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Sample records for internship program suli

  1. Papers from U.S. Department of Energy Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship Program (SULI) 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, A.; Majewski, S.; Woods, M.

    2006-01-01

    The BaBar drift chamber (DCH) is used to measure the properties of charged particles created from e + e - collisions in the PEP-II asymmetric-energy storage rings by making precise measurements of position, momentum and ionization energy loss (dE/dx). In October of 2005, the PEP-II storage rings operated with a luminosity of 10 x 10 33 cm -2 s -1 ; the goal for 2007 is a luminosity of 20 x 10 33 cm -2 s -1 , which will increase the readout dead time, causing uncertainty in drift chamber measurements to become more significant in physics results. The research described in this paper aims to reduce position and dE/dx uncertainties by improving our understanding of the BaBar drift chamber performance. A simulation program --called garfield--is used to model the behavior of the drift chamber with adjustable parameters such as gas mixture, wire diameter, voltage, and magnetic field. By exploring the simulation options offered in garfield, we successfully produced a simulation model of the BaBar drift chamber. We compared the time-to-distance calibration from BaBar to that calculated by garfield to validate our model as well as check for discrepancies between the simulated and calibrated time-to-distance functions, and found that for a 0 o entrance angle there is a very good match between calibrations, but at an entrance angle of 90 o the calibration breaks down. Using this model, we also systematically varied the gas mixture to find one that would optimize chamber operation, which showed that the gas mixture of 80:20 Helium:isobutane is a good operating point, though more calculations need to be done to confirm that it is the optimal mixture

  2. Developing An Internship Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Valerie

    1984-01-01

    Provided are suggestions for developing museum/aquarium internship programs. These include writing detailed job descriptions, advertising, designing application forms asking all the information needed, supervising the interns, interviewing applicants as they were applying for a paid position, and others. (JN)

  3. Akamai Internship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-17

    been  trained  through  the  ISEE   PDP     o 1  at  UH   Hilo   o 2  at   Hawaii  Community  College  (1  now...AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0094 AKAMAI INTERNSHIP PROGRAM Lisa Hunter UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII SYSTEMS Final Report 04/17/2015 DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution...NUMBER n/a 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER n/a 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) University of Hawaii Systems 2530 Dole St. SAK D-200

  4. Papers from U.S. Department of Energy Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship Program (SULI) 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-06-22

    The solvation sphere of halides in water has been investigated using a combination of extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) analysis techniques. The results have indicated that I{sup -} and Br{sup -} both have an asymmetric, 8 water molecule primary solvation spheres. These spheres are identical, with the Br{sup -} sphere about .3 {angstrom} smaller than the I{sup -} sphere. This study utilized near-edge analysis to supplement EXAFS analysis which suffers from signal dampening/broadening due to thermal noise. This paper has reported on the solvation first sphere of I{sup -} and Br{sup -} in water. Using EXAFS and XANES analysis, strong models which describe the geometric configuration of water molecules coordinated to a central anion have been developed. The combination of these techniques has provided us with a more substantiated argument than relying solely on one or the other. An important finding of this study is that the size of the anion plays a smaller role than previously assumed in determining the number of coordinating water molecules. Further experimental and theoretical investigation is required to understand why the size of the anion plays a minor role in determining the number of water molecules bound.

  5. The ISCB Student Council Internship Program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anupama, Jigisha; Francescatto, Margherita; Rahman, Farzana

    2018-01-01

    . Consequently, undergraduates and graduates are encouraged to undertake an internship during the course of their degree. The opportunity to explore one's research interests in the early stages of their education is important for students because it improves their skill set and gives their career a boost...... to providing access to computational biology training, especially for students from developing regions, and improving competencies in the field. Here, we present how the Internship Program works and the impact of the internship opportunities so far, along with the challenges associated with this program.......Education and training are two essential ingredients for a successful career. On one hand, universities provide students a curriculum for specializing in one's field of study, and on the other, internships complement coursework and provide invaluable training experience for a fruitful career...

  6. Lewis' Educational and Research Collaborative Internship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyward, Ann; Gott, Susan (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    The Lewis Educational and Research Collaborative Internship Program (LERCIP) is a collaborative undertaking by the Office of Educational Programs at NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field (formerly NASA Lewis Research Center) and the Ohio Aerospace Institute. This program provides 10-week internships in addition to summer and winter extensions if funding is available and/or is requested by mentor (no less than 1 week no more than 4 weeks) for undergraduate/graduate students and secondary school teachers. Students who meet the travel reimbursement criteria receive up to $500 for travel expenses. Approximately 178 interns are selected to participate in this program each year and begin arriving the fourth week in May. The internships provide students with introductory professional experiences to complement their academic programs. The interns are given assignments on research and development projects under the personal guidance of NASA professional staff members. Each intern is assigned a NASA mentor who facilitates a research assignment. In addition to the research assignment, the summer program includes a strong educational component that enhances the professional stature of the participants. The educational activities include a research symposium and a variety of workshops, and lectures. An important aspect of the program is that it includes students with diverse social, cultural and economic backgrounds. The purpose of this report is to document the program accomplishments for 2004.

  7. 2017 LLNL Nuclear Forensics Summer Internship Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavarin, Mavrik [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-12-13

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Nuclear Forensics Summer Internship Program (NFSIP) is designed to give graduate students an opportunity to come to LLNL for 8-10 weeks of hands-on research. Students conduct research under the supervision of a staff scientist, attend a weekly lecture series, interact with other students, and present their work in poster format at the end of the program. Students can also meet staff scientists one-on-one, participate in LLNL facility tours (e.g., the National Ignition Facility and Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry), and gain a better understanding of the various science programs at LLNL.

  8. Long-term outcomes of an urban farming internship program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nancy Falxa Sonti; Lindsay Campbell; Michelle Johnson; S. Daftary-Steel

    2016-01-01

    Long-term impacts of an urban farming youth internship were evaluated in Brooklyn, New York. Alumni surveyed 1 to 9 years after program completion were enrolled in college or graduate school at higher rates than their peers and reported connections to the environment and healthy eating. Participants reported learning job skills through the internship, including farming...

  9. Study on the Internship Programs for International Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Izumi; Iwatsu, Fumio

    Recently, the number of international students who have an experience of internship as employment experience has been increasing. In general, internship is a system through which students gain a work experience relating to his/her major field and future career, while at university. Many Japanese leading industries are situated in this Chubu area. Therefore, we have tried to facilitate an internship as a part of the curriculum from 2005. Here we report the progress of our internship programs and try to study the possibility of its future. Through this study, we can say that an internship would be a good opportunity for both international students and Japanese companies to understand each other. On the other hand, it is hard to bring the system to match students and companies, form both side of financial base and human resource. Therefore, to bring up good talent becomes to good connection with the industrial world.

  10. The Redesign of a Community Pharmacy Internship Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattin, Anthony J; Kelling, Sarah E; Szyskowski, Jim; Izor, Michelle L; Findley, Susan

    2016-06-01

    Pharmacy internships provide students with practical experiences that lead to enhancement of clinical skills and personal growth. To describe the design and implementation of a structured 10-week summer pharmacy internship program in a supermarket chain pharmacy. The pharmacy leadership team developed and piloted a new format of the pharmacy internship during the summer of 2013. Pharmacy students in professional year 1 (P1), 2 (P2), and 4 (P4) were invited to apply for a paid internship. Pharmacy students were recruited from all colleges of pharmacy in the state of Michigan. The goal of the new program was to create a focused learning opportunity that encouraged students to develop knowledge, skills, and abilities about patient care, pharmacy management, and working within a team. A total of 19 interns were recruited (P1 = 7, P2 = 7, and P4 = 5). Students practiced 40 hours per week and participated in the medication dispensing process and employee biometrics screening program. Interns provided approximately 500 assessments on pharmacy employees and all P1 and P2 interns completed a patient care project. The restructured internship program provided pharmacy students with a 10-week program that exposed them to many aspects of community pharmacy practice. The program needs future refinement and assessment measures to verify interns improve skills throughout the program. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Embracing Agile methodology during DevOps Developer Internship Program

    OpenAIRE

    Patwardhan, Amol; Kidd, Jon; Urena, Tiffany; Rajgopalan, Aishwarya

    2016-01-01

    The DevOps team adopted agile methodologies during the summer internship program as an initiative to move away from waterfall. The DevOps team implemented the Scrum software development strategy to create an internal data dictionary web application. This article reports on the transition process and lessons learned from the pilot program.

  12. SULI Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clevenger, E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2018-02-02

    This project looks at alternative water sources, specifically in the field of desalination and selective ion removal through capacitive deionization (CDI). It project aims to both scale up the desalination capabilities of CDI cells as well as determine the selectivity of CDI for particular ions. My task is to design and build cells that have reproducible performance and characterize the materials for building these cells. The scientific methods I’ve learned through my work in CDI and the data mining and analysis tools I’ve become familiar with through CAES will be important catalysts in my future success in a graduate program. The purpose of this presentation is to give a standard of practice for my current method of building of capacitive deionization cells. Parts 1 and 2 will be discussed in which the electrodes are prepared, and the cell is built.

  13. Long-Term Outcomes of an Urban Farming Internship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonti, Nancy Falxa; Campbell, Lindsay K.; Johnson, Michelle L.; Daftary-Steel, Sarita

    2016-01-01

    Long-term impacts of an urban farming youth internship were evaluated in Brooklyn, New York. Alumni surveyed 1 to 9 years after program completion were enrolled in college or graduate school at higher rates than their peers and reported connections to the environment and healthy eating. Participants reported learning job skills through the…

  14. Internship Attainment and Program Policies: Trends in APA-Accredited School Psychology Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfect, Michelle M.; Thompson, Miriam E.; Mahoney, Emery

    2015-01-01

    Completion of an internship that is accredited by the American Psychological Association (APA) is considered to be to the "gold standard" for health service psychology training programs. The Association of Psychology Postdoctoral and Internship Centers (APPIC) facilitates a Match process between participating applicants and internship…

  15. Pilot internship program on radioactive waste at Vanderbilt University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The fourth year of the program began with the selection of the new interns. Mailings were sent to prospective graduate students and rising juniors at Vanderbilt University with grade point averages of 3.0 or better (out of 4.0) advertising the availability of internships in radioactive waste disposal. New interns were selected. All of the interns selected in the fourth year chose to return to Vanderbilt after their field assignment

  16. Learning from internships in gerontology and geriatrics: assessment and program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasik, Rona J

    2009-01-01

    Internships are an essential component of gerontological education. Harvesting the learning from internships, however, requires careful attention to assessing an intern's work. In addition to providing feedback to students, internship assessment can also yield data useful for academic program evaluation. Drawing on internship assessment data collected from undergraduate and graduate gerontology interns and their community preceptors over a period of seven semesters, this article explores (1) concerns regarding how to assess what interns are learning, (2) ways to provide students with additional opportunities for learning from their internships, and (3) how information from these student-learning outcomes may be used to evaluate the effectiveness of the overall academic program.

  17. Issues Surrounding the Evaluation of Teacher Internship Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, D.

    2006-12-01

    Georgia Intern-Fellowships for Teachers (GIFT) is a collaborative effort designed to enhance mathematics and science experiences of Georgia teachers and their students through summer research internships for teachers. By offering business, industry, public science institute and research summer fellowships to teachers, GIFT provides educators with first-hand exposure to the skills and knowledge necessary for the preparation of our future workforce. Since 1991, GIFT has placed middle and high school math, science and technology teachers in over 1100 positions throughout the state. In these fellowships, teachers are involved in cutting edge scientific and engineering research, data analysis, curriculum development and real-world inquiry and problem solving, and create Action Plans to assist them in translating the experience into changed classroom practice. Since 2004, an increasing number of high school students have worked with their teachers in research laboratories. The GIFT program has an advisory board composed of university researchers, business and education leaders. The board members work in various subcommittees assisting the program with areas such as sponsor recruitment, evaluation and long term planning. The evaluation subcommittee has been actively involved in providing direction regarding the evaluation of the GIFT program's impact on teachers and their students. The program recently conducted a survey of its former participants. This presentation will discuss the results of the survey and the challenges associated with program evaluation of teacher internship programs.

  18. CERT tribal internship program. Final intern report: Manuel Steele, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of this internship was to facilitate transfer of advancements in renewable energy to Native American lands for economic and educational benefits and to assist in evaluation of proposals submitted for government funding under Title 26 Indian Energy Resources Program. Specific objectives were to examine specific cost factors stated by each Tribe for economic assessment of each proposal; assess environmental impacts of proposed scope of work presented by each Tribe; monitor existing grants for disbursement of requested funds; and provide Tribal governments with a fair and impartial review of grant proposals for funding by the Department of Energy.

  19. IMPACT OF THE U.S. SUPPORT PROGRAM SAFEGUARDS INTERNSHIP PROGRAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PEPPER, S.; OSIECKI, C.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Support Program began funding an internship program in the IAEA Department of Safeguards in 2002. Since that time, 39 U.S. citizens and permanent residents have been placed in one-year, paid internships with the IAEA. The management of the internship program was originally the responsibility of the International Safeguards Project Office but was transferred to the Office of Educational Programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory in 2004. Feedback on the internship program from the U.S. government and the IAEA has been positive. The interns have completed basic yet essential work for the Department of Safeguards and freed IAEA staff members to perform more complex tasks. The cost of an intern is low relative to other forms of human resources support. After the conclusion of their assignments, many of the interns go on to work for the U.S. government, the national laboratories, or companies in international safeguards and nonproliferation. This paper will discuss the work done by the interns for the IAEA, factors influencing the success of the internship program, and the effects the program has had on the careers of interns, in preparing the next generation to work in the nuclear industry, participation in INMM activities, and recruitment for U.S. citizens for safeguards positions

  20. Accounting Students' Reflections on a Regional Internship Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonnie Cord

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The opportunity to gain professional industry experience for accounting students while undertaking theirundergraduate degree provides them with both a competitive edge in the marketplace and an opportunity toexperience the activities undertaken in their chosen profession. Structured experiential learning programsprovide students with the practical opportunity to apply their knowledge in an industry context and also toreflect on their personal learning journey. This paper explores the learning contribution of students’reflection-based assessments in an innovative and flexible internship program based on an e-learningframework. Through a preliminary investigation, it has been identified that after undertaking this internshipprogram, accounting students from an Australian regional university have advanced their learning pertainingto workplace preparedness, understanding and application of accounting principles, generic skillenhancement, and consolidation of accounting as their chosen professional career. The paper suggests that aninternship program such as the one examined contributes to the professional accountancy bodies’ andcommunity’s expectations of accounting graduates possessing key cognitive and behavioural skills.

  1. Is internship program an answer to some of your business issues?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kridlova, Katarina Kridlova; Turcan, Romeo V.; Christensen, Keld Arenholt

    2018-01-01

    , which have strong influence on the quality and effectiveness of the internship program. It also summarizes part of the findings of a research project, which was conducted at a specific, multinational corporation. The main goal of the research project was to investigate the role of the internship...

  2. Creating University-Community Alliances to Build Internship Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfect, Michelle M.; Schmitt, Ara J.; Hughes, Tammy L.; Herndon-Sobalvarro, Adrianna

    2015-01-01

    By bringing together a community of field-based practitioners, university faculty can help school districts develop accredited school psychology internships. This article describes the rationale for an increase in university involvement in the development of internships, offers considerations unique to schools when supporting the development of an…

  3. Development and Implementation of An Administrative Internship Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Wermuth

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the development and implementation of a pilot program to prepare teachers seeking New York state certification as school district administrators, by assigning them as administrative interns to a school district. The superintendent of a large urban school district and the director of a college program to prepare school district administrators partnered to design a pilot experiential course in which candidates for a master’s degree and state certificate would have an opportunity to develop skills and learn by experiencing situations that support new learning (Kolb, 1984, to take the place of an existing internship course for eight candidates. The dual purpose was to provide an authentic learning experience for the candidates and to provide actionable information for the superintendent for improvement of the district instructional program. To identify areas of academic concern, the candidates reviewed the New York State District Report Card1, conducted research, and interviewed district personnel in order to be able tomake actionable suggestions and recommendations to the superintendent that might result in academic improvement. Findings and recommendations to inform district improvement efforts and for improvement of the existing course were presented to the superintendent and his administrative staff. Recommendations are included.

  4. CERT tribal internship program. Final intern report: Maria Perez, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    Historically, American Indian Tribes have lacked sufficient numbers of trained, technical personnel from their communities to serve their communities; tribal expertise in the fields of science, business and engineering being extremely rare and programs to encourage these disciplines almost non-existent. Subsequently, Tribes have made crucial decisions about their land and other facets of Tribal existence based upon outside technical expertise, such as that provided by the United States government and/or private industries. These outside expert opinions rarely took into account the traditional and cultural values of the Tribes being advised. The purpose of this internship was twofold: Create and maintain a working relationship between CERT and Colorado State University (CSU) to plan for the Summit on Tribal human resource development; and Evaluate and engage in current efforts to strengthen the Tribal Resource Institute in Business, Engineering and Science (TRIBES) program. The intern lists the following as the project results: Positive interactions and productive meetings between CERT and CSU; Gathered information from Tribes; CERT database structure modification; Experience as facilitator in participating methods; Preliminary job descriptions for staff of future TRIBES programs; and Additions for the intern`s personal database of professional contacts and resources.

  5. Students seeking technical internships as part of an exchange program

    OpenAIRE

    Nystrom, Lynn A.

    2004-01-01

    Virginia Tech students are seeking the support of research centers, academic departments, and area businesses to provide opportunities for technical internships through the International Association for the Exchange of Students for Technical Experience (IAESTE).

  6. Preparing students to be doctors: introduction of a sub-internship program.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Robb, W B

    2011-04-05

    Preparing graduates for the transformation from medical student to doctor provides medical schools with a real challenge. Medical educators advocate a process of graduated delegation of responsibility in the clinical years of medical school. This is best exemplified in the North American system of sub-internship programmes; an educational approach which European medical schools have been slow to adopt. This study reports on the introduction of an intensive two-week surgical sub-internship for final medical year students. "Sub-interns" were asked to complete pre and post sub-internship online questionnaires assessing their readiness to perform clinical and practical skills, attitudes towards the program, and how well it prepared students for internship. Forty-nine students completed a questionnaire pre sub-internship and 47 completed the post-questionnaire. Student confidence towards practical and clinical skills and their first day at work increased over the two weeks. Mean Iikert scores for all 6 practical and clinical skills improved post sub-internship. The introduction of a surgical sub-internship is timely and welcomed by medical students. Its development helps bridge the gap in responsibilities between medical student and doctor.

  7. E-Portfolio Web-based for Students’ Internship Program Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhana, A.; Abdullah, A. G.; Somantri, M.; Aryadi, S.; Zakaria, D.; Amelia, N.; Arasid, W.

    2018-02-01

    Internship program is an important part in vocational education process to improve the quality of competent graduates. The complete work documentation process in electronic portfolio (e-Portfolio) platform will facilitate students in reporting the results of their work to both university and industry supervisor. The purpose of this research is to create a more easily accessed e-Portfolio which is appropriate for students and supervisors’ need in documenting their work and monitoring process. The method used in this research is fundamental research. This research is focused on the implementation of internship e-Portfolio features by demonstrating them to students who have conducted internship program. The result of this research is to create a proper web-based e-Portfolio which can be used to facilitate students in documenting the results of their work and aid supervisors in monitoring process during internship.

  8. The ISCB Student Council Internship Program: Expanding computational biology capacity worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anupama, Jigisha; Francescatto, Margherita; Rahman, Farzana; Fatima, Nazeefa; DeBlasio, Dan; Shanmugam, Avinash Kumar; Satagopam, Venkata; Santos, Alberto; Kolekar, Pandurang; Michaut, Magali; Guney, Emre

    2018-01-01

    Education and training are two essential ingredients for a successful career. On one hand, universities provide students a curriculum for specializing in one's field of study, and on the other, internships complement coursework and provide invaluable training experience for a fruitful career. Consequently, undergraduates and graduates are encouraged to undertake an internship during the course of their degree. The opportunity to explore one's research interests in the early stages of their education is important for students because it improves their skill set and gives their career a boost. In the long term, this helps to close the gap between skills and employability among students across the globe and balance the research capacity in the field of computational biology. However, training opportunities are often scarce for computational biology students, particularly for those who reside in less-privileged regions. Aimed at helping students develop research and academic skills in computational biology and alleviating the divide across countries, the Student Council of the International Society for Computational Biology introduced its Internship Program in 2009. The Internship Program is committed to providing access to computational biology training, especially for students from developing regions, and improving competencies in the field. Here, we present how the Internship Program works and the impact of the internship opportunities so far, along with the challenges associated with this program.

  9. The ISCB Student Council Internship Program: Expanding computational biology capacity worldwide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jigisha Anupama

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Education and training are two essential ingredients for a successful career. On one hand, universities provide students a curriculum for specializing in one's field of study, and on the other, internships complement coursework and provide invaluable training experience for a fruitful career. Consequently, undergraduates and graduates are encouraged to undertake an internship during the course of their degree. The opportunity to explore one's research interests in the early stages of their education is important for students because it improves their skill set and gives their career a boost. In the long term, this helps to close the gap between skills and employability among students across the globe and balance the research capacity in the field of computational biology. However, training opportunities are often scarce for computational biology students, particularly for those who reside in less-privileged regions. Aimed at helping students develop research and academic skills in computational biology and alleviating the divide across countries, the Student Council of the International Society for Computational Biology introduced its Internship Program in 2009. The Internship Program is committed to providing access to computational biology training, especially for students from developing regions, and improving competencies in the field. Here, we present how the Internship Program works and the impact of the internship opportunities so far, along with the challenges associated with this program.

  10. Design and Development of a Learning Design Virtual Internship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiero, Dana; Boehm, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Incorporation of practical experience in learning design and technology education has long been accepted as an important step in the developmental process of future learning designers. The proliferation of adult online education has increased the number of graduate students who are in need of a practical internship placement but have limited…

  11. Mentoring and Tutoring within Administrative Internship Programs in American Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmore, Elaine L.; Bratlien, Maynard J.

    2005-01-01

    The article presents a significant national research project conducted by the authors and sponsored by the National Council of Professors of Educational Administration. It analyzes the varying aspects of administrative internships in American universities today. Professors of Educational Administration from around the nation were surveyed on-line…

  12. Evaluation of the United States Support Program’s Internship and Junior Professional Officer Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz J.; Patterson, J.; Pepper, S.

    2012-07-15

    The U.S. Support Program (USSP) to International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safeguards established a program of one-year paid internships for students and recent graduates. The program was in effect from 2002 until 2006 with a total of forty-one U.S. citizens and permanent residents placed in the IAEA. The USSP created a Junior Professional Officer (JPO) Program in 2005 that replaced the internship program at the IAEA. The JPO program creates opportunities for U.S. college graduates to become IAEA employees for a period of one to two years to help increase the effectiveness and efficiency of safeguards. The twenty three former and current JPOs work in varying fields such as software development, information collection and analysis, non-destructive analysis systems, and unattended monitoring systems. This paper will look at the impacts of the USSP internship and JPO program on the interns and JPOs, the U.S. government, and the IAEA. Academic backgrounds, past involvement in nuclear fields, program assessment, and post-program positions were recorded and analyzed through two studies using questionnaires sent to former interns and former and current JPOs. This paper will discuss the effects of the programs on the careers of the interns and JPOs, present the evaluations of the internship and JPO Programs, and report the recommendations for changes.

  13. Training of Ability for Engineering Design through Long Term Internship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konishi, Masami; Gofuku, Akio; Tomita, Eiji

    The education program for engineering design capabilities through long term internship of Okayama University had started in 2006. The program supported by the MEXT is aimed to educate students in the Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology of Okayama University. The internship satellite laboratory of the University is settled in the near place of collaborative companies in which students are engaged with the project themes extracted from problems in the factory of collaborative companies. Through the program, promotion of abilities for setup and solving a problem considering cost and due date together with performance of the solution. Students are also expected to gain knowledge on patent and ethics required for skillful engineers.

  14. Security management internship program: a great recruiting tool for your company.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaross, Dan; Morris, Ronald J

    2013-01-01

    A well thought out and managed internship program is easily a "win-win" situation, according to the authors, who established such a program for the security department of their hospital. The program benefits not only the students with gaining practical experience of the business environment, but also the colleges/universities in coordinating internship opportunities for its students and business organizations in a number of ways including the possible identification of potential young career candidates to augment their current workforces. The article is based on the authors' presentation at the ASIS International Annual Seminar in September 2012.

  15. d-Vision: Seeking Excellence through a Hands on Engineering Multi Discipline Global Internship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suss, Gavin

    2010-01-01

    The question is, "What can vision do?" (Fritz, 1989) rather than "What is vision?" Keter's Chairman, Mr. Sami Sagol's vision is to establish an internship program that will strengthen the competitive edge of the Israeli industry, within the international arena. The program will set new standards of excellence for product…

  16. The effect of nursing internship program on burnout and professional commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayaz-Alkaya, Sultan; Yaman-Sözbir, Şengül; Bayrak-Kahraman, Burcu

    2018-05-26

    Professional commitment is defined as a belief in and acceptance of the values of the profession which is chosen, effort to actualize these values, desire to improve him/herself. Nurses' professional and organizational commitment are influenced by factors such as job stress, job satisfaction and burnout. This study was conducted to determine the effect of nursing internship program on professional commitment and burnout of senior nursing students. A quasi-experimental study with a pretest and posttest without control group design was used. Students who were attending nursing internship program and agreed to participate were included in the study. Sample consisted of 101 students. Data were collected with a questionnaire, the burnout measure short version and nursing professional commitment scale. After the nursing internship, 77.2% were pleased to study nursing, 83.2% were pleased to be a senior student, 55.4% did not have any intention to change their profession, 81.2% wanted to work as nurses, and 82.2% were planning career advancement in nursing of the students, 34.7% and 43.6% were found to experience burnout, before and after the nursing internship, respectively (p nursing professional commitment scale were compared, a significant difference was found between mean scores on the total score and "maintaining membership" subscale (p nursing internship, burnout and professional commitment levels of the students increased. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Building Connections between Industry and University: Implementing an Internship Program at a Regional University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovey, Janice

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the issues of socialization and acculturation of interns into the workplace, motivation of student employees, and the relationship between education and training/workplace and academy by using an established university level internship program. Reveals the significance of these issues for positive experiential learning. (SG)

  18. The Summer Undergraduate Research Internship Program at the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, J. Donald; Castelaz, M.; Whitworth, C.; Clavier, D.; Owen, L.; Barker, T.

    2012-01-01

    Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI) offers summer undergraduate research internships. PARI has received support for the internships from the NC Space Grant Consortium, NSF awards for public science education, private donations, private foundations, and through a collaboration with the Pisgah Astronomical Research and Education Center of the University of North Carolina - Asheville. The internship program began in 2001 with 4 students. This year 7 funded students participated in 2011. Mentors for the interns include PARI's Science, Education, and Information Technology Directors and visiting faculty who are members of the PARI Research Affiliate Faculty program. Students work with mentors on radio and optical astronomy research, electrical engineering for robotic control of instruments, software development for instrument control and software for citizen science projects, and science education by developing curricula and multimedia and teaching high school students in summer programs at PARI. At the end of the summer interns write a paper about their research which is published in the PARI Summer Student Proceedings. Several of the students have presented their results at AAS Meetings. We will present a summary of specific research conducted by the students with their mentors, the logistics for hosting the PARI undergraduate internship program, and plans for growth based on the impact of an NSF supported renovation to the Research Building on the PARI campus.

  19. An Early Look at the Career Ready Internship Program. Issue Focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutschow, Elizabeth Zachry; Taketa, Jessica

    2017-01-01

    While a college degree offers the opportunity for increased income, a degree alone does not guarantee a student's successful entry into the workforce. Work-based learning, such as internships and apprenticeship programs, has become an increasingly popular way to help students build workforce skills and experience and gain real-world exposure to a…

  20. Knowledge and Skill Competency Values of an Undergraduate University Managed Cooperative Internship Program: A Case Study in Design Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbarash, David

    2016-01-01

    Students from the Purdue University landscape architecture program undergo a year-long managed cooperative internship between their junior and senior years of enrollment. During this paid internship students experience the realities of a professional design office outside of the protection of the academic classroom. Through surveys of faculty…

  1. Tertiary Students’ Entrepreneurial Ability of Entrepreneurship-Embedded Internship Program in Education Service Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Mei Chou

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The study aims to explore tertiary students’ entrepreneurial ability of entrepreneurship-embedded internship program in education service industry. To achieve this goal, the study uses interviews, and panel discussions to confirm entrepreneurial ability. In addition, the study utilizes transformation of knowledge and ability to select representative knowledge items and to confirm the entrepreneurial ability structure of entrepreneurship-embedded internship program in education service industry through panel discussions. Entrepreneurs in education service industry should have these ten categories, total 42 items, such as essential professional knowledge item; that is, entrepreneurial skills, education ability, marketing ability, computer ability, service ability, and management ability, in order to cultivate entrepreneurs’ abilities of education service industry effectively. Core entrepreneurial ability of education service industry entrepreneurs should include 13 items in total, including entrepreneurial skills, education ability, marketing ability and service ability and so on.

  2. Assessment Indicators of Tertiary Student of Internship Programs Adjust Industry 4.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Mei Chou

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to study the assessment indicators for the entrepreneurial learned by tertiary student of internship programs adjust Industry 4.0. This study used in-depth interviews and focus groups were used to develop the ability indicators and gain consistency between the ability items. The research results showed that there were three types of entrepreneurial cognition learned by students of internship programs adjust Industry 4.: start-up experience, industry-specific experience, and managerial experience. The ability content included 11 items of entrepreneurial cognition ability: entrepreneurial traits, basic commercial ability, communication ability, digital ability, professional innovative ability, financial management ability, human resource management ability, marketing management ability, operational (work ability, and risk management ability, and there were a total of 91 ability indicators. There were 48 items of entrepreneurial cognition that had high importance and usage frequency.

  3. Shaping the future: ten years of the occupational health internship program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delp, Linda; Riley, Kevin; Jacobs, Sarah; Bush, Diane; Kirkland, Katherine; Denis, Ingrid; London, Matt; Harrison, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The Occupational Health Internship Program (OHIP) was initiated in 2003 to recruit a new, diverse generation of occupational safety and health (OSH) professionals and to advance OSH within union and community-based initiatives. It retains the principles of the original OCAW/Montefiore internship program while adapting to the changed landscape of the 21st-century workplace. Case studies of OHIP projects illustrate how students have contributed to key OSH policies-to regulate silica exposure among construction workers, apply principles of green chemistry with Vietnamese nail salon workers, and integrate OSH into "green" jobs in the recycling industry. They have supported innovative campaigns with immigrant workers in contingent jobs-from taxi drivers to warehouse workers. The students, in turn, have been inspired to enter the OSH arena as professionals and worker advocates with the potential to contribute new energy to an OSH movement.

  4. The role and importance of internship programs as part of formal education: Students' perceptions: The case of college of tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šimičević Dario

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As one of the fastest growing industries tourism is in increasing need for well educated and skillful employees on both operational and managerial level. Institutions of higher education are requested by tourism industry to produce quality human resources able to respond immediately to their needs and to be involved in working processes as fast as possible with low or without any additional costs for future employees' initial job training. With inclusion of training and internship programs into, primarily vocational, but also, into bachelor studies students will be trained for their future jobs through real business situations and environment. This paper focuses on students' perceptions of internship and training programs as part of their formal education. Through analysis of the survey distributed among students of the College of Tourism it will be shown how students perceive the internship programs and importance of these programs for their future employment. Also, it will be shown the level of their satisfaction with tourism companies where they are performing internship programs and the level of their satisfaction with activities of the College of Tourism in communications during the internship, program management and implementation of the internship programs.

  5. The 2013 Summer Undergraduate Research Internship Program at the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelaz, Michael W.; Cline, J. D.; Whitworth, C.; Clavier, D.; Barker, T.

    2014-01-01

    Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI) offers summer undergraduate research internships. PARI has received support for the internships from the EMC Corporation, private donations, private foundations, and through a collaboration with the Pisgah Astronomical Research and Education Center of the University of North Carolina - Asheville. The internship program began in 2001 with 4 students. This year 10 funded students participated. Mentors for the interns include PARI’s Directors of Science, Education, and Information Technology and visiting faculty who are members of the PARI Research Faculty Affiliate program. Students work with mentors on radio and optical astronomy research, electrical engineering for robotic control of instruments, software development for instrument control and and science education by developing curricula and multimedia and teaching high school students in summer programs at PARI. At the end of the summer interns write a paper about their research which is published in the PARI Summer Student Proceedings. Students are encouraged to present their research at AAS Meetings. We will present a summary of specific research conducted by the students with their mentors.

  6. CERT tribal internship program. Final intern report: Karen Sandoval, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of the project was to: create a working relationship between CERT and Colorado State University (CSU); involve and create relationships among individuals and departments at CSU; empower Native communities to run their own affairs; establish programs for the benefit of Tribes; and create Native American Program Development Office at CSU. The intern lists the following as the project results: revised a Native American Program Development document; confirmation from 45 departments across campus for Summit attendance [Tribal Human Resource Development Summit]; created initial invitee list from CSU departments and colleges; and informed CERT and CSU staff of results. Much of the response from the campus community has been positive and enthusiastic. They are ready to develop new Native American programs on campus, but need the awareness of what they can do to be respectful of Tribal needs.

  7. Insights into an Award-Winning Summer Internship Program: The First Six Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Kashou

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Since its inception in 2008, the American Center for Reproductive Medicine’s summer internship program in reproductive research and writing has trained 114 students from 23 states within the United States and 10 countries worldwide. Its fundamental goal is to inspire pre-medical and medical students to embrace a career as a physician-scientist. During this intensive course, established scientists and clinicians train interns in the essential principles and fundamental concepts of bench research and scientific writing. Over the first six years (2008∼2013, interns have collectively published 98 research articles and performed 12 bench research projects on current and emerging topics in reproductive medicine. Interns have also developed and honed valuable soft skills including time management, communication and presentation skills, as well as life values, which all enhance personal and professional satisfaction. Program graduates are able to recognize the value of medical research and its potential to impact patient care and gain insight into their own career pathway. Between 2011 and 2014, the internship program was thrice awarded a Scholarship in Teaching Award by Case Western Reserve School of Medicine for its innovative teaching approach and positive impact on medical education and student careers. This report highlights the demographics, logistics, implementation, feedback, and results of the first six years of the American Center for Reproductive Medicine’s summer internship program at Cleveland Clinic (Cleveland, OH, USA. This may be helpful to other research and academic institutions considering implementing a similar program. In addition, it creates awareness among potential physician-scientists of what the world of research has to offer in both scientific writing and bench research. Finally, it may stimulate further discussion regarding narrowing the gap between physicians and scientists and refinement of the current program.

  8. Insights into an Award-Winning Summer Internship Program: The First Six Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashou, Anthony; Durairajanayagam, Damayanthi; Agarwal, Ashok

    2016-04-01

    Since its inception in 2008, the American Center for Reproductive Medicine's summer internship program in reproductive research and writing has trained 114 students from 23 states within the United States and 10 countries worldwide. Its fundamental goal is to inspire pre-medical and medical students to embrace a career as a physician-scientist. During this intensive course, established scientists and clinicians train interns in the essential principles and fundamental concepts of bench research and scientific writing. Over the first six years (2008~2013), interns have collectively published 98 research articles and performed 12 bench research projects on current and emerging topics in reproductive medicine. Interns have also developed and honed valuable soft skills including time management, communication and presentation skills, as well as life values, which all enhance personal and professional satisfaction. Program graduates are able to recognize the value of medical research and its potential to impact patient care and gain insight into their own career pathway. Between 2011 and 2014, the internship program was thrice awarded a Scholarship in Teaching Award by Case Western Reserve School of Medicine for its innovative teaching approach and positive impact on medical education and student careers. This report highlights the demographics, logistics, implementation, feedback, and results of the first six years of the American Center for Reproductive Medicine's summer internship program at Cleveland Clinic (Cleveland, OH, USA). This may be helpful to other research and academic institutions considering implementing a similar program. In addition, it creates awareness among potential physician-scientists of what the world of research has to offer in both scientific writing and bench research. Finally, it may stimulate further discussion regarding narrowing the gap between physicians and scientists and refinement of the current program.

  9. Evaluating the Impact of Internships - Longitudinal Participant Tracking in the Soars Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haacker, R.; Sloan, V.

    2014-12-01

    While there is widespread agreement about the benefits of research internship experiences for students, long-term tracking of student progress beyond the summer experience is challenging. Coordinated tracking can effectively document program impact, inform programmatic improvement, and identifying gaps in the internship effort. Tracking can also strengthen diversity efforts and the retention of students from underrepresented groups. Continuous follow-up and guidance can only be provided to students if we know where they are, what they are doing and what they need in order to stay engaged in the field. The SOARS Program at the National Center for Atmospheric Research has supported undergraduate students for over 18 years to enter and succeed in graduate school. Over 85% of SOARS participants have transitioned to geoscience graduate programs or the STEM workforce. The SOARS mission is to broaden participation in the atmospheric and related sciences by engaging students from groups historically under-represented in science, including Black or African-American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Hispanic or Latino, female, first-generation college students, and students with disabilities. SOARS relies on proven intervention strategies such as multi-year research experiences, multifaceted mentoring, and a strong learning community. Fostering relationships developed during this time using a wider range of technologies and program longevity play important roles in tracking participants over time. This presentation will highlight significant program results and share the tracking and evaluation techniques utilized in SOARS.

  10. The Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation Summer Research Internship Program: the benefits of preprofessional experience for prospective physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willenbring, Benjamin D; McKee, Katherine C; Wilson, Betsy V; Henry, Timothy D

    2008-08-01

    There is a distinct shortage of preprofessional opportunities for undergraduate premedical students. During the last 7 summers, the Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation Summer Research Internship Program has exposed interested students to cardiology and clinical research. The goals of the internship program are threefold: to bring students in contact with the medical profession, to offer experiences in the various disciplines of cardiology, and to introduce students to clinical research. The success of the program can be measured by its influence on participants' academic pursuits and scholarly contributions. Of the 65 internship alumni, 52 are studying to become physicians and most of the others are in health-related fields. Interns have also contributed abstracts and manuscripts to peer-reviewed journals and presented their research at major conferences.

  11. The IEDA-CCNY Data Internship Program: Undergraduate Workforce Training Through Immersion in Geoinformatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, K. A.; Goodwillie, A. M.; Cai, Y.; Gonzalez, S.; Mahmud, A.; Haggard, Z.; Wagner, J.; Chao, A. K.; Carbotte, S. M.; Lehnert, K. A.

    2015-12-01

    Large NSF-funded facilities have a record of longevity and successful production of research tools that provide convenient access to data holdings, reaching far within the geoscience community. They are therefore natural vehicles for training undergraduates for the workforce. The NSF-funded Interdisciplinary Earth Data Alliance facility (IEDA), based at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, manages diverse geoscience data collections and is running a two-year pilot Data Internship Program with the City College of New York (CCNY). The program matches undergraduate students with senior researchers to compile, process, and analyze data for ingestion in IEDA repositories. The internship provides students with exposure to research areas beyond those currently available at CCNY, giving each student the opportunity to gain experiences and skills in the curation of authentic data. From the facility perspective, the work performed by the interns promotes IEDA data activities and increases awareness of the geoinformatics field amongst tomorrow's potential geoscientists. In the first year, five interns participated in the program: two interns working on geochemistry projects throughout the academic year, and three working on geophysics projects over nine weeks in the summer. The geochemistry interns successfully engaged in the initial development of MoonDB, an archival database of lunar rock chemistry, and the geophysics interns undertook a compilation and analysis of multibeam swath bathymetry data from Japan's JAMSTEC marine agency. Interns were involved with handling research-grade geochemical and geophysical data and maintained notes to allow reproducibility of their methods. They learned the basics of the data management software, how to dissect PhP data processing scripts, and how to track down data-related issues. By working at the Lamont campus, interns were exposed to a wide range of seminars given by in-house and visiting scientists. The IEDA interns completed regular

  12. MCTP Summer Research Internship Program. Research Presentation Day: Experience Mathematics and Science in the Real World

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents the summaries of the MCTP Summer Research Internship Program. Technological areas discussed include: Mathematical curriculum development for real world problems; Rain effects on air-water gas exchange; multi-ring impact basins on mars; developing an interactive multimedia educational cd-rom on remote sensing; a pilot of an activity for for the globe program; fossils in maryland; developing children's programming for the american horticultural society at river farm; children's learning, educational programs of the national park service; a study of climate and student satisfaction in two summer programs for disadvantaged students interested in careers in mathematics and science; the maryland governor's academy, integrating technology into the classroom; stream sampling with the maryland biological stream survey (MBSS); the imaging system inspection software technology, the preparation and detection of nominal and faulted steel ingots; event-based science, the development of real-world science units; correlation between anxiety and past experiences; environmental education through summer nature camp; enhancing learning opportunities at the Salisbury zoo; plant growth experiment, a module for the middle school classroom; the effects of proxisome proliferators in Japanese medaka embryos; development of a chapter on birth control and contraceptive methodologies as part of an interactive computer-based education module on hiv and aids; excretion of gentamicin in toadfish and goldfish; the renaissance summer program; and Are field trips important to the regional math science center?

  13. A Theoretical Model for the Four-Stage Music-Industry Internship Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenbeck, Lyn

    1996-01-01

    Describes student development through experiential learning in a four-stage internship within a college music-industry curriculum, and uses the Steinaker-Bell experiential taxonomy to show how embedding a multistage internship throughout the curriculum, rather than at the end, greatly enhances learning. Suggests ways in which the multistage…

  14. Developing virtual REU cohorts: Reflections from the IRIS Undergraduate Internship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubenthal, M.; Taber, J.; Aster, R.; Frassetto, A.

    2007-12-01

    Beginning in 2006, the IRIS Education and Outreach program received funding from the National Science Foundation (EAR-0453427) to explore a novel approach to the traditional Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) model. This model blends the spirit of an REU program, which traditionally hosts participants in one location with successful prior IRIS experience hosting students at widely separated institutions to participate in summer research. A unique feature the IRIS Undergraduate Internship Program is that throughout the summer, interns form and sustain a virtual community, offering assistance, sharing ideas, asking questions, and relaying life experiences while conducting their research at diverse institutions. Key to IRIS's REU model is a combination of: one-on-one mentoring by researchers at IRIS institutions across the US, developing a strong unity among interns through both face-to-face and on-line interactions, participation of an IRIS REU alumni mentor to provide both group and intern-specific guidance developing interns' abilities to self-evaluate and work independently, through carefully designed web-based tools, and increasing interns' awareness of the IRIS and broader Earth Science community; demonstrating the role they will play in this larger community. Virtual interaction is facilitated by 1) bringing students together for face-to-face contact, through a week long orientation held annually at the IRIS PASSCAL Instrument Center on the campus of the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, and 2) the community enabling web infrastructure at http://www.iris.edu/internship/. During the orientation students engage in classes in geophysics basics, career preparation, as well as training to communicate virtually. Our experiences and evaluations from the 2006 and 2007 field seasons have:shown the increasing demand for electronic advertising of REU programs, provided support for several assumptions of the model including the key role of both the

  15. Student Focused Geospatial Curriculum Initiatives: Internships and Certificate Programs at NCCU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahovic, G.; Malhotra, R.

    2009-12-01

    This paper reports recent efforts by the Department of Environmental, Earth and Geospatial Sciences faculty at North Carolina Central University (NCCU) to develop a leading geospatial sciences program that will be considered a model for other Historically Black College/University (HBCU) peers nationally. NCCU was established in 1909 and is the nation’s first state supported public liberal arts college funded for African Americans. In the most recent annual ranking of America’s best black colleges by the US News and World Report (Best Colleges 2010), NCCU was ranked 10th in the nation. As one of only two HBCUs in the southeast offering an undergraduate degree in Geography (McKee, J.O. and C. V. Dixon. Geography in Historically Black Colleges/ Universities in the Southeast, in The Role of the South in Making of American Geography: Centennial of the AAG, 2004), NCCU is uniquely positioned to positively affect talent and diversity of the geospatial discipline in the future. Therefore, successful creation of research and internship pathways for NCCU students has national implications because it will increase the number of minority students joining the workforce and applying to PhD programs. Several related efforts will be described, including research and internship projects with Fugro EarthData Inc., Center for Remote Sensing and Mapping Science at the University of Georgia, Center for Earthquake Research and Information at the University of Memphis and the City of Durham. The authors will also outline requirements and recent successes of ASPRS Provisional Certification Program, developed and pioneered as collaborative effort between ASPRS and NCCU. This certificate program allows graduating students majoring in geospatial technologies and allied fields to become provisionally certified by passing peer-review and taking the certification exam. At NCCU, projects and certification are conducted under the aegis of the Geospatial Research, Innovative Teaching and

  16. Summer Internships for Students through the Air Force Research Laboratory’s Scholars Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnaby, David A.; Hwang, Eunsook; McCullough, Julie A.

    2017-01-01

    Did you know that the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) has sponsored a summer research program for students for the last 15 years? The AFRL Scholars Program hires high school, undergraduate, and graduate students as payed interns for 12-18 weeks each summer to work on space science and astronomy projects at one of four AFRL locations. By now, more than 1200 students from 34 states have participated. Like advisors in other summertime astrophysics research programs, the AFRL mentors benefit from extra staff for their research efforts at no cost (the Scholars are funded centrally within AFRL). Likewise, the students benefit from summer pay, job experience in a science lab, university housing, and comradery with students from other states. Pay is based on the intern’s academic level with the range being $395/week for high school up to $1115/week for recent Ph.Ds. Benefits not available from other programs include a secret clearance, socializing with a cohort exceeding 100 peers, and exposure to a pathway to a professional science career outside academia. Benefits to AFRL include persuading young people to choose science-technical-engineering-math (STEM) degrees, and roughly 89% of participants show increased interest in STEM courses following their internship.In this poster, we present the advantages to college students (and their mentors) to participating. We outline the topic areas, 60% of which are related to space science and astronomy. We quantify the range of participants’ scholastic level and majors, as well as the impact the program has on stimulating STEM careers and sight stories of students going onto rewarding careers in AFRL. To be eligible, an applicant must be a U.S. citizen, at least 16 years old, available to work a 40-hour business week, agree to a background check, and be enrolled at the time of application. To apply for the summer 2017 program, start at http://afrlscholars.usra.edu.

  17. Engaging high school students in systems biology through an e-internship program [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim E Crusio

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we describe the design and implementation of an e-internship program that BioScience Project offers high school students over the summer. Project topics are in the areas of behavioral neuroscience and brain disorders. All research, teaching, and communication is done online using open access databases and webtools, a learning management system, and Google apps. Students conduct all aspects of a research project from formulating a question to collecting and analyzing the data, to presenting their results in the form of a scientific poster. Results from a pilot study indicate that students are capable of comprehending and successfully completing such a project, and benefit both intellectually and professionally from participating in the e-internship program.

  18. Academic Value of Internships in Agronomy: A Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, Matthew D.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    A survey of the academic requirements of internships, benefits in taking part in an internship, and problems encountered in internship programs are described. Results indicated that one of the problems with internship programs occurred when faculty did not have direct control over the experience. (CW)

  19. How To Select the Right Candidate for an Internship Program for Japanese Host Companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumayama, Akihisa

    The method used by the American Graduate School of International Management (AZ) to select participants for internships with Japanese companies is described and some case studies are offered as illustrations. The composition of the selection committee is noted, the interview process is discussed briefly (focusing on elicitation of student…

  20. Reengaging New York City's Disconnected Youth through Work: Implementation and Early Impacts of the Young Adult Internship Program. OPRE Report 2017-22

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skemer, Melanie; Sherman, Arielle; Williams, Sonya; Cummings, Danielle

    2017-01-01

    This report presents implementation and early impact results from a random assignment evaluation of the Young Adult Internship Program (YAIP), a subsidized employment program for young people in New York City who have become disconnected from school and work. Operated by various provider agencies, YAIP offers disconnected youth between the ages of…

  1. Communication Faculty Internships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Dirk C.

    2001-01-01

    Offers a first-hand account of a faculty internship at a major international public relations firm. Discusses the internship host and the intern's duties; faculty internship advantages and benefits; and faculty internship disadvantages and limitations. Considers 10 experiential realizations stemming from the author's internship experience. (SR)

  2. Academic and professional excellence: enhancing internship opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A. Perez

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In building upon the World Health Organization’s definition of public health for entire populations, opportunities for public health internships have emerged as one of the ten essential public health services in developing a collaborative and competent workforce.  Academic institutions of higher learning play an important role in preparing and maintaining structures for student success, allowing capacity building through public health internships.  The Directors of Public Health Education (DPHE document that nearly all (95% of internship respondents reported that participation in internship programs provided the necessary skills to be effective on the job.  Through the development of strong internship programs, academic institutions of higher learning and public health programs are fulfilling their mission to educate and train a competent workforce. Descriptors:Public health internships;Academic institutions; Public health programs

  3. An Overview of My Internship with the Ecological Program at John F. Kennedy Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Samantha

    2010-01-01

    During my internship with Innovative Health Applications, I participated in numerous longterm research projects involving the study of various plant and animal life at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). I observed the monitoring of nesting sea turtles. I learned about the transfer of egg clutches from the northern Gulf Coast in an effort to help the hatchlings avoid the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. I gained knowledge of tracking the movements of important sport fish and sharks in this area using a hydro-acoustic tag and receiver system. This effort included routinely taking water quality data at multiple sites around KSC. Alligator population and nesting assessments was another part of my internship. I observed the biologists take morphometric measurements, blood, urine and tissue samples from alligators found in KSC waterways. I assisted in taking photosynthesis and reflectance measurements on various scrub oaks and palmettos. I participated in Florida Scrub-Jay surveys in an effort to monitor their population trends and was involved in Southeastern beach mouse trapping and identification. I also assisted in seagrass surveys monitoring the health of the seagrass beds.

  4. Modelo Crosscultural de Pasantias para Lideres de la Educacion: Cooperacion entre Estados Unidos y Venezuela (Designing an Effective School Administrator Internship Program: United States and Venezuela Cooperation).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafin, Ana Gil; Thompson, Eugene W.

    A model was developed of an internship program designed to give valuable cross-cultural experience to school administrators in training at universities in the United States and Venezuela. A naturalistic approach was used to develop the model. Leading school administrators and educational leadership theorists in both countries were interviewed by…

  5. The Health Frontiers in Tijuana Undergraduate Internship Program: A Novel Global Health Experience in Mexico for Pre-medical/Pre-health Undergraduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos, Jose L; Yee, Daniel C; Vargas-Ojeda, Adriana Carolina; Ojeda, Victoria D

    2016-01-01

    We describe the creation of the Health Frontiers in Tijuana (HFiT) Undergraduate Internship Program (UIP), a novel global health experience for U.S. and Mexican undergraduate students based at the binational HFiT student-run free clinic. The UIP introduces students to a diverse underserved patient population, and U.S.-Mexico border public health.

  6. CPR Education before Internship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Ashoorion

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: The importance of training basic and advanced life support for undergraduates and graduated physicians are now widely recognized. Graduates of medical schools in Iran immediately get license to practice medicine without any supervision. Therefore,Clarification of the best phases for training CPR and the optimum mastery level in each phase is very important. This study is an attempt to find out the ideas of stakeholders about training CPR beforeinternship, the experience needed at the beginning of internship, the best phase for training it and the assessment method.Methods: It is a survey study designed in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences to investigate the opinions of head-nurses, interns, residents and educational directors (in ten clinical departments/wards about training CPR before internship. Respondents completed self administered anonymous questionnaires. The questionnaires’ items covered opinions of respondents about CPR as interns’ duty, level of experience; best course for training and the assessment method. Meanwhile, views of participants were compared against educational directors’ idea by Fisher exact test.Results:32 head-nurse, 285 interns, 13 resident and15 educational directors participated in the study and all agreed with CPR as interns’ duty in all clinical wards. Although, directors had different idea about level of experience for CPR to be achieved by interns, residents suggested level 3 of experience. According to the results externship is the best phase for CPR training and combination of observation and OSCE suggested as the best assessment method.Conclusion: To prepare the graduates achieving full competency in CPR performance, it is needed to implement training programs before internship. Internship is the best phase for getting expertise in CPR. Based on the results CPR considered as interns’ responsibility and medical schools should feel confidence about the competency ofinterns

  7. Enhancing the International Business Curriculum through Partnership with the United States Department of Commerce: The "E" Award Internship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Jeffrey A.

