WorldWideScience

Sample records for internet diabetic education

  1. Internet delivered diabetes self-management education: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Katherine; Phillips, Beth; Johnson, Constance; Vorderstrasse, Allison

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes self-management education is a cornerstone of successful diabetes management. Various methods have been used to reach the increasing numbers of patients with diabetes, including Internet-based education. The purpose of this article is to review various delivery methods of Internet diabetes education that have been evaluated, as well as their effectiveness in improving diabetes-related outcomes. Literature was identified in the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), PubMed, Medline, EBSCO, the Cochrane Library, and the Web of Science databases through searches using the following terms: "type 2 diabetes AND internet/web based AND education" and "type 2 diabetes AND diabetes self-management education (DSME) AND web-based/internet OR technology assisted education." The search was limited to English language articles published in the last 10 years. The search yielded 111 articles; of these, 14 met criteria for inclusion in this review. Nine studies were randomized controlled trials, and study lengths varied from 2 weeks to 24 months, for a total of 2,802 participants. DSME delivered via the Internet is effective at improving measures of glycemic control and diabetes knowledge compared with usual care. In addition, results demonstrate that improved eating habits and increased attendance at clinic appointments occur after the online DSME, although engagement and usage of Internet materials waned over time. Interventions that included an element of interaction with healthcare providers were seen as attractive to participants. Internet-delivered diabetes education has the added benefit of easier access for many individuals, and patients can self-pace themselves through materials. More research on the cost-benefits of Internet diabetes education and best methods to maintain patient engagement are needed, along with more studies assessing the long-term impact of Internet-delivered DSME.

  2. Exploring educational needs and design aspects of internet-enabled patient education for persons with diabetes: a qualitative interview study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Javad; Karimi Moonaghi, Hosein; Zary, Nabil; Masiello, Italo

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this article is to explore the educational needs and design aspects of personalised internet-enabled education for patients with diabetes in Iran. Design Data were collected using semistructured interviews and then qualitatively analysed using inductive content analysis. Participants 9 patients with type 2 diabetes were included. Inclusion criteria were access to and knowledge on how to use the internet. The selection ensured representation based on gender, age, occupation and educational background. Setting The sample population was patients with diabetes who were admitted to an outpatient diabetes clinic in Mashhad, a large city of Iran with about 3 million inhabitants. Results 4 core categories emerged from the data: (1) seeking knowledge about diabetes, including specific knowledge acquisition, patient's interactions and learning requirements; (2) teaching and learning, including using different teaching methods and different ways to learn about the disease; (3) facilitators, including internet and mobile phone use to learn about the disease; and (4) barriers, including lack of internet access, uncertainty of access to the internet and lack of website in the local language and also perceived cultural barriers, such as patients' fears of the internet, lack of time and awareness. Conclusions This study provides a better understanding of the patient's educational expectations and technical needs in relation to internet-enabled education. This knowledge will inform the development of functional mock-ups in the next research phase using a design-based research approach in order to design internet-enabled patient education for self-management of diabetes. PMID:27799245

  3. Exploring educational needs and design aspects of internet-enabled patient education for persons with diabetes: a qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Javad; Karimi Moonaghi, Hosein; Zary, Nabil; Masiello, Italo

    2016-10-31

    The objective of this article is to explore the educational needs and design aspects of personalised internet-enabled education for patients with diabetes in Iran. Data were collected using semistructured interviews and then qualitatively analysed using inductive content analysis. 9 patients with type 2 diabetes were included. Inclusion criteria were access to and knowledge on how to use the internet. The selection ensured representation based on gender, age, occupation and educational background. The sample population was patients with diabetes who were admitted to an outpatient diabetes clinic in Mashhad, a large city of Iran with about 3 million inhabitants. 4 core categories emerged from the data: (1) seeking knowledge about diabetes, including specific knowledge acquisition, patient's interactions and learning requirements; (2) teaching and learning, including using different teaching methods and different ways to learn about the disease; (3) facilitators, including internet and mobile phone use to learn about the disease; and (4) barriers, including lack of internet access, uncertainty of access to the internet and lack of website in the local language and also perceived cultural barriers, such as patients' fears of the internet, lack of time and awareness. This study provides a better understanding of the patient's educational expectations and technical needs in relation to internet-enabled education. This knowledge will inform the development of functional mock-ups in the next research phase using a design-based research approach in order to design internet-enabled patient education for self-management of diabetes. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  4. Internet resources for diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadav Hariom

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Internet is transforming lives of many people in the world. Nowadays Internet has become one of the most common media to extract information of interest to researchers. The Internet is composed of a large number of smaller interconnected networks called Intranets. These Intranets connect thousands computers enabling them to share information with each other and to share various resources such as powerful super computers, software and databases of information. It has made it possible for people all over the world to effectively and inexpensively communicate with each other. The Internet has become world′s biggest library where retrieval of scientific resources is only a mouse click away. The geometric growth in Internet usage is mainly due to the great success of "World Wide Web". Various useful databases on diabetes are already on ′the Net′ and many more being added regularly. The present article is an attempt to provide a review of several sites that may be of great significance to the diabetes researchers before execution for new assignment/project.

  5. Internet Protocol Television for Personalized Home-Based Health Information: Design-Based Research on a Diabetes Education System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Ken; Kwong, Mabel; Alzougool, Basil; Hines, Carolyn; Tidhar, Gil; Frukhtman, Feodor

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of Internet protocol television (IPTV) as a channel for consumer health information is a relatively under-explored area of medical Internet research. IPTV may afford new opportunities for health care service providers to provide health information and for consumers, patients, and caretakers to access health information. The technologies of Web 2.0 add a new and even less explored dimension to IPTV’s potential. Objective Our research explored an application of Web 2.0 integrated with IPTV for personalized home-based health information in diabetes education, particularly for people with diabetes who are not strong computer and Internet users, and thus may miss out on Web-based resources. We wanted to establish whether this system could enable diabetes educators to deliver personalized health information directly to people with diabetes in their homes; and whether this system could encourage people with diabetes who make little use of Web-based health information to build their health literacy via the interface of a home television screen and remote control. Methods This project was undertaken as design-based research in two stages. Stage 1 comprised a feasibility study into the technical work required to integrate an existing Web 2.0 platform with an existing IPTV system, populated with content and implemented for user trials in a laboratory setting. Stage 2 comprised an evaluation of the system by consumers and providers of diabetes information. Results The project succeeded in developing a Web 2.0 IPTV system for people with diabetes and low literacies and their diabetes educators. The performance of the system in the laboratory setting gave them the confidence to engage seriously in thinking about the actual and potential features and benefits of a more widely-implemented system. In their feedback they pointed out a range of critical usability and usefulness issues related to Web 2.0 affordances and learning fundamentals. They also described

  6. National Diabetes Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Living Tips About WIN NIDDK Information Clearinghouses National Diabetes Education Program Together with more than 200 partners ... type 2 diabetes. Learn more about NDEP . National Diabetes Month You are the center of your diabetes ...

  7. Why Internet-based Education?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morton Ann Gernsbacher

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This essay illustrates five ways that Internet-based higher education can capitalize on fundamental principles of learning. Internet-based education can enable better mastery through distributed (shorter, more frequent practice rather than massed (longer, less frequent practice; it can optimize performance because it allows students to learn at their peak time of their day; it can deepen memory because it requires cheat-proof assignments and tests; it can promote critical thinking because it necessitates intellectual winnowing and sifting; and it can enhance writing skills by requiring students to write frequently and for a broad audience.

  8. Why internet-based education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gernsbacher, Morton Ann

    2014-01-01

    This essay illustrates five ways that Internet-based higher education can capitalize on fundamental principles of learning. Internet-based education can enable better mastery through distributed (shorter, more frequent) practice rather than massed (longer, less frequent) practice; it can optimize performance because it allows students to learn at their peak time of their day; it can deepen memory because it requires cheat-proof assignments and tests; it can promote critical thinking because it necessitates intellectual winnowing and sifting; and it can enhance writing skills by requiring students to write frequently and for a broad audience.

  9. Internet safety education for youth: stakeholder perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Megan A; Egan, Katie G; Bare, Kaitlyn; Young, Henry N; Cox, Elizabeth D

    2013-06-05

    Internet use is nearly ubiquitous among US youth; risks to internet use include cyberbullying, privacy violations and unwanted solicitation. Internet safety education may prevent these negative consequences; however, it is unclear at what age this education should begin and what group is responsible for teaching this topic. Surveys were distributed to key stakeholders in youth safety education including public school teachers, clinicians, parents and adolescents. Surveys assessed age at which internet safety education should begin, as well as experiences teaching and learning internet safety. Surveys of adults assessed willingness to teach internet safety. Finally, participants were asked to identify a group whose primary responsibility it should be to teach internet safety. A total of 356 participants completed the survey (93.4% response rate), including 77 teachers, 111 clinicians, 72 parents and 96 adolescents. Stakeholders felt the optimal mean age to begin teaching internet safety was 7.2 years (SD = 2.5), range 2-15. Internet safety was regularly taught by some teachers (20.8%), few clinicians (2.6%) and many parents (40.3%). The majority of teachers, clinicians and parents were willing to teach internet safety, but all groups surveyed identified parents as having primary responsibility for teaching this topic. Findings suggest agreement among key stakeholders for teaching internet safety at a young age, and for identifying parents as primary teachers of this topic. Clinicians have a unique opportunity to support parents by providing resources, guidance and support.

  10. [The importance of Internet in medical education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandza, H; Masić, I; Knezević, Z

    1999-01-01

    Internet is more and more involved in medical education in many countries including Bosnia and Herzegovina. Not only medical student but also physicians are using Internet to find out the latest information in specific field of medicine. Some sites are specially designed to be used for medical education. Information about some programs or courses of medical education can be found here. Improvements of network resources and multimedia technologies have made it possible to satisfy needs for medical Education. Multimedia approach offer possibility to show text, picture, sound or movie considering specific need. All of that is available on Internet. Many search engine are available in the world and student can use all of them when they have access to Internet. The more precise search can be done on specific sites that include information about medical conditions and medical education. The most important is MEDLINE. MEDLINE is bibliographic database of National Library Of Medicine in USA. This database can be explored from several sites. All relevant information about article can be find here including abstract and service to obtain full text of specific article. Database can be searched using specific keywords that can be find in text or in MESH thesaurus. Data about authors, their addresses and title of article can be found, too. The possibility of using Internet in medical education are considered in this article. Some of Internet sites are described, too.

  11. The Internet: A New Responsibility for Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Byron

    1995-01-01

    Educators will be challenged to teach students to use the Internet as critical consumers. There are numerous issues, including equity (due to income, educational level, gender, urban-rural setting, and age differences), connectivity, staff training, curriculum integration, and evaluation, that have profound implications for sustaining democratic…

  12. Pemanfaatan internet untuk edukasi gizi bagi penyandang diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emyr Reisha Isaura

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The pattern of disease incidence has changed nowadays as indicated from epidemiological transition, from infection to noninfection diseases or noncommunicable diseases. The quantity of diabetes mellitus (DM patients in Indonesia is increasing every year. Integrated management of DM requires synergy from different parties. According to Act No. 36/2009 on Health, article 17 paragraph 1 states that the government is responsible for the availability of access to information, education, and health facilities to improve and maintain highest health status. Objective: The study aimed to analyze the utilization of the internet or online media in the dissemination of recommended eating pattern and physical activities of DM patients as prevention against complication. Method: The study used cross-sectional design and was carried out in January 2013 at Surabaya Municipality. It used e-survey, with secondary data from hospitals at Surabaya Municipality. Samples were DM patients of 20-50 years old registered in hospitals and agreed with informed consent. Samples were taken purposively involving 66 respondents. Results: There was a difference in eating pattern among DM patients utilizing online and those using nononline media (OR=3.33; CI 95%=1.06-10.43; p=0.03; and in physical activities (OR=0.09; CI 95%=0.01-0.75; p=0.008. Conclusion: The utilization of online media affected eating pattern and physical activity pattern in DM patient as much as 3.33 times and 0.09 times greater than in those not using online media in looking for communication, information, and education resources in supporting prevention against DM complication. Thus online media could be one of the effective and efficient methods for the delivery of communication, information, and education for DM patients by health staff.

  13. Education for diabetic foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Batista

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this investigation was to stratify the risk in a consecutive group of diabetic patients presenting, for the first time, in a diabetic foot clinic. Additional aims were to investigate the preventive measures in the local health system and to evaluate the level of patient’s awareness about diabetic foot-associated morbidity. Methods: Fifty consecutive adult diabetic patients referred to a Diabetic Foot Clinic of a Municipal Public Hospital comprised the sample for this observational study. The enrollment visit was considered as the first health-system intervention for potential foot morbidity. The average time elapsed since a diagnosis of diabetes among patients was five years. Rresults: At the time of presentation, 94% of sample was not using appropriate footwear. Pedal pulses (dorsalis pedis and/or posterior tibial arteries were palpable in 76% of patients. Thirty subjects (60% had signs of peripheral neuropathy. Twenty-one subjects (42% had clinical deformity. There was a positive correlation between a history of foot ulcer, the presence of peripheral neuropathy, and the presence of foot deformity (p < 0.004 in each correlation. Cconclusions: Informing and educating the patients and those interested in this subject and these problems is essential for favorable outcomes in this scenario.

  14. Internet Safety in Emerging Educational Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wishart, Jocelyn

    2004-01-01

    Concern has arisen for the safety of children using the Internet to support their education outside the school context. Inappropriate material such as pornography, inflammatory and racist writings can be accessed both by accident and with deliberate intent to view. Children are also perceived to be at risk from approaches by strangers,…

  15. Educational Psychology and the Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassman, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The first comprehensive, research-based textbook on Internet-infused education, "Educational Psychology and the Internet" offers students an accessible guide to important issues in the field. Michael Glassman begins with an overview of the history that traces the evolution of the Internet and its significance for education. He outlines…

  16. Educational Psychology and the Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassman, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The first comprehensive, research-based textbook on Internet-infused education, "Educational Psychology and the Internet" offers students an accessible guide to important issues in the field. Michael Glassman begins with an overview of the history that traces the evolution of the Internet and its significance for education. He outlines…

  17. Educational system for diabetic children

    OpenAIRE

    Tretyakova, Sofia

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces an educational system for diabetic children. It aims to create interest in self-monitoring among children diagnosed with diabetes, to enable them to learn and follow diabetes control guidelines from childhood. Abidance by such rules supports a normal lifestyle for diabetic children. Accordingly, this paper presents an online educational game that could be part of a social network, and as such be accessible everywhere to teach kids how to deal with their...

  18. Monitoring Heart Disease and Diabetes with Mobile Internet Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Mulvaney

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A telemedicine system is described for monitoring vital signs and general health indicators of patients with cardiac and diabetic conditions. Telemetry from wireless sensors and readings from other instruments are combined into a comprehensive set of measured patient parameters. Using a combination of mobile device applications and web browser, the data can be stored, accessed, and displayed using mobile internet communications to the central server. As an extra layer of security in the data transmission, information embedded in the data is used in its verification. The paper highlights features that could be enhanced from previous systems by using alternative components or methods.

  19. [Breviary of diabetes education for internist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uličiansky, Vladimír

    Diabetes education is an important cornerstone for diabetes care. Patients with diabetes should participate in education to facilitate the knowledge, skill sand ability necessary for diabetes both at diagnosis and there after. Effective self-management can improve clinical outcomes, health status, and quality of life. diabetes mellitus - education - self-management.

  20. Development of a simulated Internet for education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Smith

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the early stages of research and development of an educational environment designed to enable learners to participate in remote, group based large-scale activities based on local area network and wide area network technologies working on a range of systems and within different learning situations, such as in class group work, remote group work or independent learning. The environment covers specifically routing, switching and wireless principles in the domain of computer networking. This is accomplished using the ‘multiuser functionality' feature found within the Cisco Academy programme, Packet Tracer application. The initial research explores how a ‘virtual Internet' can be implemented to enable learners to engage with the scale and complexity of the Internet without interacting with active routing infrastructures thereby interfering with others. Different communities of interest from Cisco Systems as well as their Academy Programme academic affiliates have contributed to the development of the resource as well as to research into how individuals participate in learning as a result of using this software. This paper tells the story of the iterative action research process with two initial learning situations of ‘remote many' participation and ‘in class many' participation in a large scale networking exercise. As research is still in the development process, this paper explores the experiences and observations gathered from engaging with the two learning scenarios, describing how each interaction exercise was perceived by participants and their educators. Initial findings from both activities indicate that the concept of an ‘Internet on the Internet' to deliver simulated practical learning has considerable potential and brings an alternative dimension to the practical learning experience. Research is ongoing, with the work in this paper informing the continual iterative process.

  1. Internet Shopping Behavior of College of Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyici, Mubin

    2012-01-01

    Internet is an important facilitator for human and humans use this medium almost every phase. As a shopping medium, internet attract human so attract researcher. Younger people can adapt newer technologies so they can adapt internet as shopping tool. In this research it is tried to define college of education students' online shopping behavior and…

  2. THE ADVANTAGES AND CHALLENGES OF INTERNET FOR HIGHER EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habiburrahim Habiburrahim

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In the new millennium, the internet plays an important role in improving the quality of education. Internet has become one of the means of communication, discussion, and even exploration of varieties of information from and between different worlds. In the world of education in the West, for example, the internet is used as a means of transforming education, especially by those who are dealing with the limitations of time and geographical location. The internet allows students and professors to communicate and coordinate with each other on the progress of the research they are doing. The internet, through its search engines, also has made it easier for education person to find diverse scientific literatures. Thousands of books, studies, research articles, reports and scientific papers are now available online. However, behind the ease and benefit of the search engines, educational practitioners scrutinize the implications of the use of the internet to the world of education. The internet is often misused or used as a medium to perform a variety of crimes. Stealing other people's private information and money, provocation and scorn as well as accessing pornographic sites are a a few number of examples that are always connected to the use of internet. The issue of infringement on intellectual property rights and other plagiarism is also very often associated with the misuse of the internet today. But this particular article describes the benefits of the internet through search engines, potential challenges, and benefits for higher education.

  3. Quality Assessment of Diabetes Online Patient Education Materials from Academic Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorcely, Brenda; Agarwal, Nitin; Raghuwanshi, Maya

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess and compare the readability of type 2 diabetes online patient education materials from academic institutions in the northeast USA and the American Diabetes Association. Many US residents utilise the Internet to obtain health information. Studies have shown that online patient education materials…

  4. Quality Assessment of Diabetes Online Patient Education Materials from Academic Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorcely, Brenda; Agarwal, Nitin; Raghuwanshi, Maya

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess and compare the readability of type 2 diabetes online patient education materials from academic institutions in the northeast USA and the American Diabetes Association. Many US residents utilise the Internet to obtain health information. Studies have shown that online patient education materials…

  5. The Attitudes of the Physical Education Students Towards Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaman, Metin

    2007-01-01

    Internet is a part of our life today. It offers educators alternative teaching methods. It provides us to get efficient and fast information, establishing contact with everyone and to have a chance for searching all types of data with its globalization effect. Internet facilities help physical education teachers to search lonely in order to get…

  6. Internet for Educational Television: An Opportunity or Threat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Pradeep Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Among several uses, educational use of television is a prominent one. The public broadcasters of many countries routinely provide locally-relevant and useful educational television programs. In other side, there has been phenomenal growth in Internet use worldwide. The researchers are of the view that Internet has challenged the supremacy of…

  7. Enhancing the effectiveness of diabetes self-management education: the diabetes literacy project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Broucke, S; Van der Zanden, G; Chang, P; Doyle, G; Levin, D; Pelikan, J; Schillinger, D; Schwarz, P; Sørensen, K; Yardley, L; Riemenschneider, H

    2014-12-01

    Patient empowerment through self-management education is central to improving the quality of diabetes care and preventing Type 2 Diabetes. Although national programs exist, there is no EU-wide strategy for diabetes self-management education, and patients with limited literacy face barriers to effective self-management. The Diabetes Literacy project, initiated with the support of the European Commission, aims to fill this gap. The project investigates the effectiveness of diabetes self-management education, targeting people with or at risk of Type 2 Diabetes in the 28 EU Member States, as part of a comprehensive EU-wide diabetes strategy. National diabetes strategies in the EU, US, Taiwan, and Israel are compared, and diabetes self-management programs inventorized. The costs of the diabetes care pathway are assessed on a per person basis at national level. A comparison is made of the (cost)-effectiveness of different methods for diabetes self-management support, and the moderating role of health literacy, organization of the health services, and implementation fidelity of education programs are considered. Web-based materials are developed and evaluated by randomized trials to evaluate if interactive internet delivery can enhance self-management support for people with lower levels of health literacy. The 3-year project started in December 2012. Several literature reviews have been produced and protocol development and research design are in the final stages. Primary and secondary data collection and analysis take place in 2014. The results will inform policy decisions on improving the prevention, treatment, and care for persons with diabetes across literacy levels. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Find a Diabetes Educator

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Corporate Opportunities Annual Meeting Mailing Lists Favorably Reviewed Advertising DiMedex Media Resources Quote an Expert About Diabetes ... Media Policy | Contact AADE | Sitemap Copyright 2016 AADE FaceBook Twitter LinkedIn Pinterest Google Plus Instagram

  9. The Internet--approaching a ubiquitous tool for dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, L A

    1999-01-01

    The Internet holds promise of addressing some of dentists' and dental students' needs caused by the rapid expansion of knowledge. The Internet is used primarily for communication and for courses, but the quality of Internet courses is uneven. The Internet holds potential in formal dental education for supporting information and instructional databases and as an educational administrative tool. The use of the Internet for educational purposes raises issues such as locating resources on line, ensuring information quality, and incorporation of emerging computer architecture. Some projections are offered for the future: increased instructional quality, replacement of textbooks, creating "courses" out of modules of instructional material, faculty becoming coaches, increased use of trained instructional technologists, intelligent tutoring systems, and the merging of information, instruction, and practice systems. Numerous web sites are given.

  10. 75 FR 47458 - TRICARE; Diabetic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-06

    ... of the Secretary 32 CFR Part 199 RIN 0720-AB32 TRICARE; Diabetic Education AGENCY: Office of the... final rule to clarify TRICARE coverage for diabetic education. This rule introduces new definitions and... changes pertaining to diabetic education. DATES: Effective Date: This final rule is effective September 7...

  11. Methodology and feasibility of a structured education program for diabetes education in India: The National Diabetes Educator Program

    OpenAIRE

    Shilpa Joshi; Joshi, Shashank R.; Viswanathan Mohan

    2013-01-01

    India has over 62 million people with diabetes. Unfortunately, there are no trained diabetes educators in India although many are self-taught through experience. The National Diabetes Educator Program (NDEP) was initiated with the primary aim to educate and train diabetes educators in India. The first cycle of NDEP was conducted during the period June 2011 to March 2012 in 96 training centers in India and trained 1032 diabetes educators mainly drawn from various diabetes clinics across the co...

  12. Telemedical Education: Teaching Spirometry on the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Esther H.; Gross, Thomas J.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the development and evaluation of an Internet-based tutorial for teaching spirometry interpretation to nonpulmonologists. Concludes that computer-based tutorials can effectively train off-site practitioners in spirometry interpretation. Contains 23 references. (Author/WRM)

  13. Educators' Degrees Earned on Internet Raise Fraud Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotter, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses how the degrees earned by a dozen educators on the Internet have raised fraud issues. Small firms known as "credential evaluators" help states and school districts detect educators who present phony or flimsy academic credentials from overseas institutions--a safeguard that is becoming more important with the growth of…

  14. Internet Traffic Classification for Educational Institutions Using Machine Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaspreet Kaur

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent times machine learning algorithms are used for internet traffic classification. The infinite number of websites in the internet world can be classified into different categories in different ways. In educational institutions, these websites can be classified into two categories, educational websites and non-educational websites. Educational websites are used to acquire knowledge, to explore educational topics while the non-educational websites are used for entertainment and to keep in touch with people. In case of blocking these non-educational websites students use proxy websites to unblock them. Therefore, in educational institutes for the optimum use of network resources the use of non-educational and proxy websites should be banned. In this paper, we use five ML classifiers Naïve Bayes, RBF, C4.5, MLP and Bayes Net to classify the educational and non-educational websites. Results show that Bayes Net gives best performance in both full feature and reduced feature data sets for intended classification of internet traffic in terms of classification accuracy, recall and precision values as compared to other classifiers.

  15. Distance Education in Physics via the Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Bodo; Grober, Sebastian; Jodl, Hans-Jorg

    2009-01-01

    This article describes three connected projects in physics: (1) a very successful course at the university level; (2) a collection of several thousand multimedia materials, its status and evaluation, and its dissemination; and (3) Web experiments--experiments that can be operated remotely from a distance via the Internet. (Contains 4 tables and 10…

  16. Education on the Internet: Anonymity vs. Commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyfus, Hubert L.

    1998-01-01

    Argues that learning a skill requires the kind of commitment which is undermined by the Press (the Public) and the Internet, citing Soren Kierkegaard's "The Present Age", and states that learning by apprenticeship is impossible in cyberspace. Includes: aesthetic sphere--commitment to the enjoyment of sheer information; ethical…

  17. [Therapy in diabetes education. Where are we?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isla Pera, Pilar

    2011-06-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) who receive no education cannot make informed decisions to maintain acceptable metabolic control, increasing the likelihood of complications [1]. Education and prevention of diabetes mellitus (DM) are the central theme of World Diabetes Day during the period 2009/2073. The key messages of this campaign advocating: 1) Know the risks of DM and its warning signs, 2) Know what to do and who to call and 3) Learn how to manage and control. Education is the primary theme of this campaign promoted by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and the World Health Organization (WHO) [1].

  18. Inadequate investment on management of diabetes education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvaneh Abazari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Reforming and improving the patient education process need more insight into the strengths and weaknesses of the existing education process. There is little documentation on patient education in National Diabetes Prevention and Control Program in Iran, so the present study aimed to describe patient education process in diabetes centers in one of the provinces of Iran. Materials and Methods: This is a qualitative content analysis. Twelve nurses who work as diabetes nurse educators (DNEs and an internal medicine specialist participated in this study. Data was obtained through semi-structured face-to-face interviews, a focus group, existing documents, field notes, and multiple observations. Data analysis was guided by the conventional approach of qualitative content analysis. Results: Three main themes including unequipped trainers (insufficient knowledge and experience, lack of appropriate educational facilities, lack of time, lack of patient′s interest, unstructured education (lack of educational need assessment, lack of evaluation, lack of continuing patient education, unmanaged education (lack of official planning for patient education and supervising the education process emerged from qualitative content analysis. Conclusions: Although patient education is one of the important strategies in National Diabetes Prevention and Control Program, there however has not been necessary investment and adequate space to achieve it. Patient education was not structured and based on scientific principles. Training of diabetes nurse educators (DNEs is neglected, and there is no supervision on patient education process.

  19. Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus: Educational Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousef, Jamal M. S.

    1995-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the educational implications of diabetes in children through discussion of the nature of diabetes, factors associated with educational performance, and the teacher's role in meeting the child's needs. It argues that teachers should treat these students as normal learners, without ignoring their unique needs or…

  20. Finding Quality Information on Internet for Educational Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khine, Myint Swe

    2006-01-01

    One of the major shifts in education today under the influence of information and communication technologies is that there is an increased tendency toward the use of computers and Internet. The process of ICT integration in schools reaches a considerable level of maturity and teachers and students are optimizing the learning opportunities with the…

  1. Social disparities in internet patient portal use in diabetes: evidence that the digital divide extends beyond access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Urmimala; Karter, Andrew J; Liu, Jennifer Y; Adler, Nancy E; Nguyen, Robert; López, Andrea; Schillinger, Dean

    2011-05-01

    The authors investigated use of the internet-based patient portal, kp.org, among a well-characterized population of adults with diabetes in Northern California. Among 14,102 diverse patients, 5671 (40%) requested a password for the patient portal. Of these, 4311 (76%) activated their accounts, and 3922 (69%), logged on to the patient portal one or more times; 2990 (53%) participants viewed laboratory results, 2132 (38%) requested medication refills, 2093 (37%) sent email messages, and 835 (15%) made medical appointments. After adjustment for age, gender, race/ethnicity, immigration status, educational attainment, and employment status, compared to non-Hispanic Caucasians, African-Americans and Latinos had higher odds of never logging on (OR 2.6 (2.3 to 2.9); OR 2.3 (1.9 to 2.6)), as did those without an educational degree (OR compared to college graduates, 2.3 (1.9 to 2.7)). Those most at risk for poor diabetes outcomes may fall further behind as health systems increasingly rely on the internet and limit current modes of access and communication.

  2. Role of Social Media and the Internet in Education

    OpenAIRE

    Vervaart, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Since the advent of the Internet, and in particular the development of the interactive version of the web, Web 2.0, use of Social Media has developed into a major strategy for businesses and organizations such as the IFCC to use for the purposes of Public Relations and Education. The early Internet ‘Web 1.0’ was a largely static environment which did not allow interaction between organizations and their customers and/or members and as such was mainly used as an information repository rather t...

  3. Role of Social Media and the Internet in Education

    OpenAIRE

    Vervaart, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Since the advent of the Internet, and in particular the development of the interactive version of the web, Web 2.0, use of Social Media has developed into a major strategy for businesses and organizations such as the IFCC to use for the purposes of Public Relations and Education. The early Internet ‘Web 1.0’ was a largely static environment which did not allow interaction between organizations and their customers and/or members and as such was mainly used as an information repository rather t...

  4. Remote sensing education and Internet/World Wide Web technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, J.A.; Egbert, S.L.

    2001-01-01

    Remote sensing education is increasingly in demand across academic and professional disciplines. Meanwhile, Internet technology and the World Wide Web (WWW) are being more frequently employed as teaching tools in remote sensing and other disciplines. The current wealth of information on the Internet and World Wide Web must be distilled, nonetheless, to be useful in remote sensing education. An extensive literature base is developing on the WWW as a tool in education and in teaching remote sensing. This literature reveals benefits and limitations of the WWW, and can guide its implementation. Among the most beneficial aspects of the Web are increased access to remote sensing expertise regardless of geographic location, increased access to current material, and access to extensive archives of satellite imagery and aerial photography. As with other teaching innovations, using the WWW/Internet may well mean more work, not less, for teachers, at least at the stage of early adoption. Also, information posted on Web sites is not always accurate. Development stages of this technology range from on-line posting of syllabi and lecture notes to on-line laboratory exercises and animated landscape flyovers and on-line image processing. The advantages of WWW/Internet technology may likely outweigh the costs of implementing it as a teaching tool.

  5. The digital divide in Internet-based patient education materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Gordon H

    2012-11-01

    The ubiquity of the Internet has led to the widespread availability of health-related information to the public, and the subsequent empowerment of patients has fundamentally altered the patient-physician relationship. Among several concerns of physicians is the possibility that patients may be misinformed by information obtained from the Internet. One opportunity for health care providers to address this problem exists within Internet-based patient education materials (IPEMs). According to recent research in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, IPEMs found within professional otolaryngology websites are written at the 8th- to 18th-grade reading comprehension level, essentially unchanged over the past 3 years. This greatly exceeds the fourth- to sixth-grade reading level recommended by the National Institutes of Health. Benefits, strategies, and challenges to improving the readability of IPEMs are discussed.

  6. Diabetes educator role boundaries in Australia: a documentary analysis

    OpenAIRE

    King, Olivia; Nancarrow, Susan; Grace, Sandra; Borthwick, Alan

    2017-01-01

    Background Diabetes educators provide self-management education for people living with diabetes to promote optimal health and wellbeing. Their national association is the Australian Diabetes Educators Association (ADEA), established in 1981. In Australia the diabetes educator workforce is a diverse, interdisciplinary entity, with nurses, podiatrists, dietitians and several other health professional groups recognised by ADEA as providers of diabetes education. Historically nurses have filled t...

  7. NETLAB-An Internet based laboratory for electrical engineering education

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Shu; ZHU Shan-an; LIN Qun; XU Zhi-wei; YING Shao-dong

    2005-01-01

    This article describes an Internet based laboratory (NETLAB) developed at Zhejiang University for electrical engineering education. A key feature of the project is the use of real experimental systems rather than simulation or virtual reality. NELTAB provides remote access to a wide variety of experiments, including not only basic electrical and electronic experiments but also many innovative control experiments. Students can effectively use the laboratory at any time and from anywhere.NETLAB has been in operation since July 2003.

  8. The Effect of Limited Health Literacy on How Internet Users Learn About Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yom-Tov, Elad; Marino, Barbara; Pai, Jennifer; Harris, Dawn; Wolf, Michael

    2016-10-01

    The Internet continues to be an important supplemental health information resource for an increasing number of U.S. adults, especially for those with a new or existing chronic condition. Here we examine how people use the Internet to learn about Type 2 diabetes and how health literacy (HL) influences this information-seeking behavior. We analyzed the searches of approximately 2 million people who queried for diabetes-related information on Microsoft's Bing search engine. The HL of searchers was imputed through a community-based HL score. Topics searched were categorized and subsequent websites were assessed for readability. Overall, diabetes information-seeking strategies via the Internet are similar among adults with limited and adequate HL skills. However, people with limited HL take a longer time to read pages that are quickly read by people with adequate HL and vice versa. Information seeking among the former is terminated prematurely, as is evident from a Hidden Markov Model of the search process. Our findings indicate that the reading level required to understand the majority of diabetes-related information is high. Especially on government websites, more than 80% of information requires a reading level corresponding to 7th grade or higher. Our results indicate that individuals with lower HL may disproportionately struggle with Internet searches and fail to get an equivalent benefit from this information resource compared to users with greater HL. Future interventions should target the quality and ease of navigation of health care websites and find ways to leverage other relevant professionals to encourage and promote successful information access on the Web.

  9. Educating the Web-Savvy Urban Teacher: Website Evaluation Tips and Internet Resources for Secondary Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harushimana, Immaculee

    2008-01-01

    This article, "The Web-Savvy Urban Teacher," addresses the question of what educational technology educators and scholars can do to close the pedagogical mismatch, which exists today between "digital native" secondary students and their predigital educators. The infrequent use of the Internet as a resource in urban schools is detrimental for…

  10. Computers, the Internet and medical education in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Christopher D; Pitchforth, Emma L; O'Callaghan, Christopher

    2010-05-01

    OBJECTIVES This study aimed to explore the use of information and communications technology (ICT) in undergraduate medical education in developing countries. METHODS Educators (deans and heads of medical education) in English-speaking countries across Africa were sent a questionnaire to establish the current state of ICT at medical schools. Non-respondents were contacted firstly by e-mail, subsequently by two postal mailings at 3-month intervals, and finally by telephone. Main outcome measures included cross-sectional data about the availability of computers, specifications, Internet connection speeds, use of ICT by students, and teaching of ICT and computerised research skills, presented by country or region. RESULTS The mean computer : student ratio was 0.123. Internet speeds were rated as 'slow' or 'very slow' on a 5-point Likert scale by 25.0% of respondents overall, but by 58.3% in East Africa and 33.3% in West Africa (including Cameroon). Mean estimates showed that campus computers more commonly supported CD-ROM (91.4%) and sound (87.3%) than DVD-ROM (48.1%) and Internet (72.5%). The teaching of ICT and computerised research skills, and the use of computers by medical students for research, assignments and personal projects were common. CONCLUSIONS It is clear that ICT infrastructure in Africa lags behind that in other regions. Poor download speeds limit the potential of Internet resources (especially videos, sound and other large downloads) to benefit students, particularly in East and West (including Cameroon) Africa. CD-ROM capability is more widely available, but has not yet gained momentum as a means of distributing materials. Despite infrastructure limitations, ICT is already being used and there is enthusiasm for developing this further. Priority should be given to developing partnerships to improve ICT infrastructure and maximise the potential of existing technology.

  11. [An educational tool for diabetic children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochon, Stéphanie; Monnot, Alexandra; Fayet, Corinne

    2011-04-01

    The 2010 Abbott Diabetes Care--Société Francophone du Diabète (SFD) Paramédical prize was awarded to the nursing team of the paediatric unit of the William Morey hospital in Chalon-sur-Saône (71) for the creation of a new educational tool. The interactive game aims to encourage children with type 1 diabetes to do sport by providing them with the education and knowledge they need to manage their diabetes before, during and after the physical activity.

  12. Analysis of Scientific Attitude, Computer Anxiety, Educational Internet Use, Problematic Internet Use, and Academic Achievement of Middle School Students According to Demographic Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekmezci, Mehmet; Celik, Ismail; Sahin, Ismail; Kiray, Ahmet; Akturk, Ahmet Oguz

    2015-01-01

    In this research, students' scientific attitude, computer anxiety, educational use of the Internet, academic achievement, and problematic use of the Internet are analyzed based on different variables (gender, parents' educational level and daily access to the Internet). The research group involves 361 students from two middle schools which are…

  13. Internet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    微软想要统治Internet,Windows XP就是这个计划中的一个组成部分。微软已经努力争取提供连接Internet的最方便、最完整的方法。新的操作系统含有Internet Explorer 6(IE6)、新的保密功能以及防火墙保护。Windows XP甚至包含有一个Macromedia Flash播放器插件。但是对Sun微系统公司的打击就是

  14. Study of Self-Efficacy Perceptions of Social Studies Teacher Candidates on Educational Internet Usage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akman, Özkan

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at examining the self-efficacy perceptions of social studies teacher candidates with respect to educational internet use. This research was conducted on a sample of 174 social studies teacher candidates enrolled in Gaziantep University Nizip Faculty of Education. The "Educational Internet Self-Efficacy Scale," developed…

  15. Beoordelen en selecteren van informatie op Internet: twee onderwijsmethodes vergeleken [Evaluating and selecting information on the Internet: two educational methods compared

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walraven, Amber; Brand-Gruwel, Saskia; Boshuizen, Els

    2009-01-01

    Walraven, A., Brand-Gruwel, S., & Boshuizen, E. (2008). Beoordelen en selecteren van informatie op Internet: twee onderwijsmethodes vergeleken [Evaluating and selecting information on the Internet: two educational methods compared]. OnderwijsInnovatie, 10(1), 17-25.

  16. Role of Social Media and the Internet in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vervaart, Peter

    2012-07-01

    Since the advent of the Internet, and in particular the development of the interactive version of the web, Web 2.0, use of Social Media has developed into a major strategy for businesses and organizations such as the IFCC to use for the purposes of Public Relations and Education. The early Internet 'Web 1.0' was a largely static environment which did not allow interaction between organizations and their customers and/or members and as such was mainly used as an information repository rather than a dynamic environment for the exchange of ideas and active marketing and education. Since the development of Web 2.0 we have seen a massive increase in web based traffic which could be loosely called 'social networking' which initially was mainly networking between individuals but more recently has developed into a major marketing resource allowing networking between organizations and individuals on the web. It follows then that by developing a Social Media presence on platforms such as Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and other social media sites organizations can use this networking for the purposes of marketing, public relations, and in the case of IFCC, education of members and other interested individuals across the globe.

  17. Java programming and Internet technologies for undergraduate education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Wolfgang

    2000-05-01

    Although it is somewhat of a cliché that computers are revolutionizing education, it is still not common to find computer-based interactive curricular material. Internet technologies are likely to change this situation by providing standards based on virtual machines and meta-languages. Adopting these technologies may improve the teaching of the underlying physics. This paper describes a set of Java applets, known as Physlets, that make use of these technologies. Physlets are designed to communicate with browsers by employing a scripting language such as JavaScript, thereby allowing one applet to be used in many different contexts.

  18. Recent Trends in Diabetes Knowledge, Perceptions, and Behaviors: Implications for National Diabetes Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccinino, Linda; Griffey, Susan; Gallivan, Joanne; Lotenberg, Lynne Doner; Tuncer, Diane

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Examine trends in diabetes-related knowledge, perceptions, and behavior among U.S. adults with and without a diagnosis of diabetes and among subpopulations at risk. Discuss implications for national diabetes education and for the National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) in particular. Methods: Three population-based NDEP National…

  19. Recent Trends in Diabetes Knowledge, Perceptions, and Behaviors: Implications for National Diabetes Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccinino, Linda; Griffey, Susan; Gallivan, Joanne; Lotenberg, Lynne Doner; Tuncer, Diane

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Examine trends in diabetes-related knowledge, perceptions, and behavior among U.S. adults with and without a diagnosis of diabetes and among subpopulations at risk. Discuss implications for national diabetes education and for the National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) in particular. Methods: Three population-based NDEP National…

  20. Internet Access and Use among Students of Physical Education: A Study of Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar, Rajender

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper depicts a study conducted on the behavior of physical education students towards Internet usage at Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra. Specially, the study aims to know the purposes for use of Internet resources and services, frequency of use, places and means of use, student's satisfaction level toward the Internet, and problems faced while using the Internet. A survey was carried out with a sample of 100 physical education students of Kurukshetra University and the response rate was 88%. A well-designed questionnaire was distributed to the students' sample. Amazingly, the results of the study reveal that usage of the Internet in research and education was not favored, whereas email, chatting, and sports websites were commonly used among students. The study also found that too much information on the Internet, slow access speeds, and finding relevant information were the main problems in using the Internet.

  1. Technography and Design-Actuality Gap-Analysis of Internet Computer Technologies-Assisted Education: Western Expectations and Global Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhalgh-Spencer, Heather; Jerbi, Moja

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we provide a design-actuality gap-analysis of the internet infrastructure that exists in developing nations and nations in the global South with the deployed internet computer technologies (ICT)-assisted programs that are designed to use internet infrastructure to provide educational opportunities. Programs that specifically…

  2. Diabetes Self-Management Education; Experience of People with Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Mardanian Dehkordi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetes self-management education (DSME is a major factor which can affects quality of life of people with diabetes (PWD. Understanding the experience of PWD participating in DSME programs is an undeniable necessity in providing effective DSME to this population. The Aim of the study was to explore the experiences of PWD from a local DSME program in Iran. Methods: This study applied a descriptive phenomenological approach. The participants were PWD attending a well-established local DSME program in an endocrinology and diabetes center in Isfahan, Iran. Fifteen participants willing to share their experience about DSME were selected through purposive sampling from September 2011 to June 2012. Data were collected via unstructured interviews and analyzed using Colaizzi's approach. Results: The experience of participants were categorized under three main themes including content of diabetes education (useful versus repetitive, intensive and volatile, teaching methods (traditional, technology ignorant and learning environment (friendly atmosphere, cramped and dark. Conclusion: It seems the current approach for DSME cannot meet the needs and expectations of PWD attending the program. Needs assessment, interactive teaching methods, multidisciplinary approach, technology as well as appropriate physical space need to be considered to improve DSME.

  3. Distance learning and the internet in respiratory therapy education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varekojis, Sarah M; Sergakis, Georgianna G; Dunlevy, Crystal L; Foote, Elbie; Clutter, Jill

    2011-11-01

    The profession of respiratory therapy (RT) continues to grow both in number, due to population growth and an ever-increasing aging population, and scope of practice, due to both new and expanded roles and responsibilities in divergent areas of clinical practice. Instructional technology, including distance learning, will probably play a key role in training, educating, and assessing RT students to meet the increasing demand for practitioners. To assess current uses of distance learning and opinions concerning the appropriate use of distance education in RT education programs nationwide. A 13-item on-line survey was designed to collect information about the frequency of use of various types of distance education typically utilized in RT education programs. The survey was sent to directors of 343 Committee on Accreditation for Respiratory Care accredited programs of RT education that offer entry-level or advanced courses of study. The response rate was 50% (169 respondents). Fifty-two percent of the respondents indicated that their courses included some form of on-line learning component. Most directors anticipated that the distance composition of their course offerings will remain unchanged or increase in the near future. Our results indicate that, while distance education plays an important supportive role in RT education, there is still a preference for face-to-face instruction and Internet-facilitated courses among program directors. Program directors continue to view the laboratory and clinical settings as hands-on environments that require instructor supervision in order for students to demonstrate proficiency and critical thinking skills. When used appropriately, distance learning may be an efficient and effective approach to address the many barriers to education faced by the health workforce in general, including budget constraints, overloaded schedules, the need for on-the-job learning opportunities, and lack of access.

  4. Diabetic patient education: determinants of success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, J L

    2000-01-01

    Education/empowerment is critical if successful self-management is to be achieved. All professional patient interactions have a learning component. Clinical outcomes in diabetes are as dependent on psycho-social factors or learned behaviour as on metabolic state or therapeutic interventions. These factors include targets set, self-management skills, influence of living with diabetes, emotional factors, role of other people, perceived benefits and barriers, feelings of self-efficacy, weight concern and diet barrier. Training in learning processes and factors governing behaviour are essential for all those involved in delivery of patient care. Educational programmes should recognise the wide range of learning strategies used by different people.

  5. Guidelines for Educational Research in Biochemistry on Internet Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.M. Lima

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The Internet has been used to support research in different areas, such as practical and educational  research  in  medical  and  biomedical  research.  There  are  several recommended  sites  for  carrying  biomedical  and  medical  research  (BERGER,  2003. Nevertheless,  few  studies  report  on  the  use  of  the  Internet  in  the  teaching  of Biochemistry. Considering the fact that there is no specific legislation for the use of the Internet  in  Brazil,  it  is  necessary  to  stimulate  self-regulation  of  the  sector  in  order  to establish  minimum  quality  standards,  safety,  and  reliability  of  sites  containing information  in  the  educational  area.  This  study  establishes  some  parameters  to  help guiding research for educational purposes on the internet. The following aspects should be  checked:  if  the  site  has  an  editorial  board  responsible  for  content  selection,  and whether  it  is  made  up  of  experts  in  the  area  of  expertise;  if  the  site  releases  updated scientific materials, and provides pedagogical content that fosters teaching and learning such  as  images  that  contribute  to  the  understanding  of  the  content,  educational software,  and  animation;  if  the  site  is  recommended  by  universities,  public  and  private qualified  institutions.  In  addition,  educational  sites  should  present  other  aspects, including transparency (regarding their educational purpose, quality (scientifically based information,  privacy  (related  to  the  user’s  personal  data,  responsibility  and  reliable sources.  Such  procedures  are  necessary  to  guarantee  that  searching  for  educational objectives will provide access to theoretical and pedagogical information quality.

  6. EXPLORATION OF PROBLEMATIC INTERNET USE AND LONELINESS AMONG DISTANCE EDUCATION STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan OZGUR

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The current study investigated the relationship between problematic Internet use and levels of loneliness among 311 distance education students. “The Problematic Internet Use Scale” and “UCLA-Loneliness Scale III” were used to collect the data. Independent-samples t-test and one-way ANOVA were conducted to examine the differences; and correlation and regression analyses were used to examine the relationships between variables. Findings revealed that male students’ use of the Internet was more problematic compared to female students’. As the time spent on the Internet increased, so did the problematic Internet use levels. In addition, the problematic Internet use levels of students varied with regard to marital status and not varied regard to their ages. A significant relationship was found between the level of problematic Internet use and loneliness, and loneliness was found to be among the predictors of problematic Internet use. Implications and suggestions for further research are provided.

  7. Computers and internet in dental education system of Kerala, South India: A multicentre study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanakath Harikumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Computers and internet have exerted a tremendous effect on dental education programs all over the world. A multicenter study was done to assess trends in computer and internet usage among the dental students and faculty members across the South Indian state, Kerala. A total of 347 subjects participated in the study. All participants were highly competent with the use of computers and internet. 72.3% of the study subjects preferred hard copy textbooks to PDF format books. 81.3% of the study subjects thought that internet was a useful adjunct to dental education. 73.8% of the study subjects opined that computers and internet could never be a replacement to conventional classroom teaching. Efforts should be made to provide greater infrastructure with regard to computers and internet such as Wi-Fi, free, unlimited internet access to all students and faculty members.

  8. Educational Computer Use in Leisure Contexts: A Phenomenological Study of Adolescents' Experiences at Internet Cafes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilesiz, Sebnem

    2009-01-01

    Computer use is a widespread leisure activity for adolescents. Leisure contexts, such as Internet cafes, constitute specific social environments for computer use and may hold significant educational potential. This article reports a phenomenological study of adolescents' experiences of educational computer use at Internet cafes in Turkey. The…

  9. Educational Computer Use in Leisure Contexts: A Phenomenological Study of Adolescents' Experiences at Internet Cafes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilesiz, Sebnem

    2009-01-01

    Computer use is a widespread leisure activity for adolescents. Leisure contexts, such as Internet cafes, constitute specific social environments for computer use and may hold significant educational potential. This article reports a phenomenological study of adolescents' experiences of educational computer use at Internet cafes in Turkey. The…

  10. Rethinking internet skills: the contribution of gender, age, education, Internet experience, and hours online to medium- and content-related Internet skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deursen, van Alexander J.A.M.; Dijk, van Jan A.G.M.; Peters, Oscar

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on one of the factors that appears to be important in several conceptualizations of how to approach the digital divide: the differential possession of so-called Internet skills. Three large-scale performance tests are conducted to reveal the contributions of gender, age, education

  11. Motivational Interviewing support for a behavioral health internet intervention for drivers with type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen S. Ingersoll

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available While Internet interventions can improve health behaviors, their impact is limited by program adherence. Supporting program adherence through telephone counseling may be useful, but there have been few direct tests of the impact of support. We describe a Telephone Motivational Interviewing (MI intervention targeting adherence to an Internet intervention for drivers with Type 1 Diabetes, DD.com, and compare completion of intervention benchmarks by those randomized to DD.com plus MI vs. DD.com only. The goal of the pre-intervention MI session was to increase the participant's motivation to complete the Internet intervention and all its assignments, while the goal of the post-treatment MI session was to plan for maintaining changes made during the intervention. Sessions were semi-structured and partially scripted to maximize consistency. MI Fidelity was coded using a standard coding system, the MITI. We examined the effects of MI support vs. no support on number of days from enrollment to program benchmarks. Results show that MI sessions were provided with good fidelity. Users who received MI support completed some program benchmarks such as Core 4 (t176 df = −2.25; p < .03 and 11 of 12 monthly driving diaries significantly sooner, but support did not significantly affect time to intervention completion (t177 df = −1.69; p < .10 or rates of completion. These data suggest that there is little benefit to therapist guidance for Internet interventions including automated email prompts and other automated minimal supports, but that a booster MI session may enhance collection of follow-up data.

  12. THE IMPACT OF INTERNET-OF-THINGS IN HIGHER EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Logica BANICA

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to present a new concept in IT&C (Information Technology and Communications, namely Internet-of-Things (IoT. Starting from a short introduction on the basics of this concept, a study is conducted to demonstrate the importance of introducing IoT in higher education. Also, there are identified several practical methods identified for integrating IoT features in academia, especially in the areas of teaching and learning enhancements. Even if important IT&C companies launched and implemented projects in this area, a model for “smart universities” is no well-defined. In our study, we demonstrate that the optimal technical solution for academia are IoT Platforms with real-time, limited-area service provision using Cloud Computing services.

  13. POTENTIALITIES AND RISKS OF BIOCHEMICAL EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH VIA INTERNET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. Gomes

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available The internet is more and more present in worldwide education. There are innumerable projects thatstimulate its usage for aiding the teaching-learning process. This new trend modies the reality of thewhole school. However, many copies of identical information are found in several sites: graphs, gures,texts, links and even errors. The aim of this work is to analyse the biochemical issues photosynthesisand cellular respiration available in web pages, taking into account contents quality, trustworthinessand eectiveness. Firstly, 6th secondary level students were inquired by a questionnaire on their use ofinternet resources. More than 80 percent of them were regular users. The result conrms the alreadyknown potential of internet in education. Fourteen sites were analysed regarding to contents, presenceof bibliographical references, authorship, titles of responsibles and adequacy to the target public. Inrelation to contents, presence of conceptual errors, illustrations and other stimulant elements wereanalysed. None of the sites presented biblioghraphic references; less than half divulged responsiblenames and their graduation. The great majority do not mention intended public target. In general,the sites did not contained grave conceptual errors, except for two that mention estoma insteadestroma, cilica/acilica phosphorylation (for cyclic and acyclic, grama (for grana and place oxygenas essential for anaerobic respiration. However, one of these sites was the only one that mentionedenzymes and regulation steps of cellular respiration. Half of the sites presented identical texts andgures. None used livened up resources. The majority showed contents as virtual versions of printedbooks. Illustrations did not present necessary legends. None of the analysed sites, thus, was consideredexcellent. Trustworthiness is also questionable as much of the contents arte clearly copies of otherpages, recurrent even on the errors. Our data strengthen the need for

  14. Diabetes and youth resources for school nurses: an update from the National Diabetes Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallivan, Joanne; Greenberg, R D Rachel H

    2014-07-01

    In response to the challenge of diabetes in youth, the National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) has developed free, evidence-based education materials and online resources for school nurses, parents, and children living with or at risk for diabetes. This article highlights some of NDEP's resources and identifies ways for school nurses to use them with students and their families.

