WorldWideScience

Sample records for internet diabetic education

  1. Internet delivered diabetes self-management education: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Katherine; Phillips, Beth; Johnson, Constance; Vorderstrasse, Allison

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes self-management education is a cornerstone of successful diabetes management. Various methods have been used to reach the increasing numbers of patients with diabetes, including Internet-based education. The purpose of this article is to review various delivery methods of Internet diabetes education that have been evaluated, as well as their effectiveness in improving diabetes-related outcomes. Literature was identified in the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), PubMed, Medline, EBSCO, the Cochrane Library, and the Web of Science databases through searches using the following terms: "type 2 diabetes AND internet/web based AND education" and "type 2 diabetes AND diabetes self-management education (DSME) AND web-based/internet OR technology assisted education." The search was limited to English language articles published in the last 10 years. The search yielded 111 articles; of these, 14 met criteria for inclusion in this review. Nine studies were randomized controlled trials, and study lengths varied from 2 weeks to 24 months, for a total of 2,802 participants. DSME delivered via the Internet is effective at improving measures of glycemic control and diabetes knowledge compared with usual care. In addition, results demonstrate that improved eating habits and increased attendance at clinic appointments occur after the online DSME, although engagement and usage of Internet materials waned over time. Interventions that included an element of interaction with healthcare providers were seen as attractive to participants. Internet-delivered diabetes education has the added benefit of easier access for many individuals, and patients can self-pace themselves through materials. More research on the cost-benefits of Internet diabetes education and best methods to maintain patient engagement are needed, along with more studies assessing the long-term impact of Internet-delivered DSME.

  2. Exploring educational needs and design aspects of internet-enabled patient education for persons with diabetes: a qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Javad; Karimi Moonaghi, Hosein; Zary, Nabil; Masiello, Italo

    2016-10-31

    The objective of this article is to explore the educational needs and design aspects of personalised internet-enabled education for patients with diabetes in Iran. Data were collected using semistructured interviews and then qualitatively analysed using inductive content analysis. 9 patients with type 2 diabetes were included. Inclusion criteria were access to and knowledge on how to use the internet. The selection ensured representation based on gender, age, occupation and educational background. The sample population was patients with diabetes who were admitted to an outpatient diabetes clinic in Mashhad, a large city of Iran with about 3 million inhabitants. 4 core categories emerged from the data: (1) seeking knowledge about diabetes, including specific knowledge acquisition, patient's interactions and learning requirements; (2) teaching and learning, including using different teaching methods and different ways to learn about the disease; (3) facilitators, including internet and mobile phone use to learn about the disease; and (4) barriers, including lack of internet access, uncertainty of access to the internet and lack of website in the local language and also perceived cultural barriers, such as patients' fears of the internet, lack of time and awareness. This study provides a better understanding of the patient's educational expectations and technical needs in relation to internet-enabled education. This knowledge will inform the development of functional mock-ups in the next research phase using a design-based research approach in order to design internet-enabled patient education for self-management of diabetes. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  3. Internet-enabled pulmonary rehabilitation and diabetes education in group settings at home: a preliminary study of patient acceptability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkow, Tatjana M; Vognild, Lars K; Østengen, Geir; Johnsen, Elin; Risberg, Marijke Jongsma; Bratvold, Astrid; Hagen, Tord; Brattvoll, Morten; Krogstad, Trine; Hjalmarsen, Audhild

    2013-03-05

    The prevalence of major chronic illnesses, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and diabetes, is increasing. Pulmonary rehabilitation and diabetes self-management education are important in the management of COPD and diabetes respectively. However, not everyone can participate in the programmes offered at a hospital or other central locations, for reasons such as travel and transport. Internet-enabled home-based programmes have the potential to overcome these barriers.This study aims to assess patient acceptability of the delivery form and components of Internet-enabled programmes based on home groups for comprehensive pulmonary rehabilitation and for diabetes self-management education. We have developed Internet-enabled home programmes for comprehensive pulmonary rehabilitation and for diabetes self-management education that include group education, group exercising (COPD only), individual consultations, educational videos and a digital health diary. Our prototype technology platform makes use of each user's own TV at home, connected to a computer, and a remote control. We conducted a six-week home trial with 10 participants: one group with COPD and one with diabetes. The participants were interviewed using semi-structured interviews. Both home-based programmes were well accepted by the participants. The group setting at home made it possible to share experiences and to learn from questions raised by others, as in conventional group education. In the sessions, interaction and discussion worked well, despite the structure needed for turn taking. The thematic educational videos were well accepted although they were up to 40 minutes long and their quality was below TV broadcasting standards. Taking part in group exercising at home under the guidance of a physiotherapist was also well accepted by the participants. Participants in the COPD group appreciated the social aspect of group education sessions and of exercising together, each in their own home

  4. Internet protocol television for personalized home-based health information: design-based research on a diabetes education system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Kathleen Mary; Clarke, Ken; Alzougool, Basil; Hines, Carolyn; Tidhar, Gil; Frukhtman, Feodor

    2014-03-10

    The use of Internet protocol television (IPTV) as a channel for consumer health information is a relatively under-explored area of medical Internet research. IPTV may afford new opportunities for health care service providers to provide health information and for consumers, patients, and caretakers to access health information. The technologies of Web 2.0 add a new and even less explored dimension to IPTV's potential. Our research explored an application of Web 2.0 integrated with IPTV for personalized home-based health information in diabetes education, particularly for people with diabetes who are not strong computer and Internet users, and thus may miss out on Web-based resources. We wanted to establish whether this system could enable diabetes educators to deliver personalized health information directly to people with diabetes in their homes; and whether this system could encourage people with diabetes who make little use of Web-based health information to build their health literacy via the interface of a home television screen and remote control. This project was undertaken as design-based research in two stages. Stage 1 comprised a feasibility study into the technical work required to integrate an existing Web 2.0 platform with an existing IPTV system, populated with content and implemented for user trials in a laboratory setting. Stage 2 comprised an evaluation of the system by consumers and providers of diabetes information. The project succeeded in developing a Web 2.0 IPTV system for people with diabetes and low literacies and their diabetes educators. The performance of the system in the laboratory setting gave them the confidence to engage seriously in thinking about the actual and potential features and benefits of a more widely-implemented system. In their feedback they pointed out a range of critical usability and usefulness issues related to Web 2.0 affordances and learning fundamentals. They also described their experiences with the system in

  5. A pilot service-evaluation examining change in HbA1c related to the prescription of internet-based education films for type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, S; Cranch, H; Littlemore, K; Mortimer, J; Platts, J; Stephens, J W

    2017-06-01

    We undertook a pilot service-evaluation of prescribed internet-based patient education films for patients with type 2 diabetes. The uptake was 28% and film watching was associated with a relative mean difference in HbA1c of -9.0mmol/mol in the film watchers compared to non-watchers over a three-month period (P=0.0008). Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. National Diabetes Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Living Tips About WIN NIDDK Information Clearinghouses National Diabetes Education Program Together with more than 200 partners ... type 2 diabetes. Learn more about NDEP . National Diabetes Month You are the center of your diabetes ...

  7. Why Internet-based Education?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morton Ann Gernsbacher

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This essay illustrates five ways that Internet-based higher education can capitalize on fundamental principles of learning. Internet-based education can enable better mastery through distributed (shorter, more frequent practice rather than massed (longer, less frequent practice; it can optimize performance because it allows students to learn at their peak time of their day; it can deepen memory because it requires cheat-proof assignments and tests; it can promote critical thinking because it necessitates intellectual winnowing and sifting; and it can enhance writing skills by requiring students to write frequently and for a broad audience.

  8. Why internet-based education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gernsbacher, Morton Ann

    2014-01-01

    This essay illustrates five ways that Internet-based higher education can capitalize on fundamental principles of learning. Internet-based education can enable better mastery through distributed (shorter, more frequent) practice rather than massed (longer, less frequent) practice; it can optimize performance because it allows students to learn at their peak time of their day; it can deepen memory because it requires cheat-proof assignments and tests; it can promote critical thinking because it necessitates intellectual winnowing and sifting; and it can enhance writing skills by requiring students to write frequently and for a broad audience.

  9. Internet driver education study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    Incorporating technology through online courses, including drivers education (DE), is the wave of the future for : learning. While many states allow online DE as an accepted method of learning, Wisconsin currently only allows it on a : limited bas...

  10. Diabetes education on wheels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardway, D; Weatherly, K S; Bonheur, B

    1993-01-01

    Diabetes education programs remain underdeveloped in the pediatric setting, resulting in increased consumer complaints and financial liability for hospitals. The Diabetes Education on Wheels program was designed to provide comprehensive, outcome-oriented education for patients with juvenile diabetes. The primary goal of the program was to enhance patients' and family members' ability to achieve self-care in the home setting. The program facilitated sequential learning, improved consumer satisfaction, and promoted financial viability for the hospital.

  11. The internet and nurse education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasbrenn, Martin; Raustøl, Anne; Bingen, Hanne Maria

    2017-09-01

    Participation in a community of practice through asynchronous writing is useful for learning in higher education. We argue that such computer-mediated communication via the internet is valuable in nurse education, but that it often should take place at sites protected from search with access restricted to a limited group to make the students confident and enable learning. We further argue why we think discussion of patient stories in educational settings often should be done without computers. Reflection around patient stories is a fundamental part of the education of a clinician, but should be done either with fictional cases or as face-to-face activities to protect patient confidentiality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Internet safety education for youth: stakeholder perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Megan A; Egan, Katie G; Bare, Kaitlyn; Young, Henry N; Cox, Elizabeth D

    2013-06-05

    Internet use is nearly ubiquitous among US youth; risks to internet use include cyberbullying, privacy violations and unwanted solicitation. Internet safety education may prevent these negative consequences; however, it is unclear at what age this education should begin and what group is responsible for teaching this topic. Surveys were distributed to key stakeholders in youth safety education including public school teachers, clinicians, parents and adolescents. Surveys assessed age at which internet safety education should begin, as well as experiences teaching and learning internet safety. Surveys of adults assessed willingness to teach internet safety. Finally, participants were asked to identify a group whose primary responsibility it should be to teach internet safety. A total of 356 participants completed the survey (93.4% response rate), including 77 teachers, 111 clinicians, 72 parents and 96 adolescents. Stakeholders felt the optimal mean age to begin teaching internet safety was 7.2 years (SD = 2.5), range 2-15. Internet safety was regularly taught by some teachers (20.8%), few clinicians (2.6%) and many parents (40.3%). The majority of teachers, clinicians and parents were willing to teach internet safety, but all groups surveyed identified parents as having primary responsibility for teaching this topic. Findings suggest agreement among key stakeholders for teaching internet safety at a young age, and for identifying parents as primary teachers of this topic. Clinicians have a unique opportunity to support parents by providing resources, guidance and support.

  13. An Internet Coping Skills Training Program for Youth With Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittemore, Robin; Jaser, Sarah S.; Jeon, Sangchoon; Liberti, Lauren; Delamater, Alan; Murphy, Kathleen; Faulkner, Melissa S.; Grey, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Background Managing Type 1 diabetes (T1D) during adolescence can be challenging, and there is a need for accessible interventions to help adolescents cope with diabetes-related stress. Objectives The aim of this study was to compare an Internet coping skills training (TEENCOPE) intervention to an Internet educational intervention (Managing Diabetes) for adolescents with T1D. Moderators of program efficacy were evaluated. Methods The study was a multisite clinical trial (n = 320) with data collected at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months. Data were collected on the primary outcomes of physiologic (A1C) and psychosocial (quality of life) and on the secondary outcomes of behavioral (self-management) and psychosocial (stress, coping self-efficacy, social competence, family conflict) variables consistent with the conceptual framework. Data were analyzed using mixed-model analyses with an intent-to-treat approach. Results There were no significant between-group treatment effects 6 months postintervention on primary outcomes. The Managing Diabetes youth showed a significant increase in social competence compared to the TEENCOPE youth. There were significant time effects for TEENCOPE (decreased stress and increased coping) and Managing Diabetes (improved diabetes quality of life). Discussion Youth with T1D transitioning to adolescence may need both structured diabetes education and coping skills to improve health outcomes. There may be a higher potential to reach adolescents with Type 1 diabetes of varying race and ethnicity via Internet interventions. PMID:22960587

  14. Internet FAQ Archives - Online Education - faqs.org

    Science.gov (United States)

    faqs.org Internet FAQ Archives - Online Education faqs.org faqs.org - Internet FAQ Archives Internet FAQ Archives Online Education Internet RFC Index Usenet FAQ Index Other FAQs Documents Tools IFC Rated FAQs Internet RFC/STD/FYI/BCP Archives The Internet RFC series of documents is also available from

  15. The Internet for Educators: A User's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monahan, Brian D.; Dharm, Matthew

    1995-01-01

    Presents a practical guide to use of the Internet. Topics discussed include getting connected; the UNIX operating system; electronic mail; FTP (File Transfer Protocol); Finger; Telnet; Archie; Veronica; Gopher; teacher education; the Yanoff List; and expansion of the Internet. (three references) (LRW)

  16. Education for diabetic foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Batista

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this investigation was to stratify the risk in a consecutive group of diabetic patients presenting, for the first time, in a diabetic foot clinic. Additional aims were to investigate the preventive measures in the local health system and to evaluate the level of patient’s awareness about diabetic foot-associated morbidity. Methods: Fifty consecutive adult diabetic patients referred to a Diabetic Foot Clinic of a Municipal Public Hospital comprised the sample for this observational study. The enrollment visit was considered as the first health-system intervention for potential foot morbidity. The average time elapsed since a diagnosis of diabetes among patients was five years. Rresults: At the time of presentation, 94% of sample was not using appropriate footwear. Pedal pulses (dorsalis pedis and/or posterior tibial arteries were palpable in 76% of patients. Thirty subjects (60% had signs of peripheral neuropathy. Twenty-one subjects (42% had clinical deformity. There was a positive correlation between a history of foot ulcer, the presence of peripheral neuropathy, and the presence of foot deformity (p < 0.004 in each correlation. Cconclusions: Informing and educating the patients and those interested in this subject and these problems is essential for favorable outcomes in this scenario.

  17. Internet and information technology use in treatment of diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, N

    2010-02-01

    This chapter contains clinical studies and reviews of the state-of-the-art regarding how information technology can help improve outcomes for patients with diabetes through enhanced education and support. With the increasing sophistication of diabetes treatment protocols and diabetes-related devices this new modality offers a remarkable opportunity for clinicians and patients. For the first time, with online tools clinicians are in a position to have a major impact on diabetes outcomes by providing robust and affordable just-in-time support to large numbers of patients who want to improve their diabetes outcomes through enhanced self-management of the complex behaviours so essential for good outcomes. Patients with diabetes often need a complex set of services and support ranging from glucose monitoring, insulin and other medication management, psychotherapy and social support, to physical activity promotion, nutrition counselling and more. Integrating these supports into a patient's therapeutic regimen presents challenges that need to be addressed through a variety of strategies. Patient self-management of diabetes enabled by information technology is becoming an important factor in the way providers deliver healthcare. Approaches using information technology to support clinical services are being dramatically altered by the confluence of several trends. * Patients want an active role in managing their own health and a collaborative relationship with their healthcare providers. * Widespread, low-cost internet access is erasing existing geographic, economic and demographic barriers to obtaining health information online, and with advanced Web 2.0 technologies high levels of interactivity can engage the patient. * Clinicians and researchers now have a deeper understanding of how people learn and respond online, and that knowledge can be crafted into solutions that produce effective, long-term behaviour change. Technology enabled approaches that show great promise to

  18. Role of the Diabetes Educator in Inpatient Diabetes Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-01

    It is the position of American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) that all inpatient interdisciplinary teams include a diabetes educator to lead or support improvement efforts that affect patients hospitalized with diabetes or hyperglycemia. This not only encompasses patient and family education but education of interdisciplinary team members and achievement of diabetes-related organizational quality metrics and performance outcomes.