    2006-01-01

    Management education has been subjected to scrutiny and criticism over its lack of relevance to the "real world" of management practice. In response, many institutions have developed and, in some cases, require students to complete an internship as part of their degree requirements. International business is a field of study where internships can…

  8. Peningkatan Kompetensi Dokter Pasca-Program Internship Dokter Indonesia (PIDI Tahun 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Nur Hasanah

    2017-08-01

    PIDI is a training in pre-registration phase of competency-based primary care to improve competency gained after doctor qualification from basic medical education. PIDI implemented in health care facilities that called “wahana”. A cross sectional research has been conducted in March–May 2013 to obtain PIDI implementation and assessment of interns’ competency. The population was interns which start their internship in May 2012. Interns from 9 medical faculties from 9 districts/cities in 9 provinces were selected as samples by multistage sampling considering the accreditation of medical faculties where interns finished their study, medical faculties’ ownership (public or private, placement and frequency of site’s involvement on PIDI. Data collected through focus group discussions, interviews, observation, and documents review. Results showed that competency in seven core competencies, autonomy and professionalism have been improved 75–98.3% through PIDI. This shows that PIDI was needed as a competencies, autonomy and professionalism enhancement before a doctor do his/her private practice. The proportion of 2013 interns’ handling on personal health care (UKP has already meet the target. 78% of UKP’s type of cases have been done by interns. The highest proportion in surgical cases (94.1%. PIDI should be continued because it affects on the improvement of doctors’ professionalism and improved health care system. It is necessary to improve the quality of Medical faculty’s output in order to optimize the improvement on doctors’ competencies, autonomy and professionalism.

  9. The Southern California Earthquake Center/Undergraduate Studies in Earthquake Information Technology (SCEC/UseIT) Internship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, S.; Jordan, T.

    2006-12-01

    Our undergraduate research program, SCEC/UseIT, an NSF Research Experience for Undergraduates site, provides software for earthquake researchers and educators, movies for outreach, and ways to strengthen the technical career pipeline. SCEC/UseIT motivates diverse undergraduates towards science and engineering careers through team-based research in the exciting field of earthquake information technology. UseIT provides the cross-training in computer science/information technology (CS/IT) and geoscience needed to make fundamental progress in earthquake system science. Our high and increasing participation of women and minority students is crucial given the nation"s precipitous enrollment declines in CS/IT undergraduate degree programs, especially among women. UseIT also casts a "wider, farther" recruitment net that targets scholars interested in creative work but not traditionally attracted to summer science internships. Since 2002, SCEC/UseIT has challenged 79 students in three dozen majors from as many schools with difficult, real-world problems that require collaborative, interdisciplinary solutions. Interns design and engineer open-source software, creating increasingly sophisticated visualization tools (see "SCEC-VDO," session IN11), which are employed by SCEC researchers, in new curricula at the University of Southern California, and by outreach specialists who make animated movies for the public and the media. SCEC-VDO would be a valuable tool for research-oriented professional development programs.

  10. Business school internships: sources and resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Miriam; Lampe, Marc

    2010-04-01

    An exit survey was completed by 381 undergraduate students enrolled for credit in a business school internship course. The majority worked in a for-profit business, with marketing as the most often cited functional area in an internship, for which 50% of the students were unpaid. A personal contact was most likely to be the source of the internship. One-third of the interns received a job offer, with some directly crediting the university's internship program. Results of the survey are discussed within the context of "intelligent careers."

  11. Exploring science and mathematics teaching experiences in Thailand using reflective journals of an internship program between Vietnamese and Thai students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruekpramool, Chaninan; Kanyaprasith, Kamonwan; Phonphok, Nason; Diem, Huynh Thi Thuy

    2018-01-01

    An internship program between Vietnamese student teachers from Cantho University and Thai graduate students from Srinakharinwirot University has occurred in June 2016. There were six Vietnamese student teachers and four Thai graduate students participated in this program with the help of science teachers from two schools in Sa Kaeo and Chachoengsao Provinces of Thailand. To explore Vietnamese and Thai students' life experiences and their perceptions in science and Mathematics teaching, reflective journals were used to record their progress as team teaching in primary and lower secondary classrooms in the form of the online format via social media in English language. The data were collected from 54 reflective journals from their eight days experiences at the schools. The data were analyzed qualitatively using Van Manen's level of reflectivity which composed of three levels; 1) Technical Rationality (TR), 2) Practical Action (PA) and 3) Critical Reflection (CR). The results explicitly revealed that the three levels of reflectivity have appeared in the reflective journals. Besides, Vietnamese and Thai students have learned more from each other and can exchange their educational experiences and culture. Certainly, this was the first time for them to teach science and mathematics in English to Thai students. Moreover, they have shared their impressions toward schools, teachers and also students in the schools in their reflective journal as well.

  12. Internships in the Applied Geography Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Les; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Explains why an internship is a necessary part of an applied geography curriculum. Presents a case study of an internship program at Ryerson Polytechnical Institute, Toronto, which emphasizes placement in an agency with the same specialization as the student and integration of course material and field experience. (Author/DB)

  13. Unconventional Internships for English Majors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Don H.

    After five years of research, the English department at St. Cloud (Minnesota) State University created an internship program for English majors. The philosophy behind the program is that the typical experience of the English major in college is excellent preparation for what the college graduate will be doing in most careers in business,…

  14. Employability Skills of International Accounting Graduates: Internship Providers' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackling, Beverley; Natoli, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on the perceptions of internship providers with respect to the employability skills of international accounting graduates that undertake a Professional Year Program (PYP) incorporating a 12-week (240 hour) internship. Design/methodology/approach: The study involved a survey of internship providers…

  15. Strengthening a Principal Preparation Internship by Focusing on Diversity Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo-Brown, Regina; Ringler, Marjorie Campo; James, Mandi

    2015-01-01

    This study discusses East Carolina University's (ECU) preparation program and its emphasis on the study and application of diversity throughout the internship. ECU's comprehensive internship provided candidates time to apply theory and knowledge about school leadership and diversity topics addressed on a monthly basis at internship seminars. A…

  16. Office of Educational Programs 2009 Summer Internship Symposium and Poster Session

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White,K.; Morris, M.; Osiecki, C.; Blackburn, N.

    2009-08-06

    Brookhaven National Laboratory offers college and pre-college faculty and students many opportunities to participate in Laboratory educational programs. The programs administered by the Office of Educational Programs are primarily funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Brookhaven Science Associates, and other federal and non-federal agencies. Faculty and student research participation is welcomed in physical and life sciences, computer science and engineering, as well as in a variety of applied research areas relating to alternative energy, conservation, environmental technology, and national security. Visit our website at http://www.bnl.gov/education for application deadlines and more details. Following is a description of the programs managed by the Office of Educational Programs.

  17. The Internship Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corey, Jim; Killingsworth, M. Jimmie

    1987-01-01

    Recommends a four-part structure for retrospective internship reports: (1) introduction, (2) narrative, (3) analysis and evaluation, and (4) appendix. Advises teachers to present the report form to the student before the internship begins to add structure to the internship experience. (SKC)

  18. Internship Practices in Public Relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Robert

    1980-01-01

    Surveys the range of job experiences available to journalism students and suggests how these internship programs could be standardized. Available from Public Relations Review, Communication Research Associates, Inc., 7338 Baltimore Blvd., Suite 101A, College Park, MD 20740; one year, $15.00; two years $27.00; three years $39.00. (JMF)

  19. How can blogging during internship strengthen student reflections within their own professional competencies?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    and situated in Copenhagen, Denmark. How is internship part of the program Internship is a central part of the curricula in the GNH programme and the students' engage in internships all over the world twice during the education, first 8 weeks and later 12 weeks. The purpose of internship is to practice hands...

  20. A Retrospective Self-Assessment of the SURFO Summer Internship Program in Oceanography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pockalny, R. A.; Donohue, K. A.; Fliegler, J.

    2009-12-01

    The Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships in Oceanography (SURFO) program at the Graduate School of Oceanography/University of Rhode Island is an NSF-funded Research Experience for Undergraduates site program with a programmatic research niche focused on quantitative aspects of Oceanography. Each summer-cohort includes 9-12 participants (rising seniors) who are paired with a primary research advisor and often with a graduate student mentor. The primary components of the 10-week program include a 4-week introductory phase and a 6-week core research phase. A retrospective self-assessment instrument gauged the confidence, attitude and comfort level of participants with; 1) core math and science subjects, 2) oceanography-related subjects, 3) research skills, and 4) SURFO and GSO staff. SURFO participants evaluated themselves at the start of the program, after the introductory phase, and at the end of the program. Participants were also asked to reassess their initial evaluations and provide an updated score. The pre-assessment results indicate that the program recruits students from the target group (e.g., strong physics and math backgrounds, but with limited exposure to oceanography). The results also indicate that the students are initially comfortable with their advising team, but not so comfortable with their research topic and research skills. The post-introductory phase results indicate large increases in comfort level with the advising team and the local research community yet little or no change is indicated for research skills. The final assessments show large changes in oceanography-content knowledge, research topic, and research skills. The retrospective reassessment indicates an initial overconfidence in most categories. Overall, the largest changes occurred during the core research portion of the program. These results reinforce the importance/effectiveness of authentic, hands-on, inquiry-based research for higher learning and training the next

  1. Shopping for Jobs: Mall Internship Program Opens Doors for HVAC Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolot, Terry

    1995-01-01

    Ivy Tech State College uses River Falls, a shopping mall, as an enormous heating, ventilation, and air conditioning laboratory. Students spend Saturdays working with full-time technicians getting invaluable training and experience. Students see the program as a professional opportunity and a direct route to jobs. (JOW)

  2. Program to enrich science and mathematics experiences of high school students through interactive museum internships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reif, R.J. [State Univ. of New York, New Paltz, NY (United States); Lock, C.R. [Univ. of North Carolina, Charlotte, NC (United States)

    1998-11-01

    This project addressed the problem of female and minority representation in science and mathematics education and in related fields. It was designed to recruit high school students from under-represented groups into a program that provided significant, meaningful experiences to encourage those young people to pursue careers in science and science teaching. It provided role models for those students. It provided experiences outside of the normal school environment, experiences that put the participants in the position to serve as role models themselves for disadvantaged young people. It also provided encouragement to pursue careers in science and mathematics teaching and related careers. In these respects, it complemented other successful programs to encourage participation in science. And, it differed in that it provided incentives at a crucial time, when career decisions are being made during the high school years. Further, it encouraged the pursuit of careers in science teaching. The objectives of this project were to: (1) provide enrichment instruction in basic concepts in the life, earth, space, physical sciences and mathematics to selected high school students participating in the program; (2) provide instruction in teaching methods or processes, including verbal communication skills and the use of questioning; (3) provide opportunities for participants, as paid student interns, to transfer knowledge to other peers and adults; (4) encourage minority and female students with high academic potential to pursue careers in science teaching.

  3. A Compilation of Internship Reports - 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stegman M.; Morris, M.; Blackburn, N.

    2012-08-08

    This compilation documents all research project undertaken by the 2012 summer Department of Energy - Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists interns during their internship program at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  4. Employers’ Perception on Internship Programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohaidin Nur Jannah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Internship program is compulsory for Bachelor in Accounting (BIA students in University Kuala Lumpur (UniKL. We believed internship program is useful to facilitate students learning opportunities outside classroom. These experiences provide the opportunity to apply classroom theory into real working environment thus enhancing students’ academic and career goals. Constructive comments from supervisor will give us indicator that we must prepare the students with all aspects of accounting wide knowledge. Employer’s feedback is important in preparing the students for the industry by developing a better programme structure and subjects offered. It is indirectly improves the lecturers’ teaching methods and skills. Therefore, this paper explores the employers’ perception towards internship programme for accounting students in Universiti Kuala Lumpur. Data was collected from employer’s feedback form using five point-likert scales distributed to employers of the participating companies from Semester January 2013 to Semester January 2015. The evaluation form is used to evaluate the students’ performance throughout their 6 months internship period. The statistical results found that student’s score is positively associated with employer’s feedback. The results also indicate that the employers’ perception is important for the students in preparing themselves for the industry and for the university in developing proper programme structure.

  5. Degree of vertical integration between the undergraduate program and clinical internship with respect to cervical and cranial diagnostic and therapeutic procedures taught at the canadian memorial chiropractic college.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppington, Charmody; Gleberzon, Brian; Fortunato, Lisa; Doucet, Nicolea; Vandervalk, Kyle

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if diagnostic and therapeutic procedures for the cervical and cranial spine taught to students during the undergraduate program at Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College are required to be used during their internship by their supervising clinicians and, if so, to what extent these procedures are used. Course manuals and course syllabi from the Applied Chiropractic and Clinical Diagnosis faculty of the undergraduate chiropractic program for the academic year 2009-2010 were consulted and a list of all diagnostic and therapeutic procedures for the cranial and cervical spine was compiled. This survey asked clinicians to indicate if they themselves used or if they required the students they were supervising to use each procedure listed and, if so, to what extent each procedure was used. Demographic information of each clinician was also obtained. In general, most diagnostic procedures of the head and neck were seldom used, with the exception of postural observation and palpation. By contrast, most cervical orthopaedic tests were often used, with the exception of tests for vertigo. Most therapeutic procedures were used frequently with the exception of prone cervical and "muscle" adjustments. There was a low degree of vertical integration for cranial procedures as compared to a much higher degree of vertical integration for cervical procedures between the undergraduate and clinical internship programs taught. Vertical integration is an important element of curricular planning and these results may be helpful to aid educators to more appropriately allocate classroom instruction.

  6. Internships as case-based learning for professional practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piihl, Jesper; Rasmussen, Jens Smed; Rowley, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    be designed to integrate differences in conceptions of knowledge in professional practices and pressures from short deadlines. The chapter explores how internship can enhance students’ learning and how students develop their role as academics-in-practice. Internships qualify as case based learning when......Internship programs can enhance generic learning outcomes by develop-ing students’ ability to interact with stakeholders in real world complexi-ties and contribute to changes in knowledge and practice. Experience from Denmark and Australia is used as background to show how intern-ship programs can...... the design of the program focuses on generic learning outcomes over specific solutions to specific problems in the specific context....

  7. Internship: Interpreting Micropolitical Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrich, Lisa C.; Millwater, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Many university faculties of education across Australia employ a model of internship for final semester pre-service teacher education students to help them make a smooth transition into the teaching profession. While a growing body of research has explored pre-service teachers' experiences of their practicum, including the internship, which is the…

  8. Who is looking for an internship and successful in obtaining one? Examining application data from REU programs funded through NSF GEO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubenthal, M.; Kelly, M.

    2017-12-01

    The Directorate for Geosciences (GEO) at the National Science Foundation (NSF) is currently funding 60 Research Experiences for Undergraduate (REU) sites. Each site offers opportunities for 8 to 12 undergraduates to participate in research within solid earth, oceans, atmospheric and cryosphere sciences. Because applicant data is collected at individual REU sites, the exact number of unique applicants to all REU sites, and the demographics of this national applicant pool has not been previously reported. While some sites do provide some of this information to NSF in annual reports, obtaining and combining such data is problematic because the percentage of individuals that apply to multiple programs is unknown and generally believed anecdotally to be high, especially for students traditionally underrepresented in the geosciences. Understanding both the scale and makeup of the national applicant pool is important for several reasons. First, very little is known about how the supply and geographic location of slots in REU programs compares to the demand from undergraduate STEM majors interested in research experiences. Second, research into internship programs and their role in the career development process are limited by a lack of baseline data that includes both successful and unsuccessful internship applicants across the various sub-disciplines of the Earth sciences. Finally, designing and refining efforts to engage underrepresented populations in STEM research, and measuring the impact of such efforts is difficult without baseline data for comparison. We will present aggregate application data from up to 20 GEO REU funded programs. These programs represent Oceans, Atmospheres and Earth Science research areas and includes over a thousand applicants. Preliminary analysis suggests the number of unique applicants in the pool is higher than anecdotally predicted. Similarly, unique applicants from underrepresented communities also appears higher than anticipated.

  9. Under the Cloak of Whiteness: A Circuit of Culture Analysis of Opportunity Hoarding and Colour-blind Racism Inside US Advertising Internship Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Boulton

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Drawing on qualitative fieldwork at three large agencies, this article adapts Richard Johnson’s “circuit of culture” (1986 as a framework to examine both the material practices that help reproduce an overwhelmingly white labour force within US advertising agencies and the ideological screens that conceal them from scrutiny, critique, and reform. I argue that efforts to diversify advertising through internship-based affirmative action programs are ultimately undermined and overwhelmed by the more widespread systems of white privilege whereby agency executives and powerful clients bypass the application process and directly place personal friends and relatives into highly sought after internship slots. Furthermore, I contend that such material practices of class preference are masked, and thereby enabled, by ideological screens of colour-blind meritocracy. I argue that colour-blindness leads to meritocracy in theory, but race discrimination in practice, and conclude with a discussion of some possible implications for communication theory in general and critical media industry studies in particular.

  10. Accounting Faculty Internships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill Christopher

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Accounting professionals, business college accrediting bodies, and even accounting academics themselves acknowledge that there is a disconnect between academe and the rigors and requirements of the accounting profession. Among the suggestions proposed in the literature to reduce this gap is the faculty internship, where accounting faculty members work within the field as accountants. Heretofore, individual case studies report benefits of such internships that accrue to a variety of stakeholder groups beyond just the faculty intern and include the academic institution, students, and accounting profession through faculty internships. This research seeks wider support for these benefits. This descriptive study involved surveying a sample of accounting faculty members to get their opinions about the benefits and drawbacks of faculty internships, and to determine the level of use of faculty internships in accounting. In all, 128 usable responses were obtained, representing a 14.6% response rate. The results of this study reveal that although most faculty members acknowledge the benefits cited in the literature, too few take advantage of faculty internships.

  11. Vocational Profiles and Internship Quality among Portuguese VET Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamboa, Vitor; Paixão, Maria Paula; de Jesus, Saúl Neves

    2014-01-01

    The provision of workplace-based experiences (internships) is an important component of the training program for students attending vocational education courses. The purpose of this study was to clarify the relationship between internship quality and students vocational development, considering students' vocational profiles, in a sample of 346…

  12. Quality Control in the Administration of Sport Management Internships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Dennie Ruth

    2004-01-01

    The quality of an intern's learning experience is the joint responsibility of the academic internship coordinator, the administrator of the sport management program, and the agency supervisor. The purpose of this article is to identify the areas of administrative concern in the three major components of an internship: the institution granting…

  13. Ensuring the Availability and Quality of School Psychology Doctoral Internships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Abigail M.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, only a small percentage of internships accredited by the American Psychological Association (APA) are filled by school psychology interns and only a few of the available APA internship positions are in schools. Program data submitted online to APA indicate that many interns are in sites that meet the guidelines adopted by the Council of…

  14. A History of Internships at CBC Television News

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene Murphy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Internships are a common component of journalism education in Canada and, in some cases, a requirement for graduation. I look at the history and development of internships, both paid and unpaid, in the English-language national television newsroom of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC, Canada’s public broadcaster. This account is informed by interviews with CBC staff, union officials, and former CBC interns as well as a survey of post-secondary education institutions that place interns with the CBC. I explore the establishment of unpaid internships at the CBC and the role of the Canadian Media Guild in creating the contract language defining the parameters of internship placements. Internships at the CBC are perceived by some of the Corporation’s staff as a responsibility of the public broadcaster, and representatives of the colleges and universities that participate in the program view the internships as valuable. I argue that the absence of institutional statistics on internships is a missed opportunity to deepen understanding of the role of internships at the CBC, and that systematic information-gathering by academic institutions regarding placements and offers of paid employment would be a useful resource in the debate over unpaid internships.

  15. Internship Training Directors' Perceptions of School Psychology Internship Applicants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Emery B.; Perfect, Michelle M.; Edwinson, Roxanne M.

    2015-01-01

    Since the mid-1990s, an imbalance between the number of available American Psychological Association (APA)-accredited internships and applicants has existed. In 2014, 14% of predoctoral psychology students who applied for internships accredited by the APA or members of the Association of Psychology Postdoctoral and Internship Centers (APPIC) did…

  16. Degree of vertical integration between the undergraduate program and clinical internship with respect to lumbopelvic diagnostic and therapeutic procedures taught at the canadian memorial chiropractic college.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermet, Shannon; McGinnis, Karen; Boodham, Melissa; Gleberzon, Brian J

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine to what extent the diagnostic and therapeutic procedures taught in the undergraduate program used for patients with lumbopelvic conditions are expected to be utilized by students during their clinical internship program at Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College or are being used by the clinical faculty. A confidential survey was distributed to clinical faculty at the college. It consisted of a list of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures used for lumbopelvic conditions taught at that college. Clinicians were asked to indicate the frequency with which they performed or they required students to perform each item. Seventeen of 23 clinicians responded. The following procedures were most likely required to be performed by clinicians: posture; ranges of motion; lower limb sensory, motor, and reflex testing; and core orthopedic tests. The following were less likely to be required to be performed: Waddell testing, Schober's test, Gillet tests, and abdominal palpation. Students were expected to perform (or clinicians performed) most of the mobilization (in particular, iliocostal, iliotransverse, and iliofemoral) and spinal manipulative therapies (in particular, the procedures referred to as the lumbar roll, lumbar pull/hook, and upper sacroiliac) taught at the college. This study suggests that there was considerable, but not complete, vertical integration between the undergraduate and clinical education program at this college.

  17. Faculty Internships for Hospitality Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Christine; Hales, Jonathan A; Wiener, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Internships can help hospitality faculty build industry relationships while also ensuring the best and most current training for their students. Many hospitality organizations have structured faculty internships available or are willing to work with faculty to provide individualized internship opportunities. Career and technical educators in…

  18. Perspectives from Marketing Internship Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Scott R.; Tomkovick, Chuck

    2011-01-01

    Internship research published in marketing and business education journals primarily examine student perspectives about internships or reports results based on other business disciplines. To more accurately understand how employers perceive marketing interns and internships, 352 managers located in the Midwestern United States were surveyed.…

  19. Design Visualization Internship Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Trevor D.

    2014-01-01

    This is a report documenting the details of my work as a NASA KSC intern for the Summer Session from June 2nd to August 8th, 2014. This work was conducted within the Design Visualization Group, a Contractor staffed organization within the C1 division of the IT Directorate. The principle responsibilities of the KSC Design Visualization Group are the production of 3D simulations of NASA equipment and facilities for the purpose of planning complex operations such as hardware transportation and vehicle assembly. My role as an intern focused on aiding engineers in using 3D scanning equipment to obtain as-built measurements of NASA facilities, as well as using CATIA and DELMIA to process this data. My primary goals for this internship focused on expanding my CAD knowledge and capabilities, while also learning more about technologies I was previously unfamiliar with, such as 3D scanning. An additional goal of mine was to learn more about how NASA operates, and how the U.S. Space Program operates on a day-to-day basis. This opportunity provided me with a front-row seat to the daily maneuvers and operations of KSC and NASA as a whole. Each work day, I was able to witness, and even take part of, a small building block of the future systems that will take astronauts to other worlds. After my experiences this summer, not only can I say that my goals have been met, but also that this experience has been the highlight of my experience in higher education.

  20. Copywriting, Internships Lead Ad Curricula Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agee, Warren K.

    1979-01-01

    Findings from a national study of 113 schools show that more copywriting and internship courses have been added to advertising school programs than courses in any other subject areas. Among supporting courses, marketing has been most frequently added as a requirement. (RL)

  1. Faculty Internships in California Community Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Charlie; Peralez, Jose

    In response to a request from the Board of Governors, the California Community Colleges' Office of the Chancellor undertook a study to determine the extent and characteristics of faculty internship programs in system colleges. In April 1995, surveys were mailed to human resource directors and chief instructional officers at all 106 community…

  2. Redesigning Principal Internships: Practicing Principals' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anast-May, Linda; Buckner, Barbara; Geer, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    Internship programs too often do not provide the types of experiences that effectively bridge the gap between theory and practice and prepare school leaders who are capable of leading and transforming schools. To help address this problem, the current study is directed at providing insight into practicing principals' views of the types of…

  3. MBA Internships: More Important than Ever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Michael; McCaskey, Pat; Blazer, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Twenty years ago, in response to an existing vacuum in the literature, a national study of MBA internships at programs accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business International (AACSB) was published (P. H. McCaskey, 1988). The descriptive article was written to aid educators and administrators in their decision making…

  4. Mechanical Prototyping and Manufacturing Internship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenfell, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The internship was located at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) Innovation Design Center (IDC), which is a facility where the JSC workforce can meet and conduct hands-on innovative design, fabrication, evaluation, and testing of ideas and concepts relevant to NASA's mission. The tasks of the internship included mechanical prototyping design and manufacturing projects in service of research and development as well as assisting the users of the IDC in completing their manufacturing projects. The first project was to manufacture hatch mechanisms for a team in the Systems Engineering and Project Advancement Program (SETMAP) hexacopter competition. These mechanisms were intended to improve the performance of the servomotors and offer an access point that would also seal to prevent cross-contamination. I also assisted other teams as they were constructing and modifying their hexacopters. The success of this competition demonstrated a proof of concept for aerial reconnaissance and sample return to be potentially used in future NASA missions. I also worked with Dr. Kumar Krishen to prototype an improved thermos and a novel, portable solar array. Computer-aided design (CAD) software was used to model the parts for both of these projects. Then, 3D printing as well as conventional techniques were used to produce the parts. These prototypes were then subjected to trials to determine the success of the designs. The solar array is intended to work in a cluster that is easy to set up and take down and doesn't require powered servomechanisms. It could be used terrestrially in areas not serviced by power grids. Both projects improve planetary exploration capabilities to future astronauts. Other projects included manufacturing custom rail brackets for EG-2, assisting engineers working on underwater instrument and tool cases for the NEEMO project, and helping to create mock-up parts for Space Center Houston. The use of the IDC enabled efficient completion of these projects at

  5. Safety Awareness & Communications Internship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferson, Zanani

    2015-01-01

    The projects that I have worked on during my internships were updating the JSC Safety & Health Action Team JSAT Employee Guidebook, conducting a JSC mishap case study, preparing for JSC Today Close Call success stories, and assisting with event planning and awareness.

  6. Knowledge Development in Internship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dau, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the chapter is to shed light on how these challenges and tendencies affect students’´ access to tacit and explicit knowledge and the professions’ knowledge development. To address these challenges, the chapter examines the question: How might periods of internship, offering differe...

  7. Knowledge Development in Internship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dau, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the chapter is to shed light on how these challenges and tendencies affect students’´ access to tacit and explicit knowledge and the professions’ knowledge development. To address these challenges, the chapter examines the question: How might periods of internship, offering different...

  8. Evaluation of the William S. Hall Psychiatric Institute Clinical Psychology Internship: a replication and extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stader, Sandra R; Myers, DeRosset; Forand, Angela Q; Holmes, George R; McNulty, George F; Frey, Linda; Bolton, Staci S

    2010-12-01

    This study extends three earlier investigations involving participants who completed their predoctoral clinical psychology internship at the William S. Hall Psychiatric Institute. Intern graduates (N = 37) evaluated how effectively their internship training prepared them for seven aspects of their current work as practicing psychologists. Participants also rated the relevancy of 24 different internship training experiences to their current work and how much these experiences contributed to their development as clinical psychologists. The present study, in conjunction with the three previous studies, covers most of the 40-year period since the inception of the internship program. Analysis of the current data indicates the internship has improved over time and was deemed an exceptional training experience by its graduates. Findings may be of particular interest to internship directors and faculty interested in improving their training program and those who plan to conduct a self-study to maintain their accreditation for clinical psychology internship.

  9. Study the impact of internship on improving engineering students' competency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsono, Sugandi, Machmud; Tuwoso, Purnomo

    2017-09-01

    An effort to improve human resources quality in higher education can be done through an internship program. This program is important for the graduate student to enhance their self-development and entrepreneurship ability. This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of internship course on the student's achievement, particularly of their professional competencies. Furthermore, this research was conducted to identify the type of industries that are suitable for internship program of the engineering students. The results showed that the investigation information related to data collection and assignment, lodging, suitability of expertise and some matters correlated to the process students' internship in industry. This study also found the method to improve the services of industries and university.

  10. Providing Support for Rural Teachers of Students with Low Incidence Disabilities Who Are Completing the Kentucky Teacher Internship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abell, Michael; Collins, Belva C.; Kleinert, Harold; Pennington, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The Education and Professional Standards Board (EPSB) is the governing organization for teacher certification in Kentucky. According to the EPSB (2013a), only three institutions of higher education in the state (i.e., Morehead State University, University of Kentucky, University of Louisville) offer an approved alternate certificate program in…

  11. Attracting Students Into Science: Insights From a Summer Research Internship Program for Community College Students in Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, S. P.; Smith, L. K.; Gold, A. U.; Batchelor, R. L.; Monday, B.

    2014-12-01

    Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) programs commonly serve students already committed to careers in science. To spark student interest in the sciences early in their college career, the CIRES diversity initiative teamed with the Boulder Creek Critical Zone Observatory to build an REU for Colorado community college students. A group of 7 students was selected from consideration of diversity, prior training, and personal statements. Each student was paired with a research science mentor. Field excursions and team-building exercises filled the first week of the 8-week program. Students received weekly training in science communication, responsible conduct of research, use of spreadsheet and graphing software, and statistical analysis. Each student presented their research in a poster session, an oral presentation, and a written report. Several aspects of this pilot program worked well. The students formed a very supportive cohort, despite the fact that they were not in residence. Cohesion grew out of the immersion in field trips, and was reinforced with weekly check-ins. The trainings were essential for seeing projects through to written and oral presentations. Teaming students for fieldwork was an effective strategy to build support, and reduce mentor fatigue. Each student produced useful data. In the future, we would include a workshop on personal finances to address a clear need. Transportation support will be provided. A residential program might attract some but could preclude participation of students with families or other life-issues. Personal tutoring tailored to research projects would address low math skills. All 7 students completed the program; several elected to submit to the undergraduate virtual poster session at Fall AGU. Students all reported enormous personal and academic growth. Some are discussing transfer and graduate school opportunities with their mentors. The enthusiasm and appreciation of the students was unparalleled.

  12. Cooperation and human development projects as bachelor, master and PhD thesis: evaluating an internship program

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrer Martí, Laia; Garfi, Marianna; Ferrer Martí, Ivet

    2015-01-01

    The Research Group on Cooperation and Human Development (GRECDH) of the Technical University of Catalonia (UPC) has long promoted Bachelor, Master and PhD Theses in the framework of sustainable energy projects in low income countries. In this way, students combine their work at UPC with tasks in these countries. The aim of this paper is to present and evaluate the program through the experience of several students who participated in sustainable energy projects in Central and South America.

  13. MIT January Operational Internship Experience 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLatte, Danielle; Furhmann, Adam; Habib, Manal; Joujon-Roche, Cecily; Opara, Nnaemeka; Pasterski, Sabrina Gonzalez; Powell, Christina; Wimmer, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the 2011 January Operational Internship experience (JOIE) program which allows students to study operational aspects of spaceflight, how design affects operations and systems engineering in practice for 3 weeks. Topics include: (1) Systems Engineering (2) NASA Organization (3) Workforce Core Values (4) Human Factors (5) Safety (6) Lean Engineering (7) NASA Now (8) Press, Media, and Outreach and (9) Future of Spaceflight.

  14. Internship Experiences Contribute to Confident Career Decision Making for Doctoral Students in the Life Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnoes, Alexandra M.; Caliendo, Anne; Morand, Janice; Dillinger, Teresa; Naffziger-Hirsch, Michelle; Moses, Bruce; Gibeling, Jeffery C.; Yamamoto, Keith R.; Lindstaedt, Bill; McGee, Richard; O'Brien, Theresa C.

    2018-01-01

    The Graduate Student Internships for Career Exploration (GSICE) program at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), offers structured training and hands-on experience through internships for a broad range of PhD-level careers. The GSICE program model was successfully replicated at the University of California, Davis (UC Davis). Here, we…

  15. Implementing a Perioperative Nursing Student Summer Internship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Janice; Kamel, Teya C; Sherer, Joanne; Nauer, Kathleen

    2018-01-01

    Using qualitative research and a collaborative academic service partnership, we created an innovative 120-hour perioperative nursing summer internship for eight undergraduate nursing students in 2016. Recognizing that perioperative exposure is limited in the traditional baccalaureate program, this unpaid internship served to clarify student perceptions of perioperative nursing care and encourage graduates to meet perioperative workforce demands. We based the theoretical and practical student learning experiences on the AORN Periop 101 learning modules and included faculty-led discussions, student journaling, and onsite precepted clinical activities. Evaluation data revealed that students achieved an enhanced awareness of perioperative nursing, and a majority of the participants expressed a desire to enter the perioperative field after graduation. We suggest that stakeholders continue to strategize ways to maximize educational preparation to address the evolving health care market supply and demand. © AORN, Inc, 2018.

  16. SPS Internship: Working With Physics To Go

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Logan

    2008-10-01

    The Physics To Go website (www.physicstogo.com) is one of many collections of ComPADRE, an online library of electronic resources devoted to physics and astronomy education, funded by the National Science Foundation. Physics To Go, produced by the American Physical Society (APS), is a collection focused on informal physics learning, targeted towards self-motivated learners and the general public. My contributions to the site this summer consisted of obtaining useful materials to add to the collection and working to update the homepage's ``mini-magazine'' every two weeks. I was selected for this position at APS by the Society of Physics Students (SPS) summer internship program, hosted by the American Institute of Physics (AIP) in College Park, MD. This internship is presented to a number of physics undergraduates each year and offers opportunities in research and science policy/outreach positions at SPS, APS, AAPT, NASA, and NIST.

  17. Selection criteria for internships in clinical neuropsychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, David; Odland, Anthony P; Ritchie, Abigail S; Mittenberg, Wiley

    2012-01-01

    Criteria used in the evaluation and selection of applicants for clinical neuropsychology internships were identified by a survey of programs that met guidelines for specialty training. The number of internships that offer training with specialization in clinical neuropsychology has more than doubled during the past 10 years. Supervising neuropsychologists from 75 programs replied to the survey, yielding a 72.8% response rate. Clinical experience in neuropsychological assessment, specialization in clinical neuropsychology during graduate education, personal interview, and letters of recommendation were reported to be the most salient selection criteria. Practica that provide experience with flexible or functional systems assessment approaches at university-affiliated or VA (U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs) medical centers and doctoral curricula that follow International Neuropsychological Society/Division 40 course guidelines, with teaching and supervision provided by neuropsychologists, were preferred prerequisites to internship. These results are consistent with selection criteria reported over a decade ago and indicate continued endorsement of the vertically integrated model of education and training outlined by the Houston Conference on Specialty Education and Training in Clinical Neuropsychology.

  18. SAS Institute pre-sales internship : internship report

    OpenAIRE

    António, Bruno Alexandre Zeverino

    2017-01-01

    The present document describes the work developed during the six months internship at SAS® Institute Inc.. During the internship, the intern provided support to the Pre-Sales department by integrating the analytic team. The intern received access to an extensive selection of courses designed to introduce the core technologies and present the analytical tools developed by SAS®. He was later integrated in a team working in a proof of concept dedicated to showcase the forecast capability of SAS®...

  19. College Graduate with NCI Internship Gains Experience, Carries Chemistry into Medicine | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    For Jennifer Marshall, the skills learned through an internship at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) at Frederick have prepared her for the next step of her life—medical school. Marshall, who will be attending the West Virginia University School of Medicine in the fall, spent three summers in NCI at Frederick’s Summer Internship Program expanding her love and passion for

  20. Blog Analysis: An Exploration of French Students' Perceptions towards Foreign Cultures during Their Overseas Internships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Increasingly, tourism and hospitality university programs in France include internships which add a vocational dimension to the academic aspects of the course. These internships a) provide exposure to real world professional situations, b) add market value to the student experience, and c) offer a foothold for employment. The field of blog…

  1. Challenging the 3.0 GPA Eligibility Standard for Public Relations Internships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Michael L.

    1999-01-01

    Analyzes the appropriateness of a 3.0 GPA standard for public relations internship eligibility at one university. Seeks to determine at what GPA cutoff faculty can feel confident that the student will gain from the internship without damaging the program's reputation. Finds students with a 2.7 GPA did as well as students with GPAs ranging from 3.0…

  2. The assessment of internship programs. A view point of the undergraduate tourism students from the Transilvania University of Braşov

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Codruţa Adina BĂLTESCU

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Practical education influence the development of a future professional, helps him to understand theoretical concepts, the way in which a company is organized and operates, to identify activities that fit and, finally, to shape future career. In this article are analyzed the attitudes of final year students and master students from the specialization Tourism, Trade and Services within the Faculty of Economic Sciences and Business Administration Brasov regarding the content and organization of internship performed within the faculty. The results obtained can help to improve the syllabus at the practical discipline and to adapt this discipline at the students’ needs and expectations.

  3. Electives during Medical Internship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Sultan, Ali I.; Parashar, Shyam K; Al-Ghamdi, Abulmohsin A.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of study was to find out the reasons for selecting elective rotations during a rotating medical internship.One hundred and seventy-eight medical interns in the College of Medicine, King Faisal University,Dammam, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia during the period March 2001 to August 2002 completed a questionnaire for their selection reasons with responses on a scale of 1-5.The study comprised 60% males and 98.3% Saudis. The most frequently chosen elective is Dermatology 28.1% ,radiology 20.8%, anesthesia 9.6% and otorhinolaryngology (ear, nose and throat [ENT]) 9%. Significantly, more males (89.2%) chose radiology rotation and more females (75%) chose ENT rotation.The leading reasons to choose an elective rotations are;1, to gain broad medical training and education,2, to assist in choice of future speciality and,3, being relevant to future speciality .The mean score for ENT and dermatology is higher than radiology and anesthesia for the response to participate in medical practice in different institute , while dermatology is higher than anesthesia for response to help for getting aceptance for job in the same instituteand radiology is higher than ENT and anesthesia for the response i t has infrequent or no night duties . The reason chosen reflect the educational value of electives and their important role in choosing future career. Dermatology and radiology rotations are most popular electives ,with additional and though different reasons. (author)

  4. Prepared for internship?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Abuhusain, H

    2009-03-01

    Preparedness of medical school graduates for the intern year is one of the emphasised objectives of undergraduate medical training. We have evaluated the perceived preparedness of graduates undertaking the intern year in the Republic of Ireland. A 9-page questionnaire was mailed to all 497 interns in Ireland following commencement of the intern year in July 2005. Data obtained included demographics, perceived preparedness and assessment of perceived clinical skills (four sub-domains: core competencies, communication, emergencies, and educational environment). Information on intern induction was also collected. 99 questionnaires were returned (19.9%). Most of the cohort were Irish and worked in large medical school teaching hospitals. The majority of interns felt \\'unprepared\\' for the intern year. Interns perceived themselves \\'poor\\' in all areas of clinical skills assessed. Intern induction was attended by the majority and most stated it was too short. Medical schools are actively seeking innovative methods, through early patient contact and sub-internships, to better prepare undergraduates for the intern year. The deficiencies identified in this study are significant and emphasise the need for continued reform in the undergraduate curriculum.

  5. Internship for physicians in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaber Plavc

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Well-educated and highly-trained physicians are an essential part of high-quality health care. Therefore, quality assurance in medical education must be one of the priorities of health systems. We researched and analysed responses from physicians after completion of internship (IS and their mentors to questions regarding preparedness to IS and IS itself.Methods: In this cross-sectional study electronic surveys were sent to 298 physicians, having completed the IS between February 2014 and February 2015, and to their 200 mentors. Ordinal reponses of two independent groups were compared by Mann-Whitney-U test, while Kruskal-Wallis test was used for comparing more than two groups. Frequency distributions of practical procedures that were completed by interns in required quantities were compared between institutions by χ²-test. The same test was used for comparing frequency distributions of binary responses between clinical departments.Results: Statistically significant differences were found in the following: in reported preparedness for IS between graduates of the two Slovenian medical faculties; in realisation of practical procedures in quantities as prescribed in the IS program between different health institutions; in agreement with statements about satisfaction between different clinical departments and different institutions; and in reported active participation in patient care between different clinical departments.Conclusions: In this study we identified differences in phisicians' preparedness for IS between the graduates of the two Slovenian medical faculties, as well as differences in realization of IS program between health institutions and clinical departments. Alongside presented descriptive statistics these data allow evaluation of the current quality of IS in Slovenia. Furthermore, the results of this study will permit assessment of quality improvement after realisation of planned IS program renovation.

  6. Student Learning Opportunities in Traditional and Computer-Mediated Internships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayerlein, Leopold; Jeske, Debora

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide a student learning outcome focussed assessment of the benefits and limitations of traditional internships, e-internships, and simulated internships to evaluate the potential of computer-mediated internships (CMIs) (e-internships and simulated internships) within higher education from a student…

  7. The Study of Geological Structures in Suli and Tulehu Geothermal Regions (Ambon, Indonesia Based on Gravity Gradient Tensor Data Simulation and Analytic Signal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Lewerissa

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In early 2017, the geothermal system in the Suli and Tulehu areas of Ambon (Indonesia was investigated using a gravity gradient tensor and analytic signal. The gravity gradient tensor and analytic signal were obtained through forward modeling based on a rectangular prism. It was applied to complete Bouguer anomaly data over the study area by using Fast Fourier Transform (FFT. The analysis was conducted to enhance the geological structure like faults as a pathway of geothermal fluid circulation that is not visible on the surface because it is covered by sediment. The complete Bouguer anomaly ranges of 93 mGal up to 105 mGal decrease from the southwest in Suli to the northeast in Tulehu. A high gravity anomaly indicates a strong magmatic intrusion below the Suli region. The gravity anomalies decrease occurs in the Eriwakang mountain and most of Tulehu, and it is associated with a coral limestone. The lower gravity anomalies are located in the north to the northeast part of Tulehu are associated with alluvium. The residual anomaly shows that the drill well TLU-01 and geothermal manifestations along with the Banda, and Banda-Hatuasa faults are associated with lowest gravity anomaly (negative zone. The gravity gradient tensor simulation and an analytic signal of Suli and Tulehu give more detailed information about the geological features. The gzz component allows accurate description of the shape structures, especially the Banda fault associated with a zero value. This result will be useful as a geophysical constraint to subsurface modeling according to gravity gradient inversion over the area.

  8. DHS Internship Paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreyer, J.

    2007-01-01

    During my internship at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory I worked with microcalorimeter gamma-ray and fast-neutron detectors based on superconducting Transition Edge Sensors (TESs). These instruments are being developed for fundamental science and nuclear non-proliferation applications because of their extremely high energy resolution; however, this comes at the expense of a small pixel size and slow decay times. The small pixel sizes are being addressed by developing detector arrays while the low count rate is being addressed by developing Digital Signal Processors (DSPs) that allow higher throughput than traditional pulse processing algorithms. Traditionally, low-temperature microcalorimeter pulses have been processed off-line with optimum filtering routines based on the measured spectral characteristics of the signal and the noise. These optimum filters rely on the spectral content of the signal being identical for all events, and therefore require capturing the entire pulse signal without pile-up. In contrast, the DSP algorithm being developed is based on differences in signal levels before and after a trigger event, and therefore does not require the waveform to fully decay, or even the signal level to be close to the base line. The readout system allows for real time data acquisition and analysis at count rates exceeding 100 Hz for pulses with several ∼ms decay times with minimal loss of energy resolution. Originally developed for gamma-ray analysis with HPGe detectors we have modified the hardware and firmware of the system to accommodate the slower TES signals and optimized the parameters of the filtering algorithm to maximize either resolution or throughput. The following presents an overview of the digital signal processing hardware and discusses the results of characterization measurements made to determine the systems performance.

  9. Innovative Didactics in an International Internship - inspiration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lembcke, Steen; Skibsted, Else Bengaard; Mølgaard, Niels

    An inspiration handbook for the international team from the teacher education programme in VIA. Aimed to assist internship supervisors and students during international internships in regards to innovation, social entrepreneurship and development of the international teacher. Introduces why and how...

  10. Internships in SMEs and Career Intentions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walmsley, Andreas; Thomas, Rhodri; Jameson, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    The literature on internships (also placements) emphasises their importance in career development, even seeing them as a launch pad for graduate careers. Indeed, universities use internships to enable students to develop a range of skills and to help clarify and refine employment intentions and career goals. Traditionally, most internships have…

  11. How Do You Define an Internship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, C. E.; Keane, C.

    2017-12-01

    According to the American Geosciences Institute's Geoscience Student Exit Survey, internship participation rates over the past four years have been low, particularly among bachelor's and doctoral graduates. In 2016, 65% of bachelor's graduates, 44% of master's graduates, and 57% of doctoral graduates did not participate in an internship while working on their degree. When asked if they submitted applications for internship opportunities, 42% of bachelor's graduates, 23% of master's graduates, and 46% of doctoral graduates claimed to not submit any applications. These statistics have raised concern at AGI because internships provide experiences that help develop critical professional skills and industry connections that can lead to jobs after graduation. However, when internships are discussed among various representatives in geoscience industries, there are disagreements in how an internship experience is defined. For example, opinions differ on whether REUs or other research experiences count as an internship. Clear definitions of internship opportunities may help academic faculty and advisors direct students towards these opportunities and help develop a collection of resources for finding future internships. This presentation will present some of the recent statistics on internship participation among geoscience graduates and present a series of questions to ascertain defining features of internships among AGU attendees and where help is needed to increase participation in internships among current geoscience students.

  12. Internship Quality Predicts Career Exploration of High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamboa, Vitor; Paixao, Maria Paula; Neves de Jesus, Saul

    2013-01-01

    The provision of workplace-based experiences (internship/placement) is an important component of the training program of students attending vocational education courses. Regarding the impact of such experiences on vocational development, research results are not conclusive enough, mainly, if we consider the theoretical expectation that work…

  13. Internship programmes – bridge between school and professional life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goia Agoston Simona Irina

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available All stakeholders involved in the academic educational process (e.g. students, universities, organizations, state institutions have a direct interest in developing appropriate skills among students aimed at increasing their employability chances on the very competitive labour market and in the same time lessening the transition from school to professional life. Qualitative internship programs are considered a useful instrument which can be used in order to achieve the aforementioned objective. In the last years in Romania this field boomed, many internship programs emerged and were developed and tailored according to specific needs of certain domains. This growth was triggered of one hand side by the initiatives of the socio-economic environment but also by incentives offered by the public sector in form of financing the development of such programs in universities. Which are the main characteristics of internship programs? How are they identified and structured? Which are the factors that influence their quality from students’ perspective? What strategies and measures can be adopted in order to improve the quality of internship programs? The present paper aims at addressing the above questions by analysing the responses of over 450 students which were surveyed within a questionnaire based research conducted in the Bucharest University of Economic Studies in Romania. Various research methods – starting with the analysis of descriptive statistics and continuing with factor analysis and regression analysis- were used in order offer an overview – as comprehensible as possible- of the situation of internship programs in various sectors in the field of business, economics and administration. The outcomes of the study can be of interest for several groups of stakeholders and can be taken into consideration when formulating and proposing improvement recommendations of the policies, regulations and operational measures in this field.

  14. A Ten-Year Assessment of a Biomedical Engineering Summer Research Internship within a Comprehensive Cancer Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, A. S.; Wu, X.; Frye, C. A.; Mathur, A. B.; Patrick, C. W., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    A Biomedical Engineering Internship Program conducted within a Comprehensive Cancer Center over a 10 year period was assessed and evaluated. Although this is a non-traditional location for an internship, it is an ideal site for a multidisciplinary training program for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) students. We made a…

  15. An application of importance satisfaction analysis (ISA) method in improving the internship programme for Malaysia Higher Learning Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, Mohamad Shukri Abdul; Ahad, Nor Aishah; Jamil, Jastini Mohd.; Zulkifli, Malina; Yusof, Zahayu Md.

    2015-12-01

    Nowadays most of the university students are required to undergo internship as a requirement before graduation. Internship is very important for students to practice what they have learned in the classroom. During internship students are exposed to the actual situation of how to deal with customers and suppliers which can provide added value to the students. In the choice of company for internship, students also consider a number of things such as internship allowances, work environment, interesting work, stable work shift and other fridge benefits. Study on the importance and satisfaction of students is important to improve the internship program. Importance means how students feel important to the attributes and satisfaction means how students feel after undergoing internship. The aim of this study is to investigate the gaps between students' important and satisfaction on the internship programme and to identify the internship experience factors that need to be improved. Gap analysis has been used to show the difference between how important attributes are to the studentss and how satisfied they are with those attributes. Result shows that the attributes that has high importance and satisfaction to the students are good peer relationship, broad work experience, competitive fringe benefits, interesting work, work environment, sufficient supervisory support, appreciation and praise from manager, feeling of being a team members, able to identify self-strength and able to develop technical skills. In contrast, three attributes are considered importance but low satisfaction. These attributes are internship allowances, opportunity for self-development, and able to develop interests through practice.

  16. Long-term Internship through Cooperative Education with Regional Industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kenzo; Hase, Hiroyuki

    The long term internship is one of special educational programs for graduate students of Graduate School of Engineering in University of Fukui. This is a collaborative program between university and industries where selected post-graduate students are dispatched to companies for a long term and educated in real business environments. It is the final goal of the program to develop sophisticated specialists who would be able to catch the business strategy in industries and solve any problems by themselves. The program is managed in a semester (6 months) and contains 1.5 month prior education of preliminary special knowledge, ethics and secrecy, about 3 month dispatch with long-term internship, and 1.5 month post-education for complementary education and presentation. This paper presents the effect of this program which has been evolving since 2005.

  17. Fall 2012 Graduate Engineering Internship Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    In the fall of 2012, I participated in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Pathways Intern Employment Program at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida. This was my second internship opportunity with NASA, a consecutive extension from a summer 2012 internship. During my four-month tenure, I gained valuable knowledge and extensive hands-on experience with payload design and testing as well as composite fabrication for repair design on future space vehicle structures. As a systems engineer, I supported the systems engineering and integration team with the testing of scientific payloads such as the Vegetable Production System (Veggie). Verification and validation (V&V) of the Veggie was carried out prior to qualification testing of the payload, which incorporated a lengthy process of confirming design requirements that were integrated through one or more validatjon methods: inspection, analysis, demonstration, and testing. Additionally, I provided assistance in verifying design requirements outlined in the V&V plan with the requirements outlined by the scientists in the Science Requirements Envelope Document (SRED). The purpose of the SRED was to define experiment requirements intended for the payload to meet and carry out.

  18. Building a Network of Internships for a Diverse Geoscience Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, V.; Haacker-Santos, R.; Pandya, R.

    2011-12-01

    Individual undergraduate internship programs, however effective, are not sufficient to address the lack of diversity in the geoscience workforce. Rather than competing with each other for a small pool of students from historically under-represented groups, REU and internship programs might share recruiting efforts and application processes. For example, in 2011, the RESESS program at UNAVCO and the SOARS program at UCAR shared recruiting websites and advertising. This contributed to a substantial increase in the number of applicants to the RESESS program, the majority of which were from historically under-represented groups. RESESS and SOARS shared qualified applications with other REU/internship programs and helped several additional minority students secure summer internships. RESESS and SOARS also leveraged their geographic proximity to pool resources for community building activities, a two-day science field trip, a weekly writing workshop, and our final poster session. This provided our interns with an expanded network of peers and gave our staff opportunities to work together on planning. Recently we have reached out to include other programs and agencies in activities for our interns, such as mentoring high-school students, leading outreach to elementary school students, and exposing our interns to geoscience careers options and graduate schools. Informal feedback from students suggests that they value these interactions and appreciate learning with interns from partner programs. Through this work, we are building a network of program managers who support one another professionally and share effective strategies. We would like to expand that network, and future plans include a workshop with university partners and an expanded list of REU programs to explore further collaborations.