  15. Multimedia technology for diabetes education of school nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) require school nurses (SN) with specific diabetes training. Multimedia learning can facilitate cost-effective, convenient education of SN by diabetes educators (DE). We conducted formative research to gather qualitative and quantitative data to inform the interven...

  16. Understanding Students with Diabetes: Implications for the Physical Education Professional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petray, Clayre; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Provides physical educators with an understanding of diabetes, noting important considerations when teaching physical education to students with diabetes. Discusses four aspects of the issue (overview; common questions and answers concerning the control of diabetes; balancing insulin, food intake, and physical activity; and implications for…

  17. Knowledge of diabetic patients about their disease before and after implementing a diabetes education program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liudmila Miyar Otero; Maria Lúcia Zanetti; Michelle Daguano Ogrizio

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this quasi-experimental, prospective and comparative study is to evaluate the knowledge that diabetic patients have about their disease before and after implementing a Diabetes Education Program...

  18. Diabetes education in primary care: A practical approach using the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    high levels of behaviour change and self-care activities. Many articles are written on the ... insulin resistance) and therefore glucose increases in the bloodstream. Diabetes education in ... His current interests are asthma, diabetes, motivational ...

  19. Diabetes education improves depressive state in newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Bin; Zhang, Xiyao; Xu, Xiuping; LV, XIAOFENG; Yao, Lu; Huang, Xu; Guo, Xueying; Liu, Baozhu; Li, Qiang; CUI, CAN

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The prevalence of depression is relatively high in individuals with diabetes. However, screening and monitoring of depressive state in patients with diabetes is still neglected in developing countries and the treatment of diabetes-related depression is rarely performed in these countries. In this study, our aim was to study the role of diabetes education in the improvement of depressive state in newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: The Dutch version of the cente...

  20. Nutritional supplements for diabetes sold on the internet: business or health promotion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covolo, Loredana; Capelli, Michela; Ceretti, Elisabetta; Feretti, Donatella; Caimi, Luigi; Gelatti, Umberto

    2013-08-26

    Diabetes is one of the most widespread chronic disease. Although many medications are available for the treatment and prevention of diabetes, many people turn to nutritional supplements (NSs). In these years, the online sales have contributed to the growth of use of nutritional supplement. The aim of the research was to investigate the type of information provided by sales websites on NSs, and analyse the existence of scientific evidence about some of the most common ingredients found in available NSs for diabetes. A web search was conducted in April 2012 to identify web sites selling NSs in the treatment of diabetes using Google, Yahoo and Bing! and the key word used was "diabetes nutritional supplements". Website content was evaluated for the quality of information available to consumers and for the presence of a complete list of ingredients in the first NS suggested by the site. Subsequently, in order to analyze the scientific evidence on the efficacy of these supplements a PubMed search was carried out on the ingredients that were shared in at least 3 nutritional supplements. A total of 10 websites selling NSs were selected. Only half of the websites had a Food and Drug Administration disclaimer and 40% declared clearly that the NS offered was not a substitute for proper medication. A total of 10 NS ingredients were searched for on PubMed. Systematic reviews, meta-analyses or randomized control trials were present for all the ingredients except one. Most of the studies, however, were of poor quality and/or the results were conflicting. Easy internet access to NSs lacking in adequate medical information and strong scientific evidence is a matter of public health concern, mainly considering that a misleading information could lead to an improper prevention both in healthy people and people suffering from diabetes. There is a clear need for more trials to assess the efficacy and safety of these NSs, better quality control of websites, more informed physicians and

  1. Education about Hallucinations Using an Internet Virtual Reality System: A Qualitative Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yellowlees, Peter M.; Cook, James N.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The authors evaluate an Internet virtual reality technology as an education tool about the hallucinations of psychosis. Method: This is a pilot project using Second Life, an Internet-based virtual reality system, in which a virtual reality environment was constructed to simulate the auditory and visual hallucinations of two patients…

  2. Exploration of Problematic Internet Use and Loneliness among Distance Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgur, Hasan; Demiralay, Tülay; Demiralay, Ilkay

    2014-01-01

    The current study investigated the relationship between problematic Internet use and levels of loneliness among 311 distance education students. "The Problematic Internet Use Scale" and "UCLA-Loneliness Scale III" were used to collect the data. Independentsamples t-test and one-way ANOVA were conducted to examine the…

  3. Venue of receiving diabetes self-management education and training and its impact on oral diabetic medication adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jun; Davis-Ajami, Mary Lynn; Noxon, Virginia; Lu, Zhiqiang Kevin

    2017-04-01

    To determine predictors associated with the diabetes self-management education and training (DSME) venue and its impact on oral antidiabetic (OAD) medication adherence. The Medical Expenditure Panel Survey household component (MEPS-HC) data (2010-2012) identified adults with diabetes prescribed OAD medication(s) who completed a supplemental Diabetes Care Survey (DCS). Based on the DCS responses to questions about the number and type of DSME venue(s), two groups were created: (1) multiple venues (a physician or health professional plus internet and/or group classes) vs (2) single venue (physician or health professional only). The medication possession ratio (MPR) measured medication adherence, with 0.80 the cut-point defining adherent. Logistic regression examined factors associated with the DSME venue and its effect on OAD medication adherence. Of the 2119 respondents, 41.6% received DSME from multiple venues. Age (medication adherence was suboptimal (mean MPR 0.66 vs 0.64, p=0.245), and venue showed no influence on adherence (OR: 0.92, 95% CI, 0.73-1.16). Sociodemographic characteristics influence where adults with diabetes receive DSME. Adding different DSME venues may not address suboptimal OAD medication adherence. Copyright © 2016 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Edutainment tools for initial education of type-1 diabetes mellitus: initial diabetes education with fun.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Noriaki; Ohta, Sachiko; Masuda, Hiroyuki; Naito, Tokihiro; Sawai, Takahiro; Nishida, Kayo; Okada, Taisuke; Oishi, Mariko; Iwasawa, Yuko; Toyomasu, Keiko; Hira, Kenji; Fukui, Tsuguya

    2004-01-01

    Appropriate initial education for type-1 diabetes mellitus patients is important to prevent late complications. However, type-1 diabetic children have not appreciated traditional learning methods since they rarely contain the elements of fun and interactivity. In this study, we developed, implemented and evaluated a preliminary version of edutainment tools for initial education for type-1 diabetic children. Three games running on either personal computer (PC) and GameBoy Advance were developed. All games were designed to educate patients about relationships among food (carbohydrate), plasma glucose level, exercise, and insulin dose. A total of 58 testers evaluated degree of entertainment, usability and clinical usefulness of the games. Generally, testers felt all games were intuitive and fun and the usability of games was highly scored. More than 90% of testers showed an interest in the edutainment approach, and approximately 60% agreed that these games could provide attractive educational environment compared to traditional education, especially for children. Our edutainment systems were accepted as attractive learning tools for type-1 diabetic children who need initial education.

  5. Creativity and diabetes education: Essentiality, impact and way forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarda, Archana

    2015-04-01

    The changing diabetes in children (CDiC) program is a unique program aimed at children suffering from type 1 diabetes. The whole focus of CDiC is to provide comprehensive care including diabetes education. Various innovative and creative diabetes educational materials have been developed, which makes learning fun. Lot of diabetes camps are held at CDiC, focusing on diabetes education, experience sharing and fun activities. CDiC faces many challenges in an effort to cater to the needs of most deserving children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) throughout the country, to provide comprehensive care including self-sufficiency, to serve children for as long as possible and to ultimately have better outcomes for all children with T1DM. The CDiC program aims to make the child more positive, secure and hopeful and initiate and strive for comprehensive diabetes care for the economically underprivileged children with T1DM.

  6. Creativity and diabetes education: Essentiality, impact and way forward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana Sarda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The changing diabetes in children (CDiC program is a unique program aimed at children suffering from type 1 diabetes. The whole focus of CDiC is to provide comprehensive care including diabetes education. Various innovative and creative diabetes educational materials have been developed, which makes learning fun. Lot of diabetes camps are held at CDiC, focusing on diabetes education, experience sharing and fun activities. CDiC faces many challenges in an effort to cater to the needs of most deserving children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM throughout the country, to provide comprehensive care including self-sufficiency, to serve children for as long as possible and to ultimately have better outcomes for all children with T1DM. The CDiC program aims to make the child more positive, secure and hopeful and initiate and strive for comprehensive diabetes care for the economically underprivileged children with T1DM.

  7. Creativity and diabetes education: Essentiality, impact and way forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarda, Archana

    2015-01-01

    The changing diabetes in children (CDiC) program is a unique program aimed at children suffering from type 1 diabetes. The whole focus of CDiC is to provide comprehensive care including diabetes education. Various innovative and creative diabetes educational materials have been developed, which makes learning fun. Lot of diabetes camps are held at CDiC, focusing on diabetes education, experience sharing and fun activities. CDiC faces many challenges in an effort to cater to the needs of most deserving children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) throughout the country, to provide comprehensive care including self-sufficiency, to serve children for as long as possible and to ultimately have better outcomes for all children with T1DM. The CDiC program aims to make the child more positive, secure and hopeful and initiate and strive for comprehensive diabetes care for the economically underprivileged children with T1DM. PMID:25941643

  8. The Purpose of Use of Internet Cafes Shops BadHabits and Differences Among Internet Users According to Educational Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgen KORKMAZ

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Technology, especially computers, has been widely used all over the world for supplying various opportunities to individuals. Demand to the use of computer users who don’t have personal computers is mostly supplied by internet cafe shops. These internet cafe shops have significant role to widespread information and communication technologies. The purpose of this study is to determine the objectives of the computer users and how often they use IT in internet shops in Kırşehir. This study is also aimed to identify if these users addicted bad habits like addiction, gams about intensity or sexuality and there were any significant difference according to their educational levels. In this descriptive study survey method was used. The sample of the research was composed of 474 participants in Kırşehir. 170 participants of these were the ICT users to whom questionnaire given in 4 internet shops and 304 of whom were the students at university. A public survey was also used in addition to the data collected. Data was analyzed and presented as frequency, percentages, arithmetic means and variance analysis was also used. The level of the meaningfulness was taken as 0.05.

  9. Home-Based Diabetes Symptom Self-Management Education for Mexican Americans with Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Alexandra A.; Brown, Sharon A.; Horner, Sharon D.; Zuñiga, Julie; Arheart, Kristopher L.

    2015-01-01

    This pilot study evaluated an innovative diabetes symptom awareness and self-management educational program for Mexican Americans, a fast growing minority population experiencing a diabetes epidemic. Patients with diabetes need assistance interpreting and managing symptoms, which are often annoying and potentially life-threatening. A repeated…

  10. Home-Based Diabetes Symptom Self-Management Education for Mexican Americans with Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Alexandra A.; Brown, Sharon A.; Horner, Sharon D.; Zuñiga, Julie; Arheart, Kristopher L.

    2015-01-01

    This pilot study evaluated an innovative diabetes symptom awareness and self-management educational program for Mexican Americans, a fast growing minority population experiencing a diabetes epidemic. Patients with diabetes need assistance interpreting and managing symptoms, which are often annoying and potentially life-threatening. A repeated…

  11. Improving Diabetes Care in the Latino Population: The Emory Latino Diabetes Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotberg, Britt; Greene, Rachel; Ferez-Pinzon, Anyul M.; Mejia, Robert; Umpierrez, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Background: The incidence of diabetes in Latinos is 12.8% compared to 9.3% of the general population. Latinos suffer from a higher prevalence of diabetic complications and mortality than whites yet receive less monitoring tests and education. Purpose: (1) Identify changes in clinical indicators among subjects with type 2 diabetes participating in…

  12. TEACHING FOREIGN LANGUAGES: MODERN EDUCATION MEANS OF TEACHING AND INTERNET TECHNIQUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeriy G. Apalkov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article studies key questions of distant education as a part of an integrated whole with the traditional education. The results of a questionnaire for students are depicted. We also analyze the possibilities of the Internet technologies as a means for improvement of the education quality and an individual path for developing the foreign language communicative competence of students. 

  13. Broadband for Education: The National Internet2 K20 Initiative's and WICHE's Recommendations to the FCC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The National Internet2 K20 Initiative brings together its world-class network and research community members with innovators from colleges and universities, primary and secondary schools, libraries, museums and other educational institutions, the full spectrum of America's education community, including both formal and informal education. The…

  14. Recent Trends in Diabetes Knowledge, Perceptions, and Behaviors: Implications for National Diabetes Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccinino, Linda; Griffey, Susan; Gallivan, Joanne; Lotenberg, Lynne Doner; Tuncer, Diane

    2015-10-01

    Examine trends in diabetes-related knowledge, perceptions, and behavior among U.S. adults with and without a diagnosis of diabetes and among subpopulations at risk. Discuss implications for national diabetes education and for the National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) in particular. Three population-based NDEP National Diabetes Surveys (2006, 2008, and 2011) collected information on diabetes knowledge, education, and self-management; perceived and actual risk of diabetes; and lifestyle changes. Since 2006, U.S. adults significantly advanced their knowledge and awareness of diabetes and prediabetes. Perceived personal risk did not increase among people with prediabetes (PWP) or people at risk. Family history as a risk factor dropped in reported importance, especially among PWP and Hispanics. Diabetes self-management rose modestly, although checking blood sugar significantly declined. Trends in understanding the diabetes and cardiovascular disease link, A1C testing, and adjusted logistic regression results for perceived risk are discussed. Although diabetes-related knowledge has reached high levels, stagnant perceived risk suggests people at risk are not applying this knowledge to themselves. Future surveys are planned to include additional, specific questions to capture people's movement toward behavior change and to identify where strategic efforts and educational interventions can help promote improved behaviors. © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.

  15. Making diabetes education accessible for people with visual impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Ann S

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify changes needed to make the diabetes education materials and programs of the Diabetes Association of Greater Cleveland (DAGC) accessible for people who have visual impairment and diabetes (PVID). Using the principles and techniques of participatory action research (PAR), 5 PVID and 4 staff members of a local diabetes association met once a month for a year to plan, implement, and evaluate progress toward full accessibility of all diabetes education materials and programs. The researcher served as facilitator. Four "transformational moments" are presented through which the PAR process enabled PVID and diabetes professionals to learn to understand and trust each other. Changes made to increase accessibility included production of 2 recordings for providing access to print information about diabetes; planning public education program publicity and locations for access; development of guidelines to help speakers make their diabetes education presentations accessible for people who cannot see slides and gestures; and presentation of an inservice for the entire staff of the diabetes association, including information about how they live with visual impairment, and common courtesies that make communication with PVID more effective. Diabetes education programs should include planning for full accessibility for PVID. Diabetes organizations should publish teaching materials in accessible format.

  16. Practical experiences of, and lessons learnt from, Internet technologies in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Polovina

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper addresses how the Internet as computer-mediated communication is affecting teaching and learning in higher education institutions, particularly as these institutions face increasing competition due to the emergence of Web-based collaboration and assessment technologies. London’s South Bank University (SBU, a typical modern-day higher education institution is thereby in the process of integrating Internet technologies into its conventional and distance learning programmes. From its practical experiences so far SBU has learnt a variety of valuable lessons. In particular the technical and social aspects that determine the choice and use of the most appropriate software tools were identified, as well as a new approach towards online (Internet / Web subject reference sources was outlined. From SBU’s anecdotal experiences, useful recommendations are made for the effective use of Internet technologies that applies to many higher educational institutions.

  17. Diabetes educator role boundaries in Australia: a documentary analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Olivia; Nancarrow, Susan; Grace, Sandra; Borthwick, Alan

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes educators provide self-management education for people living with diabetes to promote optimal health and wellbeing. Their national association is the Australian Diabetes Educators Association (ADEA), established in 1981. In Australia the diabetes educator workforce is a diverse, interdisciplinary entity, with nurses, podiatrists, dietitians and several other health professional groups recognised by ADEA as providers of diabetes education. Historically nurses have filled the diabetes educator role and anecdotally, nurses are perceived to have wider scope of practice when undertaking the diabetes educator role than the other professions eligible to practise diabetes education. The nature of the interprofessional role boundaries and differing scopes of practice of diabetes educators of various primary disciplines are poorly understood. Informed by a documentary analysis, this historical review explores the interprofessional evolution of the diabetes educator workforce in Australia and describes the major drivers shaping the role boundaries of diabetes educators from 1981 until 2017. This documentary analysis was undertaken in the form of a literature review. STARLITE framework guided the searches for grey and peer reviewed literature. A timeline featuring the key events and changes in the diabetes educator workforce was developed. The timeline was analysed and emerging themes were identified as the major drivers of change within this faction of the health workforce. This historical review illustrates that there have been drivers at the macro, meso and micro levels which reflect and are reflected by the interprofessional role boundaries in the diabetes educator workforce. The most influential drivers of the interprofessional evolution of the diabetes educator workforce occurred at the macro level and can be broadly categorised according to three major influences: the advent of non-medical prescribing; the expansion of the Medicare Benefits Schedule to include

  18. Is Internet search better than structured instruction for web-based health education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Joseph; Bedra, McKenzie

    2013-01-01

    Internet provides access to vast amounts of comprehensive information regarding any health-related subject. Patients increasingly use this information for health education using a search engine to identify education materials. An alternative approach of health education via Internet is based on utilizing a verified web site which provides structured interactive education guided by adult learning theories. Comparison of these two approaches in older patients was not performed systematically. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of a web-based computer-assisted education (CO-ED) system versus searching the Internet for learning about hypertension. Sixty hypertensive older adults (age 45+) were randomized into control or intervention groups. The control patients spent 30 to 40 minutes searching the Internet using a search engine for information about hypertension. The intervention patients spent 30 to 40 minutes using the CO-ED system, which provided computer-assisted instruction about major hypertension topics. Analysis of pre- and post- knowledge scores indicated a significant improvement among CO-ED users (14.6%) as opposed to Internet users (2%). Additionally, patients using the CO-ED program rated their learning experience more positively than those using the Internet.

  19. Diabetes nurse educators' experiences of providing care for women, with gestational diabetes mellitus, from disadvantaged backgrounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carolan, Mary

    2014-05-01

    To explore diabetes nurse educators' experiences of providing care for women, with gestational diabetes mellitus, from disadvantaged backgrounds and to gather information which would assist with the development of an educational programme that would support both women and diabetes educators. Rates of gestational diabetes mellitus have increased dramatically in recent years. This is concerning as gestational diabetes mellitus is linked to poorer pregnancy outcomes including hypertension, stillbirth, and nursery admission. Poorest outcomes occur among disadvantaged women. gestational diabetes mellitus is also associated with maternal type 2 diabetes and with child obesity and type 2 diabetes among offspring. Effective self-management of gestational diabetes mellitus reduces these risks. Diabetes nurse educators provide most education and support for gestational diabetes mellitus self-management. An interpretative phenomenological analysis approach, as espoused by Smith and Osborn (Qualitative Psychology: A Practical Guide to Research Methods, 2008, Sage, London, 51), provided the framework for this study. The views of six diabetes educators were explored through in-depth interviewing. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed according to steps outlined by Smith and Osborn (Qualitative Psychology: A Practical Guide to Research Methods, 2008, Sage, London, 51). Three themes emerged from the data: (1) working in a suboptimal environment, (2) working to address the difficulties and (3) looking to the future. Throughout, the diabetes nurse educators sought opportunities to connect with women in their care and to make the educational content understandable and meaningful. Low literacy among disadvantaged women has a significant impact on their understanding of gestational diabetes mellitus information. In turn, catering for women with low literacy contributes to increased workloads for diabetes nurse educators, making them vulnerable to burnout. There is a need

  20. Assessment of a National Diabetes Education Program diabetes management booklet: The GRADE experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devchand, Roshni; Nicols, Christina; Gallivan, Joanne M; Tiktin, Margaret; Krause-Steinrauf, Heidi; Larkin, Mary; Tuncer, Diane M

    2017-05-01

    The National Diabetes Education Program created the 4 Steps to Manage Your Diabetes for Life (4 Steps) booklet to help patients with diabetes learn the basics of self-management and care recommendations. The purpose of this study is to explore the impact of 4 Steps on participants' diabetes management knowledge and self-efficacy in the Glycemia Reduction Approaches in Diabetes: A Comparative Effectiveness Study (GRADE). A sample of 348 adults with type 2 diabetes enrolled in GRADE was included in this analysis. Participants took a pretest, were sent home with 4 Steps, then took a posttest at their next visit. The Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to detect differences in knowledge and self-efficacy between scale scores pre- and posttest. Analyses revealed increases in participants' diabetes management knowledge (p diabetes education showed a statistically significant increase in knowledge scores compared to those with previous diabetes education (p diabetes education materials may improve self-management knowledge and self-efficacy among adults with type 2 diabetes. Providers should feel confident using 4 Steps as a resource for clinical practice. ©2017 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  1. Impact of intensive nutritional education with carbohydrate counting on diabetes control in type 2 diabetic patients

    OpenAIRE

    Christopher Zipp; Jessica Terrone Roehr; Lucia Beck Weiss; et al.

    2010-01-01

    Christopher Zipp, Jessica Terrone Roehr, Lucia Beck Weiss, Frank FilipettoDepartment of Family Medicine, School of Osteopathic Medicine, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Stratford, NJ, USAAbstract: This pilot study assessed the impact of an intensive carbohydrate counting educational intervention on diabetes control in type 2 diabetic patients. An experimental, prospective study design was used to assess the effect of nutritional education on diabetes control. The impact an...

  2. Is diabetes self-management education still the Cinderella of diabetes care?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurley, Lorna; O'Donnell, Máire; O'Hara, Mary Clare

    2017-01-01

    This paper reflects on the status of diabetes self-management education (DSME) as a branch of diabetology in Europe and discusses some opportunities for better supporting DSME delivery. DSME (also commonly known as Therapeutic Patient Education) has been evolving as a therapy for diabetes for dec...

  3. Determining Student Internet Addiction Levels in Secondary Education and the Factors that Affect It

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fezile Ozdamli

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to determine the level of internet addiction on the part of students in secondary education in North Cyprus and the factors that affect it. In this research, a survey method which provides a general universal judgment was used to determine the level of internet addiction on the part of such students. It has been found that 59.9% of the students are at low of becoming internet addicts, 20.7% of them are in the high risk category, 13.5% face no risk of addiction, while 5.9% are internet addicts. It was determined that as students’ internet usage hours increase, the risk of addiction increases.

  4. Cost and benefits of a multidisciplinary intensive diabetes education programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keers, J.C.; Groen, H.; Sluiter, W.J.; Bouma, J.; Links, T.P.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the cost and benefits of an intensive diabetes education programme for patients with prolonged self-management problems and to determine the inclusion criteria for optimal outcomes. METHODS: Sixty-one participants of a multidisciplinary intensive diabetes education programme

  5. Intelligent Internet-based information system optimises diabetes mellitus management in communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xuejuan; Wu, Hao; Cui, Shuqi; Ge, Caiying; Wang, Li; Jia, Hongyan; Liang, Wannian

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of an intelligent Internet-based information system upon optimising the management of patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In 2015, a T2DM information system was introduced to optimise the management of T2DM patients for 1 year in Fangzhuang community of Beijing, China. A total of 602 T2DM patients who were registered in the health service centre of Fangzhuang community were enrolled based on an isometric sampling technique. The data from 587 patients were used in the final analysis. The intervention effect was subsequently assessed by statistically comparing multiple parameters, such as the prevalence of glycaemic control, standard health management and annual outpatient consultation visits per person, before and after the implementation of the T2DM information system. In 2015, a total of 1668 T2DM patients were newly registered in Fangzhuang community. The glycaemic control rate was calculated as 37.65% in 2014 and significantly elevated up to 62.35% in 2015 ( p information system, the rate of standard health management was increased from 48.04% to 85.01% ( p information system optimised the management of T2DM patients in Fangzhuang community and decreased the outpatient numbers in both community and general hospitals, which played a positive role in assisting T2DM patients and their healthcare providers to better manage this chronic illness.

  6. Pre-Service Teachers’ Internet Usage a Function of Demographic Factors: The Case of a Nigerian College of Education

    OpenAIRE

    Bede Blaise Chukwunyere Onwuagboke; Termit Kaur Ranjit Singh; Fong Soon Fook

    2014-01-01

    With the overreaching acceptance of ICT in education and access to Internet occasioned by advancement in technology, this paper investigates pre-service teachers’ use of Internet in a college of education. The study was a descriptive survey. Data was collected using a researcher designed instrument tagged “Student Internet Use Scale” (SIUS). The population comprised of all NCE pre-service teachers in Alvan Ikoku Federal College of Education Owerri Nigeria. Findings show that  mobile phones re...

  7. Oncology Nurses' Use of the Internet for Continuing Education: A Survey of Oncology Nursing Society Congress Attendees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Susan C.; Baird, Susan B.

    1999-01-01

    A survey to determine whether oncology nurses (n=670) use the Internet and for what purpose revealed that they use it for drug information, literature searches, academic information, patient education, and continuing education. Results suggest that continuing-education providers should pursue the Internet as a means of meeting the need for quick,…

  8. Violence Prevention: The Development of Internet-Delivered, Experimentally-Evaluated, Psychological-Education Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horan, John J.

    2002-01-01

    Describes several multimedia-enhanced, psychological education courses capable of Internet delivery that specifically address changing the irrational beliefs that mediate low self-esteem and occupational stereotyping, educating parents on practices that affect the career outcomes of their children and altering attributions relevant to academic…

  9. Internet Plagiarism in Higher Education: Tendencies, Triggering Factors and Reasons among Teacher Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eret, Esra; Ok, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    While plagiarism has been a growing problem in higher education for a long time, the use of the Internet has made this increasing problem more unmanageable. In many countries, this problem has become a matter of discussion, and higher education institutions feel obliged to review their policies on academic dishonesty. As part of these efforts, the…

  10. A Comparison of Internet Marketing Methods Utilized by Higher Education Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Joseph C.

    2011-01-01

    Use of Internet marketing techniques in higher education to attract prospective students is relatively new. While the research is recent, there are several studies that identify what is most valuable to students seeking information on college web sites. Higher education is now facing increasing competition from for-profit schools and reduced…

  11. Learning Online? Educational Internet Use and Participation in Adult Learning, 2002 to 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Patrick; Selwyn, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Covering a decade during which the "digital divide" came to popular and political attention, and written at a time when the Internet continues to be championed as a means of widening access to educational opportunities, this paper presents an analysis of the social, economic and educational characteristics associated with using the…

  12. The Influence of Gender on the Incorporation of the Internet in Spanish Schools' Educational Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Rivas, Enrique; Sánchez-Rodríguez, José; Ruiz-Palmero, Julio

    2016-01-01

    This article reveals the results of a research study that was carried out in Spain in 2012 with the purpose of discovering the influence of the gender variable on the incorporation of the Internet in the educational programmes of primary and secondary public education centres. By using a multiple case study carried out in situ, the research team…

  13. Impact of Diabetes Education Based on Type 1 Diabetes management model

    OpenAIRE

    Ocakçı, Ayşe Ferda

    2015-01-01

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Impact of education based on type 1 diabetes management model Çağrı Çövener Özçelik & Ayşe Ferda Ocakçı Received: 27 September 2012 /Accepted: 30 December 2014 /Published online: 18 February 2015 # Research Society for Study of Diabetes in India 2015 Abstract The diabetes management is considered to be ad-versely affected when adolescent-specific education methods are not used. In this study, Type 1 Diabetes Management Model which ensures standardis...

  14. Using the Internet for Gerontology Education: Assessing and Improving Wikipedia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infeld, Donna Lind; Adams, William C.

    2013-01-01

    Older adults, students, professionals, and the general public increasingly turn to the Internet and to Wikipedia for information. Wikipedia, the world's sixth most used website, is by far the most widely used open-source information site. Among its nearly four million English-language encyclopedia articles, how thorough is coverage of key…

  15. Using the Internet for Gerontology Education: Assessing and Improving Wikipedia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infeld, Donna Lind; Adams, William C.

    2013-01-01

    Older adults, students, professionals, and the general public increasingly turn to the Internet and to Wikipedia for information. Wikipedia, the world's sixth most used website, is by far the most widely used open-source information site. Among its nearly four million English-language encyclopedia articles, how thorough is coverage of key…

  16. The Internet and the Law: What Educators Need To Know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conn, Kathleen

    This book discusses the key legal issues public schools face in using the World Wide Web, e-mail, and other computer technologies. Chapter 1 covers the foundations of school Internet law, including Supreme Court decisions, the legal standard of conduct, standards for technology literacy, and federal vs. state law. Chapter 2 discusses freedom of…

  17. Measurement science and education in the Internet era

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Regtien, Paulus P.L.; Linss, G.

    2006-01-01

    The Internet has fundamentally altered the world in all social and economic areas within a historically short period of time. Metrology and Measurement Science have been playing an important role in our society for more than 5000 years yet the field has been significantly changed during the last 30

  18. Engineering Education Using a Remote Laboratory through the Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axaopoulos, Petros J.; Moutsopoulos, Konstantinos N.; Theodoridis, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    An experiment using real hardware and under real test conditions can be remotely conducted by engineering students and other interested individuals in the world via the Internet and with the capability of live video streaming from the test site. The presentation of this innovative experiment refers to the determination of the current voltage…

  19. CoDE: Community Diabetes Education for uninsured Mexican Americans

    OpenAIRE

    Culica, Dan; Walton, James W.; Prezio, Elizabeth A.

    2007-01-01

    Low-cost diabetes education programs that target Mexican Americans are essential to reduce the observed health disparities in this population. A culturally appropriate intervention was developed as the centerpiece of the Community Diabetes Education (CoDE) program. This article describes the structure, patient acceptance, and costs of this one-to-one educational model delivered in 7 patient contact hours by a community health worker over 12 months in a community clinic serving the uninsured. ...

  20. Interdisciplinary educational activity for patients with diabetes in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Fernandez Frigo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Rationale and Objectives: Currently Diabetes Mellitus (DM is confi gured as a major public health problems in Brazil, making it one of the most common chronic disorders in the world. Thus, this study focused strategies made by health professionals in primary care, education of patients with type 2 diabetes in primary care in order to contribute to the promotion of health. Methods: This is a literature on the application of scientifi c strategies, which aims to gather and synthesize publications and conduct a critical assessment of them. Data collection was conducted between March and May 2012, the following electronic databases: CAPES (Coordination of Improvement of Higher Education Personnel, Brazil, Scientifi c Electronic Library Online - SciELO, LILACS, Google Scholar andSBD (Brazilian Society Diabetes, where 14 articles were selected. Results: The present study showed advances knowledge regarding diabetes and changes in educational strategies used that aimed to understand their effects on disease control and management of self-care. Also, lets discuss the possible limits and options for improving the process of health education, interdisciplinary care related to diabetes. Conclusion: The educational practice presents itself as the best way to educate people with diabetes about the importance of improving dietary habits and their own care. It is a time when individuals and health professionals discussing all the information about the disease and treatment. KEYWORDS: Health education. Strategies. Diabetes Mellitus Type2.

  1. "Computers, The Internet, and Cheating Among Secondary School Students: Some Implications for Educators "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacey Conradson

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates in greater depth one particular aspect of cheating within secondary education and..some implications for measuring academic achievement. More specifically, it examines how secondary..students exploit the Internet for plagiarizing schoolwork, and looks at how a traditional method of..educational assessment, namely paper-based report and essay writing, has been impacted by the growth of..Internet usage and the proliferation of computer skills among secondary school students. One of the..conclusions is that students' technology fluency is forcing educators to revisit conventional assessment..methods. Different options for combating Internet plagiarism are presented, and some software tools as well..as non-technology solutions are evaluated in light of the problems brought about by - cyberplagiarism.-

  2. Knowledge of diabetic patients about their disease before and after implementing a diabetes education program

    OpenAIRE

    Liudmila Miyar Otero; Maria Lúcia Zanetti; Michelle Daguano Ogrizio

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this quasi-experimental, prospective and comparative study is to evaluate the knowledge that diabetic patients have about their disease before and after implementing a Diabetes Education Program. Fifty-four diabetic patients participated in the study, which occurred from April 2004 to April 2005. Data collection was performed using a questionnaire. The study population was characterized as adult and elderly subjects, with ages between 29 and 78 years; 60 years, on the average; ...

  3. La Universidad conectada The wired tower perspectives on the impact of the Internet on higher education.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guevara Cruz Horacio

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available La universidad conectada, Perspectivas del impacto de Internet en la educación superior de Matthew Serbin nos acerca a los líderes de opinión (y protagonistas en acción de los Estados Unidos en este campo desde una visión global y sin divagaciones abordan el impacto del internet con sus transformaciones y desafíos. The wired tower perspectives on the impact of the Internet on higher education of Matthew Serbin us to opinion leaders (and players in action of the United States in this field from an overall and ramblings without addressing the impact of the internet with their transformations and challenges.

  4. Educational Strategies of Diabetes Group Medical Visits: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Julienne K; Devoid, Hannah Marie; Strickland, Carmen

    2017-02-03

    Diabetes is a demanding disease that is growing in prevalence. Improved outcomes for patients with diabetes are highly dependent on self-management skills and the ability to make lifestyle changes. Innovative healthcare approaches are necessary to meet these specific patient needs. A group care medical visit (GMV) combines diabetes check-ups with diabetes education in a supportive and patient centered environment that promotes effective self-management. GMVs are associated with improved diabetes outcomes including hemoglobin A1C, weight, and self-efficacy; however details of the methods by which content is delivered to achieve these outcomes remain vague. Improved GMV diabetes outcomes may be the result of specific processes used in group care models. We seek to describe educational strategies, content, and qualities of facilitators that contribute to successful outcomes associated with diabetes GMVs . A review of the literature was conducted focusing on GMVs, specifically the educational strategies implemented, topics discussed, and facilitator qualities that contribute to successful outcomes. We identified 260 studies containing information about GMVs in patients with diabetes. A total of 7 citations met inclusion criteria and additional 5 were found through reference lists and relevant papers. Diabetes GMV educational topics comprise standard themes of disease process, medication, nutrition, and exercise. Several programs, however, target the development and realization of individualized patient goals, giving the patient more involvement in the session. Methods for facilitation may hold the key to successfully activating patients to reach meaningful behavior change goals. In addition to using expert clinical skills in diabetes care, effective facilitators provide support, and empower patients to take ownership of their diabetes. Rigorous evaluation of best practices for both the type and methods of delivering content in GMVs is lacking. Translational research to

  5. High school students educational usage of Internet and their learning approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Betül Yılmaz, Feza Orhan

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the Internet usage of high school students for educational needs in respect to their learning approaches. The “learning approach” categorizes individuals as ‘surface learners’ and ‘deep learners’. Surface learners mainly choose to rehearse and memorize the course material they work on and they acquire the information they need to learn in a disconnected way, by memorization. On the other hand, deep learners want to grasp the meaning of the course material. In the study, adapted Turkish version of Learning Process Questionnaire (LPQ was used to determine high school students’ learning approaches. 921 secondary school students were subjected and the Cronbach alpha values were 0.73 for a deep approach and 0.66 for a surface approach. According to the data obtained, surface learners use the Internet more when compared to deep learners, though they use it for non-instructional purposes. The ratios of the Internet use of deep learners for educational needs are higher when compared to those of surface learners. Ratios of the Internet use for educational needs by the students who are given assignments requiring the use of the Internet are higher.

  6. Patient education for preventing diabetic foot ulceration (Review)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorresteijn, J.A.; Kriegsman, D.M.; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Valk, G.D.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ulceration of the feet, which can result in loss of limbs and even death, is one of the major health problems for people with diabetes mellitus. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of patient education on the prevention of foot ulcers in patients with diabetes mellitus. SEARCH METHODS: Eli

  7. Patient education for preventing diabetic foot ulceration (Review)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorresteijn, J.A.; Kriegsman, D.M.; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Valk, G.D.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ulceration of the feet, which can result in loss of limbs and even death, is one of the major health problems for people with diabetes mellitus. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of patient education on the prevention of foot ulcers in patients with diabetes mellitus. SEARCH METHODS:

  8. Patient education for preventing diabetic foot ulceration (Review)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorresteijn, J.A.; Kriegsman, D.M.; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Valk, G.D.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ulceration of the feet, which can result in loss of limbs and even death, is one of the major health problems for people with diabetes mellitus. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of patient education on the prevention of foot ulcers in patients with diabetes mellitus. SEARCH METHODS: Eli

  9. A nationwide survey of diabetes education, self-management and glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Xiao-hui; YUAN Li; LOU Qing-qing; SHEN Li; SUN Zi-lin; ZHAO Fang; DAI Xia; HUANG Jin; YANG Hui-ying

    2012-01-01

    Background Diabetes management could be improved by diabetes education,through influencing attitudes towards diabetes,knowledge and behaviors of patients.The purpose of this study was to characterize the impact of diabetes education on glycemic control,and to assess the attitude,knowledge and self-care behavior in patients with type 2 diabetes in China.Methods This questionnaire-based survey was conducted in 50 medical centers across China from April to July of 2010.The patients with type 2 diabetes were eligible for the study.The information of glycemic control and diabetes education was collected.The diabetes attitude scale-3 formulae,a questionnaire of diabetes knowledge and Summary of Diabetes Self-care Activities scale were used to assess attitude,knowledge and the self-care of patients,respectively.Results Among the 5961 eligible respondents (3233 males; mean age (59.50±12.48) years; mean hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) (8.27±2.23)%),most patients (79.8%) considered themselves educated on diabetes.Compared with patients without diabetes education,their educated counterparts showed significant lower value of HbA1c,after controlling for age,gender,body mass index and duration of diabetes (P <0.01).The patients who received diabetes education also performed significant higher scores on attitude,knowledge and self-care than their uneducated counterparts.Patients with lower income or education level tended to have higher glucose levels,and showed lower percentage of patients received diabetic education.Conclusions Chinese patients with diabetes education achieved better glycemic control than un-educated patients.Our study indicates effort is required to provide professional education to patients,with emphasis on lower income and lower education level populations.

  10. Feasibility and effects of Science Education for Parents through the Internet (SPI) in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jiyoon

    This study is to evaluate the feasibility and the effectiveness of Science Education for Parents through the Internet (SPI) in Korea. The SPI is a website that helps parents teach science to their 3rd grade children at home, avoiding the limitations of time, place, and educational resources and cultural/language differences. The subjects for the study are 15 Korean parents and 44 Korean students in Gaemung Elementary School. The feasibility was measured using the interview results from parents who used SPI, and the effectiveness was determined by the parents' self-efficacy beliefs and students' attitudinal and achievement outcomes. Parents' self-efficacy beliefs were assessed using the modified Science Teaching Efficacy Beliefs Instrument (STEBI). Students' attitudes toward science were evaluated by an instrument that combines the Test of Science-Related Attitudes (TOSRA) and a modified version of the Science Experiences Survey (SES), and the achievement was measured using scales from the Korean National Standard Test instrument. Descriptive statistics confirmed the feasibility and the effects of SPI for science education. Qualitative data were collected by interviewing the parents over the Internet. These data indicated that parent science education over the Internet gave parents the opportunity to increase their beliefs in teaching their children by interacting with the teacher in school, other parents in their neighborhood, and educational resources over the Internet, as well as to promote children's achievements in science and positive attitudes toward science.

  11. Helping patients with diabetes: resources from the National Diabetes Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Philip T

    2012-01-01

    To familiarize pharmacists with the National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) and to demonstrate the value of NDEP materials in the care of patients with diabetes. The NDEP website (www.ndep.nih.gov) and PubMed (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed). NDEP is a collaboration between the National Institutes of Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and many organization partners. Since 1997, a large number of materials have been created by NDEP using an evidence-based, expert- and patient-reviewed approach to development. Materials are nonbranded and reflect current medical knowledge and practice. Educational materials are available for persons at risk for diabetes, those with diabetes, family members of persons with diabetes, employers, and professionals. The Pharmacy, Podiatry, Optometry, and Dentistry (PPOD) workgroup of NDEP promotes the value of pharmacists and other professionals in diabetes education and management. Resources are available to educate about the value of the PPOD professionals. NDEP provides evidence-based, high-quality educational materials that pharmacists will find useful in the counseling of persons with diabetes.

  12. Educational attainment moderates the associations of diabetes education with health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su Hyun

    2016-10-01

    Diabetes education is a critical element of care for people with diabetes. However, the associations between diabetes education and self-care or health outcomes have not been clearly demonstrated at a national level. The aims of this study were to examine the associations of attendance of diabetes education classes with health behaviours and glycaemic control, and to understand whether these associations were moderated by level of educational attainment. Data were analysed for 456 adults from the 2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey V, collected from January 2010 to December 2012. No significant differences were observed between patients who had attended diabetes education classes and those who had never attended for factors such as smoking, drinking, exercise, nutrition therapy or glycaemic control. There was a significant interaction effect between receiving diabetes education and level of educational attainment on obtaining optimal glycaemic control. Attending diabetes education was positively associated with optimal glycaemic control among patients with more than a high school education but was negatively associated with it among those with less than middle school education. Diabetes education programmes need to be tailored to the needs and cognitive capacities of the target population.

  13. Education about hallucinations using an internet virtual reality system: a qualitative survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yellowlees, Peter M; Cook, James N

    2006-01-01

    The authors evaluate an Internet virtual reality technology as an education tool about the hallucinations of psychosis. This is a pilot project using Second Life, an Internet-based virtual reality system, in which a virtual reality environment was constructed to simulate the auditory and visual hallucinations of two patients with schizophrenia. Eight hundred sixty-three self-referred users took a self-guided tour. Five hundred seventy-nine (69%) of the users who toured the environment completed a survey. Of the survey responders, 440 (76%) thought the environment improved their understanding of auditory hallucinations, 69% thought it improved their understanding of visual hallucinations, and 82% said they would recommend the environment to a friend. Computer simulations of the perceptual phenomena of psychiatric illness are feasible with existing personal computer technology. Integration of the evaluation survey into the environment itself was possible. The use of Internet-connected graphics environments holds promise for public education about mental illness.

  14. Can the internet in tertiary education in Africa contribute to social and economic development?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bon, Anna

    2007-01-01

    Poor internet connectivity is one of the serious underlying causes of the digital divide between developing and industrialized countries, and is hampering the transition to the global information society. The recent emergence of national and regional research and education data communication network

  15. Comparison of Oncology Nurse and Physician Use of the Internet for Continuing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Susan C.

    2003-01-01

    Comparison of surveys in 2001 (807 nurses, 111 doctors) and 2002 (1,127 and 201) showed that Internet use and frequency of use for continuing education among both nurses and physicians have been increasing. Low cost or free and easier access would increase usage. (SK)

  16. The internet of things technologies in teaching, learning and basic education management

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dlodlo, N

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available South Africa's push for universal access to education and for improved teaching and learning calls for a number of appropriate measures to be put in place. This paper proposes the adoption of internet of things technologies (IoT) in improving...

  17. Can the internet in tertiary education in Africa contribute to social and economic development?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bon, Anna

    2007-01-01

    Poor internet connectivity is one of the serious underlying causes of the digital divide between developing and industrialized countries, and is hampering the transition to the global information society. The recent emergence of national and regional research and education data communication

  18. eLearning: A Review of Internet-Based Continuing Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wutoh, Rita; Boren, Suzanne Austin; Balas, E. Andrew

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: The objective was to review the effect of Internet-based continuing medical education (CME) interventions on physician performance and health care outcomes. Methods: Data sources included searches of MEDLINE (1966 to January 2004), CINAHL (1982 to December 2003), ACP Journal Club (1991 to July/August 2003), and the Cochrane Database…

  19. Internet Safety Gone Wild? Sacrificing the Educational and Psychosocial Benefits of Online Social Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tynes, Brendesha M.

    2007-01-01

    Many Internet safety and parenting experts suggest that parents prohibit their teens from social networking sites and other online spaces where predators may lurk. But we may do adolescents a disservice when we curtail their participation in these spaces, because the educational and psychosocial benefits of this type of communication can far…

  20. Analysis of Relationships between Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge and Educational Internet Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Ismail; Celik, Ismail; Akturk, Ahmet Oguz; Aydin, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    This study analyzes the relationships between preservice teachers' technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK) and their self-efficacy beliefs in educational Internet use. Findings show statistically significant relationships among the knowledge domains in technology, pedagogy, content, and their intersections. Also, results from the…

  1. Digital Media Literacies: Rethinking Media Education in the Age of the Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckingham, David

    2007-01-01

    This article considers how media educators can respond to the new challenges and opportunities of the Internet, and of digital media more broadly. It begins by exploring the value and limitations of the notion of "literacy" in this context. It argues that "competence-based" definitions of literacy tend to neglect the social…

  2. Cognitive Skills in Internet-Supported Learning Environments in Higher Education: Research Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abate Bekele, Teklu

    2009-01-01

    How did Internet-supported learning environments (ISLE) impact students' critical thinking (CT) and problem solving (PS) skills in higher education? What specific indicators have been used to measure CT? What types of problems and learning approaches were chosen to assess PS skills? This paper qualitatively reviewed studies published in academic…

  3. Can the internet in tertiary education in Africa contribute to social and economic development?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bon, Anna

    2007-01-01

    Poor internet connectivity is one of the serious underlying causes of the digital divide between developing and industrialized countries, and is hampering the transition to the global information society. The recent emergence of national and regional research and education data communication network

  4. Diffusion of Internet Banking amongst educated consumers in a high income non-OECD country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raed Awamleh,

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This study analyses the internet banking channels and service preferences of educated banking consumers in the UAE and examines the factors influencing the intention to adopt or to continue the use of internet banking among both users and non users of internet banking.It is shown that although the banking sector in the UAE is a regional leader, internet banking in the UAE is yet to be properly utilized as a real added value tool to improve customer relationship and to attain cost advantages. The Technology Acceptance Model (TAM was used to identify factors influencing the intention to adopt and continued use of internet banking customers. Data was collected from internet banking users and potential users in the United Arab Emirates and factor analyses and multiple regression analyses were conducted to examine the data. Relative usefulness is introduced as one of the factors and is defined as the degree to which a new technology is better than exiting ones. There is a significant difference between users and non-users on six of the seven factors identified. Further, it was revealed that relative usefulness, perceived risk, computer efficacy and image had a significant impact on continued usage of internet banking for IB Users, while relative usefulness and result demonstrability were the only ones significant for Non-users of internet banking. The effects of age, gender, income, and e-commerce users also explored. Result demonstrability is significant for all categories of non-users except for those with income below AED 7,000. Implications of results were discussed, and future research directions outlined.

  5. Author's internet blog as information and communication technologies in the educational space within the physical education students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilnitskaya A.S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : to develop a web blog to attract students to physical culture and reveal their attitudes toward physical education. Material : in the survey participated 800 students from different cities of Ukraine, Russia and Belarus. Results : Internet blog created on the server "Vkontakte" as a social group called "Sport and motivation. It's nothing personal." With the help of questionnaires using internet blog revealed that of all the attractive aspects of physical fitness and physical development of students give greater preference beautiful physique. In the second place they have is health, then - endurance, agility, strength, speed, flexibility. Girls prefer a beautiful body, flexibility, plasticity, the boys prefer strength, endurance, agility and quickness. Conclusion : the need for the development and application of information and communication technologies and non-traditional forms of physical education to improve the effectiveness of the educational process in physical education in higher education institutions.

  6. Awareness of the earth and possibilities for new science education in the Internet age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemura, S

    1999-01-01

    The internet as "the nervous system of global size" and multimedia technology have changed our global experience radically and suggests possibilities of entirely new approaches to the conventional education of sciences and the environment. They are not merely the changes where printed text books are converted into dynamic things with vivid appeal to our senses and information about the world's museums and art galleries, digitalized and shared by all. If the seismic activities occurring every day in various parts of the world can be seen in real form directly through the internet by all the people of the world, how will children's views of the earth change and how will their scientific understanding improved? If there was a system whereby one could monitor, in real time, how one member or others of the world net surf the global home pages, and if one could follow the "moving" process on the internet, children would certainly appreciate the presence of the internet as a global network of information. The web site "Sensorium" (http://www.sensorium.org) was created by us in an effort to put these live experiences of the internet into design. Sensorium is not a site merely to digitalize and list the existing knowledge and data. It is an experiment for the Digital Museum as a new "forum" where we may experience and share a moment. It is also an attempt to create tools for science and environment education which are only available on the network.

  7. Impact of intensive nutritional education with carbohydrate counting on diabetes control in type 2 diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Zipp

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Christopher Zipp, Jessica Terrone Roehr, Lucia Beck Weiss, Frank FilipettoDepartment of Family Medicine, School of Osteopathic Medicine, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Stratford, NJ, USAAbstract: This pilot study assessed the impact of an intensive carbohydrate counting educational intervention on diabetes control in type 2 diabetic patients. An experimental, prospective study design was used to assess the effect of nutritional education on diabetes control. The impact and efficacy of the education were measured over a 1-year period through changes in diabetes clinical markers, including hemoglobin A1c, lipid profiles, glucose levels, patients’ energy levels, and sense of well-being. Six patients were initially enrolled in the pilot study, with only three patients completing the intervention phase and the 3-month follow-up. Two patients were followed-up at the 1-year mark for their diabetes, although neither continued participation in the study beyond the 3-month mark. Marginal improvements in clinical markers at 3 months were found. However, due to the small sample size, changes in the clinical profiles may have occurred because of variables unrelated to the nutritional intervention. Further research is indicated for the control of these variables.Keywords: type 2 diabetes, nutritional education, carbohydrate counting, diabetes control

  8. 网民意识教育问题研究%Internet users’ awareness education research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    祁文峰

    2014-01-01

    The rapid development of Internet, China has entered the Information Age, the present Chinese Internet users’ awareness education lag, network rumors, the individual and the individual groups took the opportunity to spread rumors as a means of illegal profit, hinder our network information projects at the state and society had its bad influence. Strengthening Chinese Internet users’ awareness education on Chinese road network information flow and civic rational patriotism is of great significance. This sense of responsibility by strengthening the education Internet users and network information network construction and strengthening control over three aspects of information to explore ways to improve the quality Internet users, Internet users awareness education to solve the current problems with lag breakthrough. Strengthen awareness education Internet users, and effectively protect the network and information security for Internet users rational patriotism is of great significance.%互联网的快速发展使中国进入了网络信息时代,当下中国网民意识教育滞后,网络谣言四起,个别人和个别群体趁机以制造谣言作为非法营利手段,阻碍了我国网络信息工程的建设,对国家和社会产生了及其恶劣的影响。加强中国网民意识教育,对中国网络信息道路的畅通和公民理性爱国具有重大意义。本文通过加强网民责任意识教育和网络信息工程建设以及加强对网络信息的控制力三个个方面来探索提高网民素质的途径,对解决当下网民意识教育滞后问题具有突破性进展。加强网民意识教育,切实保障网络信息安全,对网民理性爱国具有重大意义。

  9. Effect of diabetic education on the knowledge, attitude and practices of diabetic patients towards prevention of hypoglycemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garima Bhutani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To assess the role of diabetic education in increasing awareness about hypoglycemia and decreasing hypoglycemic symptoms in diabetics. Materials and Methods: This is a longitudinal study involving the use of a structured questionnaire for obtaining baseline information related to knowledge, attitude and practices (KAP of diabetic patients regarding hypoglycemia. Then the patients were given diabetic education by the treating doctor regarding hypoglycemia, its symptoms and prevention; the effect of which was assessed by repeating the same questionnaire after a month. The occurrence of hypoglycemic symptoms was also compared before and after diabetic education. Results: There is a significant improvement in all parameters like KAP with diabetic education. The hypoglycemic episodes also decrease significantly. Conclusions: Proper diabetic education is seen to improve the knowledge and attitude of the diabetic patients toward hypoglycemia. This leads to improved practices of such patients and decrease hypoglycemic episodes in them.