  19. Role of the Diabetes Educator in Inpatient Diabetes Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    It is the position of American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) that all inpatient interdisciplinary teams include a diabetes educator to lead or support improvement efforts that affect patients hospitalized with diabetes or hyperglycemia. This not only encompasses patient and family education but education of interdisciplinary team members and achievement of diabetes-related organizational quality metrics and performance outcomes.

  20. Internet and education for the patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastos, Bárbara Guimarães

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The process of education of a patient aims to improve knowledge and skill of the patient and/or family, in a way to influence attitudes and behaviors needed to maintain or improve health. Must be a integral part of interpersonal communication between health professionals and patients, and this can happen through interpersonal communication and various other means such as pamphlets, manuals and, more recently, computer resources. Goal: This update article approach the patient education and the internet potential for this process, still presenting some initiatives in the audiology área. Discussion: The informations, related to health are popular in the internet, and include interactive websites, portals, e-mails, telehealth aplications, and others. The education of the patients supported by the internet can help to solve a big ethical, political and economic issue: the problem to conciliate the needs and the expectations of the patients with the characteristics and limitations of the health system. Although the use of internet in the education of the patient is promising, this is not a solution to be used without careful planning, monitoring and evaluation. In audiology there are few initiatives with the use of e-mails and websites for complement of the patient education. Final Considerations: The health professionals, including the speech therapists, must check if their patients use internet resources, recognize that behavior change and prepare not only to discuss the information obtained with the patient, but also suggest websites with reliable information and help them to evaluate the quality of the information available online.

  1. Educational Psychology and the Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassman, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The first comprehensive, research-based textbook on Internet-infused education, "Educational Psychology and the Internet" offers students an accessible guide to important issues in the field. Michael Glassman begins with an overview of the history that traces the evolution of the Internet and its significance for education. He outlines…

  2. The Advantages and Challenges of Internet for Higher Education

    OpenAIRE

    Habiburrahim, Habiburrahim

    2012-01-01

    In the new millennium, the internet plays an important role in improving the quality of education. Internet has become one of the means of communication, discussion, and even exploration of varieties of information from and between different worlds. In the world of education in the West, for example, the internet is used as a means of transforming education, especially by those who are dealing with the limitations of time and geographical location. The internet allows students and professors ...

  3. Professional Internet Information Source Used as Educational Resource for Patients with Insulin-Treated Diabetes in the Czech Republic: A 5-Year Analysis of Operations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brož, J.; Brabec, Marek; Brožová, K.; Cibulková, I.; Janíčková Žďárská, D.; Hartmann, D.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 128, č. 3 (2016), s. 153-154 ISSN 0043-5325 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : diabetes * patient web page * statistical modeling Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 0.974, year: 2016

  4. Development of a simulated Internet for education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Smith

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the early stages of research and development of an educational environment designed to enable learners to participate in remote, group based large-scale activities based on local area network and wide area network technologies working on a range of systems and within different learning situations, such as in class group work, remote group work or independent learning. The environment covers specifically routing, switching and wireless principles in the domain of computer networking. This is accomplished using the ‘multiuser functionality' feature found within the Cisco Academy programme, Packet Tracer application. The initial research explores how a ‘virtual Internet' can be implemented to enable learners to engage with the scale and complexity of the Internet without interacting with active routing infrastructures thereby interfering with others. Different communities of interest from Cisco Systems as well as their Academy Programme academic affiliates have contributed to the development of the resource as well as to research into how individuals participate in learning as a result of using this software. This paper tells the story of the iterative action research process with two initial learning situations of ‘remote many' participation and ‘in class many' participation in a large scale networking exercise. As research is still in the development process, this paper explores the experiences and observations gathered from engaging with the two learning scenarios, describing how each interaction exercise was perceived by participants and their educators. Initial findings from both activities indicate that the concept of an ‘Internet on the Internet' to deliver simulated practical learning has considerable potential and brings an alternative dimension to the practical learning experience. Research is ongoing, with the work in this paper informing the continual iterative process.

  5. Quality Assessment of Diabetes Online Patient Education Materials from Academic Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorcely, Brenda; Agarwal, Nitin; Raghuwanshi, Maya

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess and compare the readability of type 2 diabetes online patient education materials from academic institutions in the northeast USA and the American Diabetes Association. Many US residents utilise the Internet to obtain health information. Studies have shown that online patient education materials…

  6. Geography Teachers' Usage of the Internet for Education Purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezer, Adem

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine geography teachers' use of the Internet for education purposes and the extent to which Turkish Internet sites can fulfill the needs and requirements of geography teachers' Internet usage. Research is carried out using the screening method. Data were collected by means of a measurement tool that was…

  7. Internet Shopping Behavior of College of Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyici, Mubin

    2012-01-01

    Internet is an important facilitator for human and humans use this medium almost every phase. As a shopping medium, internet attract human so attract researcher. Younger people can adapt newer technologies so they can adapt internet as shopping tool. In this research it is tried to define college of education students' online shopping behavior and…

  8. THE ADVANTAGES AND CHALLENGES OF INTERNET FOR HIGHER EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habiburrahim Habiburrahim

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In the new millennium, the internet plays an important role in improving the quality of education. Internet has become one of the means of communication, discussion, and even exploration of varieties of information from and between different worlds. In the world of education in the West, for example, the internet is used as a means of transforming education, especially by those who are dealing with the limitations of time and geographical location. The internet allows students and professors to communicate and coordinate with each other on the progress of the research they are doing. The internet, through its search engines, also has made it easier for education person to find diverse scientific literatures. Thousands of books, studies, research articles, reports and scientific papers are now available online. However, behind the ease and benefit of the search engines, educational practitioners scrutinize the implications of the use of the internet to the world of education. The internet is often misused or used as a medium to perform a variety of crimes. Stealing other people's private information and money, provocation and scorn as well as accessing pornographic sites are a a few number of examples that are always connected to the use of internet. The issue of infringement on intellectual property rights and other plagiarism is also very often associated with the misuse of the internet today. But this particular article describes the benefits of the internet through search engines, potential challenges, and benefits for higher education.

  9. Internet Journal of Medical Update

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admin

    Internet Journal of Medical Update 2010 July;5(2):8-14. Internet Journal ... hospitalizations. This study of Nigerian patients with diabetes examined the adequacy of ..... Physicians need .... relationship between patient education and glycaemic ...

  10. Internet for Educational Television: An Opportunity or Threat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Pradeep Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Among several uses, educational use of television is a prominent one. The public broadcasters of many countries routinely provide locally-relevant and useful educational television programs. In other side, there has been phenomenal growth in Internet use worldwide. The researchers are of the view that Internet has challenged the supremacy of…

  11. NEW FEATURES OF EDUCATION INFORMATIZATION - «INTERNET OF THINGS»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ольга Юрьевна Заславская

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the development of one of the most important areas of information education and information educational environment - the “Internet of things”. The study was conducted by analyzing the historicized tric development of information and telecommunication technologies, the emergence stage of network technologies and methods for their use in time-personal sphere of professional activity of the person. Special attention is given to the need to develop and adopt common standards for interaction between mobile information and communication devices among themselves. Historical aspects of formation of the concept-ment of Internet of things, its emergence and transformation in the conditions of development of information and telecommunication technologies. The problems of the relationship between the development of the information educational environment, sub-jects of the educational process and the Internet of things, the Internet of things in the place of the information educational environment of educational organization, finding necessary and sufficient conditions under which the Internet of Things becomes part of the IOS, impact of the Internet of things in the educational process. The purpose of this article is to examine the possibility of inclusion in the space of the Internet of things the education system, the study of the relationship between the development of the information educational environment, the subjects of the image of the masticatory processes and resources that can share specialized educational information.

  12. Enhancing the effectiveness of diabetes self-management education: the diabetes literacy project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Broucke, S; Van der Zanden, G; Chang, P; Doyle, G; Levin, D; Pelikan, J; Schillinger, D; Schwarz, P; Sørensen, K; Yardley, L; Riemenschneider, H

    2014-12-01

    Patient empowerment through self-management education is central to improving the quality of diabetes care and preventing Type 2 Diabetes. Although national programs exist, there is no EU-wide strategy for diabetes self-management education, and patients with limited literacy face barriers to effective self-management. The Diabetes Literacy project, initiated with the support of the European Commission, aims to fill this gap. The project investigates the effectiveness of diabetes self-management education, targeting people with or at risk of Type 2 Diabetes in the 28 EU Member States, as part of a comprehensive EU-wide diabetes strategy. National diabetes strategies in the EU, US, Taiwan, and Israel are compared, and diabetes self-management programs inventorized. The costs of the diabetes care pathway are assessed on a per person basis at national level. A comparison is made of the (cost)-effectiveness of different methods for diabetes self-management support, and the moderating role of health literacy, organization of the health services, and implementation fidelity of education programs are considered. Web-based materials are developed and evaluated by randomized trials to evaluate if interactive internet delivery can enhance self-management support for people with lower levels of health literacy. The 3-year project started in December 2012. Several literature reviews have been produced and protocol development and research design are in the final stages. Primary and secondary data collection and analysis take place in 2014. The results will inform policy decisions on improving the prevention, treatment, and care for persons with diabetes across literacy levels. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. 75 FR 47458 - TRICARE; Diabetic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-06

    ... American Diabetes Association. Coverage limitations on the provision of this benefit will be as determined... education. Diabetes self-management training (DSMT) is an interactive, collaborative process involving beneficiaries with diabetes, their physician(s), and their educators. The educational process should provide the...

  14. Internet Usage Habits and Internet Usage in Educational Studies of Vocational School Students

    OpenAIRE

    Zehra Deniz Yakıncı; Perihan Gürbüz; Gülsüm Yetiş

    2018-01-01

    Internet is the easiest way to access information. It provides positive contributions to individual and surroundings, in learning and information era. At this point the answers of the questions: ‘How do young people use internet and how much do they use internet for their education?’ come into prominence. In order to find the answers; a questionnaire prepared by resarchers and Young Internet Addiction Test- Short Form (YIAT-SF) was used on ‘Health Services Vocational High School’ students, in...

  15. Towards an educational diabetes model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, A.H.

    2012-01-01

    We are developing a mathematical model to serve as the heart of an educational diabetes simulator. The model is based on physiological principles and consists of three compartments: the gut, the plasma and the interstitial fluid. Glucose and insulin in- and outflow is described for all three

  16. Recommending Education Materials for Diabetic Questions Using Information Retrieval Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yuqun; Liu, Xusheng; Wang, Yanshan; Shen, Feichen; Liu, Sijia; Rastegar-Mojarad, Majid; Wang, Liwei; Liu, Hongfang

    2017-10-16

    Self-management is crucial to diabetes care and providing expert-vetted content for answering patients' questions is crucial in facilitating patient self-management. The aim is to investigate the use of information retrieval techniques in recommending patient education materials for diabetic questions of patients. We compared two retrieval algorithms, one based on Latent Dirichlet Allocation topic modeling (topic modeling-based model) and one based on semantic group (semantic group-based model), with the baseline retrieval models, vector space model (VSM), in recommending diabetic patient education materials to diabetic questions posted on the TuDiabetes forum. The evaluation was based on a gold standard dataset consisting of 50 randomly selected diabetic questions where the relevancy of diabetic education materials to the questions was manually assigned by two experts. The performance was assessed using precision of top-ranked documents. We retrieved 7510 diabetic questions on the forum and 144 diabetic patient educational materials from the patient education database at Mayo Clinic. The mapping rate of words in each corpus mapped to the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) was significantly different (Pretrieval algorithms. For example, for the top-retrieved document, the precision of the topic modeling-based, semantic group-based, and VSM models was 67.0%, 62.8%, and 54.3%, respectively. This study demonstrated that topic modeling can mitigate the vocabulary difference and it achieved the best performance in recommending education materials for answering patients' questions. One direction for future work is to assess the generalizability of our findings and to extend our study to other disease areas, other patient education material resources, and online forums. ©Yuqun Zeng, Xusheng Liu, Yanshan Wang, Feichen Shen, Sijia Liu, Majid Rastegar Mojarad, Liwei Wang, Hongfang Liu. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http

  17. Providing nuclear pharmacy education via the internet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilliard, N.L.; Pickett, M.; Thaxton, P.; Norenberg, J.P.; Wittstrom, K.; Rhodes, B.

    2002-01-01

    -based learning. Almost 80% of students thought that the program made a significant impact on their understanding of radiopharmacy practice. Conclusion: Nuclear pharmacy education is being delivered asynchronously to students via the Internet without the additional expense and inconvenience of travel. Student evaluations and test performance reveal a positive learning environment

  18. Internet Usage Habits and Internet Usage in Educational Studies of Vocational School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehra Deniz Yakıncı

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Internet is the easiest way to access information. It provides positive contributions to individual and surroundings, in learning and information era. At this point the answers of the questions: ‘How do young people use internet and how much do they use internet for their education?’ come into prominence. In order to find the answers; a questionnaire prepared by resarchers and Young Internet Addiction Test- Short Form (YIAT-SF was used on ‘Health Services Vocational High School’ students, in this study. 3.4 % of students were found to have internet addiction and the average internet usage was found to be 5 hours daily. When students were asked to enumerate the internet sites they use, the result was: social media, news sites, movie and series sites, educational and informational content sites, play sites, e-mail, shopping sites, and sexual content sites in order of usage preferance. While social media was preferred by 79.4% in the first place, educational content sites were determined to be preferred by 5.7% in the first place among others. The second most frequently used sites by students were movies and series (22.8%. Educational / informational content (20.2 % sites were the fifth preferred sites in the preference order.

  19. Internet and Democracy: Is the Internet an Important Predictor for Physical Education Teacher Candidates' Attitudes towards Democracy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünlü, Hüseyin

    2017-01-01

    Today, in the digital age, the Internet usage is common among university students. The Internet is also an important platform for actively participating in democracy. This study explores physical education (PE) candidate teachers' attitudes toward the Internet and democracy. It also explores whether the Internet is an important predictor for…

  20. Costs of Development and Maintenance of an Internet Program for Teens with Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grey, Margaret; Liberti, Lauren; Whittemore, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Many adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D) have difficulty completing self-management tasks within the context of their social environments. Group-based approaches to psycho-educational support have been shown to prevent declines in glucose control, but are challenging to implement due to youths’ many activities and costs. A novel solution is providing psycho-educational support via the internet. The purpose of this study is to describe the cost of developing and maintaining two internet psycho-educational programs, both of which have been shown to improve health outcomes in adolescents with T1D. We calculated actual costs of personnel and programming in the development of TEENCOPE™ and Managing Diabetes, two highly interactive programs that were evaluated in a multi-site clinical trial (n=320). Cost calculations were set at U.S. dollars and converted to value for 2013 as expenses were incurred over 6 years. Development costs over 1.5 years totaled $324,609, with the majority of costs being for personnel to develop and write content in a creative and engaging format, to get feedback from teens on content and a prototype, and IT programming. Maintenance of the program, including IT support, a part-time moderator to assure safety of the discussion board (0.5–1 hour/week), and yearly update of content was $43,845/year, or $137.00 per youth over 4.5 years. Overall, program and site development were relatively expensive, but the program reach was high, including non-white youth from 4 geographically distinct regions. Once developed, maintenance was minimal. With greater dissemination, cost-per-youth would decrease markedly, beginning to offset the high development expense. PMID:26213677

  1. The Diabetes Educator and the Diabetes Self-management Education Engagement: The 2015 National Practice Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherr, Dawn; Lipman, Ruth D

    2015-10-01

    The National Practice Study (NPS) is conducted biannually to assess current diabetes education practices in the United States with the goal of understanding current trends in the work in which diabetes educators engage. The 2015 NPS contained 54 questions about the individuals providing diabetes education, people with diabetes participating in education, and programs providing the education. The survey was sent electronically to approximately 21 975 people who were members of the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) or who were Certified Diabetes Educators with the National Certification Board for Diabetes Educators but were not currently AADE members. In addition, both the AADE and the National Certification Board for Diabetes Educators promoted participation in the NPS via social media. The combination of efforts resulted in completion of the survey by 4855 respondents. Testing was completed with a significance level of 0.05 or 95% confidence. Diabetes educators continue to represent a diverse group of health care professionals-nurses (50%), dietitians (35%), pharmacists (6%), and others (6%). By far, the most commonly held credential for the specialty continues to be the Certified Diabetes Educator (86%), with only 5% of survey respondents indicating that they held the Board Certified-Advanced Diabetes Management credential. Diabetes educators are working with individuals across the diabetes continuum, as well as with people who do not have diabetes but have other chronic conditions. The data demonstrate that much of the diabetes educator's work with people with diabetes is beyond the first year of diagnosis. Diabetes educators are increasingly seen to be providing a broader array of the integrated AADE7 Self-Care Behaviors™. The specialty of diabetes educator continues to be populated by a professionally diverse workforce, meeting the needs of people across a wide spectrum. Diabetes educators can be found providing services in primary prevention

  2. Internet Usage Habits as a Part of Distance Higher Education

    OpenAIRE

    Tufan, Firat

    2015-01-01

    Within the scope of this study, which deals with distance education method as a communication process, a focus group interview was conducted with voluntary students who were randomly selected from various areas/majors at the Department of Distance Education in Istanbul University in order to determine the relationship between their general Internet usage habits and their Internet usage as a part of distance learning and in line with their expectations. The questions posed for the students dur...