  19. Internship training in computer science: Exploring student satisfaction levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaradat, Ghaith M

    2017-08-01

    The requirement of employability in the job market prompted universities to conduct internship training as part of their study plans. There is a need to train students on important academic and professional skills related to the workplace with an IT component. This article describes a statistical study that measures satisfaction levels among students in the faculty of Information Technology and Computer Science in Jordan. The objective of this study is to explore factors that influence student satisfaction with regards to enrolling in an internship training program. The study was conducted to gather student perceptions, opinions, preferences and satisfaction levels related to the program. Data were collected via a mixed method survey (surveys and interviews) from student-respondents. The survey collects demographic and background information from students, including their perception of faculty performance in the training poised to prepare them for the job market. Findings from this study show that students expect internship training to improve their professional and personal skills as well as to increase their workplace-related satisfaction. It is concluded that improving the internship training is crucial among the students as it is expected to enrich their experiences, knowledge and skills in the personal and professional life. It is also expected to increase their level of confidence when it comes to exploring their future job opportunities in the Jordanian market. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Thomas Leps Internship Abstract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leps, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    issue. I have since narrowed the likely source of the error down to a Software Development Kit released by the camera supplier PixeLink. I have since developed a workaround in order to build star grids for calibration until the software bug can be isolated and fixed. I was also tasked with building a Hardware in the Loop test stand in order to test the full Op-Nav system. A 4k screen displays simulated Lunar and Terrestrial images from a possible Orion trajectory. These images are then projected through a collimator and then captured with an Op-Nav camera controlled by an Intel NUC computer running flight software. The flight software then analyzes the images to determine attitude and position, this data is then reconstructed into a trajectory and matched to the simulated trajectory in order to determine the accuracy of the attitude and position estimates. In order for the system to work it needs to be precisely and accurately aligned. I developed an alignment procedure that allows the screen, collimator and camera to be squared, centered and collinear with each other within a micron spatially and 5 arcseconds in rotation. I also designed a rigid mount for the screen that was machined on site in Building 10 by another intern. While I was working in the EOL we received a $500k Orion startracker for alignment procedure testing. Due to my prior experience in electronics development, as an ancillary duty, I was tasked with building the cables required to operate and power the startracker. If any errors are made building these cables the startracker would be destroyed, I was honored that the director of the lab entrusted such a critical component with me. This internship has cemented my view on public space exploration. I always preferred public sector to privatization because, as a scientist, the most interesting aspects of space for me are not necessarily the most profitable. I was concerned that the public sector was faltering however, and that in order to improve human

  1. Summarizing my DHS Internship Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, D L

    2006-09-06

    In this paper, the author addresses four main topics: (1) A description of the topic of his internship at the U.S. Department of Homeland Security; (2) A description of his contributions to the project; (3) A discussion of research directions beneficial to the Department of Homeland Security (DHS); and (4) A discussion of the impact the internship experience had on his career aspirations. He feels the first three points can best be addressed using the contents of a paper his mentor, Dr. Tina Eliassi-Rad, and he have published based on their work this summer [Roberts and Eliassi-Rad, 2006]. Sections 2 - 5 are intended for this purpose and have been excerpted from that paper. He concludes this paper in Section 6 with a discussion of the fourth point.

  2. Research, Design, and Implementation of an Internship Course in Dance: Turning Student Knowledge into Professional Know-How

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risner, Doug

    2015-01-01

    A successful internship experience can provide invaluable learning experiences connecting students' classroom knowledge to professional "know-how" in the field. Over the past three decades, post-secondary internship programs have flourished, generating considerable research literature from a variety of disciplinary perspectives; however,…

  3. Retaining Underrepresented Minority Undergraduates in STEM through Hands-on Internship Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamzai, A.; Mcpherson, R. A.; DeLong, K. L.; Rivera-Monroy, V. H.; Zak, J.; Earl, J.; Owens, K.; Wilson, D.

    2015-12-01

    The U.S. Department of the Interior's South Central Climate Science Center (SCCSC) hosts an annual 3-week summer internship opportunity for undergraduate students of underrepresented minorities interested in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields. Internship participants travel across the south-central U.S. to visit university campuses and field locations. The students interact with faculty conducting cutting edge research and with resource managers facing decision-making under uncertainty. This internship format allows the participants to see the direct impacts of climate variability and change on the Texas Hill Country, prairie and forest ecosystems and tribal cultures in Oklahoma, and the bayous, delta and coastline of Louisiana. Immersive experiences are key for exposing students to academic research and providing them with the skills and experiences needed to continue on in their professional careers. The SCCSC's program introduces students to how research is conducted, gives them a broad perspective on how collaborations form, and starts each student on the path to building a large and diverse professional network. By providing participants with a "buffet" of options, our internship serves as a launching pad from which each student can move forward towards experiences such as participating in a Research Experiences for Undergraduates program, gaining employment in a STEM-related career path, and being accepted into a graduate degree program. This presentation will describe the components of the SCCSC's internship program and provide a summary of post-internship student successes.

  4. Internships, employment opportunities, and research grants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2015-01-01

    As an unbiased, multidisciplinary science organization, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is dedicated to the timely, relevant, and impartial study of the health of our ecosystems and environment, our natural resources, the impacts of climate and land-use change, and the natural hazards that threaten us. Opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students and faculty to participate in USGS science are available in the selected programs described below. Please note: U.S. citizenship is required for all government positions.This publication has been superseded by USGS General Information Product 165 Grant Opportunities for Academic Research and Training and USGS General Information Product 166 Student and Recent Graduate Employment Opportunities.This publication is proceeded by USGS General Information Product 80 Internships, Employment Opportunities, and Research Grants published in 2008.

  5. Medical internship training in Saudi Arabia: interns’ views and perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swaid AI

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ali I Swaid,1 Abdelkhalig H Elhilu,2 Mohamed S Mahfouz3 1Department of ENT, Faculty of Medicine, Jazan University, 2Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Jazan University, 3Department of Family and Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Jazan University, Jazan, Saudi Arabia Background: Internship training offers an important opportunity for personal development and career planning. However, there are many factors affecting the efficiency of training, and the views of interns are rarely considered. The main objective of this study was to explore the views of interns enrolled in Jazan University internship program during the year 2015. Subjects and methods: A web-based cross-sectional study was conducted in the Jazan region, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, during the academic year 2015. To achieve the study goals, an online questionnaire was distributed to all interns (n=85 enrolled in the Jazan University internship program. Results: Results revealed that satisfaction with training was more evident in general surgery and pediatrics (76.1%, n=54 and 77.5%, n=55, respectively. Satisfaction was lowest for obstetrics and gynecology programs (45.1%, n=32, while in internal medicine it was 54.9% (n=39. Training in general surgery and pediatrics was rated as excellent by most of the interns (45.8% and 43.1%, respectively. The picture is reversed in obstetrics and gynecology, as 43.1% rated it as average. More than half of the study sample felt that they were well prepared to start the next step in their career at the end of internship (50.7%, while 25.4% felt that they were moderately prepared. Conclusion: It is clear that training quality in views of interns is variable across the major specialties, and there are some problems in obstetrics and gynecology training. More studies are needed to explore in-depth dimensions of internship training program in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Keywords: Jazan University, internship program, gynecology and

  6. Mechanical Engineering Internship

    CERN Document Server

    Meera, Al Mehairi

    2013-01-01

    This report discusses my summer program in CERN for summer 2013. In one of the world’s leading nuclear research organization, where scientists’ urge to figure out how universe was created and how it started, drive them to preform significant experiments on fundamental particles, using the most powerful particle accelerators. The report will address general information about CERN and its various departments. Moreover, it will include my personal experience as a summer student and an insight on my gas analysing project. Finally, I will conclude with the outcomes, skills, experience and knowledge gained through this unique journey.

  7. Materials R&D-student internships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, R.B.; Jiles, D.C.; Chumbley, L.S. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1995-05-01

    This program has as an objective the conduct of programmatic research for the Advanced Industrial Concepts Materials Program while training minority graduate students in the process. Well-known demographics indicate that minorities will constitute an increasing fraction of our future work force. Consequently, efforts have been initiated to increase the fraction of minorities and women who choose technical career paths. Included are a wide ranging set of programs beginning with pre-school education, progressing through efforts to retain students in technical paths in grades K-12 and undergraduate education, and ending with encouraging graduate education. The Materials R & D - Student Internships is a unique approach in the latter category. Here, we have focused on a particular area of applied materials research, the Advanced Industrial Concepts Materials Program. Our goal, then, is to educate minority graduate students in the context of this program. The Ames Laboratory was selected as a site for this pilot project since it is a DOE national laboratory, located on the campus of a major research university, which includes in its research interests programs with a strong technological flavor.

  8. Final report of the Department of Energy pilot internship program on radioactive waste at Vanderbilt University (September 1, 1993-08/31, 1994)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank Parker

    1999-08-31

    This final report summarizes Vanderbilt's ten year program in radioactive waste management. The report describes the interns selected for the program, the interns' course of study, and their assignments.

  9. Tax Professional Internships and Subsequent Professional Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Philip H.; Blackwood, B. J.; Landy, Sharon D.

    2010-01-01

    How do internships influence the socialization and performance of accounting students employed in the tax department of a CPA firm? Previous research on accounting internships primarily focuses on auditing personnel. There is evidence in the literature that indicates audit and tax professionals have different work cultures. This paper examines the…

  10. Internship: A Recruitment and Selection Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hao; Liden, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we examined internship as a recruitment and selection process. On the basis of impression management theory, we hypothesized that both organizations and interns make efforts to impress the other party during the internship if they intend to hire or be hired. Using longitudinal data collected at 3 points from 122 intern-supervisor…

  11. Analysis of School Leaders Licensure Assessment Content Category I-V Scores and Principal Internship Self-Assessment Scores for ISLLC Standards I-V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    This study compares School Leaders Licensure Assessment (SLLA) sub-scores with principal interns' self-assessment sub-scores (ISA) for a principal internship evaluation instrument in one educational leadership graduate program. The results of the study will be used to help establish the effectiveness of the current principal internship program,…

  12. Sports Management and Administration Internships and Students with Disabilities: Responsibilities and Practices for Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, John

    2009-01-01

    Practica, internships, and mentorships are vital for the development of capable and productive graduates of preprofessional academic programs, including sports management and sports administration programs. College students with disabilities, including those in sports management and sports administration programs, who are preparing to enter their…

  13. INTERNSHIP ROLES IN TRAINING AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPEMENT OF STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munteanu Anca-Ioana

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Romanian specialist`s studies show a harsh reality: Romanian universities programs have only theoretical value, creating specialists but not for real life, but for a more abstract environment. Our university graduates are doing very well in a stable economic and institutional environment that offers relatively easy material and financial resources, with a set of skills and professional skills which fail to meet harsh reality of the labor market. An effective solution for professional skills development is the accumulation of work experience during college in the environment and on the job we have in view by following an internship program. As a form of practical education through work, internship meets young people, particularly students keen to gain experience through practical work in a job within a company or institution chosen, giving them the opportunity to translate theoretical knowledge into practice and to develop skills and experience of labor market activities that waits for them. This paper is an original applied research conducted in the West University of Timisoara, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration. It aims to identify whether there is a need for specialization Management students to acquire work experience before graduating, to what extent they are able to assess their skills and work in a company and especially the role of internship programs in professional and personal development of students. The results show that participation in an internship program is beneficial not only for students but also for employers. Leading to increased competences and to training and professional skills and personal development, internship becomes a more attractive alternative for young people because it gives them the opportunity to be “a ringer" of an employee on the position you have in view. Without being employed, students can gain practical experience in a certain position they sought in a company or institution on the

  14. Kennedy Space Center ITC-1 Internship Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    As an intern for Priscilla Elfrey in the ITC-1 department, I was involved in many activities that have helped me to develop many new skills. I supported four different projects during my internship, which included the Center for Life Cycle Design (CfLCD), SISO Space Interoperability Smackdown, RTI Teacher Mentor Program, and the Discrete Event Simulation Integrated Visualization Environment Team (DIVE). I provided the CfLCD with web based research on cyber security initiatives involving simulation, education for young children, cloud computing, Otronicon, and Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) education initiatives. I also attended STEM meetings regarding simulation courses, and educational course enhancements. To further improve the SISO Simulation event, I provided observation feedback to the technical advisory board. I also helped to set up a chat federation for HLA. The third project involved the RTI Teacher Mentor program, which I helped to organize. Last, but not least, I worked with the DIVE team to develop new software to help visualize discrete event simulations. All of these projects have provided experience on an interdisciplinary level ranging from speech and communication to solving complex problems using math and science.

  15. NDFOM Description for DNDO Summer Internship Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budden, Brent Scott [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-12-01

    Nuclear Detection Figure of Merit (NDFOM) is a DNDO-funded project at LANL to develop a software framework that allows a user to evaluate a radiation detection scenario of interest, quickly obtaining results on detector performance. It is intended as a “first step” in detector performance assessment, and meant to be easily employed by subject matter experts (SMEs) and non-SMEs alike. The generic scenario consists of a potential source moving past a detector at a relative velocity and with a distance of closest approach. Such a scenario is capable of describing, e.g., vehicles driving through portal monitors, border patrol scanning suspected illicit materials with a handheld instrument, and first responders with backpackor pager-based detectors (see Fig. 1). The backend library is prepopulated by the NDFOM developers to include sources and detectors of interest to DNDO and its community.

  16. Carbohydrate recognition by the rhamnose-binding lectin SUL-I with a novel three-domain structure isolated from the venom of globiferous pedicellariae of the flower sea urchin Toxopneustes pileolus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu; Ichise, Ayaka; Unno, Hideaki; Goda, Shuichiro; Oda, Tatsuya; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun; Sakai, Hitomi; Nakagawa, Hideyuki

    2017-08-01

    The globiferous pedicellariae of the venomous sea urchin Toxopneustes pileolus contains several biologically active proteins. We have cloned the cDNA of one of the toxin components, SUL-I, which is a rhamnose-binding lectin (RBL) that acts as a mitogen through binding to carbohydrate chains on target cells. Recombinant SUL-I (rSUL-I) was produced in Escherichia coli cells, and its carbohydrate-binding specificity was examined with the glycoconjugate microarray analysis, which suggested that potential target carbohydrate structures are galactose-terminated N-glycans. rSUL-I exhibited mitogenic activity for murine splenocyte cells and toxicity against Vero cells. The three-dimensional structure of the rSUL-I/l-rhamnose complex was determined by X-ray crystallographic analysis at a 1.8 Å resolution. The overall structure of rSUL-I is composed of three distinctive domains with a folding structure similar to those of CSL3, a RBL from chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) eggs. The bound l-rhamnose molecules are mainly recognized by rSUL-I through hydrogen bonds between its 2-, 3-, and 4-hydroxy groups and Asp, Asn, and Glu residues in the binding sites, while Tyr and Ser residues participate in the recognition mechanism. It was also inferred that SUL-I may form a dimer in solution based on the molecular size estimated via dynamic light scattering as well as possible contact regions in its crystal structure. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  17. The Demand For, and Impact Of, Youth Internships: Evidence from a Randomized Experiment in Yemen. Policy Research Working Paper 7463

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, David; Assaf, Nabila; Cusolito, Ana Paula

    2015-01-01

    This paper evaluates a youth internship program in the Republic of Yemen that provided firms with a 50 percent subsidy to hire recent graduates of universities and vocational schools. The first round of the program took place in 2014 and required both firms and youth to apply for the program. The paper examines the demand for such a program, and…

  18. Southwest University's Innovative No-Fee Teacher Education Internships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huirong; Xiong, Jianjie; Song, Naiqing

    2013-01-01

    This article describes Southwest University's no-fee teacher education internship models in terms of their organization, content, requirements, and quality assurance. It further introduces the quality assurance system, which comprises building a teaching internship system, establishing internship sites, guiding teacher training, and processing…

  19. Internships in School Psychology: Selection and Accreditation Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keilin, W. Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Doctoral students in school psychology often report unique issues and challenges when seeking a doctoral internship. The number and range of accredited internship positions available to School Psychology (SP) students in the Association of Psychology Postdoctoral and Internship Centers (APPIC) Match is quite limited, and they often obtain…

  20. Direct economic benefits associated with dietetic internships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conklin, M T; Simko, M D

    1994-02-01

    We explored the direct economic benefits of hospital dietetics departments sponsoring an internship for dietetics studies. Forty-five dietetics departments in US hospitals participated in a mail survey that involved comprehensive data collection procedures using three instruments, including activity logs recorded by 298 dietitians and interns. Direct benefits were defined as the net student labor provided to the department during routine and staff relief experiences that released professional labor for other work. Net student productivity during routine assignments was calculated by subtracting the time dietitians spent teaching during a typical work week from the amount of time dietetic interns spent performing professional services without direct supervision. Student productivity during staff relief rotations was calculated by multiplying the number of students assigned to this type of experience by the length of the rotation. While involved in routine learning experiences, dietetic interns provided a direct benefit. The difference between the time interns spent in independent, professional service in the departments and the time dietitians spent in activities designed specifically for teaching was a mean of 29 hours in favor of the students. All departments received a direct benefit from assigning dietetic interns to a staff relief rotation. The median number of weeks of student labor gained by the departments per year was 24. A paired t test was used to analyze the difference between the time dietitians devoted to teaching interns and the time students spent in independent, professional service in the departments. The difference was very highly significant (P impact of their supervised practice program on the sponsoring organization.

  1. Analysis of the Reliability and Validity of a Mentor's Assessment for Principal Internships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koonce, Glenn L.; Kelly, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, researchers analyzed the reliability and validity of the mentor's assessment for principal internships at a university in the Southeast region of the United States. The results of the study yielded how trustworthy and dependable the instrument is and the effectiveness of the instrument in the current principal preparation program.…

  2. The Governor's School for the Arts and Its Graduate Internship Component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Jim; Uldrick, Virginia

    1990-01-01

    The South Carolina Governor's School for the Arts is a summer residential program for high-school students talented in creative writing, visual arts, theatre, music, and dance. The School's internship component offers in-service education and preparation of art educators in the area of gifted education, in conjunction with Furman University. (JDD)

  3. Providing Authentic Leadership Opportunities through Collaboratively Developed Internships: A University-School District Partnership Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havard, Timothy S.; Morgan, Joyce; Patrick, Lynne

    2010-01-01

    Programs designed to develop future educational leaders must include practical learning experiences that connect the theoretical content of university coursework with the realities of the K-12 workplace. Internships, which offer a common method of providing these experiences, have been generally lacking in the degree to which aspiring leaders…

  4. Internship guide : Work placements step by step

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haag, Esther

    2013-01-01

    Internship Guide: Work Placements Step by Step has been written from the practical perspective of a placement coordinator. This book addresses the following questions : what problems do students encounter when they start thinking about the jobs their degree programme prepares them for? How do you

  5. The Johns Hopkins Hospital: A Summer Internship

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Adam Smith, a native of Richmond, Indiana, is an advanced pharmacy practice student in the College of Pharmacy at Purdue University. In this article, he describes how career exploration through a summer internship with The Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland solidified his desire to pursue a career in pharmacy administration.

  6. Applied Geography Internships: Operational Canadian Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, L. T.

    1982-01-01

    Anxious to maintain student enrollments, geography departments have placed greater emphasis on the applied nature of the discipline. Described are (1) the advantages of internships in college geography curricula that enable students to gain firsthand knowledge about the usefulness of geography in real world situations and (2) operational models…

  7. Pathway to Success: Research and Internship Opportunities for Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahovic, G.; Malhotra, R.

    2008-12-01

    This paper presents efforts by North Carolina Central University (NCCU) in promoting geosciences by offering students paid career training opportunities with private, non-profit and government organizations. North Carolina Central University is the nation's first state-supported public Liberal Arts College funded for African Americans with approximately 86 % minority enrollment. Using data gathered from 1975 to 1999, NCCU is ranked eleventh among all US institutions based on the number of black, US citizen Ph.D.s who received their baccalaureate degree from that institution (Thurgood et al., 2006). Therefore, successful creation of research and internship pathways for NCCU students has national implications because it will increase the number of minority students joining the workforce and applying to PhD programs. Several related efforts will be described, including partnerships with the Fugro EarthData Inc., The Center for Remote Sensing and Mapping Science at the University of Georgia, The Center for Earthquake Research and Information at University of Memphis, Tennessee, and City of Durham. By developing both academic research and industry internship tracks we hope to be able to accommodate different student career goals. For example, graduate students planning to continue onto a PhD will be more interested in research based opportunities at collaborating academic institutions whereas the industry internship track is more appropriate for undergraduate or graduate students planning to enter the job market upon graduation. The internships are conducted under the aegis of the Geospatial Research, Innovative Teaching and Service Center (GRITS) housed in the Department of Environmental, Earth and Geospatial Sciences (DEEGS) at NCCU. The center was established in 2006 with funding from the National Science Foundation to promote the learning and application of geospatial technologies. Since then the GRITS center has been a hub for Geographical Information Science (GIS

  8. The association of students requiring remediation in the internal medicine clerkship with poor performance during internship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemann, Brian A; Durning, Steven J; Kelly, William F; Dong, Ting; Pangaro, Louis N; Hemmer, Paul A

    2015-04-01

    To determine whether the Uniformed Services University (USU) system of workplace performance assessment for students in the internal medicine clerkship at the USU continues to be a sensitive predictor of subsequent poor performance during internship, when compared with assessments in other USU third year clerkships. Utilizing Program Director survey results from 2007 through 2011 and U.S. Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step 3 examination results as the outcomes of interest, we compared performance during internship for students who had less than passing performance in the internal medicine clerkship and required remediation, against students whose performance in the internal medicine clerkship was successful. We further analyzed internship ratings for students who received less than passing grades during the same time period on other third year clerkships such as general surgery, pediatrics, obstetrics and gynecology, family medicine, and psychiatry to evaluate whether poor performance on other individual clerkships were associated with future poor performance at the internship level. Results for this recent cohort of graduates were compared with previously published findings. The overall survey response rate for this 5 year cohort was 81% (689/853). Students who received a less than passing grade in the internal medicine clerkship and required further remediation were 4.5 times more likely to be given poor ratings in the domain of medical expertise and 18.7 times more likely to demonstrate poor professionalism during internship. Further, students requiring internal medicine remediation were 8.5 times more likely to fail USMLE Step 3. No other individual clerkship showed any statistically significant associations with performance at the intern level. On the other hand, 40% of students who successfully remediated and did graduate were not identified during internship as having poor performance. Unsuccessful clinical performance which requires remediation in

  9. Population health intervention research training: the value of public health internships and mentorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamelin, Anne-Marie; Paradis, Gilles

    2018-01-01

    Better alignment between academia and public health practice and policies are critical to improve public health actions. Training of future researchers to address complex issues and to conduct transdisciplinary and collaborative research will help improve this alignment. In this paper, we describe the role of internship placements and mentorship for trainees' skills development in population health intervention research and the benefits of embedding research trainees within public health organizations. This qualitative descriptive study assessed the perceptions of the role and benefits of internships and mentorship for population health intervention research training among former doctoral and postdoctoral students, public health mentors, and senior public health managers who participated in the 4P Program, a research training program which bridges academic training and the public health system in Quebec, Canada. Two types of interviews were conducted: telephone semi-structured interviews by an external evaluator and face-to-face trainee "exit" interviews by the Program co-director. Semi-annual evaluation reports from each trainee were also reviewed. Qualitative data were subjected to a thematic analysis. Internships provided trainees with a working knowledge of the public health system and the context in which decisions and public health interventions are implemented. It was an opportunity for trainees to interact with knowledge-user partners and assess the gap between research and practice. Effective mentorship was key to help trainees interpret the public health reality and develop population health intervention research skills. Trainees learned to ask the "how" questions that are critical for in-depth understanding of complex interventions and the conditions under which they can be best implemented. Conditions of success of internships and mentorship for population health intervention research included the alignment of the interests between the trainee, the

  10. Evaluation of a health sciences internship for Latino and Native American library students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keselman, Alla; Quasem, Sanjana; Kelly, Janice E; Dutcher, Gale A

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a qualitative evaluation of a graduate-level internship for Latino and Native American library science students or students who are interested in serving those populations. The authors analyzed semi-structured interviews with thirteen internship program graduates or participants. The analysis suggests that the program increased participants' interest in health sciences librarianship and led to improved career opportunities, both in health sciences libraries and other libraries with health information programming. It also highlights specific factors that are likely to contribute to the strength of career pipeline programs aiming to bring Latino and Native American students and students who are interested in serving those communities into health librarianship. Exposing graduate-level interns to a broad range of health sciences librarianship tasks, including outreach to Latino and Native American communities and formal mentorship, is likely to maximize interns' interests in both health sciences librarianship and service to these communities.

  11. Norwegian High-School Students Internship Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2017-01-01

    The High-School Students Internship Programme (HSSIP is a programme developed by the ECO group’s Teacher and Student Programmes section to engage students from a young age with scientific research and innovation. Norway was selected as one out of five countries for the pilot programmes run in 2017. Out of some 150 applications, 10 boys and 14 girls, from Longyearbyen (Svalbard) in the North to Flekkefjord in the South, were invited to participate in the Norwegian programme that took place from 15 October - 28 October. The youngsters were offered an intense two-week internship at CERN, during which they took part in many diverse activities. Accompanied by mentors, the students got a deeper insight into how CERN supports particle physics by working on their own projects and through a variety of visits.

  12. Engaging Global Justice Through Internships (Penultimate Draft)

    OpenAIRE

    Ericka Tucker

    2014-01-01

    Engaging with Global Justice through InternshipsGlobal justice, on its face, seems like an impossible task. As individuals, even citizens of wealthy and powerful countries, the task of economic, social and political justice seems to outstrip our intellectual, practical and emotional abilities. Considering the scope of 'global' justice, it would appear that a massive coordinated effort would be necessary to overcome the problems of global injustice, yet it would seem such coordination may be i...

  13. A Little Help from My Friends: Testing the Utility of Facebook Groups as Online Communities in an Undergraduate Research Internship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brobst, Joseph Arthur

    2013-01-01

    This Executive Position Paper describes the findings of a study investigating the utility of Facebook Groups in fostering community among participants in the Delaware INBRE and EPSCoR undergraduate research internship programs. In the first phase of the study, findings from the existing evaluation of the programs and themes from the literature…

  14. WORK EXPERIENCE INTERNSHIP THROUGH THE EYES OF TECHNICAL UNIVERSITY STUDENTS (ON THE MATERIALS OF SOCIOLOGICAL RESEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandr Yu. Myagkov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation is to study the problem of efficiency of work experience internship in a technical university and its role in the education of future professionals (problem has been investigated in the framework of the research project «Monitoring of social well-being and problems of professional adaptation of ISPEU students».Methods. While carrying out of sociological research, selection of respondents was occurred on the multistage combined (serially-nested model of sample among students I, III and V courses of six faculties of full-time course of ISPEU. The complex of questions (its answers show features of professional identity of the future experts on initial (I course, intermediate (III course and finishing (V course stages of their professional formation has been developed to find out the dynamics of process of professional adaptation of students from the first to the fifth year. The information was processed with application of program and analytical complex SPSS. The comparative analysis to a gender sign of degree of satisfaction/dissatisfaction has been undertaken by the work experience internship organization on the side of high school and the accepting enterprises.Results. The level of graduates’ satisfaction with the work experience internship is revealed that works on an estimation by students of quality of preparation in high school, the relation to a received speciality and success in the future profession. The data on a self-estimation of readiness of students to work experience internship is cited. Criteria of successful work experience internship are formulated.Scientific novelty. The given researches carried out by the authors, prove that work experience internship positively influences professional consciousness of students and promote formation of steady positive installations for professional job. However, work experience internship in its institutional forms is functional and appears to be the effective

  15. Retention and Mentorship of Minority Students via Undergraduate Internship Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, P.

    2004-12-01

    The School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology at the University of Hawaii is undertaking an Undergraduate Research Internship project to address the lack of full representation of women and underrepresented minorities in the geosciences. The overarching educational objective is to provide education and career development guidance and opportunities for students from underrepresented minorities. In collaboration with industry partners, we hope to prepare undergraduate students for life and careers in today's complex and dynamic technological world by encouraging them to attain high standards in the geosciences, thereby enabling them to compete successfully for positions in graduate programs. To achieve his goal, the project focuses on the following objectives: (1) Creating a high-quality integrated on-campus teaching and off-campus learning environment, and (2) providing an intensive introduction to geoscience careers through the guidance of experienced faculty and workplace mentors. The program will start small, collaborating with one or two companies over the next two years, offering paid summer internships. Opportunities for students include participation in geoscience-related research, obtaining experience in interpreting observations and providing information to end-users, working to improve technology and field methods, and developing the expertise to maintain, operate and deploy equipment. Program participants are assigned individual projects that relate to their academic majors, their career goals, and the ongoing research missions of our industry partners. In addition to their research activities, participants attend a series of seminars and tours dealing with current topics in geoscience to expose them to the wide variety of scientific and technical activities that occur in the workplace. The expected outcomes of this experience will be scientific growth and career development. Given that a very small percentage of all students go on to graduate

  16. Internship Training in Community Medicine – Need For Reorientation and Strengthening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subitha Lakshminarayanan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The goal of MBBS training program is to create a basic doctor, physicians of first contact for the community in the primary care setting both in urban as well as rural areas of our country. Internship is a phase of training wherein a graduate is expected to conduct actual practice of medical and health care and acquire skills under supervision so that he/she may become capable of functioning independently. In the context of public health practice, he should be oriented to provide preventive and promotive health care services to the community, demonstrate skills in monitoring of national health programs and develop leadership qualities to function effectively as a leader of the health team. Methods: This study is based on current status assessment and reviewed literature on internship training in India from PubMed, internet and other sources. The review is presented as need for scenario of internship training in Community Medicine, need for its strengthening, guidelines for internship training and conclusions. Results: There is no uniform pattern for internship training in community medicine, in terms of exposure, training and evaluation, at medical college departments and at rural training centers both in government and private medical colleges. This is further complicated by factors like lack of structured framework for need based training, reduced time period of training, preparation for postgraduate examinations and lack of post training assessment. Poor  facilities  at  rural  health  training centers  and  primary  health  centers  like transportation and laboratory facilities, lack of infrastructure and basic amenities to cater to the residential needs of interns pose additional difficulties. Internship training in community medicine should be appropriately structured to provide confidence to medical graduates to practice their profession in common and simple settings, and be able to deliver primary health care

  17. Teaching, Learning and Interning: From Teaching Internships to Scholarly Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eileen M. Herteis

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Mount Allison University, with about 2,400 students, is a small, undergraduate Liberal Arts and Science university with a long history of faculty-student collaboration in both research and cocurricular activities. In 2005, Mount Allison introduced the Undergraduate Teaching Internship Program in which professors and senior students collaborate in instruction. The program has quickly become for its faculty participants an important springboard for teaching innovation and scholarship. Almost immediately after its introduction, it became clear that the Undergraduate Teaching Internship Program addressed two distinct but overlapping needs—the first was predictable, the second less so: (a it presented opportunities for senior students to develop skills, knowledge and values that transcend those normally associated with undergraduate education; and (b it provided a mechanism whereby faculty could engage in scholarly reflection on teaching and Scholarship of Teaching and Learning projects. In the 5 years since its inception, internship has become not simply a peripheral program but a strong thread woven into the fabric of the university culture. While outlining some constraints of the program, this descriptive paper explains the many ways in which internship has resulted in productive, mutually beneficial collaborations between interns and their supervising professors, encouraging an even more pervasive dialogue about teaching.L’Université Mount Allisson est un petit établissement qui offre des cours dans les domaines des arts et des sciences à environ 2400 étudiants de premier cycle. Son personnel enseignant et ses étudiants collaborent depuis longtemps aux activités de recherche et aux activités parallèles au programme. En 2005, l’Université a mis sur pied le programme de stages en enseignement au premier cycle où les professeurs et les étudiants qui en sont à leur dernière année d’étude collaborent à l

  18. Short-Term International Internship Experiences for Future Teachers and Other Child Development Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kari Knutson; Gonzalez, Amber M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines outcomes associated with participation in short-term, international internship experiences. Results suggest short-term international internship experiences contribute to rich personal and professional development outcomes. Findings highlight participant challenges associated with initial internship experiences, professional…

  19. NASA Pathways Internship: Spring 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Oscar, III

    2016-01-01

    I was selected to contribute to the Data Systems and Handling Branch under the Avionics Flight Systems Division at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. There I used my knowledge from school, as well as my job experience from the military, to help me comprehend my assigned project and contribute to it. With help from my mentors, supervisors, colleagues, and an excellent NASA work environment, I was able to learn, as well as accomplish, a lot towards my project. Not only did I understand more about embedded systems, microcontrollers, and low-level programming, I also was given the opportunity to explore the NASA community.

  20. Prevalent hallucinations during medical internships: phantom vibration and ringing syndromes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hsuan Lin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Phantom vibration syndrome is a type of hallucination reported among mobile phone users in the general population. Another similar perception, phantom ringing syndrome, has not been previously described in the medical literature. METHODS: A prospective longitudinal study of 74 medical interns (46 males, 28 females; mean age, 24.8±1.2 years was conducted using repeated investigations of the prevalence and associated factors of phantom vibration and ringing. The accompanying symptoms of anxiety and depression were evaluated with the Beck Anxiety and Depression Inventories before the internship began, and again at the third, sixth, and twelfth internship months, and two weeks after the internship ended. RESULTS: The baseline prevalence of phantom vibration was 78.1%, which increased to 95.9% and 93.2% in the third and sixth internship months. The prevalence returned to 80.8% at the twelfth month and decreased to 50.0% 2 weeks after the internship ended. The baseline prevalence of phantom ringing was 27.4%, which increased to 84.9%, 87.7%, and 86.3% in the third, sixth, and twelfth internship months, respectively. This returned to 54.2% two weeks after the internship ended. The anxiety and depression scores also increased during the internship, and returned to baseline two weeks after the internship. There was no significant correlation between phantom vibration/ringing and symptoms of anxiety or depression. The incidence of both phantom vibration and ringing syndromes significantly increased during the internship, and subsequent recovery. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that phantom vibration and ringing might be entities that are independent of anxiety or depression during evaluation of stress-associated experiences during medical internships.

  1. An Internship May Not Be Enough: Enhancing Bioscience Industry Job Readiness through Practicum Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason M. Cramer

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to the narrowing of options in academic careers, the bioscience industry offers robust employment opportunities for STEM-trained workers, especially those who display both scientific and business talent. Unfortunately, traditional science programs typically lack curricular features that develop this type of worker. The North Carolina State University Master of Microbial Biotechnology (MMB program facilitates industry-specific experiential learning to fill this training gap. Similar programs often rely on a single industry internship to provide students relevant work experience, but completion of one internship might not suffice to position students for employment in a highly competitive job market. The MMB program requires students to complete an internship and three practicum projects in an industry setting, to promote development of key skills in a variety of areas, to build confidence in the ability to perform initial job duties, and to establish a more extensive work history in industry. In this Perspective we discuss an unmet need in undergraduate and graduate STEM education that can be filled by incorporating a similar set of industry-specific work experiences for students who desire to transition from academe into the life science industry.

  2. Maximizing the Potential of Internships in Gerontology and Geriatrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasik, Rona J.

    2009-01-01

    Internships and similar applied opportunities have long been valued for providing students with opportunities for practical experience, career preparation, and personal growth. The need for applied experiences in gerontology and geriatrics is particularly salient. Creating and sustaining effective internship experiences, however, requires careful…

  3. Decision Making for Democratic Leadership in a Guided Internship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinker, JoAnn Franklin; Hoover, J. Duane; Valle, Fernando; Hardin, Fred

    2014-01-01

    Experience in problem-based learning, authentic experiences, on-the-job decision making, and critical reflection on decisions made formed the conceptual framework of an internship to develop democratic leadership as a professional ethic in interns. Interns in an on-the-job guided internship examined decisions over a 13-week period as they…

  4. WHK Student Internship Enrollment, Mentor Participation Up More than 50 Percent | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer The Werner H. Kirsten Student Internship Program (WHK SIP) has enrolled the largest class ever for the 2013–2014 academic year, with 66 students and 50 mentors. This enrollment reflects a 53 percent increase in students and a 56 percent increase in mentors, compared to 2012–2013 (43 students and 32 mentors), according to Julie Hartman, WHK SIP

  5. Exploring the Importance of Soft and Hard Skills as Perceived by IT Internship Students and Industry: A Gap Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patacsil, Frederick F.; Tablatin, Christine Lourrine S.

    2017-01-01

    The research paper proposes a skills gap methodology that utilized the respondent experiences in the internship program to measure the importance of the Information Technology (IT) skills gap as perceived by IT students and the industry. The questionnaires were formulated based on previous studies, however, was slightly modified, validated and…

  6. Fall 2015 NASA Internship, and Space Radiation Health Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patience, Luke

    2015-01-01

    This fall, I was fortunate enough to have been able to participate in an internship at NASA's Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center. I was placed into the Human Health & Performance Directorate, where I was specifically tasked to work with Dr. Zarana Patel, researching the impacts of cosmic level radiation on human cells. Using different laboratory techniques, we were able to examine the cells to see if any damage had been done due to radiation exposure, and if so, how much damage was done. Cell culture samples were exposed at different doses, and fixed at different time points so that we could accumulate a large pool of quantifiable data. After examining quantifiable results relative to the impacts of space radiation on the human body at the cellular and chromosomal level, researchers can defer to different areas of the space program that have to do with astronaut safety, and research and development (extravehicular mobility unit construction, vehicle design and construction, etc.). This experience has been very eye-opening, and I was able to learn quite a bit. I learned some new laboratory techniques, and I did my best to try and learn new ways to balance such a hectic work and school schedule. I also learned some very intimate thing about working at NASA; I learned that far more people want to watch you succeed, rather than watch you fail, and I also learned that this is a place that is alive with innovators and explorers - people who have a sole purpose of exploring space for the betterment of humanity, and not for any other reason. It's truly inspiring. All of these experiences during my internship have impacted me in a really profound way, so much that my educational and career goals are completely different than when I started. I started out as a biotechnology major, and I discovered recently toward the end of the internship, that I don't want to work in a lab, nor was I as enthralled by biological life sciences as a believed myself to be. Taking that all into

  7. Marketing Internships: How Values and Search Strategies Differ across the Student-Employer Dyad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Scott R.; Tomkovick, Chuck

    2012-01-01

    This study identifies the value undergraduate marketing students are placing on various aspects of a marketing internship and compares the relative importance that internship providers place on these same factors. Results were obtained by surveying 140 internship providers and 336 undergraduate marketing majors. Internship providers rated…

  8. The Effectiveness of Cognitive and Psychomotor Domain of Culinary Art Students’ Performance after Internship in Private Colleges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harun Hairuddin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available With the demand of culinary arts graduates in hospitality industry, more higher learning institutions especially private colleges offer the programs. The course syllabus of culinary arts is specifically designed to provide a strong foundation for students who aspire to be chefs in the local and international fields. Students are equipped with a basic education in the culinary skills and knowledge associated with the cognitive and psychomotor domain. This study investigates the influence of the cognitive and psychomotor domain effect to private college student’s performance after internship. The internship program is gradually enhancing the students’ knowledge; confidence level and psychomotor performance which enable them to at least gain confidence when performing their practical assessment after coming back from internship. This is a positive indication in the beginning of the students’ life before expose into a real life work situation. Thus, this research can be a guidance for the private institutional lecturers to look into the effectiveness of cognitive and psychomotor domain of culinary art students’ performance in their internship programs.

  9. Internship Abstract - Aerosciences and Flight Mechanics Intern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, John

    2015-01-01

    Mars is a hard place to land on, but my internship with NASA's Aerosciences & Flight Mechanics branch has shown me the ways in which men and women will one day land safely. I work on Mars Aerocapture, an aeroassist maneuver that reduces the fuel necessary to "capture" into Martian orbit before a descent. The spacecraft flies through the Martian atmosphere to lose energy through heating before it exits back into space, this time at a slower velocity and in orbit around Mars. Spacecraft will need to maneuver through the Martian atmosphere to accurately hit their orbit, and they will need to survive the generated heat. Engineering teams need simulation data to continue their designs, and the guidance algorithm that ensures a proper orbit insertion needs to be refined - two jobs that fell to me at the summer's start. Engineers within my branch have developed two concept aerocapture vehicles, and I run simulations on their behavior during the maneuver. I also test and refine the guidance algorithm. I spent the first few weeks familiarizing myself with the simulation software, troubleshooting various guidance bugs and writing code. Everything runs smoothly now, and I recently sent my first set of trajectory data to a Thermal Protection System group so they can incorporate it into their heat-bearing material designs. I hope to generate plenty of data in the next few weeks for various engineering groups before my internship ends mid-August. My major accomplishment so far is improving the guidance algorithm. It is a relatively new algorithm that promises higher accuracy and fuel efficiency, but it hasn't undergone extensive testing yet. I've had the opportunity to work with the principal developer - a professor at Iowa State University - to find and fix several issues. I was also assigned the task of expanding the branch's aerodynamic heating simulation software. I am excited to do this because engineers in the future will use my work to generate meaningful data and make

  10. Developing High School Geoscientists through Summer Internships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltzman, J.

    2012-12-01

    High school students in the San Francisco Bay Area have the opportunity to contribute to Earth sciences research during the summer at Stanford University. The School of Earth Sciences hosts about 25 high school students each summer to support ongoing research, through more than just washing glassware. To increase diversity in the geosciences, we select students from diverse backgrounds through an application process which lessens the burden on busy faculty. The students work for 15-20 hours per week under the supervision of graduate students or postdoctoral fellows. The supervisors come to value the interns for a few reasons: not only are they getting some extra help with their research, but they are getting teaching experience in an informal but powerful way and supervising the interns' work over the summer. Another key part of the internship is bringing all of the interns together regularly. Whether it is for career talks, lab tours or field trip, high school students find kindred spirits in the group. Another important reason for weekly gatherings is to introduce the students to the wide field of Earth sciences and the different approaches and paths that scientists take. The summer ends with a culminating event where interns make short informal presentations about their research which give them an opportunity to articulate the big questions they have been helping to answer. Some interns are also invited to present a poster in a session for high school students at the Fall AGU meeting. These experiences of working in the laboratory and communicating about the research are part of the world of Earth sciences that are absent for most youth. The high school internships foster good will between Stanford and the local communities, help develop a more Earth and environmentally knowledgeable public and may have a long-term affect on diversifying the geosciences by exposing more young people to these fields.

  11. Internship report on palliative care at St Catherine's hospice

    OpenAIRE

    Monteiro, Andreia Marlene da Silva

    2016-01-01

    This report, performed in the context of the completion of the masters in Palliative Care, presents the activities and learning experiences that I have acquired during the months of training in the different settings of palliative care. This internship was performed at St Catherine’s Hospice (Inpatient unit, Day hospice and Community team) and with the National Health Service of East Surrey Hospital Specialist Palliative Care Team. Alongside the institutional involvement, internship activitie...

  12. A Review of Internship Opportunities in Online Learning: Building a New Conceptual Framework for a Self-Regulated Internship in Hospitality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Jan; Sykes, Diane

    2017-01-01

    The primary purpose of the article was to build a framework for an innovative approach to online internships after examining best practices in hospitality internships. Learning the ins and outs of an industry virtually, using contemporary internship methods strengthens the student's expertise and better prepares them for future workplace…

  13. Internships, Workfare, and the Cultural Industries: A British Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Lee

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available While media work has long been characterized as being structurally dependent on internships, “work experience,” and other forms of free labour (Banks 2007; Hesmondhalgh and Baker 2010, the recent shift towards internships has served to normalize what has become known as the media industries “dirty little secret” (Silver 2005. This article contextualizes internship culture within the British cultural industries against a wider political and social frame. Internships and other modes of “apprenticeship” across the British economy reflect a continuation and transformation of national workfare policies, which seek to avert inflationary pressures by coercing people to work or risk losing their welfare benefits. Internship culture has been highly pronounced in the cultural industries and other attractive white-collar sectors such as law and finance (Perlin 2012. Yet, the provision of internships to young people in previously unimaginable contexts such as fast food, retail, and other low-pay service sectors represents a significant shift in policy, compounded by increasingly draconian demands on young people to comply in order to receive state benefits. Discursively, unpaid media work is now seen as an opportunity for the lucky few, rather than a mode of exploitation servicing corporate gain. This has particular relevance for battles over equality and exploitation which have been fought in these sectors, which this discursive shift makes appear increasingly archaic.

  14. Professional development utilizing an oncology summer nursing internship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollica, Michelle; Hyman, Zena

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of an oncology student nursing internship on role socialization and professional self-concept. This mixed-methods study utilized a convergent parallel approach that incorporated a quasi-experimental and qualitative design. Data was collected through pre and post-survey and open-ended questions. Participants were 11 baccalaureate nursing students participating in a summer oncology student nursing internship between their junior and senior years. Investigators completed a content analysis of qualitative questionnaires resulted in categories of meaning, while the Wilcoxon signed-ranks test was used to compare pre and post internship scores. Aggregated mean scores from all instruments showed an increase in professionalism, role socialization, and sense of belonging from pre to post-internship, although no differences were significant. Qualitative data showed participants refined their personal philosophy of nursing and solidified their commitment to the profession. Participants did indicate, however, that the internship, combined with weekly debriefing forums and conferences, proved to have a positive impact on the students' role socialization and sense of belonging. Despite quantitative results, there is a need for longitudinal research to confirm the effect of nursing student internships on the transition from student to professional. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Command and Data Handling Branch Internship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, Rachel Mae

    2016-01-01

    Modular Integrated Stackable Layers (MISL) is a computer system designed for simple, fast, and cost effective flexible reconfiguration in space environments such as the ISS and Orion projects for various uses. Existing applications include wireless and wired communications, data acquisition and instrumentation, and camera systems, and potential applications include bus protocol converters and subsystem control. MISL is based on Texas Instruments (TI)' MSP430 16-bit ultra-low-power microcontroller device. The purpose of my project was to integrate the MISL system with a liquid crystal display (LCD) touchscreen. The LCD, manufactured by Crystalfontz and part number CFAF320240F-035T-TS, is a 320 by 240 RGB resistive color screen including an optional carrier board. The vast majority of the project was done with Altium Designer, a tool for printed circuit board (PCB) schematic capture, 3D design, and FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) development. The new PCB was to allow the LCD to directly stack to the rest of MISL. Research was done with datasheets for the TI microcontroller and touchscreen display in order to meet desired hardware specifications. Documentation on prior MISL projects was also utilized. The initial step was to create a schematic for the LCD, power bus, and data bus connections between components. A layout was then designed with the required physical dimensions, routed traces and vias, power and ground planes, layer stacks, and other specified design rules such as plane clearance and hole size. Multiple consultation sessions were held with Hester Yim, the technical discipline lead for the Command and Data Handling Branch, and Christy Herring, the lead PCB layout designer in the Electronic Design and Manufacturing Branch in order to ensure proper configuration. At the moment, the PCB is awaiting revision by the latter-mentioned branch. Afterwards, the board will begin to undergo the manufacturing and testing process. Throughout the internship at

  16. Starting them Early: Incorporating Communication Training into Undergraduate Research Internships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartel, B. A.; Morris, A. R.; Charlevoix, D.

    2014-12-01

    In order to truly broaden the impact of our scientific community, effective communication should be taught alongside research skills to developing scientists. In the summer of 2014, we incorporated an informal communications course into the 10th year of UNAVCO's Research Experiences in Solid Earth Science for Students (RESESS), a year-long internship program centered around an 11-week intensive summer research experience. The goals of the newly designed course included giving students the tools they need to make a broader impact with their science, starting now; improving the students' confidence in public speaking and using social media for outreach; and giving students the tools they need to apply for jobs or graduate school. Specifically, the course included teaching of professional communication skills, such as e-mail and phone etiquette, resume and CV tailoring, and interview techniques, and public communications skills, such as crafting and simplifying messages, visual communication for the public, and public speaking. Student interns were encouraged to step back from the details of their research projects to put their work into a big-picture context relevant to the public and to policy makers. The course benefited from input and/or participation from UNAVCO Education and Community Engagement staff, engineering and managerial staff, and graduate student interns outside the RESESS program, and University of Colorado research and communications mentors already involved in RESESS. As the summer program is already packed with research and skill development, one major challenge was fitting in teaching these communications skills amongst many other obligations: a GRE course, a peer-focused scientific communications course, a computing course, and, of course, research. Can we do it all? This presentation will provide an overview of the course planning, articulation of course goals, and execution challenges and successes. We will present our lessons learned from

  17. Improving the Indico Framework at the European Organization for Nuclear Research - Internship Report - LEIC 2006/2007 (FEUP)

    CERN Document Server

    Ferreira, Jose Pedro

    2007-01-01

    This document describes the work developed by José Pedro Macedo Alves Ferreira, Informatics Engineering and Computing (LEIC) undergraduate student at the Engineering Faculty of the University of Porto (FEUP), in the context of the project "Improving the Indico Framework". The project took place at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), in the framework of both the Technical Student Program of this organization, and the curricular internship of the aforementioned degree. The contents of this report refer to the internship period, the first half of the one-year Technical Student program. The project aimed to introduce usability improvements into an already existing web application, the Indico platform, a integrated system for event scheduling and management, which was initially developed as a European project and continued by CERN, being currently used by several institutions worldwide. Indico presented some usability issues that for long had been noticed by the users and required correction, m...

  18. Ontario Interns Fight Back: Modes of Resistance Against Unpaid Internships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Webb

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article I report on three ways that interns and those sympathetic to their plight are opposing unpaid internships, focusing on the Canadian province of Ontario as a case. First, I analyze the ways that interns engage in social activism to raise awareness about problems with unpaid internships. Second, I examine several lawsuits that interns have waged against companies in an attempt to secure back pay. Third, I analyze the Ontario Ministry of Labour’s response to the growing concerns surrounding unpaid internships, and recent proposals that aim to strengthen governmental regulations. Arguing that possibilities for change have arisen largely due to the efforts of interns themselves, I conclude each section by noting some of the strengths and limitations afforded by each type of resistance.

  19. Review of geography internship of convective wave project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rademacher, Kurt R.; Collins, Charles

    1990-01-01

    The internship of the author is examined in detail. The acquisition of the internship, the personnel of the project, the project itself, and the goals associated with it are described. The authors orientation to the internship, the project's operations, and the conclusion of the findings are also described. The overall goal of the project was to determine the effect of convective waves on wind speeds in the middle and upper troposphere, and how these waves affect the general circulation on a global scale. A more specific goal of the author was the satellite analysis of cloud street formations. This was done to determine frequency and areas in which cloud streets occur off the East Asian and North American coastlines.

  20. 'The New Degree?' Constructing Internships in the Third Sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Pauline; Halford, Susan; Bruce, Katie

    2016-04-01

    The recent economic recession has impacted substantially on the graduate labour market, with many graduates now struggling to find secure employment in professional careers. In this context, temporary, unpaid 'internships' have emerged as increasingly important as a 'way in' to work for this group. Yet while there has been much media and policy debate on internships, academic consideration has been scant. This article begins to address this knowledge gap by drawing on a study of interns in a third sector environmental organisation. The research findings reveal that unpaid internships were rationalised through a complex mix of political motivations, career ambitions and lifestyle aims, but these intersected in important ways with social class. These findings are not only of empirical interest, contributing to our knowledge of graduate negotiations of precarity, but also of theoretical value, extending our understanding of young people's agency and motivations in transitions into work.

  1. Pharmacy internship in the Nordic countries – Status and future

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stig Nørgaard, Lotte; Wallman, Andy; Bjornsdóttir, Ingunn

    2017-01-01

    Pharmacy internship in the Nordic countries – Status and future Conference Paper in Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy 13(3):e14 · May 2017 DOI: 10.1016/j.sapharm.2017.02.099 Conference: Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy......Pharmacy internship in the Nordic countries – Status and future Conference Paper in Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy 13(3):e14 · May 2017 DOI: 10.1016/j.sapharm.2017.02.099 Conference: Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy...