  10. Does a multidisciplinary diabetes group education visit improve patient outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, Kristi J; O'Dell, Michael L; Taylor, James L

    2009-12-01

    Diabetes is a significant and growing public health concern, and patient education is the primary approach for self-management. The objective of this study is to assess the impact of a single session diabetes group education intervention. The design is a one-group pretest/posttest evaluation. Participants were adult outpatients with diabetes who attended a single session group education visit and volunteered to participate in the study. Survey questions include the Single Item Literacy Screener and diabetes knowledge questions. The survey was mailed and collected before the group visit. Diabetes knowledge was collected immediately after the group visit and again by telephone one to four months later. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), lipids, and blood pressure were collected from the patient electronic medical record before and, where available, three months after the group visit. Data analysis includes descriptive statistics and Students t-testing to determine pre- and posttest differences of diabetes knowledge and physiological markers. Thirty-eight adult outpatients participated in the study. Nearly half responded that they never needed to have someone help with written medical materials. There was a significant increase from pretest to immediate posttest diabetes knowledge scores (N = 3; M = 5.58 to M = 7.53 out of 10), t(38) = -5.217, p = education (M = 9.16 to M = 8.52), t(27) = 2.185, p = .038. A single session diabetes group education visit is effective in increasing patients' diabetes knowledge and decreasing HbA1c levels.

  11. ELECTRONIC MAILING LIST AND INTERNET FORUMS - TOOLS FOR MANAGEMENT AND MARKETING WITHIN EDUCATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorin Cristian COITA

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is about the use of Electronic Mailing List and Internet Forums as tools for managers within educational organizations. In the same time, some of concepts, ideas and models can be used in other business organizations, especially in service providing organizations. Understanding management requires both learning and practicing, directly experiencing. People involved in electronic networks are experiencing the alternative to real communication. We considered Electronic Mailing List and Internet Forums both as marketing tool and a human resources management tool. The benefits of using discussion lists are: people informed, involved and improved.

  12. Issues in Informal Education: Event-Based Science Communication Involving Planetaria and the Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, M.; Gallagher, D. L.; Whitt, A.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    For the past four years the Science Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center has carried out a diverse program of science communication through the web resources on the Internet. The program includes extended stories about NAS.4 science, a curriculum resource for teachers tied to national education standards, on-line activities for students, and webcasts of real-time events. Events have involved meteor showers, solar eclipses, natural very low frequency radio emissions, and amateur balloon flights. In some cases broadcasts accommodate active feedback and questions from Internet participants. We give here, examples of events, problems, and lessons learned from these activities.

  13. Internet Usage Habits as a Part of Distance Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufan, Firat

    2016-01-01

    Within the scope of this study, which deals with distance education method as a communication process, a focus group interview was conducted with voluntary students who were randomly selected from various areas/majors at the Department of Distance Education in Istanbul University in order to determine the relationship between their general…

  14. Study on utilization status of internet and needs assessment for developing nutrition education programs among elementary school children

    OpenAIRE

    Ahn, Yun; Kim, Kyung-Won

    2007-01-01

    This study was to investigate utilization status of internet, health/nutrition websites among children, and to assess the needs for developing nutrition websites and education programs for children. The survey questionnaire was administered to 5-6th grade students (n=434) at two elementary schools. About 32% used the internet every day while 19.5% used it whenever they needed, showing significant differences in internet usage by gender (p

  15. Sign language vocabulary development practices and internet use among educational interpreters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storey, Brian C; Jamieson, Janet R

    2004-01-01

    Sign language interpreters working in schools often face isolation in terms of their sign language vocabulary development opportunities. The purposes of this study were to determine the key demographic characteristics of educational interpreters in British Columbia, to identify the resources they use to learn new vocabulary, and to shed light on their Internet use and access levels, with a view to exploring the viability of this resource as a tool for vocabulary development for interpreters working in educational settings. Key demographics associated with interpreters' access to time and materials in advance of a lesson were job title and graduation from an interpreter training program. Interpreters with job titles that reflected their status as interpreters had more preparatory time each week than interpreters who had job titles focused on their roles as educational assistants. Interpreters overwhelmingly expressed the need for continuing professional development with respect to vocabulary development. In terms of the resources currently used, human resources (colleagues, deaf adults) were used significantly more often than nonhuman (books, videotapes, Internet). The resource use results showed that convenience was more important than quality. Books were used more often than videotapes, CD-ROMs, and the Internet, although the latter three had higher percentages of very satisfied users than did books. The design and content of online vocabulary resources and limited interpreter preparation time were identified as current issues keeping the Internet from reaching its potential as an easily accessible visual resource. Recommendations aimed at enhancing the viability of the Internet as a vocabulary development tool for educational interpreters are discussed.

  16. Internet-based asthma education – A novel approach to compliance: A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Hara, Cindy; Vethanayagam, Dilini; Majaesic, Carina; Mayers, Irvin

    2006-01-01

    Asthma costs Canadians over $1.2 billion per annum and, despite advances, many asthmatic patients still have poor control. An action plan, symptom diary and measurement of peak expiratory flow have been shown to improve clinical outcomes. Effective educational interventions are an important component of good care. However, many rural sites lack not only access to education but physician care as well. It is reasonable, therefore, that an Internet-based asthma management program may be used as an approach. In the present case report, a novel approach that may increase access in these poorly serviced areas is presented. In an Internet-based asthma management program, patients are reviewed by a physician, receive education and are given a unique password that provides program access. Patients record symptoms and peak expiratory flow rates. The present case report shows that a patient can be assisted through an exacerbation, thus averting emergency intervention and stabilizing control, even when travelling on another continent. PMID:16470251

  17. Internet-based asthma education - a novel approach to compliance: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Cindy; Vethanayagam, Dilini; Majaesic, Carina; Mayers, Irvin

    2006-01-01

    Asthma costs Canadians over 1.2 billion dollars per annum and, despite advances, many asthmatic patients still have poor control. An action plan, symptom diary and measurement of peak expiratory flow have been shown to improve clinical outcomes. Effective educational interventions are an important component of good care. However, many rural sites lack not only access to education but physician care as well. It is reasonable, therefore, that an Internet-based asthma management program may be used as an approach. In the present case report, a novel approach that may increase access in these poorly serviced areas is presented. In an Internet-based asthma management program, patients are reviewed by a physician, receive education and are given a unique password that provides program access. Patients record symptoms and peak expiratory flow rates. The present case report shows that a patient can be assisted through an exacerbation, thus averting emergency intervention and stabilizing control, even when travelling on another continent.

  18. Fog Computing and Edge Computing Architectures for Processing Data From Diabetes Devices Connected to the Medical Internet of Things.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klonoff, David C

    2017-07-01

    The Internet of Things (IoT) is generating an immense volume of data. With cloud computing, medical sensor and actuator data can be stored and analyzed remotely by distributed servers. The results can then be delivered via the Internet. The number of devices in IoT includes such wireless diabetes devices as blood glucose monitors, continuous glucose monitors, insulin pens, insulin pumps, and closed-loop systems. The cloud model for data storage and analysis is increasingly unable to process the data avalanche, and processing is being pushed out to the edge of the network closer to where the data-generating devices are. Fog computing and edge computing are two architectures for data handling that can offload data from the cloud, process it nearby the patient, and transmit information machine-to-machine or machine-to-human in milliseconds or seconds. Sensor data can be processed near the sensing and actuating devices with fog computing (with local nodes) and with edge computing (within the sensing devices). Compared to cloud computing, fog computing and edge computing offer five advantages: (1) greater data transmission speed, (2) less dependence on limited bandwidths, (3) greater privacy and security, (4) greater control over data generated in foreign countries where laws may limit use or permit unwanted governmental access, and (5) lower costs because more sensor-derived data are used locally and less data are transmitted remotely. Connected diabetes devices almost all use fog computing or edge computing because diabetes patients require a very rapid response to sensor input and cannot tolerate delays for cloud computing.

  19. Negative infl uence of internet on the conduct studies in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. B. Ershteyn

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper shows that nowadays the Internet is increasingly used in higher education. It is argued that the main directions of research use the Internet show a positive effect of using a global network of higher education. It was revealed that in addition to the positive influence of the Internet network has a signifi cant negative impact. Identifi ed such negative factors as the widespread learning task solving and quick copying in the case of the emergence of new jobs. Not shown the ability to publish new textbooks in applying active methods lectures, due to these facilities benefi ts the Internet. The prevalence of false information on the Internet. The question of providing students with the information as it is fi nished, it is shown that in some cases it is not advisable to do. It is said that the publication of the full study guides is suitable only in the case when it comes to the basic disciplines, in other cases it is doubtful. Analyzed the shortcomings of such methods of struggle with the designated program to identify factors such as plagiarism, limiting the exchange of scientifi c and methodological experience. Revealed such disadvantages of using plagiarism detection software as programs to combat the use of these programs, and others. It is shown that the use of new teaching jobs, may lead to the fact that completed assignments will be distributed by students via the Internet, and thus the depreciation of these tasks will occur. Revealed the following pattern of use of new teaching jobs in higher education: the more effective is the learning task, the greater the likelihood that it will be devalued. The question required a waiver of such types of learning tasks as translation work, which is due to the fact that students are copying term papers or materials to them without even reading them. The ways of using reports and abstracts that allow overcome the negative trend. It is shown that the use of the

  20. The PRIDE (Partnership to Improve Diabetes Education) Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Kathleen; Chambers, Laura; Bumol, Stefan; White, Richard O.; Gregory, Becky Pratt; Davis, Dianne; Rothman, Russell L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Patients with low literacy, low numeracy, and/or linguistic needs can experience challenges understanding diabetes information and applying concepts to their self-management. The authors designed a toolkit of education materials that are sensitive to patients' literacy and numeracy levels, language preferences, and cultural norms and that encourage shared goal setting to improve diabetes self-management and health outcomes. The Partnership to Improve Diabetes Education (PRIDE) toolkit was developed to facilitate diabetes self-management education and support. Methods The PRIDE toolkit includes a comprehensive set of 30 interactive education modules in English and Spanish to support diabetes self-management activities. The toolkit builds upon the authors' previously validated Diabetes Literacy and Numeracy Education Toolkit (DLNET) by adding a focus on shared goal setting, addressing the needs of Spanish-speaking patients, and including a broader range of diabetes management topics. Each PRIDE module was evaluated using the Suitability Assessment of Materials (SAM) instrument to determine the material's cultural appropriateness and its sensitivity to the needs of patients with low literacy and low numeracy. Reading grade level was also assessed using the Automated Readability Index (ARI), Coleman-Liau, Flesch-Kincaid, Fry, and SMOG formulas. Conclusions The average reading grade level of the materials was 5.3 (SD 1.0), with a mean SAM of 91.2 (SD 5.4). All of the 30 modules received a “superior” score (SAM >70%) when evaluated by 2 independent raters. The PRIDE toolkit modules can be used by all members of a multidisciplinary team to assist patients with low literacy and low numeracy in managing their diabetes. PMID:26647414

  1. HAVE WE DONE ENOUGH WITH DIABETIC EDUCATION? A PILOT STUDY

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    KHAIRANI O

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients’ education and empowerment are essential parts of a disease management. Patients have to be educated on the disease as well as lifestyle changes that they need to practise for a holistic and consistent improvement in their disease status. This study examined patients’ knowledge on diabetes and nutrition as well as the role of dietician in the patient education. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of patients aged more than 18 years, in a primary care centre in Kuala Lumpur. Patients responded to a pre-tested self-administered questionnaire which contains socio-demographic profiles of patients, knowledge on diabetes and nutrition. Patients were also asked on dietician consultation and the number of dietician visits. Patients were conveniently selected on the data collection days. Only consented patients and those who could understand Malay or English language were selected. Results: There were 110 patients who participated in the study. Overall the patients had good knowledge on diabetes and nutrition. The mean total knowledge score was 71.2% ± 9.34. Domains such as diabetes complications, exercise, meal practice, food sources and proportion need reinforcement. Only 60 (54.9% patients had seen a dietician. Patients who had seen dietician showed significantly higher level of knowledge score (p=0.04. However frequent meeting with the dietician did not show any significant improvement in the knowledge (p=0.10. Factors such as patients’ gender, ethnicity, level of education, employment status, glycaemic level, duration of illness and body mass index did not show any significant association with the overall diabetic and nutrition knowledge. Conclusion: There is still a need to improve the overall diabetic education particularly in areas that patients were lacking such as diabetes complications, exercise, meal practice, food sources and proportion. It is equally necessary to encourage all diabetics to see a dietician

  2. Social Media in Diabetes Education: A Viable Option?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Julie; Cox, Jill N.; Corbin, Marilyn A.

    2012-01-01

    As Extension educators are encouraged to implement more cost-effective and efficient means of programming, the use of Web-based social media has become a popular option. Penn State Extension implemented a social media awareness survey among participants in its community-based diabetes education program to determine familiarity with this medium,…

  3. Characteristics of men and women with diabetes: observations during patients' initial visit to a diabetes education centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gucciardi, Enza; Wang, Shirley Chi-Tyan; DeMelo, Margaret; Amaral, Lina; Stewart, Donna E

    2008-02-01

    To determine whether men and women with type 2 diabetes have different psychosocial, behavioural, and clinical characteristics at the time of their first visit to a diabetes education centre. A questionnaire on psychosocial and behavioural characteristics was administered at participants' first appointments. Clinical and disease-related data were collected from their medical records. Bivariate analyses (chi(2) test, t test, and Mann-Whitney test) were conducted to examine differences between men and women on the various characteristics. Two diabetes education centres in the greater Toronto area in Ontario. A total of 275 men and women with type 2 diabetes. Women were more likely to have a family history of diabetes,previous diabetes education, and higher expectations of the benefits of self-management. Women reported higher levels of social support from their diabetes health care team than men did, and had more depressive symptoms, higher body mass, and higher levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol than men did. The results of this study provide evidence that diabetes prevention, care, and education need to be targeted to men and women differently. Primary care providers should encourage men to attend diabetes self-management education sessions and emphasize the benefits of self-care. Primary care providers should promote regular diabetes screening and primary prevention to women, particularly women with a family history of diabetes or a high body mass index; emphasize the importance of weight management for those with and without diabetes; and screen diabetic women for depressive symptoms.

  4. A community-based diabetes prevention program: evaluation of the group lifestyle balance program delivered by diabetes educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, M Kaye; McWilliams, Janis R; Chen, Hsiang-Yu; Siminerio, Linda M

    2011-01-01

    With growing numbers of people at risk for diabetes and cardiovascular disease, diabetes educators report increasing referrals for intervention in prevention of these conditions. Diabetes educators have expertise in diabetes self-management education; however, they are generally not prepared for delivery of chronic disease primary prevention. The purpose of this project was to determine if individuals at risk for diabetes who participate in an intervention delivered by trained diabetes educators in existing diabetes self-management education community-based programs can reduce risk factors for diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Diabetes educators in 3 outpatient-hospital programs (urban, suburban, and rural) received training and support for implementation of the Group Lifestyle Balance program, an adaptation of the Diabetes Prevention Program lifestyle intervention, from the Diabetes Prevention Support Center of the University of Pittsburgh. Adults with prediabetes and/or the metabolic syndrome were eligible to enroll in the program with physician referral. With use of existing diabetes educator networks, recruitment was completed via on-site physician in-services, informative letters, and e-mail contact as well as participant-directed newspaper advertisement. Eighty-one participants enrolled in the study (71 women, 10 men). Mean overall weight loss was 11.3 lb (5.1%, P fasting plasma glucose, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, and blood pressure. These results suggest that the Group Lifestyle Balance program delivered by diabetes educators was successful in reducing risk for diabetes and cardiovascular disease in high-risk individuals. Furthermore, diabetes educators, already integrated within the existing health care system, provide yet another resource for delivery of primary prevention programs in the community.

  5. Aging IQ Intervention with Older Korean Americans: A Comparison of Internet-Based and In-Class Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yuri; Yoon, Hyunwoo; Marti, C. Nathan; Kim, Miyong T.

    2015-01-01

    Using the translated contents of the National Institute on Aging (NIA)'s Aging IQ, an educational intervention was delivered to older Korean Americans. The educational program was delivered via two different modalities, Internet-based education (n = 12) and in-class education (n = 11), and the overall feasibility and efficacy were evaluated by the…

  6. Aging IQ Intervention with Older Korean Americans: A Comparison of Internet-Based and In-Class Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yuri; Yoon, Hyunwoo; Marti, C. Nathan; Kim, Miyong T.

    2015-01-01

    Using the translated contents of the National Institute on Aging (NIA)'s Aging IQ, an educational intervention was delivered to older Korean Americans. The educational program was delivered via two different modalities, Internet-based education (n = 12) and in-class education (n = 11), and the overall feasibility and efficacy were evaluated by the…

  7. Pre-Service Teachers’ Internet Usage a Function of Demographic Factors: The Case of a Nigerian College of Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bede Blaise Chukwunyere Onwuagboke

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available With the overreaching acceptance of ICT in education and access to Internet occasioned by advancement in technology, this paper investigates pre-service teachers’ use of Internet in a college of education. The study was a descriptive survey. Data was collected using a researcher designed instrument tagged “Student Internet Use Scale” (SIUS. The population comprised of all NCE pre-service teachers in Alvan Ikoku Federal College of Education Owerri Nigeria. Findings show that  mobile phones remains the most widely used mode of internet access with social networking, searching for information on school assignments, chatting forming the major reasons why they surf the net. Social networking is the major purpose for Internet use by female pre-service teachers while school related activities are of priority to males. The difference in purpose of internet use according to gender is however not statistically significant; similarly, there is no statically significant difference between male and female pre-service teachers in the frequency of Internet usage. The result has far reaching implication for provision and use of Internet facilities to enhance teaching and learning in the College and colleges of education in Nigeria.

  8. The Internet Playground: Children's Access, Entertainment, and Mis-Education. Second Printing. Popular Culture and Everyday Life Volume 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiter, Ellen

    2007-01-01

    Based on four years of experience teaching computers to 8-12 year olds, media scholar Ellen Seiter offers parents and educators practical advice on what children need to know about the Internet and when they need to know it. "The Internet Playground" argues that, contrary to the promises of technology boosters, teaching with computers is very…

  9. The PRIDE (Partnership to Improve Diabetes Education) Toolkit: Development and Evaluation of Novel Literacy and Culturally Sensitive Diabetes Education Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Kathleen; Chambers, Laura; Bumol, Stefan; White, Richard O; Gregory, Becky Pratt; Davis, Dianne; Rothman, Russell L

    2016-02-01

    Patients with low literacy, low numeracy, and/or linguistic needs can experience challenges understanding diabetes information and applying concepts to their self-management. The authors designed a toolkit of education materials that are sensitive to patients' literacy and numeracy levels, language preferences, and cultural norms and that encourage shared goal setting to improve diabetes self-management and health outcomes. The Partnership to Improve Diabetes Education (PRIDE) toolkit was developed to facilitate diabetes self-management education and support. The PRIDE toolkit includes a comprehensive set of 30 interactive education modules in English and Spanish to support diabetes self-management activities. The toolkit builds upon the authors' previously validated Diabetes Literacy and Numeracy Education Toolkit (DLNET) by adding a focus on shared goal setting, addressing the needs of Spanish-speaking patients, and including a broader range of diabetes management topics. Each PRIDE module was evaluated using the Suitability Assessment of Materials (SAM) instrument to determine the material's cultural appropriateness and its sensitivity to the needs of patients with low literacy and low numeracy. Reading grade level was also assessed using the Automated Readability Index (ARI), Coleman-Liau, Flesch-Kincaid, Fry, and SMOG formulas. The average reading grade level of the materials was 5.3 (SD 1.0), with a mean SAM of 91.2 (SD 5.4). All of the 30 modules received a "superior" score (SAM >70%) when evaluated by 2 independent raters. The PRIDE toolkit modules can be used by all members of a multidisciplinary team to assist patients with low literacy and low numeracy in managing their diabetes. © 2015 The Author(s).

  10. [Visual materials for the education of patients with diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morineau, Claudie

    2015-12-01

    Some people living with diabetes are not included in any educational approach due to their cultural or linguistic particularities, their level of elementary education or their metacognitive deficiencies. It is essential for the caregiver to reflect on how to provide adapted and relevant therapeutic education to these patients. In this context, visual materials have been designed in order to be able to offer personalised support. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Internet-based distributed collaborative environment for engineering education and design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qiuli

    2001-07-01

    This research investigates the use of the Internet for engineering education, design, and analysis through the presentation of a Virtual City environment. The main focus of this research was to provide an infrastructure for engineering education, test the concept of distributed collaborative design and analysis, develop and implement the Virtual City environment, and assess the environment's effectiveness in the real world. A three-tier architecture was adopted in the development of the prototype, which contains an online database server, a Web server as well as multi-user servers, and client browsers. The environment is composed of five components, a 3D virtual world, multiple Internet-based multimedia modules, an online database, a collaborative geometric modeling module, and a collaborative analysis module. The environment was designed using multiple Intenet-based technologies, such as Shockwave, Java, Java 3D, VRML, Perl, ASP, SQL, and a database. These various technologies together formed the basis of the environment and were programmed to communicate smoothly with each other. Three assessments were conducted over a period of three semesters. The Virtual City is open to the public at www.vcity.ou.edu. The online database was designed to manage the changeable data related to the environment. The virtual world was used to implement 3D visualization and tie the multimedia modules together. Students are allowed to build segments of the 3D virtual world upon completion of appropriate undergraduate courses in civil engineering. The end result is a complete virtual world that contains designs from all of their coursework and is viewable on the Internet. The environment is a content-rich educational system, which can be used to teach multiple engineering topics with the help of 3D visualization, animations, and simulations. The concept of collaborative design and analysis using the Internet was investigated and implemented. Geographically dispersed users can build the

  12. Factors associated with computer and Internet technology implementation in biology, chemistry, and physics education in Turkish secondary schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, Melike

    The main purposes of the research were to identify computer and Internet use by biology, chemistry and physics teachers in Turkish secondary schools and identify factors associated with computer and Internet technology. To this end, survey documents were sent by the Provincial Directorate of National Education to 250 selected schools' administrators for further distribution. Administrators were asked to complete the "Computer and Internet Use: School Survey," and to distribute the "Science Teacher Computer and Internet Use" surveys to the two teachers who teach science class. Surveys were then returned to the General Directorate of Educational Technologies. Research findings showed that computer and Internet use has not occurred effectively. Computers were first introduced to Turkish schools in 1984; unfortunately the current situation of computer and Internet use in science education is not at the projected earlier point in time. Considering the fact that science teachers' participation in technology-related professional development program is higher than other subject teachers, the use of computer and Internet technologies in Turkish secondary schools is still at its early stages. Lack of computer knowledge and not knowing how to integrate computers into education were the major factors reported. With regard to computer and Internet use, a regression model for Turkish schools, which includes access and knowledge, explains a large part of the variance in study results. There was a significant relationship between computer attitude (computer liking, usefulness, and confidence) and computer and Internet use. Although there was a significant negative relationship between Internet and computer uses and the attitudinal component, computer anxiety, it did not deter individuals from expressing a desire to engage in computer use in education.

  13. The Role of Internet of Things for a Continuous Improvement in Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin-Eugen CORNEL

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This research is concentrated on the value that Internet of Things (IoT can add to the education process, by using it in development of online virtual laboratories, which is a major requirement for any education system, in order to be qualitative and competitive. Practical experimentation is possible even with distance learning approach and today students may have access to a multitude of teaching resources, including IoT services used for various real world experiments. This is possible due to low costs and high performance of new electronic modules, on one hand, and the development of many high scalable web services, which permits data processing and communication over the Internet, on the other hand. The paper also presents an example of using IoT, by connecting an Arduino platform with the Xively web service, in order to read and display data received from a temperature sensor.

  14. Internet-based dissemination of educational video presentations: a primer in video podcasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corl, Frank M; Johnson, Pamela T; Rowell, Melissa R; Fishman, Elliot K

    2008-07-01

    Video "podcasting" is an Internet-based publication and syndication technology that is defined as the process of capturing, editing, distributing, and downloading audio, video, and general multimedia productions. The expanded capacity for visual components allows radiologists to view still and animated media. These image-viewing characteristics and the ease of widespread delivery are well suited for radiologic education. This article presents detailed information about how to generate and distribute a video podcast using a Macintosh platform.

  15. Assessing the effect of an educational intervention program based on Health Belief Model on preventive behaviors of internet addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheri, Aghbabak; Tol, Azar; Sadeghi, Roya

    2017-01-01

    Internet addiction refers to the excessive use of the internet that causes mental, social, and physical problems. According to the high prevalence of internet addiction among university students, this study aimed to determine the effect of an educational intervention on preventive behaviors of internet addiction among Tehran University of Medical Sciences students. This study was a quasi-experimental study conducted among female college students who live in the dormitories of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Two-stage cluster sampling was used for selection of eighty participants in each study groups; data were collected using "Young's Internet Addiction" and unstructured questionnaire. Validity and reliability of unstructured questionnaire were evaluated by expert panel and were reported as Cronbach's alpha. Information of study groups before and 4 months after the intervention was compared using statistical methods by SPSS 16. After the intervention, the mean scores of internet addiction, perceived barriers construct, and the prevalence of internet addiction significantly decreased in the intervention group than that in the control group and the mean scores of knowledge and Health Belief Model (HBM) constructs (susceptibility, severity, benefits, self-efficacy) significantly increased. Education based on the HBM was effective on the reduction and prevention of internet addiction among female college students, and educational interventions in this field are highly recommended.

  16. Internet And E-Learning Technologies And The Adult Educator In Nigeria

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    Nkasiobi Silas Oguzor

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The internet has proved to be one of the greatest learning resources available in the 21st Century. Modern education is becoming progressively more dynamic. Internet has helped manto see the other part of the world at the click of a mouse. Various forms of instructional technologies such as the overhead projector, opaque projector, filmstrip and slide projectors,radio and television to mention but a few have been used as media in instructional process. In recent times, e-learning emerged as the fastest means by which one can teach and learn online. This paper explores the concept of e-learning. It outlined and discussed the needed e-learning resources for the usage of academic adult educators. Some of them are Computer, CD-ROM Packages, videophone system and digital library. It enumerated the benefits of e-learning to academic adult educators such as collaborative studies, virtual library. It recommends among other things that the government of Nigeria should provide computerized/digital libraries foraccessibility of information in the internet.

  17. Readability evaluation of Internet-based patient education materials related to the anesthesiology field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Oliveira, Gildasio S; Jung, Michael; Mccaffery, Kirsten J; McCarthy, Robert J; Wolf, Michael S

    2015-08-01

    The main objective of the current investigation was to assess the readability of Internet-based patient education materials related to the field of anesthesiology. We hypothesized that the majority of patient education materials would not be written according to current recommended readability grade level. Online patient education materials describing procedures, risks, and management of anesthesia-related topics were identified using the search engine Google (available at www.google.com) using the terms anesthesia, anesthesiology, anesthesia risks, and anesthesia care. Cross-sectional evaluation. None. Assessments of content readability were performed using validated instruments (Flesch-Kincaid Grade Formulae, the Gunning Frequency of Gobbledygook, the New Dale-Chall Test, the Fry graph, and the Flesch Reading Ease score). Ninety-six Web sites containing Internet patient education materials (IPEMs) were evaluated. The median (interquartile range) readability grade level for all evaluated IPEMs was 13.5 (12.0-14.6). All the evaluated documents were classified at a greater readability level than the current recommended readability grade, P materials related to the field of anesthesiology are currently written far above the recommended readability grade level. High complexity of written education materials likely limits access of information to millions of American patients. Redesign of online content of Web sites that provide patient education material regarding anesthesia could be an important step in improving access to information for patients with poor health literacy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Parents of adolescents with type 1 diabetes--their views on information and communication needs and internet use. A qualitative study.

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    Sam Nordfeldt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Little is known about parents' views on the use of online resources for information, education and support regarding childhood type 1 diabetes (T1DM. Considering the rapidly evolving new communication practices, parents' perspectives need to be explored. The main purpose of this paper was to explore parents' perceptions of their information-seeking, Internet use, and social networking online. This applied to their everyday life, including the contexts of T1DM and contact with peers. A second aim was to identify implications for future development of Internet use in this respect. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Twenty-seven parents of 24 young persons aged 10-17 with T1DM participated in eight focus group interviews during their regular visits to a county hospital. Focus group discussions were video/audio-taped, transcribed and analysed using inductive qualitative content analysis. Self-reported demographic and medical information was also collected. A main theme was Finding things out, including two sub-themes, Trust and Suitability. The latter were key factors affecting parents' perceptions of online resources. Parents' choice of information source was related to the situation, previous experiences and knowledge about sources and, most importantly, the level of trust in the source. A constantly present background theme was Life situation, including two sub-themes, Roles and functions and Emotions and needs. Parents' information-seeking regarding T1DM varied greatly, and was closely associated with their life situation, the adolescents development phases and the disease trajectory. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Health practitioners and system developers need to focus on creating trust and suitability for users' needs. They should understand the children's diverse needs, which depend on their life situation, on the children's development, and on the disease trajectory. To enhance trust in online health information and support services

  19. Undergraduate physiotherapy students’ knowledge of Diabetes Mellitus: Implications for education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Steyl

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes  mellitus  is  a  growing  public  health  concern  and its prevalence is  escalating  exponentially,  with  a  high  frequency  of morbidity, premature mortality, disability and loss of productivity.  Since health education has  become  an  important  part  of  medical  care physiotherapy  students  are potentially  well  suited  to  assist  with  the combat  of  this  disease.    The  study aimed  to  determine  the  knowledge of  diabetes  mellitus  and  its  risk  factors  of undergraduate physiotherapy students  in  the  Western  Cape.  The  study  incorporated  a  quantitative, cross-sectional design.  Three hundred and thirty eight (338 students completed the structured, self-administered questionnaire consisting of three sections, namely  socio-demographic information, diabetes mellitus risk factors and the validated 24-item diabetes Knowledge Questionnaire (dKQ-24. Both descriptive and inferential statistics were employed  and the alpha level was set at p < 0.05.  overall, 60.7% of the study sample had adequate knowledge of diabetes mellitus (≥ 75% correct answers, while 32.5% and 6.8% had marginal (≥60 ≤ 74% correct answers and inadequate knowledge (<59% correct answers respectively. Seven of the nine diabetes mellitus risk factors could readily be identified by 89.7% of the participants.  Smoking (64.8% and high blood pressure (69.0% were not readily identified as common diabetes mellitus risk factors. Significant associations with diabetes risk factors were found for gender and year of study. The study has reinforced the need for continuous education of physiotherapy students regarding diabetes mellitus and its risk factors, as inadequate knowledge of diabetes mellitus could influence the effectiveness of patient education and therefore have dangerous consequences for the patient diagnosed with diabetes mellitus.

  20. The diabetes education team in the management of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holvey, S M

    1987-02-01

    Non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) is a complex disease that lasts a lifetime. It can be controlled but not cured. Treatment involves extensive changes in the patient's lifestyle, particularly in the areas of diet and exercise, which can often result in noncompliance with treatment regimens. Efforts to bring about these lifestyle changes usually require an enormous amount of time and attention on the part of the physician, and thus, are best carried out with the help of a diabetes education team. An ideal team would consist not only of the physician, patient, and family, but also a diabetes educator, a nutritionist or dietitian, an exercise therapist, a psychologist or social worker, a podiatrist, and an ophthalmologist or retinologist. A smaller number of team participants can offer a viable alternative by doubling up discipline areas, and by using interested members of the community as a referral source.

  1. PHYSICS EDUCATION AND THE INTERNET: A beginner's guide to a physicist starting out on an Internet journey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Paul

    1998-05-01

    Thirty useful physics-related sites are listed to help get you started. I hope you will find some of the following sites of use in your teaching or good for pointing your pupils in the right direction when doing research. I have not attempted to rank or sort them in any order. However, by the time you read this issue of Physics Education some of the sites may not be available; this is the nature of the net. Those not wishing to retype each address can access them from my school's physics page (http://www.bootham.demon.co.uk/physics/links.html) or e-mail me at pkb@bootham.demon.co.uk and I can send you a document with the hypertext live links in. The new IOP sponsored 16-19 Physics project is promising great things with its own Internet site. You will be able to download information, updates, worksheets etc. Any queries about the development of this project at present can be sent to Evelyn van Dyk at: 16-19project@iop.org Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Councilhttp://www.epsrc.ac.uk Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Councilhttp://www.pparc.ac.uk American Institute of Physicshttp://www.aip.org Usenet Physics FAQ (frequently asked questions)http://www.weburbia.demon.co.uk/physics/faq.html CERNhttp://www.cern.ch/ BBC Educationhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/education/ Useful data on the Periodic Tablehttp://www.shef.ac.uk/chemistry/web-elements/ JET WWW index page:http://www.jet.uk NERC satellite station, Dundee Universityhttp://www.sat.dundee.ac.uk/ The Meteorological Officehttp://www.meto.govt.uk/ The Smithsonian Institute, Washington, DChttp://www.si.edu/newstart.htm Frequently asked questions on time and frequencyhttp://www.boulder.nist.gov/timefreq/faq/faq.htm Physics newshttp://www.het.brown.edu/news/index.html TIPTOP: The Internet Pilot to Physicshttp://www.tp.umu.se/TIPTOP/ A Dictionary of Scientific Quotationshttp://naturalscience.com/dsqhome.html ScI-Journal: an on-line publication for science studentshttp://www.soton.ac.uk/~plf/ScI-Journal/ Science On

  2. Prototype for Internet support of pregnant women and mothers with type 1 diabetes: focus group testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolfsson A

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Annsofie Adolfsson,1,2 Malin Jansson1,21School of Life Sciences, University of Skovde, Skovde, Sweden; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Skaraborg Hospital, Skovde, SwedenBackground: The aim of this study was to pilot test a prototype website called MODIAB-web designed to support pregnant women and mothers with type 1 diabetes.Method: A focus group was undertaken and the results were analyzed using qualitative content analysis.Results: Eight subthemes were identified, comprising "blood glucose versus insulin," "application for smart phones," "the time aspect," "interface and technology," "forum," "direct link to the diabetes midwife," "ask the expert," and "lack of contact information." These subthemes were condensed into two main themes. The first theme was "easily understood interface, but in need of a more blood-glucose focused orientation" and the second theme was "forum for interaction with both equals and experts." Conclusion: The women in this study had positive impressions of several of the MODIAB-web functions, including a forum for pregnant mothers with type 1 diabetes and the possibility of being able to put their blood glucose levels into a diagram which could be sent directly to the diabetes midwife. Access to articles and information via the "fact" tab and the ability to ask questions of experts were also significantly helpful to women in the focus group. Pregnant women and mothers with type 1 diabetes can gain support from such a Web-based self-help system.Keywords: type 1 diabetes, web support, pregnancy, focus group interview

  3. Development of culturally sensitive dialog tools in diabetes education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nana Folmann Hempler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Person-centeredness is a goal in diabetes education, and cultural influences are important to consider in this regard. This report describes the use of a design-based research approach to develop culturally sensitive dialog tools to support person-centered dietary education targeting Pakistani immigrants in Denmark with type 2 diabetes. The approach appears to be a promising method to develop dialog tools for patient education that are culturally sensitive, thereby increasing their acceptability among ethnic minority groups. The process also emphasizes the importance of adequate training and competencies in the application of dialog tools and of alignment between researchers and health care professionals with regards to the educational philosophy underlying their use.

  4. INTEGRATING INTERNET PROTOCOL TELEVISION (IPTV IN DISTANCE EDUCATION: A Constructivist Framework for Social Networking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Volkan YUZER

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available New communication technologies and constructivist pedagogy have the great potential to build very powerful paradigm shifts that enhance Internet Protocol Television (IPTV in distance education. Therefore, the main purpose of this chapter is to explore the new concerns, issues and potentials for the IPTV delivery of distance education to multicultural populations. In this study, the design strategies and principles of how to build social networking based on constructivist learning theory are discussed in order to generate a theoretical framework that provides everyday examples and experiences for IPTV in distance education. This framework also shows the needs, expectations and beliefs, and strengths-weaknesses of IPTV in distance. In short, this framework concentrates on discussing the main characteristics of IPTV in distance education and describes how those characteristics can help build constructivist online communities.

  5. Diabetes Education Needs of Chinese Australians: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Tammie S. T.; Walker, Karen Z.; Ralston, Robin A.; Palermo, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate a type 2 diabetes education programme for Chinese Australians, based on the experience of participants and by exploring the unique needs of Chinese patients, their health beliefs and their cultural behaviours. Design and setting: A qualitative ethnographic study was undertaken in a community health…

  6. Diabetes Education Needs of Chinese Australians: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Tammie S. T.; Walker, Karen Z.; Ralston, Robin A.; Palermo, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate a type 2 diabetes education programme for Chinese Australians, based on the experience of participants and by exploring the unique needs of Chinese patients, their health beliefs and their cultural behaviours. Design and setting: A qualitative ethnographic study was undertaken in a community health…

  7. Factors Influencing Latino Participation in Community-Based Diabetes Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Sarah L.; Noterman, Amber; Litchfield, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    An Extension diabetes program (DP) was revised for Latinos; however, participation was limited. Factors influencing low participation rates were examined. Five Latinos interested in the DP participated in a focus group discussion. Transcripts were analyzed for themes. Preferred education programs were multi-session, local, group classes led by an…

  8. Bringing Internet-based education and intervention into mental health practice: afterdeployment.org

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef I. Ruzek

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Internet-facilitated interventions may offer numerous advantages in reaching the large numbers of military service men and women exposed to traumatic events. The Internet is now a primary source of health-related information for consumers and research has shown the effectiveness of web-based interventions in addressing a range of mental health problems.Clinicians can learn how to bring Internet education and intervention into routine care, to help clients better understand mental health issues and learn skills for self-management of problems.The Afterdeployment.org (AD Internet site can be used by health care professionals serving U.S. military personnel returning from Iraq and Afghanistan, and their families. The site currently addresses 18 key domains of functioning, including post-traumatic stress, sleep, anger, alcohol and drugs, and military sexual trauma. It provides an extensive amount of client and family education that is suitable for immediate use by clients and providers, as well as the kinds of interactive workshop content and self-assessment tools that have been shown to be helpful in other treatment contexts. AD can be utilized in clinical practice in a variety of ways: as an adjunct to treatment for PTSD, to supplement existing treatments for a range of post-deployment problems, or as the primary focus of treatment for a client.AD represents a kind of service that is likely to become increasingly available in coming years and that is important for mental health providers to actively explore as a tool for extending their reach, improving their efficiency, and improving quality of care.For the abstract or full text in other languages, please see Supplementary files under Reading Tools online.

  9. Are we failing to communicate? Internet-based patient education materials and radiation safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansberry, David R., E-mail: hansbedr@njms.rutgers.edu; Ramchand, Tekchand, E-mail: ramchate@njms.rutgers.edu; Patel, Shyam, E-mail: patel288@njms.rutgers.edu; Kraus, Carl, E-mail: krauscf@njms.rutgers.edu; Jung, Jin, E-mail: jungjk@njms.rutgers.edu; Agarwal, Nitin, E-mail: nitin.agarwal@rutgers.edu; Gonzales, Sharon F., E-mail: gonzalsh@njms.rutgers.edu; Baker, Stephen R., E-mail: bakersr@njms.rutgers.edu

    2014-09-15

    Introduction: Patients frequently turn to the Internet when seeking answers to healthcare related inquiries including questions about the effects of radiation when undergoing radiologic studies. We investigate the readability of online patient education materials concerning radiation safety from multiple Internet resources. Methods: Patient education material regarding radiation safety was downloaded from 8 different websites encompassing: (1) the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, (2) the Environmental Protection Agency, (3) the European Society of Radiology, (4) the Food and Drug Administration, (5) the Mayo Clinic, (6) MedlinePlus, (7) the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and (8) the Society of Pediatric Radiology. From these 8 resources, a total of 45 articles were analyzed for their level of readability using 10 different readability scales. Results: The 45 articles had a level of readability ranging from 9.4 to the 17.2 grade level. Only 3/45 (6.7%) were written below the 10th grade level. No statistical difference was seen between the readability level of the 8 different websites. Conclusions: All 45 articles from all 8 websites failed to meet the recommendations set forth by the National Institutes of Health and American Medical Association that patient education resources be written between the 3rd and 7th grade level. Rewriting the patient education resources on radiation safety from each of these 8 websites would help many consumers of healthcare information adequately comprehend such material.

  10. Home-based diabetes symptom self-management education for Mexican Americans with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Alexandra A; Brown, Sharon A; Horner, Sharon D; Zuñiga, Julie; Arheart, Kristopher L

    2015-06-01

    This pilot study evaluated an innovative diabetes symptom awareness and self-management educational program for Mexican Americans, a fast growing minority population experiencing a diabetes epidemic. Patients with diabetes need assistance interpreting and managing symptoms, which are often annoying and potentially life-threatening. A repeated measures randomized controlled trial was conducted with 72 Mexican Americans aged 25-75 years with type 2 diabetes. Experimental condition participants received eight weekly, in-home, one-on-one educational and behavior modification sessions with a registered nurse focusing on symptom awareness, glucose self-testing and appropriate treatments, followed by eight biweekly support telephone sessions. Wait-listed control condition participants served as comparisons at three time points. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to evaluate the effects of the intervention between- and within groups on psychosocial, behavioral and clinical outcomes. Participants were predominantly female, middle-aged, moderately acculturated and in poor glycemic control. Experimental group participants (n = 39) significantly improved glycemic control, blood pressure, symptoms, knowledge, self-efficacy, empowerment and quality of life. Post intervention focus groups reported satisfaction with the symptom focus. Addressing symptoms led to clinical and psychosocial improvements. Symptoms seem to be an important motivator and a useful prompt to engage patients in diabetes self-management behaviors to relieve symptoms and prevent complications.

  11. Action research as a method for changing patient education practice in a clinical diabetes setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voigt, Jane Rohde; Hansen, Ulla M.; Glindorf, Mette

    2014-01-01

    with researchers developed and implemented a participatory, group-based diabetes education program in a diabetes clinic in the Danish health care system. The research process included a variety of qualitative methods: workshops, classroom observations, video recordings and semi-structured interviews. These methods...... aimed at obtaining contextual sensitivity, allowing dynamic interactions with educators and people with diabetes. Despite challenges, the study demonstrates how action research methods contribute to development and change of diabetes education practice while simultaneously adding knowledge to the action...

  12. Internet-based educational intervention to prevent risky sexual behaviors in Mexican adolescents: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doubova, Svetlana V; Infante-Castañeda, Claudia; Pérez-Cuevas, Ricardo

    2016-04-18

    Risky sexual behaviors of adolescents in Mexico are a public health problem; 33.4 % of adolescent girls and 14.7 % of boys report not having used any protection at their first intercourse. The fertility rate is 77 births/1000 girls aged 15-19 years. The infrequent contact of adolescents with health services and the limited extent of school sex and reproductive health education require the support of innovative strategies. The objective of this paper is to present the design of an internet-based educational strategy to prevent risky sexual behaviors in Mexican adolescents. A field trial with intervention and comparison group and with ex-ante and ex-post measurements will be conducted in two public secondary schools. Adolescents between 14 and 15 years of age will participate. The intervention will be conducted in one school and the second school will serve as a comparison group where the investigators will observe the usual sex education provided by the school. The intervention will be delivered using an internet web page that includes four educational sessions provided during a 4 week period. Follow-up will last 3 months. Information on the study variables will be obtained through an Internet-based self-applied questionnaire and collected on three occasions: 1) when the adolescents enter the study (baseline), 2) once the intervention is completed (at 1 month) and 3) after 3 months of follow-up (at the fourth month). There will be three outcome variables: 1) knowledge in regard to sexually transmitted infections, 2) attitudes regarding condom use, and 3) self-efficacy toward consistent condom use. The generalized linear model will be used to assess changes in each outcome variable controlling for baseline measures and for study covariates. The design and evaluation of an Internet-based educational strategy to prevent risky sexual behaviors in Mexican adolescents is important in order to provide a new, large-scale, easily implemented preventive tool. The

  13. Family Model of Diabetes Education with a Pacific Islander Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElfish, Pearl Anna; Bridges, Melissa D.; Hudson, Jonell S.; Purvis, Rachel S.; Bursac, Zoran; Kohler, Peter O.; Goulden, Peter A.

    2017-01-01

    Structured Abstract Purpose The purpose of this study is to use a community-based participatory approach to pilot test a family model of diabetes education conducted in participants’ homes with extended family members. Approximately 50% of Marshallese adults have type 2 diabetes, and prior attempts at diabetes education have not been shown effective due in large part to very high attrition. Research Design and Methods The pilot test included six families (27 participants) who took part in a family model of diabetes self-management education (DSME) using an intervention driven pre-test/post-test design with the aim of improving glycemic control as measured by A1C. Questionnaires and additional biometric data were also collected. Researchers systematically documented elements of feasibility using participant observations and research field reports. Results Over three-fourths (78%) of participants were retained in the study. Post-test results indicated a 5% reduction in A1C across all participants and a 7% reduction among those with type 2 diabetes. Feasibility of an in-home model with extended family members was documented, along with observations and recommendation for further DSME adaptations related to blood glucose monitoring, physical activity, nutrition, and medication adherence. Conclusions The information gained from this pilot helps bridge the gap between knowledge of an evidence-based intervention and the actual implementation of the intervention within a unique minority population with especially high rates of type 2 diabetes and significant health disparities. Building on the emerging literature of family models of DSME, this study shows that the family model delivered in the home had high acceptance and that the intervention was more accessible for this hard-to-reach population. PMID:26363041

  14. An innovative approach to diabetes education for a Hispanic population utilizing community health workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valen, Mieca S; Narayan, Suzanne; Wedeking, Lorene

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes disproportionately affects the Hispanic population. New approaches are needed to provide effective education to this population. This evidence-based project utilized community health workers (CHWs) to deliver a culturally relevant diabetes education program to a Hispanic population at a migrant clinic. The program emphasized culturally relevant interventions to improve self-efficacy. Formative evaluation was used to develop and improve the program. Participants showed improvement in diabetes knowledge and diabetes related self-efficacy scores. Outcomes also included improvement in CHWs' diabetes knowledge and development of an educational program that could be utilized in other settings serving Hispanic populations with type 2 diabetes.

  15. A mobile diabetes management and educational system for type-2 diabetics in Saudi Arabia (SAED).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alotaibi, Mohammed M; Istepanian, Robert; Philip, Nada

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic disease, with high prevalence across many nations, which is characterized by elevated level of blood glucose and risk of acute and chronic complication. The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) has one of the highest levels of diabetes prevalence globally. It is well-known that the treatment of diabetes is complex process and requires both lifestyle change and clear pharmacologic treatment plan. To avoid the complication from diabetes, the effective behavioural change and extensive education and self-management is one of the key approaches to alleviate such complications. However, this process is lengthy and expensive. The recent studies on the user of smart phone technologies for diabetes self-management have proven to be an effective tool in controlling hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels especially in type-2 diabetic (T2D) patients. However, to date no reported study addressed the effectiveness of this approach in the in Saudi patients. This study investigates the impact of using mobile health technologies for the self-management of diabetes in Saudi Arabia. In this study, an intelligent mobile diabetes management system (SAED), tailored for T2D patients in KSA was developed. A pilot study of the SAED system was conducted in Saudi Arabia with 20 diabetic patients for 6 months duration. The patients were randomly categorized into a control group who did not use the SAED system and an intervention group whom used the SAED system for their diabetes management during this period. At the end of the follow-up period, the HbA1c levels in the patients in both groups were measure together with a diabetes knowledge test was also conducted to test the diabetes awareness of the patients. The results of SAED pilot study showed that the patients in the intervention group were able to significantly decrease their HbA1c levels compared to the control group. The SAED system also enhanced the diabetes awareness amongst the patients in the intervention group during the trial

  16. 10 Guiding principles of a comprehensive Internet-based public health preparedness training and education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Lorraine K; Horney, Jennifer A; Markiewicz, Milissa; MacDonald, Pia D M

    2010-01-01

    Distance learning is an effective strategy to address the many barriers to continuing education faced by the public health workforce. With the proliferation of online learning programs focused on public health, there is a need to develop and adopt a common set of principles and practices for distance learning. In this article, we discuss the 10 principles that guide the development, design, and delivery of the various training modules and courses offered by the North Carolina Center for Public Health Preparedness (NCCPHP). These principles are the result of 10 years of experience in Internet-based public health preparedness educational programming. In this article, we focus on three representative components of NCCPHP's overall training and education program to illustrate how the principles are implemented and help others in the field plan and develop similar programs.

  17. Hands on CERN an education project on the Internet using real high energy particle collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Johansson, E K

    1999-01-01

    An educational project primarily aimed at teachers and 15 to 18 year- old students describing the essential features of a modern high energy physics experiment has been created. The whole education package is available on the Internet. It gives a detailed description of the physics processes involved and the Standard Model of Microcosm. Real particle collisions produced with the facilities at the European particle physics laboratory (CERN) are displayed using the platform-independent programming language Java, enabling interaction with the user. The project has been used by several groups of teachers and students, and has increased their knowledge of, and interest in, particle physics. This project complements the traditional physics education and introduces students to contemporary fundamental physics. (7 refs).

  18. Internet-Based Asthma Education -- A Novel Approach to Compliance: A case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy O'hara

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Asthma costs Canadians over $1.2 billion per annum and, despite advances, many asthmatic patients still have poor control. An action plan, symptom diary and measurement of peak expiratory flow have been shown to improve clinical outcomes. Effective educational interventions are an important component of good care. However, many rural sites lack not only access to education but physician care as well. It is reasonable, therefore, that an Internet-based asthma management program may be used as an approach. In the present case report, a novel approach that may increase access in these poorly serviced areas is presented. In an Internet-based asthma management program, patients are reviewed by a physician, receive education and are given a unique password that provides program access. Patients record symptoms and peak expiratory flow rates. The present case report shows that a patient can be assisted through an exacerbation, thus averting emergency intervention and stabilizing control, even when travelling on another continent.

  19. Do internet, social network and other educational tools influence in the development of nervous anorexia and bulimia?

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    In recent years eating disorders have increased theirpresence in Mexico. It has been suggested that internet and social network which promote restrictive behavior influence and may be responsible for this increment. Nowadays, internet plays a fundamental roll inthe teaching-learning process and a very importanttool in informal education, however, the use of internetand social network haven’t been significantly related tothe development of those eating disorders. On the other hand, one of the ...

  20. Web-Searching to Learn: The Role of Internet Self-Efficacy in Pre-School Educators' Conceptions and Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Chia-Pin; Chien, Hui-Min

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to explore the relationships between pre-school educators' conceptions of and approaches to learning by web-searching through Internet Self-efficacy. Based on data from 242 pre-school educators who had prior experience of participating in web-searching in Taiwan for path analyses, it was found in this study that…

  1. Association of low educational status with microvascular complications in type 2 diabetes: Jaipur diabetes registry-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niharikaa Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the association of educational status (ES, as a marker of socioeconomic status, with the prevalence of microvascular complications in diabetes. Methods: Successive patients (n = 1214 presenting to our centre were evaluated for sociodemographic, anthropometric, clinical, and therapeutic variables. Subjects were classified according to ES into Group 1 (illiterate, 216; Group 2 (8.0% was significantly greater in illiterate (38.0%, low (46.0% and middle (41.0% compared to high (31.5% ES subjects (P < 0.05. Conclusions: There is a greater prevalence of the microvascular disease in illiterate and low ES diabetes patients in India. This is associated with the higher prevalence of smoking/tobacco use, poor quality diet and sub-optimal diabetes control.

  2. Education guidelines for self-care living with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prater, B

    1983-03-01

    Educational processes for those with diabetes can occur in a variety of settings. Major problems in education and implementation of programs for this population continue to be discussed. Methods for assessing programs' effectiveness in establishing adherence to individual regimens are developing. Health care professionals have assumed that individuals who are better informed make better decisions. This assumption implies that exposure to a body of facts and opportunities to develop technical skills provide the necessary elements for self-care and thus responsibility for self-health-care. Until sufficient data either confirm or negate these assumptions, programs to develop these skills and knowledge will continue. Educational program planning should occur in a systematic way with the process of the learning experiences identified along with an evaluation of the outcome of the program objectives. This educational model described (SURVIVAL, HOME MANAGEMENT, and LIFE STYLE) provides a systematic method for developing educational programs in a variety of health care and community settings. Diabetes self-care programs can be evaluated for content, design, and process. Their outcome in terms of short-term health behavior skills can also be measured. The yet unanswered question remains: Do educational programs resulting in desirable individual behaviors (adherence) make a difference in the long-term effects, quality of life, and avoidance of disability in the diabetic population? The answers may come in the future through well controlled and defined evaluative research studies. The profession of dietetics is an important part of the future. Have we been effective in our counseling or educational endeavors and, if so, can that professional function be documented? Current economic trends are stimulating to cost-effective research. Although research studies to demonstrate such effectiveness are difficult to design, the current "Guidelines" provide a model for evaluating

  3. Rethinking internet skills: the contribution of gender, age, education, internet experience, and hours online to medium- and content-related internet skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Deursen, Alexander Johannes Aloysius Maria; van Dijk, Johannes A.G.M.; Peters, O.