  3. Internet Usage Habits and Internet Usage in Educational Studies of Vocational School Students

    OpenAIRE

    Yakıncı, Zehra Deniz; Gürbüz, Perihan; Yetiş, Gülsüm

    2018-01-01

    Internetis the easiest way to access information. It provides positive contributions toindividual and surroundings, in learning and information era. At this point theanswers of the questions: ‘How do young people use internet and how much do theyuse internet for their education?’ come into prominence. In order to find theanswers; a questionnaire prepared by resarchers and Young Internet AddictionTest- Short Form (YIAT-SF) was used on ‘Health Services Vocational High School’students, in this s...

  4. Film Scenes in Interdisciplinary Education: Teaching the Internet of Things

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Young-mee; Kim, Kwang-sun; Im, Tami

    2017-01-01

    The Internet of Things (IoT) is gaining importance in education owing to its rapid development. This study addresses the importance of interdisciplinary education between technology and the humanities. The use of films as a teaching resource is suitable for interdisciplinary education because films represent creative forecasts and predictions on…

  5. Telemedical Education: Teaching Spirometry on the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Esther H.; Gross, Thomas J.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the development and evaluation of an Internet-based tutorial for teaching spirometry interpretation to nonpulmonologists. Concludes that computer-based tutorials can effectively train off-site practitioners in spirometry interpretation. Contains 23 references. (Author/WRM)

  6. Goal setting education and counseling practices of diabetes educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malemute, Charlene L; Shultz, Jill Armstrong; Ballejos, Miriam; Butkus, Sue; Early, Kathaleen Briggs

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify goal setting education practices used by diabetes educators working with type 2 diabetes patients. Data were collected by a mail questionnaire with 179 diabetes educators purposively selected from the 2008 American Association of Diabetes Educators membership listing. Many diabetes educators (52%) reported that more than 75% of their patients set goals for diabetes control. Independent factor patterns for the frequency of information collected from the patient for the first diabetes education session showed that educators either focused on patients' self-management practices (exercise and dietary practices, knowledge, and social impacts of diabetes) or issues with learning about self-management, such as understanding the patient's learning style and motivation for managing diabetes. Factor patterns overall showed diverse approaches to working with patients, including strategies used with patients struggling with dietary goals and the importance of tasks to complete during the first patient session. Although most educators reported practices that were largely patient centered as promoted by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and models of chronic disease management, patterns of practice suggest that diabetes educators vary considerably in how they apply education practices, especially with dietary self-management education.

  7. Practice of New Style Information Literacy Education Attached Internet Enviroment

    OpenAIRE

    堀内, 泰輔

    1996-01-01

    Nowadays, to say nothing of importance of Information education. And Internet technology is developed more and more. Accordingly, at elemental information processing education, it is important to teach not only information literacy but also network literacy. In this paper, we describe about practice of new style information literacy education for freshman of our technical college, and we mention about the results and problems of this education.

  8. Education on the Internet: Anonymity vs. Commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyfus, Hubert L.

    1998-01-01

    Argues that learning a skill requires the kind of commitment which is undermined by the Press (the Public) and the Internet, citing Soren Kierkegaard's "The Present Age", and states that learning by apprenticeship is impossible in cyberspace. Includes: aesthetic sphere--commitment to the enjoyment of sheer information; ethical…

  9. Toward Dialogic Literacy Education for the Internet Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegerif, Rupert

    2015-01-01

    In order to reconceptualize literacy education for the Internet Age, we first need to understand the extent to which our thinking has already been shaped by literacy practices. I begin this article with an exploration of the relationship between ways of communicating, ways of thinking, and the way in which we understand education. Face-to-face…

  10. Internet Based Learning (IBL) in Higher Education: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Rajan; Tiruwa, Anurag; Suri, Pradeep Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The growing use of internet-based learning (IBL) platforms in institutions of higher education is producing profound changes in the traditional teaching learning process worldwide. This paper aims to identify and understand the ways in which higher education institutions draw benefits by the use of such means, synthesizing the literature…

  11. Diabetes Champions: Culture Change Through Education

    OpenAIRE

    Jornsay, Donna L.; Garnett, E. Dessa

    2014-01-01

    In Brief This article describes a diabetes champion program in its fifth year of operation. This educational intervention was designed to increase direct diabetes patient education and has grown into a vehicle for improving quality of care and patient safety and reducing gaps in the transitions of care.

  12. Internet interventions to support lifestyle modification for diabetes management: a systematic review of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, Alexander P; Durant, Nefertiti; Agne, April A; Cherrington, Andrea L

    2014-01-01

    The Internet presents a widely accessible, 24-h means to promote chronic disease management. The objective of this review is to identify studies that used Internet based interventions to promote lifestyle modification among adults with type 2 diabetes. We searched PubMed using the terms: [internet, computer, phone, smartphone, mhealth, mobile health, web based, telehealth, social media, text messages] combined with [diabetes management and diabetes control] through January 2013. Studies were included if they described an Internet intervention, targeted adults with type 2 diabetes, focused on lifestyle modification, and included an evaluation component with behavioral outcomes. Of the 2803 papers identified, nine met inclusion criteria. Two studies demonstrated improvements in diet and/or physical activity and two studies demonstrated improvements in glycemic control comparing web-based intervention with control. Successful studies were theory-based, included interactive components with tracking and personalized feedback, and provided opportunities for peer support. Website utilization declined over time in all studies that reported on it. Few studies focused on high risk, underserved populations. Web-based strategies provide a viable option for facilitating diabetes self-management. Future research is needed on the use of web-based interventions in underserved communities and studies examining website utilization patterns and engagement over time. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Diabetes educator mentorship program: mentors requested.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Joni K; Traficano, Sheryl E

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the Diabetes Educator Mentorship Program, communicate mentors' experiences and perceptions during the first 3 years following implementation, and provide strategies to encourage mentoring. Creation of this collaborative program has fostered successful attainment of additional certified diabetes educators who obtained diabetes self-management education and support (DSMES) practice requirement hours through a voluntary Diabetes Educator Mentorship Program. There is a significant need for additional mentors to meet the growing need for mentoring partnerships. Increasing the number of mentors will provide more opportunities to those seeking to gain DSMES experience and will ultimately expand the number of health professionals available to educate those with diabetes or prediabetes. © 2014 The Author(s).

  14. Ambulatory orthopaedic surgery patients' knowledge with internet-based education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkinen, Katja; Leino-Kilpi, H; Salanterä, S

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing need for patient education and an evaluation of its outcomes. The aim of this study was to compare ambulatory orthopaedic surgery patients' knowledge with Internet-based education and face-to-face education with a nurse. The following hypothesis was proposed: Internet-based patient education (experiment) is as effective as face-to-face education with a nurse (control) in increasing patients' level of knowledge and sufficiency of knowledge. In addition, the correlations of demographic variables were tested. The patients were randomized to either an experiment group (n = 72) or a control group (n = 75). Empirical data were collected with two instruments. Patients in both groups showed improvement in their knowledge during their care. Patients in the experiment group improved their knowledge level significantly more in total than those patients in the control group. There were no differences in patients' sufficiency of knowledge between the groups. Knowledge was correlated especially with patients' age, gender and earlier ambulatory surgeries. As a conclusion, positive results concerning patients' knowledge could be achieved with the Internet-based education. The Internet is a viable method in ambulatory care.

  15. Internet research and ethics: transformative issues in nursing education research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahon, Pamela Young

    2014-01-01

    As practice in the educational and clinical settings seeks to be evidence based, faculty are increasingly required to conduct research and publish the results to advance the science of our profession. The purpose of this article is to discuss transformative research ethics because Internet use is an increasing component of current research studies. How nurse educators can engage in research-utilizing methodologies inclusive of technology while adhering to ethical standards developed before the advance of the Internet is reviewed. Recommendations are cited to address the new questions that arise at institutional review board meetings resulting from potential ethical implications of using students or research participants in cyber space. © 2014.

  16. The Social Effectiveness of Internet Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovsiannikov, A. A.; Monakhov, S. V.

    2007-01-01

    A system of education is a unique social institution, the purpose of which is to develop and multiply human capital. Based on the education system it is possible to judge the situation in the country and society not only at the present time but also in the future. A system of education also should be seen as an ideological institution: it produces…

  17. INTERNET TOOLS IN EDUCATION AT DIFFERENT LEVELS OF TEACHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Wójcicka-Migasiuk

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Modern education opens up broad prospects for the use of the Internet and its applications. Global computer network helps us to cross all limits allowed for the development and transfer of knowledge and to stimulate and create personal skills. Time and distance are no longer an obstacle. Recently, it has also been popularized in the use of online tools for professional work and intellectual and to the education at all levels of education. In this way, teachers are able to adapt teaching tools to the students’ individual needs. Moreover, the aspects of graphical visualization can be more efficient and interesting for students from previously used resources. This paper presents various methods of the Internet in education, and in particular the use of software to solve advanced problems in the art, for example, to calculate transient states. These tools are not only used for training skills or to solve specific tasks but also to shape attitudes and social behavior.

  18. Internet

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Internet. The latest communication revolution surrounds Internet. Some stats*:. 210 billion emails sent daily; 15 billion phone calls everyday; ~40 billion WWW links served everyday. * Source : The Radicati group.

  19. Internet: a new concept of antenatal education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolova, Gergana

    2015-02-01

    Historically antenatal education has been seen as an important part of antenatal care and a mechanism to provide women with close to realistic interpretations of childbirth and motherhood. Through the years, the main themes and emphases of parenting education have changed, sometimes to reflect the new socio-economic structure and sometimes forced by the women themselves seeking specific information and knowledge. Yet again, this time the invasion of online information and social media is about to change the perception and the philosophy of antenatal education from an informative opportunity to a powerful and effective intervention.

  20. Patient education for preventing diabetic foot ulceration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorresteijn, J.A.; Kriegsman, D.M.; Assendelft, W.J.; Valk, G.D.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ulceration of the feet, which can result in loss of limbs and even death, is one of the major health problems for people with diabetes mellitus. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of patient education on the prevention of foot ulcers in patients with diabetes mellitus. SEARCH METHODS: We

  1. Patient education for preventing diabetic foot ulceration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorresteijn, J.A.; Kriegsman, D.M.; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Valk, G.D.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ulceration of the feet, which can result in loss of limbs and even death, is one of the major health problems for people with diabetes mellitus. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of patient education on the prevention of foot ulcers in patients with diabetes mellitus. SEARCH METHODS:

  2. Social disparities in internet patient portal use in diabetes: evidence that the digital divide extends beyond access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Urmimala; Karter, Andrew J; Liu, Jennifer Y; Adler, Nancy E; Nguyen, Robert; López, Andrea; Schillinger, Dean

    2011-05-01

    The authors investigated use of the internet-based patient portal, kp.org, among a well-characterized population of adults with diabetes in Northern California. Among 14,102 diverse patients, 5671 (40%) requested a password for the patient portal. Of these, 4311 (76%) activated their accounts, and 3922 (69%), logged on to the patient portal one or more times; 2990 (53%) participants viewed laboratory results, 2132 (38%) requested medication refills, 2093 (37%) sent email messages, and 835 (15%) made medical appointments. After adjustment for age, gender, race/ethnicity, immigration status, educational attainment, and employment status, compared to non-Hispanic Caucasians, African-Americans and Latinos had higher odds of never logging on (OR 2.6 (2.3 to 2.9); OR 2.3 (1.9 to 2.6)), as did those without an educational degree (OR compared to college graduates, 2.3 (1.9 to 2.7)). Those most at risk for poor diabetes outcomes may fall further behind as health systems increasingly rely on the internet and limit current modes of access and communication.

  3. Remote sensing education and Internet/World Wide Web technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, J.A.; Egbert, S.L.

    2001-01-01

    Remote sensing education is increasingly in demand across academic and professional disciplines. Meanwhile, Internet technology and the World Wide Web (WWW) are being more frequently employed as teaching tools in remote sensing and other disciplines. The current wealth of information on the Internet and World Wide Web must be distilled, nonetheless, to be useful in remote sensing education. An extensive literature base is developing on the WWW as a tool in education and in teaching remote sensing. This literature reveals benefits and limitations of the WWW, and can guide its implementation. Among the most beneficial aspects of the Web are increased access to remote sensing expertise regardless of geographic location, increased access to current material, and access to extensive archives of satellite imagery and aerial photography. As with other teaching innovations, using the WWW/Internet may well mean more work, not less, for teachers, at least at the stage of early adoption. Also, information posted on Web sites is not always accurate. Development stages of this technology range from on-line posting of syllabi and lecture notes to on-line laboratory exercises and animated landscape flyovers and on-line image processing. The advantages of WWW/Internet technology may likely outweigh the costs of implementing it as a teaching tool.

  4. The digital divide in Internet-based patient education materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Gordon H

    2012-11-01

    The ubiquity of the Internet has led to the widespread availability of health-related information to the public, and the subsequent empowerment of patients has fundamentally altered the patient-physician relationship. Among several concerns of physicians is the possibility that patients may be misinformed by information obtained from the Internet. One opportunity for health care providers to address this problem exists within Internet-based patient education materials (IPEMs). According to recent research in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, IPEMs found within professional otolaryngology websites are written at the 8th- to 18th-grade reading comprehension level, essentially unchanged over the past 3 years. This greatly exceeds the fourth- to sixth-grade reading level recommended by the National Institutes of Health. Benefits, strategies, and challenges to improving the readability of IPEMs are discussed.

