force (Fujita-Miyazawa force) modifies them. (author)

  2. Maris polarization in neutron-rich nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubhchintak; Bertulani, C. A.; Aumann, T.

    2018-03-01

    We present a theoretical study of the Maris polarization effect and its application in quasi-free reactions to assess information on the structure of exotic nuclei. In particular, we explore the dependence of the polarization effect on neutron excess and neutron-skin thickness. We discuss the uncertainties in the calculations of triple differential cross sections and of analyzing powers due the choices of various nucleon-nucleon interactions and optical potentials and the limitations of the method. Our study implies that polarization variables in (p, 2p) reactions in inverse kinematics can be an effective probe of single-particle structure of nuclei in radioactive-beam facilities.

  3. Structure of neutron-rich nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazarewicz, W.; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN; Warsaw Univ.

    1997-11-01

    One of the frontiers of today's nuclear science is the ''journey to the limits'': of atomic charge and nuclear mass, of neutron-to-proton ratio, and of angular momentum. The new data on exotic nuclei are expected to bring qualitatively new information about the fundamental properties of the nucleonic many-body system, the nature of the nuclear interaction, and nucleonic correlations at various energy-distance scales. In this talk, current developments in nuclear structure of neutron-rich nuclei are discussed from a theoretical perspective

  4. Structure functions and correlations in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fantoni, S.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper the results obtained for the static structure function S(k) and the longitudinal structure function S L (k) of 3 H, 3 He and 4 He nuclei and nuclear matter are presented and discussed. The calculations have been performed using realistic wave functions obtained from Faddeev and variational theories. The Monte Carlo method has been used to calculate the structure functions of finite systems, and the FHNC/SOC method for nuclear matter. The results for the 3 He nucleus are in agreement with the recent Saclay data. The results for nuclear matter are compared with the experimental data relative to heavier nuclei, like e.g. 40 Ca

  5. Black hole masses in active galactic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denney, Kelly D.

    2010-11-01

    We present the complete results from two, high sampling-rate, multi-month, spectrophotometric reverberation mapping campaigns undertaken to obtain either new or improved Hbeta reverberation lag measurements for several relatively low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We have reliably measured the time delay between variations in the continuum and Hbeta emission line in seven local Seyfert 1 galaxies. These measurements are used to calculate the mass of the supermassive black hole at the center of each of these AGNs. We place our results in context to the most current calibration of the broad-line region (BLR) RBLR-L relationship, where our results remove many outliers and significantly reduce the scatter at the low-luminosity end of this relationship. A detailed analysis of the data from our high sampling rate, multi-month reverberation mapping campaign in 2007 reveals that the Hbeta emission region within the BLRs of several nearby AGNs exhibit a variety of kinematic behaviors. Through a velocity-resolved reverberation analysis of the broad Hbeta emission-line flux variations in our sample, we reconstruct velocity-resolved kinematic signals for our entire sample and clearly see evidence for outflowing, infalling, and virialized BLR gas motions in NGC 3227, NGC 3516, and NGC 5548, respectively. Finally, we explore the nature of systematic errors that can arise in measurements of black hole masses from single-epoch spectra of AGNs by utilizing the many epochs available for NGC 5548 and PG1229+204 from reverberation mapping databases. In particular, we examine systematics due to AGN variability, contamination due to constant spectral components (i.e., narrow lines and host galaxy flux), data quality (i.e., signal-to-noise ratio, S/N), and blending of spectral features. We investigate the effect that each of these systematics has on the precision and accuracy of single-epoch masses calculated from two commonly-used line-width measures by comparing these

  6. DNA Measurement of Overlapping Cell Nuclei in Thick Tissue Sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Ji

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes an improved image analysis procedure for measuring the DNA content of cell nuclei in thick sections of liver tissue by absorption densitometry. Whereas previous methods only permitted the analysis of isolated nuclei, the new technique enables both isolated and overlapping nuclei to be measured. A 3D segmentation procedure determines whether each object is an isolated nucleus or a pair of overlapping nuclei; in the latter case the combined optical density is redistributed to the individual nuclei. A selection procedure ensures that only complete nuclei are measured.