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on one of the factors that appears to be important in several conceptualizations of how to approach the digital divide: the differential possession of so-called Internet skills. Three large-scale performance tests are conducted to reveal the contributions of gender, age,

  4. [Educational practices for diabetes mellitus: integrative literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borba, Anna Karla de Oliveira Tito; Marques, Ana Paula de Oliveira; Leal, Márcia Carréra Campos; Ramos, Roberta Souza Pereira da Silva

    2012-03-01

    This is an integrative literature review which aims to identify the multi-professional scientific production on educational practices for individuals with diabetes available in the databases: Latin American Literature in Health Sciences (Literatura Latino Americana em Ciências da Saúde-LILACS), Medical Literature and Retrieval System online (Medline), Spanish Bibliographical Index in Health Sciences (Indice Bibliográfico Español en Ciencias de la Salud-Ibecs) and the Database on Nursing (Base de Dados em Enfermagem-BDENF), from 1999 to 2009. Results show that educational practices are developed mainly for adults and seniors up to 80 years of age, and involve themes that reflect the daily ife of living with diabetes. These practices are spread mainly through groups, bringing benefits not only for the individual with diabetes but also for the healthcare professional. Thus, we can see the process of changing the traditional education paradigm to a problem-based dialogical education, with a view for promoting health.

  5. Internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy for depression in people with diabetes: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robins, Lisa; Newby, Jill; Wilhelm, Kay; Smith, Jessica; Fletcher, Therese; Ma, Trevor; Finch, Adam; Campbell, Lesley; Andrews, Gavin

    2015-01-01

    Depression substantially contributes to the personal burden and healthcare costs of living with diabetes mellitus (DM). Comorbid depression and DM are associated with poorer quality of life, poorer self-management and glycemic control, increased risk for DM complications and higher mortality rates, and higher health service utilization. Depression remains under-recognized and undertreated in people with DM, which may, in part, result from barriers associated with accessing face-to-face treatment. This study will examine the efficacy of an internet-based cognitive behaviour therapy programme for major depressive disorder (iCBT-MDD) in people with DM. A CONSORT 2010 compliant, registered randomised controlled trial of the intervention (iCBT-MDD) versus a treatment as usual control group will be conducted. The study will include 100 adults aged 18 years and over with a diagnosis of type 1 or type 2 DM and self-reported symptoms that satisfy MDD which will enable us to detect a statistically significant difference with a group effect size of 0.6 at a power of 80% and significance level of p=0.05. Participants will be randomised to receive the iCBT-MDD programme immediately, or to wait 10 weeks before accessing the programme. Primary outcomes will be self-reported depression severity, DM-related distress, and glycemic control (glycosylated hemoglobin). Secondary outcomes will be general distress and disability, generalized anxiety, lifestyle behaviours, somatization, eating habits, alcohol use, and acceptability of the iCBT programme to participants, and practicality for clinicians. Data will be analyzed with linear mixed models for each outcome measure. The Human Research Ethics Committee of St Vincent's Hospital Australia have given ethics approval (HREC/13/SVH/291). Results will be disseminated via peer-reviewed publication and social media channels of Australian Diabetes Consumer Representative Bodies. The trial is registered with the Australian and New Zealand

  6. Use of a Supplementary Internet Based Education Program Improves Sleep Literacy in College Psychology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Stuart F.; Anderson, Janis L.; Hodge, Gordon K.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Knowledge regarding the importance of sleep in health and performance and good sleep hygiene practices is low, especially among adolescents and young adults. It is important to improve sleep literacy. Introductory psychology is one of the most highly enrolled courses at colleges and universities. This study tested the impact of an Internet-based learning module on improving sleep literacy in this venue. Methods: An Internet-based supplementary learning module containing sleep physiology and hygiene information was developed using content from the Harvard Medical School sleep educational website http://www.understandingsleep.org. Access to the module was provided as an extra credit activity for 2 of 4 sections (Supplemental Sleep, SS, N = 889) of an introductory college psychology course during their standard instruction on sleep and dreaming. The remaining 2 sections (Standard Instruction, SI, N = 878) only were encouraged to visit the website without further direction. Level of knowledge was assessed before and after availability to the module/website and at the end of the semester. Students were asked to complete a survey at the end of the semester inquiring whether they made any changes in their sleep behaviors. Results: Two hundred fifty students participated in the extra credit activity and had data available at all testing points. Students in the SS Group had a significant improvement in sleep knowledge test scores after interacting with the website in comparison to the SI group (19.41 ± 3.15 vs. 17.94 ± 3.08, p psychology course. Citation: Quan SF; Anderson JL; Hodge GK. Use of a supplementary internet based education program improves sleep literacy in college psychology students. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(2):155-160. PMID:23372469

  7. Internet-based virtual classroom and educational management software enhance students' didactic and clinical experiences in perfusion education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Jeffrey B; Austin, Jon W; Holt, David W; Searles, Bruce E; Darling, Edward M

    2004-09-01

    A challenge faced by many university-based perfusion education (PE) programs is the need for student clinical rotations at hospital locations that are geographically disparate from the main educational campus. The problem has been addressed through the employment of distance-learning environments. The purpose of this educational study is to evaluate the effectiveness of this teaching model as it is applied to PE. Web-based virtual classroom (VC) environments and educational management system (EMS) software were implemented independently and as adjuncts to live, interactive Internet-based audio/video transmission from classroom to classroom in multiple university-based PE programs. These Internet environments have been used in a variety of ways including: 1) forum for communication between the university faculty, students, and preceptors at clinical sites, 2) didactic lectures from expert clinicians to students assigned to distant clinical sites, 3) small group problem-based-learning modules designed to enhance students analytical skills, and 4) conversion of traditional face-to-face lectures to asynchronous learning modules. Hypotheses and measures of student and faculty satisfaction, clinical experience, and learning outcomes are proposed, and some early student feedback was collected. For curricula that emphasize both didactic and clinical education, the use of Internet-based VC and EMS software provides significant advancements over traditional models. Recognized advantages include: 1) improved communications between the college faculty and the students and clinical preceptors, 2) enhanced access to a national network of clinical experts in specialized techniques, 3) expanded opportunity for student distant clinical rotations with continued didactic course work, and 4) improved continuity and consistency of clinical experiences between students through implementation of asynchronous learning modules. Students recognize the learning efficiency of on

  8. [Internet-based Continuing Medical Education. Presentation of the first experience of the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    San José, A; Formiga, F; López Soto, A; Ortiz, J; Tiberio, G; Ollero, M; Valero, J; Ballarín, M

    2010-12-01

    This paper presents the first experience of the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine in the development of an Internet-based Continuing Medical Education program for Society members, accredited by the Health Ministry and the Autonomous University of Barcelona, and funded by the Menarini Group SA. Academic performance and satisfaction of participants in this course have been very satisfactory, both with respect to scientific content and the virtual learning environment. This experience shows that Internet-based continuing medical education is a field with a great future that is well accepted by participating physicians, and that the scientific societies, with the collaboration of other institutions and companies, can lead Internet-based Continuing Medical Education programs especially designed and tailored to their members.

  9. A Low-Cost Remote Lab for Internet Services Distance Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Sissom

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Academic departments seeking to reach students via distance education course offerings find that some on-line curricula require a traditional hands-on lab model for student evaluation and assessment. The authors solve the problem of providing distance education curriculum and supporting instruction lab components by using a low-cost remote lab. The remote lab is used to evaluate student performance in managing web services and website development, solving security problems, patch management, scripting and web server management. In addition, the authors discuss assessment and evaluation techniques that will be used to determine instructional quality and student performance. Discussed are the remote lab architecture, use of disk images and utilization of Windows 2003 Internet Information Service, and Linux Red Hat 9.0 platforms.

  10. Comparison of neurological healthcare oriented educational resources for patients on the internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punia, Vineet; Dagar, Anjali; Agarwal, Nitin; He, Wenzhuan; Hillen, Machteld

    2014-12-01

    The internet has become a major contributor to health literacy promotion. The average American reads at 7th-8th grade level and it is recommended to write patient education materials at or below 6th grade reading level. We tried to assess the level of literacy required to read and understand online patient education materials (OPEM) for neurological diseases from various internet resources. We then compared those to an assumed reference OPEM source, namely the patient education brochures from the American Academy of Neurology (AAN), the world's largest professional association of neurologists. Disease specific patient education brochures were downloaded from the AAN website. OPEM for these diseases were also accessed from other common online sources determined using a predefined criterion. All OPEM were converted to Microsoft Word (Microsoft Corp., Redmond, WA, USA) and their reading level was analyzed using Readability Studio Professional Edition version 2012.1 (Oleander Software, Vandalia, OH, USA). Descriptive analysis and analysis of variance were used to compare reading levels of OPEM from different resources. Medline Plus, Mayo clinic and Wikipedia qualified for OPEM analysis. All OPEM from these resources, including the AAN, were written above the recommended 6th grade reading level. They were also found to be "fairly difficult", "difficult" or "confusing" on the Flesch Reading Ease scale. AAN OPEM on average needed lower reading level, with Wikipedia OPEM being significantly (presources. OPEM on neurological diseases are being written at a level of reading complexity higher than the average American and the recommended reading levels. This may be undermining the utility of these resources.

  11. Opinions Of Teachers’ Employed In Vocational and Technical Education Institutions About Computer and Internet Based Teaching Materials Usage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgen KORKMAZ

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to identify the vocational and technical educational scool teachers’ usage level of computer and internet based instructional material in their courses. A qualitative research design was used in this study. The candidates are from four different vocational schools constituting a total of 49 vocational teachers who are working Kırşehir, Turkey. To collect the data, the teachers were asked four open-ended questions about their level of computer and internet based instructional material usage in their courses and about their views through an interview form. The data obtained are analyzed by means of document review and some of the results are as follows: The majority of teachers express that they use computer and internet based instructional materials in their courses, but the usage level is not adequate. According to teachers, the primary reason for inadequate usage of computer and internet based instructional materials is insufficient material and old computer hardware.

  12. Barrier Factors to the Completion of Diabetes Education in Korean Diabetic Adult Patients: Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys 2007-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee-Tae; Lee, Kiheon; Jung, Se Young; Oh, Seung-Min; Jeong, Su-Min; Choi, Yoon-Jung

    2015-09-01

    Diabetes is a disease with high social burdens and is expected to increase gradually. A long-term management is essential for the treatment of diabetes, requiring patient self-cares. Diabetes education is important for such self-cares, but it does not sufficiently take place. In addition, little studies have been conducted on the barriers to the completion of diabetes education. This study, thus, aimed to analyze the factors related to the completion of diabetes education and investigate its barriers. Of 50,405 respondents to the fourth and fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, a total of 3,820 were selected for the analysis, excluding those aged 29 or younger and those with missing values. The completion of diabetes education was set as a dependent variable and an analysis was made on the factors that affect the dependent variable. A multivariable logistic regression was employed for the analysis. Lower educational level was associated with less diabetes education, and the degree of diabetes education was lower in the group with male, the group that didn't have a family history or was not aware of a family history, the group that was not currently aware of diabetes and the group without a spouse. There was no difference in the completion of diabetes education by underlying diseases, family income level, age, residing area, economic activity status, insurance coverage, smoking, and drinking. Diabetes education is of importance for the treatment and management of diabetes. Currently, however, diabetes education is not sufficiently carried out in Korea. The completion rate of diabetes education was low in male, patients without or not knowing a family history, patients who were not currently aware of their diabetes, patients without a spouse, and patients with low educational level. Therefore, encouraging these patients to take the education will be a more effective approach to increase the completion rate of diabetes education.

  13. Type 2 diabetes patients are more amenable to change following a contextualised diabetes education programme in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Badariah; Md Zain, Anuar Zaini; Fatt, Quek Kia

    2017-07-03

    The aim of the study is to determine the impact of diabetes education on patients' glycaemic control. A prospective 18-month intervention study was conducted at four ambulatory diabetes centres. Poorly controlled type 2 diabetes patients attended an hour of structured diabetes education at their respective diabetes centres. A month post-intervention patients were contacted through telephone and followed up for 18 months. Anthropometric measurements and socio-demographic details were collected during the first visit. HbA1C blood test for each patient was taken at beginning and end of study. Patients' diabetes knowledge showed 80% obtained Excellent or Very Good score. The Telephone Contact (TC) retention rate was 75.52% at 18 months. There was a significant improvement (p=0.001) in patients' glycaemic control with a reduction in HbA1C of ≥1% from baseline. Diabetes education intervention contributed positively to significant glycaemic improvement and should be embedded within a structured diabetes care delivery system. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Writing for Health: Rationale and Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial of Internet-Based Benefit-Finding Writing for Adults With Type 1 or Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Kay; Robins, Lisa; Proudfoot, Judy

    2017-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus is Australia’s fastest growing chronic disease, and has high comorbidity with depression. Both subthreshold depression and diabetes distress are common amongst people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes, and are associated with poorer diabetes self-care. A need exists for low-intensity self-help interventions for large numbers of people with diabetes and diabetes distress or subthreshold depression, as part of a stepped-care approach to meeting the psychological needs of people with diabetes. Benefit-finding writing is a very brief intervention that involves writing about any positive thoughts and feelings about a stressful experience, such as an illness. Benefit-finding writing has been associated with increases in positive affect and positive growth, and has demonstrated promising results in trials amongst other clinical populations. However, benefit-finding writing has not yet been examined in people with diabetes. Objective The aim of this randomized controlled trial (RCT) is to evaluate the efficacy of an Internet-based benefit-finding writing (iBFW) intervention for adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes (compared to a control writing condition) for reducing diabetes distress and increasing benefit-finding in diabetes, and also improving a range of secondary outcomes. Methods A two-arm RCT will be conducted, using the online program Writing for Health. Adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes living in Australia will be recruited using diabetes-related publications and websites, and through advertisements in diabetes services and general practitioners’ offices. Potential participants will be referred to the study-specific website for participant information and screening. All data will be collected online. Participants will be randomized to either iBFW about diabetes, or a control writing condition of writing about use-of-time. Both conditions involve three daily sessions (once per day for three consecutive days) of 15-minute online

  15. Evaluation of a Worksite Diabetes Education Program at a Large Urban Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renda, Susan; Baernholdt, Marianne; Becker, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Evidence suggests that diabetes education can be delivered at the worksite to better support employees' diabetes self-management and improve productivity and health care costs. This study was conducted to address the feasibility of a diabetes worksite education program for employees at a large urban academic health care institution. The diabetes education program was delivered in the diabetes center at the institution, a resource that was previously underutilized by employees. Through collaboration with groups in the institution, 20 employees of diverse ethnicity participated in the worksite diabetes education program with positive outcomes: improved glycemic control measured (HbA1c), attainment of self-management goals, and satisfaction with the program. Work absences trended downward, but numbers of hospitalizations and emergency department visits were unchanged in the 3 months following education. Recommendations include replication of the study with more employee participation and program evaluation over a longer period of time to continue assessment of employees' educational needs.

  16. A Study on Epistemological Beliefs of Community College Students and Their Self-Efficacy Beliefs Regarding Educational Use of the Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktürk, Ahmet Oguz

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the relationships between the self-efficacy beliefs of students at community colleges regarding the educational use of the Internet and their epistemological beliefs. Moreover, it is also examined whether the self-efficacy beliefs of the students regarding the educational use of the Internet and their epistemological…

  17. The Impact of Health Education Intervention for Prevention and Early Detection of Type 2 Diabetes in Women with Gestational Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfik, Mirella Youssef

    2016-10-14

    This study aims to investigate the impact of a health belief model (HBM)-based educational intervention on knowledge, beliefs, self-reported practices, gestational and postpartum weight in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM).

  18. Diabetes Self-Management Education: Miles to Go

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Altman Klein

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This meta-analysis assessed how successfully Diabetes Self-Management Education (DSME interventions help people with type 2 diabetes achieve and maintain healthy blood glucose levels. We included 52 DSME programs with 9,631 participants that reported post-intervention A1c levels in randomized controlled trials. The training conditions resulted in significant reductions in A1c levels compared to control conditions. However, the impact of intervention was modest shifting of only 7.23% more participants from diabetic to pre-diabetic or normal status, relative to the control condition. Most intervention participants did not achieve healthy A1c levels. Further, few DSME studies assessed long-term maintenance of A1c gains. Past trends suggest that gains are difficult to sustain over time. Our results suggested that interventions delivered by nurses were more successful than those delivered by non-nursing personnel. We suggest that DSME programs might do better by going beyond procedural interventions. Most DSME programs relied heavily on rules and procedures to guide decisions about diet, exercise, and weight loss. Future DSME may need to include cognitive self-monitoring, diagnosis, and planning skills to help patients detect anomalies, identify possible causes, generate corrective action, and avoid future barriers to maintaining healthy A1c levels. Finally, comprehensive descriptions of DSME programs would advance future efforts.

  19. Feasibility of Internet-based Post-secondary Nutrition Education: Incorporating Features of the Mediterranean Diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboul-Enein, Basil H; Bernstein, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Internet continues to serve as an ideal venue for health education interventions promoting behavior change. Due to the progressive expansion in online education programs, new methodologies that contribute across health education and program planning continuums are needed. Methods: This ecologic study investigated the change in student dietary behav-ior and food choices following an original online education intervention that introduced the Mediterranean diet (MD) in a community college in Houston, Texas. A non-probability convenience sample (n=65) provided pretest-posttest data measuring knowledge of and attitudes toward the MD. The intervention was incorporated into an undergraduate nutrition course, delivered entirely online and evaluated using the Mediterranean Diet Quality Index (KIDMED) survey. Results: The intervention improved total participant population from a mean KIDMED score of poor (4.12) to a mean score of high (8.45) indicating an increase in knowledge of MD dietary guidelines and a positive shift in favorable attitude, particularly among men. Conclusion: This study provides a unique pedagogical illustration of online learn-ing that introduce a specific evidence-based dietary guideline to a college student population. A detailed discussion of findings and lessons learned is provided. PMID:26290824

  20. Supporting Participation in Physical Education at School in Youth with Type 1 Diabetes: Perceptions of Teachers, Youth with Type 1 Diabetes, Parents and Diabetes Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacMillan, Freya; Kirk, Alison; Mutrie, Nanette; Moola, Fiona; Robertson, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    It is not clear how best to support youth with type 1 diabetes to participate in physical education (PE) at school. The aim of this study was to explore perceptions of facilitators and barriers to PE in youth with type 1 diabetes and to determine how schools can help these individuals to be physically active. Interviews and focus groups were…

  1. Supporting Participation in Physical Education at School in Youth with Type 1 Diabetes: Perceptions of Teachers, Youth with Type 1 Diabetes, Parents and Diabetes Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacMillan, Freya; Kirk, Alison; Mutrie, Nanette; Moola, Fiona; Robertson, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    It is not clear how best to support youth with type 1 diabetes to participate in physical education (PE) at school. The aim of this study was to explore perceptions of facilitators and barriers to PE in youth with type 1 diabetes and to determine how schools can help these individuals to be physically active. Interviews and focus groups were…

  2. Readability and quality assessment of internet-based patient education materials related to laryngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narwani, Vishal; Nalamada, Keerthana; Lee, Michael; Kothari, Prasad; Lakhani, Raj

    2016-04-01

    Patients are increasingly using the internet to access health-related information. The purpose of this study was to assess the readability and quality of laryngeal cancer-related websites. Patient education materials were identified by performing an internet search using 3 search engines. Readability was assessed using Flesch Reading Ease Score (FRES), Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level (FKGL), and Gunning Fog Index (GFI). The DISCERN instrument was utilized to assess quality of health information. A total of 54 websites were included in the analysis. The mean readability scores were as follows: FRES, 48.2 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 44.8-51.6); FKGL, 10.9 (95% CI = 10.3-11.5); and GFI, 13.8 (95% CI = 11.3-16.3). These scores suggest that, on average, online information about patients with laryngeal cancer is written at an advanced level. The mean DISCERN score was 49.8 (95% CI = 45.4-54.2), suggesting that online information is of variable quality. Our study suggests much of the laryngeal cancer information available online is of suboptimal quality and written at a level too difficult for the average adult to read comfortably. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Analysis of internet-based patient education materials related to pituitary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherla, Deepa V; Sanghvi, Saurin; Agarwal, Nitin; Eloy, Jean Anderson; Couldwell, William T; Liu, James K

    2014-10-01

    The Internet has become a primary and ubiquitous information source for patient education material (PEM); however, the information provided may not be appropriate for the average patient to comprehend. Various national healthcare organizations have recommended that PEM be written at or below the sixth-grade level. The purpose of this study was to assess the readability of pituitary tumor-related PEMs available on the Internet. Fifty-one PEMs on pituitary tumors were downloaded from professional society and clinical practice websites. Analysis of readability was performed using 4 different readability indices: Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level (FKGL), Flesch Reading Ease Score (FRES), Simple Measure of Gobbledygook (SMOG), and Gunning Frequency Measure of Gobbledygook (Gunning FOG). Scores from the FKGL, SMOG, and Gunning FOG scales correspond to reading grade levels. Therefore, a higher number corresponds to higher difficulty and lower readability. The average grade level of the PEMs according to the readability indices were as follows: FKGL = 11.71 (11th to 12th grades), SMOG = 14.56 (college level), and Gunning FOG = 14.86 (college level). For the FRES, higher scores imply easier readability. The average FRES was 40.19 (fairly difficult-between 10th and 11th grades). These findings suggest that online pituitary tumor-related material may be too difficult for comprehension by the majority of the targeted patient population. Keeping the reading level of PEMs at or below the sixth grade may improve understanding of this disease and its management for pituitary tumor patients.

  4. Readability assessment of Internet-based patient education materials related to endoscopic sinus surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherla, Deepa V; Sanghvi, Saurin; Choudhry, Osamah J; Liu, James K; Eloy, Jean Anderson

    2012-08-01

    Numerous professional societies, clinical practices, and hospitals provide Internet-based patient education materials (PEMs) to the general public, but not all of this information is written at a reading level appropriate for the average patient. The National Institutes of Health and the US Department of Health and Human Services recommend that PEMs be written at or below the sixth-grade level. Our purpose was to assess the readability of endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS)-related PEMs available on the Internet and compare readability levels of PEMs provided by three sources: professional societies, clinical practices, and hospitals. A descriptive and correlational design was used for this study. The readability of 31 ESS-related PEMs was assessed with four different readability indices: Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level (FKGL), Flesch Reading Ease Score (FRES), Simple Measure of Gobbledygook (SMOG), and Gunning Frequency of Gobbledygook (Gunning FOG). Averages were evaluated against national recommendations and between each source using analysis of variance and t tests. The majority of PEMs (96.8%) were written above the recommended sixth-grade reading level, based on FKGL (P Society, Inc.

  5. The Diabetes Literacy and Numeracy Education Toolkit (DLNET): materials to facilitate diabetes education and management in patients with low literacy and numeracy skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Kathleen; Cavanaugh, Kerri; Malone, Robb; Hawk, Victoria; Gregory, Becky Pratt; Davis, Dianne; Wallston, Kenneth; Rothman, Russell L

    2009-01-01

    Diabetes self-management education is an important component of comprehensive diabetes care. Patients with low health literacy and numeracy may have difficulty translating information from traditional diabetes educational programs and materials into effective self-care. To address this potential barrier to successful diabetes teaching and counseling, the authors developed the Diabetes Literacy and Numeracy Education Toolkit (DLNET). The DLNET is composed of 24 interactive modules covering standard diabetes care topics that can be customized to individual patient needs and used by all members of the multidisciplinary diabetes care team. The material's content and formatting aims to improve the ease of use for diabetes patients with low literacy and numeracy by adhering to a lower text reading level, using illustrations for key concepts, and color-coding and other accommodations to guide patients through instructions for self-care. Individual sections of the DLNET may be provided to patients for initial teaching, as well as for reinforcement. Although designed for lower literacy and numeracy skills, the DLNET provides unique materials to facilitate diabetes education for all patients.

  6. Multinational Internet-based survey of patient preference for newer oral or injectable Type 2 diabetes medication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco daCosta DiBonaventura

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Marco daCosta DiBonaventura1, Jan-Samuel Wagner1, Cynthia J Girman2, Kimberly Brodovicz2, Qiaoyi Zhang3, Ying Qiu3, Sri-Ram Pentakota3, Larry Radican31Health Sciences Practice, Kantar Health, New York; 2Epidemiology, 3Global Health Outcomes, Merck, Whitehouse Station, New Jersey, USABackground: The prevalence of Type 2 diabetes mellitus continues to rise. Although glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 analog and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4 inhibitor medications are effective, there are differences between these products, including method of administration (injectable versus oral. The objective of this study was to examine patient preferences (and predictors of preferences for two different medication profiles, one similar to a GLP-1 analog (liraglutide and another similar to a DPP-4 inhibitor (sitagliptin.Methods: Internet survey data were collected in two waves (wave 1, n = 2402; wave 2, n = 1340 using patients from the US and Europe. Patients were presented with two hypothetical medication profiles (“drug A” and “drug B”, resembling sitagliptin and liraglutide, respectively and asked to report their preferences.Results: Most patients in wave 1 and wave 2 reported that overall they would prefer a drug with the sitagliptin-like profile (81.9% and 84.4%, respectively over a drug with the liraglutide-like profile (18.1% and 15.6%, respectively, and >80% of patients reported that they would be able to take a drug with the sitagliptin-like profile as directed by their physician for a longer period. The likelihood of preferring the sitagliptin-like profile significantly increased as age (odds ratio [OR] = 1.02 and importance placed on method of administration (OR = 1.32 increased (P < 0.05. Although the sitagliptin-like profile was preferred by the majority of patients in all subgroups, a lower proportion of patients with obesity, with weight gain, with A1C values above target, and who exercised preferred the sitagliptin-like profile compared with

  7. Effective intervention or child's play? A review of video games for diabetes education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeShazo, Jonathan; Harris, Lynne; Pratt, Wanda

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study is (1) to identify diabetes education video games and pilot studies in the literature, (2) to review themes in diabetes video game design and evaluation, and (3) to evaluate the potential role of educational video games in diabetes self-management education. Studies were systematically identified for inclusion from Medline, Web of Science, CINAHL, EMBASE, Psychinfo, IEEE Xplore, and ACM Digital Library. Features of each video game intervention were reviewed and coded based on an existing taxonomy of diabetes interventions framework. Nine studies featuring 11 video games for diabetes care were identified. Video games for diabetes have typically targeted children with type 1 diabetes mellitus and used situation problem-solving methods to teach diet, exercise, self-monitored blood glucose, and medication adherence. Evaluations have shown positive outcomes in knowledge, disease management adherence, and clinical outcomes. Video games for diabetes education show potential as effective educational interventions. Yet we found that improvements are needed in expanding the target audience, tailoring the intervention, and using theoretical frameworks. In the future, the reach and effectiveness of educational video games for diabetes education could be improved by expanding the target audience beyond juvenile type 1 diabetes mellitus, the use of tailoring, and increased use of theoretical frameworks.

  8. An Evaluation of Educational Neurological Eye Movement Disorder Videos Posted on Internet Video Sharing Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickman, Simon J

    2016-03-01

    Internet video sharing sites allow the free dissemination of educational material. This study investigated the quality and educational content of videos of eye movement disorders posted on such sites. Educational neurological eye movement videos were identified by entering the titles of the eye movement abnormality into the search boxes of the video sharing sites. Also, suggested links were followed from each video. The number of views, likes, and dislikes for each video were recorded. The videos were then rated for their picture and sound quality. Their educational value was assessed according to whether the video included a description of the eye movement abnormality, the anatomical location of the lesion (if appropriate), and the underlying diagnosis. Three hundred fifty-four of these videos were found on YouTube and Vimeo. There was a mean of 6,443 views per video (range, 1-195,957). One hundred nineteen (33.6%) had no form of commentary about the eye movement disorder shown apart from the title. Forty-seven (13.3%) contained errors in the title or in the text. Eighty (22.6%) had excellent educational value by describing the eye movement abnormality, the anatomical location of the lesion, and the underlying diagnosis. Of these, 30 also had good picture and sound quality. The videos with excellent educational value had a mean of 9.84 "likes" per video compared with 2.37 for those videos without a commentary (P educational value with good picture and sound quality had a mean of 10.23 "likes" per video (P = 0.004 vs videos with no commentary). There was no significant difference in the mean number of "dislikes" between those videos that had no commentary or which contained errors and those with excellent educational value. There are a large number of eye movement videos freely available on these sites; however, due to the lack of peer review, a significant number have poor educational value due to having no commentary or containing errors. The number of "likes

  9. [Sexuality education on the Internet : From Dr. Sommer to Dr. Google].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döring, Nicola

    2017-07-24

    Female and male adolescents in Germany are increasingly using the Internet to find information about sexuality and sexual health. This review paper summarizes what we know about the status quo of online sexuality education in Germany.Based on a systematic literature review including 40 papers from international, peer-reviewed journals spanning 2010-2017, this paper first describes different aspects of the sexuality-related online search behavior of adolescents: its prevalence, predictors, topics and contexts. One main finding is the fact that adolescents use a computer or smartphone to type their sexuality-related questions into the search engine Google or the search engine of the video platform YouTube.Based on 54 online searches, this paper subsequently presents the kind of sexuality-related online content adolescents find if they ask "Dr. Google" for sexual advice; a collection of 1236 authentic sexuality-related questions of adolescents was used for this analysis. It turned out that online sexuality education offered by leading professional organizations like the BZgA ("Bundeszentrale für gesundheitliche Aufklärung") or pro familia was nearly invisible, while numerous other providers of online sex education consistently appeared in the top Google search results. Among them were the "Dr. Sommer" team of the youth magazine Bravo; online healthcare and advice portals; online forums; the online encyclopedia Wikipedia and, above all, sex education channels on YouTube. In this paper, the latter are presented in more detail for the first time.The third part of the paper addresses the quality of online sexual education over four main areas of quality evaluation. The presentation of the status quo ends with some recommendations both for future research and for sexuality education in practice.

  10. Internet of Things in Higher Education: A Study on Future Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldowah, Hanan; Rehman, Shafiq Ul; Ghazal, Samar; Naufal Umar, Irfan

    2017-09-01

    In the coming years, technology will impact the learning experience in many ways. Internet of Things (IoT) continues to confirm its important position in the context of Information and Communication Technologies and the development of society. With the support of IoT, institutions can enhance learning outcomes by providing more affluent learning experiences, improved operational efficiency, and by gaining real-time, actionable insight into student performance. The purpose of this study is to find out the potential of IoT in higher education and how to maximize its benefits and reducing the risks involved with it. Further efforts are necessary for releasing the full potential of IoT systems and technologies. Therefore, this paper presents a study about the impact of IoT on higher education especially universities. IoT stands to change dramatically the way universities work, and enhance student learning in many disciplines and at any level. It has huge potential for universities or any other educational institutions; if well prepared to ensure widespread and successful implementation by leadership, staff, and students. IoT needs development where universities can lead. Academics, researchers, and students are in a unique place to lead the discovery and development of IoT systems, devices, applications, and services. Moreover, this paper provides an evidences about the future of IoT in the higher education during the next few years, which have offered by a number of research organizations and enterprises. On the other hand, IoT also brings tremendous challenges to higher education. Hence, this paper also presents the perspective on the challenges of IoT in higher education.

  11. Views and Preferences of Low-Literate Hispanics regarding Diabetes Education: Results of Formative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosal, Milagros C.; Goins, Karin Valentine; Carbone, Elena T.; Cortes, Dharma E.

    2004-01-01

    Hispanics are twice as likely as non-Hispanic Whites to have diabetes and are also at higher risk for diabetes-related complications and poorer outcomes. The prevalence of diabetes is inversely related to educational status. Low literacy is common, especially among older Hispanics. Little literature exists on formative research to create diabetes…

  12. 77 FR 3783 - Collection; Comment Request: Revision of the National Diabetes Education Program Comprehensive...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-25

    ... knowledge of the seriousness of diabetes, its risk factors, and effective strategies for preventing type 2... Diabetes Education Program Comprehensive Evaluation Plan SUMMARY: In compliance with the requirement of... proposed data collection projects, the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases...

  13. Diabetes Care as an Active Learning Model of Postgraduate Education and Training for Pharmaceutical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koda-Kimble, Mary Anne; Batz, Forrest R.

    1994-01-01

    In a University of California continuing pharmacy education course in diabetes care, practicing pharmacists lived as patients with diabetes for two days and role-played in small groups. One year later, participants reported making changes in their diabetes care-related practice, suggesting its effectiveness in improving practitioners' skill…

  14. Deficiencies in postgraduate training for healthcare professionals who provide diabetes education and support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byrne, J. L.; Davies, Melanie J; Willaing, I.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: To consider the global provision of self-management diabetes education and training for healthcare professionals using data from the second Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs (DAWN2) study. Methods: A total of 4785 healthcare professionals caring for people with diabetes were surveyed in ...

  15. LincOn: Internet for Education. Bringing the World to Illinois, 1998. Membership Application Form and Instructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois State Board of Education, Springfield.

    This document contains the enrollment application form and line-by-line instructions for subscribing to LincOn, a statewide network, administered by the Illinois State Board of Education, that allows public K-12 schools to access the Internet. An overview of LincOn and a checklist for implementing LincOn membership are also included. Appendices…

  16. A Comparison of Internet-Based Learning and Traditional Classroom Lecture to Learn CPR for Continuing Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmati, Nima; Omrani, Soghra; Hemmati, Naser

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the satisfaction and effectiveness of Internet-based learning (IBL) and traditional classroom lecture (TCL) for continuing medical education (CME) programs by comparing final resuscitation exam results of physicians who received the newest cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) curriculum guidelines training…

  17. Study on utilization status of internet and needs assessment for developing nutrition education programs among elementary school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Yun; Kim, Kyung-Won

    2007-01-01

    This study was to investigate utilization status of internet, health/nutrition websites among children, and to assess the needs for developing nutrition websites and education programs for children. The survey questionnaire was administered to 5-6th grade students (n=434) at two elementary schools. About 32% used the internet every day while 19.5% used it whenever they needed, showing significant differences in internet usage by gender (pgame/quiz, as well as getting information using Flash animation. The favorite colors for screen and text were slightly different by gender (pgame). They also liked materials using computers, video and internet than printed materials. If nutrition education was done at schools, subjects wanted to receive 5.7 times of education per semester on average (mean length: 42.6 min./session). This study suggests that nutrition websites and education programs for children should include the topics such as assessment of obesity or diet, weight control and special information (e.g., diet for growth) as well as general information. In designing nutrition websites and programs, methods including game, quiz, Flash animation and activities (cooking, exercise) could be appropriately used to induce the interest and involvement of children.

  18. Toward Digital Citizenship: Examining Factors Affecting Participation and Involvement in the Internet Society among Higher Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zahrani, Abdulrahman

    2015-01-01

    The current study aims to understand digital citizenship, based on the assumptions of Ribble (2014), by examining factors affecting participation and involvement in the Internet virtual societies among higher education students. A quantitative approach using a survey questionnaire was implemented. The participants were 174 students from the…

  19. Social media for diabetes health education - inclusive or exclusive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, B Rani

    2014-01-01

    Technological innovations are rising rapidly and are inevitably becoming part of the health care environment. Patients frequently access Social media as a forum for discussion of personal health issues; and healthcare providers are now considering ways of harnessing social media as a source of learning and teaching. This review highlights some of the complex issues of using social media as an opportunity for interaction between public- patient-healthcare staff; considers the impact of self- education and self-management for patients with diabetes, and explores some recent advances in delivering education for staff. When using any information technology, the emphasis should rely on being assessed rigorously to show it promotes health education safely, can be recognized as delivering up-to- date health information effectively, and should ensure there is no bias in selective communication, or disadvantage to isolated patient groups.

  20. SPECIAL EDUCATION ON THE INTERNET: BLOGS AS RESOURCES OF (INFORMAL TEACHER TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Alias Rios

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, technologies are increasingly present in people's daily lives, resulting in a change in the speed of transmission of information, in the way the communication happens, interaction among people, and also in professional training. In this context, we can highlight the blogs, which are a kind of online diary used for communication and interaction among people of different ages, interests and professions. From internet searches, it is noticed that blogs are often used by teachers. In this perspective, this study aimed to analyze and describe what teachers publish in their blogs about Special Education, and if these contents are related to the training of these professionals. For this, searches were conducted from a search website, by using the descriptor "special education." As a sample, we selected ten pages, Brazilian and Portuguese ones. It was drawn a profile of teacher-blogger and analyzed the contents of the postings. It can be concluded that teachers-bloggers have, in some way, relation to Special Education. The posts could be categorized into four areas and, after analysis; it was possible to conclude that blogs are a space that contribute directly to the formation of these teachers.

  1. The Relationship between Internet Addiction and Communication, Educational and Physical Problems of Adolescents in North Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcinar, Zehra

    2011-01-01

    The Internet today, beyond being a source of information and communication, has become an "addiction" for some people. The rate of Internet addiction is rapidly increasing in the world. The aim of this study was to examine the extent of Internet addiction among adolescents in North Cyprus. Eight hundred and fifty-one participants between…

  2. An Internet-Based Distributed Laboratory for Interactive Chemical Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jing; Kettler, David J.; Al-Dahhan, Muthanna

    2007-01-01

    A common undergraduate chemical engineering experiment has been modified for on-line operation over the Internet. By adopting rapidly changing Internet and object component technologies, we developed a novel approach combining the Internet and regular laboratory equipment. The client-server applications use a Visual Basic and Labtech programming…

  3. The Relationship between Internet Addiction and Communication, Educational and Physical Problems of Adolescents in North Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcinar, Zehra

    2011-01-01

    The Internet today, beyond being a source of information and communication, has become an "addiction" for some people. The rate of Internet addiction is rapidly increasing in the world. The aim of this study was to examine the extent of Internet addiction among adolescents in North Cyprus. Eight hundred and fifty-one participants between…

  4. The Relationship between Internet Addiction and Communication, Educational and Physical Problems of Adolescents in North Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcinar, Zehra

    2011-01-01

    The Internet today, beyond being a source of information and communication, has become an "addiction" for some people. The rate of Internet addiction is rapidly increasing in the world. The aim of this study was to examine the extent of Internet addiction among adolescents in North Cyprus. Eight hundred and fifty-one participants between the ages…

  5. 新加坡的网络监管和网络素养教育%Internet Regulation and Internet Literacy Education in Singapore

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王国珍

    2011-01-01

    新加坡的网络监管推行“三合一”政策(Athree-pronged approach):法规制约(Regulatory framework)、行业自律(Industry self—regulation)、以及媒体素养教育(Media literacy educmion)。而且,新加坡认为,要营造一个安全健康的网络环境,长远之计在于网络素养教育,而不在于严厉的网络监管手段。%A three-pronged approach has been carried out to regulate the Internet in Singapore, i.e., regulatory framework, industry self-regulation, and media literacy education. It is also believed that, instead of strict Intemet eontrolling, Internet literacy education is the best long-term solution to make the eyber spaee safe and healthy.

  6. The art and science of diabetes education: a culture out of balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Robert M; Funnell, Martha M

    2008-01-01

    In the past 20 years, behavioral science has helped create a growing body of theoretically derived, evidenced-based approaches to diabetes patient education. Health care professionals in all disciplines are being required to demonstrate that their practice is evidence based. For diabetes educators, behavioral science is the source of much of that evidence. However, effective diabetes education involves a combination of art and science. Establishing a therapeutic alliance with patients is an art. Diabetes educators must have the interpersonal skills, values, and personal traits needed to cultivate relationships with patients that are characterized by trust, respect, and acceptance. They must feel and be able to express compassion, empathy, and warmth. However, if someone outside the field were reviewing diabetes education evaluation research, they would probably conclude that diabetes educators are interchangeable cogs in a wheel. The positive impact of the therapeutic alliance is well documented in the counseling, psychotherapy, education, and nursing literature. However, evidence to support the important role of the diabetes educator's values, interpersonal skills, and ability to establish a therapeutic alliance with patients is absent from that literature. Valid and reliable measures used to document the impact of interpersonal skills counselors and teachers could be used in diabetes education with little or no adaptation. The evidence and tools exist; we now need to determine if the will exists.

  7. Science Education on the Internet: Conference for Developers of OnLine Curricula ''Learning Strategies for Science Education Websites''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gesteland,Raymond F.; Dart, Dorothy S.; Logan,Jennifer; Stark, Louisa

    2000-09-01

    Internet-based science education programs are coming of age. Educators now look seriously to the Internet as a source of accessible classroom materials, and they are finding many high-quality online science programs. Beyond providing solid curriculum, these programs have many advantages. They provide materials that are far more current than what textbooks offer and are more accessible to disadvantaged and rural population. Students can engage in inquiry-based learning online through interactive and virtual activities, accessing databases, tracking nature occurrences in real time, joining online science communities and conversing with scientists.

  8. Educational Needs and Technological Preferences of Fathers of Youth With Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanese-O'Neill, Anastasia; Schatz, Desmond A; Bernhardt, Jay M; Elder, Jennifer H

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the educational needs and technological preferences of fathers of youth aged 6 to 17 years with type 1 diabetes (T1DM). Participants completed 2 surveys and 1 in-person semistructured interview. Survey data were collected via Qualtrics; interviews were recorded and transcribed. The quantitative data were analyzed with SPSS 22. Thirty fathers/stepfathers of youth 6 to 17 years old with T1DM participated in the study. Participants reported high levels of unmet diabetes-related educational needs, including needs in fundamental areas of diabetes management such as treatment of hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, and calculating and adjusting insulin doses. A majority of participants identified educational needs in more nuanced aspects of diabetes management, indicating a need for more information about insulin pumps and continuous glucose monitors, managing diabetes at school, and finding help for diabetes challenges. All participants used smartphone technology, and most expressed interest in receiving diabetes education via mobile technology. The findings contribute to our understanding of the educational needs of fathers of children with T1DM and provide preliminary support for the acceptability of delivering diabetes education via mobile technology. The incorporation of patient and caregiver perspectives into the development of mHealth diabetes education applications may increase engagement and improve health outcomes. © 2016 The Author(s).

  9. [Effectiveness of the kit Conversation Map in the therapeutic education of diabetic people attending the Diabetes Unit in Carpi, Italy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciardullo, Anna Vittoria; Daghio, Maria Monica; Fattori, Giuseppe; Giudici, Graziella; Rossii, Lorella; Vagnini, Claudio

    2010-12-01

    We implemented the "Diabetes conversations", programme of the International Diabetes Federation-Europe, characterised by the use of the Conversation Map, an educational interactive kit addressed to groups of diabetic patients on: Living with diabetes, What is diabetes, Healthy diet and physical activity, Initiating insulin therapy. After at least three month from the end of the 4-session course, clinical data of 63 participants from the first 10 groups--age (mean +/- std dev) 61.7 +/- 10.2 years, 56% women, 18.5% T1DM-improved: fasting glycemia decreased from 152.9 +/- 55.2 to 138.2 +/- 38.9 mg/dl (P Conversation Maps are useful because: (a) contribute to improve glycometabolic control; (b) educate patients on the main topics related to diabetes; (c) give to the nurse a key and active role in patients'education; (d) facilitate the connection between knowledge and behaviour; (e) involve the volunteers of the diabetic association as tutors; (f) improve the relationship and the communication between the doctor/nurse and the patient.

  10. Discrete choice as a method for exploring education preferences in a Danish population of patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiøtz, Michaela Louise; Bøgelund, Mette; Almdal, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    To determine preferences among patients with type 2 diabetes for content and format of patient education.......To determine preferences among patients with type 2 diabetes for content and format of patient education....

  11. Association of low educational status with microvascular complications in type 2 diabetes: Jaipur diabetes registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niharikaa Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the association of educational status (ES, as marker of socioeconomic status, with the prevalence of microvascular complications in diabetes.Methods: Successive patients (n = 1214 presenting to our center were evaluated for sociodemographic, anthropometric, clinical, and therapeutic variables. Subjects were classified according to ES into Group 1 (illiterate, 216; Group 2 (≤ primary, 537, Group 3 (≤ higher secondary, 312, and Group 4 (any college, 149. Descriptive statistics is reported. Results: Mean age of patients was 52 ± 10 years, duration of diabetes 7 ± 7 years and 55% were men. Prevalence of various risk factors was smoking/tobacco 25.5%, obesity body mass index ≥25 kg/m2 64.0%, abdominal obesity 63.4%, hypertension 67.5%, high fat diet 14.5%, low fruits/vegetables 31.8%, low fiber intake 60.0%, high salt diet 16.9%, physical inactivity 27.5%, coronary or cerebrovascular disease 3.0%, and microvascular disease (peripheral, ocular or renal in 20.7%. Microvascular disease was significantly greater in illiterate (25.9% and low (23.6% compared to middle (15.0% and high (14.7% ES groups (P .0% was significantly greater in illiterate (38.0%, low (46.0%, and middle (41.0% compared to high (31.5% ES subjects (P < 0.05. Conclusions: There is a greater prevalence of the microvascular disease in illiterate and low ES diabetes patients in India. This is associated with the higher prevalence of smoking/tobacco use, poor quality diet, and sub-optimal diabetes control.

  12. Educational disparities in mortality among patients with type 2 diabetes in the Netherlands (ZODIAC-23)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleefstra, N.; van Hateren, K. J. J.; Gans, R. O. B.; Bilo, H. J. G.; Groenier, K. H.; Landman, G.

    Background: Relative mortality differences between educational level in mortality have been reported among diabetic as well as among non-diabetic subjects in Europe, but data on absolute differences are lacking. We studied the effect of educational disparities on mortality in a Dutch prospective

  13. Educational disparities in mortality among patients with type 2 diabetes in the Netherlands (ZODIAC-23)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleefstra, N.; van Hateren, K. J. J.; Gans, R. O. B.; Bilo, H. J. G.; Groenier, K. H.; Landman, G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Relative mortality differences between educational level in mortality have been reported among diabetic as well as among non-diabetic subjects in Europe, but data on absolute differences are lacking. We studied the effect of educational disparities on mortality in a Dutch prospective coh

  14. Know your diabetes risk project: Student pharmacists educating adults about diabetes risk in a community pharmacy setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letassy, Nancy; Dennis, Vincent; Lyons, Timothy J; Harrison, Don; Burton, Michael; Kirkpatrick, Alice

    To determine the feasibility of educating adults about their risk of prediabetes/diabetes in a community pharmacy, to determine the common risk factors for prediabetes/diabetes in adults visiting a community pharmacy, and to assess any association between risk factors and age. Cross sectional. Oklahoma community pharmacies between April 1 and December 31, 2008. 1,852 patients aged 18 to 80 years. Student pharmacists invited adults to complete a survey to assess their risk for diabetes/prediabetes. Students reviewed participants' risk and educated them on lifestyle changes to lower diabetes risk. Patient risk factors, pharmacy identifier, and pharmacy type (independent, chain, or clinic pharmacy) and location (rural, suburban, or city). Diabetes risk assessment and education of 1,852 adults was performed by 110 student pharmacists in 52 community pharmacies located in 27 cities across 13 (of 77) Oklahoma counties. Obesity/overweight was the most common risk factor (57%), with positive family history, hypertension, elevated cholesterol, member of high-risk ethnic group, and sedentary lifestyle being reported by at least 20% of participants. The number of risk factors increased with age, with a significant increase occurring in participants older than 40 years of age. This project demonstrated that it is feasible to perform diabetes risk assessment and to provide education on lowering that risk through community pharmacies.

  15. Evaluating arts-based cancer education using an internet survey among Alaska community health workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueva, Melany; Cueva, Katie; Dignan, Mark; Lanier, Anne; Kuhnley, Regina

    2014-09-01

    Cancer, considered a rare disease among Alaska Native people as recently as the 1950s, surpassed heart disease in the 1990s to become the leading cause of mortality. In response to Alaska's village-based Community Health Workers' (CHWs) desire to learn more about cancer for themselves and the people in their communities, cancer education that incorporated the expressive arts of moving, drawing, and sculpting was developed, implemented, and evaluated. Arts-based education integrates the dynamic wisdom and experiences of Alaska Native people and western medical knowledge to share cancer information in a culturally respectful way. Between May 2009 and March 2013, 12 5-day courses that included arts activities to support cancer information were provided for 118 CHWs in Anchorage, AK, USA. A post-course internet survey was conducted in April 2013, to learn how arts-based cancer education affected participants' knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors. Surveys were completed by 54 of the 96 course participants; 22 course participants were lost to follow-up. As a result of integrating the arts with cancer education, respondents reported an increase in their cancer knowledge and comfort with talking about cancer. Additionally, 82 % (44) of respondents described feeling differently about cancer. By integrating the arts with cancer information, participants reported healthy behavior changes for themselves (76 %), with their families (70 %), and in their work (72 %). The expressive arts of moving, drawing, and sculpting provided a creative pathway for diverse adult learners in Alaska to increase their cancer knowledge, comfort with talking about cancer, and wellness behaviors.

  16. Internet Sexualities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döring, Nicola

    The term “internet sexuality” (or OSA, online sexual activities) refers to sexual-related content and activities observable on the internet (cf. Adams, Oye, & Parker, 2003; Cooper, McLoughlin, & Campbell, 2000; Leiblum & Döring, 2002). It designates a variety of sexual phenomena (e.g., pornography, sex education, sexual contacts) related to a wide spectrum of online services and applications (e.g., websites, online chat rooms, peer-to-peer networks). If an even broader range of computer networks - such as the Usenet or bulletin board systems - is included in this extensional definition, one speaks of “online sexuality” or “cybersexuality.”

  17. Use of a supplementary internet based education program improves sleep literacy in college psychology students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Stuart F; Anderson, Janis L; Hodge, Gordon K

    2013-02-01

    Knowledge regarding the importance of sleep in health and performance and good sleep hygiene practices is low, especially among adolescents and young adults. It is important to improve sleep literacy. Introductory psychology is one of the most highly enrolled courses at colleges and universities. This study tested the impact of an Internet-based learning module on improving sleep literacy in this venue. An Internet-based supplementary learning module containing sleep physiology and hygiene information was developed using content from the Harvard Medical School sleep educational website http://www.understandingsleep.org. Access to the module was provided as an extra credit activity for 2 of 4 sections (Supplemental Sleep, SS, N = 889) of an introductory college psychology course during their standard instruction on sleep and dreaming. The remaining 2 sections (Standard Instruction, SI, N = 878) only were encouraged to visit the website without further direction. Level of knowledge was assessed before and after availability to the module/website and at the end of the semester. Students were asked to complete a survey at the end of the semester inquiring whether they made any changes in their sleep behaviors. Two hundred fifty students participated in the extra credit activity and had data available at all testing points. Students in the SS Group had a significant improvement in sleep knowledge test scores after interacting with the website in comparison to the SI group (19.41 ± 3.15 vs. 17.94 ± 3.08, p level, at the end of the semester. In addition, 55.9% of the SS group versus 45.1% of the SI group indicated that they made changes in their sleep habits after participation in the extra credit sleep activity (p students enrolled in an introductory college psychology course.

  18. The Effect of Diabetes Self-Management Education on Body Weight, Glycemic Control, and Other Metabolic Markers in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Chuang Yuan; Lai, Christopher W. K.; Lawrence W. C. Chan; Meyrick Chow; Law, Helen K W; Michael Ying

    2014-01-01

    Aims. To comprehensively evaluate the effect of a short-term diabetes self-management education (DSME) on metabolic markers and atherosclerotic parameters in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods. 76 patients with type 2 diabetes were recruited in this study. They were divided into the intervention group (n = 36) and control group (n = 40). The patients in the intervention group received a 3-month intervention, including an 8-week education on self-management of diabetes mellitus and subsequ...

  19. Effectiveness of foot care education among people with type 2 diabetes in rural Puducherry, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman Saurabh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The burden of diabetes and its foot complications is increasing in India. Prevention of these complications through foot care education should be explored. The objective of our study was to assess the risk factors of poor diabetic foot care and to find the effectiveness of health education in improving foot care practice among diabetes patients. Materials and Methods: A structured pre-tested questionnaire was administered to the outpatients of a rural health center with type 2 diabetes. Awareness regarding diabetes, care of diabetes and foot care practice ware assessed and scored. Individual and group health education focusing on foot care was performed. Foot care practice was reassessed after 2 weeks of education. Results: Only 54% were aware that diabetes could lead to reduced foot sensation and foot ulcers. Nearly 53% and 41% of the patients had good diabetes awareness and good diabetes care respectively. Only 22% of the patients had their feet examined by a health worker or doctor. The patients with poor, satisfactory and good practice scores were 44.7%, 35.9% and 19.4% respectively. Low education status, old age and low awareness regarding diabetes were the risk factors for poor practice of foot care. Average score for practice of foot care improved from 5.90 ± 1.82 to 8.0 ± 1.30 after 2 weeks of health education. Practice related to toe space examination, foot inspection and foot wear inspection improved maximally. Conclusion: Foot care education for diabetics in a primary care setting improves their foot care practice and is likely to be effective in reducing the burden of diabetic foot ulcer.