  2. The Influence of Problems Faced during Internships on Interns' Views of Their Profession and Their Intention to Work in the Tourism Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasli, Mehmet; Ilban, Mehmet Oguzhan

    2013-01-01

    Problem Statement: The problem of this research is identifying the difficulties that undergraduate students experience during their internships and assessing their future intention to work in the tourism industry. Purpose of Study: This research aims to identify the problems undergraduate students encounter as interns in tourism programs and to…

  3. Intentions to Apply as Internship Students on Digital Start-Up Companies in Jakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liza Agustina Maureen Nelloh

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Human capital plays an important role in explaining organizational performance and survival, not only for well-established firms but also for digital startup companies. However no previous human resource literature, especially on employers’ brand, investigates the internship program in the startup digital firms. Our pre-test shows that students are less attracted to apply to startup digital companies. Consequently, this study aims to test students’ intention to be on an internship in startup digital companies with its several antecedents (organizational attractiveness, job meaning, organizational attributes, and institutional image. My purposive sampling generates 101 business and management students in Jakarta as my sample. I run Partial Least Square (PLS to test my hypothesis. The results indicate that organizational attributes do not affect intention to be on an internship and other hypothesis tests exhibit positive results. Further, the findings also show that organizational attributes do not exhibit mediating effect. Overall, the results suggest that digital startup companies cooperate and collaborate with universities, especially business and management departments in research and student projects in order to attract the best students to be on internship on these companies that eventually will improve their performance. Abstrak Sumber Daya Manusia memegang peran penting dalam ketahanan dan peningkatan kinerja perusahaan baik berskala besar ataupun berskala startup digital. Akan tetapi, penelitian sebelumnya mengenai sumber daya manusia khususnya merek perekrut yang menguji secara khusus pada program magang yang banyak dilakukan oleh jurusan bisnis dan manajemen atau sejenisnya masih jarang dilakukan. Kemudian, hasil prates menunjukkan rendahnya ketertarikan dan keinginan mahasiswa untuk melamar di perusahaan startup digital. Oleh karena itu, penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menguji intensi melamar calon mahasiswa magang di perusahaan

  4. Internships: Tapping into China's Next Generation of Talent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Philip

    2013-01-01

    At the current juncture of China's economic development, the mismatch between the supply of university graduates and contemporary organizations' staffing demands is becoming increasingly evident. Thus, student participation in internships and their use by organizations, as means to recruit and select graduate talent in China has undergone rapid…

  5. An Innovative Interdisciplinary Approach to Providing Internships for College Seniors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Kathy

    2015-01-01

    The undergraduate Business and Human Development (HD) Departments at California State University San Marcos (CSUSM), are collaborating in an innovative interdisciplinary approach to supporting internships with local businesses in order to provide college seniors with experiences in the area of career development known as the "Senior…

  6. Blended Learning at the Boundary: Designing a New Internship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckman, Robert; Østerlund, Carsten S.; Saltz, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores how blended learning can enhance learning at the boundary between academia and industry, and make possible the design of a new kind of internship. Boundary theory proposes that socio-cultural discontinuities between different environments create opportunities for learning. Blended learning pedagogy makes it possible to make the…

  7. Comparing the Impact of Two Internship Experiences on Student Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyler, Janet

    1993-01-01

    Of 71 students in business or social service internships, 54 participated in systematic activities to integrate core curriculum with field experience. Opportunities for guided analysis and reflection enabled them to recognize curriculum relevance and develop empathy, interpersonal skills, awareness of politics, understanding of organizations, and…

  8. Blogging for Information Management, Learning, and Social Support during Internship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Samuel K. W.; Kwan, Alvin C. M.; Warning, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The functions and possibilities afforded by blogging have been suggested to be relevant to learning and information management. Its increasing use in the business and education sectors is documented, but currently its use in professional education or internship is limited. The social nature of blogging appears to support the applicability of blogs…

  9. Australian Dental Students Views on a Compulsory Internship Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalloo, Ratilal; Johnson, Newell W.; Blinkhorn, Anthony S.; Ichim, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The National Health and Hospitals Reform Commission Report suggests introducing an internship period for all newly qualified dental/oral health practitioners in Australia. This study gauged the opinions of undergraduates from three dental schools in Australia. Methods: An online survey collected demographic information on gender and…

  10. Succession planning for RNs: implementing a nurse management internship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendler, M Cecilia; Olson-Sitki, Kristi; Prater, Marsha

    2009-01-01

    The nursing shortage affects all levels, including the pivotal role of nurse managers, who may find themselves functioning in a complex, stressful work environment. In this increasingly difficult milieu, succession planning for nurse manager turnover is imperative. The authors describe an evidence-based, theoretically driven nurse management internship that allows staff nurses to explore the nurse manager role.

  11. Beyond the Classroom: Internships and Students with Special Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severance, Theresa A.; Starr, Pamela J.

    2011-01-01

    Internships and other forms of experiential learning are a valuable learning opportunity and resource for many students and perhaps even more so for those with special needs. Outside of the classroom, however, assisting students with special needs may present faculty with new questions and challenges as they navigate the transition to a community…

  12. Improving student internship through collaborative curriculum design in Ghanaian polytechnics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akomaning, Edward

    2012-01-01

    The polytechnic institutions in Ghana are required to provide hands-on training with the necessary skills and competencies to students to meet the middle level manpower needs of industry. In order to fulfil this mandate, a student internship programme is an integrated part of the training of

  13. Curriculum Innovation in Undergraduate Accounting Degree Programmes through "Virtual Internships"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayerlein, Leopold

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to discuss major criticisms of traditional undergraduate accounting programmes and to introduce virtual internships as a curriculum innovation that addresses these criticisms. Design/methodology/approach: The main aim of the paper is to inspire curriculum innovation in accounting programmes though the…

  14. Nursing reflections from journaling during a perioperative internship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuiper, Ruth Ann

    2004-01-01

    AN IMPORTANT CONCERN in nursing practice and education is the difficulties nurses experience as they transition into a new clinical area. THIS STUDY compared the reflective journals of 26 experienced and inexperienced nurses participating in a nine-week perioperative internship. THE STUDY examined self-regulated learning strategies used to enhance metacognitive critical thinking abilities.

  15. TRAINING COURSE AS AN ORGANIZATIONAL FORM OF STUDENTS’ TEACHING INTERNSHIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Isaeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The research objective is to analyze the introduction of interactive educational technologies and methods during the teaching internship. The authors consider that a pedagogical concept «teaching internship» as an interactive form of the educational organization for students can be a useful possibility. This form is aimed at the development of students’ personal qualities for their future professional and pedagogical activities. The paper presents the types of internship training focused on the development of students’ personal qualities and willingness for future vocation and teaching, such as professional teaching, research, educational–rojecting and integrated types. The methods. The teaching professional training methodology involves SWOT-analysis to help students to gain the experience in the analysis of real pedagogical situations which are relevant for a particular educational organization and for education in general. On the basis of the group expert assessment method and the pedagogical aims arrangement by B. Bloom, the authors have worked out their own specific taxonomic model for reasoned training course tasks’ development; and the readiness level diagnostics of students involved in teaching internship. The results. The authors reveal new approaches to teaching internship organization for incoming vocational education teachers. It is specially noted that the training organization on the stages of teaching practice of bachelors provides not only constant feedback with the teaching internship head or tutor allowing to correct a practical activity but significantly increases students’ willingness to complete it in various educational institutions as well. Scientific novelty. The authors not only introduce the concept of «pedagogical training» but also supplement it, defining its aims and objectives. It is proved that SWOT-analysis usage as the strategic planning method during teaching course provides internal and

  16. Increasing Underrepresented Students in Geophysics and Planetary Science Through the Educational Internship in Physical Sciences (EIPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrazas, S.; Olgin, J. G.; Enriquez, F.

    2017-12-01

    The number of underrepresented minorities pursuing STEM fields, specifically in the sciences, has declined in recent times. In response, the Educational Internship in Physical Sciences (EIPS), an undergraduate research internship program in collaboration with The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) Geological Sciences Department and El Paso Community College (EPCC), was created; providing a mentoring environment so that students can actively engage in science projects with professionals in their field so as to gain the maximum benefits in an academic setting. This past year, interns participated in planetary themed projects which exposed them to the basics of planetary geology, and worked on projects dealing with introductory digital image processing and synthesized data on two planetary bodies; Pluto and Enceladus respectively. Interns harnessed and built on what they have learned through these projects, and directly applied it in an academic environment in solar system astronomy classes at EPCC. Since the majority of interns are transfer students or alums from EPCC, they give a unique perspective and dimension of interaction; giving them an opportunity to personally guide and encourage current students there on available STEM opportunities. The goal was to have interns gain experience in planetary geology investigations and networking with professionals in the field; further promoting their interests and honing their abilities for future endeavors in planetary science. The efficacy of these activities toward getting interns to pursue STEM careers, enhance their education in planetary science, and teaching key concepts in planetary geophysics are demonstrated in this presentation.

  17. Assessing the Internship Program in Universities: Case study of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    on business skills in an effort to address a gap between theory and practice. This in essence increases the student's degree of employability after graduating from university. To address this mismatch, companies and universities have initiated ...

  18. Using open source software contributions in an internship program

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Butgereit, L

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info Butgereit_2007.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 34602 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name Butgereit_2007.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 Math on MXit: Using MXit as a... mark among high school learners in South Africa has declined. Traditional “math clubs” and “math extra lessons” often do not work because of a number of reasons including 1) it being “uncool” to be seen going to math club 2) the stigma...

  19. CERT tribal internship program. Final intern report: Karen Sandoval, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    This intern report consists of the workshop handbook for the Comprehensive Environmental and Natural Resource Management Planning workshop presented by the Council of Energy Resource Tribes. The workshop objectives were to foster and awareness of integrated resource management rationale; present the fundamental elements of an integrated approach; explain what distinguishes this approach from mainstream strategies; discuss how worldview and philosophy shape action and policy; present ways in which philosophical dexterity promotes effective management; and identify opportunities to engage and participate in integrated management. Resource articles presented at the meeting have been removed for separate processing for inclusion on the data base.

  20. CERT tribal internship program. Final intern report: David Conrad, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    The intern`s report contains a Master`s thesis entitled, ``An implementation analysis of the US Department of Energy`s American Indian policy as part of its environmental restoration and waste management mission.`` This thesis examines the implementation of a working relationship between the Nez Perce Tribe and the US Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management at the Hanford reservation. It examines the relationship using a qualitative methodology and three generations of policy analysis literature to gain a clear understanding of the potential for successful implementation.

  1. CERT tribal internship program. Final intern report: Melinda Jacquez, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of the intern project was to write a comprehensive booklet on all state legislation proposed in 1995 on Native American issues. A second purpose was to contact tribal governments and request an ordinance, law or resolution on hazardous and nuclear waste transportation. This intern report contains a summary of bills proposed in 37 state legislatures pertaining to Native American issues. Time ran out before the second project objective could be met.

  2. US Army Research Laboratory Directed Energy Internship Program 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    7 1400–1800 nm. However, when making EDFs, the solubility of Er in traditional silica ( SiO2 )-based glass is low and the ions that successfully...Thus, either half or all of the energy in a pair of excited ions could be wasted. In traditional SiO2 -based Er-doped glass (Er-SD), Er is co-doped...upconversion, Er-doped SiO2 NPs (Er-NP) are doped into the glass core of a fiber. This process is thought to create a cage of Al and O ions around each Er

  3. Using Cogenerative Dialogs to Improve Science Teaching and Learning: Challenges and Solutions in High School Students' Internships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Pei-Ling

    2018-05-01

    Internships in science research settings have received increasing attention as a means of helping students construct appropriate understandings, practices, tools, and language in scientific activities. To advance student-scientist partnerships beyond the status quo, the study aimed to investigate how cogenerative dialogs (cogens) may help high school students and scientists identify and address challenges collectively. The analysis identified nine major challenges discussed during cogens: (1) the quality and progress of scientific practice in laboratories, (2) the quality of scientists'/assistants' instructions in classrooms, (3) the quality of student participation in classrooms and homework, (4) students' absences, including arriving late or leaving early, (5) the quality of administrative support, (6) preparation for scientific presentations, (7) the process of deciding project topics, (8) students' peer interactions and communication, and (9) students' physiological needs. The three most salient challenges were "the quality and progress of scientific practice in laboratories" (39%), "the quality of scientists'/assistants' instructions in classrooms" (20%), and "the quality of student participation in classrooms and homework" (17%). The study shows that cogens allowed students and scientists to agree on teaching modifications that positively influenced teaching and learning processes during the internship, such that issues were reduced from the beginning to the closing stages. Importantly, the challenges and solutions identified by students and scientists in this study provide accounts of first-hand experience as well as insights to aid program directors or coordinators in designing a learning environment that can foster effective practice for internships by avoiding the issues identified in the study.

  4. Music therapy internship supervisors and preinternship students: a comparative analysis of questionnaires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Andrew J

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare perceptions of professional competency between preinternship music therapy students and internship supervisors. Preinternship music therapy students and internship supervisors were asked to fill out the Internship Concerns Questionnaire (ICQ-ST, student; ICQ-SU, supervisor). Participants (N = 106) included 85 students at 16 AMTA-approved universities (n = 85), and 21 internship supervisors at active AMTA national roster internship sites (n = 21). Twenty items on the ICQ were rated on a Likert-type scale, and 1 item (Part B) asked the participant to indicate any other concerns not addressed in the ICQ. Music therapy interns and supervisors differed significantly in their mean ratings on 2 of the 20 items: "Communicating with facility staff" (p = .025) and "Maintaining client confidence" (p = .016). In both cases the student interns reported a significantly lower mean level of concern about getting assistance in these areas than did their supervisors. The present study suggests that music therapy educators may better prepare music therapy students for a successful internship by evaluating the perceptual gaps in professional training expectations between students and supervisors prior to the internship. Internship supervisors may also benefit from student's own perceptions of their knowledge and skills upon beginning the internship. Ultimately, the student is responsible for being prepared to begin the process from intern to beginning professional at the start of the internship, and to commit to gaining as much as possible from the combination of academic and clinical experiences available to them.

  5. Exploring the importance of soft and hard skills as perceived by IT internship students and industry: A gap analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick Patacsil

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The research paper proposes a skills gap methodology that utilized the respondent experiences in the internship program to measure the importance of the Information Technology (IT skills gap as perceived by IT students and the industry. The questionnaires were formulated based on previous studies,  however,  was slightly modified, validated and pilot tested  to fit into the needs of the research.  Respondents  of this study were IT students enrolled in internship while industry respondents were the supervisors of the IT students in their respective company.  Internship IT students were selected since they have a strong background on the needs of the company based on their internship experience. The findings revealed that teamwork and communication skills are very important soft skills to be possessed by IT graduates  as perceived by the respondents.  Further, results reveal that there was no significant difference in the perception of the respondents in terms of the  importance of soft skills. However, this finding contradicts the results in the case of hard skills were in there was a big range of disagreement on the importance of hard skills.   IT students perceived that hard skills were very important while industry perceived hard skills were somewhat important. It is recognized that soft  skills are very important communication tool for a customer oriented industry and  that  it is essential to enhance the communication skills of IT students for their future employment. The study suggests that the university should target improvements of soft skills and specific personality development component in the curriculum.

  6. Internships and UNAVCO: Training the Future Geoscience Workforce Through the NSF GAGE Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, A. R.; MacPherson-Krutsky, C. C.; Charlevoix, D. J.; Bartel, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    Facilities are uniquely positioned to both serve a broad, national audience and provide unique workforce experience to students and recent graduates. Intentional efforts dedicated to broadening participation in the future geoscience workforce at the NSF GAGE (Geodesy Advancing Geosciences and EarthScope) Facility operated by UNAVCO, are designed to meet the needs of the next generation of students and professionals. As a university-governed consortium facilitating research and education in the geosciences, UNAVCO is well-situated to both prepare students for geoscience technical careers and advanced research positions. Since 1998, UNAVCO has offered over 165 student assistant or intern positions including engineering, data services, education and outreach, and business support. UNAVCO offers three formal programs: the UNAVCO Student Internship Program (USIP), Research Experiences in Solid Earth Science for Students (RESESS), and the Geo-Launchpad (GLP) internship program. Interns range from community college students up through graduate students and recent Masters graduates. USIP interns gain real-world work experience in a professional setting, collaborate with teams toward a common mission, and contribute their knowledge, skills, and abilities to the UNAVCO community. RESESS interns conduct authentic research with a scientist in the Front Range area as well as participate in a structured professional development series. GLP students are in their first 2 years of higher education and work alongside UNAVCO technical staff gaining valuable work experience and insight into the logistics of supporting scientific research. UNAVCO's efforts in preparing the next generation of scientists largely focuses on increasing diversity in the geosciences, whether continuing academic studies or moving into the workforce. To date, well over half of our interns and student assistants come from backgrounds historically underrepresented in the geosciences. Over 80% of former interns

  7. Problem Based Internship in Surveying and Planning Curricula

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Esben Munk; Enemark, Stig

    2006-01-01

    Programme has been divided into a 3 year Bachelor-Programme and after this a 2 year Master-Programme. It has been done as a part of a governmental policy to adapt and fulfil the Bologna-charter in all University Curricula in Denmark. A new element in the Master Programme is a problem-based internship...... economy and – leadership”. This course is organized as an e-Learning course and the student has to develop and document their skills to follow distance e-learning courses. It will prepare them to follow and organize self paced learning in virtual environment which will develop their capacity for life...... by the society to serve the community with still more new knowledge and technology transfer from the international research community. The internship and still more real world influenced problem based learning by writing thesis will be and important bridge builder in the following years....

  8. Art Struggles: Confronting Internships and Unpaid Labour in Contemporary Art

    OpenAIRE

    Panos Kompatsiaris

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the practices of recently formed and mainly UK-based art workers’ collectives against unpaid internships and abusive work. The modes through which these collectives perform resistance involve activist tactics of boycotting, site-specific protests, counter-guides, and whistleblowing and name and shame approaches mixed with performance art and playful interventions. Grappling with the predicaments of work in contemporary art, a labouring practice that does not follow typic...

  9. IT Project Management and Systems Engineering Internship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardamone, Lauren

    2011-01-01

    In the summer of 2009 I had the privilege of participating in the NASA INSPIRE program and during the summer of 2010 I was hired by ASRC Aerospace, a NASA contractor on the USTDC contract, as an Engineering Aide. These experiences combined inspired me to pursue a career in engineering and a goal to work as a NASA engineer and astronaut.

  10. Student internships with unions and workers: building the occupational health and safety movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateson, Gail

    2013-01-01

    One of the most successful programs to recruit young professionals to the occupational safety and health field was launched more than 35 years ago, in 1976. Created by the Montefiore Medical Center's Department of Social Medicine collaborating with Tony Mazzocchi of the Oil, Chemical and Atomic Workers International Union (OCAW), it placed medical, nursing, and public health students in summer internships with local unions to identify and solve health and safety problems in the workplace. The experience of working with and learning from workers about the complex interactions of political, economic, and scientific-technological issues surrounding workplace conditions inspired many students to enter and stay in our field. Many former interns went on to make important medical and scientific contributions directly linked to their union-based projects. Former interns are now among the leaders within the occupational health and safety community, holding key positions in leading academic institutions and governmental agencies.

  11. An international internship on social development led by Canadian nursing students: empowering learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanchetta, Margareth; Schwind, Jasna; Aksenchuk, Kateryna; Gorospe, Franklin F; Santiago, Lira

    2013-07-01

    A Canadian nursing student-led knowledge dissemination project on health promotion for social development was implemented with local professionals and communities in Brazil. (a) to identify how student-interns contrasted Canadian and Brazilian cultural and social realities within a primary healthcare context from a social development perspective; (b) to examine how philosophical underpinnings, including social critical theory and notions of social justice, guided student-interns in acknowledging inequalities in primary healthcare in Brazil; and (c) to participate in the debate on the contribution of Canadian nursing students to the global movement for social development. A qualitative appraisal of short-term outcomes of an international internship in the cities of Birigui & Araçatuba (São Paulo-Brazil). Four Canadian fourth-year undergraduate nursing students enrolled in a metropolitan university program. Recruitment was through an email invitation to the student-interns, who accepted, and signed informed consent forms. Their participation was unpaid and voluntary. One-time individual interviews were conducted at the end of their internships. Transcriptions of the audio-recorded interviews were coded using the qualitative software program ATLAS ti 6.0. The findings were analyzed using thematic analysis. Student-interns' learning unfolded from making associations among concepts, new ideas, and their previous experiences, leading to a personal transformation through which they established new conceptual and personal connections. The two main themes revealed by the thematic analysis were dichotomizing realities, that is, acknowledging the existence of "two sides of each situation," and discovering an unexpected reciprocity between global and urban health. Furthermore, the student-interns achieved personal and professional empowerment. The knowledge gained from the international experience helped the student-interns learn how to collaborate with Brazilian society

  12. Making the Invisible Visible: Understanding Social Processes within Multicultural Internship Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Sherrie L.; Rogers, Margaret R.

    2013-01-01

    Despite a clear need, few resources exist to guide field-based multicultural internship supervision practices in school psychology. This article draws on literature from counseling and clinical psychology and related disciplines to ground and define multicultural internship supervision within the context of school psychology professional practice.…

  13. Student Internships in Lithuania: A Stakeholder Perspective on Management and Economics Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminskiene, Lina; Rutkiene, Aušra

    2012-01-01

    The article discusses the practice of internships in Lithuanian higher education in the context of changes and challenges to educational reforms, particularly in the enhancement of relations with the labour market and related stakeholders. Higher education institutions are grappling with the changing conception, and duration, of the internship.…

  14. How Universities Can Increase Enrollment by Advertising Internships: The "Message" and the "Medium"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucciarone, Kristy

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates how universities can increase enrollment by advertising internships to prospective students during the college search process. The primary reason students earn a college degree is to secure a good-quality career with earning potential. Internships--the single most important credential for recent graduates--are the key…

  15. Internship Experiences at AGU and AGI help train the next generations of geoscientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, P. M.; Wilson, C. E.

    2017-12-01

    Each year, the American Geosciences Institute (AGI) measures internship participation among recent geoscience graduates through AGI's Geoscience Student Exit Survey. Over the past four years, internship participation among geoscience graduates has been low, particularly among bachelor's and doctoral graduates. While participation rates have been lower than expected, those that participate in fully recognize the importance of these opportunities to their academic and professional development. Internships in policy, media, publishing, and workforce and talent pool areas at the American Geophysical Union and AGI exist to provide real life work experiences for students. Internships are offered each semester for a period of three months. The skills sets required by various internships vary within our respective organizations but they all recognize the importance of writing, communication, and critical thinking or research skills. This presentation will share some case studies of students who have participated in our internships over time, their post-internship pathways into the workforce or graduate school, and the impact of their internship on their careers as well as their contributions to the organizations.

  16. Motivating Pre-Service Teachers in Technology Integration of Web 2.0 for Teaching Internships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye Jeong; Jang, Hwan Young

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the predictors of pre-service teachers' use of Web 2.0 tools during a teaching internship, after a course that emphasized the use of the tools for instructional activities. Results revealed that integrating Web 2.0 tools during their teaching internship was strongly predicted by participants' perceived…

  17. The Effect of a Campaign Internship on Political Efficacy and Trust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Mack; Klinkner, Philip

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the effect of a 10-week campaign internship course on political efficacy and trust. We compared changes in these key political attitudes between a group of 33 undergraduate students in a campaign internship course and a control group of 65 students taking government courses. A multiple regression analysis indicates that…

  18. The Needs and Concerns of Students during the Sport Management Internship Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratta, Terese M. Peretto

    2004-01-01

    To date, no empirical studies have examined the sport management internship from students' perspectives. Due to this void in the literature, the purpose of this study was to examine the needs and concerns of students when accessing and completing internships. Rather than relying solely on sport management professionals to determine the parameters…

  19. Student and Supervisor Perceptions of the Ethical Environment of Retail Merchandising Internship Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulins, V. Ann

    2001-01-01

    Senior retail merchandising students (n=37) and their internship supervisors (n=25) were surveyed about ethical practices. Perceptions of ethics did not vary by internship location. Supervisors perceived their organizations to be more ethical than students did on two of five questions. (Contains 15 references.) (SK)

  20. The Impact of Compensation, Supervision and Work Design on Internship Efficacy: Implications for Educators, Employers and Prospective Interns

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Patrick P.

    2017-01-01

    Internships are a growing, yet controversial, labour market phenomenon. In particular, the issue of unpaid internships has been the source of legislative, judicial and ethical debate. Some have criticised colleges and universities for promoting an expansion of internships for undergraduate students -- with little regard for internship…

  1. [Professional competence of the graduates of the clinical residency and internship in the speciality 31.08.10 'forensic medical expertise'].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalev, A V; Romanenko, G Kh; Makarov, I Yu; Zharov, V V; Bereznikov, A V

    The objective of the present study was the definition of the basic professional competences of the graduates of the clinical residency and internship in the speciality 31.08.10 'forensic medical expertise'. The program for the acquirement of the basic knowledge, skills, and professional competences needed to be trained in the speciality 31.08.10 'forensic medical expertise' has been elaborated in the framework of the more extensive program for the clinical residency and internship intended for the training of the highly qualified specialists in this discipline. The preliminary list of basic professional competences of a graduate from the clinical residency and internship has been formulated in accordance with the program for the training of a competitive and highly qualified forensic medical experts. The practical professional activities are considered to be an indispensable component of the training and educational process for a future forensic medical expert. It is believed that the strengthening of this training component will greatly contribute to the improvement of the quality of training of such specialists.

  2. Internships enhancing entrepreneurial intent and self-efficacy: Investigating tertiary-level entrepreneurship education programmes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melodi Botha

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Entrepreneurship education interventions are deemed effective when they enhance interns’ entrepreneurial intent (EI and entrepreneurial self-efficacy (ESE. Notwithstanding the emergence of internship as an experiential learning approach in entrepreneurship education, evidence about their potential to foster EI and ESE lacks systemisation. Aim: The aim of this study was to determine whether internships enhance EI and ESE. Furthermore, to what extent South African tertiary institutions include internships in their entrepreneurship and management curricula and the obstacles to such inclusion. Setting: South Africa has made a concerted effort to insert an entrepreneurship component across tertiary curricula. The evolution of this entrepreneurship component to experiential learning approaches is, however, unclear. Methods: A qualitative research approach was followed. Firstly, it reviewed empirical evidence for the positive relationship between internships and EI and ESE. Secondly, it conducted a survey of entrepreneurship and business management programmes at all 23 South African tertiary institutions and content analysed the retrieved information to determine whether such programmes include internships. Finally, 10 experts were interviewed to unveil the constraints inhibiting the inclusion of internships in tertiary curricula. Results: The results revealed empirical support for the positive influence of internships on both EI and ESE. Significant lack of inclusion of internships in tertiary curricula in South Africa emerged, owing mainly to administrative issues, curriculum re-design challenges, and lack of mentoring capacity. Conclusion: Tertiary-level entrepreneurship education programmes should include an internship component. The paper suggested that tertiary institutions pilot-test the inclusion of internships with a small number of students and a selected cohort of small business owners.

  3. Art Struggles: Confronting Internships and Unpaid Labour in Contemporary Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panos Kompatsiaris

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the practices of recently formed and mainly UK-based art workers’ collectives against unpaid internships and abusive work. The modes through which these collectives perform resistance involve activist tactics of boycotting, site-specific protests, counter-guides, and whistleblowing and name and shame approaches mixed with performance art and playful interventions. Grappling with the predicaments of work in contemporary art, a labouring practice that does not follow typical processes of valorization and has a contingent object and an extremely loose territorial unity, this article argues that while the identity of the contemporary artist is systemically and conceptually moving towards fluidity and open-endedness, these groups work to reaffirm a collective in whose name it is possible to advance certain claims, assumptions, and demands. The contradictions and dynamics of art workers organizing against internships and voluntary work within a highly individualized, self-exploitative, and often privileged field are useful for informing labour organizing in the framework of ongoing capitalist restructuring.

  4. What You Should Get from a Professionally Oriented Master's Degree Program in Technical Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carliner, Saul

    1992-01-01

    Cites reasons for pursuing a curriculum in technical communication, lists objectives a program should achieve, and outlines a four-part program that includes theory, professional skills, technical proficiency, and an internship. Lists schools offering programs in technical communication. (SR)

  5. Post internship student-industry collaborative projects - as vehicle for the realization of challenging parts of the CDIO syllabus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lotte Bjerregaard

    2014-01-01

    Architectural engineering the 5 month internship period is placed early in the curriculum, after 4 semesters of study. It is obviously more challenging to find industry internships for students that are at an early stage in their studies because they need more supervision. However the investment is worth...... the trouble because the post internship curriculum is provided with pedagogical means to address parts of the syllabus that are on an advanced level in the learning taxonomy. The interface between the internship period and post internship student-industry collaborative projects is an important point of focus...

  6. Pharmaceutical assistance within the SUS: the experience of students in Rural Internship from a Pharmacy Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Tarbes Mattana Saturnino

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The 2002 Brazilian Curricular Lines established a new curriculum for Pharmacy Programs, including amplified information about the Unified Health System (SUS. Following this, some Colleges have implemented a Rural Internship (RI discipline, as a way to promote: a adequate information on the SUS, and b students' interaction with pharmaceutical assistance. In this study we analyzed the perceptions of students enrolled in the Rural Internship program of the undergraduate Pharmacy Program at the Federal University of Minas Gerais. Eight students participated in this study and their perceptions and ideas were obtained by focus groups, both before and after the RI. This information was analyzed by content analysis. The students had a fragmented, distorted view on assistance, before as well as after taking the RI. Nevertheless, the RI provided students with a view of the professional realities and difficulties routinely faced by pharmacists in the public health system. The RI course of the Pharmacy Programs was viewed as an opportunity to improve the professional work within the SUS.As Diretrizes Curriculares de 2002 implantaram um novo currículo para o Curso de Farmácia, trazendo como propósito a aprendizagem para o Sistema Único de Saúde (SUS. Para atender a esta demanda, algumas Faculdades têm implantado a disciplina de Internato Rural (IR como forma de viabilizar o ensino para o SUS e a interação do aluno com a assistência farmacêutica. Este trabalho analisa a concepção de alunos do IR do Curso de Farmácia da Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais sobre a assistência farmacêutica e sobre a atividade do profissional farmacêutico no SUS. A coleta das informações foi realizada por meio da técnica do grupo focal antes e após o IR. Para a análise dos discursos foi utilizada a técnica da análise de conteúdo. Participaram do estudo oito estudantes. Observou-se que os alunos apresentavam uma visão fragmentada sobre a assist

  7. The role of tourism and hospitality companies in ensuring an effective internship process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agita Doniņa

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Tourism and hospitality education has only been provided in Latvia as a separate curriculum relatively recently. According to legislation, the curriculum should consist of study courses, internships and the state exam. Cooperation between all stakeholders is crucial in order to achieve the goal of internship – to increase students’ knowledge and to develop skills in the study area chosen. The purpose of this study is to explore cooperation between higher educational establishments and companies targeted at enhancing students’ employability skills. The survey was conducted in Latvia by addressing managers of 154 tourism and hospitality industry companies in 2014. The findings showed that only 51.30% of the companies plan interns’ job assignment during internship on the basis of an internship programme and in 35.06% of the cases higher educational establishments do not contact internship companies for feedback at all. This means that, despite the importance of internships in developing students’ skills, cooperation among all stakeholders does not proceed in the best possible manner. It is suggested to improve cooperation at all stages of internship – at the planning, organisational and control stages.

  8. A plea for quality in internship programmes – evidence from the business and administration students’ experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goia Simona

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The career of business students is nowadays definitely influenced by their involvement in different internships and volunteering activities. The internship programmes help them understand the context of business organisations and decide what field of activity is most suitable for their professional life. However, sometimes internship programmes are not very well organised and influence in a negative manner students′ final perception of a certain domain. Our research identified and analysed the main factors that might influence the quality of an internship programme from students′ perspective. The quantitative analysis relies on a questionnaire based survey among over 450 students from one of the most prestigious universities in Romania in the field of economics and business administration. By running factor analysis, we identified five factors which mainly determine the quality of internships: Job arrangements, Mentorship and employability benefits, Learning content, Academic supervision, Bureaucracy and accessibility. Subsequently we measured through multiple regression the way the identified factors influence the quality of the internships. We consider that the results of the study are relevant not only for academics but also for students and business organisations that have the power and instruments to improve internship programmes and the entire experience for all stakeholders involved.

  9. Industrial Internship and Entrepreneurship Competencies on Vocational High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendi, H. F.; Kusumah, I. H.

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of the research is to explore the influence of internship and vocational skill to student’s entrepreneurship competencies. The research used ex post facto approach. Population in this research is all students of Vocational High School in Bandung, Indonesia. The sample of 40 respondents was determined by proportional random sampling technique. The data were collected by instrument questionnaire and test. Data analysis used descriptive statistics and multiple linear regression. The results show that almost half students have a low the competencies of an entrepreneur. The hypothesis testing shows many the influence of factory teaching has a positive and significant effect on the competencies of an entrepreneur. Similarly, vocational skills have positive influence and significant on the competencies of an entrepreneur. Respectively, the influence of factory teaching and vocational skills expertise collectively have the effect on the competencies of an entrepreneur. Therefore, the influence of factory teaching and vocational skills are effective to student’s entrepreneurship cap competencies.

  10. Integrating research into clinical internship training bridging the science/practice gap in pediatric psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuaid, Elizabeth L; Spirito, Anthony

    2012-03-01

    Existing literature highlights a critical gap between science and practice in clinical psychology. The internship year is a "capstone experience"; training in methods of scientific evaluation should be integrated with the development of advanced clinical competencies. We provide a rationale for continued exposure to research during the clinical internship year, including, (a) critical examination and integration of the literature regarding evidence-based treatment and assessment, (b) participation in faculty-based and independent research, and (c) orientation to the science and strategy of grantsmanship. Participation in research provides exposure to new empirical models and can foster the development of applied research questions. Orientation to grantsmanship can yield an initial sense of the "business of science." Internship provides an important opportunity to examine the challenges to integrating the clinical evidence base into professional practice; for that reason, providing research exposure on internship is an important strategy in training the next generation of pediatric psychologists.

  11. Integrating Research Into Clinical Internship Training Bridging the Science/Practice Gap in Pediatric Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spirito, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Existing literature highlights a critical gap between science and practice in clinical psychology. The internship year is a “capstone experience”; training in methods of scientific evaluation should be integrated with the development of advanced clinical competencies. We provide a rationale for continued exposure to research during the clinical internship year, including, (a) critical examination and integration of the literature regarding evidence-based treatment and assessment, (b) participation in faculty-based and independent research, and (c) orientation to the science and strategy of grantsmanship. Participation in research provides exposure to new empirical models and can foster the development of applied research questions. Orientation to grantsmanship can yield an initial sense of the “business of science.” Internship provides an important opportunity to examine the challenges to integrating the clinical evidence base into professional practice; for that reason, providing research exposure on internship is an important strategy in training the next generation of pediatric psychologists. PMID:22286345

  12. Media and Cultural Industries Internships: A Thematic Review and Digital Labor Parallels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Corrigan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews existing research on the motivations and experiences of interns in media and cultural industries. Digital labour theories are used to organize and make sense of the existing internship literature. Throughout the article, parallels are also drawn between the experiences of interns and those of digital creative labourers—both professionals and peer producers. Three key themes are identified within the internship literature: 1 interns derive satisfaction from work they con- sider meaningful, particularly hands-on work executed under the training and trust of effective supervisors; 2 interns see their work as future-oriented investments in their skills, professional networks, and personal brands; and 3 the ambiguity and professional necessity of media and cultural industries internships make them fertile ground for exploitation and self-exploitation. In conclusion, I argue that attentiveness to meaning, temporality, and ambiguity will be essential to future critical investigations of internships.

  13. [Nursing Internship Internal Medicine: Evaluation and Influences on the Attitude towards the Specialization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirkner, Janine; Stracke, Sylvia; Lange, Anja; Dabers, Thomas; Merk, Harry; Kasch, Richard

    2017-08-01

    Background  German medical students have to perform a nursery internship of three month duration. While this internship is widely discussed, there is a lack of student evaluation data. Objectives  Here, for the first time, student evaluation of a nursery internship in internal medicine (IM) is investigated. Moreover, the question was raised, whether the early experience during this internship may influence students' attitude towards the specialty. Methods  In a nation-wide online-survey, 767 German medical students (mean age 22.8 years; 58 % female) evaluated a nursery internship on an IM ward concerning integration in medical teams, teachers, structure and quality of teaching, and satisfaction. Multivariate comparisons were conducted following the question, whether students could imagine choosing IM for a clinical elective after this nursery internship. Results  71 % of the students felt well integrated in the medical team, most was learned from the nurses, and most students indicated having acquired nursing skills. Only 19 % evaluated the structure of the internship as good, and 40 % indicated that they reached the learning goals. Students who could imagine performing an IM clinical elective (52 %) gave best evaluations on all items. Conclusions  A successful nursery internship can promote students' interest in the specialty of internal medicine. But, there is a strong need for improvement in structure and content, including the, to date missing, definition of learning targets, regarding this first practical experience in medical studies. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. (Devaluing Intern Labour: Journalism Internship Pay Rates and Collective Representation in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Errol Salamon

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Unpaid journalism internships have attracted increasing media coverage, but they have received limited scholarly attention. This paper traces the connections between trade unions (in unionized media organizations and the labour conditions marking journalism internships. While some unions can be complicit in sustaining the exploitation and devaluation of interns with regard to the standard market value of entry-level labour, other unions have fought to establish internships, locking higher salaries into collective agreements. Building on the concept of precarity, this article surveys internships at 19 mainstream English-language newspapers and magazines in Canada. It draws on documentary evidence from and personal communication with labour unions and journalism organizations, internship advertisements, and media coverage to offer a typology of the relationships between pay rates and collective representation within journalism internships: unpaid/low paid and not under union jurisdiction; unpaid/low paid and under union jurisdiction; paid at intern rates and not under union jurisdiction; paid at intern rates and under union jurisdiction; and paid at entry-level employee rates and under union jurisdiction.

  15. 2013 Iowa DOT engineering intern development and management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    The Institute for Transportation (InTrans) at Iowa State University (ISU) developed an internship mentoring program in collaboration : with the Iowa Department of Transportation (DOT) to provide additional mentorship to both student interns and Iowa ...

  16. Field research internships: Why they impact students' decisions to major in the geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortz, K. M.; Cardace, D.; Savage, B.; Rieger, D.

    2017-12-01

    Although internships have been shown to retain geoscience students, little research has been done on what components of research or field experiences during an internship impact students' decisions to major in the geosciences. We created and led a short, two-week field-based internship for 5 introductory-level students to conduct research and create a poster to present their results. In addition to the two professors leading the internship and the 5 interns, there were 2 masters students and 1 community college student who were returning to the field area to collect data for their own projects. These students also helped to guide and mentor the interns. The interns were diverse in many aspects: 3 were female, 2 were non-white, 3 were community college students (1 4YC student was a transfer), 2 were first-generation college students, and their ages ranged from 18 to 33. Based on our evaluation, we found that the research experience increased students' self-efficacy in the geosciences through various means, increased their connection with mentors and other individuals who could serve as resources, gave them a sense of belonging to the geoscience culture, increased their knowledge of geoscience career paths and expectations, helped them make connections with Earth, and maintained their interest. These factors have been described in the literature as leading to retention, and we propose that field-based internships are successful for recruitment or retention in the geosciences because they influence so many of these affective and cognitive components at once. In particular, the social aspect of internships plays a fundamental role in their success because many of these factors require close and sustained interactions with other people. An implication of this research is that these affective components, including social ones, should be explicitly considered in the design and implementation of internships to best serve as a recruitment and retention strategy.

  17. Comparative values of medical school assessments in the prediction of internship performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ming; Vermillion, Michelle

    2018-02-01

    Multiple undergraduate achievements have been used for graduate admission consideration. Their relative values in the prediction of residency performance are not clear. This study compared the contributions of major undergraduate assessments to the prediction of internship performance. Internship performance ratings of the graduates of a medical school were collected from 2012 to 2015. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were used to examine the predictive values of undergraduate measures assessing basic and clinical sciences knowledge and clinical performances, after controlling for differences in the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT). Four hundred eighty (75%) graduates' archived data were used in the study. Analyses revealed that clinical competencies, assessed by the USMLE Step 2 CK, NBME medicine exam, and an eight-station objective structured clinical examination (OSCE), were strong predictors of internship performance. Neither the USMLE Step 1 nor the inpatient internal medicine clerkship evaluation predicted internship performance. The undergraduate assessments as a whole showed a significant collective relationship with internship performance (ΔR 2  = 0.12, p < 0.001). The study supports the use of clinical competency assessments, instead of pre-clinical measures, in graduate admission consideration. It also provides validity evidence for OSCE scores in the prediction of workplace performance.

  18. Utilization of mathematics amongst healthcare students towards problem solving during their occupational safety health internship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umasenan a/l Thanikasalam

    2017-05-01

    Occupational safety health is a multidisciplinary discipline concentrating on the safety, health and welfare of workers in the working place. Healthcare Students undergoing Occupational Safety Health internships are required to apply mathematical in areas such as safety legislation, safety behavior, ergonomics, chemical safety, OSH practices, industrial hygiene, risk management and safety health practices as problem solving. The aim of this paper is to investigate the level of mathematics and logic utilization from these students during their internship looking at areas of Hazard identification, Determining the population exposed to the hazard, Assessing the risk of the exposure to the hazards and Taking preventive and control. A total of 142 returning healthcare students from their Occupational Safety Health, internship were given a questionnaire to measure their perceptions towards mathematical and logic utilization. The overall results indicated a strong positive skewed result towards the use of Mathematics during their internship. The findings showed that mathematics were well delivered by the students during their internship. Mathematics could not be separated from OSH practice as a needed precision in quantifying safety, health an d welfare of workers in addition to empiricism.

  19. Practical Liability Issues of Information Technology Education: Internship and Consulting Engagements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A. Peak

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available This article examines university liability created by internship and consulting relationships. Business clients participating in outreach relationships formulate performance expectations based on perceptions of experience and / or qualifications. Clients assign tasks accordingly, and the university incurs liability that is conditioned by business clients’ expectations. Substantial liability is related to unusually large and rare unfavorable outcomes in the outreach engagement, known as tail events. Tail events can significantly and negatively impact the client. Both the liability for and the probability of tail events increase as universities continue to expand business outreach activities. As internship and consulting engagements increase, the probability of a tail event also increases. The responsibilities of IT intern engagements and potential liability of the sponsoring university are analyzed. The university is the primary insurer for the client and indemnifies its representatives. All internship engagements should be formalized by written contract. An example contract is attached.

  20. A novel paradigm for engineering education: virtual internships with individualized mentoring and assessment of engineering thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesler, Naomi C; Ruis, A R; Collier, Wesley; Swiecki, Zachari; Arastoopour, Golnaz; Williamson Shaffer, David

    2015-02-01

    Engineering virtual internships are a novel paradigm for providing authentic engineering experiences in the first-year curriculum. They are both individualized and accommodate large numbers of students. As we describe in this report, this approach can (a) enable students to solve complex engineering problems in a mentored, collaborative environment; (b) allow educators to assess engineering thinking; and (c) provide an introductory experience that students enjoy and find valuable. Furthermore, engineering virtual internships have been shown to increase students'-and especially women's-interest in and motivation to pursue engineering degrees. When implemented in first-year engineering curricula more broadly, the potential impact of engineering virtual internships on the size and diversity of the engineering workforce could be dramatic.

  1. Nothing for Money and Your Work for Free: Internships and the Marketing of Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Einstein

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available American universities have significantly increased their marketing expenditures over the last decade. The high cost of education, reductions in government funding, and precipitous declines in the traditional college-aged population (18-21 year olds are some of the key factors forcing universities to be more aggressive with the promotional techniques they use to attract prospective students. In this competitive marketplace, schools promote the attributes they believe will be most compelling to high schoolers and their parents, including academics, sports, campus life, and careers. Tied into this last factor is the promotion of internship opportunities. While some of these hands-on experiences lead to jobs, there are no guarantees that attending college and engaging in an internship will translate into full-time employment. Using content analysis and auto-ethnography, I examine how universities use internships to market higher education, and argue that this is a particularly pernicious practice within the area of media studies.

  2. An Exploratory Study of the Effect of Professional Internships on Students' Perception of the Importance of Employment Traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Brian Patrick; Graybeal, Patricia; Madison, Roland L.

    2011-01-01

    The authors measured the effects of a formal internship on students' perceptions of the importance of traits employees consider during the hiring process. Prior studies have reported that accounting firms perceive students with internship experience as better entry-level accountants. This perception may be related to changes in student beliefs…

  3. Professional Identity Development of Teacher Candidates Participating in an Informal Science Education Internship: A Focus on Drawings as Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Phyllis; McGinnis, J. Randy; Hestness, Emily; Riedinger, Kelly; Marbach-Ad, Gili; Dai, Amy; Pease, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the professional identity development of teacher candidates participating in an informal afterschool science internship in a formal science teacher preparation programme. We used a qualitative research methodology. Data were collected from the teacher candidates, their informal internship mentors, and the researchers. The…

  4. Perspectives of Turkish Intern and Non-Intern Students towards Sport Management Internship within the Context of Field Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coknaz, Dilsad

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine differences between intern and non-intern students in terms of their perspectives on sport management internship within the context of field experience. The subjects of the study were a total of 189 students. They were 4th year students who completed their internship and 3rd year students who were yet to…

  5. Professional Development for Graduate Students through Internships at Federal Labs: an NSF/USGS Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, E.; Jones, E.; Patino, L. C.; Wasserman, E.; Isern, A. R.; Davies, T.

    2016-12-01

    In 2013 the White House initiated an effort to coordinate STEM education initiatives across federal agencies. This idea spawned several important collaborations, one of which is a set of National Science Foundation programs designed to place graduate students in federal labs for 2-12 months of their Ph.D. training. The Graduate Research Internship Program (GRIP) and the Graduate Student Preparedness program (GSP) each have the goal of exposing PhD students to the federal work environment while expanding their research tools and mentoring networks. Students apply for supplementary support to their Graduate Research Fellowship (GRIP) or their advisor's NSF award (GSP). These programs are available at several federal agencies; the USGS is one partner. At the U.S. Geological Survey, scientists propose projects, which students can find online by searching USGS GRIP, or students and USGS scientists can work together to develop a research project. At NSF, projects are evaluated on both the scientific merit and the professional development opportunities they afford the student. The career development extends beyond the science (new techniques, data, mentors) into the professional activity of writing the proposal, managing the budget, and working in a new and different environment. The USGS currently has 18 GRIP scholars, including Madeline Foster-Martinez, a UC Berkeley student who spent her summer as a GRIP fellow at the USGS Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center working with USGS scientist Jessica Lacy. Madeline's Ph.D. work is on salt marshes and she has studied geomorphology, accretion, and gas transport using a variety of research methods. Her GRIP fellowship allowed her to apply new data-gathering tools to the question of sediment delivery to the marsh, and build and test a model for sediment delivery along marsh edges. In addition, she gained professional skills by collaborating with a new team of scientists, running a large-scale field deployment, and

  6. Skills learned through professional internships can contribute to higher confidence in students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamalavage, A.

    2014-12-01

    Through completing an internship, a student has the opportunity to learn skills that may not be typically emphasized in the classroom. Students can create a unique professional identity by participating in internships that may be relevant to their career path. The diversity of internships can also allow a student to try an experience in a job that may be away from their assumed career trajectory, contributing to students finding where their skills could fit best. I have learned a core set of skills that have supported my transition from an undergraduate degree through two internships in both a non-profit organization and an oil and gas company. This presentation will include an analysis of the project management and communication skills that have given me "real-world" experience to understand what skills could be useful in pursuing a career in the Earth sciences. I believed that participation in clubs, mentoring assignments, and classes abroad during my undergraduate were fully providing me with the fundamental skills to enter the professional job market. Although I did learn time management, facilitation and collaboration, I did not fully gauge the necessity of a crucial understanding of these skills in the workplace. My skills using collaborative work have strengthened most since finishing my undergraduate degree. Through group work at each of my internships, I learned clear communication, management, respect, financial responsibility and how to fulfill an obligation towards a common goal. Without strengthening those skills, I do not think I would be pursuing a graduate degree in the Earth sciences with confidence. The essential skills I have learned have furthered my assurance to approach a problem with certainty when developing a hypothesis, seeking help from others, and developing a solution. This presentation will suggest further research and how specific feedback can be gathered from other Earth science students who have completed internships. With further

  7. Planetary Science Education - Workshop Concepts for Classrooms and Internships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musiol, S.; Rosenberg, H.; Rohwer, G.; Balthasar, H.; van Gasselt, S.

    2014-12-01

    the Martian surface and presented their results in the end. Extensive handouts and high-quality print material supplemented face-to-face exercises. For the future we plan to expand our workshop concepts, to give students the possibility of conducting a week-long internship with our Planetary Sciences research group.

  8. "What" and "how" does a mentor teacher learn during a secondary science teacher candidate's internship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashmann, Scott A.

    Teaching science for understanding is hard work. Not many teachers leave a teacher education program sufficiently prepared to engage in this practice. In fact, many veteran teachers struggle with this complicated task, so effective professional development is needed. One approach that may hold some promise is being a mentor teacher to an intern. To investigate this possibility, the following central question guided this study: "What" and "how" does a secondary science teacher learn about the practices of teaching from the experience of being a mentor teacher for a science intern? A conceptual framework based on three planes of focus was utilized in this study. These planes are (a) a focus on the larger learning community and context, (b) a focus on the local learning community and activities, and (c) a focus on learners and purposes. Data were collected on two focus mentor teachers. These data included observations of interactions between the mentor and intern, responses to clarifying questions, interviews with other science teachers, and observations of both the mentor and the intern teaching lessons. Relationships among the characteristics of the context of the school and science department with the mentor teacher's theory of learning and teaching practices and the patterns of practice the mentor used in responding to specific occasions for learning were explored. It was found that these characteristics are related to five elements of mentor teacher learning: the social environment, resource use, defining tasks, the learning process, and the nature of a satisfactory conclusion. Two conclusions were made. The first was that remarkably detailed parallels exist among key elements in the context in which a mentor teacher works, the mentor teacher's approaches to teaching and learning, and the mentor's response to occasions for learning during the internship. The second was that differences among mentors in these key elements could account for differences in "what

  9. 42 CFR 68a.1 - What is the scope and purpose of the NIH Clinical Research Loan Repayment Program for Individuals...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) CLINICAL RESEARCH LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAM FOR... to the award of educational loan payments under the NIH Clinical Research Loan Repayment Program for... relative to income, to conduct clinical research as NIH employees. ...

  10. Supervision in Physical Education Teacher Education Programs: Making the Case for Paired Placements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidorn, Brent; Jenkins, Deborah Bainer

    2015-01-01

    Many student teaching experiences in physical education teacher education programs face challenges related to supervision and realistic preparation for the workplace. This article suggests paired placements as a model for effective supervision and increased collaboration during the student teaching internship.

  11. Evaluation of the industrial internship for the Diploma IT programme at DTU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyborg, Mads; Høgh, Stig; Lauridsen, Pia

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present the result of analyzing data based on more than 5 years’ systematic collection of questionnaire survey data on the evaluation of the industrial internship for the Diploma IT programme at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU). Since 2005, we have been tutors for all...