  5. Internet use, needs and expectations of web-based information and communication in childbearing women with type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berg Marie

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the childbearing period women use the internet both to seek information and as an important source of communication. For women with type 1 diabetes, pregnancy and early motherhood constitute a more complex situation than for women in general. This implies need for support from various professionals and a way of bridging any discontinuity in care would be to develop a website providing complementary social support and information. The objective of this study was to explore internet use, needs, and expectations regarding web-based information and communication in childbearing women with type 1 diabetes. Methods Data were collected via a web-based survey with an explorative and descriptive design, in which 105 of 139 eligible mothers with type 1 diabetes and recent childbearing experience participated. The data were analyzed with descriptive and analytical statistics, and open answers with a directed content analysis. Results Of the 105 women, 22% never used the internet to search for information concerning pregnancy, childbirth, and parenthood. 12% searched for information every day, 29% one or more times a week, and 38% one or more times a month. Of the women 44% declared themselves to be passive participants on social websites, and 45% to be active participants. 45% had specific expectations of web-based support directed towards childbearing, especially those with higher educational level (P = .01. Expectations of instrumental and informational support included an expert-controlled website with reliable, updated, and information focused on childbearing and diabetes, improved access to diabetes care professionals and alternative ways to communicate and to receive childbearing-related support. The women also asked for online technical devices to manage the frequent monitoring of blood glucose during pregnancy. Informal, emotional, and appraisal support from women in similar situations was suggested as a way to provide an

  6. Internet use, needs and expectations of web-based information and communication in childbearing women with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparud-Lundin, Carina; Ranerup, Agneta; Berg, Marie

    2011-07-07

    In the childbearing period women use the internet both to seek information and as an important source of communication. For women with type 1 diabetes, pregnancy and early motherhood constitute a more complex situation than for women in general. This implies need for support from various professionals and a way of bridging any discontinuity in care would be to develop a website providing complementary social support and information. The objective of this study was to explore internet use, needs, and expectations regarding web-based information and communication in childbearing women with type 1 diabetes. Data were collected via a web-based survey with an explorative and descriptive design, in which 105 of 139 eligible mothers with type 1 diabetes and recent childbearing experience participated. The data were analyzed with descriptive and analytical statistics, and open answers with a directed content analysis. Of the 105 women, 22% never used the internet to search for information concerning pregnancy, childbirth, and parenthood. 12% searched for information every day, 29% one or more times a week, and 38% one or more times a month. Of the women 44% declared themselves to be passive participants on social websites, and 45% to be active participants. 45% had specific expectations of web-based support directed towards childbearing, especially those with higher educational level (P = .01). Expectations of instrumental and informational support included an expert-controlled website with reliable, updated, and information focused on childbearing and diabetes, improved access to diabetes care professionals and alternative ways to communicate and to receive childbearing-related support. The women also asked for online technical devices to manage the frequent monitoring of blood glucose during pregnancy. Informal, emotional, and appraisal support from women in similar situations was suggested as a way to provide an arena for belonging instead of creating feelings of

  7. The scope of educational resources for radiologists on the internet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarsbrook, A.F.; Graham, R.N.J.; Perriss, R.W.

    2005-01-01

    The quantity of radiological educational resources available via the internet is enormous and is constantly increasing. The quality is variable, and much time can be wasted trying to find what is required. Web-based learning is highly attractive as it is widely available, cheap, accessible at any time and frequently updated (in contrast to conventional study materials). We present an introduction to the scope and diversity of educational websites in radiology. Effective evaluation of web-based material is essential to maximize the benefit to the user: a suitable method of evaluating radiological educational websites is described

  8. Diabetic Mario: Designing and Evaluating Mobile Games for Diabetes Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghaei, Nilufar; Nandigam, David; Casey, John; Direito, Artur; Maddison, Ralph

    2016-08-01

    Traditionally, diabetes education has relied on written materials, with limited resources available for children with diabetes. Mobile games can be effective and motivating tools for the promotion of children's health. In our earlier work, we proposed a novel approach for designing computer games aimed at educating children with diabetes. In this article, we apply our game design to a mobile Android game (Mario Brothers). We also introduce four heuristics that are specifically designed for evaluating the mobile game, by adapting traditional usability heuristics. Results of a pilot study (n = 12) to evaluate gameplay over 1-week showed that the children found the game engaging and improved their knowledge of healthy diet and lifestyle.

  9. Educational Uses Of Internet In The World and Turkey (A Comparative Review)

    OpenAIRE

    USUN, Salih

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the educational uses and major technologies of the Internet in the World and Turkey; Compares eachother; reviews of the literature; examines the uses of the Internet in Primary, Secondary and Higher education in Turkey a developing country; exposes and discusses applications, studies and problems on the educational uses of the Internet in Turkey comparing with the developed countries ; number of suggestions presents on the effective using of the Internet in Turkish educa...

  10. Effect of individualized diabetes education for type 2 diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: To evaluate the effect of individualized education for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods: A total of 280 patients (158 males, mean age 63 ± 10 years) with T2DM were randomly divided into study and control group. Eysenck Personality questionnaire was used to assess the personality of the ...

  11. American Association of Diabetes Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... will focus on truck drivers, whose rates of type 2 diabetes are twice that of the general population. (?) Read More AADE and ADA Release Language Guidance How we talk to and about people with diabetes has an impact on motivation, behaviors and outcomes. Read our new paper and ...

  12. The 2017 Diabetes Educator and the Diabetes Self-Management Education National Practice Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinker, Joanne; Dickinson, Jane K; Litchman, Michelle L; Williams, Ann S; Kolb, Leslie E; Cox, Carla; Lipman, Ruth D

    2018-06-01

    Purpose The American Association of Diabetes Educators conducts the National Practice Survey (NPS) biennially to document current practice in diabetes education in the United States. The purpose of the study is to obtain insight about factors influencing the work of the diabetes educator. Method The 2017 NPS was comprised of 100 questions covering diabetes educator demographics, profile populations of people with diabetes, practice information, program accreditation, program curriculum, staffing, education delivery methods, data collection, and reporting. The basic survey consisted of 22 questions using branch logic, from which respondents were then directed to questions tailored to their particular practice setting, enabling them to answer only a relevant subset of the remaining questions. The web-based survey was sent to approximately 32 000 individuals who were either members of the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) or Certified Diabetes Educators (CDE) with the National Certification Board for Diabetes Educators (NCBDE) but not AADE members. Weekly reminder e-mails were sent to recipients who had not yet responded. The outreach efforts resulted in the survey being completed by 4696 individuals, a 17% response rate yielding 95% confidence that these responses are within ±5% accuracy. Results Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support (DSMES) continues to be a field dominated by women (95%). Diabetes educators represent a diverse health care profession, with educators indicating most commonly that their primary discipline is nursing (48%), nutrition (38%), and pharmacy (7%). When asked about credentials, 82.6% indicated that they held a CDE, 3.8% held the Board Certified-Advanced Diabetes Management (BC-ADM) credential, and 16.5% held neither the CDE nor the BC-ADM. Nearly 75% characterized their role as a diabetes educator as providing direct patient care. DSMES continued to be provided in a varied array of settings to educationally

  13. Community Health: FCS Extension Educators Deliver Diabetes Education in PA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Jill N.; Corbin, Marilyn

    2011-01-01

    For decades, family and consumer sciences (FCS) Extension educators have provided health related education to consumers through Cooperative Extension programming at land grant universities. However, offering diabetes education can be extra challenging due to the complicated nature of the disease and the multi-faceted treatment required. Faced with…

  14. Computers, the Internet and medical education in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Christopher D; Pitchforth, Emma L; O'Callaghan, Christopher

    2010-05-01

    OBJECTIVES This study aimed to explore the use of information and communications technology (ICT) in undergraduate medical education in developing countries. METHODS Educators (deans and heads of medical education) in English-speaking countries across Africa were sent a questionnaire to establish the current state of ICT at medical schools. Non-respondents were contacted firstly by e-mail, subsequently by two postal mailings at 3-month intervals, and finally by telephone. Main outcome measures included cross-sectional data about the availability of computers, specifications, Internet connection speeds, use of ICT by students, and teaching of ICT and computerised research skills, presented by country or region. RESULTS The mean computer : student ratio was 0.123. Internet speeds were rated as 'slow' or 'very slow' on a 5-point Likert scale by 25.0% of respondents overall, but by 58.3% in East Africa and 33.3% in West Africa (including Cameroon). Mean estimates showed that campus computers more commonly supported CD-ROM (91.4%) and sound (87.3%) than DVD-ROM (48.1%) and Internet (72.5%). The teaching of ICT and computerised research skills, and the use of computers by medical students for research, assignments and personal projects were common. CONCLUSIONS It is clear that ICT infrastructure in Africa lags behind that in other regions. Poor download speeds limit the potential of Internet resources (especially videos, sound and other large downloads) to benefit students, particularly in East and West (including Cameroon) Africa. CD-ROM capability is more widely available, but has not yet gained momentum as a means of distributing materials. Despite infrastructure limitations, ICT is already being used and there is enthusiasm for developing this further. Priority should be given to developing partnerships to improve ICT infrastructure and maximise the potential of existing technology.

  15. Impact of Diabetes Education Based on Type 1 Diabetes management model

    OpenAIRE

    Ocakçı, Ayşe Ferda

    2015-01-01

    The diabetes management is considered to be adversely affected when adolescent-specific education methods are not used. In this study, Type 1 Diabetes Management Model which ensures standardisation of the diabetes education and is based on the health promotion model and formed by applying health promotion model (HPM) according to the mastery-learning theory was used. The study was performed to determine effectiveness of diabetes education based on “Type 1 Diabetes Management Model” on adolesc...

  16. Recent Trends in Diabetes Knowledge, Perceptions, and Behaviors: Implications for National Diabetes Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccinino, Linda; Griffey, Susan; Gallivan, Joanne; Lotenberg, Lynne Doner; Tuncer, Diane

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Examine trends in diabetes-related knowledge, perceptions, and behavior among U.S. adults with and without a diagnosis of diabetes and among subpopulations at risk. Discuss implications for national diabetes education and for the National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) in particular. Methods: Three population-based NDEP National…

  17. INTERNET OF THINGS IN EDUCATION: CASE STUDY AND PERSPECTIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Tavares

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available With the presence of the Internet in people's lives there was a significant behavioral change. People communicate, work, relate and learn in a totally different way. Technological innovation ends up facilitating access to information through an increasing number of devices, as well as bringing with it an ever increasing demand by people with good educational background, able to generate skills and abilities of a professional with a more critical profile, flexible, dynamic and in continuous lifelong learning. The most diverse pedagogical models try to adapt to this diversity of information, devices and technologies known as Internet of Things (IoT in order to establish new forms of knowledge and learning. This paper presents a learning experience that integrates the BYOD method into the IoT scenario. The results obtained evidenced a clear acceptance of IoT technology within the teaching process.

  18. Diabetes Self-Management Education; Experience of People with Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardanian Dehkordi, Leila; Abdoli, Samereh

    2017-06-01

    Introduction: Diabetes self-management education (DSME) is a major factor which can affects quality of life of people with diabetes (PWD). Understanding the experience of PWD participating in DSME programs is an undeniable necessity in providing effective DSME to this population. The Aim of the study was to explore the experiences of PWD from a local DSME program in Iran. Methods: This study applied a descriptive phenomenological approach. The participants were PWD attending a well-established local DSME program in an endocrinology and diabetes center in Isfahan, Iran. Fifteen participants willing to share their experience about DSME were selected through purposive sampling from September 2011 to June 2012. Data were collected via unstructured interviews and analyzed using Colaizzi's approach. Results: The experience of participants were categorized under three main themes including content of diabetes education (useful versus repetitive, intensive and volatile), teaching methods (traditional, technology ignorant) and learning environment (friendly atmosphere, cramped and dark). Conclusion: It seems the current approach for DSME cannot meet the needs and expectations of PWD attending the program. Needs assessment, interactive teaching methods, multidisciplinary approach, technology as well as appropriate physical space need to be considered to improve DSME.

  19. Diabetes Self-Management Education; Experience of People with Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Mardanian Dehkordi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetes self-management education (DSME is a major factor which can affects quality of life of people with diabetes (PWD. Understanding the experience of PWD participating in DSME programs is an undeniable necessity in providing effective DSME to this population. The Aim of the study was to explore the experiences of PWD from a local DSME program in Iran. Methods: This study applied a descriptive phenomenological approach. The participants were PWD attending a well-established local DSME program in an endocrinology and diabetes center in Isfahan, Iran. Fifteen participants willing to share their experience about DSME were selected through purposive sampling from September 2011 to June 2012. Data were collected via unstructured interviews and analyzed using Colaizzi's approach. Results: The experience of participants were categorized under three main themes including content of diabetes education (useful versus repetitive, intensive and volatile, teaching methods (traditional, technology ignorant and learning environment (friendly atmosphere, cramped and dark. Conclusion: It seems the current approach for DSME cannot meet the needs and expectations of PWD attending the program. Needs assessment, interactive teaching methods, multidisciplinary approach, technology as well as appropriate physical space need to be considered to improve DSME.

  20. Experimental Evaluation of Internet of Things in the Educational Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr Elsaadany

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In the trials of utilization of technology for the society, efforts have shown benefits of the ICT use in facilitating education from different perspectives based on different waves of technological change. The recent development in technologies has also resulted in change of user behavior and usage patterns towards different areas of life, and consequently in the area of education. A new wave of change has started and is expecting to proliferate with stronger connectivity and interoperability of various devices, named as the Internet of Things (IoT. The internet of things is expected to give strong impacts on different areas of life including healthcare, transportation, smart homes, smart campus, and more. Consequently, there are inherent benefits to the education environment that are not yet well established in literature. The paper studies the potential benefit and impact of the IoT evolution concept in both the physical and the virtual learning environment and suggests a paradigm with use case scenarios. The results of an experimental evaluation on the aspects of applying IoT technology in education are presented and discussed in order to verify the set of related hypotheses.

  1. Perceived Internet health literacy of HIV-positive people through the provision of a computer and Internet health education intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Christie; Graham, Joy

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this study was to assess perceived Internet health literacy of HIV-positive people before and after an Internet health information educational intervention. We developed a 50-min educational intervention on basic computer skills and online health information evaluation. We administered a demographic survey and a validated health literacy survey (eHEALS) at baseline, immediately after, and 3 months the class. Changes in scores between the surveys were analysed. Eighteen HIV-positive participants were included in the final analysis. Before the intervention, most respondents' assessment of their ability to access Internet health information was unfavourable. Post-intervention, the majority of respondents agreed or strongly agreed they were able to access and identify Internet health information resources. The increase in self-assessed skill level was statistically significant for all eight items eHEALS (P Internet health information educational intervention HIV-positive people with baseline low perceived Internet health literacy significantly improves confidence in finding and using Internet health information resources. Studies with larger numbers of participants should be undertaken to determine if brief interventions improve self-care, patient outcomes and use of emergency services. © 2010 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2010 Health Libraries Group.

  2. Diabetes education via mobile text messaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangberg, Silje C; Arsand, Eirik; Andersson, Niklas

    2006-01-01

    Living with diabetes makes great educational demands on a family. We have tested the feasibility of using the mobile phone short message service (SMS) for reaching people with diabetes information. We also assessed user satisfaction and perceived pros and cons of the medium through interviews. Eleven parents of children with type 1 diabetes received messages for 11 weeks. The parents were positive about the system and said that they would like to continue to use it. The pop-up reminding effect of SMS messages in busy everyday life was noted as positive. Some parents experienced the messages as somewhat intrusive, arriving too often and at inconvenient times. The parents also noted the potential of the messages to facilitate communication with their adolescent children. The inability to store all of the messages or to print them out were seen as major disadvantages. Overall, the SMS seems to hold promise as means of delivering diabetes information.

  3. Role of Social Media and the Internet in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vervaart, Peter

    2012-07-01

    Since the advent of the Internet, and in particular the development of the interactive version of the web, Web 2.0, use of Social Media has developed into a major strategy for businesses and organizations such as the IFCC to use for the purposes of Public Relations and Education. The early Internet 'Web 1.0' was a largely static environment which did not allow interaction between organizations and their customers and/or members and as such was mainly used as an information repository rather than a dynamic environment for the exchange of ideas and active marketing and education. Since the development of Web 2.0 we have seen a massive increase in web based traffic which could be loosely called 'social networking' which initially was mainly networking between individuals but more recently has developed into a major marketing resource allowing networking between organizations and individuals on the web. It follows then that by developing a Social Media presence on platforms such as Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and other social media sites organizations can use this networking for the purposes of marketing, public relations, and in the case of IFCC, education of members and other interested individuals across the globe.

  4. Exploring Educators' Perceptions of Internet Technology for Classroom Education in Northern Virginia Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamey, Sherrill Dean, II.