  20. Educational inequalities in diabetes mortality across Europe in the 2000s: the interaction with gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenheede, Hadewijch; Deboosere, Patrick; Espelt, Albert; Bopp, Matthias; Borrell, Carme; Costa, Giuseppe; Eikemo, Terje Andreas; Gnavi, Roberto; Hoffmann, Rasmus; Kulhanova, Ivana; Kulik, Margarete; Leinsalu, Mall; Martikainen, Pekka; Menvielle, Gwenn; Rodriguez-Sanz, Maica; Rychtarikova, Jitka; Mackenbach, Johan P

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate educational inequalities in diabetes mortality in Europe in the 2000s, and to assess whether these inequalities differ between genders. Data were obtained from mortality registries covering 14 European countries. To determine educational inequalities in diabetes mortality, age-standardised mortality rates, mortality rate ratios, and slope and relative indices of inequality were calculated. To assess whether the association between education and diabetes mortality differs between genders, diabetes mortality was regressed on gender, educational rank and 'gender × educational rank'. An inverse association between education and diabetes mortality exists in both genders across Europe. Absolute educational inequalities are generally larger among men than women; relative inequalities are generally more pronounced among women, the relative index of inequality being 2.8 (95 % CI 2.0-3.9) in men versus 4.8 (95 % CI 3.2-7.2) in women. Gender inequalities in diabetes mortality are more marked in the highest than the lowest educated. Education and diabetes mortality are inversely related in Europe in the 2000s. This association differs by gender, indicating the need to take the socioeconomic and gender dimension into account when developing public health policies.

  1. A Comparative Study of University of Wisconsin-Stout Freshmen and Senior Education Major's Computing and Internet Technology Skills/Knowledge and Associated Learning Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sveum, Evan Charles

    2010-01-01

    A study comparing University of Wisconsin-Stout freshmen and senior education majors' computing and Internet technology skills/knowledge and associated learning experiences was conducted. Instruments used in this study included the IC[superscript 3][R] Exam by Certiport, Inc. and the investigator's Computing and Internet Skills Learning…

  2. Dynamic Interactive Educational Diabetes Simulations Using the World Wide Web: An Experience of More Than 15 Years with AIDA Online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Eldon D; Dewolf, Dennis K; Novotny, Christopher A; Reed, Karen; Gotwals, Robert R

    2014-01-01

    Background. AIDA is a widely available downloadable educational simulator of glucose-insulin interaction in diabetes. Methods. A web-based version of AIDA was developed that utilises a server-based architecture with HTML FORM commands to submit numerical data from a web-browser client to a remote web server. AIDA online, located on a remote server, passes the received data through Perl scripts which interactively produce 24 hr insulin and glucose simulations. Results. AIDA online allows users to modify the insulin regimen and diet of 40 different prestored "virtual diabetic patients" on the internet or create new "patients" with user-generated regimens. Multiple simulations can be run, with graphical results viewed via a standard web-browser window. To date, over 637,500 diabetes simulations have been run at AIDA online, from all over the world. Conclusions. AIDA online's functionality is similar to the downloadable AIDA program, but the mode of implementation and usage is different. An advantage to utilising a server-based application is the flexibility that can be offered. New modules can be added quickly to the online simulator. This has facilitated the development of refinements to AIDA online, which have instantaneously become available around the world, with no further local downloads or installations being required.

  3. Dynamic Interactive Educational Diabetes Simulations Using the World Wide Web: An Experience of More Than 15 Years with AIDA Online

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eldon D. Lehmann

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. AIDA is a widely available downloadable educational simulator of glucose-insulin interaction in diabetes. Methods. A web-based version of AIDA was developed that utilises a server-based architecture with HTML FORM commands to submit numerical data from a web-browser client to a remote web server. AIDA online, located on a remote server, passes the received data through Perl scripts which interactively produce 24 hr insulin and glucose simulations. Results. AIDA online allows users to modify the insulin regimen and diet of 40 different prestored “virtual diabetic patients” on the internet or create new “patients” with user-generated regimens. Multiple simulations can be run, with graphical results viewed via a standard web-browser window. To date, over 637,500 diabetes simulations have been run at AIDA online, from all over the world. Conclusions. AIDA online’s functionality is similar to the downloadable AIDA program, but the mode of implementation and usage is different. An advantage to utilising a server-based application is the flexibility that can be offered. New modules can be added quickly to the online simulator. This has facilitated the development of refinements to AIDA online, which have instantaneously become available around the world, with no further local downloads or installations being required.

  4. Implementation and evaluation of a low health literacy and culturally sensitive diabetes education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swavely, Deborah; Vorderstrasse, Allison; Maldonado, Edgardo; Eid, Sherrine; Etchason, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Low health literacy is more prevalent in persons with limited education, members of ethnic minorities, and those who speak English as a second language, and is associated with multiple adverse diabetes-related health outcomes. This study examined the effectiveness of a low health literacy and culturally sensitive diabetes education program for economically and socially disadvantaged adult patients with type 2 diabetes. A pre-post prospective study design was used to examine outcomes over 12 months. Outcome measures included diabetes knowledge, self-efficacy, and self-care, measured using reliable and valid survey tools, and A1C. Over this period of time 277 patients were enrolled in the program, with 106 participants completing survey data. At the completion of the program patients had significant improvements in diabetes knowledge (p diabetes education program designed to be culturally sensitive and meet the needs of individuals with low health literacy improves short-term outcomes. © 2013 National Association for Healthcare Quality.

  5. Perceptions of the Internet and Education: A Study with Physics Education Website Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokalp, Muhammed Sait

    2013-01-01

    The use of the web in teaching and learning and research studies on this issue are increasingly common in science education. In most of these studies, teachers' and students' perceptions of and their attitudes toward the specific web-assisted/based learning activities and the effects of these activities on their achievement and attitudes have been…

  6. Live Educational Outreach for Ocean Exploration: High-Bandwidth Ship-to-Shore Broadcasts Using Internet2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, D. F.; Ballard, R. D.

    2005-12-01

    During the past 3 field seasons, our group at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography, in partnership with the Institute for Exploration and a number of educational institutions, has conducted a series of ocean exploration expeditions with a significant focus on educational outreach through "telepresence" - utilizing live transmissions of video, audio, and data streams across the Internet and Internet2. Our educational partners include Immersion Presents, Boys and Girls Clubs of America, the Jason Foundation for Education, and the National Geographic Society, all who provided partial funding for the expeditions. The primary funding agency each year was NOAA's Office of Ocean Exploration and our outreach efforts were conducted in collaboration with them. During each expedition, remotely operated vehicle (ROV) systems were employed to examine interesting geological and archaeological sites on the seafloor. These expeditions include the investigation of ancient shipwrecks in the Black Sea in 2003, a survey of the Titanic shipwreck site in 2004, and a detailed sampling and mapping effort at the Lost City Hydrothermal Field in 2005. High-definition video cameras on the ROVs collected the footage that was then digitally encoded, IP-encapsulated, and streamed across a satellite link to a shore-based hub, where the streams were redistributed. During each expedition, live half-hour-long educational broadcasts were produced 4 times per day for 10 days. These shows were distributed using satellite and internet technologies to a variety of venues, including museums, aquariums, science centers, public schools, and universities. In addition to the live broadcasts, educational products were developed to enhance the learning experience. These include activity modules and curriculum-based material for teachers and informal educators. Each educational partner also maintained a web site that followed the expedition and provided additional background information

  7. The Effect of Educational Interventions on Glycemic Control in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Javad Zibaeenezhad

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease with many serious complications. Objectives: The present study aimed to assess the effect of educational interventions on glycemic control represented by changes in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c levels in the patients with type 2 diabetes. Patients and Methods: This study was performed on 100 adults with type 2 diabetes using computerized randomization based on registration numbers from June to November 2012. An educational course of diabetes together with exercise training and nutritional education was designed for the study population in order to increase the patients’ knowledge and attitude toward diabetes and to increase their participation in self-monitoring of blood glucose. Results: All the 100 diabetic patients completed the educational course. The mean age of the participants was 57.76 ± 10.03 years (range: 40 - 75 years. HbA1c changes three months after completion of the educational interventions were compared to baseline values using paired sample t-test. According to the results, the mean level of HbA1C was significantly lower at the 3-month follow-up compared to the baseline (8.09 ± 0.31 versus 8.51 ± 0.26, P < 0.001. Conclusions: The educational interventions effectively improved the diabetic patients’ glycemic control and are, thus, highly recommended for diabetic patients.

  8. Overview of Diabetes in Children and Adolescents. A Fact Sheet from the National Diabetes Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP), 2006

    2006-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes in U.S. children and adolescents may be increasing and many more new cases of type 2 diabetes are being reported in young people. Standards of care for managing children with diabetes issued by the American Diabetes Association in January 2005 provide more guidance than previously given. To update primary care providers and their…

  9. Integrating hospital medical care data with pharmaceutical education materials for diabetes self management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shwu-Jiuan; Yeh, Yu-Ting; Li, Chun-Chuan; Chiu, Yuan-Ting; Huang, Juei-Fen; Liu, Chien-Tsai

    2006-01-01

    Diabetic patients need long-term treatment and follow-up exams as well as appropriate self-care pharmaceutical education to get the disease under control and to prevent possible complications. Pharmaceutical treatment plays an essential role in diabetes. If patients don't understand the medicines and dosages they take, their blood glucose control may be affected. In addition, the possibility of developing hypoglycemia may be increased. In this paper, we enhance the POEM system, previously developed for diabetic patient education, by providing diabetic patients' pharmaceutical education. The new system integrates both diabetic patients' pharmaceutical education information and medical care information to provide them with more comprehensive personalized medication information so that they can access the on-line system afterwards. It also strengthens patients' understanding of pharmaceutical functions, side-effects and relevant knowledge thus increasing patients' adherence of medication orders and having better control in their blood glucose levels.

  10. Differences in High School and College Students' Basic Knowledge and Perceived Education of Internet Safety: Do High School Students Really Benefit from the Children's Internet Protection Act?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zheng

    2009-01-01

    The Children's Internet Protection Act (CIPA; 2000) requires an Internet filtering and public awareness strategy to protect children under 17 from harmful visual Internet depictions. This study compared high school students who went online with the CIPA restriction and college students who went online without the restriction in order to…

  11. International distance education and the transition from ISDN to high-bandwidth Internet connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Dale S; Berg, Benjamin W; Chitpatima, Suwicha; Hudson, Donald

    2002-12-01

    The Thailand Hawaii Assessment of Interactive Healthcare Initiative (THAI-HI) is an international distance-education project between two teaching hospitals in Honolulu and Bangkok that uses videoconferencing over three ISDN lines. A 'morning report' format is used to discuss clinical cases primarily covering infectious disease and critical-care topics. An audience response system is used at both sites to add interactivity. From July 2001 to May 2002, 816 health-care providers attended 20 clinical conferences. Audiences rated the conferences as highly relevant and as having high training value. Since the ISDN connection is expensive, we plan to convert the telecommunications to a high-bandwidth Internet connection. The Honolulu site will use a 45 Mbit/s commercial connection to the Hawaii Intranetwork Consortium, which links to the Abilene Network on the US mainland. The Bangkok hospital will use a 155 Mbit/s wireless optical connection to UNINET Thailand, which has a 45 Mbit/s circuit to Abilene.

  12. Poultry production: a model for developing interactive Internet-based distance education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmert, J L; Shortridge, A M; Sexton, S L

    2003-05-01

    Over the last several decades, many poultry science programs have merged with other departments, but the poultry industry has undergone tremendous expansion worldwide, leading to a growing instructional void with regard to poultry production information. The objective of this project was to address the demand for information by developing two Web-based poultry production courses that cover management of broilers, turkeys, breeders, and layers. The Internet was chosen as the platform because it is asynchronous and may be accessed from any connected site around the world. To be effective, web-based courseware must be theoretically grounded and interactive, but university-level web-based distance education courses often fail to meet these standards. During courseware development, the impact of instructional techniques and technologies on interactivity and learning outcomes was explored. A content expert, an instructional designer, and a graphic artist carefully reviewed a variety of instructional techniques to increase interactivity. Concept mapping was chosen because it has been shown to be a superior learning tool for enhancing the exchange of ideas and knowledge between instructors, students, and content. A unique instructional interface was established that includes threaded e-mail discussion, thought questions, animation, hypertext, rollover interactions, video clips, and concept mapping exercises. Results indicate that the integration of concept mapping into web-based learning environments successfully increased interactivity and learning outcomes.

  13. Internet and Internet Use: Teacher Trainees' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinoglu, Orhan

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to present the development and issues of internet and internet use. The study has a descriptive survey design and 185 randomly selected teacher trainees at Marmara University, Ataturk Education Faculty in the 2001-2002 academic year constitute the sample. Data were collected via a questionnaire prepared by the researcher…

  14. Use of Internet for Academic Purposes among Students in Malaysian Institutions of Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayub, Ahmad Fauzi Mohd; Hamid, Wan Hamzari Wan; Nawawi, Mokhtar Hj.

    2014-01-01

    Students in institutions of higher learning should take advantage of information available on the Internet in their coursework. The Internet is also utilised for social and other non-academic functions. Hence, it is desirable, for students to strike a balance in the time spent online for academic and non-academic purposes. In this study, the…

  15. Internet as an Effective Tool for Modern Educational and Business Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eze, Samuel Godwin; Chijioke, Edmond Ogochukwu

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the effectiveness of Internet in the promotion of academic institutions and local business in Enugu through website development and its services. The three organizations chosen for the study were Doma internet services Ltd. Abakpa, Annunciation Specialist Hospital, Emene, Enugu and Information and Communication Technology unit…

  16. Taking up Online Opportunities? Children's Uses of the Internet for Education, Communication and Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingstone, Sonia; Bober, Magdalena

    2004-01-01

    The research project, UK Children Go Online (UKCGO), is conducting a rigorous investigation of 9-19 year-olds' use of the Internet, comparing girls and boys of different ages, backgrounds, etc., in order to ask how the Internet may be transforming, or may itself be shaped by, family life, peer networks and school. It combines qualitative…

  17. Assessing the Application of HIV and AIDS Related Education and Counselling on the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGuzman, Michael A.; Ross, Michael W.

    1999-01-01

    Reviews Internet technological capabilities for counseling and assesses the application of HIV/AIDS related counseling on the Internet. Interviews with health professionals reveal four major themes: counselor client relationship, target population, ethics, and operation. Major concerns include the lack of visual and verbal cues during interaction,…

  18. An assessment of patient education and self-management in diabetes disease management--two case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzner, Karen; Greenwood, Deborah; Payne, Hildegarde; Thomson, John; Vukovljak, Lana; McCulloch, Amber; Specker, James E

    2008-12-01

    Diabetes affects 7.8% of Americans, nearly 24 million people, and costs $174 billion yearly. People with diabetes benefit from self-management; disease management (DM) programs are effective in managing populations with diabetes. Little has been published on the intersection of diabetes education and DM. Our hypothesis was that diabetes educators and their interventions integrate well with DM and effectively support providers' care delivery. A literature review was conducted for papers published within the past 3 years and identified using the search terms "diabetes educator" and "disease management." Those that primarily addressed community health workers or the primary care/community setting were excluded. Two case studies were conducted to augment the literature. Ten of 30 manuscripts identified in the literature review were applicable and indicate that techniques and interventions based on cognitive theories and behavioral change can be effective when coupled with diabetes DM. Better diabetes self-management through diabetes education encourages participation in DM programs and adherence to recommended care in programs offered by DM organizations or those that are provider based. Improved health outcomes and reduced cost can be achieved by blending diabetes education and DM. Diabetes educators are a critical part of the management team and, with their arsenal of goal setting and behavior change techniques, are an essential component for the success of diabetes DM programs. Additional research needs to be undertaken to identify effective ways to integrate diabetes educators and education into DM and to assess clinical, behavioral, and economic outcomes arising from such programs.

  19. Geophysics education on the Internet: Course production and assessment of our MOOC, "Deep Earth Science"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Y.; Tazawa, K.; Sugie, K.; Sakuraba, H.; Hideki, M.; Tagawa, S.; Cross, S. J.

    2016-12-01

    Recently, massive open online courses (MOOC or MOOCs) have gained wide-spread attention as a new educational platform delivered via the internet. Many leading institutions all over the world have provided many fascinating MOOC courses in various fields. Students enrolled in MOOCs study their interested topic in a course not only by watching video lectures, reading texts, and answering questions, but also by utilizing interactive online tools such as discussion boards, Q&A sessions and peer assessments. MOOC is also gaining popularity as a way to do outreach activity and diffuse research results. Tokyo Institute of Technology provided its 1st MOOC, "Introduction to Deep Earth Science Part1" on edX, which is one of the largest MOOC providers. This four-week-long course was designed for 1st year college students and with two learning goals in this course; 1) to introduce students to the fascinating knowledge of solid Earth, 2) to provide an opportunity to use scientific thinking as well as to show how interesting and exciting science can be. This course contained materials such as 1) structure of inside of the Earth 2) internal temperature of the earth and how it is estimated and 3) chemical compositions and dynamics inside the earth. After the end of the provision of Part1, this course was re-made as "Introduction to Deep Earth Science"(so to speak, Part2) on the basis of opinions obtained from students who have attended our course and student teaching assistants (TA) who have run and produced this course. In this presentation, we will explain our MOOC making model, which is a team based course creation effort between the course instructor, Tokyo Tech Online Education Development Office (OEDO) staff and TA students. Moreover, we will share details and feedback of Part1 received from some of the 5000 enrolled students from 150 counties and regions, and report the implementation of Part2 in the light of challenges resulted from Part1.

  20. [Initial education for parents of children with diabetes: effort and outcomes in children and parents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, K; Kleine, T; Danne, T

    2011-05-01

    Parents are responsible for the therapy and prognosis of their child with diabetes. Thus a structured initial education covering medical and psychosocial aspects of diabetes for parents offered by a multidisciplinary paediatric diabetes team is essential. Quality of educational process and outcomes were assessed in 10 German paediatric diabetes units with parents of 81 children (4-14 yrs). A structured diabetes education programme for parents was used. Outcome parameters were parental satisfaction with education, diabetes knowledge (DWT: Typ1), children's quality of metabolic control and health related quality of life (QoL) (KINDL-R) and both parents' well-being (WHO-5) at onset (t0) and 6 (t1) and 12 (t2) months later. On average 30.6 ± 10.1 lessons were required. Parents were highly satisfied with the education. Their diabetes knowledge at t0 and t1 exceeded the T-norms of the best educated adult patients. Children's QoL at t1 and t2, assessed by their parents, didn't differ from representative healthy norms. Mean HbA1c at t1 was 6.8 ± 1.0% and 7.2 ± 1.2% at t2. Compared to standard values of WHO-5 mothers' psychological well-being was poor. Scores < 13 (indicating depression) were seen at 50% (t0), 41% (t1) and 29% (t2) of the mothers. The comprehensive diabetes education leads to high levels of diabetes knowledge and satisfaction with care. 12 months after diabetes onset the target of metabolic control (HbA1c < 7.5%) was met by 71% of the children, while their QoL was good. However, the great psychological burden of mothers at onset indicates their need for ongoing specialized care. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Evaluation of a school-based diabetes education intervention, an extension of Program ENERGY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, Matthew David

    . The second questionnaire, adapted from a survey developed for the Starr County Diabetes Education Study (Garcia et al, 2001), measured general diabetes and diabetes management knowledge. A comparison group, a total of 19 students, also completed both surveys during the study period. Results: Significant increases (pmanagement knowledge, and awareness of diabetes prevention strategies, when compared to the baseline study group and comparison group.

  2. Randomized controlled trial for assessment of Internet of Things system to guide intensive glucose control in diabetes outpatients: Nagoya Health Navigator Study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onoue, Takeshi; Goto, Motomitsu; Kobayashi, Tomoko; Tominaga, Takashi; Ando, Masahiko; Honda, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Yasuko; Tosaki, Takahiro; Yokoi, Hisashi; Kato, Sawako; Maruyama, Shoichi; Arima, Hiroshi

    2017-08-01

    The Internet of Things (IoT) allows collecting vast amounts of health-relevant data such as daily activity, body weight (BW), and blood pressure (BP) automatically. The use of IoT devices to monitor diabetic patients has been studied, but could not evaluate IoT-dependent effects because health data were not measured in control groups. This multicenter, open-label, randomized, parallel group study will compare the impact of intensive health guidance using IoT and conventional medical guidance on glucose control. It will be conducted in outpatients with type 2 diabetes for a period of 6 months. IoT devices to measure amount of daily activity, BW, and BP will be provided to IoT group patients. Healthcare professionals (HCPs) will provide appropriate feedback according to the data. Non-IoT control, patients will be given measurement devices that do not have a feedback function. The primary outcome is glycated hemoglobin at 6 months. The study has already enrolled 101 patients, 50 in the IoT group and 51 in the non-IoT group, at the two participating outpatient clinics. The baseline characteristics of two groups did not differ, except for triglycerides. This will be the first randomized, controlled study to evaluate IoT-dependent effects of intensive feedback from HCPs. The results will validate a new method of health-data collection and provision of feedback suitable for diabetes support with increased effectiveness and low cost.

  3. Use of educational internet-resources in the physical training course of the students engaged in taekwondo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salamakha O.Y.

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Informatization produces essential changes in the structure and organisation of the educative process, making it flexible, advancing and public. In order to optimaze the training process on taekwondo in conditions of the technical university the educational web-site, uniting texts, graphics, sound and video in one cover, has been created. Use of this internet-resource will generate interest in physical training, increase gnostic activity, stimulate the maximum rate of knowledge acquisition and ability development, solve a problem of health promotion.

  4. Educational interventions for knowledge on the disease, treatment adherence and control of diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueira, Ana Laura Galhardo; Boas, Lilian Cristiane Gomes Villas; Coelho, Anna Claudia Martins; Freitas, Maria Cristina Foss de; Pace, Ana Emilia

    2017-04-20

    to assess the effect of educational interventions for knowledge on the disease, medication treatment adherence and glycemic control of diabetes mellitus patients. evaluation research with "before and after" design, developed in a sample of 82 type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. To collect the data, the Brazilian version of the Diabetes Knowledge Scale (DKN-A), the Measure of Adherence to Treatments and the electronic system at the place of study were used. The data were collected before and after the end of the educational interventions. The educational activities were developed within 12 months, mediated by the Diabetes Conversation Maps, using the Cognitive Social Theory to conduct the interventions. the knowledge on the disease (pknowledge about diabetes mellitus, the medication treatment adherence and the glycated hemoglobin rates.

  5. Education and psychological issues Diabetes nutrition therapy and dietary intake among individuals with Type 1 diabetes in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaacks, L. M.; Liu, W.; Ji, L.; Mendez, M.; Du, S.; Crandell, J.; Rosamond, W.; Mayer-Davis, E. J.

    2014-01-01

    Aims To describe the contribution of diabetes nutrition therapy to disease self-management among individuals with Type 1 diabetes mellitus in China and to estimate the association of diabetes nutrition therapy with dietary intake. Methods The 3C Study was an epidemiological study of the coverage, cost and care of Type 1 diabetes in China. The data reported in the present study are from the 3C Nutrition Ancillary Study, a follow-up study conducted 1.6±0.2 years later. Diabetes nutrition therapy was assessed by an interviewer-administered questionnaire. Dietary intake was assessed using three 24-h recalls. The association of diabetes nutrition therapy with dietary intake was estimated using ANCOVA. Results Participants (n=100; 54% male) had a mean ± SD age of 41.7±16.3 years old and a mean ± SD diabetes duration of 11.8±9.7 years. Fewer than half of the participants reported that they had ‘ever’ met with a dietician. While 64% of participants were taught carbohydrate counting, only 12% ‘ever’ use this tool. Participants on insulin pumps and those testing ≥1 time/day reported greater dietary flexibility and higher fruit intakes compared with participants on other insulin regimens and testing less frequently. After adjustment for confounding by age and occupation, there were no consistent differences in dietary intake across subgroups of diabetes nutrition therapy. Conclusions In this sample of individuals with Type 1 diabetes in China there is little dietician involvement or carbohydrate counting. Increased frequency of nutrition education in conjunction with intensified self-monitoring of blood glucose is needed to improve care. PMID:25407093

  6. Using a robot to personalise health education for children with diabetes type 1: a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanson Henkemans, O.A.; Bierman, B.P.B.; Janssen, J.; Neerincx, M.A.; Looije, R.; Bosch, H. van der; Giessen, J.A.M. van der

    2013-01-01

    Objective Assess the effects of personalised robot behaviours on the enjoyment and motivation of children (8–12) with diabetes, and on their acquisition of health knowledge, in educational play. Methods Children (N = 5) played diabetes quizzes against a personal or neutral robot on three occasions:

  7. Planning Continuing Education to Meet the Needs of Nurses: Diabetes Mellitus Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Debbie Ransom; Brown, Sylvia J.

    1983-01-01

    It is critical for nurses to be aware of changing treatment strategies and new research developments in the field of diabetes. This is important so that nurses can respond to patient questions as well as, in some cases, modify their actual patient care approach. Thus, nurses are a vital target group for diabetes continuing education programs. (SSH)

  8. Role of Health Educators in Assisting Youth and Adolescents with Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, Gail A.; Evert, Alison; Shea, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Management of diabetes in children requires balancing nutrition, physical activity and medication on a daily basis in order to achieve blood glucose targets. The health educator can assist children and their families in meeting their diabetes management goals by better understanding the current recommendations and tasks involved to achieve them.…

  9. An Education-Support-Group Program for Visually Impaired People with Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caditz, J.

    1992-01-01

    This article describes the Diabetes Education/Support Group Program for people with diabetes and visual impairment. It analyzes some of the common problems that participants have reported (such as fear of insulin reactions and of long-term complications) and discusses methods of reducing anxiety and depression related to the two conditions.…

  10. Using a robot to personalise health education for children with diabetes type 1: a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanson Henkemans, O.A.; Bierman, B.P.B.; Janssen, J.; Neerincx, M.A.; Looije, R.; Bosch, H. van der; Giessen, J.A.M. van der

    2013-01-01

    Objective Assess the effects of personalised robot behaviours on the enjoyment and motivation of children (8–12) with diabetes, and on their acquisition of health knowledge, in educational play. Methods Children (N = 5) played diabetes quizzes against a personal or neutral robot on three occasions:

  11. Improving Diabetes Outcomes Using a Web-Based Registry and Interactive Education: A Multisite Collaborative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Robert W.; Fletcher, Jason; Kelly, Kim F.; Shea, Laura A.; Spence, Maureen M.; Sullivan, Janet N.; Cerniglia, Joan R.; Yang, YoonJung

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: To support the adoption of guideline concordant care by primary care practices, the New York Diabetes Coalition (NYDC) promoted use of an electronic diabetes registry and developed an interactive educational module on using the registry and improving patient communication. The NYDC hypothesized that use of a registry with immediate…

  12. Applying Medical Anthropology: Developing Diabetes Education and Prevention Programs in American Indian Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Brooke

    1999-01-01

    Medical anthropology provides a broader contextual framework for understanding complex causal factors associated with diabetes among American Indians and how to minimize these factors in education/treatment programs. Discusses historical, epidemiological, and genetic considerations in American Indian diabetes; cultural factors related to foods,…

  13. Sustaining a creative community-based diabetes education program: motivating Texans with type 2 diabetes to do well with diabetes control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielamowicz, Mary Kinney; Pope, Paul; Rice, Carol Ann

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the community-based diabetes education project was to evaluate participants' knowledge and use of healthy cooking practices as they relate to controlling diabetes. In addition, an attempt was made to ascertain whether participants' self-reported blood glucose levels and hemoglobin A1C changed as a result of the educational intervention. Extension agents were trained statewide on principles of diabetes self-management education (DSME) and nutrition concepts for the programs Do Well, Be Well with Diabetes (DWBW) and Cooking Well with Diabetes (CWWD). Upon returning to their respective counties, trained extension agents established health coalitions for program delivery. In 86 counties, online data were collected on perceived knowledge and behaviors related to healthy cooking practice and were assessed before the start of the program (pretest; time 1), after the third lesson (posttest; time 2), and again after the fourth and final lesson (time 3). Most participants trained in DWBW joined cooking classes so the group already had some knowledge of food preparation techniques and had adopted many of the recommended practices, yet the program still had impact. Findings suggest an improvement in participants' knowledge and self-reported behaviors. The CWWD program provided a short-term impact of knowledge gain, and the adoption of healthy cooking practices was observed among program participants. A pattern of healthy eating should lead to a reduction of blood glucose levels and hemoglobin A1C. The relatively short time between pretest and posttest was not sufficient to realize and measure such reductions.

  14. Physician education programme improves quality of diabetes care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    complications. Guidelines are available ... Globally diabetes mellitus is a significant problem with an estimated 140 .... reduction of macrovascular disease in diabetic patients, micro- albuminuria, and ..... Microvascular complications in South.

  15. A structured therapeutic education program for children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes: an analysis of the efficacy of the "Pediatric Education for Diabetes" project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauri, Alessandra; Schmidt, Susanna; Sosero, Valentina; Sambataro, Maria; Nollino, Laura; Fabris, Francesco; Corò, Anna; Scantamburlo, Antonella; Cazziola-Merlotto, Michela; Ciani, Tania; Tessarin, Michele; Paccagnella, Agostino

    2017-02-07

    Therapeutic education for Type 1 Diabetes involves the process of transmitting knowledge and developing the skills and behavior required to treat the disease. guidelines agree on stressing the importance of therapeutic educational intervention in teaching self-management skills to children and adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes (T1D). This study presents the results of the "Pediatric Education for Type 1 Diabetes (T1D)" (PED) project, specifically designed for children and adolescents aged 6 to 16, and structured on guidelines indications, as part of a broader clinical-educational intervention for Type 1 diabetes. 24 patients with Type 1 diabetes (mean age: 12,13 y; SD = 1.48 y; range 9- 14) were studied in a 12-month PED structured project followed by a educational summer camp. All the activities were designed and organized by a multidisciplinary team (dietitian, pediatric diabetologist, nurse, psychologist and adult diabetologist). Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C), knowledge about Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) (self-monitoring and nutrition), self- management (self-monitoring, nutrition and flexibility of medical treatment), and wellbeing were used as outcome measures. Data suggest that the PED had a positive impact on all the targeted levels indicated for recommended care. The results of this study seem to confirm the effectiveness in altering the three levels of "knowing", "know-how" and "wellbeing" required to optimize the quality of life of young patients with Type 1 diabetes. In addition, the proposed model, where a pediatric diabetologist always cooperates with an adult diabetologist, seems to be a permanent solution to the transitional gap widely discussed in the literature.

  16. Design and evaluation of an Internet based data repository and visualization system for science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalphond, James M.

    In modern classrooms, scientific probes are often used in science labs to engage students in inquiry-based learning. Many of these probes will never leave the classroom, closing the door on real world experimentation that may engage students. Also, these tools do not encourage students to share data across classrooms or schools. To address these limitations, we have developed a web-based system for collecting, storing, and visualizing sensor data, as well as a hardware package to interface existing classroom probes. This system, The Internet System for Networked Sensor Experimentation (iSENSE), was created to address these limitations. Development of the system began in 2007 and has proceeded through four phases: proof-of-concept prototype, technology demonstration, initial classroom deployment, and classroom testing. User testing and feedback during these phases guided development of the system. This thesis includes lessons learned during development and evaluation of the system in the hands of teachers and students. We developed three evaluations of this practical use. The first evaluation involved working closely with teachers to encourage them to integrate activities using the iSENSE system into their existing curriculum. We were looking for strengths of the approach and ease of integration. Second, we developed three "Activity Labs," which teachers used as embedded assessments. In these activities, students were asked to answer questions based on experiments or visualizations already entered into the iSENSE website. Lastly, teachers were interviewed after using the system to determine what they found valuable. This thesis makes contributions in two areas. It shows how an iterative design process was used to develop a system used in a science classroom, and it presents an analysis of the educational impact of the system on teachers and students.

  17. Readability assessment of internet-based patient education materials related to facial fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanghvi, Saurin; Cherla, Deepa V; Shukla, Pratik A; Eloy, Jean Anderson

    2012-09-01

    Various professional societies, clinical practices, hospitals, and health care-related Web sites provide Internet-based patient education material (IPEMs) to the general public. However, this information may be written above the 6th-grade reading level recommended by the US Department of Health and Human Services. The purpose of this study is to assess the readability of facial fracture (FF)-related IPEMs and compare readability levels of IPEMs provided by four sources: professional societies, clinical practices, hospitals, and miscellaneous sources. Analysis of IPEMs on FFs available on Google.com. The readability of 41 FF-related IPEMs was assessed with four readability indices: Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level (FKGL), Flesch Reading Ease Score (FRES), Simple Measure of Gobbledygook (SMOG), and Gunning Frequency of Gobbledygook (Gunning FOG). Averages were evaluated against national recommendations and between each source using analysis of variance and t tests. Only 4.9% of IPEMs were written at or below the 6th-grade reading level, based on FKGL. The mean readability scores were: FRES 54.10, FKGL 9.89, SMOG 12.73, and Gunning FOG 12.98, translating into FF-related IPEMs being written at a "difficult" writing level, which is above the level of reading understanding of the average American adult. IPEMs related to FFs are written above the recommended 6th-grade reading level. Consequently, this information would be difficult to understand by the average US patient. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  18. T-cell education in autoimmune diabetes : teachers and students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosmalen, JGM; van Ewijk, [No Value; Leenen, PJM

    2002-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus is a classical example of a T-cell-mediated autoimmune disease. Several aberrations in immune regulation have been described in both human diabetes patients and animal models of type 1 diabetes. In this review, we summarize how proposed immune defects might be implicated in

  19. Do internet, social network and other educational tools influence in the development of nervous anorexia and bulimia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sámano Orozco, L. F

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years eating disorders have increased theirpresence in Mexico. It has been suggested that internet and social network which promote restrictive behavior influence and may be responsible for this increment. Nowadays, internet plays a fundamental roll inthe teaching-learning process and a very importanttool in informal education, however, the use of internetand social network haven’t been significantly related tothe development of those eating disorders. On the other hand, one of the most accepted models about influential factors of the mentioned disorders leaves outthe possibility that constant contact with these technology tools favors the development of anorexia and bulimia and other unspecified problems if we do not havethe presence of other important factors.

  20. Parent Health Literacy and Communication With Diabetes Educators in a Pediatric Diabetes Clinic: A Mixed Methods Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Carol J; Cipher, Daisha J; LeFlore, Judy; Lipman, Terri H

    2015-01-01

    Low health literacy is associated with poor communication between adults and providers, but little is known about how parents' health literacy influences communication in pediatric encounters. We examined how parent health literacy affected communication between parents and diabetes educators in a pediatric diabetes clinic. A mixed methods study was conducted including a cross-sectional survey of 162 parents and semi-structured interviews with a subsample of 24 parents of a child with Type 1 diabetes. Parent and child characteristics, parents' report of quality of communication, and parent health literacy were assessed. Logistic regression was performed to determine associations between health literacy and 4 subscales of the Interpersonal Processes of Care (IPC) survey; directed content analyses of interview data were completed. Although health literacy was not significantly associated with the IPC subscales, results from directed content analyses revealed different communication experiences for parents by health literacy classification. Low health literate parents were confused by diabetes jargon, preferred hands-on teaching, and wished for information to be communicated in simple language, broken down into key points, and repeated. Parents with adequate health literacy wanted comprehensive information communicated through ongoing dialogue. Findings indicate that learner-driven curricula may be most appropriate for diabetes education.

  1. Initial versus ongoing education: Perspectives of people with type 1 diabetes in 13 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beran, David; Golay, Alain

    2017-05-01

    To understand the perspectives of people with type 1 diabetes with regards to the diabetes education they receive within the health system. Grounded Theory was used for the collection and analysis of data from interviews with 101 people with type 1 diabetes from 13 countries. There are two aspects to education, namely initial education received when diagnosed and the ongoing education people continue to receive. Within these two categories content and process of diabetes education are important as are factors linked to the healthcare worker and setting. Tangible elements are the "what" that is delivered and are the different skills and information needed for people to manage their diabetes. Process elements are the "how" this is delivered. Finally intangible elements are those, which were found to be specific to certain contexts and health professionals. These could be the hardest to replicate, but possibly the most important. Health systems can provide the tangible elements and organize themselves to have processes in place to deliver education. The challenge is how can the intangible elements be seen as important and developed and delivered to improve management, but also meet the needs of people with diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Diabetes Case Management in Primary Care: The New Brunswick Experience and Expanding the Practice of the Certified Diabetes Educator Nurse into Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Shelley L

    2015-08-01

    The role of the outreach diabetes case manager in New Brunswick, Canada, was first developed in the Moncton Area of Horizon Health Network in response to a physician-identified gap between patients' diagnoses of diabetes and their attendance at the local diabetes education centre. This model of collaborative interprofessional practice increases support for primary care providers and people living with diabetes in that they are being provided the services of certified diabetes educators who can address knowledge gaps with respect to evidence-based guidelines and best practice, promote advancement of diabetes and chronic-disease management therapies and support adherence to treatment plans and self-management practices. This report chronicles a review of the implementation, expansion and evaluation of the outreach diabetes case manager model in the province of New Brunswick, Canada, along with the rationale for development of the role for registered nurses in other jurisdictions.

  3. International Mathematical Internet Olympiad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Domoshnitsky

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Modern Internet technologies open new possibilities in wide spectrum of traditional methods used in mathematical education. One of the areas, where these technologies can be efficiently used, is an organization of mathematical competitions. Contestants can stay at their schools or universities and try to solve as many mathematical problems as possible and then submit their solutions through Internet. Simple Internet technologies supply audio and video connection between participants and organizers.

  4. Patient explanations for non-attendance at type 2 diabetes self-management education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwennesen, Nete; Henriksen, Jan Erik; Willaing, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    as reasons for non-attendance. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, patients cited both individual and organisational factors as explaining non-attendance at type 2 diabetes self-management education. Further studies should take into account the importance of timing and of tailoring schedules and content......AIM: To explore reasons for non-attendance at type 2 diabetes self-management education. METHODS: To elicit the main themes explaining non-attendance, 15 semi-structured interviews were conducted with persons referred to, but not attending, self-management education. Systematic text condensation......-management education....

  5. Mortality, incidence of cardiovascular diseases, and educational level among the diabetic and non-diabetic populations in two large Italian cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnavi, R; Canova, C; Picariello, R; Tessari, R; Giorda, C; Simonato, L; Costa, G

    2011-05-01

    We investigated if diabetes modifies the effect of the association of education with mortality and incidence of cardiovascular diseases. We identified 44,889 diabetics using multiple data sources. They were followed up from January 2002 up to December 2005, and their mortality, incidence of myocardial infarction and stroke, by educational level were analysed, and compared with those of the local non-diabetic population. The all-cause Standardized Mortality Ratios among diabetics, compared with non-diabetics, were 170 for men and 175 for women. Standardized Incidence Ratios were 199 for myocardial infarction, and 183 for stroke in men and, respectively, 281, and 179 in women. Among non-diabetics there was a clear inverse relation with educational level for all outcomes, whereas among diabetics no significant social difference in incidence was found; slight social differences in mortality were present among men, but not among women. The effect of diabetes on social differences was enhanced in the youngest population. Diabetes increases the risk of death and the incidence of vascular diseases, but reduces their inverse association with education. This is likely related to the high accessibility and good quality of health care provided by the local networks of diabetic centres and primary care. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Diabetes Education, Knowledge Improvement, Attitudes and Self-Care Activities Among Patients With Type 2 Diabetes in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Diabetes education provided by physicians in Bangladesh has some limitations, and its impacts on self-management are unclear. These prompted the Diabetic Association of Bangladesh (BADAS to train 100 diabetes educators to improve the diabetes self-care activities of patients and to pilot the effects of the education. Objectives In this context, the current study aimed to assess the impact of diabetes education to improve knowledge on and attitudes towards diabetes and self-care activities in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Methods The pretest-posttest study recruited 500 newly-diagnosed patients with T2DM by convenience method from 19 healthcare centers of BADAS. They received a one-hour diabetes education only once at the time of registration to the hospital. A four-part interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to assess the knowledge, attitudes, and self-care activities in the patients with diabetes. The observed changes were compared after 18 months of the intervention and psychological support, in knowledge, attitudes and self-care activities among 458 (91.6% patients with the mean age of 52.3 ± 11.4 years. Results After the intervention, the mean score of knowledge (8.5 ± 2.6 vs. 5.5 ± 2.9 and attitudes (85.7 ± 6.1 vs. 79.9 ± 6.5 of the patients improved significantly (P = 0.0001. About 67.7%, 85.2%, 82.8% and 92.1% of the patients were monitored for blood glucose, doing exercises, taking foot care and smoking withdrawal whereas the rates were 8.3%, 69.2%, 25.8% and 86.7%, respectively before the intervention; a significant difference was observed between the measures. Consumption of betel nuts increased at the posttest compared to that of the pretest (73.4% vs. 70.7%. About 25.5% followed the dietary advice given by dietitians whereas it was only 5.2% at the pretest; there were significant changes between the pretest and posttest measures in this regard (P = 0.0001. One-third of the subjects took meals

  7. An interactive internet-based continuing education course on sexually transmitted diseases for physicians and midwives in Peru.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredy A Canchihuaman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clinicians in developing countries have had limited access to continuing education (CE outside major cities, and CE strategies have had limited impact on sustainable change in performance. New educational tools could improve CE accessibility and effectiveness. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The objective of this study was to evaluate an interactive Internet-based CE course on Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs management for clinicians in Peru. Participants included physicians and midwives in private practice drawn from a census of 10 Peruvian cities. The CE included a three-hour workshop for improving Internet skills, followed by a 22-hour online course on STD-syndrome-management, with subsequent educational support. The course used case-based clinical vignettes tailored to local STD problems. Knowledge and reported practices on STD management were assessed before, immediately after and at four months after completion of the course. Statistical analysis included parametric tests-linear regression multivariate analysis, paired t-test and repeated measures ANOVA using SPSS 14.0. Of 1,071 eligible clinicians, 510 agreed to participate, as did an additional 132 public sector clinicians. Of these 642 participants, 619 (96.4% completed the course, and 596 (96.3% took the four-month follow-up evaluation. Physician and midwife scores improved from 64.2% correct answers on the pre-test to 77.9% correct on the four-month follow-up test (p<0.001. Most participants (95% found the online course useful for their work needs. Self reported STD management practices did not change. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Among physicians and midwives in Peru, an Internet-based CE course was feasible, acceptable with high participation rates, and led to sustained improvement in knowledge at four months. Further studies are needed to test it as a model for improving the training of physicians, midwives, and other health care providers.

  8. “互联网+教育”:辨析与思考%"Internet+Education":Analysis and Thinking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李茜

    2016-01-01

    “互联网+教育”不仅是一个频繁被提出的组合词,还是当今社会和技术发展下教育的必然走向,在探索和发展的道路上,必然会出现问题。我们必须追本溯源,把握本质,找到最优发展状态,才能达到理想的效果。本文通过对“互联网+教育”辨析,试图弄清概念,提出思考,探索最优道路。%"Internet +Education" is not only a frequently men-tioned combined word, but also the inevitable trend of education under the present social and technological development, but in the exploration and development of it, problems will be encoun-tered inevitably. To find the best state of its development and achieve the desired effect, we must trace to its source and grasp its essence. Through an analysis of"Internet + Education", this paper attempts to make clear its definition, propose some thinking and explore the best way of its development.

  9. Integrating education, group support, and case management for diabetic Hispanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Sharon A; García, Alexandra A; Winter, Mary; Silva, Lita; Brown, Adama; Hanis, Craig L

    2011-01-01

    Culturally tailored diabetes self-management education (DSME) improves glycemic control and other health outcomes in Mexican Americans but sociocultural barriers to health improvements remain. This study explored the feasibility of adding a nurse case manager (NCM) to DSME to foster DSME attendance and increase utilization of other available health care services. The setting was a rural community on the Texas-Mexico border in one of the poorest counties in the United States. Using a repeated measures pretest, post-test control group design, we enrolled 165 Mexican American adults into: 1) an experimental group that received a DSME intervention plus access to a NCM; or 2) a control group that received DSME only. Both experimental and control groups received the DSME intervention, reported positive changes in diet and physical activity, and showed improved clinical outcomes; there were no significant group differences. A statistically significant reduction in body mass index was seen in women compared to men, regardless of group or number of NCM contacts. For individuals having the most NCM contacts, DSME attendance rates were greater. Participants expressed acceptance of the NCM; they preferred face-to-face contact rather than by telephone. Our previously tested, culturally tailored DSME continues to be an effective strategy for improving glycemic control in Mexican Americans. This feasibility study provided partial support for the NCM model for underserved border communities, but additional research is needed on resource utilization and the nature of NCM contacts.

  10. Internet enlightens; Internet eclaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueiredo, S. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, IRSN, 92 - Fontenay aux Roses (France)

    2009-10-15

    Numerous Internet sites are given in relation with radiotherapy, nuclear medicine and ionizing radiation, nuclear activity, radiation protection for populations, radioactive waste management in France and Europe. (N.C.)

  11. Internet enlightens; Internet eclaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueiredo, S. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2009-07-15

    Numerous Internet sites are given in relation with radiotherapy, nuclear activity, radiation protection, and environment shared by sites in France, Europe, big agencies and non-ionizing radiations. (N.C.)

  12. Internet enlightens; Internet eclaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2010-01-15

    This part of the issue gives Internet addresses in relation with nuclear energy, safety, radiation protection, legislation, at the national level and European and international level. A special part is devoted to non ionizing radiation. (N.C.)

  13. Political, citizen and educational challenges of the use of Internet at school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Aróstegui Plaza

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on different topics related to democracy underpinning the current development and use of the Internet. In the three first sections, different concepts of democratic theory are discussed (what democracy at large is, what liberalism and neoliberalism are, and the meaning of radical or deliberative democracy. Then, the implications of the Internet for the society in general and for schools in particular are analysed. Finally, it is concluded that schools should not only train on how to use Information Technologies. Students’ training on searching for and selecting information is not enough either. It is also imperative to train students to use the Internet as a tool to get involved in the problems of our world as responsible citizens who act knowingly.

  14. Contexts of Learning: The PATOIS project and Internet-based teaching and learning in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Kilbride

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available This article is a reflection on the problems, challenges and strengths of network-based distance learning in archaeology. Based on the experience of one project - the PATOIS (Publications and Archives Teaching with Online Information Systems Project - it looks at how archaeologists might best respond (and by implication how they ought not to respond to the use of information technology in teaching. The PATOIS project is an attempt on behalf of a consortium of UK higher education institutions and allied research bodies to tell students about the information tools that are emerging in archaeology, and which are changing the culture of scholarship. Funded by the Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC and led by the Archaeology Data Service (ADS, PATOIS presents students with these new research tools and novel forms of academic literacy by direct exposure to 'primary' datasets. The PATOIS project is producing a set of Internet-based tutorials that lead students through different datasets and show how they may be deployed in research. This article describes the institutional and intellectual background to the project, and reports on the content of the tutorials themselves. Perhaps more importantly, it looks at the process through which PATOIS was developed, reviewing the challenges and constraints that the development team faced. Thereafter, we turn to the implementation of PATOIS in real teaching scenarios and look at how and when these have been successful as well as the challenges that remain unanswered. The project is not yet complete, so at this stage we can come to no firm conclusions about the long-term impact of PATOIS in facilitating change in undergraduate research training. Nonetheless, from the perspective of development work, the project has largely been completed, so those conclusions that may be drawn are most appropriately addressed to developers hoping or planning to undertake similar work in the future, or academics looking to

  15. Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Derbyshire general practitioner Stuart Bootle has had diabetes for 20 years. He speaks to Paul Smith, who has type 1 diabetes himself, about the trials and tribulations of being on the receiving end of NHS care

  16. [Therapeutic education didactic techniques].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valverde, Maite; Vidal, Mercè; Jansa, Margarida

    2012-10-01

    This article includes an introduction to the role of Therapeutic Education for Diabetes treatment according to the recommendations of the American Diabetes Association (ADA), the Diabetes Education Study Group (DESG) of the "European Association for Study of Diabetes (EASD) and the clinical Practice Guidelines (CPG) of the Spanish Ministry of Health. We analyze theoretical models and the differences between teaching vs. learning as well as current trends (including Internet), that can facilitate meaningful learning of people with diabetes and their families and relatives. We analyze the differences, similarities, advantages and disadvantages of individual and group education. Finally, we describe different educational techniques (metaplan, case method, brainstorming, role playing, games, seminars, autobiography, forums, chats,..) applicable to individual, group or virtual education and its application depending on the learning objective.

  17. Development and pilot evaluation of literacy-adapted diabetes and CVD education in urban, diabetic African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill-Briggs, Felicia; Renosky, Ronda; Lazo, Mariana; Bone, Lee; Hill, Martha; Levine, David; Brancati, Frederick L; Peyrot, Mark

    2008-09-01

    Despite prevalent low literacy nationally, empirical research on the development and testing of literacy-adapted patient education remains limited. To describe procedures for developing and evaluating usability and acceptability of an adapted diabetes and CVD patient education. Materials adaptation for literacy demand and behavioral activation criteria, and pre-/post-test intervention evaluation design. Pilot sample of 30 urban African-American adults with type 2 diabetes with Below Average literacy (n = 15) and Average literacy (n = 15). Wide Range Achievement Test (WRAT-3, Reading), assessment of diabetes and CVD knowledge, and patient rating scale. Reading grade levels were: > 12th, 30%; 10th-12th, 20%; 7th-9th, 10%; 4th-6th grade, 10%; and literacy groups, with up to a ten-fold increase, at post-education, in the number of participants responding correctly to some content items. The print materials and class received maximum usability and acceptability ratings from patients. Development of patient education meeting very low literacy criteria was feasible, effective for knowledge acquisition, and highly acceptable irrespective of literacy level.

  18. Creating Pupils' Internet Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bognar, Branko; Šimic, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    This article presents an action research, which aimed to improve pupils' literary creativity and enable them to use computers connected to the internet. The study was conducted in a small district village school in Croatia. Creating a pupils' internet magazine appeared to be an excellent way for achieving the educational aims of almost all…

  19. Profiles of smokers and non-smokers with type 2 diabetes: initial visit at a diabetes education centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gucciardi, Enza; Mathew, Rebecca; Demelo, Margaret; Bondy, Susan J

    2011-10-01

    This study explores differences in psychosocial, behavioral and clinical characteristics among smoking and non-smoking individuals with diabetes attending diabetes education centers (DEC). A questionnaire was administered to 275 individuals with type 2 diabetes attending two DECs between October 2003 and 2005. The participants' characteristics were analyzed and multivariable linear and ordinal regressions were performed to adjust for variables correlated with smoking. Findings revealed that smokers, compared to non-smokers, had lower outcome expectations of the benefits of self-management, lower diastolic blood pressure, and followed their recommended diet and tested blood glucose levels less often than non-smokers. Smokers also had lower intentions to use resources outside and within the DEC. Results demonstrate poorer self-care behaviors among smokers compared to non-smokers and further suggest cognitive and behavioral differences between smokers and non-smokers regarding participation and attitudes toward self-management practices. These findings identify issues that need to be addressed in diabetes self-management programs to allow for more effective interventions tailored to the healthcare needs of this specific population. Copyright © 2011 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Literacy-appropriate educational materials and brief counseling improve diabetes self-management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Andrea S; Seligman, Hilary K; Davis, Terry C; Schillinger, Dean; Arnold, Connie L; Bryant-Shilliday, Betsy; Freburger, Janet K; DeWalt, Darren A

    2009-06-01

    In this pilot study, we evaluated the impact of providing patients with a literacy-appropriate diabetes education guide accompanied by brief counseling designed for use in primary care. We provided the Living with Diabetes guide and brief behavior change counseling to 250 English and Spanish speaking patients with type 2 diabetes. Counseling sessions using collaborative goal setting occurred at baseline and by telephone at 2 and 4 weeks. We measured patients' activation, self-efficacy, diabetes distress, knowledge, and self-care at baseline and 3-month follow-up. Statistically significant (pdiabetes-related distress, self-reported behaviors, and knowledge. Improvements were similar across literacy levels. Spanish speakers experienced both greater improvement in diabetes-related distress and less improvement in self-efficacy levels than English speakers. A diabetes self-management support package combining literacy-appropriate patient education materials with brief counseling suitable for use in primary care resulted in important short-term health-related psychological and behavioral changes across literacy levels. Coupling literacy-appropriate education materials with brief counseling in primary care settings may be an effective and efficient strategy for imparting skills necessary for diabetes self-management.