  12. Recruiting Science Majors into Secondary Science Teaching: Paid Internships in Informal Science Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsham, Heather M.; Friedrichsen, Patricia; Soucie, Marilyn; Barnett, Ellen; Akiba, Motoko

    2014-01-01

    Despite the importance of recruiting highly qualified individuals into the science teaching profession, little is known about the effectiveness of particular recruitment strategies. Over 3 years, 34 college science majors and undecided students were recruited into paid internships in informal science settings to consider secondary science teaching…

  13. Integration of Web-Enhanced Pedagogy. Teaching Ethical Decision-Making through Internship Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crutsinger, Christy; Tas, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Internships provide an important link between education and industry as students gain realistic views of the work world and broader perspectives of job opportunities. In their formative work experiences, students may encounter ethical situations they are ill equipped to handle. For example, they may experience harassment from fellow coworkers or …

  14. HOW DO KNOWLEDGE AND SELF-EFFICACY OF INTERNSHIP NURSING STUDENTS IN PERFORMING CARDIOPULMONARY RESUSCITATION?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selly Desiani

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR is the emergency first aid in cardiac arrest. CPR delivery is influenced by knowledge and self-efficacy. Internship students can be the first responder of cardiac arrest in hospital and expected on having knowledge and high self-efficacy of CPR early. But there is no data on self-efficacy of internship students in performing CPR. Objective: The purpose of this research was to identify knowledge and self-efficacy of internship students in performing CPR. Methods: The method in this research was descriptive quantitative with cross-sectional approach on 76 internship students selected by simple random sampling. Knowledge questionnaire and Resuscitation Self-Efficacy Scale instrument were used in this research, with validity score 0.56-0.84 (α=0.91. Data were analysed by distribution frequency. Results: The results showed that 49 respondents (64.5% had moderate knowledge and 73 respondents (96.1% had high self-efficacy. The lowest domain in knowledge was conceptual knowledge, while in self-efficacy were reporting, debriefing and recording. Conclusions: Therefore, it becomes important to increase information on the conceptual knowledge and enhances training on the self-efficacy domain: reporting; debriefing and recording.

  15. Developing Leadership through "Serviceship": Leveraging the Intersection between Service-Learning and Professional Internship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, Lindsay J.; Wall, Milan; Mantonya, Kurt

    2018-01-01

    Considering the role of higher education in preparing the next generation of leaders for social change, leadership education is challenged to consider how best to prepare young adults for socially responsible leadership. Service-learning and professional internships, separately, have been identified as vehicles for preparing young adults for…

  16. A Desktop Publishing Course: An Alternative to Internships for Rural Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flammia, Madelyn

    1992-01-01

    Suggests that a course in desktop publishing can provide students at rural schools with experience equivalent to internships. Notes that the course provided students with real-world experience and benefited the university in terms of services and public relations. (RS)

  17. Ethical Tensions and Dilemmas Experienced in a Northern Ugandan Social Work Internship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbin, Joanne

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the ethical tensions and dilemmas that arose for 2 U.S. social work students during an 8-month international clinical internship in northern Uganda. These students encountered cultural differences related to issues of confidentiality, autonomy, and self-determination. Student experiences were analyzed using the cultural…

  18. United nations internship programme policy and the need for its amendment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novaković Marko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An internship at the United Nations is an opportunity that young people interested in international law, international relations, and many other fields, perceive as he best possible career starting point - and rightfully so. The United Nations internship is an experience second to none in the world of international organizations and this is why it must be available to the widest range of people, regardless of their status, place of birth and social context. However, the current United Nations internship policy is very controversial and in desperate need of a change. While voices for change of policy are raised more and more, this topic has been very rarely addressed in academic literature across the world and papers and books dealing exclusively with this issue are almost non-existent. In this article, the author will address the main points of the concern regarding unpaid internship and will offer potential solutions for its improvement. This article is a humble contribution that will hopefully instigate wider academic acknowledgment of this problem and eventually contribute to the resolution of this unfortunate practice.

  19. Mechanisms of formation of maladaptation states among internship doctors and approaches to their correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Vyun

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A doctor’s adaptation to medical activity has a great influence on the effectiveness of his professional activity. The objective: to explore individual psychological predictors of the formation of maladaptation states of internship doctors for the development of a system for their diagnosis, correction and psychoprophylaxis. A comprehensive clinical-psychological, psychodiagnostic and clinical-anamnestic examination of 213 internship doctors of the first year of training atKharkovNationalMedicalUniversity, 116 women and 97 men, aged 22-25 years old had been conducted. It had been established that internship doctors are characterized by feelings of internal tension and dissatisfaction, decreased mood, irritability, anxiety, long-term uncertain negative emotions, unmotivated fears, self-doubt, doubts about making decisions, decline in intellectual activityin conjunction with increased exhaustion and withdrawal mercurial attention. We have developed a system of medical and psychological support during the professional training period depending on the type of disadaptation. The psychotherapeutic complex in the internship doctors included the use of rational psychotherapy, autogenous training (psychotonic version of Shogham-Mirovsky, art therapy, progressive muscle relaxation by Jacobson, cognitive-behavioral therapy of Beck, autogenous training in the modification of Lebedinsky - Bortnik, etc. were used. The results of a three-year catamnestic study proved the effectiveness of the proposed system of psychotherapeutic correction of disorders of adaptation, positive dynamics of the mental state was noted, the maladaptive states were reduced; 92.6% of the examined recurrences of the violations of adaptation did not occur.

  20. Experiencing a Social Network in an Organizational Context: The Facebook Internship

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEachern, Robert W.

    2011-01-01

    As Facebook becomes increasingly more popular as a communication tool for businesses and organizations, it is important that our students learn to transfer personal Facebook skills to professional settings. This article focuses on the lessons learned by two students who used Facebook as part of a social media internship, as well as what the author…

  1. The Effect of Internship and a Personal Trait on Career Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braswell, Cara Mia C.; Cobia, Debra

    Applying Social Cognitive Career Theory to preservice teachers, a study examined to what extent dispositional optimism and a subjective sense of performance during an internship predict changes in career self-efficacy. The study first determined whether a sample of preservice teachers experienced positive changes in career self-efficacy after an…

  2. Song of the Open Road: Business Students Blog about Tacit Knowledge in Their Internships

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, Arlene O.

    2010-01-01

    Student interns produce professional blogs, using Web 2.0, to capture tacit knowledge concepts which are the experiential learning goals of internships in business education. This article discusses the pedagogical goals, methods and outcomes of this initiative. It also provides the theoretical underpinnings of the concept of tacit knowledge in…

  3. Students' Experiences of Clinic-Based Learning during a Final Year Veterinary Internship Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew, Susan M.; Taylor, Rosanne M.; Ellis, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated veterinary students' experiences of clinic-based learning (CBL) during a comprehensive final year internship programme. Open-ended surveys (n = 93) were used to gather qualitative data about students' conceptions of what is learned during CBL and their approaches to learning in clinics. Phenomenography was used for detailed…

  4. Lifelong Learning: The Value of an Industrial Internship for a Graduate Student Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Gregory S.; Pazmino, Jorge H.; Hickman, Daniel A.; Varma, Arvind

    2015-01-01

    A chemical engineering PhD student from Purdue University completed an internship at The Dow Chemical Company, evaluating the effect of scale on the hydrodynamics of a trickle bed reactor. A unique aspect of this work was that it arose from an ongoing collaboration, so that the project was within the scope of the graduate student's thesis. This…

  5. Undergraduate Internship Supervision in Psychology Departments: Use of Experiential Learning Best Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Sarah F.; Barber, Larissa K.; Nelson, Videl L.

    2017-01-01

    This study examined trends in how psychology internships are supervised compared to current experiential learning best practices in the literature. We sent a brief online survey to relevant contact persons for colleges/universities with psychology departments throughout the United States (n = 149 responded). Overall, the majority of institutions…

  6. Teaching Sociology Students to Become Qualitative-Researchers Using an Internship Model of Learner-Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolich, Martin; Scarth, Bonnie; Shephard, Kerry

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the experiences of final year undergraduate sociology students enrolled in an internship course where they researched a local community project, mostly in small groups, for a client. A sociology lecturer supervised their projects. Course-related outcomes were assessed using conventional university procedures but a research…

  7. Kennedy Space Center: Constellation Program Electrical Ground Support Equipment Research and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Keegan

    2010-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is NASA's spaceport, launching rockets into space and leading important human spaceflight research. This spring semester, I worked at KSC on Constellation Program electrical ground support equipment through NASA's Undergraduate Student Research Program (USRP). This report includes a discussion of NASA, KSC, and my individual research project. An analysis of Penn State's preparation of me for an internship and my overall impressions of the Penn State and NASA internship experience conclude the report.

  8. Partial Support of MAST Academy Outreach Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-05-25

    Another very positive aspect of the student-mentor relationship occured when young women served their internship with a woman scientist or the... siences has indirectly led to the initiation of similar programs in other academic areas. APPENDIX A JOB DESCRIPTIONS FOR MAST ACADEMY OUTREACH PROGRAM

  9. ARL/OMS Consultant Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euster, Joanne R.

    1982-01-01

    Describes Academic Library Consultant Training Program begun in 1979, sponsored by Office of Management Studies (OMS) and designed to provide 80 consultants to aid academic libraries in improving performance. Viewpoints are included from OMS Director and participants concerning program objectives, trainee selection, workshops, internships, and the…

  10. Functional Programming in Computer Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Loren James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Davis, Marion Kei [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-01-19

    We explore functional programming through a 16-week internship at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Functional programming is a branch of computer science that has exploded in popularity over the past decade due to its high-level syntax, ease of parallelization, and abundant applications. First, we summarize functional programming by listing the advantages of functional programming languages over the usual imperative languages, and we introduce the concept of parsing. Second, we discuss the importance of lambda calculus in the theory of functional programming. Lambda calculus was invented by Alonzo Church in the 1930s to formalize the concept of effective computability, and every functional language is essentially some implementation of lambda calculus. Finally, we display the lasting products of the internship: additions to a compiler and runtime system for the pure functional language STG, including both a set of tests that indicate the validity of updates to the compiler and a compiler pass that checks for illegal instances of duplicate names.

  11. Internship workplace preferences of final-year medical students at Zagreb University Medical School, Croatia: all roads lead to Zagreb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polasek, Ozren; Kolcic, Ivana; Dzakula, Aleksandar; Bagat, Mario

    2006-04-01

    Human resources management in health often encounters problems related to workforce geographical distribution. The aim of this study was to investigate the internship workplace preferences of final-year medical students and the reasons associated with their choices. A total of 204 out of 240 final-year medical students at Zagreb University Medical School, Croatia, were surveyed a few months before graduation. We collected data on each student's background, workplace preference, academic performance and emigration preferences. Logistic regression was used to analyse the factors underlying internship workplace preference, classified into two categories: Zagreb versus other areas. Only 39 respondents (19.1%) wanted to obtain internships outside Zagreb, the Croatian capital. Gender and age were not significantly associated with internship workplace preference. A single predictor variable significantly contributed to the logistic regression model: students who believed they would not get the desired specialty more often chose Zagreb as a preferred internship workplace (odds ratio 0.32, 95% CI 0.12-0.86). A strong preference for Zagreb as an internship workplace was recorded. Uncertainty about getting the desired specialty was associated with choosing Zagreb as a workplace, possibly due to more extensive and diverse job opportunities.

  12. [Application of case-based learning in clinical internship teaching of conservative dentistry and endodontics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sheng-bo; Peng, Bin; Song, Ya-ling; Xu, Qing-an

    2013-12-01

    To investigate the education effect of case-based learning (CBL) pattern on clinical internship of conservative dentistry and endodontics. Forty-one undergraduates were randomly assigned into CBL group and traditional teaching group. After clinical internship in the department of conservative dentistry and endodontics for 11 weeks, each student in the 2 groups underwent comprehensive examinations including medical record writing, case analysis, academic knowledge, professional skills and the ability of winning the trust of the patients. The scores were compared between the 2 groups using SPSS 13.0 software package. There was no significant difference between the 2 groups with regard to the scores of academic knowledge and profession skills (P>0.05). However, the results of medical record writing, case analysis and the ability of winning the trust of the patients showed significant difference between the 2 groups(Pendodontics contributes to improve students' ability of clinical thinking, synthetical analysis and adaptability to different patients.

  13. Required internship in diagnostic radiology in the fifth year of medicine at Montreal University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saint-Georges, G.; Raymond-Tremblay, D.; Danais, S.; Dussault, R.; Grignon, A.; Lafortune, M.; Saltiel, J.

    1984-01-01

    Problems of methodology, organization, and evaluation confronting the radiology departments of the university hospitals affiliated with the University of Montreal, the medical students, and the University itself in connection with an elective internship in radiology offered in the fifth year of medicine, resulted in the formation of a committee to reorganize the course of study. In this concise article the authors describe this and other measures taken by the University to solve these problems. The committees' main purpose was to restructure the internship which was made compulsory so that future physicians would be prepared to draw on the resources of diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine. To this end, the committee formulated the objectives, content, evaluation system, and pedagogical methods to be used in those courses. The 25 self-teaching modules, together with the observation and practical interpretation of radiology sessions, proved highly useful in solving the initial problems, and were of particular interest to the students. (author)

  14. ‘The New Degree?’ Constructing Internships in the Third Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Pauline; Halford, Susan; Bruce, Katie

    2015-01-01

    The recent economic recession has impacted substantially on the graduate labour market, with many graduates now struggling to find secure employment in professional careers. In this context, temporary, unpaid ‘internships’ have emerged as increasingly important as a ‘way in’ to work for this group. Yet while there has been much media and policy debate on internships, academic consideration has been scant. This article begins to address this knowledge gap by drawing on a study of interns in a third sector environmental organisation. The research findings reveal that unpaid internships were rationalised through a complex mix of political motivations, career ambitions and lifestyle aims, but these intersected in important ways with social class. These findings are not only of empirical interest, contributing to our knowledge of graduate negotiations of precarity, but also of theoretical value, extending our understanding of young people’s agency and motivations in transitions into work. PMID:27524840

  15. Internship – tool for improving the employability of Economic Science graduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia SUMEDREA

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Romania's economy has undergone major changes as a result of various technological, economic and social factors, so that the labor market has undergone major changes too, which puts more acute the problem of youth employability. The article presents the results of a project to develop human resources financed by European Union funds aimed at improving the way students realize internship, the ultimate goal of implementation of the project being to accustom students with employers' demands and rigors of a job to thus contribute to increasing the employability of future graduates of economic studies. Internship results are presented by taking into account the students’ opinions and some suggestions are made in order to improve this activity in the future.

  16. Physiotherapy students' experiences of bullying on clinical internships: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Diana; Stubbs, Brendon; Soundy, Andy

    2014-03-01

    To consider the experiences of final-year physiotherapy students who have experienced workplace bullying on a clinical internship. Qualitative methodology using individual semi-structured interviews. A university in the Midlands region of the UK. Eight undergraduate physiotherapy students who had experienced one incident of bullying on a clinical internship. Thematic analysis of semi-structured interviews. Four main themes were identified: (1) external and situational influences of bullying; (2) students' reactions to the experience of bullying; (3) inability to reveal the experience; and (4) overcoming problems. Bullying had a range of adverse effects on the students, with many expressing self-doubt in their competence and viewing their supervisor as unapproachable and unsupportive. Five students were not initially able to recognise the experience as bullying. In addition, students did not feel able to report the experience and use the support mechanisms in place. This may have been a result of having concerns that the problem would escalate if they reported the experience and, as a consequence, have a negative effect on their grade. Students were keen to offer a range of strategies for clinical practice in order to prevent bullying for future generations of students. Students' health, security and confidence in their ability as a physiotherapist can be at great risk from bullying. Steps are needed to ensure that students are better protected from bullying, and feel more able to address bullying behaviour during clinical internships. Copyright © 2013 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Difficulties Encountered by Final-Year Male Nursing Students in Their Internship Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Momani, Mohammed Mahmoud

    2017-01-01

    Background The cultural norms of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia do not encourage men to choose nursing as a career. Understanding male nursing students’ experiences of their clinical exposure to the nursing profession throughout their internship might increase their retention. This study explored the experiences of final-year male nursing students as they transitioned to the role of registered nurse. Methods A qualitative descriptive research design with an inductive content-analysis approach was used. The experiences of 22 final-year male nursing students from three public hospitals in a major city of Saudi Arabia were explored. The data were collected using focus-group interviews and documentary analysis in March 2015 and May 2015. Results Content analysis revealed three major themes: the societal and cultural image of male nurses, male students’ engagement in nursing practice, and restructuring the internship programmes’ policies to suit male students’ needs. Conclusion The findings reveal issues that mainly stem from negative social views of nursing as a male profession. Considering the students’ social and cultural needs during their internship programme will facilitate their transition into the role of registered nurse and their retention in the nursing profession. PMID:28951687

  18. The lived experiences of flemish midwifery students undertaking an internship in Suriname: A phenomenological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilde, Curinckx; Marion, Welsh; Marianne, Nieuwenhuijze

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the lived experience of Flemish midwifery students undertaking an internship in Suriname. Hermeneutic phenomenological method as described by van Manen. Seven midwifery students from one University College were selected purposefully for an in-depth interview during their internship abroad within the period October-November 2014. All interviews were audio-taped, transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically. The study revealed five overarching themes: (1) A time to reconsider the time, (2) a time of connection and disconnection, (3) spatiality for thought and rethinking, (4) a body to undergo or a body to respond and (5) the other(s) among the others. The experience of an internship in Suriname presents itself in each individual as: 'A process of awareness from the self with a main focus on the professional'. Meaning that it was a process of 'disconnection' from their own culture towards 'connection' with another culture. Both, the 'rethinking' of their role as a midwife, as well as, balancing between guarding one's own authenticity by 'responding' or being the friendly stranger through 'undergoing', was noticeably striking. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. What Killed Moritz Erhardt? Internships and the Cultural Dangers of “Positive” Ideas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Costea

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Moritz Erhardt’s tragic death as an intern at Bank of America Merrill Lynch in August 2013 provides an illustration of the cultural intensity and complexity that has come to imbue internships in higher education degree schemes. We offer an analysis of internships as part of a wider process of dissemination and proliferation of managerial vocabularies and images that underpin certain hyper-performative practices that permeate the powerful cultures stimulated by and sustained in many organizations. We analyze the cultural ground from which such practices might be seen to arise and present an interpretation of how certain “positive” themes and motifs—such as “potentiality,” “self-expression,” or “self-realization”—can become dangerous. These categories become dangerous once they are constituted as ideal measures of an unattainable level of performativity which can then become destabilizing and disorienting for any individual’s sense of self. In this sense, the paper contributes to the growing body of literature investigating the significance of internships in the new cultures of work characterizing the broader context of neoliberalism.

  20. Psychological peculiarities of the formation and the course of maladaptive states of internship doctors in the aspect of their psychocorrection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Vyun

    2016-08-01

    shortcomings in the organization of the medical process, with a rapid recovery in their solution and the preservation of psychological comfort outside the work process. The low level (8.8% of men and 6.1% of women is characterized by the development of maladaptation, psychological discomfort in everyday life. Constant feeling of dissatisfaction with themselves and their professional activities. In 55.7% of men and 68.6% of women, maladaptation was detected. Namely, the high level of maladaptation requiring the use of urgent measures (psychological and medical was found in 9,2% of men and 12,5% of women; the significant level of maladaptation requiring mandatory intervention by psychologists, the conduction of a rehabilitation program – in 10.3% of men, 14.0% of women; the average level of maladaptation, when it is useful to carry out the advisory work of specialists – in 36,2% and 42,1% respectively. In order to prevent and correct the disorders of adaptation to the professional activities of internship doctors, we have developed a system of medical and psychological support during the professional training period, which involves the use of integrated psychotherapeutic and psychoeducational effects; establishment of the purpose of psychotherapy as an effect on pathogenetically significant biopsychosocial factors of the development of maladaptation; differentiation of tasks and amount of psychotherapy and psychocorrection according to the type of maladaptation. It should be noted that the effectiveness of psychotherapeutic influence is possible only in conjunction with the organizational and pedagogical plan.

  1. Cross-Cultural Competencies for the NASA International Internship Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedbala, Elizabeth M.; Feinberg, Jessica

    2017-01-01

    One of the principles that NASA upholds is to cooperate with other nations to advance science, exploration, and discovery for all. Effective cooperation across cultures, however, requires a certain level of skill. A construct called cross-cultural competency (CCC) emphasizes that individuals are capable of acquiring skills that facilitate positive and cooperative interaction with people of another culture. While some aspects of CCC stem from stable individual traits such as personality (i.e., extraversion, tolerance for ambiguity), most components can be learned and strengthened over time (i.e., empathy, mindfulness, trust). Because CCC is such a vital part of international cooperation, this summer we will design a training program to cultivate these skills between student interns, their mentors, and the Ames community as a whole. First, we will research what specific competencies are valuable for anyone to have when working in an international setting. We will then design a series of activities, events, workshops, and discussions that target and strengthen those skills. Finally, we will use both qualitative and quantitative evaluation methods to measure the success of the pilot program. This summer, the current international student interns will serve as our trial population for the program, while our goal is to launch the full program in Fall 2017. Overall, we hope to contribute to NASAs mission of optimizing international collaboration for everyone involved.

  2. Effective Internships: Building Bridges between Theory and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, William G.; Sherman, Whitney H.

    2008-01-01

    Growing criticism of existing educational leadership preparation programs seems to focus on a lack of contextual relevancy and instructional leadership. Universities and school districts need to develop more formal, collaborative, long-term relationships focused on the nature of principal preparation, moving beyond acculturation to district norms…

  3. SERS internship fall 1995 abstracts and research papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Beverly

    1996-05-01

    This report is a compilation of twenty abstracts and their corresponding full papers of research projects done under the US Department of Energy Science and Engineering Research Semester (SERS) program. Papers cover a broad range of topics, for example, environmental transport, supercomputers, databases, biology. Selected papers were indexed separately for inclusion the the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  4. Training Program for Practical Engineering Design through the Collaboration with Regional Companies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gofuku, Akio; Tabata, Nobuhisa; Tomita, Eiji; Funabiki, Nobuo

    An education program to bring up engineering design capabilities through long-term internship by the collaboration with regional companies has been put in practice for five years. The program is composed of two types of long-term internships and several lectures for patent systems and engineering ethics. This paper describes the outline of the program, educational effects, and our experiences. The program was improved into two educational programs in 2011. The one is a special course to educate engineers and scientists who can lead the technologies of their domains. The other is a long-term internship program for master students in engineering divisions of graduate school. This paper also describes the current activities of the latter program.

  5. Hunter College Dance Therapy Masters Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmais, Claire; White, Elissa Q.

    Described is development of the Hunter College dance therapy 18-month 30-credit masters program involving 33 adult students, (in two classes beginning in 1971 and 1972), an educational model, internship in psychiatric institutions, and preparation of instructional materials. The dance therapist is said to incorporate the psychiatric patient's…

  6. Leadership Preparation in an Education Doctorate Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryerson, Dean

    2011-01-01

    This was a study of an education doctorate program at a small, private college. It examined the following nine components: theory of leadership for school improvement; candidate recruitment and selection based on leadership; coherent curriculum; use of active learning strategies; knowledgeable faculty; high quality internships; social and…

  7. Undergraduate Consumer Affairs Program Needs: Employers' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Kathryn; Saboe-Wounded Head, Lorna; Cho, Soo Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Forty-six Consumer Affairs (CA) internship supervisors were surveyed to identify critical knowledge and skills demonstrated by interns and to examine the importance of knowledge and skills needed in the workplace from the supervisors' perspectives.The knowledge and skills measured were identified through program goals. Results revealed that CA…

  8. A Review of Technical Communication Programs Outside the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alred, Gerald J.

    2001-01-01

    Examines technical communication programs outside the United States and comments on such features as their location in the university structure, links with public relations, the inclusion of internships or practicums, the balance of theory and practice, and typical course offerings. Lists a dozen major programs in seven countries. Concludes that…

  9. SERS internship: Fall 1994 abstracts and research papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, B.

    1994-12-01

    This publication is a collection of articles generated as a result of the fall 1994 Science and Engineering Research Semester program at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Research titles include: electrochemical cells in the reduction of hexavalent chromium; an automated system for studying the power distribution of electron beams; the mapping of novel genes to human chromosome 19; bolometer analysis comparisons; design and implementation of the LLNL Gigabit Testbed; in vitro synthesis and purification of PhIP-Deoxyguanosine and PhIP-DNA Covalent Complexes; pre-thymic somatic mutation leads to high mutant frequency hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase gene; characterization of thin film multi-layers with magnetization curves and modeling of low angle X-ray diffraction data; total least squares; determining the water content of the Geysers Graywacke of northern California; a general approach to sharing data between scientific representations; nanomechanical properties of SiC thin films grown from C 60 precursors; advanced information technology, a tool set for building clean database applications; the design of an automated electrolytic enrichment procedure for tritium; fluvial terrace dating using in-situ cosmogenic 21 Ne; computer- aided mapping of stream channels beneath the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA; X-ray spectroscopic technique for energetic electron transport studies in short-pulse laser/plasma interactions. Separate entries have been put in the energy data base for articles from this report. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database

  10. SERS internship: Fall 1994 abstracts and research papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, B.

    1994-12-01

    This publication is a collection of articles generated as a result of the fall 1994 Science and Engineering Research Semester program at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Research titles include: electrochemical cells in the reduction of hexavalent chromium; an automated system for studying the power distribution of electron beams; the mapping of novel genes to human chromosome 19; bolometer analysis comparisons; design and implementation of the LLNL Gigabit Testbed; in vitro synthesis and purification of PhIP-Deoxyguanosine and PhIP-DNA Covalent Complexes; pre-thymic somatic mutation leads to high mutant frequency hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase gene; characterization of thin film multi-layers with magnetization curves and modeling of low angle X-ray diffraction data; total least squares; determining the water content of the Geysers Graywacke of northern California; a general approach to sharing data between scientific representations; nanomechanical properties of SiC thin films grown from C{sub 60} precursors; advanced information technology, a tool set for building clean database applications; the design of an automated electrolytic enrichment procedure for tritium; fluvial terrace dating using in-situ cosmogenic {sup 21}Ne; computer- aided mapping of stream channels beneath the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA; X-ray spectroscopic technique for energetic electron transport studies in short-pulse laser/plasma interactions. Separate entries have been put in the energy data base for articles from this report. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  11. First Contact: interprofessional education based on medical students' experiences from their nursing internship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eich-Krohm, Astrid

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Goal: The aim of the course “interprofessional communication and nursing” is to reflect medical students’ experiences from the nursing internship. The content of the course focuses on barriers and support of interprofessional communication as a foundation for teamwork between nursing professionals and physicians. The nursing internship is for most medical students the first contact with nursing professionals and can lead to perceptions about the other group that might hinder interprofessional teamwork and consequently harm patients. To meet the demographic challenges ahead it is important to emphasize interprofessional education in the study of medicine and better prepare future physicians for interprofessional collaboration. Method: The design of the course includes an assessment of a change in the students’ perceptions about nursing and interprofessional communication. The first class meeting presents the starting point of the assessment and visualizes students’ perceptions of nursing and medicine. The content of the following class meetings serve to enhance the students’ knowledge about nursing as a profession with its own theories, science and scholarship. In addition, all students have to write a research paper that entails to interview one nursing professional and one physician about their ideas of interprofessional communication and to compare the interviews with their own experiences from the nursing internship. To access what students learned during the course a reflective discussion takes place at the last meeting combined with an analysis of the students’ research papers. Results: The assessment of the students’ perceptions about the nursing profession and the importance of successful interprofessional communication showed a new and deeper understanding of the topic. They were able to identify barriers and support measures of interprofessional communication and their own responsibilities as part of a team

  12. Challenges of Communicating Climate Change in North Dakota: Undergraduate Internship and Collaboration with Middle School Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullendore, G. L.; Munski, L.; Kirilenko, A.; Remer, F.; Baker, M.

    2012-12-01

    In summer 2010, the University of North Dakota (UND) hosted an internship for undergraduates to learn about climate change in both the classroom and group research projects. As a final project, the undergraduates were tasked to present their findings about different aspects of climate change in webcasts that would be later used in middle school classrooms in the region. Interns indicated that participation significantly improved their own confidence in future scholarly pursuits. Also, communicating about climate change, both during the project and afterwards, helped the interns feel more confident in their own learning. Use of webcasts widened the impact of student projects (e.g. YouTube dissemination), and multiple methods of student communication should continue to be an important piece of climate change education initiatives. Other key aspects of the internship were student journaling and group building. Challenges faced included media accessibility and diverse recruiting. Best practices from the UND internship will be discussed as a model for implementation at other universities. Lesson plans that complement the student-produced webcasts and adhere to regional and national standards were created during 2011. Communication between scientists and K-12 education researchers was found to be a challenge, but improved over the course of the project. These lesson plans have been reviewed both during a teacher workshop in January 2012 and by several Master teachers. Although select middle school educators have expressed enthusiasm for testing of these modules, very little hands-on testing with students has occurred. Wide-ranging roadblocks to implementation exist, including the need for adherence to state standards and texts, inadequate access to technology, and generally negative attitudes toward climate change in the region. Feedback from regional educators will be presented, and possible solutions will be discussed. Although some challenges are specific to the

  13. First Contact: interprofessional education based on medical students' experiences from their nursing internship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eich-Krohm, Astrid; Kaufmann, Alexandra; Winkler-Stuck, Kirstin; Werwick, Katrin; Spura, Anke; Robra, Bernt-Peter

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the course "interprofessional communication and nursing" is to reflect medical students' experiences from the nursing internship. The content of the course focuses on barriers and support of interprofessional communication as a foundation for teamwork between nursing professionals and physicians. The nursing internship is for most medical students the first contact with nursing professionals and can lead to perceptions about the other group that might hinder interprofessional teamwork and consequently harm patients. To meet the demographic challenges ahead it is important to emphasize interprofessional education in the study of medicine and better prepare future physicians for interprofessional collaboration. The design of the course includes an assessment of a change in the students' perceptions about nursing and interprofessional communication. The first class meeting presents the starting point of the assessment and visualizes students' perceptions of nursing and medicine. The content of the following class meetings serve to enhance the students' knowledge about nursing as a profession with its own theories, science and scholarship. In addition, all students have to write a research paper that entails to interview one nursing professional and one physician about their ideas of interprofessional communication and to compare the interviews with their own experiences from the nursing internship. To access what students learned during the course a reflective discussion takes place at the last meeting combined with an analysis of the students' research papers. The assessment of the students' perceptions about the nursing profession and the importance of successful interprofessional communication showed a new and deeper understanding of the topic. They were able to identify barriers and support measures of interprofessional communication and their own responsibilities as part of a team. Interprofessional education is an important part of medical education

  14. Spring Internship 2018 at the Prototype Development Lab: A place of Dreamers and Makers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda, Juan F.

    2018-01-01

    This paper covers the role of the design process and the methodology of creating a trophy during my Spring 2018 Internship at the Prototype Development Laboratory at the Kennedy Space Center. In the course of this project I used many new machines and materials while trying to deliver a professional product for a competition that invites college student teams from across the country. The machines covered in this paper include the wood chop saw, CNC mill, water jet, laser engraver, and the 3D printer. This paper also serves as an assembly guide for the trophy.

  15. Health journalism internships: a social marketing strategy to address health disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Duy H; Shimasaki, Suzuho; Stafford, Helen Shi; Sadler, Georgia Robins

    2010-09-01

    The USA seeks to eliminate health disparities by stimulating the rapid uptake of health-promoting behaviors within disadvantaged communities. A health journalism internship incorporates social marketing strategies to increase communities' access to cancer information, while helping the interns who are recruited from underrepresented communities gain admission to top graduate schools. Interns are taught basic health journalism skills that enable them to create immediate streams of cancer-related press releases for submission to community newspapers. Interns are charged with the social responsibility of continuing this dissemination process throughout their careers. Intermediate outcomes are measured as mediators of distal behavioral change goals.

  16. An Analysis of the Nurse Internship Program at Naval Medical Center San Diego

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-03-01

    for skin breakdown. • Identifies and describes appropriate interventions for patients at risk for nosocomial infections . • Identifies and describes...room, intensive care unit, emergency department, medical–surgical unit, maternal -child unit, and pediatrics. An extensive literature review...Clinical Orientation Safety, confidentiality, infection control, universal precautions Surgical Experience Intern follows a patient through

  17. The Impacts of a National Internship Program on Interns' Perceived Leadership, Critical Thinking, and Communication Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Dennis W.; Birdsong, Victoria; Fuhrman, Nicholas; Borron, Abigail

    2017-01-01

    At perhaps all levels of education, strong leadership skills are often equated with the ability to engage in critical thinking, and effective oral and written communication. The purpose of this study was to identify the self-perceived expansion of animal health interns' leadership, critical thinking and communication competencies using the…

  18. CERT tribal internship program. Final intern report: D`Lisa Penney, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of this intern`s project was to: education the Nez Perce people of the Hanford situation; begin researching into past and present health effects from the Hanford site; and inform and educate the Nez Perce people of the Hanford site and past exposures. The specific objectives were to begin researching the history of Nez Perce people and Hanford; create an understanding for the importance of this research; define the radiation and risks and how they occur; inform the Nez Perce people of the issue; and write the paper so it is easy to understand. This intern report contains a copy of the final paper written for the Nez Perce people. Because the dose reconstruction for Hanford is not complete, the health effects section is informative, but not definitive.

  19. Tertiary Students' Entrepreneurial Career Intentions of Entrepreneurship-Embedded Internship Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chun-Mei; Shen, Chien-Hua; Hsiao, Hsi-Chi; Chen, Su-Chang

    2017-01-01

    This study examines 1630 tertiary students in regard to their entrepreneurial career intentions (ECIs) and their influencing factors. The findings may serve as academic reference for the development of entrepreneurship-related education. The results show that students' computer self-efficacy (CSE) has a significant direct effect on ECIs, and…

  20. Australian intern pharmacists’ perceived preparedness for practice, and their expectations and experiences of the internship year and future career intentions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mak VSL

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Vivienne SL Mak,1,2 Geoff March,2 Alice Clark,2 Andrew L Gilbert21Department of Pharmacy Practice, School of Pharmacy, International Medical University, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 2Quality Use of Medicines and Pharmacy Research Centre, Sansom Institute for Health Research, School of Pharmacy and Medical Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA, AustraliaBackground: A key objective of Australia's health care reform is a skilled, flexible, and well-trained workforce. To meet these requirements, the training of health professionals, including pharmacists, needs to be focused on patient care processes, and students must develop competencies in the delivery of patient care. Pharmacy graduates need to be well prepared for new and alternative career pathways through their education and training, to be a part of the future workforce. This study explores Australian intern pharmacists' perceived preparedness for practice, the match between their expectations and experience to meet the requirements of health professionals in Australia's health care reforms, and their future career intentions.Methods: Two questionnaires were sent by post to all 136 intern pharmacists in South Australia; one was sent early in their internship and the second follow-up questionnaire was sent near the completion of their internship.Results: Pharmacy graduates felt prepared for patient care, medicines information, and primary health care roles. A mismatch between expectations and actual experiences was found. By the end of the internship, 45% agree/strongly agree that they wanted to do something else other than being a practicing pharmacist.Conclusion: The current internship model no longer meets the needs and expectations of knowledgeable and skilled pharmacy graduates. An alternative internship model, which considers the expectations of graduates, is required.Keywords: intern pharmacist, preparedness, expectations, experiences, internship, future career

  1. Portfolio assessment during medical internships: How to obtain a reliable and feasible assessment procedure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michels, Nele R M; Driessen, Erik W; Muijtjens, Arno M M; Van Gaal, Luc F; Bossaert, Leo L; De Winter, Benedicte Y

    2009-12-01

    A portfolio is used to mentor and assess students' clinical performance at the workplace. However, students and raters often perceive the portfolio as a time-consuming instrument. In this study, we investigated whether assessment during medical internship by a portfolio can combine reliability and feasibility. The domain-oriented reliability of 61 double-rated portfolios was measured, using a generalisability analysis with portfolio tasks and raters as sources of variation in measuring the performance of a student. We obtained reliability (Phi coefficient) of 0.87 with this internship portfolio containing 15 double-rated tasks. The generalisability analysis showed that an acceptable level of reliability (Phi = 0.80) was maintained when the amount of portfolio tasks was decreased to 13 or 9 using one and two raters, respectively. Our study shows that a portfolio can be a reliable method for the assessment of workplace learning. The possibility of reducing the amount of tasks or raters while maintaining a sufficient level of reliability suggests an increase in feasibility of portfolio use for both students and raters.

  2. Youth Engagement through Science (YES!) - Engaging Underrepresented Minorities in Science through High School Internships at the National Museum of Natural History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, G.; Cruz, E.; Selvans, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Smithsonian's Youth Engagement through Science (YES!) program at the National Museum of Natural History gives young people from the Washington, D.C. area the opportunity to engage in science out of school through 16-week internships. We will present the program's successful strategies and lessons learned around recruiting and engaging young people from underserved communities, and maintaining relationships that help to support their pursuit of STEM and other career paths. The YES! program connects Smithsonian collections, experts, and training with local DC youth from communities traditionally underrepresented in science careers. YES! is now in its fifth year and has directly served 122 students; demographics of alumni are 67% female, and 51% Latino, 31% African-American, 7% Asian, 5% Caucasian and 6% other. The program immerses students in science research by giving them the opportunity to work side-by-side with scientists and staff from the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History, Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Gardens, and National Zoo. In addition to working on a research project, students have college preparatory courses, are trained in science communication, and apply their skills by interacting with the public on the exhibit floor.

  3. Entrepreneurship of dietetic program graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Linda L; Blum, Ilya

    2004-01-01

    Successful dietetic program graduates must have an entrepreneurial mindset and skills to respond to environmental changes and consumer trends. The purpose of this study was to determine current or intended entrepreneurship by graduates of a Dietitians of Canada accredited university program, as influenced by self-efficacy stemming from entrepreneurial experiences in education or early career, as well as by internal and external factors. This study employed an exploratory descriptive methodology with a questionnaire mailed to a discrete sample. Ninety graduates completed and returned the questionnaire for a response rate of 55%. Data analysis included descriptive statistics, two-way table analysis, the chi-square test for independence, and Fisher's exact test. Significant relationships were found between self-efficacy scores and entrepreneurial action, specific entrepreneurial experiences and entrepreneurial intent and action, dietetic internship and intent, and belief in the importance of business skills and intent. Those with entrepreneurial intent and/or action identified creativity, dietetic education/internship, persistence, business skills, and family/friend support as helping factors. These results suggest that undergraduate, internship, and continuing education programs for dietitians should incorporate activities that develop entrepreneurial skills and contribute toward an entrepreneurial mindset.

  4. Senior Medical Students' Attitudes toward Psychiatry as a Career Choice before and after an Undergraduate Psychiatry Internship in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Homayoun; Moghaddam, Yasaman; Nejatisafa, Ali-Akbar; Esmaeili, Sara; Kaviani, Hosein; Shoar, Saeed; Shabani, Amir; Samimi-Ardestani, Mehdi; Akhlaghi, Amir Abbas Keshavarz; Noroozi, Alireza; Mafi, Mostafa

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The study aimed to assess 1) the attitudes of medical students in the sixth and seventh years (known as interns in Iran) toward psychiatry as a career choice, and 2) the degree of attractiveness of psychiatry as a career choice, with regard to various defined aspects, before and after an undergraduate psychiatry internship (similar to…

  5. A TV Reporter, an Adviser's Internship, a TV Anchor/Reporter, an Assignment Editor, a TV Photojournalist's Bag of Tricks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrow, Kris; Youngblood, Steve; Madden, Tracy; Hamburger, Jeff; Johnson, Kevin

    2000-01-01

    Intends to help high school journalism students understand the field they are preparing for by presenting brief descriptions of a day in the work life of a television news reporter, a TV anchor/reporter, and a television news assignment editor. Describes the five-week internship at a local television news station of a journalism instructor. (SR)

  6. Opinion of the Ministry of Education on Vigorously Promoting Educational Aid Work by Normal University Students during Teaching Internships (2007)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinese Education and Society, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This is a policy that aims at improving teaching practices in rural schools in China. Normal university students are encouraged to participate in educational aid work in disadvantaged schools as a fulfillment of their teaching internship. The policy supports the policies of free compulsory education for rural school issued in the past. In…

  7. The Differential Effects of Internship Participation on End-of-Fourth-Year GPA by Demographic and Institutional Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Eugene T., III.; Kilgo, Cindy A.; Sheets, Jessica K. Ezell; Pascarella, Ernest T.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the effects of internship participation on college students, specifically the effect on college GPA. Further, because of the capacity to disaggregate students by race in the sample, this study is significant because it provides much needed empirical evidence surrounding the impact of participation in…

  8. Internship-Related Learning Outcomes and Their Influential Factors: The Case of Vietnamese Tourism and Hospitality Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghia, Tran Le Huu; Duyen, Nguyen Thi My

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences of Tourism and Hospitality interns in Vietnam to identify dimensions of internship-related learning outcomes and factors influencing these learning outcomes. Design/methodology/approach: In total, 12 in-depth interviews were conducted with 12 interns to identify the dimensions of…

  9. Variation in Clinical Placement Supervisors' Conceptions of and Approaches to Supervision in a Veterinary Internship Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gelderen, Ingrid; Matthew, Susan M.; Hendry, Graham D.; Taylor, Rosanne

    2018-01-01

    Good teaching that supports final year students' learning in clinical placements is critical for students' successful transition from an academic environment to professional practice. Final year internship programmes are designed to encourage student-centred approaches to teaching and deep approaches to learning, but the extent to which clinical…

  10. 中祁连苏里地区奥陶纪石英闪长岩地球化学特征及年代学意义%Geochemical Characteristics and Chronology Significance of Ordovician Quartz Diorite from Suli Area in Middle Qilian Mountains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑英; 陈光庭; 张小永; 宋泰忠; 梁坤先

    2017-01-01

    In Suli area,the Ordovieian quartz diorite has poor aluminum and high potassium (K2O>NaO),which belongs to calc-alkaline series,with the characteristics of partial aluminium shoshonite series and obvious Ⅰ-type granite.Rare earth and trace elements characteristics show that a mantle material was involved in the material source of quartz diorite.The tectonic environment discrimination suggests that the quartz diorite belongs to the island arc granite formed before the plate collision.The zircon U-Pb isotopic age has been tested by LA-ICP-MS method,the obtained zircon 206pb/238 U weighted average age is (474 ±-2.9) Ma (MSWD =0.12),which limit the formation age of the quartz diorite era to early Ordovician,suggesting that the north Qilian Ocean experienced two-way expansion and subduction stage,while the southern Qilian continental subduction extrusion cause the mantle material upwelling andthe partial melting of continental crust.And then,the rock mass of quartz diorite was formed.The age determination of this rock mass provides a new evidence for the subduction era of the north Qilian Ocean.%苏里地区奥陶纪石英闪长岩具贫铝、高钾(K2O>NaO)特征,属于钙碱性系列,具偏铝质钾玄岩系列岩石的特点,明显具Ⅰ型花岗岩的特征.岩石稀土及微量元素特征均显示物质来源有地幔物质参与,构造环境判别显示为形成于板块碰撞前的岛弧花岗岩.利用LA-ICP-MS法进行锆石U-Pb同位素年龄测定,样品的锆石206 pb/238U加权平均年龄为(474±2.9) Ma(MSWD=0.12),限定该石英闪长岩的形成时代为早奥陶世,表明在北祁连大洋发生双向扩张俯冲阶段,南部中祁连陆块遭受俯冲挤压导致地幔物质上涌,同时陆壳部分熔融,岩体为两者混合而形成的产物,该岩体年龄的确定为北祁连洋的俯冲时代提供了新的证据.

  11. Practicing the triad teaching-research- extension in supervised internship of licentiateship in biological sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilliane Miranda Freitas

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we report an educational experience based on the triad teaching-research-extension occurred in the supervised internship in licentiateship in Biological Sciences. In this experiment, the students made a transposition of the scientific knowledge produced in their course conclusion work to the knowledge of basic education curriculum. We analyze in this article the impressions of undergraduates after completion of pedagogical actions. We discuss, based on the reports, how the knowledge that is constructed and reconstructed in academic research can contribute directly to the improvement of the science education quality through science literacy and also in teacher training of undergraduates, through the reflection on their own practice. Therefore, we consider that, with the practice of the inseparability of teaching-research-extension, there will be more return for academic research and also for the school community, generating significant changes in educational practices in schools

  12. Spare the rod, spoil the child: Bullying during medical internship in three Peruvian hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Achata-Espinoza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dear Editor, Bullying has traditionally been considered normal during health professional training (1. However, it is now recognized as harmful to both academic traiwning and mental and emotional health, with negative consequences such as low career satisfaction, depression, burnout syndrome, and post-traumatic stress symptoms (2,3. The hierarchy observed in the different stages of the medical career facilitates power abuse and makes medical students vulnerable. Likewise, frequently undervaluing abuse leads to less willingness to report bullying cases, and in the continuity of this behavior over time (1,4. During medical internships, students are also considered as workers, which increases the chances of being bullied; in addition, the training environment differs from what they experienced early in their career (3.

  13. ASSESSMENT OF EFFECTIVENESS OF TB POSTING DURING THE COMPULSORY ROTATORY RESIDENTIAL INTERNSHIP (CRRI PROGRAMME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep Aggarwal

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Research Question: What is the effectiveness of TB posting during the Compulsory Rotatory Residential Internship (CRRI programme? Objectives: To assess the effectiveness of TB posting during the CRRI programme. To find out the need of making Tuberculosis & Respiratory Diseases Department posting mandatory during CRRI Programme. Study Design: Cross Sectional study. Study Duration: 12 months i.e. 01st April 2009 till 31st March 2010 Participants: 90 students who joined the CRRI programme formed the study group. Out of these 90 interns only 57 (64% of them joined their two months Compulsory Rotatory Internship in the Department of Community Medicine and these were posted in Tuberculosis & Respiratory Diseases Department for 15 days. Methodology: A pre-designed pre-tested self-administered questionnaire was administered to the participants on the first day and last day of their posting in Tuberculosis & Respiratory Diseases Department. The results were analysed by using suitable statistical package. Results: The mean pre-test score was 28 (49.6% and the mean post-test score was 38 (61.5%. It was observed that there was a 27% improvement in the knowledge of the participants when the question about the year of launching of RNTCP programme in India was asked. A remarkable improvement (46% was found in the difference between pre and post-test knowledge of the participants when the questions like “Who are the DOTS providers” and “What is the colour coding of boxes for different categories of patients” were asked. A significant difference in the knowledge was found in the pre and post-test assessment in reference to Tuberculosis and its National Programm

  14. Description of the case mix experienced by chiropractic students during a clinical internship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puhl, Aaron A; Reinhart, Christine J; Injeyan, H Stephen; Tibbles, Anthony

    2017-10-01

    The primary objective of this study was to describe the case mix experienced by chiropractic students during their clinical internship at the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College. Secondary objectives were to characterize teaching clinic patient populations, assess the similarity to previously published data for practicing chiropractors, and describe the treatment plans being recommended by interns. A prospective, observational study was conducted using a convenience sample of 24 chiropractic interns. Data were collected by interns using a standardized form that was completed for each new patient and each new complaint examined during the 1-year internship. Standardized forms included data regarding patient demographics, complaint characteristics, and treatment recommendations. Data were included for 23 of 24 participating interns, who described 828 patients and a total of 948 unique complaint presentations. Overall, 60% of patients were female, 86% were 18 to 64 years old, and 23% were naive to chiropractic care. Of all presenting complaints, 93% were pain-based, 67% were chronic, 65% included spinal complaints, and 7% presented with red flags; individual interns' experiences were variable and are described. On average, treatment recommendations called for 9.4 visits and often included multimodal treatment approaches, most commonly soft-tissue therapies (91%), home-based active care (84%), and spine manipulation (70%). The findings of this study suggest that patients presenting to CMCC teaching clinics are similar to those reported previously to attend private chiropractic clinics. While all participating interns encountered multiple complex clinical cases, very few had experience with pediatric populations. This study adds to the few that detail the characteristics of patients attending chiropractic teaching clinics; to our knowledge it is the first to describe average case loads of chiropractic interns.

  15. 75 FR 48555 - Exchange Visitor Program-Trainees and Interns

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-11

    ... ``specialty occupations,'' establish a new internship program, and modify the selection criteria for... regulatory provisions to provide greater specificity regarding the selection, screening, placement and... Department is the past practice of placing participants as counter help in quick service restaurants or other...

  16. Alternative Approaches for Educating Future Global Marketing Professionals: A Comparison of Foreign Study and Research-Intensive Marketing Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Peter A.; Melton, Horace L.; Varner, Iris I.; Hoelscher, Mark; Schmidt, Klaus; Spaulding, Aslihan D.

    2011-01-01

    Using an experiential learning model as a conceptual background, this article discusses characteristics and learning objectives for well-known foreign study programs such as study tours, study abroad, and internships and compares them with a less common overseas program called the "Global Marketing Program" (GMP). GMP involves…

  17. Transition Program: The Challenges Faced by Special Needs Students in Gaining Work Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alias, Aliza

    2014-01-01

    Transition program for special needs students is known to open opportunities for students with learning disabilities to gain work experience in actual work environment. The program provides training activities and also an opportunity to go for internship to gain work experience. Therefore, this study is to identify the challenges faced by special…

  18. Dogs in the Hall: A Case Study of Affective Skill Development in an Urban Veterinary Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Michael; Tummons, John; Ball, Anna; Bird, William

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this bounded single case study was to explore how an urban high school veterinary program impacted students' affective skill development. The program was unique because students were required to participate in internships with local animal care businesses and care for animals within the school veterinary laboratory. The…

  19. Preparing Graduate Students for Solar System Science and Exploration Careers: Internships and Field Training Courses led by the Lunar and Planetary Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaner, A. J.; Kring, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    To be competitive in 21st century science and exploration careers, graduate students in planetary science and related disciplines need mentorship and need to develop skills not always available at their home university, including fieldwork, mission planning, and communicating with others in the scientific and engineering communities in the U.S. and internationally. Programs offered by the Lunar and Planetary Institute (LPI) address these needs through summer internships and field training programs. From 2008-2012, LPI hosted the Lunar Exploration Summer Intern Program. This special summer intern program evaluated possible landing sites for robotic and human exploration missions to the lunar surface. By the end of the 2012 program, a series of scientifically-rich landing sites emerged, some of which had never been considered before. Beginning in 2015 and building on the success of the lunar exploration program, a new Exploration Science Summer Intern Program is being implemented with a broader scope that includes both the Moon and near-Earth asteroids. Like its predecessor, the Exploration Science Summer Intern Program offers graduate students a unique opportunity to integrate scientific input with exploration activities in a way that mission architects and spacecraft engineers can use. The program's activities may involve assessments and traverse plans for a particular destination or a more general assessment of a class of possible exploration targets. Details of the results of these programs will be discussed. Since 2010 graduate students have participated in field training and research programs at Barringer (Meteor) Crater and the Sudbury Impact Structure. Skills developed during these programs prepare students for their own thesis studies in impact-cratered terrains, whether they are on the Earth, the Moon, Mars, or other solar system planetary surface. Future field excursions will take place at these sites as well as the Zuni-Bandera Volcanic Field. Skills

  20. CONVERSATIONS IN THE TEACHING INTERNSHIP: THE EMERGENCE OF THE POTENTIAL OF VIRTUAL LEARNING OBJECTS BY PEDAGOGICAL MEDIATION IN PHYSICS TEACHING

    OpenAIRE

    Berenice Vahl Vaniel; Débora Pereira Laurino

    2013-01-01

    In this article we attempt to explain a study experienced in Teaching Internship, of the Graduate Course in Physics, discipline of Physics Education Activities II, Federal University of Rio Grande-FURG. The activities developed aimed to experience teaching as an interactive and reflective process, and also investigate the potential of virtual learning objects (OV) for educational activities in physics teaching. The concepts of recursion, recursiveness and structural coupling, present in Biolo...