  7. Delayed protons and properties of proton-rich nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karnaukhov, V.A.

    1976-01-01

    The object of the investigation is to study the properties of proton-rich nuclei. The emphasis in the proposed survey is made on investigations in the range of Z > 50. Measurement of the total energy in emission of delayed protons (DP) enables one to determine the difference between the masses of initial and final isotopes. The statistical model of the DP emission is used for describing the proton spectrum. A comparison of the DP experimental and theoretical spectra shows that the presence of local resonances in the strength functions of the β dacay is rather a rule than an exception. Studies into the fine structure of the proton spectra supply information of the density of nuclei considerably removed from the β-stability line at the excitation energies of 3-7 MeV. The aproaches for retrieval of nuclear information with the aid of proton radiators developed so far can serve as a good basis for systematic investigation over a wide range of A and Z

  8. Formation and decay of hot nuclei: the experimental situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerreau, D.

    1989-01-01

    With the achievement of new facilities in the 80's providing us heavy ion beams well above the Coulomb barrier, a unique opportunity was offered to the experimentalists to produce and study nuclear matter under extreme conditions. Effectively, in the energy range 20-100 MeV/u, on which we will concentrate in these lectures, it appeared very rapidly that excited nuclei could be formed at rather high temperatures. These lectures are intended to give an overview of the experimental status in this ''hot'' domain. Other lectures are more focused on the theoretical point of view. This paper will be arranged as follows: In a first part, the conceptual problems one might have to face will be introduced. A long chapter will be then devoted to the different experimental methods used so far in order to characterize the hot nucleus. We shall then discuss what can be learned from the study of deexcitation of nuclei at high T. The fourth part will be focused on the experimental evidences for the existence of limiting temperatures. Finally, a brief discussion will follow related to possible clues for the onset of nuclear instabilities at this critical temperature

  9. Stability of the spherical form of nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabry, A.A.

    1976-08-01

    An extension of the mass formula for a spherical nucleus in the drop model to include a largely deformed nucleus of different forms is investigated. It is found that although the spherical form is stable under small deformations from equilibrium, there exists for heavier nuclei another more favourable stable form, which can be approximated by two, or three touching prolate ellipsoids of revolution

  10. High energy spin isospin modes in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanfray, G.; Ericson, M.

    1984-01-01

    The high energy response of nuclei to a spin-isospin excitation is investigated. We show the existence of a strong contrast between the spin transverse and spin longitudinal responses. The second one undergoes a shadow effect in the Δ region and displays the occurrence of the pionic branch

  11. Transitional nuclei in the A∼100 region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petry, R.F.

    1986-01-01

    This is a report on nuclear structure studies funded by the Department of Energy over a seven-year period from August 1, 1979 to August 31, 1986. In summary, the work was concerned with nuclear structure in the A∼100 region. In particular the focus of the work was on odd-A deformed nuclei in this region with N > 60

  12. Contact nuclei formation in aqueous dextrose solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerreta, Michael K.; Berglund, Kris A.

    1990-06-01

    A laser Raman microprobe was used in situ to observe the growth of alpha dextrose monohydrate on alpha anhydrous dextrose crystals. The Raman spectra indicate growth of the monohydrate below 28.1°C, but the presence of only the anhydrous form above 40.5°C. Contact nucleation experiments with parent anhydrous crystals yielded only monohydrate nuclei below 28.1°C, while contacts in solutions between 34.5 and 41.0°C produced both crystalline forms, and contacts in solutions above 43.5°C produced only anhydrous nuclei. The inability of the monohydrate to grow on anhydrous crystals in the same solution that forms the two crystalline phases with a single contact precludes a simple attrition mechanism of nuclei formation. For the same reason, the hypothetical mechanism involving parent crystal stabilization of pre-crystalline clusters, allowing the clusters to grow into nuclei, is also contradicted. A third, mechanism, which may be a combination of the two, is believed to apply.