  1. Effects of cancer comorbidity on disease management: making the case for diabetes education (a report from the SOAR program).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irizarry, Lauren; Li, Qijuan E; Duncan, Ian; Thurston, Andrew L; Fitzner, Karen A; Edwards, Beatrice J; McKoy-Bent, Judith M; Tulas, Katrina M; McKoy, June M

    2013-02-01

    Individuals with type II diabetes have an increased risk of cancer diagnosis (relative risk [RR]=1.12-2.50) and mortality (RR=1.4) compared to normoglycemic individuals. Biologic mechanisms, including mitogenic effects of insulin, hyperglycemia, and increased oxidative stress, as well as behavioral factors (eg, difficulty managing the comorbidity) may explain the elevated risk. To investigate the effects of the comorbidity on disease management, the authors compared diabetes education utilization in individuals with diabetes-cancer co-morbidity to utilization by individuals with diabetes in the absence of cancer. The effect of diabetes education on outcomes was further assessed in the subset of individuals with diabetes-cancer comorbidity. Administrative claims data were used for this analysis. The study population included individuals >60 years of age and members of both commercial and Medicare Advantage health plans from a private national database of payer data, but excluded Medicare fee for service and Medicaid patients. Most of these individuals were eligible to receive reimbursement for diabetes education. Diabetes education utilization was identified using procedure codes. Outcomes were assessed for a 3-year time period. There was little difference in diabetes education utilization between individuals with diabetes in the absence of cancer (3.8% utilization) and those with diabetes-cancer comorbidity (3.5% utilization). Individuals who receive diabetes education are more likely to have multiple HbA1c tests per year, fewer emergency department visits, fewer hospital admissions, and lower care-associated costs (except for outpatient and pharmacy averages). When diabetes coexists with cancer, management of diabetes often lags, making diabetes education an imperative.

  2. A Survey of Diabetic Educators and Patients for the Revision of Korean Food Exchange Lists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Won Cho

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundFood exchange lists are one of the main methods of nutritional education. However, Korean food exchange lists have not been revised since 1994. Therefore, we surveyed the opinions of diabetes educators and patients with diabetes regarding the need for revision of the current food exchange lists.MethodsFor two weeks beginning on 10 March 2008, a 12-item questionnaire regarding the opinion and need for revision of the current food exchange lists was e-mailed to diabetes educators nationwide. Another 15-question survey was administered to patients with diabetes in 13 hospitals located in the Seoul and Gyeonggi regions of Korea.ResultsWe obtained survey responses from 101 diabetes educators and 209 patients; 65 (64.3% of the educators answered that the current food exchange lists should be revised. The items that needed revision were the glycemic index, addition of new foods and reaffirmation of exchange standard amounts. The patients demanded specific education about choosing appropriate foods, a balanced meal plan, proper snacks, and dining intake.ConclusionOur survey results demonstrate the need to revise the Korean food exchange lists. This process should focus on glycemic index, the addition of new foods and reconfirmation of one exchange reference unit.

  3. Psychology Experiments on the Internet: An Evaluation of the Impact on Distance Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKillop, Chris; Mackintosh, Bundy; Watt, Stuart

    2003-01-01

    The internet offers considerable potential for open and distance learning in psychology. Research reveals an abundance of psychology demonstrations and experiments available online, directed both at students and potential research participants. Although expertise is being developed to overcome the technical problems associated with this medium,…

  4. Teaching and Learning with the Internet: Issues for Training Special Education Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellani, John

    This paper is a report on the findings of a study conducted in a graduate level course for teaching and learning with the Internet for high school teachers working with students having severe learning and emotional disabilities. Qualitative interview data were used to explore issues throughout the course as teachers used information in their…

  5. Internet-based Group Relations: A High School Peace Educational Project in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yablon, Yaacov B.; Katz, Yaacov J.

    2001-01-01

    Describes how Internet-based group communication was used as the major strategy to promote the societal values of understanding, equality, tolerance, and peace between Jewish and Bedouin Arab high school students in Israel. Discusses changes in student attitudes and considers the prognosis for long-term change and cooperation between the two…

  6. Role of Internet Search Engine in Internet Ideological and Political Education of University Students%试论网络搜索引擎在大学生网络思想政治教育中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    申小蓉; 易宇峰; 汪洁

    2014-01-01

    Faced with enormous Internet information, the Internet search engine has becoming an important tool of acquiring information for university students. Based on investigations and statistics, it is verified that the Internet search engine greatly impacts on university students. Therefore, this paper analyzes the impacts theoretically, and puts forward suggestions on positive roles that the Internet search engine plays on the Internet ideological and political education of university students.%面对海量的网络信息,网络搜索引擎越来越成为大学生获取信息的重要渠道。根据调查统计,证实了网络搜索引擎对大学生会产生巨大影响。对此,通过从理论上分析网络搜索引擎对大学生网络思想政治教育的影响,提出了发挥网络搜索引擎在进一步加强和改进大学生网络思想政治教育方面具有积极作用的若干建议。

  7. Periodontal health and diabetes awareness among Saudi diabetes patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahammam, Maha A

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to examine diabetic patients in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, regarding their general diabetic and oral health-related awareness and practices, their awareness of the association of diabetes with periodontal disease, and their sources of diabetes-related information. Methods Diabetic patients (n=454) who were receiving care at the diabetes clinic in King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, from October 2013 to May 2014, completed a six-part questionnaire assessing their sociodemographic characteristics, general and oral health awareness and practices, and sources of diabetes-related information. Descriptive statistics were used to report the results. Results The responses indicated inadequate health-related practices in the surveyed group: 22.2% brushed their teeth twice daily, 73.6% never flossed their teeth, and while 80.2% visited a physician in the past year, only 12.6% visited a dentist during the same year. Of the respondents, 94.8% reported that they had never received advice on oral hygiene tasks in relation to diabetes from a health professional. Awareness about the diabetes and periodontal disease association was limited: 46.7% knew that diabetics have gum problems more often if their blood sugar stays very high, and only 21.8% knew that gum disease makes it harder to control blood sugar in diabetic patients. A significant association (Pdisease, regular exercise, and regular visits to the physician and awareness about diabetes mellitus. Additionally, a significant association (Pperiodontal disease and diabetes awareness. Family and friends were the main source of diabetes-related information, and the Internet was the least likely source. Conclusion Customized educational programs should be planned for diabetic patients according to community needs. PMID:25673974

  8. Sugar Free with Justin T.: Diabetes Education through Community Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Justin B.; Donaldson, Joseph L.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the design, development, and delivery of an Extension community cable television program, "Sugar Free with Justin T.," in Roane County, Tennessee. The program targets diabetics, pre-diabetics, and those who care for them, with practical information and demonstrations to improve dietary quality. In addition to…

  9. Sugar Free with Justin T.: Diabetes Education through Community Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Justin B.; Donaldson, Joseph L.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the design, development, and delivery of an Extension community cable television program, "Sugar Free with Justin T.," in Roane County, Tennessee. The program targets diabetics, pre-diabetics, and those who care for them, with practical information and demonstrations to improve dietary quality. In addition to…

  10. Impact of nutrition education on diabetes knowledge and attitudes of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Attitudes Scale-III assessed the attitudes towards diabetes and treatment. ..... C on trol. D iff erence in means (95% CI) p. -v alue a. In terven tion. C on trol. D iff .... ard diabetes and its treatmen t: diff erences betw een in terven tion and con trol g.

  11. The Effects of Intensive Nutrition Education on Late Middle-Aged Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Many patients with type 2 diabetes find it difficult to maintain good glycemic control. Undesirable glycemic control occurs greatly due to deficiencies of nutritional knowledge and difficulty in obtaining dietary prescriptions. The late middle-aged and elder individuals are the main populations that are affected by type 2 diabetes. The main purpose of this study was to investigate whether intensive nutrition education would make benefits for late middle-aged patients with type 2 diabetes. Method: 196 patients between 50 to 65 years old meeting type 2 diabetes criteria and eligible for the program were included in a single-blinded, 30-day centralized management of an education program in China. Participants in the program were randomly divided into a usual nutrition education group or an intensive nutrition education group. The usual nutrition education group was used as a control group and received only basic health advice and principles of diabetic diets at the beginning and the end of the study. Participants in the intensive nutrition education group were arranged to receive intensive nutritional lectures about diabetes for 30 days. The primary outcomes were the changes in weight, body mass index (BMI, fasting plasma glucose (FPG, 2-h postprandial plasma glucose (PG, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c, total glycerin (TG, total cholesterol (TC, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c. Results: After 30 days of intervention, FPG, PG, and HbA1c in the treatment group decreased significantly than the control group (p < 0.05. HbA1c reduced significantly by 0.6% in the intervention group. No significant differences in the change of blood lipids were observed between groups. However, TG, TC, and HDL-c made improvements compared with the baseline in the experimental group. Both groups had a reduction in weight and BMI within groups, especially in intensive nutrition education group. However

  12. The Effects of Intensive Nutrition Education on Late Middle-Aged Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ye; Xu, Meihong; Fan, Rui; Ma, Xiaotao; Gu, Jiaojiao; Cai, Xiaxia; Liu, Rui; Chen, Qihe; Ren, Jinwei; Mao, Ruixue; Bao, Lei; Zhang, Zhaofeng; Wang, Junbo; Li, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Many patients with type 2 diabetes find it difficult to maintain good glycemic control. Undesirable glycemic control occurs greatly due to deficiencies of nutritional knowledge and difficulty in obtaining dietary prescriptions. The late middle-aged and elder individuals are the main populations that are affected by type 2 diabetes. The main purpose of this study was to investigate whether intensive nutrition education would make benefits for late middle-aged patients with type 2 diabetes. Method: 196 patients between 50 to 65 years old meeting type 2 diabetes criteria and eligible for the program were included in a single-blinded, 30-day centralized management of an education program in China. Participants in the program were randomly divided into a usual nutrition education group or an intensive nutrition education group. The usual nutrition education group was used as a control group and received only basic health advice and principles of diabetic diets at the beginning and the end of the study. Participants in the intensive nutrition education group were arranged to receive intensive nutritional lectures about diabetes for 30 days. The primary outcomes were the changes in weight, body mass index (BMI), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 2-h postprandial plasma glucose (PG), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), total glycerin (TG), total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c). Results: After 30 days of intervention, FPG, PG, and HbA1c in the treatment group decreased significantly than the control group (p < 0.05). HbA1c reduced significantly by 0.6% in the intervention group. No significant differences in the change of blood lipids were observed between groups. However, TG, TC, and HDL-c made improvements compared with the baseline in the experimental group. Both groups had a reduction in weight and BMI within groups, especially in intensive nutrition education group. However, there was

  13. Educational inequalities in diabetes mortality across Europe in the 2000s: the interaction with gender

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Vandenheede (Hadewijch); P. Deboosere (Patrick); A. Espelt (Albert); M. Bopp (Matthias); C. Borrell (Carme); G. Costa (Giuseppe); T.A. Eikemo (Terje); R. Gnavi (Roberto); R. Hoffmann (Rasmus); I. Kulhánová (Ivana); M.C. Kulik (Margarete); M. Leinsalu (Mall); P. Martikainen; G. Menvielle (Gwenn); M. Rodriguez-Sanz (Maica); J. Rychtǎŕikov́a (Jitka); J.P. Mackenbach (Johan)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: To evaluate educational inequalities in diabetes mortality in Europe in the 2000s, and to assess whether these inequalities differ between genders.Methods: Data were obtained from mortality registries covering 14 European countries. To determine educational inequalities in

  14. Interest of the therapeutic education in patients with type 2 diabetes observing the fast of Ramadan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henda Jamoussi

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: Our results justify the interest of patient education centered on the month of Ramadan in all type 2 diabetic patients observing the fast of the holy month. This education should be continued during Ramadan in order to fulfill this religious rite safely.

  15. Experimenting with styles of living: Bernard, Canguilhem and type 2 diabetes education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljungdalh, Anders Kruse

    2013-09-01

    The paper links a debate in the history of medical science between statistics and the experimental method with contemporary diabetes educational practices. An empirical example of a tension between neglect and concern in diabetes self-regulation frames the subsequent theoretical discussion between first, Claude Bernard and statistics and afterwards, Georges Canguilhem as a correlative to Bernard. Through these philosophers of medical science a connection between the experimental method and education is demonstrated. Finally, a case description of an experimental approach to alcohol and experimentation frames and highlights the educational aspect of the methodological discussion.

  16. Myths about type 1 diabetes: Awareness and education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Kanungo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Not all healthcare professionals (HCPs are aware of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM and various myths still exist in the society and among HCPs. The medical challenge in treating T1DM is the confusion between T1DM and T2DM and its management, which is very common and is observed with both general practitioners and parents of children with diabetes. There are multiple medical and social myths associated with diabetes, especially T1DM, prevalent in society. Diabetes management requires support and collaboration from family, school and society, which is sometimes difficult, as they are more discouraging than positive. The launch of the Changing Diabetes in Children program in India has created a lot of awareness and is helping patients and their parents understand the disease.

  17. Design and evaluation of a personal robot playing a self-management education game with children with diabetes type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanson Henkemans, O.A.; Bierman, B.P.B.; Janssen, J.; Looije, R.; Neerincx, M.A.; Dooren, M.M.M. van; Vries, J.L.E. de; Burg, G.J. van der; Huisman, S.D.

    2017-01-01

    Objective To assess the effects of a personal robot, providing diabetes self-management education in a clinical setting on the pleasure, engagement and motivation to play a diabetes quiz of children (7–12) with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), and on their acquisition of knowledge about their

  18. 77 FR 38072 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; The National Diabetes Education Program Survey of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-26

    ... objectives are to: (1) Increase awareness and knowledge of the seriousness of diabetes, its risk factors, and... Diabetes Education Program Survey of the Public SUMMARY: Under the provisions of Section 3507(a)(1)(D) of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney...

  19. internet, utilisation, lectu

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information Impact: Journal of Information and Knowledge Management

    commonly or basically used for the purposes of information, communication, education ... people with information, the Internet has now become a social networking ..... Madu, E. C. (2008) Fundamentals of modern reference services: Manual vs ...

  20. Academic Detailing in Diabetes: Using Outreach Education to Improve the Quality of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Michael A

    2016-10-01

    Most diabetes care is provided in primary care settings, but typical primary care clinicians struggle to keep up with the latest evidence on diabetes screening, pharmacotherapy, and monitoring. Accordingly, many patients with diabetes are not receiving optimal guideline-based therapy. Relying on front-line clinicians on their own to assess the huge volume of new literature and incorporate it into their practice is unrealistic, and conventional continuing medical education has not proven adequate to address gaps in care. Academic detailing, direct educational outreach to clinicians that uses social marketing techniques to provide specific evidence-based recommendations, has been proven in clinical trials to improve the quality of care for a range of conditions. By directly engaging with clinicians to assess their needs, identify areas for change in practice, and provide them with specific tools to implement these changes, academic detailing can serve as a tool to improve care processes and outcomes for patients with diabetes.

  1. Evaluation of the Impact of a Diabetes Education Curriculum for School Personnel on Disease Knowledge and Confidence in Caring for Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Cory T.; Chen, Aleda M. H.; Plake, Kimberly S.; Nash, Christiane L.

    2012-01-01

    Background: School personnel may lack knowledge of diabetes and be unprepared to address the needs of students with type 1 diabetes. This project evaluated the effectiveness of a type 1 diabetes education program for school personnel on increasing knowledge of diabetes and confidence in caring for students with diabetes. Methods: Two types of…

  2. Evaluation of the Impact of a Diabetes Education Curriculum for School Personnel on Disease Knowledge and Confidence in Caring for Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Cory T.; Chen, Aleda M. H.; Plake, Kimberly S.; Nash, Christiane L.

    2012-01-01

    Background: School personnel may lack knowledge of diabetes and be unprepared to address the needs of students with type 1 diabetes. This project evaluated the effectiveness of a type 1 diabetes education program for school personnel on increasing knowledge of diabetes and confidence in caring for students with diabetes. Methods: Two types of…

  3. Impact of internet supported dental education: Initial outcomes in a study sample

    OpenAIRE

    Fırat Sarsar; Mehmet Emin Kaval; Gary D. Klasser; Pelin Güneri

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this preliminary mixed method study was to understand dental students’ thoughts on internet supported learning environment (ISLE) and to investigate its’ impact on their academic success. The research was designed to enroll the students from the 7th semester of School of Dentistry. The lecturer taught dental students for four hours (within four weeks) on the topics of "anamnesis, extraoral and intraoral examination". Voluntary twenty-four students participated actively to the ISLE....

  4. Diabetes Awareness of Low-Income Middle School Students Participating in the Help a Friend, Help Yourself Youth Diabetes Awareness Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wroten, Kathryn; Reames, Elizabeth S.; Tuuri, Georgianna

    2012-01-01

    The study reported here investigated the effectiveness of the LSU AgCenter Help a Friend, Help Yourself youth diabetes education curriculum to increase knowledge and awareness of diabetes and its symptoms in low-income middle school students participating in the Boys and Girls Club after-school program. The curriculum includes four lessons with…

  5. Diabetes Awareness of Low-Income Middle School Students Participating in the Help a Friend, Help Yourself Youth Diabetes Awareness Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wroten, Kathryn; Reames, Elizabeth S.; Tuuri, Georgianna

    2012-01-01

    The study reported here investigated the effectiveness of the LSU AgCenter Help a Friend, Help Yourself youth diabetes education curriculum to increase knowledge and awareness of diabetes and its symptoms in low-income middle school students participating in the Boys and Girls Club after-school program. The curriculum includes four lessons with…

  6. Communication Barriers in Distance Education: "Text-Based Internet-Enabled Online Courses"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabaj, Fahme; Isman, Aytekin

    2004-01-01

    With the rapid technological changes and the diverse people demands and conditions, traditional educational systems and institutions are forced to provide additional educational opportunities. A number of educational establishments are contributing to these conditions and demands by developing and offering distance education programs. Distance…

  7. Internet enlightens; Internet eclaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueiredo, S. [IRSN, 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2010-04-15

    This part of the issue gives Internet addresses in relation with nuclear energy, safety, radiation protection in nuclear medicine, legislation, at the national level and European and international level. A special part is devoted to non ionizing radiation. (N.C.)

  8. Effect of intensive nursing education on the prevention of diabetic foot ulceration among patients with high-risk diabetic foot: a follow-up analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Meng; Yang, Chuan; Lin, Diao Zhu; Xiao, Hui Sheng; Mai, Li Fang; Guo, Yi Chen; Yan, Li

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the study was to discuss the effect of intensive nursing education on the prevention of diabetic foot ulceration among patients at high risk for diabetic foot. One hundred eighty-five diabetes patients at high risk for foot diseases were enrolled in this study and provided with intensive nursing education, including individualized education about diabetes mellitus and diabetic foot diseases, instruction in podiatric care (the right way of washing the foot, the care of foot skin, appropriate choice of shoes and socks, intense examinations and records of feet by patients themselves every day, and the assistant management of calluses). Study subjects were followed up for 2 years. Once the foot ulceration developed, the inducing factors of foot ulceration were inquired about, the ulcers were evaluated, and the incidence of foot ulceration was analyzed before and after the intensive nursing education according to self-paired data. Results showed there were highly statistically significant improvements in the intensive treatment group compared with the control group in plasma glucose, blood pressure, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. More important is that intensive nursing education helps to prevent diabetic foot ulceration and to decrease the rate of amputation among patients at high risk for diabetic foot.

  9. How To Use the Internet in Your Classroom: A Guide for Teachers, Technology Coordinators, Staff Developers, Administrators, and Other Educators about Teaching and Learning in the New Media Classroom. By Teachers, for Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Ellen, Ed.

    This book provides information to help teachers use the Internet in the classroom. Tips from 28 educators note potential pitfalls and offer many perspectives on teaching with the Internet. The educators present their own classroom materials, lesson plans, Web sites, and words of wisdom. Interviews with renowned experts in the field address key…

  10. A requirements engineering approach for improving the quality of diabetes education websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabestari, Omid; Roudsari, Abdul

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus is a major chronic disease with multi-organ involvement and high-cost complications. Although it has been proved that structured education can control the risk of developing these complications, there is big room for improvement in the educational services for these patients. e-learning can be a good solution to fill this gap. Most of the current e-learning solutions for diabetes were designed by computer experts and healthcare professionals but the patients, as end-users of these systems, haven't been deeply involved in the design process. Considering the expectations of the patients, this article investigates a requirement engineering process comparing the level of importance given to different attributes of the e-learning by patients and healthcare professionals. The results of this comparison can be used for improving the currently developed online diabetes education systems.

  11. Internet Banking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felician ALECU

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Internet Banking (known also as online banking allows performing transactions and payments over the internet through a bank's secure website. This can be very useful, especially for banking outside bank hours (which tend to be very short and banking from anywhere where internet access is available. In most cases a web browser such as Internet Explorer or Mozilla Firefox is utilized and any normal internet connection is suitable. No special software or hardware is usually needed.

  12. Pediatric Diabetes Outpatient Center at Rhode Island Hospital: The impact of changing initial diabetes education from inpatient to outpatient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingul, Mia M; Mulvihill, Erin M; Reinert, Steven E; Gopalakrishnan, Geetha; Plante, Wendy A; Boney, Charlotte M; Bialo, Shara R; Quintos, Jose Bernardo

    2017-02-01

    This study compared outcomes and costs for new-onset Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) patients educated at the outpatient versus inpatient settings. Retrospective study examining the following variables: 1) hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), 2) severe hypoglycemia, 3) admissions for diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) or ER visits, and 4) healthcare cost. 152 patients with new-onset T1DM from September 2007-August 2009. There were no differences between outpatient group (OG) and inpatient group (IG) in mean HbA1c levels at 1, 2 and 3 years post-diagnosis (OG 8%, 8.5%, 9.3%; IG 8.3%, 8.9%, 9%, p=0.51). Episodes of severe hypoglycemia, DKA, and ER visits were not different between the two groups. Mean total hospital costs for OG and pure OG were significantly less than IG (OG: $2886 vs. IG: $4925, p<0.001), (pure OG: $1044 vs. IG: $4925, p<0.0001). Our study demonstrates that outpatient- based pediatric diabetes education lowers healthcare cost without compromising medical outcomes. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2017-02.asp].

  13. The effects of education based on extended health belief model in type 2 diabetic patients: a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Bayat, Fatemeh; Shojaeezadeh, Davoud; Baikpour, Masoud; Heshmat, Ramin; Baikpour, Maryam; Hosseini, Mostafa

    2013-01-01

    Background Type II diabetes and its complications impose a large economic burden on health care systems. This study aims to assess the effectiveness of educational intervention based on extended health belief model on type 2 diabetic patients. Methods 120 patients with type II diabetes referring to randomly selected hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences were enrolled in this educational intervention study. Patients were randomly divided into two groups (intervention and control)....

  14. Impact of a District-Wide Diabetes Prevention Programme Involving Health Education for Children and the Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheeladevi, Sethu; Sagar, Jayanthi; Pujari, Siddharth; Rani, Padmaja Kumari

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To present results from a district-wide diabetes prevention programme involving health education for school children and the local community. Method: The model of health education that was utilized aimed to secure lifestyle changes and the identification of diabetes risk by school children (aged 9-12 years). The children acted as health…

  15. Impact of a District-Wide Diabetes Prevention Programme Involving Health Education for Children and the Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheeladevi, Sethu; Sagar, Jayanthi; Pujari, Siddharth; Rani, Padmaja Kumari

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To present results from a district-wide diabetes prevention programme involving health education for school children and the local community. Method: The model of health education that was utilized aimed to secure lifestyle changes and the identification of diabetes risk by school children (aged 9-12 years). The children acted as health…

  16. Development and pilot of a low-literacy diabetes education book using social marketing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavin, Michelle; Añel-Tiangco, Raquel M; Mauger, David T; Gabbay, Robert A

    2010-12-01

    The primary objective of this work was to develop a diabetes education book, to pilot its use, and to evaluate its impact on patient care. The secondary objective was to compare the value of providing only the book to patients versus providing the book along with a brief tutorial given by a nurse on how to use the book. A diabetes education book was developed through a social marketing approach. The impact of the book was then tested in a pilot, prospective, randomized controlled trial evaluating diabetes knowledge, emotional distress, self-care behavior, and clinical outcomes in a primary care patient population. The three-arm study randomized one group to usual care (n=33), one group to receive the book alone (n=33), and one group to receive the book with a brief nurse tutorial (n=34). Patients completed surveys at baseline, 4 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months to assess knowledge (Knowledge Questionnaire), self-care behaviors (Summary of Diabetes Self Care Activities [SDSCA] survey), and disease-related distress (Problem Areas in Diabetes [PAID] scale). A patient advocacy committee identified a need for information on basic diabetes knowledge, diet, medications, complications, preparing for a visit, and plans for daily life. Using social marketing with a focus on low literacy, the Penn State Hershey Diabetes Playbook was created. The pilot study showed a trend towards improved knowledge, decreased distress, and improved self-care behaviors in patients who received the book. There was no difference in outcomes in patients who were provided the book alone versus those who received a brief nurse tutorial along with the book. Social marketing techniques and low literacy awareness are useful in developing diabetes educational materials.

  17. Research Notes: Interim Report: A Case Study of Internet-Based Distance Education Program Development in Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick J. Fahy

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available This is a report of the role of Distance education (DE in enhancing education and training in developing countries. As countries compete in an ever more challenging international marketplace, they recognize the need to continually train and upgrade their citizenry. As national leaders struggle to cope with increasing populations and decreasing budgets, DE can be an additional and often essential tool in accomplishing this goal.This paper is a case study of the efforts of one college in Vietnam, Fisheries College Number 4, to develop a plan to introduce a small distance education offering to its regular courses. Its purpose was to better serve farmers in remote regions. The first author, Ramona Materi, through her company, Ingenia Consulting, carried out the work on behalf of the International Development Research Centre (IDRC, a public corporation created by the Parliament of Canada to help researchers and communities in the developing world to find solutions to their social, economic, and environmental problems. Materi’s assignment was to work with College officials to develop the DE plan and funding proposal.The paper begins with a brief description of the role of information and communications technology (ICT in education and development, particularly in South East Asia. It then provides an overview of Vietnam and its current activities in DE. The next section offers a detailed examination of the challenges the College faced in developing a plan for DE on the Internet. The paper concludes with Materi’s personal observations and commentary on lessons learned.

  18. A COMPARISON OF INTERNET-BASED LEARNING AND TRADITIONAL CLASSROOM LECTURE TO LEARN CPR FOR CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser HEMMATI

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare the satisfaction and effectiveness of Internet-based learning (IBL and traditional classroom lecture (TCL for continuing medical education (CME programs by comparing final resuscitation exam results of physicians who received the newest cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR curriculum guidelines training either by traditional or by an Internet-based CME. A randomized two-group pretest-posttest quasi-experimental design was used. Postgraduate general physician trainees of Iran medical schools were participated. Two methods were compared for teaching the newest curriculum guidelines of the American Heart Association: lecture method in which the teacher follows a Power point presentation with linear layout, and with interactive self-assessment and Scenario-based learning, feedback, multimedia with linear and nonlinear layout with the same power point presentation as lecture in terms of text and photography. The data on final CPR exam grades, collected both groups trained physicians, were obtained for a total of 80 physicians in 2011. An independent sample t-test analysis indicated that participants in the IBL format reported significantly higher mean ratings for this format (62.5 ±2.32 than TCL format (54.6±2.18 (p=.001. There were no significant differences between the two groups in cognitive gains (p<0.05. well-designed IBL content can be effective or a supplement component to CME.

  19. Type 1 diabetes, quality of life, occupational status and education level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Helena B.; Ovesen, Louise L.; Mortensen, Laust H.

    2016-01-01

    , occupational status (level of employment, working hours and sick leave) and education level. METHODS: 2415 adults (aged 18-98years) with type 1 diabetes were compared to 48,511 adults (aged 18-103years) from the general population. Data were obtained from two cross-sectional surveys conducted in 2010 and 2011......: Compared to the general population, adults with type 1 diabetes experienced lower health-related quality of life, were more frequently unemployed, had more sick leave per year and were slightly better educated. Differences in health-related quality of life and employment increased with age and were larger...

  20. Corazza L., Internet e la società conoscitiva. Cyberdemocrazia e sfide educative, Trento, Erickson, 2008.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Giustini

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Laura Corazza in questo libro vuole proporre una riflessione sull'attuale società della conoscenza e analizzare le opportunità e i rischi dell'utilizzo delle nuove tecnologie dell'informazione e della comunicazione come strumenti di educazione democratica: se da un lato internet può essere uno strumento di democrazia, di partecipazione e di formazione per tutto l'arco della vita, dall'altro c'è il rischio di un uso distorto (e illegale della potenzialità della rete, del condizionamento delle logiche di mercato, del digital divide e della manipolazione ideologica

  1. Innovativeness and Variety of Internet Shopping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Brian F.; Neuendorf, Kimberly A.; Valdiserri, Colin M.

    2003-01-01

    This survey of 208 Internet users examined the factors underlying Internet usage and shopping. Data were gathered on Information shopping (IS) innovativeness, overall IS frequency, visit variety, purchase variety, network prevalence, education, age, gender, employment, extensiveness of Internet use, and non-shopping Internet applications. (MES)

  2. Innovativeness and Variety of Internet Shopping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Brian F.; Neuendorf, Kimberly A.; Valdiserri, Colin M.

    2003-01-01

    This survey of 208 Internet users examined the factors underlying Internet usage and shopping. Data were gathered on Information shopping (IS) innovativeness, overall IS frequency, visit variety, purchase variety, network prevalence, education, age, gender, employment, extensiveness of Internet use, and non-shopping Internet applications. (MES)

  3. Association of Education and Smoking Status on Risk of Diabetes Mellitus: A Population-Based Nationwide Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Hyeong; Noh, Juhwan; Choi, Jae-Woo; Park, Eun-Cheol

    2017-06-19

    Background: Exposure to smoke, including environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), is a well-known risk factor for diabetes. Low socioeconomic status, especially lack of education, is also a risk factor for diabetes. Therefore, we assessed the association of demographic, socioeconomic, clinical, and behavior risk factor-related variables and smoking status, including ETS exposure, with the prevalence of diabetes. Methods: Data were from the 2007-2013 Korea National Health and Nutritional Evaluation Survey (KNHANES). Multivariable logistic regression examined associations between various lifestyle and health factors and the prevalence of diabetes while controlling for potential confounding variables. Subgroup analysis was performed according to smoking status to determine factors associated with diabetes. Results: Of 19,303 individuals analyzed, 1325 (11.4%) had diabetes. Greater average age, male sex, lower educational level, unemployment, and coexisting health problems were significantly associated with diabetes. Individuals with only elementary, middle, or high school level education had significantly greater odds ratios (p graduates; smokers and nonsmokers exposed to ETS had significantly greater OR (p < 0.05) than nonsmokers unexposed to ETS. Subgroup analysis of diabetics according to smoking status revealed significant associations (p < 0.05) for diabetic nonsmokers exposed to ETS with female sex, single status, elementary level education, urban residence, National Health Insurance (NHI), hypertension, a lack of alcohol intake, and a lack of moderate physical activity. For diabetic smokers, there were significant associations (p < 0.05) with elementary education, urban residence, a lack of moderate physical activity, a lack of alcohol intake, and NHI. Conclusions: The results suggested that smoking status, as well as ETS exposure, was associated with a higher prevalence of diabetes, especially in populations with less education. Thus, we should direct efforts for

  4. Association of Education and Smoking Status on Risk of Diabetes Mellitus: A Population-Based Nationwide Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Hyeong Kim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Exposure to smoke, including environmental tobacco smoke (ETS, is a well-known risk factor for diabetes. Low socioeconomic status, especially lack of education, is also a risk factor for diabetes. Therefore, we assessed the association of demographic, socioeconomic, clinical, and behavior risk factor-related variables and smoking status, including ETS exposure, with the prevalence of diabetes. Methods: Data were from the 2007–2013 Korea National Health and Nutritional Evaluation Survey (KNHANES. Multivariable logistic regression examined associations between various lifestyle and health factors and the prevalence of diabetes while controlling for potential confounding variables. Subgroup analysis was performed according to smoking status to determine factors associated with diabetes. Results: Of 19,303 individuals analyzed, 1325 (11.4% had diabetes. Greater average age, male sex, lower educational level, unemployment, and coexisting health problems were significantly associated with diabetes. Individuals with only elementary, middle, or high school level education had significantly greater odds ratios (p < 0.05 compared to college graduates; smokers and nonsmokers exposed to ETS had significantly greater OR (p < 0.05 than nonsmokers unexposed to ETS. Subgroup analysis of diabetics according to smoking status revealed significant associations (p < 0.05 for diabetic nonsmokers exposed to ETS with female sex, single status, elementary level education, urban residence, National Health Insurance (NHI, hypertension, a lack of alcohol intake, and a lack of moderate physical activity. For diabetic smokers, there were significant associations (p < 0.05 with elementary education, urban residence, a lack of moderate physical activity, a lack of alcohol intake, and NHI. Conclusions: The results suggested that smoking status, as well as ETS exposure, was associated with a higher prevalence of diabetes, especially in populations with less

  5. The use of self-efficacy enhancing methods in diabetes education in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopman-van den Berg, D J; van der Bijl, J J

    2001-01-01

    According to the social cognitive theory of Bandura, self-efficacy predicts behavorial change. Bandura notes that self-efficacy is based on four major sources of information: performance accomplishments, vicarious experience, verbal persuasion and self-evaluation. This exploratory study examined the use of these four sources of information by Dutch nurse diabetes educators to enhance self-efficacy among people with diabetes mellitus. A survey questionnaire was sent to all Dutch nurse members of the European Association of Diabetes Educators (EADE) asking about the use of self-efficacy-enhancing methods, and four different educational programs were observed. Survey respondents said that performance accomplishments and verbal persuasion were often used, vicarious experience was hardly ever used, and the use of self-evaluation varied. The observations gave a different picture: only verbal persuasion was observed often; the other three sources were hardly ever used. Clearly, self-efficacy-enhancing educational methods are not systematically used in the Netherlands and there is little variety in the methods used. More varied methods of enhancing self-efficacy need to be developed and implemented in diabetes education programs.

  6. The contribution of education to the control of Diabetes Mellitus, type II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Kalogianni

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus Type II, (non‐insulin‐dependent consists one of the greatest problems that the individual has faced, globally. The number of patients is increasing dramatically every year and pecis exted to be double the next decades. The aetiology and pathogenesis of the disease is mainly attributed to genetic factors. aim of pThe resent study was to evaluate whether administration of an educational program can contribute to the control of the disease. The method οf this study included bibliography research from both the review and the research literature which referred to the relationship between education and the control of diabetes mellitus, type II. Results: The majority of research studies showed that there is a very strong correlation between education and the maintenance of plasma glucose level of patients with diabetes mellitus, type II, within normal range. An effective educative program is mainly comprised of basic knowledge of these parameters that exert a beneficial effect on the management of the disease such as : healthy nutrition habits, participation in physical exercise programs, avoidance of sedentary life, self‐monitoring of glucose, correct way to perform insulin injections, etc. The overall goal of the educative intervention is to help individuals with diabetes gain the necessary knowledge and support needed, to achieve optimal health by modifying their behaviour and adopting a more positive attitude to the disease. Conclusions: The present review confirms that educational intervention has beneficial effects on the control of Type II Diabetes Mellitus. The maintenance of plasma glucose levels into normal range indicates the effectiveness of education.

  7. Site of initial diabetes education does not affect metabolic outcomes in children with T1DM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonyushkina, Ksenia N; Visintainer, Paul F; Jasinski, Christopher F; Wadzinski, Thomas L; Allen, Holley F

    2014-03-01

    To determine the difference in metabolic outcomes at 1 and 2 yr post type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) diagnosis in children depending on the site of initial diabetes education: inpatient, vs. outpatient, vs. mixed locations. A retrospective chart review was performed for all patients with new onset antibody positive T1DM, aged 1-18 yr old, diagnosed in 2004-2009, and followed for at least 1 yr in a diabetes program at a tertiary academic health care center. Patients were divided into three groups based on the site of initial diabetes education: inpatient, outpatient, and mixed locations. The primary outcome was A1c at 1 and 2 yr. We enrolled 238 children (133 boys), mean (± SD) age 9.9 (± 4.1). A1c levels did not differ among inpatient, outpatient, and mixed location groups at 1 and 2 yr post diagnosis (p = 0.85 and p = 0.69, respectively) and the long-acting insulin doses were similar at 1 and 2 yr (p = 0.18 and p = 0.15, respectively). There was no difference in the number of acute diabetes complications between the groups. At 1 yr, 21.8% of outpatient-educated children were on insulin pump therapy in contrast to 14.7% of inpatient and 2.7% of mixed educated groups (p = 0.04). Families of children with new onset T1DM can be successfully and safely educated in a clinic setting. An 'education' admission for a medically stable patient is not necessary most of the time, however, clinical judgment and careful assessment of the family's coping and learning capabilities are important when determining the site of education. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. An audit of diabetes self-management education programs in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loveness Dube

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes is a significant contributor to the burden of disease worldwide. Since its treatment requires extensive self-care, self-management education is widely recommended, particularly in resource limited settings. This study aimed to review the current state of policies and implementation of diabetes self-management education (DSME in South Africa, with a specific focus on cultural appropriateness. Design and Methods: The audit involved a review of policy documents and semi-structured questionnaires with providers and experts in public and private health services. Forty-four respondents were interviewed. Documents were analysed with reference to the International Standards for Diabetes Education from the International Diabetes Federation. Data were entered and analysed in excel to give a description of the DSME programs and ad hoc interventions. Results: Three guidelines for Type 2 diabetes and two for chronic diseases were retrieved, but none were specifically dedicated to DSME. Five structured programs and 22 ad-hoc interventions were identified. DSME is mostly provided by doctors, nurses and dieticians and not consistently linked to other initiatives such as support groups. Health education materials are mainly in English with limited availability. Conclusions: DSME in South Africa is limited in scope, content and consistency, especially in the public services. A National curricula and materials for diabetes education need to be developed and adapted to the socio-economic context, culture and literacy levels of the target populations. It is recommended that DSME would be addressed in national policies and guidelines to guide the development and implementation of standardised programs.

  9. Pilot project and evaluation of delivering diabetes work-based education using video conferencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltinsky, W; Hall, S; Grant, L; Simpson, K; MacRury, S

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic long-term disease with an increasing incidence. There is a need to increase access to effective care and to ensure such care is delivered as locally as possible. The geographical spread of NHS Highland Scotland presents additional challenges to ensuring a skilled workforce given education is normally work-based tuition and assessment. The aim of this pilot project was to deliver teleconferenced diabetes training to healthcare and allied healthcare professionals who provide basic level care for, and management of, people with diabetes and to evaluate this training. Work-based diabetes education was designed to be delivered by a diabetes educator through videoconferencing or face to face (F2F) for healthcare professionals in peripheral settings in the Scottish Highlands region over two half-days. The education covered theoretical and practical training in diabetes. The evaluation of the project was through post-course questionnaires and assessment instruments to capture views of the content and delivery mode, as well as student performance. Feedback from participants indicated that the educational content was relevant and that the use of videoconferencing (VC) could provide accessibility to training where distance, cost and other issues may make access difficult. Student performance on the assessment instruments did not differ between those who received the training through video conferencing and those who received the training through F2F delivery. Video conferencing can counteract the difficulties of accessing training for clinical peripherally based professionals. Training through VC did not compromise student acquisition of learning outcomes. Feedback indicates that VC can reduce the interactive nature of the learning and teaching experience.

  10. CONTINUING EDUCATION TEACHER OF INDIGENOUS AND NON-INDIGENOUS MEDIATED SOCIAL NETWORK ON THE INTERNET: A PERSPECTIVE INTERCULTURAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Lima Paniago Lopes

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to analyze continuous training of teachers indigenous and non-indigenous, mediated by a social network on Ning called Internet under an intercultural perspective. This social network has come up as a virtual community as they have been established emotional ties, webs of connections and relationships between its participants. This is a qualitative research and collaborative in the sense that the experiences of researchers and teachers are valued and shared within a social context. The results show that participants in the group continuing of education, despite their difficulties using the technology itself and with little technological infrastructure, they see these virtual spaces as a possibility for new discoveries, creations and knowledge production, not forsaking the customs, traditions and their own culture.

  11. An empirical study of factors influencing adoption of Internet banking among students of higher education: Evidence from Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Kabeer Kazi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Thispaper investigated the influence of factors on the intention to adopt Internetbanking services among students of higher education in Pakistan. Theoreticalframework used for this study has been adopted from Technology Acceptance Model(TAM with four independent variables. Convenience sampling method was usedwith a total of valid 220 respondents, which included students of Khadim AliShah Bukhari Institute of Technology (KASBIT, Karachi, Pakistan.  Data was collected through self administeredquestionnaire of two parts: Demographic and Likert scale multi-item scale forvariables under study. Results indicated that convenience, perceivedcredibility, and perceived usefulness had significant positive influence amongstudents on the intention to adopt Internet banking. The findings from thisresearch would be useful for banks in the subject area, particularly forstudents in Pakistan.

  12. Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomberk, Gwen

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatologists have often divided research of the pancreas based upon the origin of the function or disease, namely the endocrine or exocrine pancreas. In fact, as a result, many of our meetings and conferences have followed separate paths. Interestingly, among patients with chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, both disorders of the exocrine pancreas, diabetes is common. However, the clinical features of the diabetes associated with these two differ. Peripheral insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia are the predominant diabetic traits in pancreatic cancer, while reduced islet cell mass and impaired insulin secretion are observed more often in chronic pancreatitis. The causal relationship between diabetes and pancreatic cancer remains an intriguing but unanswered question. Since diabetes often precedes pancreatic cancer, it is regarded as a potential risk factor for malignancy. On the other hand, there remains the possibility that pancreatic cancer secretes diabetogenic factors. Regardless of how the science ultimately illuminates this issue, there is increasing interest in utilizing screening for diabetes to aid early detection of pancreatic tumor lesions. Therefore, in this issue of Pancreatology and the Web, we explore the topic of diabetes to keep us alert to this very important association, even if we study diseases of the exocrine pancreas.

  13. 移动互联网视阈下的医德教育思考%Thinking about medical ethics education from the perspective of mobile Internet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙莹炜; 刘芳

    2015-01-01

    移动互联网给医德教育带来机遇与挑战,如何在移动互联网时代加强医德教育效果,彰显医德教育力量显得尤为紧迫和重要。本文通过梳理移动互联网时代的变化和特点,对在移动互联网视阈下如何改进和加强医德教育进行分析,对途径效果进行思考,以期多方面提升医德教育的针对性和实效性。%Mobile internet brings opportunities and challenges to medical ethics education. It is particularly urgent and important to explore how to advance the effect and express the power of medical ethics education in the era of mobile Internet. This article analyzes the changes and characteristics of the mobile Internet era, studies how to improve and enhance medical ethics education from the perspective of mobile Internet and explores the effect of ways, in order to improve the pertinence and effectiveness of medical ethics education in many aspects.

  14. [Diabetic foot syndrome from the perspective of internist educated in podiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirkovská, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Podiatry is the science dealing with the diagnostics and treatment of the foot and ankle and associated tissues and structures by all appropriate methods and also with the local manifestation of the overall processes in this area. Diabetic foot disease is defined as infection, ulceration or destruction of tissues of the foot associated with neuropathy and/or peripheral artery disease in the lower extremity of people with diabetes according to the latest edition of the International Consensus. Successful treatment and prevention of diabetic foot syndrome depends on a holistic approach, in which it is seen as part of the multiple organ involvement. Teamwork of series of experts is therefore necessary. Internist with diabetes and podiatric education plays a key role in this team in particular, when control diabetes and in the prevention and treatment of co-morbidities, in the diagnosis of malnutrition and in the nutritional therapy and in the early diagnosis and effective treatment of infections. Last but not least, internist in collaboration with other professionals works when treatment of lower limb ischemia, suitable offloading of the ulcer and topical therapy and in the prevention of ulcers. Recurrent ulcerations are the major problem in podiatry and it can occur in up to 40% of patients in the first year after healing. Follow-up of patients with diabetic foot syndrome by experienced internist can help reduce the serious consequences, including amputation and cardiovascular mortality.Key words: diabetic foot - internal medicine - podiatry.

  15. Application Use, Online Relationship Types, Self-Disclosure, and Internet Abuse among Children and Youth: Implications for Education and Internet Safety Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blau, Ina

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the relationships between Internet abuse (IA)--self-disclosure, online application usage, and relationship types--traditional long-distance, purely virtual, and migratory mixed-mode. An online questionnaire was administered to 2884 children and youth. According to the hypotheses, applications differed in their relationships…

  16. 网络调查在高校德育研究中的应用%The Application of Internet Poll in College Moral Education Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张奕华; 刘劲宇

    2011-01-01

    网络调查是传统调查在网络环境下的一种扩展,将网络会议、电子邮件调查、网页问卷调查、网络电视访谈等方法应用于高校德育研究,可以发挥网络调查便捷性、高效性、多样性、匿名性和开放性的优势,但要注意克服网络拥堵、调查内容有限、调查的信度和数据安全性等问题,对此,需要注意网络调查和传统调查相结合、加强对网络调查的研究以及培养一支专业的网络调查队伍。%Internet poll is an extension of the traditional one in the Internet environment, which involves Internet meeting, E-mail poll, Web questionnaire, telephone interview through the Intcrnet and so on in the application of the college moral education. It optimizes the advantages of the convenience, the effectiveness, the diversity, the anonymity and the openness. During the poll, some problems should be avoided, such as the net congestion, the limited content of the poll, the reliability of the poll, the safety of the data and so on. It is essential to fully develop the internet poll in the college moral education, combining the internet poll and the traditional poll, furthering the research on the internet poll and cultivating a team specializing in Internet poll.

  17. Promoting diabetes self-management among African Americans: an educational intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Eleanor A; Stevens, Karen A; Persaud, Sabita

    2010-08-01

    Diabetes is a major national health problem that affects African Americans more seriously than other population groups. The purpose of this project was to increase knowledge and self-management of diabetes among African American adults 40 years of age and older diagnosed with type II diabetes. A quasi-experimental pre-test/post-test comparison group design was used. Three educational sessions were provided to participants in the intervention group. Content included information about diabetes and its complications, risk factors, proper diet, recommendations for exercise, medications, and monitoring blood glucose. Teaching strategies included discussion, games, and demonstrations. Patient navigators provided follow-up by phone at the scheduled intervals. Preliminary results indicated significantly increased knowledge among intervention group participants between the pre- and post-test and the pre-test and follow-up. Findings for HbA1c values, body mass index, and weight were not significant.

  18. Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, Peter; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R

    2015-01-01

    For >30 years, insulin has been the drug of choice for the medical treatment of gestational diabetes mellitus. However, the use of oral hypoglycaemic agents has increased during the past 1–2 decades, so a recent comparison of treatment with glibenclamide, metformin or insulin in women with gestat......For >30 years, insulin has been the drug of choice for the medical treatment of gestational diabetes mellitus. However, the use of oral hypoglycaemic agents has increased during the past 1–2 decades, so a recent comparison of treatment with glibenclamide, metformin or insulin in women...... with gestational diabetes mellitus is highly relevant....

  19. Interactive internet-based clinical education: an efficient and cost-savings approach to point-of-care test training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Herschel; Chan, Kee; Anaya, Henry D; Goetz, Matthew B

    2011-06-01

    We successfully created and implemented an effective HIV rapid testing training and certification curriculum using traditional in-person training at multiple sites within the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Healthcare System. Considering the multitude of geographically remote facilities in the nationwide VA system, coupled with the expansion of HIV diagnostics, we developed an alternate training method that is affordable, efficient, and effective. Using materials initially developed for in-person HIV rapid test in-services, we used a distance learning model to offer this training via live audiovisual online technology to educate clinicians at a remote outpatient primary care VA facility. Participants' evaluation metrics showed that this form of remote education is equivalent to in-person training; additionally, HIV testing rates increased considerably in the months following this intervention. Although there is a one-time setup cost associated with this remote training protocol, there is potential cost savings associated with the point-of-care nurse manager's time productivity by using the Internet in-service learning module for teaching HIV rapid testing. If additional in-service training modules are developed into Internet-based format, there is the potential for additional cost savings. Our cost analysis demonstrates that the remote in-service method provides a more affordable and efficient alternative compared with in-person training. The online in-service provided training that was equivalent to in-person sessions based on first-hand supervisor observation, participant satisfaction surveys, and follow-up results. This method saves time and money, requires fewer personnel, and affords access to expert trainers regardless of geographic location. Further, it is generalizable to training beyond HIV rapid testing. Based on these consistent implementation successes, we plan to expand use of online training to include remote VA satellite facilities spanning

  20. Diabetes

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — These datasets provide de-identified insurance data for diabetes. The data is provided by three managed care organizations in Allegheny County (Gateway Health Plan,...

  1. Utilizing a Diabetes Risk Test and A1c Point-of-Care Instrument to Identify Increased Risk for Diabetes In an Educational Dental Hygiene Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giblin, Lori J; Rainchuso, Lori; Rothman, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this pilot study was to demonstrate the number of patients at increased risk for type 2 diabetes development using a validated survey; and to assess the rate of compliance for A1c screening in an educational dental hygiene setting. This was a descriptive study using a purposive sample of patients in an academic dental hygiene clinic, who were 18 years or older, not diagnosed with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes. Utilizing the American Diabetes Association adopted diabetes risk survey, patients determined to be at increased risk for type 2 diabetes were offered the opportunity for further assessment by having their A1c tested using a point of care instrument. Patients demonstrating an increased risk for prediabetes or type 2 diabetes, with either the survey or the point of care instrument, were referred to their primary physician for further evaluation. A total 179 of the 422 solicited patients agreed to participate in the American Diabetes Association adopted diabetes risk survey. According to the survey guidelines, 77 participants were considered increased risk for type 2 diabetes for an at-risk prevalence of 48% (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 40 to 56%). The at-risk participants were then asked to have an A1c test of which 45 agreed (compliance rate 58%, 95% CI: 47 to 70%). Using American Diabetes Association A1c parameters, 60.98% (n=25) indicated a prediabetes (5.7 to 6.4%) range, and 4.88% (n=2) indicated a diabetes (≥6.5%) range. Utilizing the American Diabetes Association adopted diabetes risk survey in any dental setting could provide patients with invaluable health information, and potentially improve overall health outcomes. Copyright © 2016 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  2. Effects of Self-management Education Through Telephone Follow-up in Diabetic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namjoo Nasab, Mahmood; Ghavam, Abbas; Yazdanpanah, Abbas; Jahangir, Fereidoun; Shokrpour, Nasrin

    It is expected that the number of people living with diabetes rise especially in low- and middle-income countries. In Iran, more than four million adults have diabetes mellitus, and self-management education is essential for effective diabetes self-care. This study aimed to investigate the effect of self-management education with telephone follow-up in diabetic patients of rural areas of Fars province in Lamerd city, Iran. In this experimental study, 64 participants were randomly assigned to intervention and control groups (32 patients for each group). In the intervention group, the participants attended four educational sessions, each lasting 90 minutes. The control group received the usual care. Outcome measures were clinical variables and the patients' scores in Diabetes Self-Management Questionnaire (DSMQ) in the preintervention and postintervention phases. Effects of the intervention were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U test and analysis of covariance. Data of 60 patients (30 in each group) were analyzed. There were significant differences between the two groups in fasting blood sugar after 3 months of intervention. There was a significant difference between the intervention and control groups in DSMQ sum scale after adjusting for baseline value. In subscales of DSMQ, there were significant differences between the intervention and control groups in glucose management, dietary control, and physical activity, whereas no significant difference was found in health care use between the intervention and control groups. Self-management education with telephone follow-up in diabetic patients in rural areas is effective, especially in improving fasting blood sugar level and increasing scores of patients based on DSMQ.