  1. A new experimental community pharmacy internship module for undergraduate pharmacy students in western Nepal: overview and reflections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangita Timsina

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Community pharmacies in Nepal and other South Asian countries are in a mediocre state due to poor regulation and the fact that many pharmacies are run by people with insufficient training in dispensing. This has led to the inappropriate use of medicines. The problems due to poor regulation and the mediocre state of community pharmacies in South Asia encompass both academia and clinical practice. In this paper, a 2-week community pharmacy internship programme completed by 2 graduating pharmacy students of Pokhara University (a Nepalese public university at Sankalpa Pharmacy, Pokhara, Nepal is illustrated. During the internship, they were systematically trained on store management, pharmaceutical care, counselling skills, the use of medical devices, pharmaceutical business plans, medicine information sources, and adverse drug reaction reporting. An orientation, observations and hands-on training, case presentation, discussion, and feedback from 2 senior pharmacists were used as the training method. A proper community pharmacy internship format, good pharmacy practice standards, and a better work environment for pharmacists may improve the quality of community pharmacies.

  2. A new experimental community pharmacy internship module for undergraduate pharmacy students in western Nepal: overview and reflections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timsina, Sangita; K C, Bhuvan; Adhikari, Dristi; Alrasheedy, Alian A; Mohamed Ibrahim, Mohamed Izham; Kaundinnyayana, Atisammodavardhana

    2017-01-01

    Community pharmacies in Nepal and other South Asian countries are in a mediocre state due to poor regulation and the fact that many pharmacies are run by people with insufficient training in dispensing. This has led to the inappropriate use of medicines. The problems due to poor regulation and the mediocre state of community pharmacies in South Asia encompass both academia and clinical practice. In this paper, a 2-week community pharmacy internship programme completed by 2 graduating pharmacy students of Pokhara University (a Nepalese public university) at Sankalpa Pharmacy, Pokhara, Nepal is illustrated. During the internship, they were systematically trained on store management, pharmaceutical care, counselling skills, the use of medical devices, pharmaceutical business plans, medicine information sources, and adverse drug reaction reporting. An orientation, observations and hands-on training, case presentation, discussion, and feedback from 2 senior pharmacists were used as the training method. A proper community pharmacy internship format, good pharmacy practice standards, and a better work environment for pharmacists may improve the quality of community pharmacies.

  3. Programming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    The programmer's task is often taken to be the construction of algorithms, expressed in hierarchical structures of procedures: this view underlies the majority of traditional programming languages, such as Fortran. A different view is appropriate to a wide class of problem, perhaps including some problems in High Energy Physics. The programmer's task is regarded as having three main stages: first, an explicit model is constructed of the reality with which the program is concerned; second, this model is elaborated to produce the required program outputs; third, the resulting program is transformed to run efficiently in the execution environment. The first two stages deal in network structures of sequential processes; only the third is concerned with procedure hierarchies. (orig.)

  4. Programming

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, M A

    1982-01-01

    The programmer's task is often taken to be the construction of algorithms, expressed in hierarchical structures of procedures: this view underlies the majority of traditional programming languages, such as Fortran. A different view is appropriate to a wide class of problem, perhaps including some problems in High Energy Physics. The programmer's task is regarded as having three main stages: first, an explicit model is constructed of the reality with which the program is concerned; second, thi...

  5. [Level of teaching competence at the Undergraduate Medical Internship of UNAM's Faculty of Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-González, Adrián; Lifshitz-Guinzberg, Alberto; González-Quintanilla, Eduardo; Monterrosas-Rojas, Ana María; Flores-Hernández, Fernando; Gatica-Lara, Florina; Martínez-Franco, Adrián Israel; Sánchez-Mendiola, Melchor

    2017-01-01

    There is no systematic evaluation of teaching performance in the clinical area at UNAM Faculty of Medicine. The study purpose is to assess the teaching competence level in the Undergraduate Medical Internship (UMI). The paper describes the process of psychometric validity for the instrument designed to evaluate teaching competence in the UMI. This instrument was constructed from two previously developed instruments. The final version with 54 items in a Likert scale was studied with exploratory factorial analysis. Four dimensions were obtained: Solution of clinical problems, Psychopedagogy, Mentoring, and Evaluation. The instrument had a reliability of 0.994, with an explained variance of 77.75%. To evaluate the teaching competence level, we administered 844 questionnaires to a sample of students with a response rate of 89%. We obtained an overall global score of 89.4 ± 9.6 (mean ± SD). The dimension Solution of clinical problems was the one with a greater value, in contrast with the dimension of Evaluation, which had a lower score. The teachers of the UMI are considered educators with high level of teaching competence, according to the perceptions of the undergraduate internal doctors. The evaluation of teaching competence level is very important for institutions that look for the continuous professional development of its faculty.

  6. Female military medical school graduates entering surgical internships: are we keeping up with national trends?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertrees, Amy; Laferriere, Nicole; Elster, Eric; Shriver, Craig D; Rich, Norman M

    2014-10-01

    Ratios of women graduating from the only US military medical school and entering surgical internships were reviewed and compared with national trends. Data were obtained from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences graduation announcements from 2002 to 2012. There were 1,771 graduates from 2002 to 2012, with 508 female (29%) and 1,263 male (71%) graduates. Female graduates increased over time (21% to 39%; P = .014). Female general surgery interns increased from 3.9% to 39% (P = .025). Female overall surgical subspecialty interns increased from 20% in 2002 to 36% in 2012 (P = .046). Women were represented well in obstetrics (57%), urology (44%), and otolaryngology (31%), but not in neurosurgery, orthopedics, and ophthalmology (0% to 20%). The sex disparity between military and civilian medical students occurs before entry. Once in medical school, women are just as likely to enter general surgery or surgical subspecialty as their male counterparts. Increased ratio of women in the class is unlikely to lead to a shortfall except in specific subspecialties. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Wabanaki Youth in Science (WaYS): A Tribal Mentoring and Educational Program Integrating Traditional Ecological Knowledge and Western Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    tish carr; Laura S. Kenefic; Darren J. Ranco

    2017-01-01

    The Wabanaki Youth in Science (WaYS) program provides mentoring and training opportunities in the life sciences for Native American youth in Maine. This program, which was motivated by a shortage of young natural resource professionals to manage tribal lands, uses a multifaceted approach (i.e., camps, community outreach, and internships with cultural resource and...

  8. A Program for the Preparation and Certification of School Administrators. Program E--Learning Resource Specialist. In Compliance with Guidelines and Standards for the Development and Approval of Programs of Preparation Leading to Certification [of] School Professional Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canzler, Lillian

    The initial and continuing competencies needed by a district-level administrator in educational media or learning resources are outlined. An introductory discussion covers internship program procedures, supervision and evaluation, record keeping and reports, and competencies and skills. Competencies are then defined, the use of the format is…

  9. Integrated surgical emergency training plan in the internship: A step toward improving the quality of training and emergency center management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhlaghi, Mohammad Reza; Vafamehr, Vajiheh; Dadgostarnia, Mohammad; Dehghani, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    , facing a variety of patients, practicing the role of general practitioners, role-playing on a real patient's bedside, having a multilateral approach to the patient, reducing the wasting time on minor wards, balancing the work and rest schedules of the interns, and better learning and satisfaction of the interns. Over 60% of the participants believed the program has the following benefits: More attention on the training plan, improving the learning of patient management, being more responsive for the training of interns, increasing operational approach to emergency patients, being more aware of the performed actions, and increasing the quality and speed of services provided to patients. The mean score assigned to the whole questionnaire of investigating the viewpoints was 37.5 out of 50. The mean score of the interns' questionnaire was significantly more than the mean score of the assistants. The results obtained indicated that the greatest existing consensus about this plan was the positive impact on the learning of interns in the emergency setting. Thus, it will not only increase the number of patients who the interns are managing during the internship course, but also increases the balance of their workload and they can learn and manage the emergency patients with more leisure.

  10. Important Skills for Internship and the Fourth-Year Medical School Courses to Acquire Them: A National Survey of Internal Medicine Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Anne G; Harrell, Heather E; Weissman, Arlene; Smith, Cynthia D; Dupras, Denise; Kane, Gregory C

    2016-06-01

    To obtain feedback from internal medicine residents, a key stakeholder group, regarding both the skills needed for internship and the fourth-year medical school courses that prepared them for residency. This feedback could inform fourth-year curriculum redesign efforts. All internal medicine residents taking the 2013-2014 Internal Medicine In-Training Examination were asked to rank the importance of learning 10 predefined skills prior to internship and to use a dropdown menu of 11 common fourth-year courses to rank the 3 most helpful in preparing for internship. The predefined skills were chosen based on a review of the literature, a national subinternship curriculum, and expert consensus. Chi-square statistics were used to test for differences in responses between training levels. Of the 24,820 internal medicine residents who completed the exam, 20,484 (83%) completed the survey, had complete identification numbers, and consented to have their responses used for research. The three skills most frequently rated as very important were identifying when to seek additional help and expertise, prioritizing clinical tasks and managing time efficiently, and communicating with other providers around care transitions. The subinternship/acting internship was most often selected as being the most helpful course in preparing for internship. These findings indicate which skills and fourth-year medical school courses internal medicine residents found most helpful in preparing for internship and confirm the findings of prior studies highlighting the perceived value of subinternships. Internal medicine residents and medical educators agree on the skills students should learn prior to internship.

  11. Southern California Earthquake Center/Undergraduate Studies in Earthquake Information Technology (SCEC/UseIT): Towards the Next Generation of Internship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, S.; Benthien, M.; Jordan, T. H.

    2005-12-01

    The SCEC/UseIT internship program is training the next generation of earthquake scientist, with methods that can be adapted to other disciplines. UseIT interns work collaboratively, in multi-disciplinary teams, conducting computer science research that is needed by earthquake scientists. Since 2002, the UseIT program has welcomed 64 students, in some two dozen majors, at all class levels, from schools around the nation. Each summer''s work is posed as a ``Grand Challenge.'' The students then organize themselves into project teams, decide how to proceed, and pool their diverse talents and backgrounds. They have traditional mentors, who provide advice and encouragement, but they also mentor one another, and this has proved to be a powerful relationship. Most begin with fear that their Grand Challenge is impossible, and end with excitement and pride about what they have accomplished. The 22 UseIT interns in summer, 2005, were primarily computer science and engineering majors, with others in geology, mathematics, English, digital media design, physics, history, and cinema. The 2005 Grand Challenge was to "build an earthquake monitoring system" to aid scientists who must visualize rapidly evolving earthquake sequences and convey information to emergency personnel and the public. Most UseIT interns were engaged in software engineering, bringing new datasets and functionality to SCEC-VDO (Virtual Display of Objects), a 3D visualization software that was prototyped by interns last year, using Java3D and an extensible, plug-in architecture based on the Eclipse Integrated Development Environment. Other UseIT interns used SCEC-VDO to make animated movies, and experimented with imagery in order to communicate concepts and events in earthquake science. One movie-making project included the creation of an assessment to test the effectiveness of the movie''s educational message. Finally, one intern created an interactive, multimedia presentation of the UseIT program.

  12. Lewis' Educational and Research Collaborative Intership Program Grant Closeout Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The Lewis' Educational and Research Collaborative Internship Program (LERCIP) is a collaborative undertaking by the Office of Educational Programs at NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field (formerly NASA Lewis Research Center) and the Ohio Aerospace Institute. This program provides 10-week internships and 10 or 12-week fellowships for undergraduate/graduate students and secondary school teachers. Approximately 130 interns are selected to participate in this program each year and begin arriving the second week in May. The internships provide students with introductory professional experiences to complement their academic programs. The interns are given assignments on research and development projects under the personal guidance of NASA professional staff members. Each intern is assigned a NASA mentor who facilitates a research assignment. In addition to the research assignment, the summer program includes a strong educational component that enhances the professional stature of the participants. The educational activities include a research symposium and a variety of workshops, lectures and short courses. An important aspect of the program is that it includes students with diverse social, cultural and economic backgrounds.

  13. BY THE EXPERIENCE OF FOREIGN INTERNSHIP AMONG RUSSIAN STUDENTS’ OF CIVIL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT OF IZHSTU AT BRNO UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY (2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valery P. Grahov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to investigate the possibilities of foreign internships among Russian students. Methods. The methods involve general-scientific methods of theoretical research – analysis and synthesis. Results. The article is devoted to the analysis of foreign internships of Civil Engineering Department of Kalashnikov Izhevsk State Technical University in foreign universities for a specific period of time. The authors analyze the entry of Russian students into the European educational process. Additionally, the authors describe the educational process of training among Russian students of the Industrial and Civil Construction Department in Brno University of Technology. The training is conducted in accordance with the project of the European Union «Lifelong Learning Programme», which involves some non-profitable projects of foreign exchange of students and teachers; e.g. Erasmus Mundus, that is accessible more or less for all universities all over the world. A brief assessment of teaching subjects in the Czech University is given. The concept of students’ foreign internships as a part of preparation of intended graduates with a degree in «Construction» is extended. Evident, current and future advantages and benefits of such foreign internship projects are noted. Scientific novelty and practical significance. The research findings include the developed recommendations for students’ internship organization in foreign universities. 

  14. Work-Integrated Learning Process in Tourism Training Programs in Vietnam: Voices of Education and Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuong, Cam Thi Hong

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses the work-integrated learning (WIL) initiative embedded in selected tourism training programs in Vietnam. The research was grounded on the framework of stakeholder ethos. Drawing on tourism training curriculum analysis and interviews with lecturers, institutional leaders, industry managers and internship supervisors, this study…

  15. Technology Experiences of Student Interns in a One to One Mobile Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Theresa A.; Karademir, Tugra

    2018-01-01

    This article describes how a group of student intern teachers (n = 51) in a one to one teacher education iPad program were asked to reflect using Experience Sampling Method (ESM) on their use of technology in the classroom during internship. Interns also completed summative reflections and class discussions. Data collected both in online and…

  16. The Role of an Actuarial Director in the Development of an Introductory Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staples, Susan G.

    2014-01-01

    We describe the roles and duties of a director in developing an introductory actuarial program. Degree plan design, specialized exam courses, internship classes, coordination of efforts with Economics and Finance Departments, opportunities for creating a minor in actuarial mathematics, actuarial clubs, career advice, and interaction with actuarial…

  17. 42 CFR 65a.1 - To what programs do these regulations apply?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... (see parts 63 and 64a of this chapter), or (4) Research training support under the NIH AIDS Research..., INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SCIENCES HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES BASIC RESEARCH... part apply to the award of grants to support programs for basic research and training directed towards...

  18. The Roles of Site-Based Mentors in Educational Leadership Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowser, Audrey; Hux, Annette; McBride, Jackie; Nichols, Cindy; Nichols, Joe

    2014-01-01

    This study focused on whether the roles of site based mentors in an educational leadership program were successfully completed. Three hundred eleven internship candidates' portfolios were reviewed to determine whether mentors essentially performed the tasks of collaboration, supervision, and evaluation of their protegees portfolios. A bibliography…

  19. Tracing the evolution of chiropractic students' confidence in clinical and patient communication skills during a clinical internship: a multi-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecimovich, Mark; Volet, Simone

    2012-06-19

    Anecdotal evidence points to variations in individual students' evolving confidence in clinical and patient communication skills during a clinical internship. A better understanding of the specific aspects of internships that contribute to increasing or decreasing confidence is needed to best support students during the clinical component of their study. A multi-method approach, combining two large-scale surveys with 269 students and three in-depth individual interviews with a sub-sample of 29 students, was used to investigate the evolution of change in student confidence during a 10-month long internship. Change in levels of confidence in patient communication and clinical skills was measured and relationship to demographic factors were explored. The interviews elicited students' accounts and reflections on what affected the evolution of their confidence during the internship. At the start of their internship, students were more confident in their patient communication skills than their clinical skills but prior experience was significantly related to confidence in both. Initial confidence in patient communication skills was also related to age and prior qualification but not gender whilst confidence in clinical skills was related to gender but not age or prior qualification. These influences were maintained over time. Overall, students' levels of confidence in patient communication and clinical skills confidence increased significantly over the duration of the internship with evidence that change over time in these two aspects were inter-related. To explore how specific aspects of the internship contributed to changing levels of confidence, two extreme sub-groups of interviewees were identified, those with the least increase and those with the highest increase in professional confidence over time. A number of key factors affecting the development of confidence were identified, including among others, interactions with clinicians and patients, personal agency and

  20. Tracing the evolution of chiropractic students’ confidence in clinical and patient communication skills during a clinical internship: a multi-methods study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Anecdotal evidence points to variations in individual students’ evolving confidence in clinical and patient communication skills during a clinical internship. A better understanding of the specific aspects of internships that contribute to increasing or decreasing confidence is needed to best support students during the clinical component of their study. Methods A multi-method approach, combining two large-scale surveys with 269 students and three in-depth individual interviews with a sub-sample of 29 students, was used to investigate the evolution of change in student confidence during a 10-month long internship. Change in levels of confidence in patient communication and clinical skills was measured and relationship to demographic factors were explored. The interviews elicited students’ accounts and reflections on what affected the evolution of their confidence during the internship. Results At the start of their internship, students were more confident in their patient communication skills than their clinical skills but prior experience was significantly related to confidence in both. Initial confidence in patient communication skills was also related to age and prior qualification but not gender whilst confidence in clinical skills was related to gender but not age or prior qualification. These influences were maintained over time. Overall, students’ levels of confidence in patient communication and clinical skills confidence increased significantly over the duration of the internship with evidence that change over time in these two aspects were inter-related. To explore how specific aspects of the internship contributed to changing levels of confidence, two extreme sub-groups of interviewees were identified, those with the least increase and those with the highest increase in professional confidence over time. A number of key factors affecting the development of confidence were identified, including among others, interactions with clinicians

  1. Authentic Learning Experiences for Educators through Summer Internships: Revising the DIG Texas Instructional Blueprints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, A. O.; Bohls-Graham, E.; Jacobs, B. E.; Ellins, K. K.

    2014-12-01

    Texas teachers have expressed a need for engaging activities for use in high school Earth science courses. With funding from the NSF, geoscience and education faculty from different institutions around the state collaborated with ten Earth science teachers to create five online Earth science instructional blueprints. The work is part of the DIG (Diversity and Innovation for Geosciences) Texas Instructional Blueprint project. A blueprint stitches together nine units for a yearlong Earth science course (scope and sequence). Each unit covers three weeks of teaching and contains lectures, readings, visualizations, lab investigations, learning activities, and other educational materials from credible sources, which are aligned with Texas state science standards for Earth and Space Science and the Earth Science Literacy Principles. Taken together, the collection of activities address the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). During summer 2014, three minority-serving secondary teachers completed a six-week internship at The University of Texas Institute for Geophysics (UTIG). As DIG Texas Education Interns, we organized and revised the content of the units, created scaffolding notes, and built blueprints by selecting groups of nine units from the project's current collection of twenty-one units. Because fieldwork is an important element of geoscience learning, we integrated virtual field trips into each unit. We (1) gained expertise in selecting high quality activities that directly correlate with state standards and address the Earth Science Literacy Principles; (2) developed a keen awareness of the value of the NGSS; (3) learned how to navigate through the NGSS website to track the relationships between the Science and Engineering Practices, Disciplinary Core Ideas, and Crosscutting Concepts for Earth science, as well as connections to other disciplines in the same grade level. Collaborating with other secondary Earth science teachers introduced each of us to new

  2. Boot cAMP: educational outcomes after 4 successive years of preparatory simulation-based training at onset of internship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Gladys L; Page, David W; Coe, Nicholas P; Lee, Patrick C; Patterson, Lisa A; Skylizard, Loki; St Louis, Myron; Amaral, Marisa H; Wait, Richard B; Seymour, Neal E

    2012-01-01

    Preparatory training for new trainees beginning residency has been used by a variety of programs across the country. To improve the clinical orientation process for our new postgraduate year (PGY)-1 residents, we developed an intensive preparatory training curriculum inclusive of cognitive and procedural skills, training activities considered essential for early PGY-1 clinical management. We define our surgical PGY-1 Boot Camp as preparatory simulation-based training implemented at the onset of internship for introduction of skills necessary for basic surgical patient problem assessment and management. This orientation process includes exposure to simulated patient care encounters and technical skills training essential to new resident education. We report educational results of 4 successive years of Boot Camp training. Results were analyzed to determine if performance evidenced at onset of training was predictive of later educational outcomes. Learners were PGY-1 residents, in both categorical and preliminary positions, at our medium-sized surgical residency program. Over a 4-year period, from July 2007 to July 2010, all 30 PGY-1 residents starting surgical residency at our institution underwent specific preparatory didactic and skills training over a 9-week period. This consisted of mandatory weekly 1-hour and 3-hour sessions in the Simulation Center, representing a 4-fold increase in time in simulation laboratory training compared with the remainder of the year. Training occurred in 8 procedural skills areas (instrument use, knot-tying, suturing, laparoscopic skills, airway management, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, central venous catheter, and chest tube insertion) and in simulated patient care (shock, surgical emergencies, and respiratory, cardiac, and trauma management) using a variety of high- and low-tech simulation platforms. Faculty and senior residents served as instructors. All educational activities were structured to include preparatory materials

  3. MillenniumDoen! and global citizenship : The effects of voluntary work or internship in a developing country on the development of Global Citizenship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. (Saskia) Rademaker

    2015-01-01

    This study will examine whether voluntary work or an internship in a developing country contributes to the development of global citizenship among young people. For the purpose of this study, global citizenship will be defined as a combination of social awareness and possessing international

  4. Social Media Use in the Career Development of Graduate Students: The Mediating Role of Internship Effectiveness and the Moderating Role of Zhongyong

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Changqing; Gu, Jibao; Wu, Wei; Zhai, Xuesong; Song, Jun

    2017-01-01

    This paper proves that social media use can contribute in important ways to employability outcomes. Specifically, results from a survey of 196 recent graduate students in China indicate that social media use is positively related to employability skills. Internship effectiveness serve as a mediating mechanism through which social media use affects…

  5. Comparison of the Effects of Cooperative Learning and Traditional Learning Methods on the Improvement of Drug-Dose Calculation Skills of Nursing Students Undergoing Internships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, Tulay; Yildiz, Dilek

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of cooperative learning and traditional learning methods on the development of drug-calculation skills. Design: Final-year nursing students ("n" = 85) undergoing internships during the 2010-2011 academic year at a nursing school constituted the study group of this…

  6. Cleveland Clinic's summer research program in reproductive medicine: an inside look at the class of 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damayanthi Durairajanayagam

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The American Center for Reproductive Medicine's summer internship course in reproductive medicine and research at Cleveland Clinic is a rigorous, results-oriented annual program that began in 2008 to train both local and international students in the fundamentals of scientific research and writing. The foremost goal of the program is to encourage premedical and medical students to aspire toward a career as a physician–scientist. The internship provides participants with an opportunity to engage in original bench research and scientific writing while developing theoretical knowledge and soft skills. This study describes selected survey responses from interns who participated in the 2014 internship program. The objective of these surveys was to elicit the interns' perspective on the internship program, its strengths and weaknesses, and to obtain insight into potential areas for improvement. Methods: Questionnaires were structured around the five fundamental aspects of the program: 1 theoretical knowledge, 2 bench research, 3 scientific writing, 4 mentorship, and 5 soft skills. In addition, an exit survey gathered information on factors that attracted the interns to the program, communication with mentors, and overall impression of the research program. Results: The opportunity to experience hands-on bench research and scientific writing, personalized mentorship, and the reputation of the institution were appreciated and ranked highly among the interns. Nearly 90% of the interns responded that the program was beneficial and well worth the time and effort invested by both interns and faculty. Conclusion: The outcomes portrayed in this study will be useful in the implementation of new programs or refinement of existing medical research training programs.

  7. Cleveland Clinic's summer research program in reproductive medicine: an inside look at the class of 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durairajanayagam, Damayanthi; Kashou, Anthony H; Tatagari, Sindhuja; Vitale, Joseph; Cirenza, Caroline; Agarwal, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    The American Center for Reproductive Medicine's summer internship course in reproductive medicine and research at Cleveland Clinic is a rigorous, results-oriented annual program that began in 2008 to train both local and international students in the fundamentals of scientific research and writing. The foremost goal of the program is to encourage premedical and medical students to aspire toward a career as a physician-scientist. The internship provides participants with an opportunity to engage in original bench research and scientific writing while developing theoretical knowledge and soft skills. This study describes selected survey responses from interns who participated in the 2014 internship program. The objective of these surveys was to elicit the interns' perspective on the internship program, its strengths and weaknesses, and to obtain insight into potential areas for improvement. Questionnaires were structured around the five fundamental aspects of the program: 1) theoretical knowledge, 2) bench research, 3) scientific writing, 4) mentorship, and 5) soft skills. In addition, an exit survey gathered information on factors that attracted the interns to the program, communication with mentors, and overall impression of the research program. The opportunity to experience hands-on bench research and scientific writing, personalized mentorship, and the reputation of the institution were appreciated and ranked highly among the interns. Nearly 90% of the interns responded that the program was beneficial and well worth the time and effort invested by both interns and faculty. The outcomes portrayed in this study will be useful in the implementation of new programs or refinement of existing medical research training programs.

  8. Summer Undergraduate Research Program: Environmental studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMillan, J. [ed.

    1994-12-31

    The purpose of the summer undergraduate internship program for research in environmental studies is to provide an opportunity for well-qualified students to undertake an original research project as an apprentice to an active research scientist in basic environmental research. The students are offered research topics at the Medical University in the scientific areas of pharmacology and toxicology, epidemiology and risk assessment, environmental microbiology, and marine sciences. Students are also afforded the opportunity to work with faculty at the University of Charleston, SC, on projects with an environmental theme. Ten well-qualified students from colleges and universities throughout the eastern United States were accepted into the program.

  9. Nuclear thermal source transfer unit, post-blast soil sample drying system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiser, Ralph S.; Valencia, Matthew J

    2017-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory states that its mission is ''To solve national security challenges through scientific excellence.'' The Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) programs exists to engage undergraduate students in STEM work by providing opportunity to work at DOE facilities. As an undergraduate mechanical engineering intern under the SULI program at Los Alamos during the fall semester of 2016, I had the opportunity to contribute to the mission of the Laboratory while developing skills in a STEM discipline. I worked with Technology Applications, an engineering group that supports non-proliferation, counter terrorism, and emergency response missions. This group specializes in tool design, weapons engineering, rapid prototyping, and mission training. I assisted with two major projects during my appointment Los Alamos. The first was a thermal source transportation unit, intended to safely contain a nuclear thermal source during transit. The second was a soil drying unit for use in nuclear postblast field sample collection. These projects have given me invaluable experience working alongside a team of professional engineers. Skills developed include modeling, simulation, group design, product and system design, and product testing.

  10. Nuclear thermal source transfer unit, post-blast soil sample drying system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiser, Ralph S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Valencia, Matthew J [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-03

    Los Alamos National Laboratory states that its mission is “To solve national security challenges through scientific excellence.” The Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) programs exists to engage undergraduate students in STEM work by providing opportunity to work at DOE facilities. As an undergraduate mechanical engineering intern under the SULI program at Los Alamos during the fall semester of 2016, I had the opportunity to contribute to the mission of the Laboratory while developing skills in a STEM discipline. I worked with Technology Applications, an engineering group that supports non-proliferation, counter terrorism, and emergency response missions. This group specializes in tool design, weapons engineering, rapid prototyping, and mission training. I assisted with two major projects during my appointment Los Alamos. The first was a thermal source transportation unit, intended to safely contain a nuclear thermal source during transit. The second was a soil drying unit for use in nuclear postblast field sample collection. These projects have given me invaluable experience working alongside a team of professional engineers. Skills developed include modeling, simulation, group design, product and system design, and product testing.

  11. Idaho National Laboratory Human Capitol Development Program Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rynes, Amanda R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative HCD Subprogram has successfully employed unique nuclear capabilities and employee expertise through INL to achieve multiple initiatives in FY14. These opportunities range from internship programs to university and training courses. One of the central facets of this work has been the international safeguards pre inspector training course. Another significant milestone is the INL led university engagement effort which resulted in courses being offered at ISU and University of Utah.

  12. Station Program Note Pull Automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Upon commencement of my internship, I was in charge of maintaining the CoFR (Certificate of Flight Readiness) Tool. The tool acquires data from existing Excel workbooks on NASA's and Boeing's databases to create a new spreadsheet listing out all the potential safety concerns for upcoming flights and software transitions. Since the application was written in Visual Basic, I had to learn a new programming language and prepare to handle any malfunctions within the program. Shortly afterwards, I was given the assignment to automate the Station Program Note (SPN) Pull process. I developed an application, in Python, that generated a GUI (Graphical User Interface) that will be used by the International Space Station Safety & Mission Assurance team here at Johnson Space Center. The application will allow its users to download online files with the click of a button, import SPN's based on three different pulls, instantly manipulate and filter spreadsheets, and compare the three sources to determine which active SPN's (Station Program Notes) must be reviewed for any upcoming flights, missions, and/or software transitions. Initially, to perform the NASA SPN pull (one of three), I had created the program to allow the user to login to a secure webpage that stores data, input specific parameters, and retrieve the desired SPN's based on their inputs. However, to avoid any conflicts with sustainment, I altered it so that the user may login and download the NASA file independently. After the user has downloaded the file with the click of a button, I defined the program to check for any outdated or pre-existing files, for successful downloads, to acquire the spreadsheet, convert it from a text file to a comma separated file and finally into an Excel spreadsheet to be filtered and later scrutinized for specific SPN numbers. Once this file has been automatically manipulated to provide only the SPN numbers that are desired, they are stored in a global variable, shown on the GUI, and

  13. THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A U.S. SUPPORT PROGRAM INTERSHIP PROGRAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PEPPER, S.E.

    2003-01-01

    In 2002, the U.S. Support Program to IAEA Safeguards established a program of one-year paid internships with the IAEA Department of Safeguards for students and recent graduates. Six interns are currently working with the IAEA in software development and information collection activities. The program is administered through the International Safeguards Project Office (ISPO) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Software development assignments were considered to be most feasible because of the considerable abilities of many computer science students after a few years' education. Candidates in information science were also recruited because of an existing internship program managed by the Monterey Institute of International Studies. ISPO recruited students from US. colleges and other sources. Applications were collected and provided to the IAEA for review and selection. SGIT then identified the best applicants and, after confirming their intention to accept the position, tailored assignments based on their qualifications. Before the assignments started, ISPO conducted an orientation to provide the interns with information to ease their transition into working with the IAEA and living in Vienna. Four interns began their assignments in software development in June 2002 and two others began their assignments in information collection in July and August. The IAEA, the interns, and the Subgroup on Safeguards Technical Support have found the assignments to be beneficial. The internship program provides additional staff to the IAEA at low cost to the USSP, introduces young professionals to careers in the nuclear industry and international civil service, and provides the IAEA access to U.S. academic institutions. In 2003, the program will be expanded to include engineering and technical writing in support of the Division of Safeguards Technical Services. The paper will discuss the recruitment and selection of interns and the administration of the program

  14. SUPERVISED CURRICULUM INTERNSHIP IN GEOGRAPHY AND PEDAGOGICAL MEDIATION: between knowledge and practices for a dialogical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Kennedy Silva dos Santos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present article is the result of an inquiry which has for its object the pedagogical mediation in Geography, with reference to the supervised curriculum internship in Geography, obligatory component for teacher training in degree courses. We start from an analysis of reflective professional trajectory teaching, in research supported type "state of the art" or "state of knowledge" for bibliographical supports our interventions (FERREIRA, 2002. We seek authors such as (CORTELLA, 2008; FAZENDA, 1991; FREIRE, 2003; LIBÂNEO, 2005; TARDIF, 2002; among others further deepening of the central categories for our analyzes. We intend to test this, open up new possibilities for understanding the role of teaching practice in teacher education in the light of the narrowing theory and practice. The reflection on the everyday, especially from the real questions of the teacher, is in the condition to proceed with training more articulate and coherent with reality. The lack of a more systematic partnership between schools and the University has led to the development of proposals and optimized with little impact on the educational community. Being a teacher today is a challenge that involves humanitarian issue and expertise needed to see and mingle with the world. RESUMO: O presente artigo resulta de uma investigação que tem por objeto a mediação pedagógica em Geografia, tendo como referência o estágio curricular supervisionado, componente obrigatório para formação de professores nos cursos de licenciatura. Partimos de uma análise reflexiva da trajetória profissional docente, respaldados em pesquisas do tipo “estado da arte” ou “estado do conhecimento” de caráter bibliográfico para dá suporte a nossas intervenções (FERREIRA, 2002. Buscamos em autores como (CORTELLA, 2008; FAZENDA, 1991; FREIRE, 2003; LIBÂNEO, 2005; TARDIF, 2002; entre outros um maior aprofundamento das categorias centrais para nossas análises. Pretendemos com este

  15. Competencies of Career-Entry Medical Technology Graduates of Lyceum of Batangas: Basis for Enhancement of the Internship Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Anacleta P.

    2010-01-01

    The role of medical technologists in the years due to changes in the laboratory environment. curriculum is needed to prepare graduates for changes in laboratory medicine. It is the ultimate goal of the College to prepare students for career entry positions as medical technology professionals. The curriculum should be designed to prepare the…

  16. Education, Technology, and Media: A Peak into My Summer Internship at NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, James

    2004-01-01

    My name is James Moon and I am a senor at Tennessee State University where my major is Aeronautical and Industrial Technology with a concentration in industrial electronics. I am currently serving my internship in the Engineering and Technical Services Directorate at the Glenn Research Center (GRC). The Engineering and Technical Service Directorate provides the services and infrastructure for the Glenn Research Center to take research concepts to reality. They provide a full range of integrated services including engineering, advanced prototyping and testing, facility management, and information technology for NASA, industry, and academia. Engineering and Technical Services contains the core knowledge in Information Technology (IT). This includes data systems and analysis, inter and intranet based systems design and data security. Including the design and development of embedded real-time sohare applications for flight and supporting ground systems, Engineering and Technical Services provide a wide range of IT services and products specific to the Glenn Research Center research and engineering community.

  17. Writing cases as a knowledge capture process in a competitive intelligence program

    OpenAIRE

    Mallowan , Monica; Marcon , Christian

    2009-01-01

    International audience; Students in Competitive Intelligence (CI) programs submit a report following their internship in an organisation. It is proposed that the result of their experiences be shared with their peers, in the form of cases written for in-class analysis. A knowledge base is thus created, which gradually becomes the program's memory and, by its constant renewal and connection with the reality, the most useful teaching tool for the professor.

  18. Design and Control of Small Neutral Beam Arc Chamber for Investigations of DIII-D Neutral Beam Failure During Helium Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fremlin, Carl; Beckers, Jasper; Crowley, Brendan; Rauch, Joseph; Scoville, Jim

    2017-10-01

    The Neutral Beam system on the DIII-D tokamak consists of eight ion sources using the Common Long Pulse Source (CLPS) design. During helium operation, desired for research regarding the ITER pre-nuclear phase, it has been observed that the ion source arc chamber performance steadily deteriorates, eventually failing due to electrical breakdown of the insulation. A significant investment of manpower and time is required for repairs. To study the cause of failure a small analogue of the DIII-D neutral beam arc chamber has been constructed. This poster presents the design and analysis of the arc chamber including the PLC based operational control system for the experiment, analysis of the magnetic confinement and details of the diagnostic suite. Work supported in part by US DoE under the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) program and under DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  19. Investigation of Liquid Metal Embrittlement of Materials for use in Fusion Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Daniel; Jaworski, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Liquid metals can provide a continually replenished material for the first wall and extraction blankets of fusion reactors. However, research has shown that solid metal surfaces will experience embrittlement when exposed to liquid metals under stress. Therefore, it is important to understand the changes in structural strength of the solid metal materials and test different surface treatments that can limit embrittlement. Research was conducted to design and build an apparatus for exposing solid metal samples to liquid metal under high stress and temperature. The apparatus design, results of tensile testing, and surface imaging of fractured samples will be presented. This work was supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists (WDTS) under the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internships Program (SULI).

  20. A transitional curriculum for preparing medical students for internship, does it work?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Dehghani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In a formative evaluation, we were supposed to find whether an innovative program has some merits to be continued or not. We also determined the critical points of the program. The evaluated program was a clinical pre-clerkship curriculum launched for departing to a less stressful medical clerkship. Materials and Methods: We analyzed the information contained in the students′ logbooks. Using Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure standardized questionnaire, we also assessed the students′ perception of learning environment within six clinical departments. Results: Totally, 64% of expected patient contacts, and teaching of more than 71% of required skills at 4 departments were carried out and students had more positive than negative perspective of their learning environments. Conclusion: The evaluand is a worthwhile program to be continued, though it needs some considerations for improvement.

  1. A Correlation Study between Student Performance in Food and Beverage Services Course and Internship in F&B Department of Hospitality Business

    OpenAIRE

    Dexter R. Buted; Sevillia S. Felicen; Abigail I. Manzano

    2014-01-01

    One of the biggest challenges hospitality educators face today is determining clear goals and objectives for the curriculum to the constantly changing needs of the industry. It is crucial to close the gap between what is taught to students and what the industry expects from the graduates being hired. This study aimed to assess the relationship between the performance of the students on Food and Beverage Services Course and their internship performance in Food and Beverage department in differ...

  2. Native American Training Program in Petroleum Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Winifred M.; Kokesh, Judith H.

    1999-04-27

    This report outlines a comprehensive training program for members of Native American tribes whose lands have oil and gas resources. The program has two components: short courses and internships. Programs are proposed for: (1) adult tribes representatives who are responsible for managing tribal mineral holdings, setting policy, or who work in the oil and gas industry; (2) graduate and undergraduate college students who are tribal members and are studying in the appropriate fields; and (3) high school and middle school teachers, science teachers. Materials and program models already have been developed for some components of the projects. The plan is a coordinated, comprehensive effort to use existing resources to accomplish its goals. Partnerships will be established with the tribes, the BIA, tribal organizations, other government agencies, and the private sector to implement the program.

  3. Construction of a competence-based curriculum for internship in obstetrics and gynecology within the medical course at the Federal University of Ceará (Sobral campus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Juvenal Linhares

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: This research project arose from a proposal made to the teachers by the students of a medical course at a federal university in Brazil, from their personal experiences regarding the skills and competencies that should be developed during the obstetrics and gynecology (OBG stage of the internship. The objective here was to develop the matrix of skills necessary for training good general physicians in the medical course.DESIGN AND SETTING: Exploratory qualitative study conducted in a federal university in Brazil.METHODS: The basis for developing these competencies among OBG interns was "The Competency Matrix for Medical Internship" developed by Bollela and Machado. The instrument was presented to, analyzed by and modified by a set of OBG specialists, at two sessions.RESULTS: The specific competencies expected from students over the internship in OBG were framed within overall topics that had previously been determined and listed: healthcare, decision-making, communication and interpersonal relationships, management and organization of the Brazilian National Health System (Sistema Único de Saúde, SUS and professionalism.CONCLUSIONS: A competency matrix that standardizes the minimum requirements that interns should be capable of putting into practice after concluding the OBG stage is a valuable tool for ensuring student performance and a fair and rigorous assessment for them, thereby seeking to train good general physicians who meet the community's needs.

  4. Promoting Health Through Policy and Systems Change: Public Health Students and Mentors on the Value of Policy Advocacy Experience in Academic Internships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez, Daniela; Pell, Dylan; Forster-Cox, Sue; Garcia, Evelyn; Ornelas, Sophia; Bandstra, Brenna; Mata, Holly

    2017-05-01

    Emerging professionals and new Certified Health Education Specialists often lack academic training in and actual experience in National Commission for Health Education Credentialing Area of Responsibility VII: Communicate, Promote, and Advocate for Health, Health Education/Promotion, and the Profession. For undergraduate and graduate students who have an opportunity to complete an internship or practicum experience, gaining experience in Competencies 7.2: Engage in advocacy for health and health education/promotion and 7.3: Influence policy and/or systems change to promote health and health education can have a profound impact on their career development and their ability to advocate for policies that promote health and health equity. Compelling evidence suggests that interventions that address social determinants of health such as poverty and education and those that change the context through improved policy or healthier environments have the greatest impact on public health, making it vital for emerging public health professionals to gain experience in policy advocacy and systems change. In this commentary, students and faculty from two large universities in the U.S.-Mexico border region reflect on the value of policy advocacy in academic internship/fieldwork experiences. Based on their experiences, they highly recommend that students seek out internship opportunities where they can participate in policy advocacy, and they encourage university faculty and practicum preceptors to provide more opportunities for policy advocacy in both classroom and fieldwork settings.

  5. Instructional Internships: Improving the Teaching and Learning Experience for Students, Interns, and Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmerich, Abby L.; Hoepner, Jerry K.; Samelson, Vicki M.

    2015-01-01

    Students training for clinical careers must acquire skills for teaching clients, their families, and fellow professionals. Guidelines for training programs in Communication Sciences and Disorders (Speech-Language Pathology), however, do not currently include standards for pedagogy. The aim of this study was to measure changes in undergraduate…

  6. CONVERSATIONS IN THE TEACHING INTERNSHIP: THE EMERGENCE OF THE POTENTIAL OF VIRTUAL LEARNING OBJECTS BY PEDAGOGICAL MEDIATION IN PHYSICS TEACHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berenice Vahl Vaniel

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article we attempt to explain a study experienced in Teaching Internship, of the Graduate Course in Physics, discipline of Physics Education Activities II, Federal University of Rio Grande-FURG. The activities developed aimed to experience teaching as an interactive and reflective process, and also investigate the potential of virtual learning objects (OV for educational activities in physics teaching. The concepts of recursion, recursiveness and structural coupling, present in Biology of Knowledge, subsidized the construction of the argument that there is a need of living, discussion and problematization in a recursive and recurring way of methodological issues related to the use of digital technologies in the context of Physics graduate courses. The analysis of this experience was based on the methodology of Discursive Textual Analysis, Moraes (2003, consisting of three phases: unitarization, categorization and meta-text. The results indicated by analysis are presented in two categories: Conversations about opportunities to teach Physics and Conversations on students’ production: the emergence of the potential of OV by pedagogical mediation, both guided by listening to the other and by recursive talk.

  7. GateWay Community College Water Resources Program Partnerships: An Opportunity for Program Success and Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaneda, M.

    2012-12-01

    GateWay Community College Water Resources Technologies (WRT) Program offers Certificate of Completions and Associate Degrees on Hydrologic Studies, Water Treatment and Wastewater Treatment. The program has been in existence since 1998 and has gone through several updates to meet the demand for professionals in those areas. The program includes theoretical and practical hands-on training in the monitoring of water quality and quantity as well as in water and industrial wastewater treatment. The WRT program offers online, face-to-face, and hybrid courses to address different student's needs for training. The program only Full-time faculty is supported by 15 adjunct- faculty professionals. Adjunct faculty is usually hired from a wide variety of professional people already working in the industry that have shown interest on teaching. Adjunct faculty also provide free tutoring to the WRT students when they are not teaching courses. The college Learning Center provides funding to support these tutoring activities. The program has an active Advisory Committee that provides guidance and recommends program changes to meet their training needs. This Advisory Committee is made of professionals from different federal, state, county agencies, and municipalities, private industry and consulting companies in the area. The Advisory Committee meets every year to provide feedback to GateWay on curriculum changes and commit to potential internship opportunities for the WRT students. Those internships (or voluntary work) are paid directly by the municipalities or agencies or can be paid by the GateWay WRT program. These internship jobs provides with an opportunity to actively promote the WRT program throughout the valley. The GateWay WRT program considers the Advisory Committee an essential component for the program success: the committee supports the program in recommending and acquiring the latest field equipment needed for the hands-on training. One of the main WRT program

  8. A retraining program for inactive physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, M; Sakai, F J; Selzer, A

    1969-11-01

    During the past two years a pilot project was conducted in which 19 inactive physicians were retrained in preparation for resumption of active practice. The initial program consisted of a flexible training program of six months to one year patterned after conventional internship-residency concepts. During the second year the program was modified by providing an initial condensed indoctrination period of two months' duration especially designed for this purpose, followed by a preceptorship type of training. The project was considered successful in permitting trainees to enter some form of active medical work, or to enroll in formal specialty training. The observations made by the faculty of the program and its accomplishments are discussed in the light of the effort expended and the cost of the project.

  9. Council of Energy Resources Tribes 1993 summer internship report: Nez Perce Tribe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crow, J.S.

    1993-08-01

    This paper is designed to be a working part of a larger project which would deal with the topic of Tribal interests affected by the DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management program and the approaches by which those Tribal interests can be advanced. Topics discussed in this paper include: background history of the Nez Perce Tribe`s relations with the US government; a Nez Perce view of tribal interests affected by DOE activities at Hanford; and a Nez Perce framework for private/governmental/tribal interest.

  10. Criteria for acceptance to preprofessional dietetics programs vs desired qualities of professionals: an analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, K K

    1995-01-01

    The objectives of this analysis were to examine the literature and compare and contrast (a) qualities preferred in preprofessional dietetics students by directors of internships and approved preprofessional practice programs (AP4s), (b) characteristics needed to succeed in a scientific field, (c) traits emphasized by dietetics training programs compared with those most valued by employers, (d) skills needed by high-level managerial dietitians and those in business and communications, and (e) qualities dietitians have aspired to develop for increased competitiveness in the marketplace. Even though the revised Standards of Education have been in place since 1988, recent evaluation of criteria for internship and AP4 admission has shown traditional emphasis on academic performance and the importance of work experience. Success in scientific pursuits has been linked with more than innate intelligence; a drive for success and enthusiasm for learning are also involved. Internships foster mostly technical learning, so development of skills in human and conceptual areas are somewhat lacking. These skills, which have been identified as valuable to employers, need greater development or more consistent identification in the selection and training process. Perhaps serious consideration should be given to applicants for preprofessional programs who have shown leadership qualities through extracurricular activities or who have given themselves the opportunity to develop and improve these skills. Such students might hasten the metamorphosis of dietetics practitioners toward improved levels of compensation and professional fulfillment.

  11. Federal Employees Health Benefits Program and Federal Employees Dental and Vision Insurance Program: eligibility for Pathway Programs participants. Interim final rule with request for comments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-06

    The U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM) is issuing an interim final regulation to update the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program (FEHBP) and the Federal Employees Dental and Vision Insurance Program (FEDVIP) regulations to reflect updated election opportunities for participants in the Pathways Programs. The Pathways Programs were created by Executive Order (E.O.) 13562, signed by the President on December 27, 2010, and are designed to enable the Federal Government to compete effectively for students and recent graduates by improving its recruitment efforts through internships and similar programs with Federal agencies. This interim final rule furthers these recruitment and retention efforts by providing health insurance, as well as dental and vision benefits, to eligible program participants and their families.

  12. Adapting and Bending the Portal to the Public: Evaluation of an NSF-Funded Science Communication Model for UNAVCO's Geoscience Summer Internships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutilly, E.; Charlevoix, D. J.; Bartel, B. A.

    2017-12-01

    UNAVCO is a National Science Foundation (NSF) facility specializing in geodesy. As part of its education and outreach work, it operates annual summer internships. In 2016, UNAVCO joined the Portal to the Public (PoP) network and the PoP model was adapted and bent to provide science communication professional development for summer interns. PoP is one way that UNAVCO invests in and trains future generations of geoscientists. The NSF-funded PoP initiative and its network, PoPNet, is a premier outreach framework connecting scientists and public audiences for over a decade. PoPNet is a network of sixty organizations committed to using the PoP method to engage the public in face-to-face interactions with practicing scientists. The PoP initiative provides professional development to scientists focused on best practices in science communication, helps them to develop an interactive exhibit consistent with their current research, and offers them a venue for interacting with the public. No other evaluation work to date has examined how summer internships can uptake the PoP model. This presentation focuses on evaluation findings from two cohorts of summer interns across two years. Three primary domains were assessed: how demographic composition across cohorts required changes to the original PoP framework, which of the PoP professional development trainings were valued (or not) by interns, and changes to intern knowledge, attitudes, and abilities to communicate science. Analyses via surveys and interviews revealed that level of intern geoscience knowledge was a major factor in deciding the focus of the work, specifically whether to create new hands-on exhibits or use existing ones. Regarding the use of PoP trainings, there was no obvious pattern in what interns preferred. Most growth and learning for interns occurred during and after the outreach activity. Results of this evaluation can be used to inform other applications of the PoP approach in summer internships.

  13. Education Program on Fossil Resources Including Coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usami, Masahiro

    Fossil fuels including coal play a key role as crucial energies in contributing to economic development in Asia. On the other hand, its limited quantity and the environmental problems causing from its usage have become a serious global issue and a countermeasure to solve such problems is very much demanded. Along with the pursuit of sustainable development, environmentally-friendly use of highly efficient fossil resources should be therefore, accompanied. Kyushu-university‧s sophisticated research through long years of accumulated experience on the fossil resources and environmental sectors together with the advanced large-scale commercial and empirical equipments will enable us to foster cooperative research and provide internship program for the future researchers. Then, this program is executed as a consignment business from the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry from 2007 fiscal year to 2009 fiscal year. The lecture that uses the textbooks developed by this program is scheduled to be started a course in fiscal year 2010.

  14. Do medical students and young physicians assess reliably their self-efficacy regarding communication skills? A prospective study from end of medical school until end of internship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gude, Tore; Finset, Arnstein; Anvik, Tor; Bærheim, Anders; Fasmer, Ole Bernt; Grimstad, Hilde; Vaglum, Per

    2017-06-30

    This prospective study from end of medical school through internship investigates the course and possible change of self- reported self-efficacy in communication skills compared with observers' ratings of such skills in consultations with simulated patients. Sixty-two medical students (43 females) from four Norwegian universities performed a videotaped consultation with a simulated patient immediately before medical school graduation (T1) and after internship (internal medicine, surgery and family medicine, half a year each - T2). Before each consultation, the participants assessed their general self-efficacy in communication skills. Trained observers scored the videos and applied a well-validated instrument to rate the communication behaviour. Results from the two assessment methods were correlated at both time points and possible differences from T1 to T2 were explored. A close to zero correlation between self-efficacy and observed communication skills were found at T1. At T2, participants' self-efficacy scores were inversely correlated with levels of observed skills, demonstrating a lack of concordance between young physicians' own assessment of self-efficacy and observers' assessment. When dividing the sample in three groups based on the observers' scores (low 2/3), the group of male physicians showed higher levels of self-efficacy than females in all the three performance groups at T1. At T2, those having a high performance score yielded a low self-efficacy, regardless of gender. The lack of positive correlations between self-efficacy assessment and expert ratings points to limitations in the applicability of self-assessment measures of communication skills. Due to gender differences, groups of female and male physicians should be investigated separately. Those obtaining high-performance ratings from observers, through the period of internship, may become more conscious of how demanding clinical communication with patients may be. This insight may represent a

  15. Extension of Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program's Fluid Property Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Kishan

    2011-01-01

    This internship focused on the development of additional capabilities for the General Fluid Systems Simulation Program (GFSSP). GFSSP is a thermo-fluid code used to evaluate system performance by a finite volume-based network analysis method. The program was developed primarily to analyze the complex internal flow of propulsion systems and is capable of solving many problems related to thermodynamics and fluid mechanics. GFSSP is integrated with thermodynamic programs that provide fluid properties for sub-cooled, superheated, and saturation states. For fluids that are not included in the thermodynamic property program, look-up property tables can be provided. The look-up property tables of the current release version can only handle sub-cooled and superheated states. The primary purpose of the internship was to extend the look-up tables to handle saturated states. This involves a) generation of a property table using REFPROP, a thermodynamic property program that is widely used, and b) modifications of the Fortran source code to read in an additional property table containing saturation data for both saturated liquid and saturated vapor states. Also, a method was implemented to calculate the thermodynamic properties of user-fluids within the saturation region, given values of pressure and enthalpy. These additions required new code to be written, and older code had to be adjusted to accommodate the new capabilities. Ultimately, the changes will lead to the incorporation of this new capability in future versions of GFSSP. This paper describes the development and validation of the new capability.