    2011-01-01

    The pervasiveness of Internet technology in the educational environment of the United States has altered the way educators present information in the classroom. The schools of Northern Virginia, located in several of the financially wealthiest suburbs of the United States, provide a technologically advanced school system to explore Internet…

  5. Java programming and Internet technologies for undergraduate education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Wolfgang

    2000-05-01

    Although it is somewhat of a cliché that computers are revolutionizing education, it is still not common to find computer-based interactive curricular material. Internet technologies are likely to change this situation by providing standards based on virtual machines and meta-languages. Adopting these technologies may improve the teaching of the underlying physics. This paper describes a set of Java applets, known as Physlets, that make use of these technologies. Physlets are designed to communicate with browsers by employing a scripting language such as JavaScript, thereby allowing one applet to be used in many different contexts.

  6. Internet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    微软想要统治Internet,Windows XP就是这个计划中的一个组成部分。微软已经努力争取提供连接Internet的最方便、最完整的方法。新的操作系统含有Internet Explorer 6(IE6)、新的保密功能以及防火墙保护。Windows XP甚至包含有一个Macromedia Flash播放器插件。但是对Sun微系统公司的打击就是

  7. Partnering with diabetes educators to improve patient outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Burke SD; Sherr D; Lipman RD

    2014-01-01

    Sandra D Burke,1,2 Dawn Sherr,3 Ruth D Lipman3 1American Association of Diabetes Educators, Chicago, IL, USA; 2University of Illinois at Chicago College of Nursing, Urbana, IL, USA; 3Science and Practice, American Association of Diabetes Educators, Chicago, IL, USA Abstract: Diabetes is a chronic, progressive disease that affects millions worldwide. The paradigm of diabetes management has shifted to focus on empowering the person with diabetes to manage the disease successfully and to improv...

  8. Analysis of Scientific Attitude, Computer Anxiety, Educational Internet Use, Problematic Internet Use, and Academic Achievement of Middle School Students According to Demographic Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekmezci, Mehmet; Celik, Ismail; Sahin, Ismail; Kiray, Ahmet; Akturk, Ahmet Oguz

    2015-01-01

    In this research, students' scientific attitude, computer anxiety, educational use of the Internet, academic achievement, and problematic use of the Internet are analyzed based on different variables (gender, parents' educational level and daily access to the Internet). The research group involves 361 students from two middle schools which are…

  9. Searching for Educational Content in the For-Profit Internet: Case Study and Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabos, Bettina

    This case study investigates the commercialized nature of Internet content and the ways educators and students negotiate and talk about such content. In factoring in the economic and historical context of educational Internet content, this case study also addresses educators' evolving attitudes towards commercialism in the classroom. A survey was…

  10. Study of Self-Efficacy Perceptions of Social Studies Teacher Candidates on Educational Internet Usage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akman, Özkan

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at examining the self-efficacy perceptions of social studies teacher candidates with respect to educational internet use. This research was conducted on a sample of 174 social studies teacher candidates enrolled in Gaziantep University Nizip Faculty of Education. The "Educational Internet Self-Efficacy Scale," developed…

  11. THE INTERNET AND ICT: Opportunities or Threats to the Education World?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habib Habiburrahim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this millennium era, the Internet plays pivotal roles in providing educational access. It serves as a significant tool to communicate, discuss, and even explore various information from a different world and reference. In educational world in most developed countries, the Internet is used as an important educational transformation, especially for those who struggle with times and geographical boundaries. As such, the Internet could flexibly bridge between a Professor and a student to communicate and coordinate with regard to their research progress. Beside its advantages, some educational practitioners have harshly criticized the implication of the Internet used in the educational world. Opponents of the Internet users claim that the Internet could threat anyone, including educational world. Oftentimes the Internet is used to do crimes and other unlawful actions, stealing other people's information and money is one of the tangible examples associated with the Internet. Issues on intellectual and copy rights, and other academic misconducts are also connected to the Internet in the last few years. This paper attempts to provide a brief discussion on the advantages and disadvantages of the Internet in higher education.

  12. Distance learning and the internet in respiratory therapy education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varekojis, Sarah M; Sergakis, Georgianna G; Dunlevy, Crystal L; Foote, Elbie; Clutter, Jill

    2011-11-01

    The profession of respiratory therapy (RT) continues to grow both in number, due to population growth and an ever-increasing aging population, and scope of practice, due to both new and expanded roles and responsibilities in divergent areas of clinical practice. Instructional technology, including distance learning, will probably play a key role in training, educating, and assessing RT students to meet the increasing demand for practitioners. To assess current uses of distance learning and opinions concerning the appropriate use of distance education in RT education programs nationwide. A 13-item on-line survey was designed to collect information about the frequency of use of various types of distance education typically utilized in RT education programs. The survey was sent to directors of 343 Committee on Accreditation for Respiratory Care accredited programs of RT education that offer entry-level or advanced courses of study. The response rate was 50% (169 respondents). Fifty-two percent of the respondents indicated that their courses included some form of on-line learning component. Most directors anticipated that the distance composition of their course offerings will remain unchanged or increase in the near future. Our results indicate that, while distance education plays an important supportive role in RT education, there is still a preference for face-to-face instruction and Internet-facilitated courses among program directors. Program directors continue to view the laboratory and clinical settings as hands-on environments that require instructor supervision in order for students to demonstrate proficiency and critical thinking skills. When used appropriately, distance learning may be an efficient and effective approach to address the many barriers to education faced by the health workforce in general, including budget constraints, overloaded schedules, the need for on-the-job learning opportunities, and lack of access.

  13. Internet Access and Use among Students of Physical Education: A Study of Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar, Rajender

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper depicts a study conducted on the behavior of physical education students towards Internet usage at Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra. Specially, the study aims to know the purposes for use of Internet resources and services, frequency of use, places and means of use, student's satisfaction level toward the Internet, and problems faced while using the Internet. A survey was carried out with a sample of 100 physical education students of Kurukshetra University and the response rate was 88%. A well-designed questionnaire was distributed to the students' sample. Amazingly, the results of the study reveal that usage of the Internet in research and education was not favored, whereas email, chatting, and sports websites were commonly used among students. The study also found that too much information on the Internet, slow access speeds, and finding relevant information were the main problems in using the Internet.

  14. Technography and Design-Actuality Gap-Analysis of Internet Computer Technologies-Assisted Education: Western Expectations and Global Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhalgh-Spencer, Heather; Jerbi, Moja

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we provide a design-actuality gap-analysis of the internet infrastructure that exists in developing nations and nations in the global South with the deployed internet computer technologies (ICT)-assisted programs that are designed to use internet infrastructure to provide educational opportunities. Programs that specifically…

  15. Guidelines for Educational Research in Biochemistry on Internet Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.M. Lima

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The Internet has been used to support research in different areas, such as practical and educational  research  in  medical  and  biomedical  research.  There  are  several recommended  sites  for  carrying  biomedical  and  medical  research  (BERGER,  2003. Nevertheless,  few  studies  report  on  the  use  of  the  Internet  in  the  teaching  of Biochemistry. Considering the fact that there is no specific legislation for the use of the Internet  in  Brazil,  it  is  necessary  to  stimulate  self-regulation  of  the  sector  in  order  to establish  minimum  quality  standards,  safety,  and  reliability  of  sites  containing information  in  the  educational  area.  This  study  establishes  some  parameters  to  help guiding research for educational purposes on the internet. The following aspects should be  checked:  if  the  site  has  an  editorial  board  responsible  for  content  selection,  and whether  it  is  made  up  of  experts  in  the  area  of  expertise;  if  the  site  releases  updated scientific materials, and provides pedagogical content that fosters teaching and learning such  as  images  that  contribute  to  the  understanding  of  the  content,  educational software,  and  animation;  if  the  site  is  recommended  by  universities,  public  and  private qualified  institutions.  In  addition,  educational  sites  should  present  other  aspects, including transparency (regarding their educational purpose, quality (scientifically based information,  privacy  (related  to  the  user’s  personal  data,  responsibility  and  reliable sources.  Such  procedures  are  necessary  to  guarantee  that  searching  for  educational objectives will provide access to theoretical and pedagogical information quality.

  16. Reducing the risks of diabetes complications through diabetes self-management education and support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Dan; D'Eramo Melkus, Gail; Stuart, Patricia Mickey W; McKoy, June M; Urbanski, Patti; Boren, Suzanne Austin; Coke, Lola; Winters, Janis E; Horsley, Neil L; Sherr, Dawn; Lipman, Ruth

    2013-04-01

    People with diabetes are at risk of developing complications that contribute to substantial morbidity and mortality. In 2011, the American Association of Diabetes Educators convened an invitational Reducing Risks Symposium, during which an interdisciplinary panel of 11 thought leaders examined current knowledge about the reduction and prevention of diabetes-related risks and translated evidence into diabetes care and self-management education. Symposium participants reviewed findings from the literature and engaged in a moderated roundtable discussion. This report summarizes the discussion and presents recommendations to incorporate into practice to improve outcomes. The objective of the symposium was to develop practical advice for diabetes educators and other members of the diabetes care team regarding the reduction of diabetes-related risks. Optimal diabetes management requires patients to actively participate in their care, which occurs most effectively with a multidisciplinary team. Diabetes education is an integral part of this team approach because it not only helps the patient understand diabetes, its progression, and possible complications, but also provides guidance and encouragement to the patient to engage in proactive risk-reduction decisions for optimal health. A variety of tools are available to help the diabetes educator develop an individualized, patient-centered plan for risk reduction. More research is needed regarding intervention efficacy, best practices to improve adherence, and quantification of benefits from ongoing diabetes support in risk reduction. Diabetes educators are urged to stay abreast of evolving models of care and to build relationships with health care providers both within and beyond the diabetes care team.

  17. Effectiveness of Internet-Based Interventions on Glycemic Control in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ying; Wang, Fengbin; Zhang, Xing; Zhu, Xiaorou; Sun, Qiudan; Fisher, Edwin; Sun, Xinying

    2018-05-07

    The popularity of internet as an area of research has grown manifold over the years. Given its rapid development and increasing coverage worldwide, internet-based interventions seem to offer a promising option to ameliorate huge burdens brought by type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, studies conducted by different researchers have provided contradictory results on the effect of internet-based interventions in glycemic control. This meta-analysis aims to summarize currently available evidence and evaluate the overall impact of internet-based interventions on glycemic management of type 2 diabetic patients. A systematic literature search was performed in PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Web of Science. Randomized controlled trials that used glycosylated hemoglobin values as the outcome measure of glycemic control were considered. Risk of bias and publication bias were evaluated. Of the 492 studies, 35 were included in meta-analysis, and results indicated that the weighted mean difference (WMD) between usual care and internet-based interventions at endpoint was -0.426% (95% CI -0.540 to -0.312; P<.001). Subgroup analyses revealed that intervention duration ≤3 months yielded optimal performance (WMD -0.51%; 95% CI -0.71 to -0.31; P<.001). Combined mobile and website interventions were substantially superior to solely Web-based and mobile-based interventions in glycemic control (combined WMD -0.77%, 95% CI -1.07 to -0.47; P<.001; Web only: WMD -0.48%; 95% CI -0.71 to -0.24, P<.001; mobile only WMD -0.31%, 95% CI -0.49 to -0.14; P<.001). Furthermore, the effect of interventions with automated feedbacks was similar to those with manual feedbacks, and studies with internet-based educational contents were more effective in glycemic control. The assessment revealed a low risk of bias. In conclusion, utilization of internet-based intervention is beneficial for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and taking full advantage of this type of intervention may substantially reduce the

  18. Variability of patient spine education by Internet search engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghobrial, George M; Mehdi, Angud; Maltenfort, Mitchell; Sharan, Ashwini D; Harrop, James S

    2014-03-01

    Patients are increasingly reliant upon the Internet as a primary source of medical information. The educational experience varies by search engine, search term, and changes daily. There are no tools for critical evaluation of spinal surgery websites. To highlight the variability between common search engines for the same search terms. To detect bias, by prevalence of specific kinds of websites for certain spinal disorders. Demonstrate a simple scoring system of spinal disorder website for patient use, to maximize the quality of information exposed to the patient. Ten common search terms were used to query three of the most common search engines. The top fifty results of each query were tabulated. A negative binomial regression was performed to highlight the variation across each search engine. Google was more likely than Bing and Yahoo search engines to return hospital ads (P=0.002) and more likely to return scholarly sites of peer-reviewed lite (P=0.003). Educational web sites, surgical group sites, and online web communities had a significantly higher likelihood of returning on any search, regardless of search engine, or search string (P=0.007). Likewise, professional websites, including hospital run, industry sponsored, legal, and peer-reviewed web pages were less likely to be found on a search overall, regardless of engine and search string (P=0.078). The Internet is a rapidly growing body of medical information which can serve as a useful tool for patient education. High quality information is readily available, provided that the patient uses a consistent, focused metric for evaluating online spine surgery information, as there is a clear variability in the way search engines present information to the patient. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Multimedia technology for diabetes education of school nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) require school nurses (SN) with specific diabetes training. Multimedia learning can facilitate cost-effective, convenient education of SN by diabetes educators (DE). We conducted formative research to gather qualitative and quantitative data to inform the interven...

  20. Developing Culturally Targeted Diabetes Educational Materials for Older Russian-Speaking Immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Son, Catherine R

    2014-07-01

    Older adults who immigrate late in life face many challenges adapting to a new country. Immigrants bring their cultural beliefs and behaviors with them, which can influence their ability to make dietary changes required when they have type 2 diabetes. Culturally targeted patient education materials are needed to improve immigrants' health literacy and abilities to self-manage diabetes. Currently, there is a scarcity of diabetes patient education materials to meet the educational needs of the Russian-speaking immigrant group. The purpose of this article is to describe a project in which culturally targeted diabetes education materials for older Russian-speaking immigrants were designed and developed. Culturally targeted patient education materials are essential if they are to be accepted and used by clients from different ethnic minority populations. The creation of culturally relevant materials requires a team effort and community stakeholder input. The availability of materials on the internet facilitates access and use by health care providers. Culturally targeted education materials are an important component in addressing health literacy in ethnic minority populations. Next steps require that these materials be evaluated to test their impact on diabetes self-management behaviors and clinical outcomes such as adherence, amount of physical activity, and blood glucose levels. © 2014 The Author(s).

  1. Computers and internet in dental education system of Kerala, South India: A multicentre study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanakath Harikumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Computers and internet have exerted a tremendous effect on dental education programs all over the world. A multicenter study was done to assess trends in computer and internet usage among the dental students and faculty members across the South Indian state, Kerala. A total of 347 subjects participated in the study. All participants were highly competent with the use of computers and internet. 72.3% of the study subjects preferred hard copy textbooks to PDF format books. 81.3% of the study subjects thought that internet was a useful adjunct to dental education. 73.8% of the study subjects opined that computers and internet could never be a replacement to conventional classroom teaching. Efforts should be made to provide greater infrastructure with regard to computers and internet such as Wi-Fi, free, unlimited internet access to all students and faculty members.

  2. A Comparative Analysis of User Preferences for for Major Internet Based Education Media in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Chunyang; Jiang, Yanqing

    2014-01-01

    Internet based education media are developing at an amazing rate and being seen as an upstart that will likely take the place of traditional education means worldwide in the future. This paper presents the results of a comparative analysis on user preferences for four major categories of internet-based media used in China. In this paper, we first…

  3. Educational Computer Use in Leisure Contexts: A Phenomenological Study of Adolescents' Experiences at Internet Cafes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilesiz, Sebnem

    2009-01-01

    Computer use is a widespread leisure activity for adolescents. Leisure contexts, such as Internet cafes, constitute specific social environments for computer use and may hold significant educational potential. This article reports a phenomenological study of adolescents' experiences of educational computer use at Internet cafes in Turkey. The…

  4. Elements of effective nutrition education for adults with Diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Elements of effective nutrition education for adults with Diabetes mellitus in resource poor settings: A review. ... Journal Home > Vol 14, No 1 (2009) >. Log in or Register to get access ... Type 2 diabetes is increasing to epidemic levels globally.