  3. Foot care education and self management behaviors in diverse veterans with diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan M Olson

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Jonathan M Olson1, Molly T Hogan2, Leonard M Pogach3, Mangala Rajan3, Gregory J Raugi4, Gayle E Reiber51University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA, USA; 2Department of Internal Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA, USA; 3Department of Veterans Affairs, New Jersey Healthcare System, Center for Healthcare Knowledge Management, East Orange, NJ, USA; 4Division of Dermatology, VA Puget Sound Healthcare System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA, USA; 5Research and Development, VA Puget Sound Healthcare System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA, USAAbstract: The objective of this study was to examine differences in self-reported diabetes foot care education, self management behaviors, and barriers to good foot care among veterans with diabetes by race and ethnicity. Data was collected using the Veterans Health Administration Footcare Survey, a validated tool that assessed demographic, general health, diabetes and foot self-care information, barriers to foot self-care, receipt of professional foot care, and satisfaction with current care. We mailed surveys to a random sample of patients with diabetes from eight VA medical centers. Study participants were 81% White; 13% African American; 4% Asian, and 2% American Indian and Pacific Islanders. The majority of respondents felt that they did not know enough about foot self-care. There were large gaps between self-reported knowledge and actual foot care practices, even among those who reported “knowing enough” on a given topic. There were significant differences in self-reported foot care behaviors and education by race and ethnicity. These findings document the need for culturally-specific self-management education to address unique cultural preferences and barriers to care.Keywords: diabetes mellitus, diabetic foot, patient self-management, ethnic groups, education

  4. Patient empowerment via 'pushed' delivery of Personalised Healthcare educational content over the internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidi, S S; Han, C Y; Abidi, S R

    2001-01-01

    We present an Internet-based Personalised Healthcare Information (PHI) dissemination system. Information personalisation is guided by the individual's current health profile as recorded in his/her EMR. A PHI package is composed by intelligently selecting and synthesizing various topic-specific documents, each corresponding to some health parameter noted in the EMR. To ensure medical consistency, constraint satisfaction techniques are employed during the information selection phase. The resultant PHI package--covering both long-term and immediate health-maintenance requirements--can be pro-actively pushed to the individual via email, thereby ensuring the timely availability of situation-specific health maintenance information. The featured work is in line with the Malaysian Multimedia Super Corridor Telemedicine initiative and can serve as a test-bed to evaluate the effectiveness of PHI, system design and operational considerations for larger-scale deployment.

  5. Internet economics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henten, Anders; Skouby, Knud Erik; Øst, Alexander Gorm

    1997-01-01

    A paper on the economics of the Internet with respect to end user pricing and pricing og interconnect.......A paper on the economics of the Internet with respect to end user pricing and pricing og interconnect....

  6. Internet Economics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henten, Anders; Skouby, Knud Erik; Øst, Alexander Gorm

    1998-01-01

    Article descibing and analysing the influence of the commercialisation of Internet on end-user and interconnect pricing.......Article descibing and analysing the influence of the commercialisation of Internet on end-user and interconnect pricing....

  7. Internet factories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strijkers, R.J.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis contributes a novel concept for introducing new network technologies in network infrastructures. The concept, called Internet factories, describes the methodical process to create and manage application-specific networks from application programs, referred to as Netapps. An Internet

  8. Internet Factories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strijkers, R.J.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis contributes a novel concept for introducing new network technologies in network infrastructures. The concept, called Internet factories, describes the methodical process to create and manage application-specific networks from application programs, referred to as Netapps. An Internet

  9. Internet Economics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henten, Anders; Skouby, Knud Erik; Øst, Alexander Gorm

    1998-01-01

    Article descibing and analysing the influence of the commercialisation of Internet on end-user and interconnect pricing.......Article descibing and analysing the influence of the commercialisation of Internet on end-user and interconnect pricing....

  10. Internet economics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henten, Anders; Skouby, Knud Erik; Øst, Alexander Gorm

    1997-01-01

    A paper on the economics of the Internet with respect to end user pricing and pricing og interconnect.......A paper on the economics of the Internet with respect to end user pricing and pricing og interconnect....

  11. The numeracy demands of health education information: an examination of numerical concepts in written diabetes materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joram, Elana; Roberts-Dobie, Susan; Mattison, Sue J; Devlin, Michele; Herbrandson, Kristy; Hansen, Kim; Eslinger, Denise

    2012-01-01

    The comprehension of numerical concepts that appear in written health educational materials is an important aspect of health literacy. Health materials that include many advanced numerical concepts may place high demands on readers, especially those with low health literacy levels. The purpose of this study was to examine and document the types of numerical concepts that appear in passages selected from written diabetes educational materials that varied in their type of content. Readability of the passages was also analyzed. One hundred and fifty passages of 100 words each were selected from 50 diabetes-related educational documents, produced by major health organizations. Passages were coded for type of numerical concept, SMOG Reading Grade Level, Flesch Reading Ease, and features that elaborated the numerical concepts, such as pictures or explanations. Findings indicate that passages containing general information about diabetes and its prevention contained significantly more advanced numerical concepts, the highest reading grade level, the lowest reading ease scores, and the lowest frequency of elaborative features, relative to many other types of content. Recommendations are made for enhancing the presentation of numerical concepts in written diabetes educational materials.

  12. Psychological, Behavioral, and Educational Considerations for Children with Classified Disabilities and Diabetes within the School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyckoff, Leah; Hanchon, Timothy; Gregg, S. Renee

    2015-01-01

    School nurses are answering a call to action to provide day-to-day care for an increasing number of students diagnosed with chronic illnesses. Diabetes mellitus is one of the most prevalent chronic health conditions identified among school-age children and presents a host of complex challenges for the school nurse, educators, and other support…

  13. Psychological, Behavioral, and Educational Considerations for Children with Classified Disabilities and Diabetes within the School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyckoff, Leah; Hanchon, Timothy; Gregg, S. Renee

    2015-01-01

    School nurses are answering a call to action to provide day-to-day care for an increasing number of students diagnosed with chronic illnesses. Diabetes mellitus is one of the most prevalent chronic health conditions identified among school-age children and presents a host of complex challenges for the school nurse, educators, and other support…

  14. Outcomes of a type 2 diabetes education program adapted to the cultural contexts of Saudi women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bannay, Hana R.; Jongbloed, Lyn E.; Jarus, Tal; Alabdulwahab, Sami S.; Khoja, Tawfik A.; Dean, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the outcomes of a pilot intervention of a type 2 diabetes (T2D) education program, based on international standards, and adapted to the cultural and religious contexts of Saudi women. Methods: This study is an experiment of a pilot intervention carried out between August 2011 and January 2012 at the primary health clinics in Dammam. Women at risk of or diagnosed with T2D (N=35 including dropouts) were assigned to one of 2 groups; an intervention group participated in a pilot intervention of T2D education program, based on international standards and tailored to their cultural and religious contexts; and a usual care group received the usual care for diabetes in Saudi Arabia. Outcomes included blood glucose, body composition, 6-minute walk distance, life satisfaction, quality of life, and diabetes knowledge. The intervention group participated in a focus group of their program experience. Data analysis was based on mixed methods. Results: Based on 95% confidence interval comparisons, improvements were noted in blood sugar, 6-minute walk distance, quality of life, and diabetes knowledge in participants of the intervention group. They also reported improvements in lifestyle-related health behaviors after the education program. Conclusion: Saudi women may benefit from a T2D education program based on international standards and adapted to their cultural and religious contexts. PMID:26108595

  15. Effective Nutrition Education for Aboriginal Australians: Lessons from a Diabetes Cooking Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Penelope A.; Davison, Joyce E.; Moore, Louise F.; Rubinstein, Raechelle

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the experiences of Aboriginal Australians with or at risk of diabetes who attended urban community cooking courses in 2002-2007; and to develop recommendations for increasing the uptake and effectiveness of nutrition education in Aboriginal communities. Methods: Descriptive qualitative approach using semistructured…

  16. Internet marketing

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    In the bachelor thesis are introduced theoretical concepts of the Internet and marketing, accented the need of marketing mix along with its specifics of the internet environment. Next is interpreted which tools can be used for marketing of firms and which marketing instruments are to be deployed. Final chapter illustrates socio-demographics of Czech internet users along with media market allocation from the perspective of all media as well as in the segment of the Internet.

  17. The Internet as a Tool for Informal Education: A Case of Uyghur Language Websites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clothey, Rebecca A.

    2017-01-01

    The 200th year since Jullien published his influential book "Esquisse et vues preliminaries d'un ouvrage sur l'éducation comparée" (Preliminary plan and views of a work of comparative education) is an opportunity to reflect on the field of comparative education and potential new research and theoretical directions. This paper will…

  18. Educational-researching and Information Resources In Interdisciplinary Automated Training System Based On Internet Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Savitskaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research is the study of the functionality of modular object-oriented dynamic learning environment (Moodle to development the informational and educational and educational research resource for training students in the disciplines of natural-scientific and engineer science. Have considered scientific-practical and methodological experience in the development, implementation and use of the interdisciplinary automated training system based on the Moodle system in the educational process. Presented the structure of the typical training course and set out recommendations for the development of information and educational resources different types of lessons and self-study students.Have considered the features of preparation of teaching-research resources of the assignments for lab using the software package MatLab. Also has considered the experience of implementing the discipline “Remote educational technologies and electronic learning in the scientific and the educational activities” for the training of graduate students at the Mendeleev University of Chemical Technology of Russia. The proposed an article approaches to the implementation of informational and educational and educational research resources in the interdisciplinary automated training system can be applied for a wide range of similar disciplines of natural-scientific and engineering sciences in a multilevel system of training of graduates.

  19. A socioeconomic and behavioral survey of patients with difficult-to-control type 2 diabetes mellitus reveals an association between diabetic retinopathy and educational attainment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emoto N

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Naoya Emoto,1,2 Fumitaka Okajima,1,2 Hitoshi Sugihara,2 Rei Goto3 1Department of Endocrinology, Nippon Medical School Chiba-Hokusoh Hospital, Chiba, 2Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Graduate School of Medicine, Nippon Medical School, Tokyo, 3Graduate School of Business Administration, Keio University, Kanagawa, Japan Background: We have recently reported that the attitude of patients toward risk could be a factor in the progression of diabetic complications. In general, risk preference is closely related to socioeconomic status (SES, which includes factors such as age, sex, income, and educational attainment.Objective: We aimed to determine the effect of SES and behavioral propensity on the progress of diabetic complications in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM.Methods: We conducted a survey of 238 patients with difficult-to-control T2DM treated at a hospital in Japan using a modified behavioral economics questionnaire that included questions related to SES. The patients had been referred by general practitioners or other departments in the hospital because of poor metabolic control or unstable complications.Results: Educational attainment was significantly associated with progression of retinopathy in patients <65 years of age. Educational attainment of a high school diploma (12 years of education or lower was a significant risk factor, but there were no differences among levels of attainment beyond high school (13–16 years or more of education. Behavioral propensities were also weakly associated with complications, but not as much as educational attainment. Personal income level and economic status did not show an association with the retinopathy levels.Conclusion: Lower educational attainment is a strong risk factor for diabetic retinopathy, and it is independent of the economic status. The result suggests that cognitive function may play an important role in the progression of diabetic retinopathy in

  20. Wireless Internet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    el Zarki, M.; Heijenk, Geert; Lee, Kenneth S.; Bidgoli, H.

    This chapter addresses the topic of wireless Internet, the extension of the wireline Internet architecture to the wireless domain. As such the chapter introduces the reader to the dominant characteristics of the Internet, from its structure to the protocols that control the forwarding of data and

  1. Internet Accounting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pras, Aiko; Beijnum, van Bert-Jan; Sprenkels, Ron; Párhonyi, Robert

    2001-01-01

    This article provides an introduction to Internet accounting and discusses the status of related work within the IETF and IRTF, as well as certain research projects. Internet accounting is different from accounting in POTS. To understand Internet accounting, it is important to answer questions like

  2. The effects of an educational self-efficacy intervention on osteoporosis prevention and diabetes self-management among adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Mei; Hu, Jie; Petrini, Marcia A; McCoy, Thomas P

    2014-10-01

    Prevalence of osteoporosis (OP) is high among Chinese adults with diabetes. Assessment of OP and fracture risk as well as patient education should be included as part of the management of diabetes. The purpose of this pilot study was to test the effectiveness of an educational self-efficacy intervention on knowledge about OP, dietary calcium intake, the importance of physical activity (PA), and glycemic control among Chinese adults with type 2 diabetes residing in Wuhan, China. A quasi-experimental design with repeated measures was employed. Participants were assigned to either the intervention (n = 23) or the control group (n = 23). Intervention participants attended 6 weekly 1-hr educational sessions comprising presentations, demonstration, and discussions. Control participants received standard care. Data were collected via questionnaires at pre- and postintervention and at 3-month follow-up, and blood was drawn at preintervention and 3-month follow-up. Participants in the intervention group had significant improvement in OP knowledge, F(2, 43) = 11.504, p diabetes self-care activities, F(2, 43) = 14.009, p diabetes self-efficacy, F(2, 43) = 19.722, p prevention education based on self-efficacy theory among Chinese adults with type 2 diabetes. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. An augmented reality game to support therapeutic education for children with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle-Bustos, Andrés-Marcelo; Juan, M-Carmen; García-García, Inmaculada; Abad, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Therapeutic education in diabetes helps patients take responsibility for self-control of their disease, and providing technological support systems facilitates this education. In this paper, we present an augmented reality game to support therapeutic education for patients with diabetes. Our game helps children (aged 5-14 years) to learn carbohydrate (carb) content of different foods. The game shows virtual foods on a real dish. The number of carb choices corresponding to the visualized food is also shown (1 carb choice = 10 grams of carbs). A study to determine the effectiveness of the game in terms of learning and perceived satisfaction and usability was carried out. A total of seventy children with diabetes participated in the study. From the results, we observed that the initial knowledge about carb choices of the children who participated in the study was low (a mean of 2 on a scale from 0 to 9). This indicates that therapeutic education for patients with diabetes is needed. When the results for the pre-knowledge questionnaire and the post-knowledge questionnaire were compared, it was shown that the children learned about carb choices by playing our game. We used two post-knowledge questionnaires (one post-knowledge questionnaire that contained the same foods as the pre-knowledge questionnaire and a second post-knowledge questionnaire that contained foods that were different from the ones on the pre-knowledge questionnaire). There were no statistically significant differences between these two different post-knowledge questionnaires. Moreover, the knowledge acquired was independent of gender and age. We also evaluated usability and perceived satisfaction. The children were satisfied with the game and considered that the game offers a high degree of usability. This game could be a valuable therapeutic education tool for patients with diabetes.

  4. Evaluation of internet-based patient education materials from internal medicine subspecialty organizations: will patients understand them?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansberry, David R; Agarwal, Nitin; John, Elizabeth S; John, Ann M; Agarwal, Prateek; Reynolds, James C; Baker, Stephen R

    2017-06-01

    The majority of Americans use the Internet daily, if not more often, and many search online for health information to better understand a diagnosis they have been given or to research treatment options. The average American reads at an eighth-grade level. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the readability of online patient education materials on the websites of 14 professional organizations representing the major internal medicine subspecialties. We used ten well-established quantitative readability scales to assess written text from patient education materials published on the websites of the major professional organizations representing the following subspecialty groups: allergy and immunology, cardiology, endocrinology, gastroenterology, geriatrics, hematology, hospice and palliative care, infectious disease, nephrology, oncology, pulmonology and critical care, rheumatology, sleep medicine, and sports medicine. Collectively the 540 articles analyzed were written at an 11th-grade level (SD 1.4 grade levels). The sleep medicine and nephrology websites had the most readable materials, written at an academic grade level of 8.5 ± 1.5 and 9.0 ± 0.2, respectively. Material at the infectious disease site was written at the most difficult level, with average readability corresponding to grades 13.9 ± 0.3. None of the patient education materials we reviewed conformed to the American Medical Association (AMA) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) guidelines requiring that patient education articles be written at a third- to seventh-grade reading level. If these online resources were rewritten, it is likely that more patients would derive benefit from reading them.

  5. Pharmacist-provided diabetes management and education via a telemonitoring program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shane-McWhorter, Laura; McAdam-Marx, Carrie; Lenert, Leslie; Petersen, Marta; Woolsey, Sarah; Coursey, Jeffrey M; Whittaker, Thomas C; Hyer, Christian; LaMarche, Deb; Carroll, Patricia; Chuy, Libbey

    2015-01-01

    To assess clinical outcomes (glycosylated hemoglobin [A1C], blood pressure, and lipids) and other measurements (disease state knowledge, adherence, and self-efficacy) associated with the use of approved telemonitoring devices to expand and improve chronic disease management of patients with diabetes, with or without hypertension. Four community health centers (CHCs) in Utah. Federally qualified safety net clinics that provide medical care to underserved patients. Pharmacist-led diabetes management using telemonitoring was compared with a group of patients receiving usual care (without telemonitoring). Daily blood glucose (BG) and blood pressure (BP) values were reviewed and the pharmacist provided phone follow-up to assess and manage out-of-range BG and BP values. Changes in A1C, BP, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) at approximately 6 months were compared between the telemonitoring group and the usual care group. Patient activation, diabetes/hypertension knowledge, and medication adherence were measured in the telemonitoring group. Of 150 patients, 75 received pharmacist-provided diabetes management and education via telemonitoring, and 75 received usual medical care. Change in A1C was significantly greater in the telemonitoring group compared with the usual care group (2.07% decrease vs. 0.66% decrease; P telemonitoring group. Pharmacist-provided diabetes management via telemonitoring resulted in a significant improvement in A1C in federally qualified CHCs in Utah compared with usual medical care. Telemonitoring may be considered a model for providing clinical pharmacy services to patients with diabetes.

  6. Education and multidisciplinary team care concepts for pediatric and adolescent diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brink, Stuart J; Miller, Marilyn; Moltz, Kathleen C

    2002-01-01

    The DCCT scientifically established the basis for optimizing blood glucose control in type 1 diabetes mellitus around the world using a multidisciplinary team approach and patient-centered adjustments of food and insulin based upon blood glucose data generated by the patient. Pediatric diabetologists no longer believe that it is prudent to allow higher blood glucose levels in prepubertal children but much educational emphasis must be placed upon minimizing serious episodes of hypoglycemia. Individualized treatment should be determined by a close working relationship between highly trained diabetes nurses, educators and dieticians with the patient as the focus of self-care decisions, and a pediatric diabetologist ideally setting the philosophical and medical goals. Rather than the diabetes health care team being the only ones to initiate treatment, patient and parents should be empowered to analyze their own data, identify patterns, solve problems with food and activity, and do so based upon actual blood glucose results. This empowerment paradigm helps decrease care frustrations and improve treatment outcomes. Survival education followed by in-depth problem solving education and organized follow-up education are all needed steps for successful diabetes management. Identification of psychosocial barriers and energy diverting behavioral and family issues just as knowledge about learning styles play key roles in this process. Dogma should be avoided. More physiological utilization of insulin analogs, greater insulin dosing flexibility with a multidose insulin regimen coupled with adaptation of insulin to food and activity, should allow maximum benefit. Four major types of learning styles are reviewed: concrete sequential learners, abstract sequential learners, abstract random learners and concrete random learners. Health Belief Models, Locus of Control constructs, and Self-Efficacy models all provide sophisticated ways to help identify and overcome learning and self

  7. Education of people with type 2 diabetes through peers with diabetes: is it cost effective?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena González

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCCIÓN La inadecuada calidad de atención brindada a personas con diabetes tipo 2, genera un gran impacto socioeconómico y un grave problema de salud pública. La educación de estas personas a través de pares con diabetes mellitus es una alternativa, a la brindada por equipos profesionales (educación tradicional, que logra resultados no inferiores a esta última. Sin embargo, hay escasa evidencia de costo-efectividad de la educación a través de pares respecto de la tradicional. OBJETIVO Evaluar la relación costo-efectividad de la educación de personas con diabetes tipo 2, durante un año por un equipo profesional (educación tradicional, versus educación y apoyo impartida por un par con diabetes mellitus (educación de pares. MÉTODOS Análisis de costo-efectividad basado en un estudio clínico prospectivo aleatorizado, desarrollado en la ciudad de La Plata sobre 199 personas con diabetes tipo 2, organizados en dos grupos: uno que recibió educación tradicional y otro educación a través de pares con diabetes mellitus. Como indicador primario de efectividad se consideró el cambio en la hemoglobina glicosilada y como secundarios otros como índice de masa corporal, presión arterial sistólica, presión arterial diastólica, glucemia en ayunas, colesterol total y triglicéridos. Se estimó el costo directo de cada estrategia basándose en recursos utilizados en el estudio clínico y evaluándose tres escenarios de costos para la educación de pares. La robustez de los resultados se evaluó mediante análisis de sensibilidad univariado. RESULTADOS El costo por unidad de descenso (% de hemoglobina glicosilada con educación tradicional fue de $2621 pesos argentinos; y con educación a través de pares fue de $1508, $1779 y $2071 pesos argentinos, para cada uno de los tres escenarios considerados (escenario 1, escenario 2 y escenario 3, respectivamente. Por cada $100 pesos argentinos invertidos se logró descender 0,04% de

  8. Educating families from ethnic minorities in type 1 diabetes-experiences from a Danish intervention study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Povlsen, Lene; Olsen, Birthe; Ladelund, Steen

    2005-01-01

    focusing on immigrant families with children with type 1 diabetes is described. The intervention included the development of adapted educational material and guidelines, and a subsequent re-education of children, adolescents and parents from 37 families. The study demonstrated that it was possible......Ethnic minorities may constitute vulnerable groups within Western health care systems as their ability to master severe chronic diseases could be affected by barriers such as different culture and health/illness beliefs, communication problems and limited educational background. An intervention...... to improve health outcome. During the study, the knowledge of diabetes increased, but with considerable differences between the families. HbA(1c) also decreased significantly during the intervention, but increased during follow-up. The paper discusses possible explanations and suggestions for optimising...

  9. Educating families from ethnic minorities in type 1 diabetes-experiences from a Danish intervention study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Povlsen, Lene; Olsen, Birthe; Ladelund, Steen

    2004-01-01

    focusing on immigrant families with children with type 1 diabetes is described. The intervention included the development of adapted educational material and guidelines, and a subsequent re-education of children, adolescents and parents from 37 families. The study demonstrated that it was possible......Ethnic minorities may constitute vulnerable groups within Western health care systems as their ability to master severe chronic diseases could be affected by barriers such as different culture and health/illness beliefs, communication problems and limited educational background. An intervention...... to improve health outcome. During the study, the knowledge of diabetes increased, but with considerable differences between the families. HbA(1c) also decreased significantly during the intervention, but increased during follow-up. The paper discusses possible explanations and suggestions for optimising...

  10. Health care professionals from developing countries report educational benefits after an online diabetes course

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer Albrechtsen, Nicolai J; Poulsen, Kristina W; Svensson, Lærke Ø

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Medical education is a cornerstone in the global combat against diseases such as diabetes and obesity which together affect more than 500 million humans. Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) are educational tools for institutions to teach and share their research worldwide. Currently......, millions of people have participated in evidence-based MOOCs, however educational and professional benefit(s) for course participants of such initiatives have not been addressed sufficiently. We therefore investigated if participation in a 6 week open online course in the prevention and treatment......-2015) of Diabetes - a Global Challenge. Using an online based questionnaire (nine sections) software (Survey Monkey), email invitations were send out using a Coursera based database to the 29.469 course participants. Responses were analyzed and stratified, according to the United Nations stratification method...

  11. Understanding the role of the promotora in a Latino diabetes education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deitrick, Lynn M; Paxton, Hannah D; Rivera, Alicia; Gertner, Eric J; Biery, Nyann; Letcher, Abby S; Lahoz, Lissette M; Maldonado, Edgardo; Salas-Lopez, Debbie

    2010-03-01

    We explore the role of the promotora de salud (health promoter) who provided diabetes self-management education to Puerto Rican diabetics in her community. The education program was developed as a hospital and community-based organization partnership. Information from both Spanish-language focus groups with 35 class participants and an in-depth interview with the promotora indicated patients appreciated having the classes taught in Spanish by a Latina promotora from their community. Respondents reported satisfaction with the program, increased ability to self-manage diabetes, and strengthened connections with other Latino diabetics. Terms patients used for the promotora included comadre, hijita, and buena profesora. Some of these words denote almost kinship-level connections, suggesting that patients were forming strong connections with the promotora. Specific promotora roles were identified but varied among patients, promotora, and the literature. This hospital and community-based organization partnership promotora model appears to be effective for providing chronic disease self-management education in an urban community setting.

  12. Diabetes Self-Management Education in South Auckland, New Zealand, 2007-2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Silva, PhD

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionSelf-management education programs seek to help patients realize that they are their own principal caregivers and that health care professionals are consultants who support them in this role. The aim of this study was to evaluate a diabetes self-management education program implemented as part of a district-wide approach in South Auckland, New Zealand, which has some of the highest prevalence rates for diabetes and is one of the most ethnically diverse and deprived regions of New Zealand.MethodsSelf-management attitudes and behaviors were monitored with the use of questionnaires before and after program implementation. Clinical outcomes such as hemoglobin A1c, body mass index, and blood pressure were also tracked before the program began and 3 months after the program ended. Participant focus groups and facilitator interviews were conducted to explore perceptions of the program.ResultsParticipants showed improvement in attitudes toward their own ability to manage their diabetes; in diet, physical activity, and foot care; and in hemoglobin A1c levels 3 months after the end of participation. Participants also reduced their sense of isolation when dealing with their diabetes. However, catering to the needs of a multiethnic community is extremely resource-intensive because of the need to provide adequate language and cultural interpretation.ConclusionSelf-management education can work in multiethnic, high-needs communities in New Zealand. Programs must ensure they enable the appropriate mechanisms and have appropriate resources to support the community’s needs.

  13. Educational strategies for diabetic people at risk for foot neuropathy: synthesis of good evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Catunda Gomes de Menezes

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to identify the best evidence concerning health education strategies used in teaching-learning for people with diabetes mellitus who are at risk for foot neuropathy. An integrative review was conducted in the databases PubMed, LILACS, CINAHL and SCOPUS in January 2015; a total of 14 papers was analyzed in detail. The results are shown in a summary table and categories are discussed, covering various health education strategies for prevention and management with patients at risk of foot neuropathy (group; individual in face-to-face visits or via telephone; and using interactive technologies, and a synthesis of the best evidence for the effectiveness of these interventions in reducing diabetic foot complications. It was concluded that all the educational strategies are effective in promoting diabetic foot self-care. However, the group strategies showed greater effectiveness, enabling significant improvements in the knowledge, attitude, and practices of care for feet and general health of diabetic patients.

  14. Education for type 2 diabetes mellitus self-care: from compliance to empowerment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Pithon Cyrino

    Full Text Available Through a critical review of the literature on education for diabetes self-care and self-management, it was sought to point out the inappropriateness of traditional approaches towards compliance with treatment and transmission of information, considering the complexity of self-care under chronic conditions. The influence of the social sciences on the field of studies on chronic degenerative diseases in general, and diabetes in particular, was explored. From this perspective, it can be recognized that the fields of anthropology and sociology have been incorporated into research focusing more on individuals as patients, and on the experience gained through this process. Recently, there has been a slight change within the field of health education research relating to diabetes, with the introduction of strategies that seek to value the experience and autonomy of patients as self-care agents. This paper discusses the strategy for empowerment in education for diabetes self-care and self-management, as a dialogue-focused practice that respects patients' moral and cognitive autonomy.

  15. Education for type 2 diabetes mellitus self-care: from compliance to empowerment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Pithon Cyrino

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Through a critical review of the literature on education for diabetes self-care and self-management, it was sought to point out the inappropriateness of traditional approaches towards compliance with treatment and transmission of information, considering the complexity of self-care under chronic conditions. The influence of the social sciences on the field of studies on chronic degenerative diseases in general, and diabetes in particular, was explored. From this perspective, it can be recognized that the fields of anthropology and sociology have been incorporated into research focusing more on individuals as patients, and on the experience gained through this process. Recently, there has been a slight change within the field of health education research relating to diabetes, with the introduction of strategies that seek to value the experience and autonomy of patients as self-care agents. This paper discusses the strategy for empowerment in education for diabetes self-care and self-management, as a dialogue-focused practice that respects patients' moral and cognitive autonomy.

  16. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from Other Government Agencies and Offices National Diabetes Education Program Diabetes Information on MedlinePlus Diabetes and Depression ... Emergency Preparedness International Programs News & Events Training & Continuing Education Inspections & Compliance Federal, State & Local Officials Consumers Health ...

  17. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from Other Government Agencies and Offices National Diabetes Education Program Diabetes Information on MedlinePlus Diabetes and Depression ... Emergency Preparedness International Programs News & Events Training & Continuing Education Inspections & Compliance Federal, State & Local Officials Consumers Health ...

  18. Measurement Of Electromagnetic Field Radiation In The Internet Halls And Educational Computer Laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanim Thiab Hasan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available     There are more concerns about possible health effects related to electromagnetic fields from computer monitors and other video display terminals because of the widespread using of computers in laboratories ,offices and internet halls. This research aims to detect the effect of electromagnetic field radiations in these halls and laboratories and study the successful ways of minimizing its negative  health  effect on human health. The research has been performed on both the mathematical calculations and practical measurements. The obtaining results show that the practical measurements are consistent with the  mathematical calculations results. Comparison of  these results with the safety standard guideline  limits shows that they are within the acceptable exposuring limits recommended by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection  (ICNIRP and that means there is no health risk from exposure to these fields if the exposure is within the acceptable limits.     

  19. The Internet as a New Tool in the Rehabilitation Process of Patients—Education in Focus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erzsébet Forczek

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In the article we deal with the rehabilitation of patients using information technology, especially Internet support. We concentrate on two main areas in the IT support of rehabilitation: one of them is the support for individual therapy, the other one is providing patients with information, which is the basic step in emphasising individual responsibility. In the development of rehabilitation programmes, the knowledge of the IT professional and the therapist, in the IT support of web guidance, medical expertise plays the primary role. The degree of assistance involved in the rehabilitation process depends on the IT knowledge of medical (general practitioner, nursing staff professionals as well. The necessary knowledge required in healing and development processes is imparted to professionals by a special (full-time university training. It was a huge challenge for us to teach web-based information organisation skills to doctors and nurses, and it is also a complex task to put forward such an IT viewpoint to information specialists in order to create the foundations of the cooperation between IT and healthcare professionals.

  20. Impact of internet supported dental education: Initial outcomes in a study sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fırat Sarsar

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this preliminary mixed method study was to understand dental students’ thoughts on internet supported learning environment (ISLE and to investigate its’ impact on their academic success. The research was designed to enroll the students from the 7th semester of School of Dentistry. The lecturer taught dental students for four hours (within four weeks on the topics of "anamnesis, extraoral and intraoral examination". Voluntary twenty-four students participated actively to the ISLE. During the evaluation phase, data were collected by using open-ended questionnaire, instructor’s observation, students’ evaluation forms and exam results. According to the Open-ended questionnaire, 90% of the participating students mentioned e-learning experience positively affected their success; 55% of the students stated that dental courses can be taught online. According to students’ evaluation form, the highest mean score was granted to the instructor of the course (4.6/5, followed by the learning environment (4.1/5 and the materials (3.7/5. There was a significant difference between the grades granted to the instructor and materials; students thought the instructor was more important than the teaching materials (p<0.05. It was concluded that ISLE supported by PBL increased the students’ satisfaction, positive learning environment and academic success.

  1. Education and technology used to improve the quality of life for people with diabetes mellitus type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Brooke; Heiland, Brianne; Kohler-Rausch, Elizabeth; Kovic, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of type II diabetes mellitus (DMT2) is expected to continue to rise. Current research has analyzed various tools, strategies, programs, barriers, and support in regards to the self-management of this condition. However, past researchers have yet to analyze the education process; including the adaptation of specific strategies in activities of daily living and roles, as well as the influence of health care providers in the integration of these strategies. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to identify the strengths and limitations of the current model of diabetes education in the United States and hypothesize how technology can impact quality of life. Key informants on diabetes education were recruited from diabetes education centers through the American Association of Diabetes Educators. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with participants. Health care practitioners convey limited knowledge of DMT2. Individuals with DMT2 often have limited understanding of the implications of poor self-management. There appears to be no consistent standard of care for how to effectively incorporate self-management strategies. There is limited education for the use of technology in self-management. Diabetes educators describe that technology could be beneficial. Findings suggest the importance of the role of care providers in emphasizing the implications of poor self-management strategies; that a multidisciplinary approach may enhance the education process; and a need for further developments in technology to address DMT2 self-management strategies.

  2. Internet and medical student in Marrakech

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    difficulties encountered when using internet for medical purpose were similar. This can be ... Conclusion:The learning process is still based on traditional methods. Educational .... English as a language for their internet medical searches, while ...

  3. Internet addiction: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pejović-Milovančević Milica

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Some addictions cannot be connected with substance abuse (pathological gambling, video games playing, binge eating, compulsive physical activity, emotional relationship addiction, TV addiction. Since 1995, Internet addiction has been accepted as a clinical entity with profound negative effect on social, familial, educational and economical personal functioning. The diagnosis of Internet addiction could be established if the person spends more than 38 hours per week on the Internet exempting online professional needs. Basic symptoms are the increased number of hours spent in front of the computer along with the Internet use, development of abstinent syndrome if the Internet access is prohibited, sleep inversion, neglect of basic social requirements and personal hygiene, many somatic symptoms developed due to prolonged sitting or monitor watching, dissocial behavior. In this paper, data about the Internet addiction are presented and a case report of an adolescent with developed Internet addiction.

  4. Development of a Guided Internet-based Psycho-education Intervention Using Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Self-Management for Individuals with Chronic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Jennifer; VanDenKerkhof, Elizabeth G; Wilson, Rosemary; Tripp, Dean A

    2017-04-01

    Evidence-based chronic pain treatment includes nonpharmacologic therapies. When addressing barriers to treatment, there is a need to deliver these therapies in a way that is accessible to all individuals who may benefit. To develop a guided Internet-based intervention for individuals with chronic pain, program content and sequence of evidence-based treatments for chronic pain, traditionally delivered via in-person sessions, were identified to be adapted for Internet delivery. With consideration to historical barriers to treatment, and through use of a concept map, therapeutic components and educational material were situated, in an ordered sequence, into six modules. An Internet-based chronic pain intervention was constructed to improve access to evidence-based chronic pain therapies. Research using this intervention, in the form of a pilot study for intervention refinement, was conducted, and a large-scale study to assess effectiveness is necessary prior to implementation. As clients may face barriers to multimodal treatment for chronic pain, nurses could introduce components of education, cognitive behavioral therapy and self-management to clients and prepare them for the "work" of managing chronic pain, through use of this Internet-based intervention. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Teenagers’ internet literacy education in internet age%网络时代青少年的网络素养教育

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王钰

    2013-01-01

    The rapid development of internet technology and popularization, mankind has entered the network society, information technology is rapidly applied to every aspect of human work and learning,"the Internet"has become a kind of inevitable. In our country huge Internet users, young people under the age of 30 is the largest use of the network which is the most active groups, the network has become an important platform for young people to learn knowledge, access to information, exchange ideas, leisure and entertainment. How to take measures, and guide young people healthy use of the Internet, give full play to the positive role of the network, enable young people to adapt to the information time development, advancing with the times, is the current important issues of common concern by parents and teachers.%互联网技术的迅猛发展和广泛普及,使人类进入网络社会,信息技术被快速的应用到人类工作和学习的各个方面,“上网”成为了一种必然。在我国庞大的网民中,30岁以下的青少年是使用网络最大的也是最为活跃的群体,网络已成为青少年学习知识、获取信息、交流思想、休闲娱乐的重要平台。如何采取措施,引导青少年健康地使用网络,充分发挥网络的积极作用,使青少年适应信息时代的发展、与时俱进,是当前教师、家长共同关注的重要问题。

  6. Periodontal health and diabetes awareness among Saudi diabetes patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahammam MA

    2015-02-01

    diabetes-related information, and the Internet was the least likely source.Conclusion: Customized educational programs should be planned for diabetic patients according to community needs.Keywords: periodontal health, diabetes, patients, awareness, Saudi Arabia 

  7. The current status of diabetes professional educational standards and competencies in the UK--a position statement from the Diabetes UK Healthcare Professional Education Competency Framework Task and Finish Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, N; George, S; Priest, L; Deakin, T; Vanterpool, G; Karet, B; Simmons, D

    2011-12-01

    Diabetes is a significant health concern, both in the UK and globally. Management can be complex, often requiring high levels of knowledge and skills in order to provide high-quality and safe care. The provision of good, safe, quality care lies within the foundations of healthcare education, continuing professional development and evidence-based practice, which are inseparable and part of a continuum during the career of any health professional. Sound education provides the launch pad for effective clinical management and positive patient experiences. This position paper reviews and discusses work undertaken by a Working Group under the auspices of Diabetes UK with the remit of considering all health professional educational issues for people delivering care to people with diabetes. This work has scoped the availability of education for those within the healthcare system who may directly or indirectly encounter people with diabetes and reviews alignment to existing competency frameworks within the UK's National Health Service.

  8. On the Development of Art Education in the Era of "Internet +"%论“互联网+”时代艺术教育之发展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵崇华; 李嘉璐

    2016-01-01

    挖掘“互联网+”的深刻内涵,探索“互联网+艺术教育”所形成的多层面意义,从多元艺术史观的建立、先进教学模式与教育设施的建设以及多维的艺术评议体系详细论述,向“互联网+”时代的艺术教育发展提供切实建议,以促进艺术教育发展。%This paper explores the profound connotation of "Internet +"and the multi -dimentional meaning developed by"Internet +Art education"by anaylizing the establiment of multielement art history,advanced model of teaching,the con-struction of educational facilities and the multidimentional art appraisal system.And then,the paper makes practical sugges-tions on the development of art education in the era of "Internet +"for the sake of the improvement of art education.

  9. Internet and child pornography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seda Çağlar

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, internet use and access is becoming increasingly common as a great entertainment, communication and educational resource for children as well as for adults. Internet is a perfect environment for children, for exploring the world, learning and having fun. However, access to illegal sites that contain violence and sexuality, and contact dangerous people are among the particular risks for children using the internet. It is a known fact that, internet and developing technology make the production and distribution of child pornography cheaper and easier. There has been consensus on the need of creating a plan and increasing the awareness in the community for the fight against child pornography. Because of the increasing internet use and the risk for children mentioned, nurses got new responsibilities. Nurses have to inform society, especially families and children, about safe internet use. In this review, legal regulations about the fight against child pornography on the internet, the reasons that lay the ground for child pornography and their negative effects on children has been addressed.

  10. The Effect of an Education Program Utilising PRECEDE Model on the Quality of Life in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghdisi, M. H.; Borhani, M.; Solhi, M.; Afkari, M. E.; Hosseini, F.

    2012-01-01

    Background and objective: The problems caused by diabetes have direct and indirect impacts on the quality of life of diabetic patients. An increase of these problems means a decrease in a patient's quality of life. This study was conducted to assess the effect of the educational programme based on the precede model in promoting quality of life of…

  11. The role of patient education in the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, Adriana; Sasso, Loredana; Bagnasco, Annamaria; Giustina, Andrea; Gazzaruso, Carmine

    2016-07-01

    The management of type 2 diabetes mellitus includes ability and empowerment of the patient to change lifestyle, maintain an adequate diet and physical activity, manage the disease, and follow a specific program of periodic medical checks and education sessions. In addition, the patient should be able to correctly identify and adequately solve problems related to the disease and actively collaborate with the healthcare system. To obtain these goals, therapeutic patient education (TPE) is now considered a crucial element not only in the treatment but also in the prevention of type 2 diabetes. Several trials showed that TPE is able to improve clinical, lifestyle, and psycho-social outcomes. Nevertheless, studies have not clarified the ideal characteristics of a comprehensive patient education program in clinical practice. Other work is needed to answer open questions regarding the type of PTE (individual or group education), themes, frequency and number of education sessions, contact time between educator and patient, background of educators, use of new technologies, and barriers to self-management. The present review discusses these points on the basis of the most recent data of the literature.

  12. Current Issues of Motivation, Academic Performance and Internet Use-Applications for an Education of Excellence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turturean, Monica

    2012-01-01

    Today's world is facing many problems caused by the economic crisis "leading" thus to an education crisis. "Witnessing" major changes in the curricula, "at" different ways of assessment, at teaching and learning in a transdisciplinary manner which took by surprise the students who, in turn, "feel" disarmed and unable to cope with these changes…

  13. A Survey of Internet-Mediated Intercultural Foreign Language Education in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang; Coleman, James A.

    2009-01-01

    In all educational contexts, technological developments and changes in pedagogical theory mean that any picture of current practice and attitudes must be dynamic. In many countries, the learning outcomes of foreign language courses now include intercultural communicative competence (ICC), although the precise model for teaching ICC varies even…

  14. The Effectiveness of Internet-Controlled Astronomical Research Instrumentation for Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratap, Preethi; Salah, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    Over the last decade, remote instruments have become widely used in astronomy. Educational applications are more recent. This paper describes a program to bring radio astronomy into the undergraduate classroom through the use of a remote research-grade radio telescope, the MIT Haystack Observatory 37 m telescope. We examine the effectiveness of…

  15. Reading and Writing about Literature on the Internet. Two Innovative Experiences with Blogs in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neira-Piñeiro, María del Rosario

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes two innovative experiences with ICT in teacher training by means of the development of two blogs about children's and young adults' literature. The study of both activities shows the usefulness of blogs in higher education and their contribution to the linguistic and literary training of future teachers. The results show that…

  16. Understanding information and education gaps among people with type 1 diabetes: a qualitative investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, David; Heller, Simon; Lawton, Julia

    2011-04-01

    Many patients with type 1 diabetes struggle to self-manage this chronic disease, often because they have a poor knowledge and understanding of the condition. However, little attention has been paid to examining the reasons for this poor knowledge/understanding. To inform future educational interventions, we explored patients' accounts of the education and information they had received since diagnosis, and the reasons behind gaps in their diabetes knowledge. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 30 type 1 diabetes patients enrolled on a structured education programme in the UK. Data were analysed using an inductive, thematic approach. Patients' accounts illustrated a number of knowledge deficits which were influenced by various lifecourse events. Reasons for deficits included: diagnosis at a young age and assumption of decision-making responsibility by parents; lack of engagement with information when feeling well; transitions in care; inconsistency in information provision; and, lack of awareness that knowledge was poor or incomplete. Patients' knowledge deficits can arise for different reasons, at different points in the lifecourse, and may change over time. The delivery of individualised education should take account of the origins of patients' knowledge gaps and be provided on a regular and on-going basis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Scientix: the new internet-based community for science education in europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, C.; Gras-Velázquez, À.; Gerard, E.

    2012-04-01

    The objectives of the Lisbon declaration (2000) and the affirmation of the European Commission that there is a need to promote more widely inquiry based science education methodologies in primary and secondary schools and to support teachers' networks (2007), were the basis for launch by European Schoolnet (EUN) of Scientix, a new web-based information platform for science education in Europe. It's aim is to ensure the regular dissemination and sharing of progress, know-how, and best practices in the field of science education and providing a feedback mechanism. Scientix is a three-year project run by EUN since December 2009 on behalf of the European Commission Directorate General Research and is funded under the 7th Framework Programme. The portal (http://www.scientix.eu), available in six European languages, offers a resource repository containing hundreds of teaching materials from European projects, but also research reports and policy-making documents; a translation on demand service for the teaching materials towards any of the 23 languages of the European Union; a community including a forum and chat rooms; an online news service featuring international science education topics and a calendar of forthcoming events and training opportunities; and also a newsletter sent once a month to registered users. The Scientix main targets are teachers, providing teaching materials, scientific support and documentation that are able to give them some quality tools for the development and implementation of inquiry based science education teaching methodologies. Besides the website, several events and workshops will be organized during the three years of the project. Workshops and newsletters to inform science teachers, give them tools to use the Scientix platform in class effectively and meet other science teachers in Europe will be organized from 2010 to 2012 and will take place in several European countries. An example of this was the Scientix European Conference that

  18. [Development and outcome of motivational support during inpatient education of insulin-dependent diabetic patients--a pilot project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haisch, J; Lang-Hatzfeld, A; Brückel, J; Böhm, B O

    1996-01-01

    At the Ulm University Hospital 43 type-1-diabetes patients took part in a structured in-patient diabetes education program during a 12-day hospitalization period. 27 of the patients received an additional motivational support program which addressed psychological and social impediments related to the topics of the structured diabetes education program. 16 patients underwent the structured diabetes education program only. Motivational support aimed at reducing the specifically addressed sociopsychological barriers. Thus, the effects of the structured diabetes education program should be stabilized and an optimal outcome insured. All patients were asked to complete a questionnaire before, right after and 3 months after the program. Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbAlc) was evaluated before and 3 months after the program. Patients who underwent the motivational support program still felt 3 months after completion of the program that metabolic control was important, whereas patients without motivational support did not. Metabolic control--as indicated by measurement of glycosylated hemoglobin--could be maintained in the patient group with motivational support. Although their blood glucose levels had been in the normal range to start with. These encouraging results suggest implementation of a motivational support program into standard diabetes education programs for type-I-diabetes patients.

  19. Investigating diet and physical activity in Malaysia: education and family history of diabetes relate to lower levels of physical activity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tam, Cai Lian; Bonn, Gregory; Yeoh, Si Han; Wong, Chee Piau

    2014-01-01

    .... Knowledge of diabetes, health locus of control, diet and exercise habits, as well as family history, education level and other demographic factors to better understand the correlates of risky and healthy behaviors...

  20. What role could community pharmacists in Malaysia play in diabetes self-management education and support? The views of individuals with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, E Lyn; Wong, Pei Se; Tan, Ming Yeong; Sheridan, Janie

    2017-06-02

    This study explored the experiences and views of individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) on their diabetes self-management and potential roles for community pharmacists in diabetes self-management education and support (DSME/S) in Malaysia. A qualitative study, using semi-structured, face-to-face interviews, was conducted with patients with T2D attending a primary care health clinic in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed inductively. Fourteen participants with T2D were interviewed. Data were coded into five main themes: experience and perception of diabetes self-management, constraints of the current healthcare system, perception of the community pharmacist and community pharmacies, perceived roles for community pharmacists in diabetes care, and challenges in utilising community pharmacies to provide DSME/S. There were misconceptions about diabetes management that may be attributed to a lack of knowledge. Although participants described potential roles for community pharmacists in education, medication review and continuity of care, these roles were mostly non-clinically oriented. Participants were not confident about community pharmacists making recommendations and changes to the prescribed treatment regimens. While participants recognised the advantages of convenience of a community pharmacy-based diabetes care service, they raised concerns over the retail nature and the community pharmacy environment for providing such services. This study highlighted the need to improve the care provision for people with T2D. Participants with T2D identified potential, but limited roles for community pharmacists in diabetes care. Participants expressed concerns that need to be addressed if effective diabetes care is to be provided from community pharmacies in Malaysia. © 2017 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  1. 糖尿病患者的健康宣教%Diabetes Health Education

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宁月华; 李志娟

    2013-01-01

      目的从护理角度加强对糖尿病患者的健康宣教,提高糖尿病患者的自我防病意识。方法对糖尿病患者进行疾病知识、治疗、饮食调控、适度运动、心理护理等几方面进行宣教。结果与结论通过健康宣教使糖尿病患者对疾病引起重视,在日常生活中进行自我保健,提高糖尿病患者的生活质量。%Objective From a nursing perspective on diabetes patient's health education, improving the self awareness of prevention of diabetes mel itus patients. Methods Diabetic patients knowledge Of disease, treatment, diet, moderate exercise,psychological nursing and other aspects. Results and Conclusion On the disease of diabetes patients pay attention to, in daily life, self care, improve the quality of life in patients with diabetes mel itus.

  2. The effectiveness of nutritional education on the knowledge of diabetic patients using the health belief model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Sharifirad

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available

    • BACKGROUND: Patients have a major role in the control and treatment of type 2 diabetes. So, knowledge of different aspects of this disease especially diet therapy is very important for these patients. This study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of the Health Belief Model (HBM on nutrition education in type 2 diabetic patients.
    • METHOD: Eighty eight type 2 diabetic patients attending Iranian Diabetes Association seminars were randomly selected to participate in the study (44 in intervention group and 44 in control group. The intervention was consisted of two educational sessions each one for 80 minutes. Data were collected by a validated and reliable questionnaire (58 questions before intervention and one month after intervention.
    • RESULTS: After intervention, knowledge scores increased in the intervention group compared to the control group (Mean differences in the intervention and test group: 22.68 ± 15.90 vs - 2.27 ± 17.30, P < 0.001. Perceived susceptibility increased significantly in the intervention group compared to the control group (27.5 ± 18.5 vs 3.9 ± 17.2, P < 0.001. The result was the same for perceived severity, perceived threatened and perceived benefits (P < 0.001. In contrast perceived barriers reduced in the intervention group compared to the control diet (-14.7 ± 13.3 vs 0.9 ± 13.9, P < 0.001. In the intervention group, behavior grades increased more than control group (34.61 ± 14.93 vs -0.23 ± 8.52, P < 0.001.
    • CONCLUSION: The efficacy of the health belief model in nutritional education to the diabetic patients was confirmed in the present study.

  3. Internet and web projects for fusion plasma science and education. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eastman, Timothy E. [Senior Research Associate, Silver Spring, MD (United States)

    1999-08-30

    The plasma web site at http://www.plasmas.org provides comprehensive coverage of all plasma science and technology with site links worldwide. Prepared to serve the general public, students, educators, researchers, and decision-makers, the site covers basic plasma physics, fusion energy, magnetic confinement fusion, high energy density physics include ICF, space physics and astrophysics, pulsed-power, lighting, waste treatment, plasma technology, plasma theory, simulations and modeling.

  4. A pilot study: the development of a culturally tailored Malaysian Diabetes Education Module (MY-DEMO) based on the Health Belief Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ahmad, Badariah; Ramadas, Amutha; Kia Fatt, Quek; Md Zain, Anuar Zaini

    2014-01-01

    .... Contrastingly, few structured and validated diabetes modules are available in Malaysia. This pilot study aims to develop and validate diabetes education material suitable and tailored for a multicultural society like Malaysia...

  5. [Effect of educational support on treatment adherence in patients with type 2 diabetes: an experimental study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Cornejo, María de Los Ángeles; Rico-Herrera, Laura; Padilla-Raygoza, Nicolás

    2014-01-01

    Adherence to pharmacological or non-pharmacological treatment of diabetes type 2 is fundamental in order to delay the onset of complications. To measure the effect of nursing educational support on compliance with treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes attending Regional Hospital Universitario of Colima, Mexico. An experimental, randomized study including outpatients with type 2 diabetes attending a Regional Hospital who agreed in writing to participate in the study. Nursing educational intervention sessions of three hours on two days a week for three months were provided. Adherence to treatment was assessed before and after intervention using the Scale for treatment adherence in type 2 diabetes (EATDM-III(©)). We performed two-proportion Z and p; Risk Ratio and confidence interval 95% and attributable fraction exposed. e experimental group had 32 members, the same as the control. After the intervention it was found that 16 members (50%) in the experimental group showed treatment adherence, unlike the control group where no one showed adherence to treatment, obtaining an independent two-proportion Z=4.62, P=.0000, Risk Ratio=65; Confidence Interval 95%=3.67 to 1152.38; exposed attributable fraction=98.46%. The intervention was effective for the adherence of treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  6. Disparities in attendance at diabetes self-management education programs after diagnosis in Ontario, Canada: a cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cauch-Dudek Karen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients newly-diagnosed with diabetes require self-management education to help them understand and manage the disease. The goals of the study were to determine the frequency of diabetes self-management education program utilization by newly-diagnosed patients, and to evaluate whether there were any demographic or clinical disparities in utilization. Methods Using population-level health care data, all 46,553 adults who were diagnosed with any type of non-gestational diabetes in Ontario, Canada between January and June 2006 were identified. They were linked with a diabetes self-management education program registry to identify those who attended within 6 months of diagnosis. The demographic and clinical characteristics of attendees and non-attendees were compared. Results A total of 9,568 (20.6% patients attended a diabetes self-management education program within 6 months of diagnosis. Younger age, increasing socioeconomic status, and the absence of mental health conditions or other medical comorbidity were associated with attendance. Patients living in rural areas, where access to physicians may be limited, were markedly more likely to attend. Recent immigrants were 40% less likely to attend self-management education programs than longer-term immigrants or nonimmigrants. Conclusion Only one in five newly-diagnosed diabetes patients attended a diabetes self-management education program. Demographic and clinical disparities in utilization persisted despite a publicly-funded health care system where patients could access these services without direct charges. Primary care providers and education programs must ensure that more newly-diagnosed diabetes patients receive self-management education, particularly those who are older, poorer, sicker, or recent immigrants.