  13. Properties of semi-infinite nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Jaick, L.J.; Kodama, T.

    1976-04-01

    Several relations among density distributions and energies of semi-infinite and infinite nuclei are iventigated in the framework of Wilets's statistical model. The model is shown to be consistent with the theorem of surface tension given by Myers and Swiatecki. Some numerical results are shown by using an appropriate nuclear matter equation of state

  14. Electronuclear sum rules for the lightest nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efros, V.D.

    1992-01-01

    It is shown that the model-independent longitudinal electronuclear sum rules for nuclei with A = 3 and A = 4 have an accuracy on the order of a percent in the traditional single-nucleon approximation with free nucleons for the nuclear charge-density operator. This makes it possible to test this approximation by using these sum rules. The longitudinal sum rules for A = 3 and A = 4 are calculated using the wave functions of these nuclei corresponding to a large set of realistic NN interactions. The values of the model-independent sum rules lie in the range of values calculated by this method. Model-independent expressions are obtained for the transverse sum rules for nuclei with A = 3 and A = 4. These sum rules are calculated using a large set of realistic wave functions of these nuclei. The contribution of the convection current and the changes in the results for different versions of realistic NN forces are given. 29 refs., 4 tabs

  15. Physics of the continuum of borromean nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaagen, J S; Rogde, T [Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Bergen (Norway); Danilin, B V [RRC The Kurchatov Inst., Kurchatov, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ershov, S N [JINR, Dubna, Moscow (Russian Federation); Thompson, I J [Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom); Zhukov, M V [Chalmers Univ. of Technology and Goeteborg Univ., Goeteborg (Sweden); RNBT Collaboration

    1998-06-01

    The continuum states of two-neutron halo nuclei are calculated in the method of hyperspherical harmonics. Using DWIA theory appropriate for dilute halo matter we have probed the structure of the low-lying {sup 6}He continuum via calculations of charge-exchange and inelastic scattering. (orig.)

  16. Collective Quadrupole Excitations of Transactinide Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Zajac, K; Pomorski, K; Rohozinski, S G; Srebrny, J

    2003-01-01

    The quadrupole excitations of transuranic nuclei are described in the frame of the microscopic Bohr Hamiltonian modified by adding the coupling with the collective pairing vibrations. The energies of the states from the ground-state bands in U to No even-even isotopes as well as the B(E2) transition probabilities are reproduced within the model containing no adjustable parameters.

  17. Cloud condensation nuclei from biomass burning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, C.F.; Hudson, J.G.; Zielinska, B.; Tanner, R.L.; Hallett, J.; Watson, J.G.

    1991-01-01

    In this work, the authors have analyzed biomass and crude oil smoke samples for ionic and organic species. The cloud condensation nuclei activities of the smoke particles are discussed in terms of the measured chemical compositions of the smoke samples. The implications of biomass burning to global climatic change are discussed

  18. Electron interactions with nuclei: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-08-01

    This paper contains information on the following topics: inclusive electron scattering; electroexcitation of Δ in nuclei; longitudinal and transverse response in the quasi-elastic region; electron scattering at MIT-Bates; detector development at LEGS; electron scattering at Saclay; intermediate energy nuclear interactions; research and development at CEBAF; and computing facilities

  19. Quasars: Active nuclei of young galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komberg, B. V.

    1980-01-01

    The hypothetical properties of 'young' galaxies and possible methods of observing them are discussed. It is proposed that star formation first takes place in the central regions of protogalaxies which may appear as quasar-like objects. An evolutionary scheme is outlined in which the radio quasars are transformed in time into the nuclei of radio galaxies.

  20. Fisica degli atomi e dei nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Bernardini, Carlo

    1965-01-01

    Evidenza della struttura atomica della materia ; le proprietà degli atomi e la meccanica atomica ; gli atomi e le radiazioni elettromagnetiche ; struttura microscopica dello stato gassoso ; struttura microscopica dello stato liquido ; struttura microscopica della stato solido ; proprietà elettriche e magnetiche delle sostanze ; proprietà dei nuclei degli atomi ; le particelle elementari.