  5. Views of patients on a group diabetes education programme using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-09-06

    Sep 6, 2012 ... diabetes education or group motivational interviewing by mid- level health ..... events. Stress mostly revolved around family problems, work and the ... role of stress in managing their diabetes, and had embarked on different ...

  6. Educational Technology Research Journals: "The Internet and Higher Education", 2001-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drysdale, Jeffery S.; Matthews, Michael; Terekhova-Nan, Vera; Woodfield, Wendy; West, Richard E.

    2013-01-01

    This article analyzes articles published in "The Internet and Higher Education" from 2001-2010. The researchers analyzed the frequency of author-provided keywords and common abstract words, type and frequency of authorship, the type of research method employed, and the number of citations the journal and specific articles received. Words…

  7. Role of Using Internet on Self-Efficacy, Educational Motivation and Educational Achievement Tabriz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golmohammadnazhad Bahrami GhR

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aims: In order to improve the quality of education in the scientific and educational centers, usage of communication technologies, especially the Internet, is encouraged and promoted. However, there are not still considerable researches on the role of Internet to improve the quality of education and psychological characteristics of students. The present study investigated the role of using Internet on self-efficacy, educational motivation and achievement of medical students. Instrument & Methods: In this quasi-experimental study, 363 of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences’ students (174 Internet users and 189 nonusers who had studied in 2013-14 academic year were selected by stratified random sampling method and entered into the study. To collect data, educational motivation scale, Sharer's self-efficacy scale (GSES, Internet using questionnaire which made by researcher and the latest educational grade point averages were used. Data were analyzed by multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA and independent samples T tests. Findings: The internet user students had significantly more general self-efficacy (creativity and attempt subscales in comparison to nonusers, but there was no significant difference in perseverance subscale of two groups. Internet user students had more educational achievement and motivation (task of interest subscales, educational effort, social interest, praise gaining, typifying, business continuity, competing in comparison to nonusers. However, there was no significant difference between two groups in social power subscale. Conclusion: Self-efficacy and educational achievement motivation of Internet user students is more than nonusers.

  8. Diabetes education improves depressive state in newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Bin; Zhang, Xiyao; Xu, Xiuping; Lv, Xiaofeng; Yao, Lu; Huang, Xu; Guo, Xueying; Liu, Baozhu; Li, Qiang; Cui, Can

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The prevalence of depression is relatively high in individuals with diabetes. However, screening and monitoring of depressive state in patients with diabetes is still neglected in developing countries and the treatment of diabetes-related depression is rarely performed in these countries. In this study, our aim was to study the role of diabetes education in the improvement of depressive state in newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: The Dutch version of the cente...

  9. THE IMPACT OF INTERNET-OF-THINGS IN HIGHER EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Logica BANICA

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to present a new concept in IT&C (Information Technology and Communications, namely Internet-of-Things (IoT. Starting from a short introduction on the basics of this concept, a study is conducted to demonstrate the importance of introducing IoT in higher education. Also, there are identified several practical methods identified for integrating IoT features in academia, especially in the areas of teaching and learning enhancements. Even if important IT&C companies launched and implemented projects in this area, a model for “smart universities” is no well-defined. In our study, we demonstrate that the optimal technical solution for academia are IoT Platforms with real-time, limited-area service provision using Cloud Computing services.

  10. POTENTIALITIES AND RISKS OF BIOCHEMICAL EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH VIA INTERNET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. Gomes

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available The internet is more and more present in worldwide education. There are innumerable projects thatstimulate its usage for aiding the teaching-learning process. This new trend modies the reality of thewhole school. However, many copies of identical information are found in several sites: graphs, gures,texts, links and even errors. The aim of this work is to analyse the biochemical issues photosynthesisand cellular respiration available in web pages, taking into account contents quality, trustworthinessand eectiveness. Firstly, 6th secondary level students were inquired by a questionnaire on their use ofinternet resources. More than 80 percent of them were regular users. The result conrms the alreadyknown potential of internet in education. Fourteen sites were analysed regarding to contents, presenceof bibliographical references, authorship, titles of responsibles and adequacy to the target public. Inrelation to contents, presence of conceptual errors, illustrations and other stimulant elements wereanalysed. None of the sites presented biblioghraphic references; less than half divulged responsiblenames and their graduation. The great majority do not mention intended public target. In general,the sites did not contained grave conceptual errors, except for two that mention estoma insteadestroma, cilica/acilica phosphorylation (for cyclic and acyclic, grama (for grana and place oxygenas essential for anaerobic respiration. However, one of these sites was the only one that mentionedenzymes and regulation steps of cellular respiration. Half of the sites presented identical texts andgures. None used livened up resources. The majority showed contents as virtual versions of printedbooks. Illustrations did not present necessary legends. None of the analysed sites, thus, was consideredexcellent. Trustworthiness is also questionable as much of the contents arte clearly copies of otherpages, recurrent even on the errors. Our data strengthen the need for

  11. Motivational Interviewing support for a behavioral health internet intervention for drivers with type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen S. Ingersoll

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available While Internet interventions can improve health behaviors, their impact is limited by program adherence. Supporting program adherence through telephone counseling may be useful, but there have been few direct tests of the impact of support. We describe a Telephone Motivational Interviewing (MI intervention targeting adherence to an Internet intervention for drivers with Type 1 Diabetes, DD.com, and compare completion of intervention benchmarks by those randomized to DD.com plus MI vs. DD.com only. The goal of the pre-intervention MI session was to increase the participant's motivation to complete the Internet intervention and all its assignments, while the goal of the post-treatment MI session was to plan for maintaining changes made during the intervention. Sessions were semi-structured and partially scripted to maximize consistency. MI Fidelity was coded using a standard coding system, the MITI. We examined the effects of MI support vs. no support on number of days from enrollment to program benchmarks. Results show that MI sessions were provided with good fidelity. Users who received MI support completed some program benchmarks such as Core 4 (t176 df = −2.25; p < .03 and 11 of 12 monthly driving diaries significantly sooner, but support did not significantly affect time to intervention completion (t177 df = −1.69; p < .10 or rates of completion. These data suggest that there is little benefit to therapist guidance for Internet interventions including automated email prompts and other automated minimal supports, but that a booster MI session may enhance collection of follow-up data.

  12. Effectiveness of Internet-Based Interventions on Glycemic Control in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ying; Wang, Fengbin; Zhang, Xing; Zhu, Xiaorou; Sun, Qiudan; Fisher, Edwin

    2018-01-01

    Background The popularity of internet as an area of research has grown manifold over the years. Given its rapid development and increasing coverage worldwide, internet-based interventions seem to offer a promising option to ameliorate huge burdens brought by type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, studies conducted by different researchers have provided contradictory results on the effect of internet-based interventions in glycemic control. Objective This meta-analysis aims to summarize currently available evidence and evaluate the overall impact of internet-based interventions on glycemic management of type 2 diabetic patients. Methods A systematic literature search was performed in PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Web of Science. Randomized controlled trials that used glycosylated hemoglobin values as the outcome measure of glycemic control were considered. Risk of bias and publication bias were evaluated. Results Of the 492 studies, 35 were included in meta-analysis, and results indicated that the weighted mean difference (WMD) between usual care and internet-based interventions at endpoint was –0.426% (95% CI –0.540 to –0.312; P<.001). Subgroup analyses revealed that intervention duration ≤3 months yielded optimal performance (WMD –0.51%; 95% CI –0.71 to –0.31; P<.001). Combined mobile and website interventions were substantially superior to solely Web-based and mobile-based interventions in glycemic control (combined WMD –0.77%, 95% CI –1.07 to –0.47; P<.001; Web only: WMD –0.48%; 95% CI –0.71 to –0.24, P<.001; mobile only WMD –0.31%, 95% CI –0.49 to –0.14; P<.001). Furthermore, the effect of interventions with automated feedbacks was similar to those with manual feedbacks, and studies with internet-based educational contents were more effective in glycemic control. The assessment revealed a low risk of bias. Conclusions In conclusion, utilization of internet-based intervention is beneficial for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and

  13. Internet use by colorectal surgery patients: a surgeon's tool for education and marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Jeffrey P; Ortega, Adrian; Vukasin, Petar; Kaiser, Andreas M; Kaufman, Howard S; Beart, Robert W

    2004-06-01

    The goal of this study is to understand the role of the Internet in the education and recruitment of patients within colorectal surgery practices. Surveys of Internet use were completed by 298 patients visiting five outpatient colorectal surgery clinics affiliated with the University of Southern California. Data collected included the patient's age, gender, level of education, zip code at home, type of clinic visited, and information on the respondent's Internet use. Overall, 20 per cent of the respondent patients visiting our clinics had used the Internet to research the medical condition that prompted their visit. Highest grade level completed (P Internet whereas gender was not (P = 0.58). Among Internet users, only household income and frequent use of the Internet were associated with searching the Internet for medical information (P Internet-using patients surveyed felt the medical information they found was "some what" or "very helpful." Understanding which patients "go online" to search for medical information is essential for surgeons who wish to use the Internet for marketing their practices and educating their patients.

  14. Creativity and diabetes education: Essentiality, impact and way forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarda, Archana

    2015-04-01

    The changing diabetes in children (CDiC) program is a unique program aimed at children suffering from type 1 diabetes. The whole focus of CDiC is to provide comprehensive care including diabetes education. Various innovative and creative diabetes educational materials have been developed, which makes learning fun. Lot of diabetes camps are held at CDiC, focusing on diabetes education, experience sharing and fun activities. CDiC faces many challenges in an effort to cater to the needs of most deserving children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) throughout the country, to provide comprehensive care including self-sufficiency, to serve children for as long as possible and to ultimately have better outcomes for all children with T1DM. The CDiC program aims to make the child more positive, secure and hopeful and initiate and strive for comprehensive diabetes care for the economically underprivileged children with T1DM.

  15. The Status of Internet Education in Japanese and German Guidelines on ICT and Media Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Langner

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper tries to locate references to Internet related elements in curricula and guidelines for general education in Japan and Germany from around 1985 to the present. The most obvious difference is the historically grown concentration on «information» in Japan vs. «media» in Germany (although in Germany informatics exists as a general school subject and accordingly the assignment of Internet related content to the respective area. The guidelines do not differ much in that they stress comparable general aims of education, but differences in focus become visible through examination of the detailed content listed for information and media education. The paper concludes with suggestions to further pursue some of the strong points from both approaches.

  16. [Internet-based continuing medical education: as effective as live continuing medical education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisonneuve, Hervé; Chabot, Olivier

    2009-10-01

    E-learning consists in using new multimedia and Internet technologies to improve the quality of learning activities by facilitating access to resources and services, as well as exchanges and remote collaboration. The Internet is used for adult education in most professional domains, but its use for continuing medical education is less developed. Advantages are observed for teachers (e.g., permanent updating, interactive links, illustrations, archiving, and collective intelligence) and for the learners (e.g., accessibility, autonomy, flexibility, and adaptable pace). Research and meta-analyses have shown that e-CME is as effective as live events for immediate and retained learning. English-language educational medical websites that grant CME credits are numerous; few such French-language sites can currently grant credits. Accreditation of websites for CME, in its infancy in Europe, is common in North America.

  17. USE OF SOCIAL INTERNET SERVICES IN EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITY OF STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Shlianchak

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article reviews the key opportunities of using services of web 2. 0 technologies to the educational process. It is shown of Social Software tools: Wiki technology, system of creating blogs, systems of storing and sharing web resources. The basic lines of Wiki-technology, possibility, and methods of the use of it are described in pedagogical practice. The described pedagogical potential of Wiki-technology to organize project activities of students. It should be stressed that Wiki is a piece of server software that allows users to freely create and edit web page content using any web browser. The author focusing on teaching and methodical opportunities of the Internet blogs and systems of storing and sharing web resources (for joint hypertext materials creation, placement of presentations, text documents, photos, video resources, etc. in professional preparation of the future primary school teachers. It is shown efficiency using of web 2. 0 technologies in the educational work future teachers (by the example of their own resources of Kirovograd State Pedagogical University named after Volodymyr Vynnychenko.

  18. Internet-Based Contingency Management to Improve Adherence with Blood Glucose Testing Recommendations for Teens with Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiff, Bethany R.; Dallery, Jesse

    2010-01-01

    The current study used Internet-based contingency management (CM) to increase adherence with blood glucose testing to at least 4 times daily. Four teens diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes earned vouchers for submitting blood glucose testing videos over a Web site. Participants submitted a mean of 1.7 and 3.1 blood glucose tests per day during the 2…

  19. Usage of Internet Technology in Financial Education and Financial Inclusion by Students of Economics Universities

    OpenAIRE

    B. Frączek

    2016-01-01

    The paper analyses the usage of the Internet by university students in Visegrad Countries (4V Countries) who study economic fields in their formal and informal financial education and captures the areas of untapped potential of Internet in educational processes. Higher education and training, technological readiness, and the financial market development are in the group of pillars, that are key for efficiency driven economies. These three pillars have become an inspiration to the research on ...

  20. Home-Based Diabetes Symptom Self-Management Education for Mexican Americans with Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Alexandra A.; Brown, Sharon A.; Horner, Sharon D.; Zuñiga, Julie; Arheart, Kristopher L.

    2015-01-01

    This pilot study evaluated an innovative diabetes symptom awareness and self-management educational program for Mexican Americans, a fast growing minority population experiencing a diabetes epidemic. Patients with diabetes need assistance interpreting and managing symptoms, which are often annoying and potentially life-threatening. A repeated…

  1. Improving Diabetes Care in the Latino Population: The Emory Latino Diabetes Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotberg, Britt; Greene, Rachel; Ferez-Pinzon, Anyul M.; Mejia, Robert; Umpierrez, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Background: The incidence of diabetes in Latinos is 12.8% compared to 9.3% of the general population. Latinos suffer from a higher prevalence of diabetic complications and mortality than whites yet receive less monitoring tests and education. Purpose: (1) Identify changes in clinical indicators among subjects with type 2 diabetes participating in…

  2. Impact of nutrition education on diabetes knowledge and attitudes of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: attitudes, diabetes knowledge, nutrition education, South Africa, type 2 diabetes ... limited data on diabetes dietary interventions that concurrently ..... exercise. 23 (56.10). 22 (53.66). 0.82. 16 (39.02). 18 (43.90). 0.65. 23 (56.10).

  3. Physician education programme improves quality of diabetes care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To determine if a physician education programme and a structured consultation schedule would improve the quality of diabetes patient care in a diabetes clinic. Setting. Two tertiary care diabetes clinics at Kalafong Hospital, Pretoria. Study design. Quasi-experimental controlled before-and-after study. Methods.

  4. Internet-Based Education for Prostrate Cancer Screening. Addendum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    of site usage and changes in depression and anxiety scores. Journal of Medical Internet Research , 4(1), e3. Clarke, G., Eubanks, D., Reid, E...skills program with reminders. Journal of Medical Internet Research , 7(2), e16. Cobb, N. K., Graham, A. L., Bock, B. C., Papandonatos, G., & Abrams, D...programs. Journal of Medical Internet Research , 8(3), e15. Danaher, B. G. & Seeley, J. R. (2009). Methodological issues in research on web-based

  5. 77 FR 11130 - Medicare Program; Application by the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-24

    ...] Medicare Program; Application by the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) for Continued... American Association of Diabetes Educators' (AADE) request for the Secretary's approval of its... Association of Diabetes Educators for continued recognition as a national accreditation program for...

  6. THE ANALYSIS OF POSSIBILITIES OF INTERNET RESOURCES TO IMPROVE THE EFFICIENCY THE EDUCATIONAL PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    С А Усманов

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In article the analysis of Internet resources of educational appointment is carried out and the short characteristic of the main opportunities of these resources is given. Today it is already impossible to present educational process without use of opportunities of Internet resources. The modern teacher has to be able to work with information which is necessary for realization of his professional activity, the solution of his professional tasks, to have skills of cooperation with pupils on the basis of information exchange. The educational Internet resource is complete, named, interconnected, uniform systemically organized set which includes both the general education formalized and professionally significant knowledge and means of organizational and methodical ensuring educational process and means for their automated storage, accumulation and processing. Internet resources are designed to satisfy needs of the user for various aspects and spheres of educational activity. Quite often concrete resource includes several properties such difficult at once on structure and functioning of means what the Internet is. Use of the Internet allows to establish between the teacher and pupils feedback when performing independent works, allows to carry out mailing of materials and to conduct surveys. Occupations with use of resources of the Internet represent alloy of new information technologies with new pedagogical technologies.