  7. Internet Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehr, William H.; Pupillo, Lorenzo Maria

    The Internet is now widely regarded as essential infrastructure for our global economy and society. It is in our homes and businesses. We use it to communicate and socialize, for research, and as a platform for E-commerce. In the late 1990s, much was predicted about what the Internet has become at present; but now, we have actual experience living with the Internet as a critical component of our everyday lives. Although the Internet has already had profound effects, there is much we have yet to realize. The present volume represents a third installment in a collaborative effort to highlight the all-encompassing, multidisciplinary implications of the Internet for public policy. The first installment was conceived in 1998, when we initiated plans to organize an international conference among academic, industry, and government officials to discuss the growing policy agenda posed by the Internet. The conference was hosted by the European Commission in Brussels in 1999 and brought together a diverse mix of perspectives on what the pressing policy issues would be confronting the Internet. All of the concerns identified remain with us today, including how to address the Digital Divide, how to modify intellectual property laws to accommodate the new realities of the Internet, what to do about Internet governance and name-space management, and how to evolve broadcast and telecommunications regulatory frameworks for a converged world.

  8. [Internet addiction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkeila, Jyrki

    2012-01-01

    Internet addiction is defined as uncontrolled and harmful use of Internet, which manifests in three forms: gaming, various sexual activities and excessive use of emails, chats or SMS messaging. Several studies have found that abuse of alcohol and other substances, depression and other health problems are associated with Internet addiction. In boys and men depression may be more a consequence of the addiction than a cause for it. ADHD seems to be a significant background factor for developing the condition. Because it is almost impossible to lead a life without Internet and computers nowadays, it is unrealistic to aim towards full abstinence. Treatment has generally followed the guidelines adapted for pathological gambling.

  9. Assessment of the Effectiveness of Internet-Based Distance Learning through the VClass e-Education Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chadchadaporn Pukkaew

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study assesses the effectiveness of internet-based distance learning (IBDL through the VClass live e-education platform. The research examines (1 the effectiveness of IBDL for regular and distance students and (2 the distance students’ experience of VClass in the IBDL course entitled Computer Programming 1. The study employed the common definitions of evaluation to attain useful statistical results. The measurement instruments used were test scores and questionnaires. The sample consisted of 59 first-year undergraduate students, most of whom were studying computer information systems at Rajamangala University of Technology Lanna Chiang Mai in Thailand. The results revealed that distance students engaged in learning behavior only occasionally but that the effectiveness of learning was the same for distance and regular students. Moreover, the provided computer-mediated communications (CMC (e.g., live chat, email, and discussion board were sparingly used, primarily by male distance students. Distance students, regular students, the instructor, and the tutor agreed to use a social networking site, Facebook, rather than the provided CMC during the course. The evaluation results produce useful information that is applicable for developing and improving IBDL practices.

  10. Information system «History, geographical and social-economic parallel XIX–XXI age on archive information of the removal A. I. Mende» on base internet-technology as complex innovacionnyh educational resource

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shekotilov V. G.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Information system «History, geographical and social-economic parallel XIX–XXI age on archive information of the removal A. I. Mende» on base internet-technology as complex innovacionnyh educational resource.

  11. Educação via Internet: experiência preliminar de Hematologia e Oncologia da Faculdade de Medicina da Fundação ABC Medical education through the Internet: preliminary experience of the Hematology-Oncology discipline of the ABC Foundation School of Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Moura

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Com o intuito de estimular o uso da Internet pelos nossos estudantes de medicina, criamos uma prova virtual a qual se submeteu toda a classe durante o curso de Oncologia e Hematologia ministrado no 3o ano do curso médico. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Através de uma página na Internet especialmente criada para esta prova, avaliou-se através de perguntas específicas dados pessoais, padrões de uso e conhecimentos básicos sobre o acesso à rede. Ofereceu-se ainda, dentro desta mesma página, um pequeno curso virtual sobre como utilizar a Internet. RESULTADOS: Notamos que apenas 53% dos nossos alunos tinham usado a Internet antes da prova. O uso da Internet se correlacionou com a presença de outros usuários entre os membros da família (p BACKGROUND: In order to foster the use of the Internet by our medical students, we devised a virtual test to be taken by the whole class during the Hematology-Oncology course given in the third year. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Through a specially designed home page in the Internet students were asked questions regarding their personal characteristics, knowledge of basic Internet skills and were also given a short virtual course on line on the use of the Internet. RESULTS: We noted that only 53% of our students had used the Internet before. The use of the Internet was correlated with having more members of the household accessing the net (p < 0,001 but not with the student's sex, age or family income. CONCLUSION: Most of the students reacted favourably to this educational experience through which about half of them got acquainted with the use of the Internet for the first time.

  12. The Role of the Adult Educator in Helping Learners Access and Select Quality Health Information on the Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Melissa; Grabowsky, Adelia

    2011-01-01

    In 2002, 45 percent of American adults had used the Internet to search for health information. However, according to a 2009 report, the number had increased to 71 percent of adults ages thirty to forty-nine and 46 percent of those 50 and older who had sought health information online. While the number of adults using the Internet to search for…

  13. An evaluation of Web-based education as an alternative to group lectures for diabetes self-management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Misoon; Choe, Myoung-Ae; Kim, Keum Soon; Yi, Myung Sun; Lee, Insook; Kim, Jeongeun; Lee, Mira; Cho, Young Min; Shim, Young Suk

    2009-09-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of Web-based diabetes self-management education for newly diagnosed patients with type II diabetes as an alternative to group lectures. Using a non-equivalent control group, pretest-post-test design, the participants in the Web group (n = 15) took part in a Web-based diabetes self-management program, while those in the lecture group (n = 16) attended 3 h of group lectures provided by health-care professionals specializing in diabetes care. The outcome variables were measured at the baseline (T0), and 6 weeks (T1) and 3 months (T2) after the interventions. The glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) percentage and diabetes care knowledge in the Web group improved significantly from T0 to T1, while the diabetes care behavior improved significantly from T0 to T1 and from T1 to T2. The diabetes care knowledge and diabetes care behavior in the lecture group improved significantly from T0 to T1, but the HbA1c percentage did not change significantly between any times. These results show the potential of the Web-based program as an alternative to group lectures for diabetes self-management education.

  14. Diabetes risk reduction in overweight first degree relatives of type 2 diabetes patients: Effects of a low-intensive lifestyle education program (DiAlert) A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heideman, W.H.; de Wit, M.; Middelkoop, B.J.C.; Nierkens, V.; Stronks, K.; Verhoeff, A.P.; Snoek, F.J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To test the efficacy of a low-intensive lifestyle education program (DiAlert) for overweight first degree relatives of type 2 diabetes patients aimed at reducing diabetes risk. Methods Overweight first degree relatives of type 2 diabetes patients were randomly assigned to the DiAlert

  15. 浅谈互联网+职业教育的实现途径%Realization Approach of Vocational Education through Internet Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘淑焕; 王崇博; 丁晓燕

    2015-01-01

    In the Internet era, the traditional vocational education pattern could not meet the demand for knowledge popularization and update. In the mean time, the pattern is constrained by ownership of different sectors."Internet plus"vocational education provides a new platform. Social, politic, economic, cultural, and educational factors all affect vocational education. Internet technology makes the integra-tion of these factors possible and puts forward effective approach to Internet plus vocational education, which will be more intelligent in the future. The Internet plus era has a higher demand for vocational education, including teaching contents more suitable to actual circum-stances, talent teams, training system, product concept, and O2O channel.%在互联网时代,原有的职业教育培训模式已不适应现代的知识普及和更新的需要,同时又受到部门所有制的制约,为此“互联网+”职业教育给职业教育发展提供了平台。影响职业教育的因素有社会、政治、经济、文化、教育诸多方面,通过互联网技术进行资源整合,为实现“互联网+”职业教育的实现提供了有效的途径。未来“互联网+”职业教育,将会向智慧教育的方向发展。教学内容切合实际,把人才梯度,培训体系、产品理念,线上线下及O2O渠道等方面的建设和研究,摆在适当位置,这将是“互联网+”时代对职业教育的一个更高的标准和要求。

  16. Efficacy of photographic educational materials for carbohydrate counting training of adolescents with diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Adriana Servilha Gandolfo; Débora Vasconcelos Bastos; Bruna Abreu Jabur Makluf; Lenycia de Cassya Lopes Neri; Roberta Diaz Savoldelli; Thais Della Manna; Durval Damiani; Alexandre Archanjo Ferraro

    2014-01-01

    Background: Carbohydrate counting (CHC) is acknowledged by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) as an important tool. Objective: To assess the efficacy of photographic educational materials to train adolescents with DM to perform CHC. Subjects and methods: 76 adolescents were randomly divided into two groups of CHC orientation: by means of photographic materials (Photo) or by a list of foods (List). One month afterwards, the participants were contacted via telephone to answer questions on ...

  17. Conversation Maps and Diabetes Education Groups: An Evaluation at an Australian Rural Health Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kewming, Sue; D'Amore, Angelo; Mitchell, Eleanor K L

    2016-02-01

    Objective. The rural Central Gippsland Health Service (CGHS) assists patients with diabetes through the provision of diabetes education. The purpose of this study was to compare and evaluate the CGHS 5-week didactic program and a modified group-participatory Conversation Maps diabetes education program. Method. A pre- and post-program survey was conducted of clients who attended the two different diabetes education programs. The survey consisted of a self-constructed demographic questionnaire, the Diabetes Knowledge Test, the Diabetes Empowerment Scale, and the Diabetes Self-Care Activities Measure. Results. For the CGHS program, there were no differences between pre- and post-program surveys in knowledge scores (11.05 ± 3.56 vs. 12.75 ± 4.19, P = 0.0883, n = 20), self-care activities (4.46 ± 1.11 vs. 4.83 ± 0.68, P = 0.0832, n = 12), or empowerment scores (7.16 ± 1.60 vs. 7.92 ± 1.26, P = 0.0540, n = 17). For the modified Conversation Maps program, there were significant improvements between pre- and post-program surveys in knowledge scores (12.42 ± 4.15 vs. 15.54 ± 3.79, P = 0.0004, n = 26), self-care activities (4.74 ± 1.09 vs. 5.32 ± 0.80, P = 0.0139, n = 24), and empowerment scores (6.56 ± 2.19 vs. 8.11 ± 1.46, P = 0.0016, n = 21). The greatest difference between the two programs was observed in knowledge gain (P = 0.0178). Overall, participants were satisfied with both programs, with no difference seen in satisfaction levels (P = 0.9763). A1C results improved in both programs to a mean of 6.7% (P = 0.0071 for CGHS and P = 0.0092 for Conversation Maps). Conclusion. The modified Conversation Maps program resulted in significant improvements for rural participants.

  18. Impact of Education on Weight in Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes: Every Little Bit Helps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen M J Azar

    Full Text Available Highly structured, intensive behavioral lifestyle interventions have been shown to be efficacious in research settings for type 2 diabetes management and weight loss. We sought to evaluate the benefit of participation in more limited counseling and/or education among individuals with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes in more modest real-world clinical settings.Electronic Health Records of newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes patients age 35-74 from a large ambulatory group practice were analyzed (n = 1,314. We examined participation in clinic-based lifestyle counseling/education and subsequent weight loss.Of the total cohort, 599 (45.6% patients received counseling/education with (26.2% and without (19.4% medication, 298(22.7% patients received a prescription for medication alone, and 417(31.7% patients were only monitored. On average, those who participated in counseling/education attended 2.5 sessions (approximately 2-3 hours. The average weight loss of patients who received counseling/education alone during the follow-up period (up to three years post-exposure to participation was 6.3 lbs. (3.3% of body weight, and, if received with medication prescription, 8.1 lbs. (4.0% of body weight (all at P<0.001. The weight loss associated with medication was only 3.5 lbs. (P<0.001. No significant weight change was observed in the monitoring only group.While efforts to improve both the short-term and long-term effectiveness of behavioral lifestyle interventions in real-world settings are ongoing, it is important for clinicians to continue to utilize less intensive, existing resources. Even relatively small "doses" of health education may help in promoting weight loss and may potentially reduce cardiometabolic risk.

  19. Education and technology used to improve the quality of life for people with diabetes mellitus type II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dudley B

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Brooke Dudley, Brianne Heiland, Elizabeth Kohler-Rausch, Mark Kovic Midwestern University Occupational Therapy Program, Downers Grove, IL, USA Background: The incidence of type II diabetes mellitus (DMT2 is expected to continue to rise. Current research has analyzed various tools, strategies, programs, barriers, and support in regards to the self-management of this condition. However, past researchers have yet to analyze the education process; including the adaptation of specific strategies in activities of daily living and roles, as well as the influence of health care providers in the integration of these strategies. Objectives: The purpose of this qualitative case study was to identify the strengths and limitations of the current model of diabetes education in the United States and hypothesize how technology can impact quality of life. Methods: Key informants on diabetes education were recruited from diabetes education centers through the American Association of Diabetes Educators. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with participants. Results: Health care practitioners convey limited knowledge of DMT2. Individuals with DMT2 often have limited understanding of the implications of poor self-management. There appears to be no consistent standard of care for how to effectively incorporate self-management strategies. There is limited education for the use of technology in self-management. Diabetes educators describe that technology could be beneficial. Conclusion: Findings suggest the importance of the role of care providers in emphasizing the implications of poor self-management strategies; that a multidisciplinary approach may enhance the education process; and a need for further developments in technology to address DMT2 self-management strategies. Keywords: health promotion, quality of life, diabetes mellitus type 2, technology, health education

  20. Applying national survey results for strategic planning and program improvement: the National Diabetes Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffey, Susan; Piccinino, Linda; Gallivan, Joanne; Lotenberg, Lynne Doner; Tuncer, Diane

    2015-02-01

    Since the 1970s, the federal government has spearheaded major national education programs to reduce the burden of chronic diseases in the United States. These prevention and disease management programs communicate critical information to the public, those affected by the disease, and health care providers. The National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP), the leading federal program on diabetes sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), uses primary and secondary quantitative data and qualitative audience research to guide program planning and evaluation. Since 2006, the NDEP has filled the gaps in existing quantitative data sources by conducting its own population-based survey, the NDEP National Diabetes Survey (NNDS). The NNDS is conducted every 2–3 years and tracks changes in knowledge, attitudes and practice indicators in key target audiences. This article describes how the NDEP has used the NNDS as a key component of its evaluation framework and how it applies the survey results for strategic planning and program improvement. The NDEP's use of the NNDS illustrates how a program evaluation framework that includes periodic population-based surveys can serve as an evaluation model for similar national health education programs.

  1. The perception of nurses regarding educational practices for children with diabetes in hospital care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Peixoto dos Santos Pennafort

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to describe the perception of nurses regarding educational practices conducted with children with diabetes in a hospital unit. It is a descriptive qualitative study, conducted in an inpatient unit of a public hospital in Fortaleza, state of Ceará, Brazil, between January and February of 2013, with six nurses. Data were collected by means of semi-structured interviews and submitted to content analysis, from which two categories emerged: role of nurses and staff in caring for the child with diabetes: the necessary intersection; and health education directed at the child with diabetes and family members in the hospital context. Nursing professionals acknowledged educational activities as part of an interdisciplinary care strategy which must occur since the moment the child is admitted. However, they displayed a reductionist view, centered on insulin therapy and changes of habit, which indicates the need for more creative approaches, capable of enhancing learning aspects and minimizing the gaps which prevent the disease from being managed appropriately.

  2. Association between information sources and level of knowledge about diabetes in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cántaro, Katherine; Jara, Jimena A; Taboada, Marco; Mayta-Tristán, Percy

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the association between the type of information source and the level of knowledge about diabetes mellitus in patients with type 2 diabetes. A cross-sectional study was conducted at a reference diabetes and hypertension center in Lima, Peru, during 2014. Level of knowledge was measured using the Diabetes Knowledge Questionnaire-24 and 12 information sources. Patients with 75% correct answers were considered to have a good knowledge. Adjusted odds ratios were calculated. Of the total 464 patients enrolled, 52.2% were females, and 20.3% used the Internet as information source. Mean knowledge was 12.9±4.8, and only 17.0% had a good knowledge, which was associated with information on diabetes obtained from the Internet (OR=2.03, 95% CI 1.32 to 3.14), and also from other patients (OR=1.99, 95% CI 1.20 to 3.31). Good knowledge was also associated with postgraduate education (OR=3.66, 95% CI 1.21 to 11.09), disease duration longer than 12 years (OR=1.91, 95% CI 1,22 to 3.01), and age older than 70 years (OR=0.39, 95% CI 0.21-0.72). Search for information in the Internet was positively associated to a good level of knowledge. It is suggested to teach patients with diabetes to seek information on the Internet and, on the other hand, to develop virtual spaces for interaction of patients with diabetes. Copyright © 2016 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Internet effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valkenburg, P.M.; Peter, J.; Levesque, R.J.R.

    2011-01-01

    Adolescents’ extensive use of Internet communication and the uncertainty about its consequences call for an integrative perspective that helps to understand both the appeal of Internet communication and its risks and opportunities. The aim of this essay is to theorize, and if possible, substantiate

  4. Internet Predictions

    OpenAIRE

    Estrin, Deborah; Chandy, K. Mani; Young, R. Michael; Smarr, Larry; Odlyzko, Andrew; Clark, David; Reding, Viviane; Ishida, Toru; Sharma, Sharad; Cerf, Vinton G.; Hölzle, Urs; Barroso, Luiz André; Mulligan, Geoff; Hooke, Adrian; Elliott, Chip

    2010-01-01

    More than a dozen leading experts give their opinions on where the Internet is headed and where it will be in the next decade in terms of technology, policy, and applications. They cover topics ranging from the Internet of Things to climate change to the digital storage of the future. A summary of the articles is available in the Web extras section.

  5. Internet effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valkenburg, P.M.; Peter, J.; Levesque, R.J.R.

    2011-01-01

    Adolescents’ extensive use of Internet communication and the uncertainty about its consequences call for an integrative perspective that helps to understand both the appeal of Internet communication and its risks and opportunities. The aim of this essay is to theorize, and if possible, substantiate

  6. The effect of a diabetes education, coping skills training, and care intervention on physiological and psychosocial outcomes in black women with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Eramo Melkus, Gail; Chyun, Deborah; Vorderstrasse, Allison; Newlin, Kelley; Jefferson, Vanessa; Langerman, Susan

    2010-07-01

    An 11-week culturally relevant group diabetes self-management training (DSMT), coping skills training (CST), and diabetes care intervention was compared to a 10-week usual diabetes education and diabetes care intervention on physiological and psychosocial outcomes in 109 Black women (aged 48 +/- 10 years) with type 2 diabetes in primary care (PC). Strong time effects for hemoglobin A1c improvement were seen in both groups from baseline to 3 months and remained similar at 12 and 24 months (p < .0001). Systolic blood pressure (p =.01) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (p = .05) improved in both groups from baseline to 24 months. Baseline quality of life ([QOL]; Medical Outcome Study Short Form-36) was low. Social function, role-emotional, and mental health domains increased initially in both groups then declined slightly, with less decline for the experimental group at 12 months. At 24 months, experimental group scores increased. General health (p = .002), vitality (p = .01), role-physical, and bodily pain (p = .02) domains increased in both groups over time. Perceived provider support for diet (p = .0001) and exercise (p = .0001) increased in both groups over time. Diabetes-related emotional distress decreased in the experimental compared to the control group (group x time, p = .01). Findings suggest that both methods of diabetes education combined with care can improve metabolic control, QOL, and perceptions of provider care. CST may further assist in long-term improvements in health outcomes. Behavioral interventions are needed in addition to routine diabetes care, particularly in PC.

  7. Nutrition Education in an Era of Global Obesity and Diabetes: Thinking Outside the Box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, David M; Burgess, Jonathan D

    2015-07-01

    In an era when rates of obesity, diabetes, and other lifestyle-related diseases challenge medical educators and governments worldwide, it is necessary to consider novel educational strategies, both didactic and experiential, whereby current and future health professionals can be better prepared to proactively advise and teach patients enhanced self-care skills (e.g., diet, movement, stress management, and enhanced behavioral change).In this Perspective, the authors summarize current circumstances involving rising rates of obesity and diabetes worldwide, the lack of nutrition- and lifestyle-related curricular requirements for professional medical certification, societal trends regarding modern food culture and food availability in health care settings, and the misalignment of financial incentives to promote health.The authors assess what elements of self-care should or should not be required within future curricula and certification exams. They consider how best to educate trainees about diet and how to "translate" nutrition, exercise, and behavioral science knowledge into practical advice. They explore several ideas for reforming nutrition education, including "teaching kitchens" as required laboratory classes for nutrition and lifestyle instruction, wearable technologies for tracking behaviors and physiological data relating to lifestyle choices, and the prospect of hospitals and other medical venues serving as exemplars of healthy, delicious food options. Finally, the authors argue that "salutogenesis"-the study of the creation and maintenance of health and well-being-should assume its rightful position alongside the study of "pathogenesis"-disease diagnosis and treatment-in medical education and practice.

  8. A Qualitative Assessment of the Practice Experiences of Certified Diabetes Educator Pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzahrani, Fahad; Taylor, Jeff; Perepelkin, Jason; Mansell, Kerry

    2015-08-01

    To describe the practice experiences of Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE) pharmacists in Saskatchewan and determine what impact the CDE designation has had on their personal practices. A qualitative research approach was used. All pharmacists in Saskatchewan were e-mailed about the study, and eventually, a purposive sampling method was used to select a range of CDE pharmacists. Semistructured, in-person interviews were performed. An interview guide was developed to assess the work activities performed, the benefits of becoming a CDE and the challenges and resultant solutions that optimize their CDE designations. All interviews were transcribed verbatim and coded using deductive thematic analysis to identify the main themes that described the experiences of respondents, with the aid of QSR NVivo. A total of 14 CDE pharmacists from various communities and work settings chose to participate. All of the participants indicated they were engaging in increased diabetes-related activities since becoming CDEs. All participants indicated they were happy with their decisions to become CDEs and described numerous benefits as a direct result of achieving this designation. Although some solutions were offered, participants still face challenges in optimizing their role as CDEs, such as devoting enough time to diabetes management and remuneration for providing diabetes services. CDE pharmacists in Saskatchewan report performing enhanced diabetes-related activities subsequent to becoming CDEs and that obtaining this designation has had a positive impact on their personal practices. A larger, cross-country study is necessary to determine whether these results are consistent amongst all pharmacists in Canada. Copyright © 2015 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Virtual reality technologies for research and education in obesity and diabetes: research needs and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ershow, Abby G; Peterson, Charles M; Riley, William T; Rizzo, Albert Skip; Wansink, Brian

    2011-03-01

    The rising rates, high prevalence, and adverse consequences of obesity and diabetes call for new approaches to the complex behaviors needed to prevent and manage these conditions. Virtual reality (VR) technologies, which provide controllable, multisensory, interactive three-dimensional (3D) stimulus environments, are a potentially valuable means of engaging patients in interventions that foster more healthful eating and physical activity patterns. Furthermore, the capacity of VR technologies to motivate, record, and measure human performance represents a novel and useful modality for conducting research. This article summarizes background information and discussions for a joint July 2010 National Institutes of Health - Department of Defense workshop entitled Virtual Reality Technologies for Research and Education in Obesity and Diabetes. The workshop explored the research potential of VR technologies as tools for behavioral and neuroscience studies in diabetes and obesity, and the practical potential of VR in fostering more effective utilization of diabetes- and obesity-related nutrition and lifestyle information. Virtual reality technologies were considered especially relevant for fostering desirable health-related behaviors through motivational reinforcement, personalized teaching approaches, and social networking. Virtual reality might also be a means of extending the availability and capacity of health care providers. Progress in the field will be enhanced by further developing available platforms and taking advantage of VR's capabilities as a research tool for well-designed hypothesis-testing behavioral science. Multidisciplinary collaborations are needed between the technology industry and academia, and among researchers in biomedical, behavioral, pedagogical, and computer science disciplines. Research priorities and funding opportunities for use of VR to improve prevention and management of obesity and diabetes can be found at agency websites (National

  10. Integrating Internet into Engineering Education: A Case Study of Students' Usage and Attitudes in Faculty of Engineering, Ahmadu Bello University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.O. Anafi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The attitude of students towards the integration of the internet as a study tool and communication channel in teaching and learning in engineering has been investigated. A study was carried out in the Faculty of Engineering, Ahmadu Bello University Zaria, Nigeria, aimed at investigating the effect of certain variables such as gender, course of study, computer experience, and the percentage of internet usage on teaching and learning processes. A well-structured questionnaire was administered to a randomly selected five hundred (500 male and female students across the seven (7 departments of the faculty and about 85% were filled and returned. The study also examines the university management's perspectives and strategies to incorporate internet usage in teaching and learning processes especially in engineering. Amazingly, responses received showed that experience in the use of the computer in surfing the internet for problem based activities mainly affects the level of internet usage across the faculty. This factor makes some students to misplace their priority in internet usage emphasizing on e-mail correspondence and social networking rather than sourcing for information and solving problems as it is done by a few students. Furthermore, findings support that internet cannot entirely substitute for traditional teaching and learning processes like text reading but can serve as a reasonable alternative when the latter is unavailable

  11. Student Empowerment Through Internet Usage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Purushothaman, Aparna

    2011-01-01

    in a University in Southern India to empower the female students through Internet usage. The study was done to find out the problems the woman students faced in gaining access and using Internet and how they can be empowered through Internet usage. Future workshop was conducted to find out the problems...... Technologies that brought massive change in the ways people communicate and how information is exchanged across the globe. Educational sector has been strongly influenced by the emergence of Internet Technologies. Digital literacy is a prerequisite for students of this generation. Studies say that woman always...... and a research design was formulated in consultation with the participants. Action research model for reflective Internet searching developed by Edwards and Bruce (2002) was deployed in the study where students did the Internet searching based on the action research cycle of planning, acting, recording...

  12. The ability of health promoters to deliver group diabetes education in South African primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna S. Botes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes makes a significant contribution to the burden of disease in South Africa.This study assesses a group diabetes education programme using motivational interviewingin public sector health centres serving low socio-economic communities in Cape Town.The programme was delivered by mid-level health promotion officers (HPOs.Objectives: The aim of the study was to explore the experience of the HPOs and to observetheir fidelity to the educational programme.Methods: Three focus group interviews were held with the 14 HPOs who delivered theeducational programme in 17 health centres. Thirty-three sessions were observed directly andthe audio tapes were analysed using the motivational interviewing (MI integrity code.Results: The HPOs felt confident in their ability to deliver group education after receiving thetraining. They reported a significant shift in their communication style and skills. They feltthe new approach was feasible and better than before. The resource material was found to berelevant, understandable and useful. The HPOs struggled with poor patient attendance and alack of suitable space at the facilities. They delivered the majority of the content and achievedbeginning-level proficiency in the MI guiding style of communication and the use of openquestions. The HPOs did not demonstrate proficiency in active listening and continued to offersome unsolicited advice.Conclusion: The HPOs demonstrated their potential to deliver group diabetes education despiteissues that should be addressed in future training and the district health services. Thefindings will help with the interpretation of results from a randomised controlled trial evaluatingthe effectiveness of the education.

  13. Internet enlightens; Internet eclaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueiredo, S. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire - IRSN, 92 - Clamart (France)

    2011-01-15

    This section gathers a selection of Internet links to online articles dealing with radiation protection issues. Below are the titles of the papers with their web site source: 1 - A mission of the European Commission verifies the proper enforcement by France of the EURATOM treaty dispositions relative to the control of radioactivity in the vicinity of uranium mines (http://www.asn.fr); 2 - tritium contamination at Saint-Maur-des-Fosses: new results from measurements performed by IRSN in the environment; 3 - status of radioactivity monitoring in French Polynesia in 2009 (http://www.irsn.fr); 4 - study of mortality and cancers impact near the Aube facility for low- and medium-activity waste storage (http://www.invs.sante.fr); 5 - Marcel Jurien de la Graviere appointed president of the guidance committee of the defense nuclear expertise of the Institute of radiation protection and nuclear safety (IRSN) (http://www.legifrance.gouv.fr); 6 - radiation protection 163: 'Childhood Leukaemia - Mechanisms and Causes'; 7- Radiation Protection 164: Radioactive effluents from nuclear power stations and nuclear fuel reprocessing sites in the European Union, 2004-08; 8 - Radiation Protection 165: Medical Effectiveness of Iodine Prophylaxis in a Nuclear Reactor Emergency Situation and Overview of European Practices Protection (http://ec.europa.eu); 9 - Report RIFE 15: Radioactivity in Food and the Environment - RIFE (SEPA - Scottish Environment Protection Agency, http://www.sepa.org.uk); 10 - HPA response statement: Advisory Group on Ionising Radiation's report on circulatory disease risk (HPA - Health Protection Agency, http://www.hpa.org.uk); 11 - launching of the national database for the voluntary registering of (quasi) incidents (AFCN - Federal agency of nuclear control, http://www.fanc.fgov.be); 12 - Radiation dose optimization in nuclear medicine (IAEA RPOP - Radiation Protection Of Patients, http://rpop.iaea.org); 13 - The government of Canada finances

  14. 高中生网络成瘾的社区健康教育%Community intervention of health education to internet addiction in high school students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄悦勤; 张新乔; 刘肇瑞

    2011-01-01

    目的:采取知信行健康教育模式,对北京市高中生网络成瘾进行社区干预研究,评价对网络成瘾的知识、态度和行为的干预效果.方法:采用分层整群抽样方法,选取4877名高中生,随机分为干预组(n=2538)和非干预组(n=2139).采用观看视频讲座、发放知识手册和张贴宣传画方式进行干预,自编网络成瘾知信行(Knowledge,Attitude and Practice,KAP)问卷和网络使用自评量表(the Self-rating Internet Using Scale,SIUS)评估效果.结果:(1) 干预后干预组的SIUS分明显低于非干预组,而KAP 分明显高于非干预组(均P<0.01);(2) 干预组干预前后的SIUS 分和KAP 分差值均大于非干预组(均P<0.001);(3) 干预组在干预后对网络成瘾知识的回答正确率比干预前普遍提高,不正确的网络成瘾相关态度和行为的出现率普遍降低,而非干预组均无明显变化.结论:针对高中生这一网络成瘾的高危人群中进行健康教育干预,能有效提高中学生对网络成瘾的认识和了解,促进其对网络的正确使用.%Objective: Using health education model, a community intervention study to internet addiction was carried in high school students in Beijing to evaluate the effect on knowledge, attitude and practice of internet addiction. Method: Using stratify cluster sampling, 4877 high schools students were randomly divided into intervention group and control group. The self-made questionnaire of Knowledge Attitude and Practice for Internet Addiction (KAPI) and Self-report Internet Using Scale (SIUS) were used to evaluate the effect of mental health education after intervention. Result: (1) The mean scores of SIUS of the intervention group were significantly lower than that of the non-intervention group. The mean scores of KAPI in the intervention group were significantly higher than that in the control group (P <0. 01). (2) The differences of the SIUS and KAPI scores between pre-and post-intervantion were higher in the

  15. "The group facilitates everything": meanings patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus assigned to health education groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Melo, Lucas Pereira; de Campos, Edemilson Antunes

    2014-01-01

    to interpret the meanings patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus assign to health education groups. ethnographic study conducted with Hyperdia groups of a healthcare unit with 26 informants, with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and having participated in the groups for at least three years. Participant observation, social characterization, discussion groups and semi-structured interviews were used to collect data. Data were analyzed through the thematic coding technique. four thematic categories emerged: ease of access to the service and healthcare workers; guidance on diabetes; participation in groups and the experience of diabetes; and sharing knowledge and experiences. The most relevant aspect of this study is the social use the informants in relation to the Hyperdia groups under study. the studied groups are agents producing senses and meanings concerning the process of becoming ill and the means of social navigation within the official health system. We expect this study to contribute to the actions of healthcare workers coordinating these groups given the observation of the cultural universe of these individuals seeking professional care in the various public health care services.

  16. "The group facilitates everything": meanings patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus assigned to health education groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Pereira de Melo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to interpret the meanings patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus assign to health education groups.METHOD: ethnographic study conducted with Hyperdia groups of a healthcare unit with 26 informants, with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and having participated in the groups for at least three years. Participant observation, social characterization, discussion groups and semi-structured interviews were used to collect data. Data were analyzed through the thematic coding technique.RESULTS: four thematic categories emerged: ease of access to the service and healthcare workers; guidance on diabetes; participation in groups and the experience of diabetes; and sharing knowledge and experiences. The most relevant aspect of this study is the social use the informants in relation to the Hyperdia groups under study.CONCLUSION: the studied groups are agents producing senses and meanings concerning the process of becoming ill and the means of social navigation within the official health system. We expect this study to contribute to the actions of healthcare workers coordinating these groups given the observation of the cultural universe of these individuals seeking professional care in the various public health care services.

  17. Educational and intervention programmes for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) management: An integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carolan-OIah, Mary C

    2016-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a serious pregnancy disorder, which is linked to stillbirth, birth damage and later development of type 2 diabetes. Rates of GDM have increased dramatically in the past 20 years, related to obesity, sedentary lifestyles and ethnicity. The aim of this integrative review was to identify and to critically review existing self-management programmes for GDM. A search for studies published between 2000 and 2013 was conducted on: PubMed, CINAHL, Medline, OvidSP, ProQuest, SCOPUS and Wiley online library. GDM search terms included gestational diabetes mellitus; GDM, pregnancy diabetes. Search terms for self-management programmes, included educational programmes; lifestyle intervention; exercise, diet, weight management in pregnancy; life-style interventions. Fifty papers were located in the search, and 12 were included in the review. Interventions fell into three main groups: (1) dietary and exercise interventions; (2) self-monitoring of blood glucose levels; and (3) counselling/behavioural interventions. This review found that although interventions varied in approach, most were successful in reducing insulin requirements; in reducing rates of macrosomia and hypertensive disorders, and in improving levels of knowledge and pregnancy outcomes. Only one study found that the intervention did not contribute some positive outcome. Interventions that include adopting a low glycemic index diet and increasing levels of activity appear to be successful at reducing maternal blood glucose levels and reducing insulin requirements during pregnancy. Reducing maternal blood glucose levels, in turn, is associated with a reduction of macrosomia and maternal weight gain.

  18. Monogenic Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... form of monogenic diabetes? • What type of monogenic diabetes does my child (or do I) have? • What are the treatment options? • What are the advantages and disadvantages of each treatment option? • Should I see a diabetes educator? • Should I see an endocrinologist? Resources • Find- ...

  19. The internet in intercultural education: changing attitudes and values after the implementation of a program in elementary education students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica PEÑAHERRERA LEÓN

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false ES X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabla normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman";} This research aims to assess the effects of the program "E-Culture" has taken grade 6 pupils in Primary Education. The intercultural program content is based on a constructivist approach to learning and use of the net. To evaluate the effects of the program has used quasi-experimental method through a pre-posttest design, through the "Survey of Intercultural Education E-Culture. " The implementation of the program has produced satisfying results in relation to integration, coexistence, tolerance, better cultural understanding and respect for other cultures.

  20. Online access and literacy in Maori New Zealanders with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reti, Shane R; Feldman, Henry J; Safran, Charles

    2011-09-01

    Online web-based interventions can be effective ancillary tools for managing diabetes. There is a high prevalence of diabetes in New Zealand Maori, and yet this group has generally been a low priority for web-based interventions due to perceptions of low Internet access and Internet literacy. To assess Internet access and literacy in New Zealanders with diabetes, especially high-risk Maori. A telephone survey of all patients with diabetes in an urban general practice. Internet access is assessed by Internet presence in the home, and Internet literacy by the ability to use email and the World Wide Web. One hundred percent response rate with 68 participants, including 38% Maori. Internet access for Maori was 70% and Internet literacy 41%. Internet access and literacy for Maori with diabetes may be higher than previously thought. Health policies may wish to focus effective and cost-efficient web-based interventions on this high diabetes risk group.

  1. Towards Internet of Things: Survey and Future Vision

    OpenAIRE

    Omar Said; Mehedi Masud

    2013-01-01

    Internet of things is a promising research due to its importance in many commerce, industry, and education applications. Recently, new applications and research challenges in numerous areas of Internet of things are fired. In this paper, we discuss the history of Internet of things, different proposed architectures of Internet of things, research challenges and open problems related to the Internet of things. We also introduce the concept of Internet of things database and discuss about the f...

  2. Effect of health education on self-nursing of patient with diabetes%健康教育对提高糖尿病患者自我护理能力的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨崴; 尹富敏

    2002-01-01

    Background: Diabetes needs a long self-nursing time and the deficiency of knowledge about diabetes will directly influence patients' healthy life. Health education in diabetes is the important content of nursing in fact.

  3. The mediating role of internet connection, virtual friends, and mood in predicting loneliness among students with and without learning disabilities in different educational environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharabi, Adi; Margalit, Malka

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated a multidimensional model of loneliness as related to risk and protective factors among adolescents with learning disabilities (LD). The authors aimed to identify factors that mediated loneliness among 716 adolescents in Grades 10 through 12 who were studying in high schools or in Youth Education Centers for at-risk populations. There were 334 students with LD, divided into subgroups according to disability severity (three levels of testing accommodations), and 382 students without LD. Five instruments measured participants' socioemotional characteristics: loneliness, Internet communication, mood, and social and academic achievement-oriented motivation. Using structural equation modeling, the results confirmed the loneliness model and revealed that the use of the Internet to support interpersonal communication with friends predicted less intense loneliness, whereas virtual friendships with individuals whom students knew only online predicted greater loneliness. Positive and negative mood and motivation also predicted students' loneliness. In addition, the severity of LD predicted stronger loneliness feelings.

  4. Internet Inquiry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This collection of dialogues is the only textbook of its kind. Internet Inquiry: Conversations About Method takes students into the minds of top internet researchers as they discuss how they have worked through critical challenges as they research online social environments. Editors Annette N....... Markham and Nancy K. Baym illustrate that good research choices are not random but are deliberate, studied, and internally consistent. Rather than providing single "how to" answers, this book presents distinctive and divergent viewpoints on how to think about and conduct qualitative internet studies....

  5. Internet Inquiry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This collection of dialogues is the only textbook of its kind. Internet Inquiry: Conversations About Method takes students into the minds of top internet researchers as they discuss how they have worked through critical challenges as they research online social environments. Editors Annette N....... Markham and Nancy K. Baym illustrate that good research choices are not random but are deliberate, studied, and internally consistent. Rather than providing single "how to" answers, this book presents distinctive and divergent viewpoints on how to think about and conduct qualitative internet studies....

  6. Genetic vulnerability to diabetes and obesity: does education offset the risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, S Y; Walter, S; Marden, J; Rehkopf, D H; Kubzansky, L D; Nguyen, T; Glymour, M M

    2015-02-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and obesity has recently increased dramatically. These common diseases are likely to arise from the interaction of multiple genetic, socio-demographic and environmental risk factors. While previous research has found genetic risk and education to be strong predictors of these diseases, few studies to date have examined their joint effects. This study investigates whether education modifies the association between genetic background and risk for type 2 diabetes (T2D) and obesity. Using data from non-Hispanic Whites in the Health and Retirement Study (HRS, n = 8398), we tested whether education modifies genetic risk for obesity and T2D, offsetting genetic effects; whether this effect is larger for individuals who have high risk for other (unobserved) reasons, i.e., at higher quantiles of HbA1c and BMI; and whether effects differ by gender. We measured T2D risk using Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level, and obesity risk using body-mass index (BMI). We constructed separate genetic risk scores (GRS) for obesity and diabetes respectively based on the most current available information on the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) confirmed as genome-wide significant predictors for BMI (29 SNPs) and diabetes risk (39 SNPs). Linear regression models with years of schooling indicate that the effect of genetic risk on HbA1c is smaller among people with more years of schooling and larger among those with less than a high school (HS) degree compared to HS degree-holders. Quantile regression models show that the GRS × education effect systematically increased along the HbA1c outcome distribution; for example the GRS × years of education interaction coefficient was -0.01 (95% CI = -0.03, 0.00) at the 10th percentile compared to -0.03 (95% CI = -0.07, 0.00) at the 90th percentile. These results suggest that education may be an important socioeconomic source of heterogeneity in responses to genetic vulnerability to T2D.

  7. Health care professionals from developing countries report educational benefits after an online diabetes course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wewer Albrechtsen, Nicolai J; Poulsen, Kristina W; Svensson, Lærke Ø; Jensen, Lasse; Holst, Jens J; Torekov, Signe S

    2017-05-31

    Medical education is a cornerstone in the global combat against diseases such as diabetes and obesity which together affect more than 500 million humans. Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) are educational tools for institutions to teach and share their research worldwide. Currently, millions of people have participated in evidence-based MOOCs, however educational and professional benefit(s) for course participants of such initiatives have not been addressed sufficiently. We therefore investigated if participation in a 6 week open online course in the prevention and treatment of diabetes and obesity had any impact on the knowledge, skills, and career of health care professionals contrasting participants from developing countries versus developed countries. 52.006 participants signed up and 29.469 participants were active in one of the three sessions (2014-2015) of Diabetes - a Global Challenge. Using an online based questionnaire (nine sections) software (Survey Monkey), email invitations were send out using a Coursera based database to the 29.469 course participants. Responses were analyzed and stratified, according to the United Nations stratification method, by developing and developed countries. 1.303 (4.4%) of the 29.469 completed the questionnaire. 845 of the 1303 were defined as health care professionals, including medical doctors (34%), researchers (15%), nurses (11%) and medical students (8%). Over 80% of the health care participants report educational benefits, improved knowledge about the prevention and treatment therapies of diabetes and furthermore improved professional life and practice. Over 40% reported that their professional network expanded after course participation. Study participants who did not complete all modules of the course reported similar impact as the ones that completed the entire course(P = 0.9). Participants from developing countries gained more impact on their clinical practice (94%) compared to health care professionals from

  8. Strengthen the education management to treat the students' internet addiction%强化教育管理 应对学生网络沉溺

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董海浪; 张梅

    2011-01-01

    Internet space is a new intercourse space to mankind. It changes the mankind's life and intercourse modes deeply, further influences the persons' mental state and behavior deeply. Numerous netizens, especially vast teenagers are usually immoderate in using internet because they are lack of self-control competence, this bring many problems for their learning, life, work, physical and mental health. Therefore, departments of justice, police, publicity, internet man- agement,intemet technology research, education administration, and all levels, all kinds schools as well as families should educate teenagers from different angles so as to prevent the teen-age internet addiction.%网络空间是一种全新的人类交往空间,它的出现深刻地改变了人类的生活方式和交往方式,进而深刻地影响着人们的心理及行为。众多的网民,尤其是广大的青少年往往会因为缺乏自我控制能力,因而无节制的使用网络,给他们的学习、生活、工作和身心健康带来很多问题。因此,司法部门、公安管理部门、宣传舆论部门、网络管理部门、网络技术研究部门、教育行政管理部门及各级、各类学校和家庭应从不同的角度对青年学生进行教育,预防青少年网瘾的发生。

  9. Effects of Pharmacist-Led Patient Education on Diabetes-Related Knowledge and Medication Adherence: A Home-Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Ee Pin; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi; Saleem, Fahad; Aljadhey, Hisham

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Patient education is key to the management of acute and chronic conditions. However, the majority of such educational interventions have been reported from health-care settings. In contrast, this study aims to evaluate whether a home-based intervention can result in better understanding about type 2 diabetes mellitus and can increase…

  10. Effects of Pharmacist-Led Patient Education on Diabetes-Related Knowledge and Medication Adherence: A Home-Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Ee Pin; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi; Saleem, Fahad; Aljadhey, Hisham

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Patient education is key to the management of acute and chronic conditions. However, the majority of such educational interventions have been reported from health-care settings. In contrast, this study aims to evaluate whether a home-based intervention can result in better understanding about type 2 diabetes mellitus and can increase…

  11. A model educational program for people with type 2 diabetes: a cooperative Latin American implementation study (PEDNID-LA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardino, J J; Etchegoyen, G

    2001-06-01

    To implement an educational program in 10 Latin American countries and to evaluate its effect on the clinical, biochemical, and therapeutic aspects as well as the economic cost of diabetes. Educators from each participating country were previously trained to implement the educational model. The patient population included 446 individuals with type 2 diabetes; all patients were education courses. Clinical and therapeutic data and the cost of their pharmacological treatment were collected 6 months before participation in the educational program (-6 months), on entry into the program (time 0), and at 4, 8, and 12 months after initiation of the program. All parameters measured had improved significantly (P educational model, implemented in 10 Latin American countries, reinforce the value of patient education as an essential part of diabetes care. They also suggest that an educational approach promoting healthy lifestyle habits and patient empowerment is an effective strategy with the potential to decrease the development of complications related to diabetes as well as the socioeconomic costs of the disease.

  12. Group Patient Education: Effectiveness of a Brief Intervention in People with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Primary Health Care in Greece: A Clinically Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merakou, K.; Knithaki, A.; Karageorgos, G.; Theodoridis, D.; Barbouni, A.

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to assess the impact of a brief patient group education intervention in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The sample, 193 people with type 2 diabetes mellitus who were patients at the diabetic clinic of a primary health care setting in Attica, was assigned to two groups, intervention (138 individuals) and control group (55…

  13. Nutrition Education intervention in dyslipidemic children and adolescent with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asmaa m. Abdallah*, Zainab B* and Mohamed M. A. Shahat

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus is the most common endocrine metabolic disorder of childhood and adolescence with important consequences for physical and emotional development. Aim of the study: This study was designed to detect the effect of diet therapy (through nutrition education program on lipid profile and blood glucose level in diabetic children. Subjects and Methods: The study was carried on 45 diabetic children aged between 8-15 years old at diabetic nutrition clinic of nutrition institute in Cairo from 2003-2005. Children included in the study were divided into two groups: insulin dependent dyslipidemic group (IDDM (diet control/ group and insulin dependent non dyslipidemic (control group. All were subjected to full dietetic history by the 24 hour recall for 3 days, thorough clinical examination, they were evaluated for plasma lipids, lipoproteins, fasting blood glucose (FBG and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c levels. The dyslipidemic were measured after three months for the previously measured parameters. The nutrition education process was performed and continued on weekly intervals for three months. Results: There was significant decrease in serum cholesterol and triglyceride levels in the study group after the program, and insignificant increase in serum HDL and decrease in serum LDL. Also, there was insignificant decrease in FBG but there was statistically significant decrease in HbA1 after the program. These changes occurred in parallel with increases in intakes of protein and total calories with adequate carbohydrate and sometimes a reduction in intakes of total fat. Conclusion: Nutrition therapy for children with IDDM is essential to improve measures of glycemic control and lipoprotein mediated risk for dyslipidemia. More innovative approaches to achieve lifestyle changes are required to meet current recommendations which are likely to produce greater beneficial changes than those observed in this study

  14. INTERNET ETHICS

    OpenAIRE

    Laurentiu Fratila

    2008-01-01

    In our age, Internet is the biggest information network in the world; it consists of a set of heterogeneous networks from over 100 countries displaying huge amounts of virtual resources; it provides facilities such as email, file transmission protocol (ftp), workgroups discussion or chat, information and dissemination of information (www – world wide web). Internet has a major impact over all activity fields: political, social, economic and private life of users, as well. Newly developed, mod...

  15. On the Media Fusion of the TV and Internet Education-Taking Legal Education As an Example%电视与网络教育的媒介融合--以法治教育为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石雁

    2014-01-01

    电视与网络是当今使用最为广泛的传播媒介,随着科技的发展,二者在传播过程中的融合不断深入。该文以法治教育为例,通过对电视与网络的传播特征及利弊分析,探讨在媒介融合视野下,电视与网络在保持各自原有传播优势的同时,如何互相利用资源,实现法治教育的电视与网络媒介融合。%TV and internet are the most widely used media nowadays,with the development of technic,in the dissemination process,the two media are fusing more and more deeply.This article taking the legal education as an example,by analyzing the propagation characteristics and advantages and disadvantages of TV and internet,in the media fusion perspective,discuss how to make mutual use of resources and realize the fusion of TV and internet media in the legal education area,while TV and internet can keep their original dissemination advantages.

  16. Making and maintaining lifestyle changes after participating in group based type 2 diabetes self-management educations: a qualitative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marit B Rise

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Disease management is crucial in type 2 diabetes. Diabetes self-management education aims to provide the knowledge necessary to make and maintain lifestyle changes. However, few studies have investigated the processes after such courses. The aim of this study was to investigate how participants make and maintain lifestyle changes after participating in group-based type 2 diabetes self-management education. METHODS: Data was collected through qualitative semi-structured interviews with 23 patients who attended educational group programs in Central Norway. The participants were asked how they had used the advice given and what they had changed after the course. RESULTS: Knowledge was essential for making lifestyle changes following education. Three factors affected whether lifestyle changes were implemented: obtaining new knowledge, taking responsibility, and receiving confirmation of an already healthy lifestyle. Four factors motivated individuals to maintain changes: support from others, experiencing an effect, fear of complications, and the formation of new habits. CONCLUSION: Knowledge was used to make and maintain changes in diet, medication and physical activity. Knowledge also acted as confirmation of an already adequate lifestyle. Knowledge led to no changes if diabetes appeared "not that scary" or if changes appeared too time consuming. Those involved in diabetes education need to be aware of the challenges in convincing asymptomatic patients about the benefits of adherence to self-management behaviour.

  17. Making and maintaining lifestyle changes after participating in group based type 2 diabetes self-management educations: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rise, Marit B; Pellerud, Anneli; Rygg, Lisbeth Ø; Steinsbekk, Aslak

    2013-01-01

    Disease management is crucial in type 2 diabetes. Diabetes self-management education aims to provide the knowledge necessary to make and maintain lifestyle changes. However, few studies have investigated the processes after such courses. The aim of this study was to investigate how participants make and maintain lifestyle changes after participating in group-based type 2 diabetes self-management education. Data was collected through qualitative semi-structured interviews with 23 patients who attended educational group programs in Central Norway. The participants were asked how they had used the advice given and what they had changed after the course. Knowledge was essential for making lifestyle changes following education. Three factors affected whether lifestyle changes were implemented: obtaining new knowledge, taking responsibility, and receiving confirmation of an already healthy lifestyle. Four factors motivated individuals to maintain changes: support from others, experiencing an effect, fear of complications, and the formation of new habits. Knowledge was used to make and maintain changes in diet, medication and physical activity. Knowledge also acted as confirmation of an already adequate lifestyle. Knowledge led to no changes if diabetes appeared "not that scary" or if changes appeared too time consuming. Those involved in diabetes education need to be aware of the challenges in convincing asymptomatic patients about the benefits of adherence to self-management behaviour.

  18. Comparison of the effects of Korean mindfulness-based stress reduction, walking, and patient education in diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hee Young; Lee, Haejung; Park, Jina

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of Korean mindfulness-based stress reduction (K-MBSR), walking, and patient education regarding diabetes mellitus (DM) on stress response, glycemic control, and vascular inflammation in patients with diabetes mellitus. A cluster randomized trial including 56 adults with diabetes mellitus (K-MBSR group = 21, walking group = 18, patient education group = 17) was conducted between 13 July and 14 September 2012. The questionnaire included the Diabetes Distress Scale and Perceived Stress Response Inventory. Fasting blood samples were used to measure levels of cortisol, blood glucose, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), and tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA). There were no statistically significant differences between the effects of K-MBSR, walking, and patient education on stress, glycemic control, or vascular inflammation. However, in the K-MBSR and walking groups, significant reductions in the levels of serum cortisol and PAI-1 were observed. A significant reduction in psychological responses to stress was observed in the walking and patient education groups. Longitudinal studies could provide better insight into the impact of K-MBSR, walking, and patient education on health outcomes in adults with diabetes mellitus. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diabetes: Lindsey's Story (Video) Diabetes Center Movie: Endocrine System Diabetes ... Visit the Nemours Web site. Note: All information on KidsHealth® is for educational purposes only. For ...

  20. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diabetes: Lindsey's Story (Video) Diabetes Center Movie: Endocrine System Diabetes ... Visit the Nemours Web site. Note: All information on KidsHealth® is for educational purposes only. For ...