  16. Competitividade da Agricultura Familiar no Rio Grande do SulI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Pinheiro de Sousa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo objetiva identificar os determinantes da competitividade da agricultura familiar nos municípios gaúchos; mensurar um índice de desempenho competitivo da agricultura familiar (IDAF em tais municípios; e verificar se há diferença significativa na competitividade da agricultura familiar entre as mesorregiões gaúchas. Para tal, utilizaram-se os métodos de estatística multivariada de análise fatorial e os testes paramétricos de Levene e t de Student para dados não pareados. Os resultados indicaram que apenas dois municípios gaúchos apresentaram alto nível de desempenho competitivo da agricultura familiar, considerando os parâmetros estabelecidos. Verificou-se também que há diferenças significativas na competitividade da agricultura familiar entre as mesorregiões gaúchas

  17. The effectiveness of CPR training during anesthesia internship rotation on improvement of interns, knowledge and clinical skills of Lorestan university of medical sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    sepideh Vahabi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background : Since only the correct and effective Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR can increase the survival of patients with cardiopulmonary arrest, the aim of this study is to determine the effects of CPR training in the anesthetioligy ward to improve CPR knowledge and clinical skills of interns of Lorestan university of medical sciences. Materials and Methods : A 10-month Educational experimental study was done on 31 undergraduate medical students at Lorestan university of medical sciences in 2013. During a period of 15 days of anesthesiology internship course, all these students underwent CPR training including Basic Life Support ( BLS , Advanced Cardiac Life Support ( ACLS and practical skills. Data were collected via a questionnaire with 4 parts including demographic, pre and post knowledge and skills as standpoint of interns and ward,s professor. Results: After training the mean of score about knowledge of CPR and its practical skills significantly increased from 5.68 to 7.94 and 10.65 to 23.45 respectivly (PV=0.0001 . A significant relationship between preinternship exam score and knowledge of CPR before anesthesiology internship course was shown (PV=0.001, but there was no significant relationship with practical skills score pre and post CPR training in anesthesilogy ward.(PV=0.38 Conclusion: The CPR training course in anesthetiology ward leads to significant increase in CPR skills and Knowledge of medical interns. Adding this course to undergraduated medical students is essential

  18. Pasantías PENTA UC: Una Propuesta Innovadora de Desarrollo Profesional Docente PENTA UC Internships: An Innovative Proposal for Teacher Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina García

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Se evaluaron procesos y resultados obtenidos durante la implementación de un nuevo modelo de perfeccionamiento docente, Pasantía PENTA UC, que propone que profesores asistan como alumnos, durante un semestre, a un curso dictado por académicos universitarios para escolares con talentos académicos, y así profundicen en contenidos de sus disciplinas y en herramientas metodológicas, y elaboren un proyecto de transferencia de lo aprendido al aula regular. Los resultados muestran que los profesores aumentan sus conocimientos, aprenden herramientas metodológicas, reflexionan sobre el proceso de aprendizaje y desarrollan proyectos de calidad y viables. Así, la Pasantía PENTA UC se vislumbra como una opción potencialmente efectiva de perfeccionamiento.Procedures and outcomes obtained during the implementation of a new teacher professional development model, Pasantía PENTA UC, were evaluated, this internship proposes that teachers attend, as students, during a semester, to a course dictated by university professors to gifted students, and thus getting in-depth knowledge in their areas of expertise and acquiring new methodological tools, and to create a transference project from the internship to the regular classroom. The results show that the teachers increase their knowledge, learn methodological tools, reflect over the learning process, and develop quality and viable projects. Thus, Pasantía PENTA UC outstands as a potentially effective improvement option.

  19. Comparison and Evaluation of Motivation and Attitude of Medical Students at Basic Sciences and Internship phase on Cheating in Exams at Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences in 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliasghar Jame-Bozorgi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: There is much evidence that the prevalence of academic misbehaviors is increasing in universities. This study examined the motivation and attitudes of medical students of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences on cheating and its frequency.Methods: The study is a survey of medical students’ of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences attitudes on cheating and Data was analyzed using Chi-square and McNemar's test.Results: One hundred and sixty medical students participated in this study. The mean and standard deviation of students’ age was 22.69±2.29 years. Basic Sciences and internship students’ attitudes on three cheating behaviors, including cheating from others (P=0.028, helping other students to copy answers during exams (P=0.001, and recording false reports deliberately to facilitate assignments were significantly different (P=0.0001. The students' highest motivation for cheating was fear of failing in the exam (79.3% and difficulty of the course (77.5%.Conclusions: The results showed that there were a higher number of interns than basic sciences students considered two behaviors of helping others to cheat and copying from one’s hand as cheating. It seems that policy-making in universities must be in a way that the problems of educational program, attitude and environment get more attention. In this regard, medical ethics education, reduced stress and pressure associated with medical education, fair and decisive punishment for dishonest people and appropriate resource allocation should be carried out for exam’s environment control.Keywords: Motivation, Attitude, Medical Students, Cheating

  20. A Program to Prepare Graduate Students for Careers in Climate Adaptation Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntly, N.; Belmont, P.; Flint, C.; Gordillo, L.; Howe, P. D.; Lutz, J. A.; Null, S. E.; Reed, S.; Rosenberg, D. E.; Wang, S. Y.

    2017-12-01

    We describe our experiences creating a graduate program that addresses the need for a next generation of scientists who can produce, communicate, and help implement actionable science. The Climate Adaptation Science (CAS) graduate program, funded by the National Science Foundation Research Traineeship (NRT) program, prepares graduate students for careers at the interfaces of science with policy and management in the field of climate adaptation, which is a major 21st-century challenge for science and society. The program is interdisciplinary, with students and faculty from natural, social, and physical sciences, engineering, and mathematics, and is based around interdisciplinary team research in collaboration with partners from outside of academia who have climate adaptation science needs. The program embeds students in a cycle of creating and implementing actionable science through a two-part internship, with partners from government, non-governmental organizations, and industry, that brackets and informs a year of interdisciplinary team research. The program is communication-rich, with events that foster information exchange and understanding across disciplines and workplaces. We describe the CAS program, our experiences in developing it, the research and internship experiences of students in the program, and initial metrics and feedback on the effectiveness of the program.

  1. Collaboration for cooperative work experience programs in biomedical engineering education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Shankar

    2010-01-01

    Incorporating cooperative education modules as a segment of the undergraduate educational program is aimed to assist students in gaining real-life experience in the field of their choice. The cooperative work modules facilitate the students in exploring different realistic aspects of work processes in the field. The track records for cooperative learning modules are very positive. However, it is indeed a challenge for the faculty developing Biomedical Engineering (BME) curriculum to include cooperative work experience or internship requirements coupled with a heavy course load through the entire program. The objective of the present work is to develop a scheme for collaborative co-op work experience for the undergraduate training in the fast-growing BME programs. A few co-op/internship models are developed for the students pursuing undergraduate BME degree. The salient features of one co-op model are described. The results obtained support the proposed scheme. In conclusion, the cooperative work experience will be an invaluable segment in biomedical engineering education and an appropriate model has to be selected to blend with the overall training program.

  2. Summer 2015 Internship Abstract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Courtney

    2015-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) visually shows the expression of proteins by fluorescing when exposed to certain wavelengths of light. The GFP in this experiment was used to identify cells actively releasing viruses. The experiment focused on the effect of microgravity on the GFP expression of Akata B-cells infected with Epstein Barr Virus (EBV). Two flasks were prepared with 30 million cells each and two bioreactors were prepared with 50 million cells each. All four cultures were incubated for 16 days and fed every four days. Cellometer readings were taken on the feeding days to find cell size, viability, and GFP expression. In addition, the cells were treated with Propodium monoazide (PMA) and run through real time PCR to determine viral load on the feeding days. On the International Space Station air samples are taken to analyze the bacterial and fungal organisms in the air. The Sartorius Portable Airport is being investigated for potential use on the ISS to analyze for viral content in the air. Multiple samples were taken around Johnson Space Center building 37 and in Clear Lake Pediatric Clinic. The filter used was the gelatin membrane filter and the DNA was extracted directly from the filter. The DNA was then run through real time PCR for Varicella Zoster Virus (VZV) and EBV as well as GAPDH to test for the presence of DNA. The results so far have shown low DNA yield and no positive results for VZV or EBV. Further inquiry involves accurately replicating an atmosphere with high viral load from saliva as would be found on the ISS to run the air sampler in. Another line of research is stress hormones that may be correlated to the reactivation of latent viruses. The stress hormones from saliva samples are analyzed rather than blood samples. The quantity found in saliva shows the quantity of the hormones actually attached to cells and causing a reaction, whereas in the blood the quantity of hormones is the total amount released to cause a reaction. The particular hormones tested for were cortisol, alpha-amylase, and DHEA. The DHEA was very high in the two control samples tested. Regularly, samples came into the lab from local clinics to be tested for various viruses. Saliva, blood, body scrapes, and tears were received from the clinics and then run for VZV, EBV, and Human Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1) with the results then reported back to the clinician. Blood, saliva, and urine from astronauts were also tested for viruses and logged. In addition, several cell cultures were brought up and grown, including adherent Human Lung Fibroblast (HFL) cells infected with VZV, and Akata B-cells infected with EBV.

  3. INTERNSHIP FINAL REPORT

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    test

    2005-12-31

    Dec 31, 2005 ... and level of comfort with, the issues and the various projects with which GEH ... and I do believe that there is no better way to become familiar with something ... Web maintenance and updating on a regular and on-going basis;.

  4. DHS Internship Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    House, Samantha [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    This summer I worked on projects that involved RNA sequencing of pathogens after an infection of host cells. The goal of these projects was to continue developing pathogen enrichment strategies for transcriptomic analysis, and also to perform hostpathogen interaction studies.

  5. DHS Internship Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tew, Karen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    I spent the last ten weeks working in the Systems Biology department at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, CA. Under the direction of Zachary Bent, I helped do preliminary testing/optimization of a vacuum-driven, capture-based system for pathogen RNA transcript enrichment. I also worked on a project to create mutant Yersinia enterocolitica strains in order to test which genes are involved in intracellular pathogen virulence, as well as sequencing several Klebsiella pneumoniae samples for use by a bioinformaticist.

  6. FY 2008 Next Generation Safeguards Initiative International Safeguards Education and Training Pilot Programs Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreicer, M.; Anzelon, G.; Essner, J.; Dougan, A.; Doyle, J.; Boyer, B.; Hypes, P.; Sokova, E.; Wehling, F.

    2008-01-01

    Key component of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) launched by the National Nuclear Security Administration is the development of human capital to meet present and future challenges to the safeguards regime. An effective university-level education in safeguards and related disciplines is an essential element in a layered strategy to rebuild the safeguards human resource capacity. Two pilot programs at university level, involving 44 students, were initiated and implemented in spring-summer 2008 and linked to hands-on internships at LANL or LLNL. During the internships, students worked on specific safeguards-related projects with a designated Laboratory Mentor to provide broader exposure to nuclear materials management and information analytical techniques. The Safeguards and Nuclear Material Management pilot program was a collaboration between the Texas A and M University (TAMU), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). It included a 16-lecture course held during a summer internship program. The instructors for the course were from LANL together with TAMU faculty and LLNL experts. The LANL-based course was shared with the students spending their internship at LLNL via video conference. A week-long table-top (or hands-on) exercise on was also conducted at LANL. The student population was a mix of 28 students from a 12 universities participating in a variety of summer internship programs held at LANL and LLNL. A large portion of the students were TAMU students participating in the NGSI pilot. The International Nuclear Safeguards Policy and Information Analysis pilot program was implemented at the Monterey Institute for International Studies (MIIS) in cooperation with LLNL. It included a two-week intensive course consisting of 20 lectures and two exercises. MIIS, LLNL, and speakers from other U.S. national laboratories (LANL, BNL) delivered lectures for the audience of 16 students. The majority of students

  7. PUBLIC SERVANT TEACHERS' EVALUATION DURING THE INTERNSHIP PERIOD WITHIN THE AUTONOMOUS COMMUNITY OF THE BASQUE COUNTRY: TOWARDS THE EVALUATION OF THE TEACHING ROLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karmele Totoricagüena Barandica

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this communication is to present the experience developed in the Basque Country regarding to the evaluation of the public servants in their internship period during the academic year 2015-16. The aim of this work is also to contribute the obtained conclusions to the teachers practice evaluation corpus. In that direction, and for the formalisation of the evaluation, new tools and specific materials had been prepared. The intervention carried out by the inspection had been done first informing and then interacting with the participants involved. From the developed experience can be determined that the classroom observation, the autoevaluation and the exchange/contrast of the observed practices done between the inspection and the evaluated participant should be the key elements to monitor the teaching role.

  8. [Environmental Hazards Assessment Program annual report, June 1992--June 1993]. Summer undergraduate research program: Environmental studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMillan, J. [ed.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of the summer undergraduate internship program for research in environmental studies is to provide an opportunity for well-qualified students to undertake an original research project as an apprentice to an active research scientist in basic environmental research. Ten students from throughout the midwestern and eastern areas of the country were accepted into the program. These students selected projects in the areas of marine sciences, biostatistics and epidemiology, and toxicology. The research experience for all these students and their mentors was very positive. The seminars were well attended and the students showed their interest in the presentations and environmental sciences as a whole by presenting the speakers with thoughtful and intuitive questions. This report contains the research project written presentations prepared by the student interns.

  9. Double degree master program: Optical Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakholdin, Alexey; Kujawinska, Malgorzata; Livshits, Irina; Styk, Adam; Voznesenskaya, Anna; Ezhova, Kseniia; Ermolayeva, Elena; Ivanova, Tatiana; Romanova, Galina; Tolstoba, Nadezhda

    2015-10-01

    Modern tendencies of higher education require development of master programs providing achievement of learning outcomes corresponding to quickly variable job market needs. ITMO University represented by Applied and Computer Optics Department and Optical Design and Testing Laboratory jointly with Warsaw University of Technology represented by the Institute of Micromechanics and Photonics at The Faculty of Mechatronics have developed a novel international master double-degree program "Optical Design" accumulating the expertise of both universities including experienced teaching staff, educational technologies, and experimental resources. The program presents studies targeting research and professional activities in high-tech fields connected with optical and optoelectronics devices, optical engineering, numerical methods and computer technologies. This master program deals with the design of optical systems of various types, assemblies and layouts using computer modeling means; investigation of light distribution phenomena; image modeling and formation; development of optical methods for image analysis and optical metrology including optical testing, materials characterization, NDT and industrial control and monitoring. The goal of this program is training a graduate capable to solve a wide range of research and engineering tasks in optical design and metrology leading to modern manufacturing and innovation. Variability of the program structure provides its flexibility and adoption according to current job market demands and personal learning paths for each student. In addition considerable proportion of internship and research expands practical skills. Some special features of the "Optical Design" program which implements the best practices of both Universities, the challenges and lessons learnt during its realization are presented in the paper.

  10. Office of Equal Opportunity Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Jennifer L.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Office of Equal Opportunity Programs works to provide quality service for all programs and/or to assist the Center in becoming a model workplace. During the summer of 2004, I worked with Deborah Cotleur along with other staff members to create and modify customer satisfaction surveys. This office aims to assist in developing a model workplace by providing functions as a change agent to the center by serving as an advisor to management to ensure equity throughout the Center. In addition, the office serves as a mediator for the Center in addressing issues and concerns. Lastly, the office provides assistance to employees to enable attainment of personal and organizational goals. The Office of Equal Opportunities is a staff office which reports and provides advice to the Center Director and Executive Leadership, implements laws, regulations, and presidential executive orders, and provides center wide leadership and assistance to NASA GRC employees. Some of the major responsibilities of the office include working with the discrimination complaints program, special emphasis programs (advisory groups), management support, monitoring and evaluation, contract compliance, and community outreach. During my internship in this office, my main objective was to create four customer satisfaction surveys based on EO retreats, EO observances, EO advisory boards, and EO mediation/counseling. I created these surveys after conducting research on past events and surveys as well as similar survey research created and conducted by other NASA centers, program for EO Advisory group members, leadership training sessions for supervisors, preventing sexual harassment training sessions, and observance events. I also conducted research on the style and format from feedback surveys from the Marshall Equal Opportunity website, the Goddard website, and the main NASA website. Using the material from the Office of Equal Opportunity Programs at Glenn Research Center along with my

  11. Advanced interdisciplinary undergraduate program: light engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakholdin, Alexey; Bougrov, Vladislav; Voznesenskaya, Anna; Ezhova, Kseniia

    2016-09-01

    The undergraduate educational program "Light Engineering" of an advanced level of studies is focused on development of scientific learning outcomes and training of professionals, whose activities are in the interdisciplinary fields of Optical engineering and Technical physics. The program gives practical experience in transmission, reception, storage, processing and displaying information using opto-electronic devices, automation of optical systems design, computer image modeling, automated quality control and characterization of optical devices. The program is implemented in accordance with Educational standards of the ITMO University. The specific features of the Program is practice- and problem-based learning implemented by engaging students to perform research and projects, internships at the enterprises and in leading Russian and international research educational centers. The modular structure of the Program and a significant proportion of variable disciplines provide the concept of individual learning for each student. Learning outcomes of the program's graduates include theoretical knowledge and skills in natural science and core professional disciplines, deep knowledge of modern computer technologies, research expertise, design skills, optical and optoelectronic systems and devices.

  12. Building Capacity Through Hands-on Computational Internships to Assure Reproducible Results and Implementation of Digital Documentation in the ICERT REU Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, R.; Gentle, J.

    2015-12-01

    Modern data pipelines and computational processes require that meticulous methodologies be applied in order to insure that the source data, algorithms, and results are properly curated, managed and retained while remaining discoverable, accessible, and reproducible. Given the complexity of understanding the scientific problem domain being researched, combined with the overhead of learning to use advanced computing technologies, it becomes paramount that the next generation of scientists and researchers learn to embrace best-practices. The Integrative Computational Education and Research Traineeship (ICERT) is a National Science Foundation (NSF) Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) Site at the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC). During Summer 2015, two ICERT interns joined the 3DDY project. 3DDY converts geospatial datasets into file types that can take advantage of new formats, such as natural user interfaces, interactive visualization, and 3D printing. Mentored by TACC researchers for ten weeks, students with no previous background in computational science learned to use scripts to build the first prototype of the 3DDY application, and leveraged Wrangler, the newest high performance computing (HPC) resource at TACC. Test datasets for quadrangles in central Texas were used to assemble the 3DDY workflow and code. Test files were successfully converted into a stereo lithographic (STL) format, which is amenable for use with a 3D printers. Test files and the scripts were documented and shared using the Figshare site while metadata was documented for the 3DDY application using OntoSoft. These efforts validated a straightforward set of workflows to transform geospatial data and established the first prototype version of 3DDY. Adding the data and software management procedures helped students realize a broader set of tangible results (e.g. Figshare entries), better document their progress and the final state of their work for the research group and community, helped students and researchers follow a clear set of formats and fill in the necessary details that may be lost otherwise, and exposed the students to the next generation workflows and practices for digital scholarship and scientific inquiry for converting geospatial data into formats that are easy to reuse.

  13. Psychology of the scientist: LXXXI. Professional school and traditional program graduates: comparison on measures of achievement in clinical psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templer, D I; Tomeo, M E; Pointkowski, S R; Mitroff, D; Niederhauser, R N; Siscoe, K

    2000-06-01

    Clinical psychologists who graduated from traditional programs and those who graduated from professional schools were compared on both scientifically and professionally oriented criteria of achievement and recognition. Upon controlling for year of graduation from a doctoral program, the professional school graduates were less likely to be APA fellows, less likely to be on the editorial board of specified research oriented journals in clinical psychology, less likely to have diplomate status in the American Board of Professional Psychology (ABPP), less likely to have been president of state psychological associations, and less likely to have been APPIC internship directors.

  14. Preparing Science-Trained Professionals for the Biotechnology Industry: A Ten-Year Perspective on a Professional Science Master’s Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul T. Hamilton

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The biotechnology industry has a need for business-savvy scientists; however, this is not the way scientists are traditionally trained at universities and colleges. To address this need, universities have developed Professional Science Master’s (PSM degree programs that offer advanced training in a technical field along with professional skills development through team-based projects and internships. Nearly ten years ago, the Department of Microbiology at NCSU started a PSM program in Microbial Biotechnology (MMB. This article provides an overview of the MMB program, and shares some of the lessons that we have learned.

  15. Recruitment of Early STEM Majors into Possible Secondary Science Teaching Careers: The Role of Science Education Summer Internships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgerding, Lisa A.

    2015-01-01

    A shortage of highly qualified math and science teachers pervades the U.S. public school system. Clearly, recruitment of talented STEM educators is critical. Previous literature offers many suggestions for how STEM teacher recruitment programs and participant selection should occur. This study investigates how early STEM majors who are not already…

  16. 77 FR 2602 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Form DS-7002, Training/Internship Placement...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-18

    ... public comments. SUMMARY: The Department of State is seeking Office of Management and Budget (OMB... accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995. Title of Information Collection: Exchange Visitor... visitor programs in the trainee or intern categories and U.S. businesses that provide the training or...

  17. NOAA's Undergraduate Scholarship Program Outcomes and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, M.; Jabanoski, K.; Christenson, T.

    2017-12-01

    NOAA supports about 115 - 150 undergraduates per year through the Ernest F. Hollings Scholarship and the Educational Partnership Program Undergraduate Scholarship. These programs provide tuition support and paid summer internships at NOAA to exceptional students majoring in the geosciences. Multiple methods were used to evaluate program outcomes and track the career trajectories, including mining LinkedIn data and conducting evaluation surveys of recipients as well as students who applied but did not receive the award. Results show more than 75% of scholars continued on to graduate school, primarily in a NOAA mission fields. This compared to only 56% of nonrecipients. More than 60% of alumni had at least one professional record, with the most alumni working in private industry, followed by nongovernmental organizations and federal, state and local government. The evaluation identified 77 other scholarship programs applied to by NOAA scholarship recipients. The most commonly reported program was the NSF Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) for which 20% of scholars applied and 46% of applications were successful. Other common scholarships included the Goldwater Scholarship (received by 5% of NOAA scholars) and the Udall Scholarship (received by 4% of scholars). In the most recent class of 118 undergraduate scholars, 24% reported having another research experience by the time they arrived for orientation at the end of their sophomore year. These results suggest coordination across scholarship opportunities may be useful to engage and retain students in geoscience fields.

  18. Psychological Assessment Training in Clinical Psychology Doctoral Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihura, Joni L; Roy, Manali; Graceffo, Robert A

    2017-01-01

    We surveyed American Psychological Association-accredited clinical psychology doctoral programs' (n = 83) training in psychological assessment-specifically, their coverage of various assessment topics and tests in courses and practica, and whether the training was optional or required. We report results overall and separately per training model (clinical science, scientist-practitioner, and practitioner-focused). Overall, our results suggest that psychological assessment training is as active, or even more active, than in previous years. Areas of increased emphasis include clinical interviewing and psychometrics; multimethod, outcomes, health, and collaborative or therapeutic assessment; and different types of cognitive and self-report personality tests. All or almost all practice-focused programs offered training with the Thematic Apperception Test and Rorschach compared to about half of the scientist-practitioner programs and a third of the clinical science programs. Although almost all programs reported teaching multimethod assessment, what constitutes different methods of assessing psychopathology should be clarified in future studies because many programs appear to rely on one method-self-report (especially clinical science programs). Although doctoral programs covered many assessment topics and tests in didactic courses, there appears to be a shortage of program-run opportunities for students to obtain applied assessment training. Finally, we encourage doctoral programs to be familiar with (a) internships' assessment expectations and opportunities, (b) the professional guidelines for assessment training, and (c) the American Psychological Association's requirements for preinternship assessment competencies.

  19. Improving Science Teacher Preparation through the APS PhysTEC and NSF Noyce Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Tasha; Tyler, Micheal; van Duzor, Andrea; Sabella, Mel

    2013-03-01

    Central to the recruitment of students into science teaching at a school like CSU, is a focus on the professional nature of teaching. The purpose of this focus is twofold: it serves to change student perceptions about teaching and it prepares students to become teachers who value continued professional development and value the science education research literature. The Noyce and PhysTEC programs at CSU place the professional nature of teaching front and center by involving students in education research projects, paid internships, attendance at conferences, and participation in a new Teacher Immersion Institute and a Science Education Journal Reading Class. This poster will focus on specific components of our teacher preparation program that were developed through these two programs. In addition we will describe how these new components provide students with diverse experiences in the teaching of science to students in the urban school district. Supported by the NSF Noyce Program (0833251) and the APS PhysTEC Program.

  20. The Evaluation of The Knowledge Levels and Attitudes of Medical Students Who Have Accomplished Obstetric and Gynaecological Diseases Internship in a Medical School About Human Papilloma Virus Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fatih Onsuz

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Aim of the study was to determine medical school students’ knowledge levels and attitudes who accomplished Obstetric and Gynecology clerkship in a medical school about HPV vaccination and intention to suggest HPV vaccine to their patients. Method: This descriptive study was carried out in a medical school among 166 medical students accomplishing their internship in the Obstetrics and Gynaecological Diseases Department. Study data had been collected by questionnaire which had three part and 30 question. The data were evaluated by descriptive statistics. Results: Fifty five point four of the students stated that they felt informed about HPV vaccine, 72.9% of them stated that HPV was more serious for women. 95.8% of the participants thought they would suggest HPV vaccine to their patients and the most proposed group was adolescent girls (51.6%. 80.5% of students stated their possibility to suggest the vaccine would increase in case the vaccine would be free. The most important drawback points of the students in suggesting the vaccine to their patients were thinking high priced and not cost effectiveness of the vaccine (51.6% and inducing unprotected, risky sexual intercourses (45.9%. Conclusion: In this study we determine the professional acception of HPV vaccine between students. Also we determine the most important factor in suggesting the HPV vaccine is the cost effectiveness of it. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2011; 10(5.000: 557-564

  1. [Environmental Hazards Assessment Program annual report, June 1992--June 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMillan, J.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the summer undergraduate internship program for research in environmental studies is to provide an opportunity for well-qualified students to undertake an original research project as an apprentice to an active research scientist in basic environmental research. Ten students from throughout the midwestern and eastern areas of the country were accepted into the program. These students selected projects in the areas of marine sciences, biostatistics and epidemiology, and toxicology. The research experience for all these students and their mentors was very positive. The seminars were well attended and the students showed their interest in the presentations and environmental sciences as a whole by presenting the speakers with thoughtful and intuitive questions. This report contains the research project written presentations prepared by the student interns

  2. Doctoral Programs Need Changes to Attract and Retain Underrepresented Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, R. E.; Mayfield, K. K.

    2017-12-01

    Geoscience is currently recognized as the least diverse of all STEM fields. While attention typically focuses on K-12 and undergraduate populations, the extreme lack of diversity among graduate students, and doctoral students in particular, should be examined and addressed. In 2016, members of underrepresented minority (URM) groups made up only 6% of those graduating with geoscience PhDs. In all STEM fields, only 48% of Hispanic/Latino and 38% of Black/African American doctoral studies had earned doctorates within 7 years, with 36% of members of these groups leaving the program entirely. Recent studies suggest that these high attrition rates can be attributed, in part, to a mismatch between motivations of URM members and PhD-granting institutions while students are pursuing scientific education and careers. Traditional STEM doctoral programs do not offer, facilitate, or incentivize substantial opportunities to integrate social justice issues, community involvement, and altruism—factors which have been found to be of more importance to these populations than to male members of well-represented groups. URM members are also less likely to be interested in purely academic research careers, so doctoral programs may be failing to attract (and failing to prepare) diverse populations by not offering experiences beyond typical research and TA duties. In this presentation, trends in motivation and persistence among URM students in STEM will be discussed, in addition to highlighting education and outreach activities that can be successfully incorporated for a more fulfilling, balanced, attractive, and preparatory education experience. Specific activities undertaken and recommended by the presenter in her PhD experience include the following: a federal research internship, a state government policy internship, a formal partnership with a local K-12 teacher though a former NSF GK-12 program, a two-week education workshop aboard a scientific research drillship, and attending a

  3. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative University Fellowship Program. Final Progress Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, Cathy

    2012-01-01

    2004-2011 Final Report for AFCI University Fellowship Program. The goal of this effort was to be supportive of university students and university programs - particularly those students and programs that will help to strengthen the development of nuclear-related fields. The program also supported the stability of the nuclear infrastructure and developed research partnerships that are helping to enlarge the national nuclear science technology base. In this fellowship program, the U.S. Department of Energy sought master's degree students in nuclear, mechanical, or chemical engineering, engineering/applied physics, physics, chemistry, radiochemistry, or fields of science and engineering applicable to the AFCI/Gen IV/GNEP missions in order to meet future U.S. nuclear program needs. The fellowship program identified candidates and selected full time students of high-caliber who were taking nuclear courses as part of their degree programs. The DOE Academic Program Managers encouraged fellows to pursue summer internships at national laboratories and supported the students with appropriate information so that both the fellows and the nation's nuclear energy objectives were successful.

  4. The American Geological Institute Minority Participation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M. J.; Byerly, G. R.; Callahan, C. N.

    2001-12-01

    Since 1971, the American Geological Institute (AGI) Minority Participation Program (MPP) has supported scholarships for underrepresented minorities in the geosciences at the undergraduate and graduate levels. Some of our MPP scholars have gone on to hugely successful careers in the geosciences. MPP scholars include corporate leaders, university professors, a NASA scientist-astronaut and a National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER awardee. Yet as ethnic minorities continue to be underrepresented in the geosciences, AGI plans to expand its efforts beyond its traditional undergraduate and graduate scholarships to include diversity programs for secondary school geoscience teacher internships, undergraduate research travel support, and doctoral research fellowships. Funding for the MPP has come from multiple sources, including industry, scientific societies, individuals, and during the last 10 years, the NSF. College-level students apply for the MPP awards or award renewals, and the MPP Advisory Committee selects scholarship recipients based upon student academic performance, financial need, and potential for success as a geoscience professional. Mentoring is a long-standing hallmark of the AGI MPP. Every AGI MPP scholar is assigned a professional geoscientist as a mentor. The mentor is responsible for regular personal contacts with MPP scholars. The MPP Advisory Committee aims to match the profession of the mentor with the scholar's academic interest. Throughout the year, mentors and scholars communicate about possible opportunities in the geosciences such as internships, participation in symposia, professional society meetings, and job openings. Mentors have also been active in helping younger students cope with the major changes involved in relocating to a new region of the country or a new college culture. We believe that AGI is well-positioned to advance diversity in the geosciences through its unique standing as the major professional organization in the

  5. Training of Teachers and Teaching Services Specialists for the Design and Implementation of the "School Psychology Master Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksimova L.A.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the experience of organizing the training courses for teachers and teaching services specialists for design and implementation of the basic professional educational pedagogical master program in a psycho-pedagogical training direction (educational psychologist with enhanced internship for students in a context of networking. The authors submit a modular design of training program. The first module includes methodological bases of the design and implementation of the basic professional educational master program. The second module includes legal coverage of the design and implementation of the basic professional educational master program. The third module consists of design and implementation of the basic professional educational master program in a psycho-pedagogical training direction (educational psychologist. The program involves a variety of active and interactive educational technology, providing the development of professional activities: remote technology, expert seminars, design stations, panels and plenary discussions, business games, round-table discussions.

  6. Perception about the Medical Internship at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro by the Service’s Preceptors in Primary Health Care: a Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salesia Felipe de Oliveira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction A preceptor is understood as a health care professional with an important role in introducing students and recently graduated doctors into professional practice. However, studies into medical teaching in the Family Health Strategy (FHS have shown inadequacies in the quality, training and time spent by the tutors with students. In the municipality of Rio de Janeiro (RJ, the expansion of the FHS was belated, resulting in a vacuum of medical students being inserted into the network. Objective To understand the perception of Family Health Strategy physician preceptors regarding their performance with medical student interns from the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ. Methods This is a case study which employed a qualitative method and took place in the city of Rio de Janeiro (RJ. Semi-structured interviews were conducted between September 2011 and March 2012, with 15 preceptors from six Family Clinics receiving UFRJ medical interns. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, read and subjected to thematic content analysis, resulting in the establishment of five categories: encouragement and motivation; appreciation; training; real world versus academic world; teaching-service integration. Results The preceptors report that they feel recognized and encouraged by the students, but do not feel appreciated by the service coordinators, who fail to allocate adequate space and time to their preceptorship activities. A good relationship is established with both tutors and students. The preceptors would like to be trained in preceptorship and to strengthen their ties to UFRJ. They view their time with the students as both precious and challenging, because it stimulates them to rethink their care practices. They recognize in the internship the opportunity for students to gain practical experience of what has been learned in theory. Conclusion The preceptors’ work is supported by the good relationship established between preceptors

  7. BURECS: An Interdisciplinary Undergraduate Climate Science Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, D. P.; Marchant, D. R.; Christ, A. J.; Ehrenfeucht, S.

    2017-12-01

    The current structure of many undergraduate programs, particularly those at large research universities, requires students to engage with a major or academic emphasis early in their university careers. This oftentimes curbs exploration outside the major and can inhibit interdisciplinary collaboration. The Boston University Research Education and Communication of Science (BURECS) program seeks to bridge this institutional divide by fostering interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary collaboration on climate change-related issues by students from across Boston University (B.U.). Every year, approximately fifteen first-year students from B.U.'s College of Arts and Sciences, College of Communication, and School of Education are selected to join BURECS, which includes a climate science seminar, a hands-on lab course, a supported summer internship with Boston-area researchers, and the opportunity to participate in Antarctic field work during subsequent B.U. Antarctic Research Group expeditions. Currently in its third year, BURECS is funded through the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Professors Program.

  8. Developing Leaders: Implementation of a Peer Advising Program for a Public Health Sciences Undergraduate Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan eGriffin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Peer advising is an integral part of our undergraduate advising system in the Public Health Sciences major at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. The program was developed in 2009 to address the advising needs of a rapidly growing major that went from 25 to over 530 majors between 2007 and 2014. Each year, 9-12 top performing upper-level students are chosen through an intensive application process. A major goal of the program is to provide curriculum and career guidance to students in the major and empower students in their academic and professional pursuits. The year-long program involves several components, including: staffing the drop-in advising center, attending training seminars, developing and presenting workshops for students, meeting prospective students and families, evaluating ways to improve the program, and collaborating on self-directed projects. The peer advisors also provide program staff insight into the needs and perspectives of students in the major. In turn, peer advisors gain valuable leadership and communication skills, and learn strategies for improving student success. The Peer Advising Program builds community and fosters personal and professional development for the peer advisors. In this paper, we will discuss the undergraduate peer advising model, the benefits and challenges of the program, and lessons learned. Several methods were used to understand the perceived benefits and challenges of the program and experiences of students who utilized the Peer Advising Center. The data for this evaluation were drawn from three sources: 1 archival records from the Peer Advising Center; 2 feedback from peer advisors who completed the year-long internship; and 3 a survey of students who utilized the Peer Advising Center. Results of this preliminary evaluation indicate that peer advisors gain valuable skills that they can carry into their professional world. The program is also a way to engage students in building community

  9. High-precision gamma-ray spectroscopy of 61Cu, an emerging medical isotope used in positron emission tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, N.; Ellison, P.; Nickles, R.; McCutchan, E.; Sonzogni, A.; Smith, S.; Greene, J.; Carpenter, M.; Zhu, S.; Lister, C.; Moran, K.

    2017-09-01

    61Cu (t1 / 2 = 3.339h) is an important medical isotope used in positron emission tomography (PET) tumor hypoxia imaging scans; however, its beta-plus decay and the subsequent gamma decay of 61Ni has not been studied in over 30 years. Therefore, high quality decay data of 61Cu is desired to determine the overall dose delivered to a patient. In this study, 61Cu was produced at the University of Wisconsin - Madison cyclotron and then assayed using the Gammasphere array at Argonne National Laboratory. Consisting of 70 Compton-suppressed high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors, Gammasphere provides precise decay data that exceeds that of previous 61Cu studies. γ-ray singles and coincident data were recorded and then analyzed using Radware gf3m software. Through γ- γ coincidence techniques, new γ-ray transitions were identified and high precision determination of γ-ray intensities were made. These modifications and additions to the current decay scheme will be presented, and their impact on the resulting does estimates will be discussed. DOE Isotope Program is acknowledged for funding ST5001030. Work supported by the U.S. DOE under Grant No. DE-FG02-94ER40848 and Contract Nos. DE-AC02-98CH10946 and DE-AC02-06CH11357 and by the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship Program (SULI).

  10. High-precision gamma-ray spectroscopy of 82Rb and 72As, two important medical isotopes used in positron emission tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nino, Michael; McCutchan, E.; Smith, S.; Sonzogni, A.; Muench, L.; Greene, J.; Carpenter, M.; Zhu, S.; Lister, C.

    2015-10-01

    Both 82Rb and 72As are very important medical isotopes used in imaging procedures, yet their full decay schemes were last studied decades ago using low-sensitivity detection systems; high quality decay data is necessary to determine the total dose received by the patient, the background in imaging technologies, and shielding requirements in production facilities. To improve the decay data of these two isotopes, sources were produced at the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BLIP) and then the Gammasphere array, consisting of 89 Compton-suppressed HPGe detectors, at Argonne National Laboratory was used to analyze the gamma-ray emissions from the daughter nuclei 82 Kr and 72 Ge. Gamma-ray singles and coincidence information were recorded and analyzed using Radware Gf3m software. Significant revisions were made to the level schemes including the observation of many new transitions and levels as well as a reduction in uncertainty on measured γ-ray intensities and deduced β-feedings. The new decay schemes as well as their impact on dose calculations will be presented. DOE Isotope Program is acknowledged for funding ST5001030. Work supported by the U.S. DOE under Grant No. DE-FG02-94ER40848 and Contract Nos. DE-AC02-98CH10946 and DE-AC02-06CH11357 and by the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internships Program (SULI).

  11. A program wide framework for evaluating data driven teaching and learning - earth analytics approaches, results and lessons learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasser, L. A.; Gold, A. U.

    2017-12-01

    There is a deluge of earth systems data available to address cutting edge science problems yet specific skills are required to work with these data. The Earth analytics education program, a core component of Earth Lab at the University of Colorado - Boulder - is building a data intensive program that provides training in realms including 1) interdisciplinary communication and collaboration 2) earth science domain knowledge including geospatial science and remote sensing and 3) reproducible, open science workflows ("earth analytics"). The earth analytics program includes an undergraduate internship, undergraduate and graduate level courses and a professional certificate / degree program. All programs share the goals of preparing a STEM workforce for successful earth analytics driven careers. We are developing an program-wide evaluation framework that assesses the effectiveness of data intensive instruction combined with domain science learning to better understand and improve data-intensive teaching approaches using blends of online, in situ, asynchronous and synchronous learning. We are using targeted online search engine optimization (SEO) to increase visibility and in turn program reach. Finally our design targets longitudinal program impacts on participant career tracts over time.. Here we present results from evaluation of both an interdisciplinary undergrad / graduate level earth analytics course and and undergraduate internship. Early results suggest that a blended approach to learning and teaching that includes both synchronous in-person teaching and active classroom hands-on learning combined with asynchronous learning in the form of online materials lead to student success. Further we will present our model for longitudinal tracking of participant's career focus overtime to better understand long-term program impacts. We also demonstrate the impact of SEO optimization on online content reach and program visibility.

  12. Education Model Program on Water-Energy Research: A New STEM Graduate Program from Development through Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCay, D.; Fiorenza, P.; Lautz, L.

    2017-12-01

    More than half of Ph.D. scientists and engineers find employment in non-academic sectors. Recognizing the range of career options for graduate degree holders and the need to align graduate education with the expectations of prospective employers, the National Science Foundation (NSF) created the NSF Research Traineeship (NRT) program. To date, over 100 NRT programs have been funded. As these programs are implemented, it is important to assess their progress, successes, and challenges. This presentation describes the ongoing evaluation of one NRT program, "Education Model Program on Water-Energy Research" (or EMPOWER) at Syracuse University. Through seminars, mini-grants, professional development activities, field courses, internship opportunities, and coursework, EMPOWER's goal is to equip students with the skills needed for the range of career options in water and energy. In collaboration with an external evaluator, EMPOWER is examining the fidelity of the program to proposed goals, providing feedback to inform project improvement (formative assessment) and assessing the effectiveness of achieving program goals (summative assessment). Using a convergent parallel mixed method design, qualitative and quantitative data were collected to develop a full assessment of the first year of the program. Evaluation findings have resulted in several positive changes to the program. For example, EMPOWER students perceive themselves to have high technical skills, but the data show that the students do not believe that they have a strong professional network. Based on those findings, EMPOWER offered several professional development events focused on building one's professional network. Preliminary findings have enabled the EMPOWER leadership team to make informed decisions about the ways the program elements can be redesigned to better meet student needs, about how to the make the program more effective, and determine the program elements that may be sustained beyond the funding

  13. Clemson University Science Master's Program in Sustainable and Resilient Infrastructure: A program evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sell, Elizabeth Eberhart

    The Clemson University Science Master's Program (SMP) in Sustainable and Resilient Infrastructure is a program which aims to link engineering, materials, construction, environment, architecture, business, and public policy to produce graduates with unique holistic perspective and expertise to immediately contribute to the workforce in the area of sustainable and resilient infrastructure. A program evaluation of the SMP has been performed to study the effectiveness of the SMP and identify areas where the goals and vision of the SMP are achieved and areas where improvements can be made. This was completed by analysis of trends within survey responses, review of Master's thesis reports, and review of courses taken. It was found that the SMP has facilitated new interdisciplinary research collaborations of faculty in different concentration areas within the Glenn Department of Civil Engineering, as well as collaboration with faculty in other departments. It is recommended that a course which provides instruction in all eight competency areas be required for all SMP students to provide a comprehensive overview and ensure all students are exposed to concepts of all competency areas. While all stakeholders are satisfied with the program and believe it has been successful thus far, efforts do need to be made as the program moves forward to address and improve some items that have been mentioned as needing improvement. The concerns about concentration courses, internship planning, and advising should be addressed. This evaluation provides benefits to prospective students, current SMP participants, and outside program supporters. The goal of this evaluation is to provide support that the SMP is an effective and worthwhile program for participating students, while attempting to identify any necessary program improvements and provide recommendations for achieving these improvements. This goal has been accomplished.

  14. Estágio supervisionado e prática docente: Sentidos das produções discursivas da ANPEd, BDTD e EPENN. Supervised internship and teachers practice: Meanings of the discursive productions of ANPEd, BDTD and EPENN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melo, Maria Julia C. de

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to analyze the meanings assigned to supervised internship and teachers practice on the discursive productions of ANPEd, UFPE’s BDTD and EPENN, Brazil. These meanings are understood as having a dynamic character, always being historically resignified and occupying epistemic and political disputes’ place. Therefore, this article starts with the discussion on the historically established relationship between theory and practice in teachers’ education; it also addresses the dialogue on the challenges of internship; moves forward to the debate about teachers practice, in addition to the publications themselves that were at the same time theoretical and analysis references. Methodologically, this article embraced qualitative approach, analyzing scientific publications from the French perspective of Discourse Analysis. Thus, the published papers bring the internship as an opportunity to establish praxis and dialogue between the several curriculum components. In addition, the internship linked to the reflection’s enunciation presents itself as a place of resignification of teachers practice. The papers also establish links between theory of reflective practice and Marxist slant theory of praxis. Nevertheless, the analyzed productions on internship and teaching practice make use of both conceptions on the attempt to establish the relationship between theory and practice. Este artigo objetiva analisar os sentidos atribuídos ao estágio supervisionado e à prática docente nas produções discursivas da ANPEd, BDTD da UFPE, e EPENN, Brasil. Esses sentidos são compreendidos como tendo um caráter dinâmico, sempre ressignificados historicamente e ocupando o lugar de disputas epistêmicas e políticas. Assim, o artigo inicia com a discussão sobre a relação teoria e prática historicamente construída na formação de professores; investe ainda no diálogo sobre os desafios do estágio; discorrendo com o debate a respeito da pr

  15. ANALISIS KESIAPAN PROGRAM STUDI DALAM PRODUCTION BASED EDUCATION: STUDI PADA PROGRAM STUDI D3 AKUNTANSI POLINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Noor Ardiansah

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available There has been no clear studies to identify, verify and analyze readiness program resources in order to study the implementation of PBE resulted in initial position (existing point is not clear that the priority programs and activities that are carried out per year tend to be responsive and not directed priorities. These conditions resulted in analysis of resource readiness courses in the management of production-based learning pattern PBE draw conducted This study aims to identify and verify and analyze readiness resources management courses in the pattern of production based learning, particularly in the Accounting Studies Program. This research is expected to be used to increase the effectiveness of learning and vocational education to improve the quality and relevance of polytechnic graduates. Total score was 33 the existence of resources from the scale of 12-60. The average score is 2.75. The average score was shown the position of Prodi's resources have been used, but its role is unclear (repeatable tend to have clearly defined functions, communicated and documented (defined. Resources have been managed, monitored and evaluated well (managed are: curriculum resources, networking courses, lab facilities, ISO-based management. Resources have been used but not optimal role: resources module practice, the formulation of an internship, practice material / TA, the performance of IC-based lecturer

  16. ANALISIS KESIAPAN PROGRAM STUDI DALAM PRODUCTION BASED EDUCATION: STUDI PADA PROGRAM STUDI D3 AKUNTANSI POLINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Noor Ardiansah

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available There has been no clear studies to identify, verify and analyze readiness program resources in order to study the implementation of PBE resulted in initial position (existing point is not clear that the priority programs and activities that are carried out per year tend to be responsive and not directed priorities. These conditions resulted in analysis of resource readiness courses in the management of production-based learning pattern PBE draw conducted This study aims to identify and verify and analyze readiness resources management courses in the pattern of production based learning, particularly in the Accounting Studies Program. This research is expected to be used to increase the effectiveness of learning and vocational education to improve the quality and relevance of polytechnic graduates. Total score was 33 the existence of resources from the scale of 12-60. The average score is 2.75. The average score was shown the position of Prodi's resources have been used, but its role is unclear (repeatable tend to have clearly defined functions, communicated and documented (defined. Resources have been managed, monitored and evaluated well (managed are: curriculum resources, networking courses, lab facilities, ISO-based management. Resources have been used but not optimal role: resources module practice, the formulation of an internship, practice material / TA, the performance of IC-based lecturer

  17. Functional Programming

    OpenAIRE

    Chitil, Olaf

    2009-01-01

    Functional programming is a programming paradigm like object-oriented programming and logic programming. Functional programming comprises both a specific programming style and a class of programming languages that encourage and support this programming style. Functional programming enables the programmer to describe an algorithm on a high-level, in terms of the problem domain, without having to deal with machine-related details. A program is constructed from functions that only map inputs to ...

  18. Internship Progress Summary: Fall 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiser, Ralph S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Valencia, Matthew John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-12-13

    This fall I had the opportunity to work at Los Alamos National Laboratory for the Technology Applications engineering group. I assisted two main projects during my appointment, both related to the Lab’s mission statement: “To solve national security challenges through scientific excellence.” My first project, a thermal source transfer unit, involved skills such as mechanical design, heat transfer simulation, and design analysis. The goal was to create a container that could protect a heat source and regulate its temperature during transit. I generated several designs, performed heat transfer simulations, and chose a design for prototyping. The second project was a soil drying unit for use in post blast sample analysis. To ensure fast and accurate sample processing, agents in the field wanted a system that could process wet dirt and turn it into dry powder. We designed a system of commercially available parts, and we tested the systems to determine the best methods and processes.

  19. An evaluation of vocational high schools in Indonesia: A comparison between four-year and three-year programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soenarto Soenarto

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The research aimed to gain insights into the quality of four-year program vocational high school (VHS in Indonesia compared to four-year program VHS. This research was conducted based on the school graduate standard, business sector and industrial sector (or Dunia Usaha dan Dunia Industri (DUDI – or the performance of the graduates and alumni (the graduates’ satisfaction. The research was conducted using Discrepancy Evaluation Model using 16 VHSs (eight four-year program VHSs and eight three-year program VHSs. The result shows that from the standpoint of the school, the graduates of the four-year program VHS are higher in quality than those of the three-year program VHS. The four-year program VHS graduates are more qualified in seven aspects: teamwork, discipline, tenacity, theoretical knowledge, confidence, creativity, and leadership. Meanwhile, using DUDI standpoint, the four-year program VHS graduates are also higher in quality than the three-year program VHS graduates. In addition, the four-year program VHS graduates are better in the quality of their discipline, tenacity, theoretical knowledge, practical skills, confidence, carefulness, creativity, and leadership. The four-year program VHS graduates have a higher level of satisfaction in terms of income than the three-year program VHS graduates. The higher quality of the four-year program VHS graduates has resulted from longer duration of the internship program (PKL that provides them with reliable experience and skills concerning work-related problem-solving activities.

  20. Statistical characterization of surface features from tungsten-coated divertor inserts in the DIII-D Metal Rings Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Jacob; Unterberg, Ezekial; Chrobak, Christopher; Stahl, Brian; Abrams, Tyler

    2017-10-01

    Continuing analysis of tungsten-coated inserts from the recent DIII-D Metal Rings Campaign utilizes a statistical approach to study carbon migration and deposition on W surfaces and to characterize the pre- versus post-exposure surface morphology. A TZM base was coated with W using both CVD and PVD and allowed for comparison between the two coating methods. The W inserts were positioned in the lower DIII-D divertor in both the upper (shelf) region and lower (floor) region and subjected to multiple plasma shots, primarily in H-mode. Currently, the post-exposure W inserts are being characterized using SEM/EDX to qualify the surface morphology and to quantify the surface chemical composition. In addition, profilometry is being used to measure the surface roughness of the inserts both before and after plasma exposure. Preliminary results suggest a correlation between the pre-exposure surface roughness and the level of carbon deposited on the surface. Furthermore, ongoing in-depth analysis may reveal insights into the formation mechanism of nanoscale bumps found in the carbon-rich regions of the W surfaces that have not yet been explained. Work supported in part by US DoE under the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) program and under DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  1. Design and Calibration of a Dispersive Imaging Spectrometer Adaptor for a Fast IR Camera on NSTX-U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reksoatmodjo, Richard; Gray, Travis; Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Team

    2017-10-01

    A dispersive spectrometer adaptor was designed, constructed and calibrated for use on a fast infrared camera employed to measure temperatures on the lower divertor tiles of the NSTX-U tokamak. This adaptor efficiently and evenly filters and distributes long-wavelength infrared photons between 8.0 and 12.0 microns across the 128x128 pixel detector of the fast IR camera. By determining the width of these separated wavelength bands across the camera detector, and then determining the corresponding average photon count for each photon wavelength, a very accurate measurement of the temperature, and thus heat flux, of the divertor tiles can be calculated using Plank's law. This approach of designing an exterior dispersive adaptor for the fast IR camera allows accurate temperature measurements to be made of materials with unknown emissivity. Further, the relative simplicity and affordability of this adaptor design provides an attractive option over more expensive, slower, dispersive IR camera systems. This work was made possible by funding from the Department of Energy for the Summer Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) program. This work is supported by the US DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  2. Analysis of Mechanical Stresses/Strains in Superconducting Wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Matthew; Chen, Jingping; Zhai, Yuhu

    2016-10-01

    The optimization of superconducting magnet performance and development of high-field superconducting magnets will greatly impact the next generation of fusion devices. A successful magnet development, however, relies deeply on the understanding of superconducting materials. Among the numerous factors that impact a superconductor's performance, mechanical stress is the most important because of the extreme operation temperature and large electromagnetic forces. In this study, mechanical theory is used to calculate the stresses/strains in typical superconducting strands, which consist of a stabilizer, a barrier, a matrix and superconducting filaments. Both thermal loads and mechanical loads are included in the analysis to simulate operation conditions. Because this model simulates the typical architecture of major superconducting materials, such as Nb3Sn, MgB2, Bi-2212 etc., it provides a good overall picture for us to understand the behavior of these superconductors in terms of thermal and mechanical loads. This work was supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists (WDTS) under the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) program.

  3. Analysis Tools for the Ion Cyclotron Emission Diagnostic on DIII-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Castillo, C. A.; Thome, K. E.; Pinsker, R. I.; Meneghini, O.; Pace, D. C.