  7. Diabetes educator role boundaries in Australia: a documentary analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Olivia; Nancarrow, Susan; Grace, Sandra; Borthwick, Alan

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes educators provide self-management education for people living with diabetes to promote optimal health and wellbeing. Their national association is the Australian Diabetes Educators Association (ADEA), established in 1981. In Australia the diabetes educator workforce is a diverse, interdisciplinary entity, with nurses, podiatrists, dietitians and several other health professional groups recognised by ADEA as providers of diabetes education. Historically nurses have filled the diabetes educator role and anecdotally, nurses are perceived to have wider scope of practice when undertaking the diabetes educator role than the other professions eligible to practise diabetes education. The nature of the interprofessional role boundaries and differing scopes of practice of diabetes educators of various primary disciplines are poorly understood. Informed by a documentary analysis, this historical review explores the interprofessional evolution of the diabetes educator workforce in Australia and describes the major drivers shaping the role boundaries of diabetes educators from 1981 until 2017. This documentary analysis was undertaken in the form of a literature review. STARLITE framework guided the searches for grey and peer reviewed literature. A timeline featuring the key events and changes in the diabetes educator workforce was developed. The timeline was analysed and emerging themes were identified as the major drivers of change within this faction of the health workforce. This historical review illustrates that there have been drivers at the macro, meso and micro levels which reflect and are reflected by the interprofessional role boundaries in the diabetes educator workforce. The most influential drivers of the interprofessional evolution of the diabetes educator workforce occurred at the macro level and can be broadly categorised according to three major influences: the advent of non-medical prescribing; the expansion of the Medicare Benefits Schedule to include

  8. Exploration of Problematic Internet Use and Loneliness among Distance Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgur, Hasan; Demiralay, Tülay; Demiralay, Ilkay

    2014-01-01

    The current study investigated the relationship between problematic Internet use and levels of loneliness among 311 distance education students. "The Problematic Internet Use Scale" and "UCLA-Loneliness Scale III" were used to collect the data. Independentsamples t-test and one-way ANOVA were conducted to examine the…

  9. Diabetes nurse educators' experiences of providing care for women, with gestational diabetes mellitus, from disadvantaged backgrounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carolan, Mary

    2014-05-01

    To explore diabetes nurse educators' experiences of providing care for women, with gestational diabetes mellitus, from disadvantaged backgrounds and to gather information which would assist with the development of an educational programme that would support both women and diabetes educators. Rates of gestational diabetes mellitus have increased dramatically in recent years. This is concerning as gestational diabetes mellitus is linked to poorer pregnancy outcomes including hypertension, stillbirth, and nursery admission. Poorest outcomes occur among disadvantaged women. gestational diabetes mellitus is also associated with maternal type 2 diabetes and with child obesity and type 2 diabetes among offspring. Effective self-management of gestational diabetes mellitus reduces these risks. Diabetes nurse educators provide most education and support for gestational diabetes mellitus self-management. An interpretative phenomenological analysis approach, as espoused by Smith and Osborn (Qualitative Psychology: A Practical Guide to Research Methods, 2008, Sage, London, 51), provided the framework for this study. The views of six diabetes educators were explored through in-depth interviewing. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed according to steps outlined by Smith and Osborn (Qualitative Psychology: A Practical Guide to Research Methods, 2008, Sage, London, 51). Three themes emerged from the data: (1) working in a suboptimal environment, (2) working to address the difficulties and (3) looking to the future. Throughout, the diabetes nurse educators sought opportunities to connect with women in their care and to make the educational content understandable and meaningful. Low literacy among disadvantaged women has a significant impact on their understanding of gestational diabetes mellitus information. In turn, catering for women with low literacy contributes to increased workloads for diabetes nurse educators, making them vulnerable to burnout. There is a need

  10. Internet-Based Education for Prostate Cancer Screening

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Taylor, Kathryn L

    2008-01-01

    .... Abundant evidence documents the expanding role of the Internet in increasing access to and understanding of health information and the need for systematic evaluations of Internet-based interventions. The print- and web-based interventions have been completed and we have accrued 618 participants to the randomized trial.

  11. Cooperative Learning Technique through Internet Based Education: A Model Proposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Hasan Huseyin

    2010-01-01

    Internet is gradually becoming the most valuable learning environment for the people which form the information society. That the internet provides written, oral and visual communication between the participants who are at different places, that it enables the students' interaction with other students and teachers, and that it does these so fast…

  12. Internet: Education and Application for the Knowledge Warrior

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-05-01

    Demonstrate the ability to execute basic Telnet and FTP actions on the seminar computer . INTERNET / INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (IT) COURSE OBJECTIVES: 1...and FTP actions on the seminar computer . INTERNET / INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (IT) COURSE OBJECTIVES: 1. Comprehend the concept and capabilities of...have information on demand for future conflicts.9 As computer and telecommunications technologies continue to expand, they are redefining the way

  13. Cost-benefit analysis of internet therapeutic intervention on patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lan; White, Adam S; Pawlowska, Monika; Pottinger, Betty; Aydin, Jessica; Chow, Nelson; Tildesley, Hugh D

    2015-04-01

    With the emergence of IBGMS for allowing for patients to communicate their self-monitored blood glucose (SMBG) readings with their health care providers, their impact on the management of diabetes is becoming well-supported with regards to clinical benefits. Their impact on healthcare costs, however, has yet to be investigated. This study aims to determine the cost-benefits of such interventions in comparison to routine care. To analyze the cost-benefit of an Internet Blood Glucose Monitoring Service (IBGMS) in comparison to routine diabetes care. 200 patients were surveyed to assess the cost associated with doctor appointments in the past 12 months. Annual number of visits to medical services for diabetes and costs of transportation, parking, and time taken off work for visits were surveyed. Self-reported frequency of SMBG and most recent A1C were also surveyed. We compared 100 patients who used the IBGMS with 100 patients who only used routine care. There is a trend of lowered total cost in the intervention group compared to the control group. The control group spent $210.89 per year on visits to physicians; the intervention group spent $131.26 (P = 0.128). Patients in control group visited their endocrinologist 1.76 times per year, those in intervention group visited their endocrinologist 1.36 times per year, significantly less frequently than the control group (P = 0.014). Number of visits to other medical services is similar between the groups. Average A1C in intervention group is 7.57%, in control group is 7.69% (P = 0.309). We have demonstrated that IBGMS, while not reaching statistical significance, may be associated with slightly reduced A1C and cost due to visiting physicians.

  14. Cost and benefits of a multidisciplinary intensive diabetes education programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keers, J.C.; Groen, H.; Sluiter, W.J.; Bouma, J.; Links, T.P.

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the cost and benefits of an intensive diabetes education programme for patients with prolonged self-management problems and to determine the inclusion criteria for optimal outcomes. METHODS: Sixty-one participants of a multidisciplinary intensive diabetes education programme

  15. Mobile internet and technology for optical teaching reform in higher education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Muchun; Zhao, Qi; Chen, Yanru

    2017-08-01

    There are some problems in optical education such as insufficient flexibility, individuality and adaptability to students who need information and education at present. The development of mobile internet and technology provides support to solve these problems. Basic characteristics, advantages and developments of these techniques used in education are presented in this paper. Mobile internet is introduced to reform the classroom teaching of optical courses. Mobile network tool selection, teaching resources construction and reform in teaching methods are discussed. Academic record and sampling surveys are used to assess intention to adopt mobile internet and learning effect of academic major of students, the results show that high quality optical education can be offered by adopting mobile internet and technologies in traditional instruction.

  16. Identifying groups of nonparticipants in type 2 diabetes mellitus education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Ingmar; Küver, Claudia; Wiese, Birgitt; Pawels, Marc; van den Bussche, Hendrik; Kaduszkiewicz, Hannah

    2013-06-01

    Patient education is a compulsory element of the nationwide disease management program (DMP) for type 2 diabetes mellitus in Germany. However, a considerable proportion of patients do not attend diabetes self-management education courses. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to describe patient-reported reasons for nonparticipation and to identify typical subgroups of nonparticipants in order to improve recruitment strategies. The authors performed a cross-sectional observational study on 165 participants and 132 nonparticipants in diabetes education using a postal survey and chart review. Participants and nonparticipants were compared using 2-sided t tests and χ2 tests. Nonparticipants were grouped by cluster analysis based on the reasons for nonparticipation. A total of 95% of participants and 36% of nonparticipants reported to have received a recommendation for diabetes education from their physician. The authors identified 4 typical subgroups of nonparticipants: the "informed and responsible," the "unconcerned without desire for more information," the "uninformed but responsible," and the "anxious and burdened with psychosocial problems and functional limitations." The physician's recommendation seems to influence participation in diabetes education and should be used intentionally to increase participation rates. Also, differentiating barriers of nonparticipants can be determined by the degree of feeling informed and responsible for diabetes management. Physicians should more clearly explore patients' perception of their knowledge of diabetes and their attribution of responsibility for diabetes management. Starting from this patient perspective might help physicians motivate patients to participate in diabetes education.

  17. Internet-based health education in China: a content analysis of websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ying; Wu, Xi; Atkins, Salla; Zwarentein, Merrick; Zhu, Ming; Zhan, Xing Xin; Zhang, Fan; Ran, Peng; Yan, Wei Rong

    2014-01-27

    The Internet is increasingly being applied in health education worldwide; however there is little knowledge of its use in Chinese higher education institutions. The present study provides the first review and highlights the deficiencies and required future advances in Chinese Internet-based health education. Two authors independently conducted a duplicate Internet search in order to identify information regarding Internet-based health education in China. The findings showed that Internet-based education began in China in September 1998. Currently, only 16 of 150 (10.7%) health education institutions in China offer fee-based online undergraduate degree courses, awarding associates and/or bachelors degrees. Fifteen of the 16 institutions were located in the middle or on the eastern coast of China, where were more developed than other regions. Nursing was the most popular discipline in Internet-based health education, while some other disciplines, such as preventive medicine, were only offered at one university. Besides degree education, Chinese institutions also offered non-degree online training and free resources. The content was mainly presented in the form of PowerPoint slides or videos for self-learning. Very little online interactive mentoring was offered with any of the courses. There is considerable potential for the further development of Internet-based health education in China. These developments should include a focus on strengthening cooperation among higher education institutions in order to develop balanced online health curricula, and on enhancing distance education in low- and middle-income regions to meet extensive learning demands.

  18. Internet Self-Efficacy Does Not Predict Student Use of Internet-Mediated Educational Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Tom; Joban, Sanjay; Porter, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Two studies tested the hypothesis that use of learning technologies among undergraduate psychology students was associated with higher Internet self-efficacy (ISE). In Study 1, the ISE scores of 86 students were found not to be associated with either attitudes towards, or measured use of, blogs and wikis as part of an IT skills course. ISE was…

  19. [Educational program to type 1 diabetes mellitus patients: basic topics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Silmara A Oliveira; Zanim, Ligia Maria; Granzotto, Paula Carolina D; Heupa, Sabrina; Lamounier, Rodrigo N

    2008-03-01

    Type 1 diabetes incidence has been increasing worldwide, however the vast majority of patients do not have a good glycaemic control. This review focuses on diabetes educational programs designed for children, young adults and their families, as well as regular pump users educational tips, collected from papers published between 2000 and 2007. A comprehensive review of the literature has identified 40 articles describing the methods and the evaluation of diabetes self-management education interventions. Three research questions are posed. First: what are the recommendations and standards for diabetes self-management education from the different diabetes institutions/associations? Second: is there sufficient evidence to recommend any adaptation of any particular program? And third: Are the educational programs effective in lowering glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c)? The patient and his family should be instructed and trained to take appropriate decisions for diabetes management regarding their daily care. Diabetes self-management education improves glicaemic control (both in an individual basis as well as in groups) in such a way that the longer the education training in diabetes the better is the effect on glycaemic control is.

  20. Increasing capacity to deliver diabetes self-management education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carey, M. E.; Mandalia, P. K.; Daly, H.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To develop and test a format of delivery of diabetes self-management education by paired professional and lay educators. Methods: We conducted an equivalence trial with non-randomized participant allocation to a Diabetes Education and Self Management for Ongoing and Newly Diagnosed Type 2 di...... educator role can provide equivalent patient benefits. This could provide a method that increases capacity, maintains quality and is cost-effective, while increasing access to self-management education.......Aim: To develop and test a format of delivery of diabetes self-management education by paired professional and lay educators. Methods: We conducted an equivalence trial with non-randomized participant allocation to a Diabetes Education and Self Management for Ongoing and Newly Diagnosed Type 2...... diabetes (DESMOND) course, delivered in the standard format by two trained healthcare professional educators (to the control group) or by one trained lay educator and one professional educator (to the intervention group). A total of 260 people with Type 2 diabetes diagnosed within the previous 12 months...

  1. Internet-Based Education for Prostate Cancer Screening

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Taylor, Kathryn L

    2007-01-01

    .... Abundant evidence documents the expanding role of the Internet in increasing access to and understanding of health information and the need for systematic evaluations of Internetbased interventions. The print- and web-based interventions have been.

  2. Burnout and diabetes: reflections from working with educators and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charman, D

    2000-05-01

    Patients with Type-2 diabetes present with a range of psychosocial symptoms that, in combination with social and organizational pressures, often serve to exacerbate the stress of diabetes educators and contribute to burnout. Some of the more salient sources of both patient and educator stress are elaborated upon, and the nature of parallel processes between these two groups is noted. A case illustration with a burned-out diabetes educator demonstrates how enhancing self-understanding and achieving a greater sense of balance can reduce symptoms of burnout, depression, and anxiety. This article highlights the need for educators, and more broadly all health professionals, to develop self-management skills.

  3. Design of Mobile e-Books as a Teaching Tool for Diabetes Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Sophie Huey-Ming

    2017-01-01

    To facilitate people with diabetes adopting information technologies, a tool of mobile eHealth education for diabetes was described in this paper, presenting the validity of mobile eBook for diabetes educators. This paper describes the design concepts and validity of this mobile eBook for diabetes educators delivering diabetes electronic…

  4. Practical experiences of, and lessons learnt from, Internet technologies in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Polovina

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper addresses how the Internet as computer-mediated communication is affecting teaching and learning in higher education institutions, particularly as these institutions face increasing competition due to the emergence of Web-based collaboration and assessment technologies. London’s South Bank University (SBU, a typical modern-day higher education institution is thereby in the process of integrating Internet technologies into its conventional and distance learning programmes. From its practical experiences so far SBU has learnt a variety of valuable lessons. In particular the technical and social aspects that determine the choice and use of the most appropriate software tools were identified, as well as a new approach towards online (Internet / Web subject reference sources was outlined. From SBU’s anecdotal experiences, useful recommendations are made for the effective use of Internet technologies that applies to many higher educational institutions.

  5. Is Internet search better than structured instruction for web-based health education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Joseph; Bedra, McKenzie

    2013-01-01

    Internet provides access to vast amounts of comprehensive information regarding any health-related subject. Patients increasingly use this information for health education using a search engine to identify education materials. An alternative approach of health education via Internet is based on utilizing a verified web site which provides structured interactive education guided by adult learning theories. Comparison of these two approaches in older patients was not performed systematically. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of a web-based computer-assisted education (CO-ED) system versus searching the Internet for learning about hypertension. Sixty hypertensive older adults (age 45+) were randomized into control or intervention groups. The control patients spent 30 to 40 minutes searching the Internet using a search engine for information about hypertension. The intervention patients spent 30 to 40 minutes using the CO-ED system, which provided computer-assisted instruction about major hypertension topics. Analysis of pre- and post- knowledge scores indicated a significant improvement among CO-ED users (14.6%) as opposed to Internet users (2%). Additionally, patients using the CO-ED program rated their learning experience more positively than those using the Internet.