    2017-10-01

    Ion cyclotron emission (ICE) waves are excited by suprathermal particles such as neutral beam particles and fusion products. An ICE diagnostic is in consideration for use at ITER, where it could provide important passive measurement of fast ions location and losses, which are otherwise difficult to determine. Simple ICE data analysis codes had previously been developed, but more sophisticated codes are required to facilitate data analysis. Several terabytes of ICE data were collected on DIII-D during the 2015-2017 campaign. The ICE diagnostic consists of antenna straps and dedicated magnetic probes that are both digitized at 200 MHz. A suite of Python spectral analysis tools within the OMFIT framework is under development to perform the memory-intensive analysis of this data. A fast and optimized analysis allows ready access to data visualizations as spectrograms and as plots of both frequency and time cuts of the data. A database of processed ICE data is being constructed to understand the relationship between the frequency and intensity of ICE and a variety of experimental parameters including neutral beam power and geometry, local and global plasma parameters, magnetic fields, and many others. Work supported in part by US DoE under the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) program and under DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  4. Teaching-skills training programs for family medicine residents: systematic review of formats, content, and effects of existing programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacasse, Miriam; Ratnapalan, Savithiri

    2009-09-01

    To review the literature on teaching-skills training programs for family medicine residents and to identify formats and content of these programs and their effects. Ovid MEDLINE (1950 to mid-July 2008) and the Education Resources Information Center database (pre-1966 to mid-July 2008) were searched using and combining the MeSH terms teaching, internship and residency, and family practice; and teaching, graduate medical education, and family practice. The initial MEDLINE and Education Resources Information Center database searches identified 362 and 33 references, respectively. Titles and abstracts were reviewed and studies were included if they described the format or content of a teaching-skills program or if they were primary studies of the effects of a teaching-skills program for family medicine residents or family medicine and other specialty trainees. The bibliographies of those articles were reviewed for unidentified studies. A total of 8 articles were identified for systematic review. Selection was limited to articles published in English. Teaching-skills training programs for family medicine residents vary from half-day curricula to a few months of training. Their content includes leadership skills, effective clinical teaching skills, technical teaching skills, as well as feedback and evaluation skills. Evaluations mainly assessed the programs' effects on teaching behaviour, which was generally found to improve following participation in the programs. Evaluations of learner reactions and learning outcomes also suggested that the programs have positive effects. Family medicine residency training programs differ from all other residency training programs in their shorter duration, usually 2 years, and the broader scope of learning within those 2 years. Few studies on teaching-skills training, however, were designed specifically for family medicine residents. Further studies assessing the effects of teaching-skills training in family medicine residents are

  5. Contributions of the NOAA Hollings Undergraduate Scholarship Program to the Geosciences Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, M.

    2016-12-01

    Since 2005, the NOAA Ernest F. Hollings Undergraduate Scholarship Program has provided tuition support and paid summer internship opportunities at NOAA to exceptional students majoring in the geosciences. The purpose of the scholarship program is to train students in NOAA mission fields. Multiple methods were used to track the career trajectories of Hollings alumni, including mining LinkedIn data, conducting an impact analysis based on a professionally developed web-based evaluation survey, and a web-based alumni update system. At least one postgraduate record was recorded for 80% of Hollings Scholarship alumni. Of the alumni reached, more than 75% continued on to graduate school in a NOAA mission field, and 86% of those graduate degrees were in a NOAA mission field or other STEM field. More than 60% of alumni had at least one professional record, with the most alumni working in private industry, followed by nongovernmental organizations and federal, state and local government.

  6. Inter-Institutional Partnerships Propel A Successful Collaborative Undergraduate Degree Program In Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Malcolm J; Wang, Qiquan

    2012-10-01

    Small private liberal arts colleges are increasingly tuition-dependent and mainly attract students by creating student-centered learning communities. On the other hand, larger universities tend to be trendsetters where its faculty tend to seek intellectual independence and are involved in career focused cutting-edge research. The Institutional Development Awards (IDeA) and Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) are federal-state-university partnerships that builds basic research infrastructure and coax the state-wide higher education institutions to collaborate with each other in order to enhance their competitiveness. As a result in Delaware, Wesley College instituted curricular and operational changes to launch an undergraduate program in biological chemistry where its students take three upper division chemistry courses and can choose to participate in annual summer undergraduate internships at nearby Delaware State University.

  7. Coding a Weather Model: DOE-FIU Science & Technology Workforce Development Program.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, Jon David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-12-01

    DOE Fellow, Andres Cremisini, completed a 10-week internship with Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Under the management of Kristopher Klingler and the mentorship of Jon Bradley, he was tasked with conceiving and coding a realistic weather model for use in physical security applications. The objective was to make a weather model that could use real data to accurately predict wind and precipitation conditions at any location of interest on the globe at any user-determined time. The intern received guidance on software design, the C++ programming language and clear communication of project goals and ongoing progress. In addition, Mr. Cremisini was given license to structure the program however he best saw fit, an experience that will benefit ongoing research endeavors.

  8. STEm Minority Graduate Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholas, Kaen E

    2012-09-20

    the EAA has assisted college graduates in their quest to attain advanced degrees in STEM by providing fellowships. The EAA continued this effort by recruiting and providing fellowships to students who aspired to continue their education at the graduate level. The fellowships provided funding for tuition, fees, books, technology, and stipends to assist with room, board, and living expenses during the academic year and salary, transportation, and living expenses to those students who secured internships with the Department of Energy. Additionally the EAA designed and implemented needed support systems to ensure successful completion of the Masters degree programs, including but not limited to membership in professional associations, attendance at industry and academic conferences, and professional development workshops, and tutorial assistance if needed. This program assisted over 80 students directly and society-at-large by helping to educate and develop future physicists, engineers, biostatisticians, and researchers who will have the necessary skillsets to fill the increasing numbers of positions that require such expertise.

  9. University program in hazardous chemical and radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, F.L.

    1987-01-01

    The three main functions of a university program are education, training, and research. At Vanderbilt University, there is a Solid and Hazardous Waste option in the Master of Science in Engineering Program. The two main foci are treatment of wastes and environmental transport and transformation of the wastes. Courses in Hazardous Waste Engineering and Radioactive Waste Disposal present a synoptic view of the field, including legal, economic, and institutional aspects as well as the requisite technical content. The training is accomplished for some of the students through the aegis of an internship program sponsored by the US Department of Energy. In the summer between the two academic years of the program, the study works at a facility where decontamination and/or decommissioning and/or remedial actions are taking place. Progress in understanding the movement, transformation, and fate of hazardous materials in the environment is so rapid that it will not be possible to be current in the field without participating in that discovery. Therefore, their students are studying these processes and contributing to new knowledge. Some recent examples are the study of safety factors implicit in assuming a saturated zone below a hazardous waste landfill when an unsaturated zone exists, application of probabilistic risk assessment to three National Priority List sites in Tennessee, and the explanation of why certain organics precede pH, conductivity and nitrates through a clay liner at a hazardous waste disposal site

  10. NASA's Student Airborne Research Program (SARP) 2009-2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, E. L.

    2017-12-01

    The NASA Student Airborne Research Program (SARP) is a unique summer internship program for rising senior undergraduates majoring in any of the STEM disciplines. SARP participants acquire hands-on research experience in all aspects of a NASA airborne campaign, including flying onboard NASA research aircraft while studying Earth system processes. Approximately thirty-two students are competitively selected each summer from colleges and universities across the United States. Students work in four interdisciplinary teams to study surface, atmospheric, and oceanographic processes. Participants assist in the operation of instruments onboard NASA aircraft where they sample and measure atmospheric gases and image land and water surfaces in multiple spectral bands. Along with airborne data collection, students participate in taking measurements at field sites. Mission faculty and research mentors help to guide participants through instrument operation, sample analysis, and data reduction. Over the eight-week program, each student develops an individual research project from the data collected and delivers a conference-style final presentation on their results. Each year, several students present the results of their SARP research projects in scientific sessions at this meeting. We discuss the results and effectiveness of the program over the past nine summers and plans for the future.

  11. NASA Applied Sciences' DEVELOP National Program: a unique model cultivating capacity in the geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, K. W.; Favors, J. E.; Childs-Gleason, L. M.; Ruiz, M. L.; Rogers, L.; Allsbrook, K. N.

    2013-12-01

    The NASA DEVELOP National Program takes a unique approach to cultivating the next generation of geoscientists through interdisciplinary research projects that address environmental and public policy issues through the application of NASA Earth observations. Competitively selected teams of students, recent graduates, and early career professionals take ownership of project proposals outlining basic application concepts and have ten weeks to research core scientific challenges, engage partners and end-users, demonstrate prototypical solutions, and finalize and document their results and outcomes. In this high pressure, results-driven environment emerging geoscience professionals build strong networks, hone effective communication skills, and learn how to call on the varied strengths of a multidisciplinary team to achieve difficult objectives. The DEVELOP approach to workforce development has a variety of advantages over classic apprenticeship-style internship systems. Foremost is the experiential learning of grappling with real-world applied science challenges as a primary actor instead of as an observer or minor player. DEVELOP participants gain experience that fosters personal strengths and service to others, promoting a balance of leadership and teamwork in order to successfully address community needs. The program also advances understanding of Earth science data and technology amongst participants and partner organizations to cultivate skills in managing schedules, risks and resources to best optimize outcomes. Individuals who come through the program gain experience and networking opportunities working within NASA and partner organizations that other internship and academic activities cannot replicate providing not only skill development but an introduction to future STEM-related career paths. With the competitive nature and growing societal role of science and technology in today's global community, DEVELOP fosters collaboration and advances environmental

  12. A Prototype Two-tier Mentoring Program for Undergraduate Summer Interns from Minority-Serving Institutions at the University of Alaska Fairbanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gens, R.; Prakash, A.; Ozbay, G.; Sriharan, S.; Balazs, M. S.; Chittambakkam, A.; Starkenburg, D. P.; Waigl, C.; Cook, S.; Ferguson, A.; Foster, K.; Jones, E.; Kluge, A.; Stilson, K.

    2013-12-01

    The University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) is partnering with Delaware State University, Virginia State University, Elizabeth City State University, Bethune-Cookman University, and Morgan State University on a U.S. Department of Agriculture - National Institute for Food and Agriculture funded grant for ';Enhancing Geographic Information System Education and Delivery through Collaboration: Curricula Design, Faculty, Staff, and Student Training and Development, and Extension Services'. As a part of this grant, in summer 2013, UAF hosted a week long workshop followed by an intense two week undergraduate internship program. Six undergraduate students from partnering Universities worked with UAF graduate students as their direct mentors. This cohort of undergraduate mentees and graduate student mentors were in-turn counseled by the two UAF principal investigators who served as ';super-mentors'. The role of each person in the two-tier mentoring system was well defined. The super-mentors ensured that there was consistency in the way the internship was setup and resources were allocated. They also ensured that there were no technical glitches in the research projects and that there was healthy communication and interaction among participants. Mentors worked with the mentees ahead of time in outlining a project that aligned with the mentees research interest, provided basic reading material to the interns to get oriented, prepared the datasets required to start the project, and guided the undergraduates throughout the internship. Undergraduates gained hands-on experience in geospatial data collection and application of tools in their projects related to mapping geomorphology, landcover, geothermal sites, fires, and meteorological conditions. Further, they shared their research results and experiences with a broad university-wide audience at the end of the internship period. All participants met at lunch-time for a daily science talk from external speakers. The program offered

  13. Program specialization

    CERN Document Server

    Marlet, Renaud

    2013-01-01

    This book presents the principles and techniques of program specialization - a general method to make programs faster (and possibly smaller) when some inputs can be known in advance. As an illustration, it describes the architecture of Tempo, an offline program specializer for C that can also specialize code at runtime, and provides figures for concrete applications in various domains. Technical details address issues related to program analysis precision, value reification, incomplete program specialization, strategies to exploit specialized program, incremental specialization, and data speci

  14. The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research's Significant Opportunities in Atmospheric and Related Sciences (UCAR-SOARS) program: A paradigm case for a research based analysis of elements and attributes of a highly successful research experience for undergraduate (REU) program designed to broaden participation in STEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windham, T. L.

    2011-12-01

    REU (research experience for undergraduate) programs in science serve as a centerpiece for: recruitment improved learning, retention and increased graduation rates among students in STEM fields. Structured REUs are highly effective programs for broadening participation and remedying inequities, to increase and diversify the STEM talent pool and professional workforce. Now in its 16th year, SOARS is dedicated to broadening participation in the atmospheric and related sciences. SOARS is an undergraduate through graduate program built on the structure of: a summer research internship, mentoring by professional scientists, and a supportive learning community. SOARS is an exemplar. Its structure serves as a paradigm case for the recruitment, retention, and graduation of students from underserved populations. This research-based examination of SOARS explores its program elements and identifies attributes and practices that contribute to its impact and lasting outcomes.

  15. Advancing Space Sciences through Undergraduate Research Experiences at UC Berkeley's Space Sciences Laboratory - a novel approach to undergraduate internships for first generation community college students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raftery, C. L.; Davis, H. B.; Peticolas, L. M.; Paglierani, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Space Sciences Laboratory at UC Berkeley launched an NSF-funded Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program in the summer of 2015. The "Advancing Space Sciences through Undergraduate Research Experiences" (ASSURE) program recruited heavily from local community colleges and universities, and provided a multi-tiered mentorship program for students in the fields of space science and engineering. The program was focussed on providing a supportive environment for 2nd and 3rd year undergraduates, many of whom were first generation and underrepresented students. This model provides three levels of mentorship support for the participating interns: 1) the primary research advisor provides academic and professional support. 2) The program coordinator, who meets with the interns multiple times per week, provides personal support and helps the interns to assimilate into the highly competitive environment of the research laboratory. 3) Returning undergraduate interns provided peer support and guidance to the new cohort of students. The impacts of this program on the first generation students and the research mentors, as well as the lessons learned will be discussed.

  16. Medical education resources initiative for teens program in baltimore: A model pipeline program built on four pillars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mains, Tyler E; Wilcox, Mark V; Wright, Scott M

    2016-01-01

    Less than 6% of U.S. medical school applicants are African-American. The lack of diversity among physicians, by race as well as other measures, confers a negative impact on the American healthcare system because underrepresented minority (URM) physicians are more likely to practice in underserved communities and deliver more equitable, culturally competent care. MERIT (Medical Education Resources Initiative for Teens) is a nonprofit organization based in Baltimore, Maryland, USA. MERIT prepares URM high school students for health careers by providing a holistic support system for seven consecutive years. The program model, which utilizes weekly Saturday sessions, summer internships, and longitudinal mentoring, is built on four foundational pillars: (1) Ignite the Fire, (2) Illuminate the Path, (3) Create the Toolkit, and (4) Sustain the Desire. Since 2011, MERIT has supported 51 students in the Baltimore City Public School System. For the past two years, 100% (n = 14) of MERIT seniors enrolled in universities, compared to only 20.2% of Baltimore City students overall. While it is too early to know whether MERIT alumni will realize their goals of becoming healthcare professionals, they are currently excelling in universities and over 75% (n = 17) are still planning to pursue graduate degrees in health-related fields. After piloting an effective program model, MERIT now has three key priorities moving forward: (1) Creating a sustainable and thriving organization, (2) increasing the number of scholars the program supports in Baltimore, and (3) expanding MERIT to other cities.

  17. The SC State NSF PAARE Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Donald; Ajello, Marco; Brittain, Sean; Cash, Jennifer; Fogle, Bryan; Hartmann, Dieter; Ho, Shirley; Howell, Steve; King, Jeremy; Leising, Mark; Smith, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    We report on the activities of our NSF PAARE program during Year 3 of the project. Our partnership under this award includes South Carolina State University (a Historically Black College/University), Clemson University (a Ph.D. granting institution) and individual investigators at NASA Ames and elsewhere. Our partnership with the Citizen CATE Experiment and involvement in the total solar eclipse which passed through our campus on August 21, 2017, will be discussed. The PAARE project continues to strengthen our partnership with Clemson. We are close to completing a memorandum of agreement between the two institutions that will allow for the seamless transfer of an undergraduate from SC State to Clemson’s graduate program in physics and astronomy. Additionally, we have worked together under the Citizen CATE project and through other research activities. SC State is a member of the National Astronomy Consortium (NAC) and participates through its faculty and undergraduates, one of whom (Wesley Red) is reporting on his summer internship at this conference. We also served as the state coordinator for South Carolina for the Citizen CATE Experiment. The August 21st path of totality crossed through our campus and the campus of our partner Clemson University. Additional colleges, universities and citizen scientist groups partnered with us to provide 7 sites of coverage across South Carolina from the foothills of the Appalachian mountains to the Atlantic Ocean near the site of departure of the shadow from the continental U.S. Support for this work includes our NSF PAARE award AST-1358913 as well as resources and support provided by Clemson University and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory. CATE work has been supported by NASA SMD award NNX16AB92A to the National Solar Observatory. Additional details can be found at: http://physics.scsu.edu

  18. The InterCon network: a program for education partnerships at the University of Texas-Houston Health Science Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, G A; Bouldin, P A; Farver, D W; Maugans, L A; Sanders, L C; Booker, J

    1999-04-01

    The University of Texas-Houston Health Science Center (UT-Houston) has created programs and activities to address the state's pressing needs in minority education. Through InterCon, a network of universities and K-12 schools, UT-Houston works with its partners to identify competitive candidates in the current pool of minority graduates with bachelor's degrees and to help them--along with their non-minority counterparts--progress in their education. Another objective is to expand the pool of minorities underrepresented in medicine who complete high school and go to college. In 1994 UT-Houston and Prairie View A&M University created a collaborative venture to provide new educational opportunities at UT-Houston for Prairie View's predominantly African American students. A three-track summer internship program--a result of that collaboration--has since been expanded to partnerships with other minority and majority universities throughout Texas. In 1998, for example, 108 undergraduate students from these universities (and 40 other universities nationwide) participated in research, professional, and administrative summer internships at UT-Houston. The InterCon network also has partnerships with K-12 schools. UT-Houston works with inner-city, suburban, and rural school districts to develop education models that can be transferred throughout the state. The partnerships deal with helping to teach basic academic skills and computer literacy, improve science-related instruction, meet demands for health promotion materials and information for school-initiated health and wellness programs, and develop distance-learning paradigms. UT-Houston views InterCon as a program helping Texas institutions to engage and adapt to the socioeconomic factors, demographic changes, and technology explosion that currently challenge public education.

  19. Strengthening programs in science, engineering and mathematics. Third annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandhu, S.S.

    1997-09-30

    The Division of Natural Sciences and Mathematics at Claflin College consists of the Departments of Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Physics, Engineering and Mathematics. It offers a variety of major and minor academic programs designed to meet the mission and objectives of the college. The division`s pursuit to achieve excellence in science education is adversely impacted by the poor academic preparation of entering students and the lack of equipment, facilities and research participation, required to impart adequate academic training and laboratory skills to the students. Funds were received from the US Department of Energy to improve the divisional facilities and laboratory equipment and establish mechanism at pre-college and college levels to increase (1) the pool of high school students who will enroll in Science and Mathematics courses (2) the pool of well qualified college freshmen who will seek careers in Science, Engineering and Mathematics (3) the graduation rate in Science,engineering and Mathematics at the undergraduate level and (4) the pool of well-qualified students who can successfully compete to enter the graduate schools of their choice in the fields of science, engineering, and mathematics. The strategies that were used to achieve the mentioned objectives include: (1) Improved Mentoring and Advisement, (2) Summer Science Camp for 7th and 8th graders, (3) Summer Research Internships for Claflin SEM Seniors, (4) Summer Internships for Rising High School Seniors, (5) Development of Mathematical Skills at Pre-college/Post-secondary Levels, (6) Expansion of Undergraduate Seminars, (7) Exposure of Undergraduates to Guest Speakers/Roll Models, (8) Visitations by Undergraduate Students to Graduate Schools, and (9) Expanded Academic Program in Environmental Chemistry.

  20. Academic program models for undergraduate biomedical engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Shankar M

    2014-01-01

    There is a proliferation of medical devices across the globe for the diagnosis and therapy of diseases. Biomedical engineering (BME) plays a significant role in healthcare and advancing medical technologies thus creating a substantial demand for biomedical engineers at undergraduate and graduate levels. There has been a surge in undergraduate programs due to increasing demands from the biomedical industries to cover many of their segments from bench to bedside. With the requirement of multidisciplinary training within allottable duration, it is indeed a challenge to design a comprehensive standardized undergraduate BME program to suit the needs of educators across the globe. This paper's objective is to describe three major models of undergraduate BME programs and their curricular requirements, with relevant recommendations to be applicable in institutions of higher education located in varied resource settings. Model 1 is based on programs to be offered in large research-intensive universities with multiple focus areas. The focus areas depend on the institution's research expertise and training mission. Model 2 has basic segments similar to those of Model 1, but the focus areas are limited due to resource constraints. In this model, co-op/internship in hospitals or medical companies is included which prepares the graduates for the work place. In Model 3, students are trained to earn an Associate Degree in the initial two years and they are trained for two more years to be BME's or BME Technologists. This model is well suited for the resource-poor countries. All three models must be designed to meet applicable accreditation requirements. The challenges in designing undergraduate BME programs include manpower, facility and funding resource requirements and time constraints. Each academic institution has to carefully analyze its short term and long term requirements. In conclusion, three models for BME programs are described based on large universities, colleges, and

  1. Optical Science Discovery Program: Pre-College Outreach and So Much More

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Miriam

    2010-03-01

    Recruiting and retaining women into the physical sciences is an ongoing struggle for universities, with the gap between men and women in physics remaining strong. Research shows a precipitous drop in female participation in the physical sciences around the 7th grade year of primary education, where girls begin losing interest during middle school, the drain continuing throughout high school with another significant drop at the bachelors level. To combat the loss of women in the physical sciences, the Oregon Center for Optics at the University of Oregon has created the Optical Science Discovery Program (OSDP), a precollege outreach program that targets girls in middle and high school. This program uses optical sciences as the medium through which girls explore experimental science. The program consists of a one-week intensive summer camp, a mentored monthly science club, summer internships and mentoring opportunities for camp alumni. By utilizing media often at the core of teenage life (e.g. Facebook, MySpace) we also aim to interact with program participants in a familiar and informal environment. Mentoring of OSDP activities is carried out by faculty and students of all levels. This in turn allows other education and outreach efforts at the University of Oregon to incorporate OSDP activities into their own, contributing to our broader university goals of surmounting barriers to higher education and creating a more scientifically literate populace. This talk will describe the OSDP program and its incorporation into the broader spectrum of outreach and education efforts.

  2. The Woods Hole Partnership Education Program (PEP) (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jearld, A.; Liles, G.; Gutierrez, B.

    2013-12-01

    In March 2009, the Woods Hole Diversity Initiative (WHDI) launched the Partnership Education Program (PEP), a multi-institutional effort to increase diversity in the student population (and ultimately the work force) in the Woods Hole science community. PEP, a summer research internship program, is open to students of all backgrounds but is designed especially to provide opportunities for individuals from populations under-represented in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) and who otherwise would not have had the opportunity to come to Woods Hole to study or do research. A month-long course, 'Ocean and Environmental Sciences: Global Climate Change,' sets the stage for their summer research projects. The PEP model is emerging as an effective and sustainable approach to bringing students into the STEM research community. PEP is carefully structured to provide critical support for students as they complete their undergraduate experience and prepare for careers and/or graduate school. In its first five years, PEP has brought to the Woods Hole science community more than 75 students from over 50 colleges and universities, including many that do not typically send talent into marine and/or ecological research. PEP is unusual (perhaps even unique) in that it is a collaborative initiative involving seven partner institutions. Working together, the PEP collaborative has established a critical mass of under-represented students who are now in graduate school and/or working in STEM areas.

  3. Clinical capabilities of graduates of an outcomes-based integrated medical program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scicluna Helen A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The University of New South Wales (UNSW Faculty of Medicine replaced its old content-based curriculum with an innovative new 6-year undergraduate entry outcomes-based integrated program in 2004. This paper is an initial evaluation of the perceived and assessed clinical capabilities of recent graduates of the new outcomes-based integrated medical program compared to benchmarks from traditional content-based or process-based programs. Method Self-perceived capability in a range of clinical tasks and assessment of medical education as preparation for hospital practice were evaluated in recent graduates after 3 months working as junior doctors. Responses of the 2009 graduates of the UNSW’s new outcomes-based integrated medical education program were compared to those of the 2007 graduates of UNSW’s previous content-based program, to published data from other Australian medical schools, and to hospital-based supervisor evaluations of their clinical competence. Results Three months into internship, graduates from UNSW’s new outcomes-based integrated program rated themselves to have good clinical and procedural skills, with ratings that indicated significantly greater capability than graduates of the previous UNSW content-based program. New program graduates rated themselves significantly more prepared for hospital practice in the confidence (reflective practice, prevention (social aspects of health, interpersonal skills (communication, and collaboration (teamwork subscales than old program students, and significantly better or equivalent to published benchmarks of graduates from other Australian medical schools. Clinical supervisors rated new program graduates highly capable for teamwork, reflective practice and communication. Conclusions Medical students from an outcomes-based integrated program graduate with excellent self-rated and supervisor-evaluated capabilities in a range of clinically-relevant outcomes. The program

  4. 医学本科生视角下的精神病学临床见习与改革%Clinical internship and innovation of psychiatry from the perspective of medical undergraduates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谷俊杰; 刘变; 张骏

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the current methods for psychiatry clinical internship and needs for innovation from the perspectives of medical undergradutes.Methods Independent interview on patients and their relatives as well as social psychological interview were conducted for five-year psychiatry majors in clinical internship (n =72).Self-made questionnaire was used to investigate the teaching feedback concerning the practice effect and teaching method tendency.Data were analyzed by t test and P < 0.05 signifies statistically significant differences.Results Medical students considered the clinical internship as the main source of psychiatry knowledge (rising from 29.4 % (20/69) to 36.2% (25/69),t =4.67,P <0.01).Respective interviewing with patients and their families and then doing focus-group discussion was the most acceptable method for medical undergraduates:82.6%(57/69) of medical undergraduates thought this method helped expose defects of clinical skills and prejudice against psychiatry; 54.3% (37/69) of medical undergraduates thought this method was more beneficial to acquire psychiatry knowledge.The second acceptable method was the demonstration of a typical case by teacher:27.3% (19/69) thought this method helped expose defects of clinical skills and prejudice against psychiatry; 27.2% (19/69) thought this method was more beneficial to acquire psychiatry knowledge.62.0% (43/69) of medical undergraduates ranked the characteristics of the symptomatology and core symptoms differentiation as the first place.49.0% (34/69) considered the training of interviewing skills with patients as the second important in the clinical training.91.3% (63/69) expected to see more kinds of mental disorders.65.2 % (45/69) expected to learn more about the interviewing skills.Conclusions It is necessary to pay more attention to the method of doing respective interviewing with patients and their families and then making focus-group discussion.Meanwhile training of

  5. Program History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn how the National Cancer Institute transitioned the former Cooperative Groups Program to the National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN) program. The NCTN gives funds and other support to cancer research organizations to conduct cancer clinical trials.

  6. Program auto

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawool-Sullivan, M.W.; Plagnol, E.

    1990-01-01

    The program AUTO was developed to be used in the analysis of dE vs E type spectra. This program is written in FORTRAN and calculates dE vs E lines in MeV. The provision is also made in the program to convert these lines from MeV to ADC channel numbers to facilitate the comparison with the raw data from the experiments. Currently the output of this program can be plotted with the display program, called VISU, but it can also be used independent of the program VISU, with little or no modification in the actual fortran code. The program AUTO has many useful applications. In this article the program AUTO is described along with its applications

  7. Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Degrees 10 Things To Know Before You Apply Financing Your Degree Fellowships and Internships Certified in Public ... Pruitt , Administrator of the EPA, strongly protesting his decision to prohibit EPA-funded scientists from serving on ...

  8. A review of characteristics and outcomes of Australia's undergraduate medical education rural immersion programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Belinda G; McGrail, Matthew R; Russell, Deborah; Chambers, Helen; Major, Laura

    2018-01-31

    A key strategy for increasing the supply of rural doctors is rurally located medical education. In 2000, Australia introduced a national policy to increase rural immersion for undergraduate medical students. This study aims to describe the characteristics and outcomes of the rural immersion programs that were implemented in Australian medical schools. Information about 19 immersion programs was sourced in 2016 via the grey and published literature. A scoping review of the published peer-reviewed studies via Ovid MEDLINE and Informit (2000-2016) and direct journal searching included studies that focused on outcomes of undergraduate rural immersion in Australian medical schools from 2000 to 2016. Programs varied widely by selection criteria and program design, offering between 1- and 6-year immersion. Based on 26 studies from 10 medical schools, rural immersion was positively associated with rural practice in the first postgraduate year (internship) and early career (first 10 years post-qualifying). Having a rural background increased the effects of rural immersion. Evidence suggested that longer duration of immersion also increases the uptake of rural work, including by metropolitan-background students, though overall there was limited evidence about the influence of different program designs. Most evidence was based on relatively weak, predominantly cross-sectional research designs and single-institution studies. Many had flaws including small sample sizes, studying internship outcomes only, inadequately controlling for confounding variables, not using metropolitan-trained controls and providing limited justification as to the postgraduate stage at which rural practice outcomes were measured. Australia's immersion programs are moderately associated with an increased rural supply of early career doctors although metropolitan-trained students contribute equal numbers to overall rural workforce capacity. More research is needed about the influence of student interest

  9. Brazilian Scientific Mobility Program - Science without Borders - Preliminary Results and Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, Concepta; Nobre, Carlos A

    2017-05-01

    The Brazilian Scientific Mobility Program - Science without Borders (SwB) - saw the concession of over 101 thousand scholarships for Brazilian STEM students and education professionals to attend universities worldwide. As the first phase of this program ends, it is time to take a first look at its impacts, mainly on the undergraduate student body (79% of total scholarships implemented). Benefits included a 6-month language course (optional), a one year undergraduate course and optional 2 month internship in a university, government laboratory or technology company. Positive impacts have been seen on entrance into post-graduate programs (>20% of SwB students compared to 50% from families with less than 6 minimum wages per month). The impact of the program will need to be evaluated over the next years, but innovation on the part of the students is already apparent. Any new SwB program needs to take into account the lessons learned from this first experience and therefore recommendations are presented.

  10. Self-Reflection and Professional Competences in the Master Program for Chemical Engineers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijenga, J.C.; Vinken, E.; Gupta-Bhowon, M.; Jhaumeer-Laulloo, S.; Li Kam Wah, H.; Ramasami, P.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation into the quality of self-reflection during industrial intern-ships by Chemical Engineering students at the Eindhoven University of Technology in The Netherlands. The quality of the self-reflection reports written at the end of a compulsory in-dustrial internship

  11. Material Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vallgårda, Anna; Boer, Laurens; Tsaknaki, Vasiliki

    2017-01-01

    . Consequently we ask what the practice of programming and giving form to such materials would be like? How would we be able to familiarize ourselves with the dynamics of these materials and their different combinations of cause and effect? Which tools would we need and what would they look like? Will we program......, and color, but additionally being capable of sensing, actuating, and computing. Indeed, computers will not be things in and by themselves, but embedded into the materials that make up our surroundings. This also means that the way we interact with computers and the way we program them, will change...... these computational composites through external computers and then transfer the code them, or will the programming happen closer to the materials? In this feature we outline a new research program that floats between imagined futures and the development of a material programming practice....

  12. Effective Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost, Jacob

    To investigate the use of VTLoE as a basis for formal derivation of functional programs with effects. As a part of the process, a number of issues central to effective formal programming are considered. In particular it is considered how to develop a proof system suitable for pratical reasoning......, how to implement this system in the generic proof assistant Isabelle and finally how to apply the logic and the implementation to programming....

  13. Program Fullerene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wirz, Lukas; Peter, Schwerdtfeger,; Avery, James Emil

    2013-01-01

    Fullerene (Version 4.4), is a general purpose open-source program that can generate any fullerene isomer, perform topological and graph theoretical analysis, as well as calculate a number of physical and chemical properties. The program creates symmetric planar drawings of the fullerene graph, an......-Fowler, and Brinkmann-Fowler vertex insertions. The program is written in standard Fortran and C++, and can easily be installed on a Linux or UNIX environment....

  14. Programming F#

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Why learn F#? This multi-paradigm language not only offers you an enormous productivity boost through functional programming, it also lets you develop applications using your existing object-oriented and imperative programming skills. With Programming F#, you'll quickly discover the many advantages of Microsoft's new language, which includes access to all the great tools and libraries of the .NET platform. Learn how to reap the benefits of functional programming for your next project -- whether it's quantitative computing, large-scale data exploration, or even a pursuit of your own. With th

  15. PLC Programming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seong Jae; Wi, Seong Dong; Yoo, Jong Seon; Kim, Se Chan

    2001-02-01

    This book tells of PLC programming for KGL-WIN with summary of PLC, performance and function of PLC like characteristic of KGL-WIN, connection method with PLC, basic performance of K200S/K300S/K1000S, diagram of input and output H/W, writing project, staring the program, editing of program, on-line function, debugging and instructions like control, timer and counter, data transmission, comparison, rotation and moving, system, data operating data conversion and application program.

  16. Programming Interactivity

    CERN Document Server

    Noble, Joshua

    2009-01-01

    Make cool stuff. If you're a designer or artist without a lot of programming experience, this book will teach you to work with 2D and 3D graphics, sound, physical interaction, and electronic circuitry to create all sorts of interesting and compelling experiences -- online and off. Programming Interactivity explains programming and electrical engineering basics, and introduces three freely available tools created specifically for artists and designers: Processing, a Java-based programming language and environment for building projects on the desktop, Web, or mobile phonesArduino, a system t

  17. Fostering Under-represented Minority Student Success and Interest in the Geosciences: Outcomes of the UNC-Chapel Hill Increasing Diversity and Enhancing Academia (IDEA) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, M. H.; Gray, K.; Drostin, M.

    2016-12-01

    For under-represented minority (URM) students, opportunities to meaningfully participate in academic communities and develop supportive relationships with faculty and peers influence persistence in STEM majors (Figueroa, Hurtado, & Wilkins, 2015; PCAST, 2012; Tsui, 2007). Creating such opportunities is even more important in the geosciences, where a lower percentage of post-secondary degrees are awarded to URM students than in other STEM fields (NSF, 2015; O'Connell & Holmes, 2011; NSF, 2011). Since 2011, Increasing Diversity and Enhancing Academia (IDEA), a program of the UNC-Chapel Hill Institute for the Environment (UNC-IE), has provided 39 undergraduates (predominantly URM and female students) with career-relevant research experiences and professional development opportunities, including a culminating experience of presenting their research at a campus-wide research symposium. External evaluation data have helped to characterize the effectiveness of the IDEA program. These data included pre- and post-surveys assessing students' interest in geosciences, knowledge of career pathways, and perceptions of their abilities related to a specific set of scientific research skills. Additionally, progress towards degrees and dissemination outcomes were tracked. In this presentation, we will share quantitative and qualitative data that demonstrate that participation in the IDEA program has influenced students' interest and persistence in geosciences research and careers. These data range from self-reported competencies in a variety of scientific skills (such as organizing and interpreting data and reading and interpreting science literature) to documentation of student participation in geoscience study and professions. About 69% of participants continued research begun during their internships beyond the internship; and about 38% pursued graduate degrees and secured jobs in geoscience and other STEM fields. (Nearly half are still in school.) Overall, these evaluation data

  18. Influence of year-on-year performance on final degree classification in a chiropractic master's degree program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewhurst, Philip; Rix, Jacqueline; Newell, David

    2016-03-01

    We explored if any predictors of success could be identified from end-of-year grades in a chiropractic master's program and whether these grades could predict final-year grade performance and year-on-year performance. End-of-year average grades and module grades for a single cohort of students covering all academic results for years 1-4 of the 2013 graduating class were used for this analysis. Analysis consisted of within-year correlations of module grades with end-of-year average grades, linear regression models for continuous data, and logistic regression models for predicting final degree classifications. In year 1, 140 students were enrolled; 85.7% of students completed the program 4 years later. End-of-year average grades for years 1-3 were correlated (Pearson r values ranging from .75 to .87), but the end-of-year grades for years 1-3 were poorly correlated with clinic internship performance. In linear regression, several modules were predictive of end-of-year average grades for each year. For year 1, logistic regression showed that the modules Physiology and Pharmacology and Investigative Imaging were predictive of year 1 performance (odds ratio [OR] = 1.15 and 0.9, respectively). In year 3, the modules Anatomy and Histopathology 3 and Problem Solving were predictors of the difference between a pass/merit or distinction final degree classification (OR = 1.06 and 1.12, respectively). Early academic performance is weakly correlated with final-year clinic internship performance. The modules of Anatomy and Histopathology year 3 and Problem Solving year 3 emerged more consistently than other modules as being associated with final-year classifications.

  19. NASA Applied Sciences' DEVELOP National Program: Training the Next Generation of Remote Sensing Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Lauren; Brozen, Madeline; Hillyer, Nelson

    2010-01-01

    Since its inception over a decade ago, the DEVELOP National Program has provided students with experience in utilizing and integrating satellite remote sensing data into real world-applications. In 1998, DEVELOP began with three students and has evolved into a nationwide internship program with over 200 students participating each year. DEVELOP is a NASA Applied Sciences training and development program extending NASA Earth science research and technology to society. Part of the NASA Science Mission Directorate s Earth Science Division, the Applied Sciences Program focuses on bridging the gap between NASA technology and the public by conducting projects that innovatively use NASA Earth science resources to research environmental issues. Project outcomes focus on assisting communities to better understand environmental change over time. This is accomplished through research with global, national, and regional partners to identify the widest array of practical uses of NASA data. DEVELOP students conduct research in areas that examine how NASA science can better serve society. Projects focus on practical applications of NASA s Earth science research results. Each project is designed to address at least one of the Applied Sciences focus areas, use NASA s Earth observation sources and meet partners needs. DEVELOP research teams partner with end-users and organizations who use project results for policy analysis and decision support, thereby extending the benefits of NASA science and technology to the public.

  20. Better Communication for Better Public Health: Perspectives From an Interdisciplinary Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlafer, Rebecca J; McRee, Annie-Laurie; Gower, Amy L; Bearinger, Linda H

    2016-03-01

    Myriad factors determine the health of young people-biological, psychological, familial, contextual, environmental, and political, to name a few. Improving the health of adolescents means that leaders in health care and public health must have the requisite skills for translating research into priorities, practices, and policies that influence a wide array of health determinants. While adolescent health training programs may give emphasis to effective communication with adolescents as patients or as priority populations in health education/promotion efforts, are we adequately preparing our future leaders with the skill sets necessary for moving scientific evidence into practice, programs, and policies? Internship and fellowship programs may invest heavily in teaching skills for conducting research and health education/promotion, but they may not focus enough on how to translate scientific evidence into practice, programs, and policy. In this commentary, we share our experiences equipping professionals working with adolescents in health care and public health settings with skills for scientific writing, public speaking, and advocacy on behalf of young people, and discuss the need for more collaboration across disciplines. © 2016 Society for Public Health Education.

  1. Stakeholders' perceptions on competency and assessment program of entry-level pharmacists in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asante, Isaac; Andoh, Irene; Muijtjens, Arno M M; Donkers, Jeroen

    2017-05-01

    To assess the stakeholders' perceptions on the competency of entry-level pharmacists and the use of written licensure examination as the primary assessment for licensure decisions on entry-level pharmacists who have completed the Pharmacy Internship Program 1 (PIP) in developing countries. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among stakeholders in which they completed a web-based 21-item pre-tested questionnaire to determine their views regarding the competency outcomes and assessment program for entry-level pharmacist. The stakeholders rated the entry-level pharmacists to possess all competencies except research skills. Stakeholders suggested improvement of the program by defining the competency framework and training preceptors. However, stakeholders disagree on using written examination as the primary assessment for licensure decision and suggested the incorporation of other performance-based assessments like preceptor's assessment reports. Stakeholders are uncertain on entry-level pharmacists in developing countries possessing adequate research competencies and think their assessment program for licensure need more than written examination to assess all required competencies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Computer Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Tiffoni

    This module provides information on development and use of a Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) software program that seeks to link literacy skills education, safety training, and human-centered design. Section 1 discusses the development of the software program that helps workers understand the MSDSs that accompany the chemicals with which they…

  3. BASIC Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Carol Ann

    Designed for use by both secondary- and postsecondary-level business teachers, this curriculum guide consists of 10 units of instructional materials dealing with Beginners All-Purpose Symbol Instruction Code (BASIC) programing. Topics of the individual lessons are numbering BASIC programs and using the PRINT, END, and REM statements; system…

  4. Choreographic Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montesi, Fabrizio

    , as they offer a concise view of the message flows enacted by a system. For this reason, in the last decade choreographies have been used in the development of programming languages, giving rise to a programming paradigm that in this dissertation we refer to as Choreographic Programming. Recent studies show...... endpoint described in a choreography can then be automatically generated, ensuring that such implementations are safe by construction. However, current formal models for choreographies do not deal with critical aspects of distributed programming, such as asynchrony, mobility, modularity, and multiparty...... sessions; it remains thus unclear whether choreographies can still guarantee safety when dealing with such nontrivial features. This PhD dissertation argues for the suitability of choreographic programming as a paradigm for the development of safe distributed systems. We proceed by investigating its...

  5. Results in Developing an Engineering Degree Program in Safeguards and Security of Nuclear Materials at Moscow Engineering Physics Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryuchkov, Eduard F.; Geraskin, Nikolay I.; Killinger, Mark H.; Goodey, Kent O.; Butler, Gilbert W.; Duncan, Cristen L.

    2007-01-01

    The world's first master's degree program in nuclear safeguards and security, established at Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (MEPhI), has now graduated nine classes of students. Most of the graduates have gone on to work at government agencies, research organizations, or obtain their PhD. In order to meet the demand for safeguards and security specialists at nuclear facilities, MEPhI established a 5-1/2 year engineering degree program that provides more hands-on training desired by facilities. In February 2004, the first students began their studies in the new discipline Nuclear Material Safeguards and Nonproliferation. This class, as well as other subsequent classes, included students who started the program in their third year of studies, as the first 2-1/2 years consists of general engineering curriculum. Fourteen students made up the first graduating class, receiving their engineering degrees in February 2007. The topics addressed in this paper include specific features of the program caused by peculiarities of Russian education legislation and government quality control of academic education. This paper summarizes the main joint actions undertaken by MEPhI and the US National Laboratories in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Energy, to develop the engineering degree program. Also discussed are the program's specific training requirements, student internships, and job placement. The paper concludes with recommendations from a recent international seminar on nonproliferation education and training

  6. Use of a Web-based Delphi for identifying critical components of a professional science master's program in biotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantz, Jeannine Wells

    The primary purpose of this research was to develop a model for a professional science master's program combining biotechnology and business. The objectives were to identify stakeholder preferences for various dimensions of a professional science master's program combining biotechnology and business and to identify differences in priorities between subgroups. A secondary purpose was to examine user preferences between Web-based and traditional methods of conducting a Delphi study and the panelist's impressions of its usefulness for program development. Prior to the first round, demographic data were collected on panelists regarding their gender, age, years experience in their current field, position title and education levels. Round 1 started with eight open-ended questions designed to investigate (a) learning objectives, (b) internships, (c) thesis vs. non-thesis degrees, (d) program focus (e) possible entry level positions, (f) roles for the industry advisory board, (g) recommended hours of hands-on experience and (h) other issues of importance. The final round ended with three questions to assess the panelists' perception of the usefulness of the Delphi for program development in higher education. Twenty-four panelists started Round 1 and participation in subsequent rounds varied from 17 in Round 2 to 11 in Round 4. Education level varied and included all levels of education in science and business. Issues emerged early in the study regarding development of different program tracks and the program goals, which were clarified in subsequent rounds. Significant differences occurred between industry and academic subgroups for two tracks, six skills designated for tracks, method of evaluating the internship, and entry-level positions appropriate for new graduates. When analyzed by level of confidence (high confidence vs. low confidence), significant differences occurred for (a) the number of semesters of hands-on experience students should have upon graduation, (b

  7. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Leadership Programs and activities In your community Funding opportunities Internships and jobs View all pages in this ... Leadership Programs and activities In your community Funding opportunities Internships and jobs View all pages in this ...

  8. Overcoming challenges

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Leadership Programs and activities In your community Funding opportunities Internships and jobs View all pages in this ... Leadership Programs and activities In your community Funding opportunities Internships and jobs View all pages in this ...

  9. Breastfeeding: Planning Ahead

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... mission Leadership Programs and activities In your community Funding opportunities Internships and jobs View all pages in ... mission Leadership Programs and activities In your community Funding opportunities Internships and jobs View all pages in ...

  10. Overcoming challenges

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... mission Leadership Programs and activities In your community Funding opportunities Internships and jobs View all pages in ... mission Leadership Programs and activities In your community Funding opportunities Internships and jobs View all pages in ...

  11. Icobj Programming

    OpenAIRE

    Boussinot , Frédéric

    1996-01-01

    A simple and fully graphical programming method is presented, using a powerful means to combine behaviors. This programming is based on the notion of an «icobj» which has a behavioral aspect («object» part), a graphical aspect («icon» part), with an «animation» aspect. Icobj programming provides parallelism, broadcast event communication and migration through the network. An experimental system based on this approach is described in details. Its implementation with reactive scripts is also pr...

  12. Programming Python

    CERN Document Server

    Lutz, Mark

    2011-01-01

    If you've mastered Python's fundamentals, you're ready to start using it to get real work done. Programming Python will show you how, with in-depth tutorials on the language's primary application domains: system administration, GUIs, and the Web. You'll also explore how Python is used in databases, networking, front-end scripting layers, text processing, and more. This book focuses on commonly used tools and libraries to give you a comprehensive understanding of Python's many roles in practical, real-world programming. You'll learn language syntax and programming techniques in a clear and co

  13. Integrating electron microscopy into nanoscience and materials engineering programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormia, Robert D.; Oye, Michael M.; Nguyen, Anh; Skiver, David; Shi, Meng; Torres, Yessica

    2014-10-01

    Preparing an effective workforce in high technology is the goal of both academic and industry training, and has been the engine that drives innovation and product development in the United States for over a century. During the last 50 years, technician training has comprised a combination of two-year academic programs, internships and apprentice training, and extensive On-the-Job Training (OJT). Recently, and especially in Silicon Valley, technicians have four-year college degrees, as well as relevant hands-on training. Characterization in general, and microscopy in particular, is an essential tool in process development, manufacturing and QA/QC, and failure analysis. Training for a broad range of skills and practice is challenging, especially for community colleges. Workforce studies (SRI/Boeing) suggest that even four year colleges often do not provide the relevant training and experience in laboratory skills, especially design of experiments and analysis of data. Companies in high-tech further report difficulty in finding skilled labor, especially with industry specific experience. Foothill College, in partnership with UCSC, SJSU, and NASA-Ames, has developed a microscopy training program embedded in a research laboratory, itself a partnership between university and government, providing hands-on experience in advanced instrumentation, experimental design and problem solving, with real-world context from small business innovators, in an environment called `the collaboratory'. The program builds on AFM-SEM training at Foothill, and provides affordable training in FE-SEM and TEM through a cost recovery model. In addition to instrument and engineering training, the collaboratory also supports academic and personal growth through a multiplayer social network of students, faculty, researchers, and innovators.

  14. Program overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    The program overview describes the following resources and facilities; laser facilities, main laser room, target room, energy storage, laboratory area, building support systems, general plant project, and the new trailer complex

  15. Linear programming

    CERN Document Server

    Solow, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    This text covers the basic theory and computation for a first course in linear programming, including substantial material on mathematical proof techniques and sophisticated computation methods. Includes Appendix on using Excel. 1984 edition.

  16. Science Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laboratory Delivering science and technology to protect our nation and promote world stability Science & ; Innovation Collaboration Careers Community Environment Science & Innovation Facilities Science Pillars Research Library Science Briefs Science News Science Highlights Lab Organizations Science Programs Applied

  17. SPOT Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jason T.; Welsh, Sam J.; Farinetti, Antonio L.; Wegner, Tim; Blakeslee, James; Deboeck, Toni F.; Dyer, Daniel; Corley, Bryan M.; Ollivierre, Jarmaine; Kramer, Leonard; hide

    2010-01-01

    A Spacecraft Position Optimal Tracking (SPOT) program was developed to process Global Positioning System (GPS) data, sent via telemetry from a spacecraft, to generate accurate navigation estimates of the vehicle position and velocity (state vector) using a Kalman filter. This program uses the GPS onboard receiver measurements to sequentially calculate the vehicle state vectors and provide this information to ground flight controllers. It is the first real-time ground-based shuttle navigation application using onboard sensors. The program is compact, portable, self-contained, and can run on a variety of UNIX or Linux computers. The program has a modular objec-toriented design that supports application-specific plugins such as data corruption remediation pre-processing and remote graphics display. The Kalman filter is extensible to additional sensor types or force models. The Kalman filter design is also strong against data dropouts because it uses physical models from state and covariance propagation in the absence of data. The design of this program separates the functionalities of SPOT into six different executable processes. This allows for the individual processes to be connected in an a la carte manner, making the feature set and executable complexity of SPOT adaptable to the needs of the user. Also, these processes need not be executed on the same workstation. This allows for communications between SPOT processes executing on the same Local Area Network (LAN). Thus, SPOT can be executed in a distributed sense with the capability for a team of flight controllers to efficiently share the same trajectory information currently being computed by the program. SPOT is used in the Mission Control Center (MCC) for Space Shuttle Program (SSP) and International Space Station Program (ISSP) operations, and can also be used as a post -flight analysis tool. It is primarily used for situational awareness, and for contingency situations.

  18. Sprego programming

    OpenAIRE

    Csernoch, Mária; Biró, Piroska

    2015-01-01

    Spreadsheet management is a border-land between office applications and programming, however, it is rather communicated that spreadsheet is nothing more than an easily handled fun piece. Consequently, the complexity of spreadsheet handling, the unprepared end-users, their problem solving abilities and approaches do not match. To overcome these problems we have developed and introduced Sprego (Spreadsheet Lego). Sprego is a simplified functional programming language in spreadsheet environment,...

  19. Recombinant Programming

    OpenAIRE

    Pawlak , Renaud; Cuesta , Carlos; Younessi , Houman

    2004-01-01

    This research report presents a promising new approach to computation called Recombinant Programming. The novelty of our approach is that it separates the program into two layers of computation: the recombination and the interpretation layer. The recombination layer takes sequences as inputs and allows the programmer to recombine these sequences through the definition of cohesive code units called extensions. The output of such recombination is a mesh that can be used by the interpretation la...

  20. Improving the Raster Scanning Methods used with X-ray Fluorescence to See the Ancient Greek Text of Archimedes (SULI Paper)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, Isabella B.; /Norfolk State U. /SLAC, SSRL

    2006-01-04

    X-ray fluorescence is being used to detect the ancient Greek copy of Archimedes work. The copy of Archimedes text was erased with a weak acid and written over to make a prayer book in the Middle Ages. The ancient parchment, made of goat skin, has on it some of Archimedes most valuable writings. The ink in the text contains iron which will fluoresce under x-ray radiation. My research project deals with the scanning and imaging process. The palimpsest is put in a stage that moves in a raster format. As the beam hits the parchment, a germanium detector detects the iron atoms and discriminates against other elements. Since the computer scans in both forwards and backwards directions, it is imperative that each row of data lines up exactly on top of the next row. There are several parameters to consider when scanning the parchment. These parameters include: speed, count time, shutter time, x-number of points, and acceleration. Formulas were made to relate these parameters together. During the actual beam time of this project, the scanning was very slow going; it took 30 hours to scan 1/2 of a page. Using the formulas, the scientists doubled distance and speed to scan the parchment faster; however, the grey scaled data was not lined up properly causing the images to look blurred. My project was is to find out why doubling the parameters caused blurred images, and to fix the problem if it is fixable.