  6. Diabetes education for children with type 1 diabetes mellitus and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, Robert; Jetha, Mary; Dryden, Donna M; Hooten, Nicola; Liang, Yuanyuan; Durec, Tamara; Sumamo, Elizabeth; Spooner, Carol; Milne, Andrea; O'Gorman, Kate; Klassen, Terry P

    2008-04-01

    To determine the effectiveness of diabetes education on metabolic control, diabetes-related hospitalizations, complications, and knowledge, quality of life and other psychosocial outcomes for children with type 1 diabetes and their families. A systematic and comprehensive literature review was conducted in 21 electronic databases of medical and health education literature to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies evaluating the effectiveness of diabetes education. Study selection, quality assessment, and data extraction were conducted independently by several investigators in duplicate. A descriptive analysis is presented. From 12,756 citations, 80 studies were identified and included in the review (53 RCTs or CCTs, 27 observational studies). The methodological quality of studies was generally low. Most studies (35/52) that examined the effect of educational interventions on HbA1c found no evidence of increased effectiveness of the interventions over the education provided as part of standard care. Successful interventions were heterogeneous and included cognitive behavioral therapy, family therapy, skills training and general diabetes education. Most studies reported a positive effect on health service utilization (i.e., reduced use), although less than half were statistically significant. There was no clear evidence that educational interventions had an effect on short-term complications. The effect of educational interventions on diabetes knowledge was unclear with 12/30 studies reporting a significant improvement. Interventions which had varying effects on knowledge scores included diabetes camp, general diabetes education, and cognitive behavioral therapy. In the area of self management/regimen adherence, 10/21 studies reported improving this outcome significantly. Successful interventions included general diabetes education and cognitive behavioral therapy. Educational interventions were successful in improving various

  7. Diabetic foot workshop: Improving technical and educational skills for nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalaa, Maryam; Sanjari, Mahnaz; Shahbazi, Samimeh; Shayeganmehr, Zahra; Abooeirad, Maryam; Amini, Mohammad Reza; Adibi, Hossien; Mehrdad, Neda

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus as one of the most common metabolic disorders has some complications, one of the main ones is diabetic foot (DF). Appropriate care and education prevents 85% of diabetic foot amputations. An ideal management to prevent and treat diabetic foot necessitates a close collaboration between the health team members and the diabetic patient. Therefore, improving nurses' knowledge about DF care and advancement in the quality of care provided by the nurses could significantly improve diabetic foot prevention and management. Therefore, the aim of DF workshop was to improve technical and educational skills of the nurses to prevent and manage diabetic foot. Considering the vital role of the nurses in providing DF care, EMRI decided to conduct Diabetic foot workshop for them. The following five steps were designed for the 14 coordinating sessions in the workshop: Goals definition, deciding about attendees, location selection, creating agenda, and developing a follow-up plan. "Diabetic Foot Workshop for Nurses" provides appropriate training to DF nurses at the national level; and combining theory and practice in this workshop not only increases nurses' knowledge, but also improves their skills in the field of the diabetic foot. Providing education and care to patients by DF nurse specialists instead of general nurses could be an important output of this workshop, which may lead to DF prevention and amputation decrease in the long term.

  8. On any Saturday--a practical model for diabetes education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Inge R; Nash, Creshelle; Ridgway, Andrea

    2002-02-01

    Patient self-management is an important part of treating chronic diseases. However, many primary care physicians face barriers in offering office-based diabetes education. This paper will discuss a practical program of community-based diabetes education that can be easily modified for a practitioner's office. Half-day diabetes education workshops geared toward local health care providers and patients with diabetes and their families were conducted in two rural communities in Arkansas. Participants were surveyed with respect to the effectiveness of the program and how they would use what they learned in the program. Thirty-one health care providers and 59 patients with diabetes and their families attended. Program evaluation scores were between 4.1 and 5 on a 5-point Likert scale. One third of the patients commented that they had a better understanding of diet and medication use. Feedback from community health care providers noted that attendance in local diabetes support groups increased after the workshops. Diabetes complications have a large impact on the health of the population and a growing economic impact on the health care industry. Although there are many barriers to diabetes education and control, a practical half-day diabetes workshop on any Saturday can be effectively developed and implemented.

  9. Synchronous distance anesthesia education by Internet videoconference between Uganda and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiwanuka, J K; Ttendo, S S; Eromo, E; Joseph, S E; Duan, M E; Haastrup, A A; Baker, K; Firth, P G

    2015-09-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of anesthesia education delivered via Internet videoconferencing between the Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, and Mbarara Regional Referral Hospital, Uganda. This is a prospective educational study. The setting is the education in 2 hospitals in Uganda and the United States. The subjects are anesthesia residents. The interventions are anesthesia education lectures delivered in person and via Internet videoconferencing. The average pre-lecture and post-lecture scores of the local, remote, and combined audiences were compared. Post-lecture test scores improved over pre-lecture scores: local audience, 59% ± 22% to 81% ± 16%, P = .0002, g = 1.144; remote audience, 51% ± 19% to 81% ± 8%, P Internet videoconferencing. This technique may be useful to expand educational capacity and international cooperation between academic institutions, a particular priority in the growing field of global health. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Community Evaluation of the National Diabetes Education Program's Diabetes HealthSense Website.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Michele DeBarthe; Saperstein, Sandra L; Carpenter, Carrie; Devchand, Roshni; Tuncer, Diane; O'Brian, Catherine; Nicols, Christina; Gallivan, Joanne

    2017-10-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of Diabetes HealthSense on knowledge, attitudes, and behavior changes that prevent, delay, or manage diabetes among people at risk (PAR) for diabetes and people with diabetes (PWD). Methods Using a 2-group pretest-posttest design, 15 community sites were randomly assigned to either an intervention or comparison group. Intervention participants attended a group education session with a diabetes educator, followed by 4 weeks of independent use of the Diabetes HealthSense website. The comparison group received no intervention. A total of 311 adults (n = 135 intervention, n = 176 comparison) completed both a pretest and posttest. Outcome measures examined changes in self-reported knowledge, self-efficacy, and behaviors that support diabetes prevention or management. Results Statistically significant within-group pretest to posttest changes were found for almost all outcome measures in the intervention group, with no significant changes in the comparison group. Significant between-group differences were also found for almost all outcome measures at posttest, with the intervention group having more positive outcomes than the comparison group. Conclusions Patient referral to online tools is considered one key component of initial and ongoing diabetes self-management education and support (DSME/S) and is recommended as a way to enhance and extend the reach of in-person diabetes education. Positive outcomes were found for PWD/PAR who used Diabetes HealthSense following a guided education session. Study results suggested that with guided exploration, Diabetes HealthSense provided a valuable tool for educators to use with patients to support and extend the reach of DSME/S.

  11. Strategies for improving participation in diabetes education. A qualitative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingmar Schäfer

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Diabetes mellitus is highly prevalent and can lead to serious complications and mortality. Patient education can help to avoid negative outcomes, but up to half of the patients do not participate. The aim of this study was to analyze patients' attitudes towards diabetes education in order to identify barriers to participation and develop strategies for better patient education. METHODS: We conducted a qualitative study. Seven GP practices were purposively selected based on socio-demographic data of city districts in Hamburg, Germany. Study participants were selected by their GPs in order to increase participation. Semi-structured face-to-face interviews were conducted with 14 patients. Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. The sample size was determined by data saturation. Data were analysed by qualitative content analysis. Categories were determined deductively and inductively. RESULTS: The interviews yielded four types of barriers: 1 Statements and behaviour of the attending physician influence the patients' decisions about diabetes education. 2 Both, a good state of health related to diabetes and physical/psychosocial comorbidity can be reasons for non-participation. 3 Manifold motivational factors were discussed. They ranged from giving low priority to diabetes to avoidance of implications of diabetes education as being confronted with illness narratives of others. 4 Barriers also include aspects of the patients' knowledge and activity. CONCLUSIONS: First, physicians should encourage patients to participate in diabetes education and argue that they can profit even if actual treatment and examination results are promising. Second, patients with other priorities, psychic comorbidity or functional limitations might profit more from continuous individualized education adapted to their specific situation instead of group education. Third, it might be justified that patients do not participate in diabetes education if

  12. Strategies for improving participation in diabetes education. A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Ingmar; Pawels, Marc; Küver, Claudia; Pohontsch, Nadine Janis; Scherer, Martin; van den Bussche, Hendrik; Kaduszkiewicz, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is highly prevalent and can lead to serious complications and mortality. Patient education can help to avoid negative outcomes, but up to half of the patients do not participate. The aim of this study was to analyze patients' attitudes towards diabetes education in order to identify barriers to participation and develop strategies for better patient education. We conducted a qualitative study. Seven GP practices were purposively selected based on socio-demographic data of city districts in Hamburg, Germany. Study participants were selected by their GPs in order to increase participation. Semi-structured face-to-face interviews were conducted with 14 patients. Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. The sample size was determined by data saturation. Data were analysed by qualitative content analysis. Categories were determined deductively and inductively. The interviews yielded four types of barriers: 1) Statements and behaviour of the attending physician influence the patients' decisions about diabetes education. 2) Both, a good state of health related to diabetes and physical/psychosocial comorbidity can be reasons for non-participation. 3) Manifold motivational factors were discussed. They ranged from giving low priority to diabetes to avoidance of implications of diabetes education as being confronted with illness narratives of others. 4) Barriers also include aspects of the patients' knowledge and activity. First, physicians should encourage patients to participate in diabetes education and argue that they can profit even if actual treatment and examination results are promising. Second, patients with other priorities, psychic comorbidity or functional limitations might profit more from continuous individualized education adapted to their specific situation instead of group education. Third, it might be justified that patients do not participate in diabetes education if they have slightly increased blood sugar values only and no

  13. Intelligent Internet-based information system optimises diabetes mellitus management in communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xuejuan; Wu, Hao; Cui, Shuqi; Ge, Caiying; Wang, Li; Jia, Hongyan; Liang, Wannian

    2018-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of an intelligent Internet-based information system upon optimising the management of patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In 2015, a T2DM information system was introduced to optimise the management of T2DM patients for 1 year in Fangzhuang community of Beijing, China. A total of 602 T2DM patients who were registered in the health service centre of Fangzhuang community were enrolled based on an isometric sampling technique. The data from 587 patients were used in the final analysis. The intervention effect was subsequently assessed by statistically comparing multiple parameters, such as the prevalence of glycaemic control, standard health management and annual outpatient consultation visits per person, before and after the implementation of the T2DM information system. In 2015, a total of 1668 T2DM patients were newly registered in Fangzhuang community. The glycaemic control rate was calculated as 37.65% in 2014 and significantly elevated up to 62.35% in 2015 ( p information system, the rate of standard health management was increased from 48.04% to 85.01% ( p information system optimised the management of T2DM patients in Fangzhuang community and decreased the outpatient numbers in both community and general hospitals, which played a positive role in assisting T2DM patients and their healthcare providers to better manage this chronic illness.

  14. Determining Student Internet Addiction Levels in Secondary Education and the Factors that Affect It

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fezile Ozdamli

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to determine the level of internet addiction on the part of students in secondary education in North Cyprus and the factors that affect it. In this research, a survey method which provides a general universal judgment was used to determine the level of internet addiction on the part of such students. It has been found that 59.9% of the students are at low of becoming internet addicts, 20.7% of them are in the high risk category, 13.5% face no risk of addiction, while 5.9% are internet addicts. It was determined that as students’ internet usage hours increase, the risk of addiction increases.

  15. Is diabetes self-management education still the Cinderella of diabetes care?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurley, Lorna; O'Donnell, Máire; O'Hara, Mary Clare

    2017-01-01

    This paper reflects on the status of diabetes self-management education (DSME) as a branch of diabetology in Europe and discusses some opportunities for better supporting DSME delivery. DSME (also commonly known as Therapeutic Patient Education) has been evolving as a therapy for diabetes...... Europe, for most people diabetes education is not truly embedded in routine clinical care, being seen as more of an optional add-on to conventional therapies. In comparison to drugs and devices, DSME lacks investment, and funding for DSME research lags far behind other therapies. The rigour with which...

  16. Internet-accessible radiographic database of Vietnam War casualties for medical student education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critchley, Eric P; Smirniotopoulos, James G

    2003-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of archiving radiographic images from Vietnam era conflict casualties into a personal computer-based electronic database of text and images and displaying the data using an Internet-accessible database for preservation and educational purposes. Thirty-two patient cases were selected at random from a pool of 1,000 autopsy reports in which radiographs were available. A total of 74 radiographs from these cases were digitized using a commercial image scanner and then uploaded into an Internet accessible database. The quality of the digitized images was assessed by administering an image-based test to a group of 12 medical students. No statistically significant (p > 0.05) differences were found between test scores when using the original radiographs versus using the digitized radiographs on the Internet-accessible database. An Internet-accessible database is capable of effectively archiving Vietnam era casualty radiographs for educational purposes.

  17. Health professions' education and practice: A commentary on transformation through the internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Frederick B; Smith, Betsey C; Mathews, Mary Beth

    2006-01-01

    The Internet, in all of its forms and functions, is well on the way to becoming the most ubiquitous technology of the 21st century. It is changing the way the world does business, the way formal education is conducted, and the way humans interact with each other. The Internet already has become an invaluable tool for formal health education and for the delivery by health professionals of information, training, and education to their employees and patients. With new paradigms for health on the horizon, modem Internet technologies will transform health care practice and systems delivery. In this report, the authors focus attention on the use of distance learning/distance education technologies and their relationship to, and use in, the health professions.

  18. [Education of people with type 2 diabetes through peers with diabetes: is it cost effective?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Lorena; Elgart, Jorge Federico; Gagliardino, Juan José

    2015-12-29

    Inadequate quality of care provided to people with type 2 diabetes mellitus, generates a significant socioeconomic burden and a serious public health problem. Diabetes education through peers with diabetes is an alternative to that provided by professional educators (traditional education) which achieves non-inferior results. However, there is little evidence of cost-effectiveness of education trough peers over traditional education. To evaluate cost-effectiveness of education of people with type 2 diabetes mellitus, during a year, by a team of professional educators (traditional education) versus education and support delivered by trained peers with diabetes. Cost-effectiveness analysis based on a randomized prospective clinical study conducted in the city of La Plata, including 199 people with type 2 diabetes mellitus, divided in two groups:, one receiving traditional education and another receiving the same education but delivered by peer educators with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Change in glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) was considered as a primary indicator of effectiveness and secondary indicators were others, such as body mass index, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, total cholesterol and triglyceride levels. The direct cost of each strategy was estimated based on resources used in the trial, evaluating three cost scenarios for peer education. The strength of the results was assessed by univariate sensitivity analysis. Cost per unit decrease (%) in HbA1c: traditional education: $2 621; peer education: $1 508, $1 779 y $2 071 for each of the three scenarios considered (scenario 1, scenario 2, scenario 3), respectively. For each $100 invested a decrease of 0.04% in the HbA1c with traditional education was achieved; and 0.07% in scenario 1; 0.06% in scenario 2 and 0.05% in scenario 3, with education delivered by peer educators. Sensitivity analysis showed the strength of the results. Education of type 2 diabetes mellitus

  19. Measurement science and education in the Internet era

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Regtien, Paulus P.L.; Linss, G.

    2006-01-01

    The Internet has fundamentally altered the world in all social and economic areas within a historically short period of time. Metrology and Measurement Science have been playing an important role in our society for more than 5000 years yet the field has been significantly changed during the last 30

  20. Using the Internet for Gerontology Education: Assessing and Improving Wikipedia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infeld, Donna Lind; Adams, William C.

    2013-01-01

    Older adults, students, professionals, and the general public increasingly turn to the Internet and to Wikipedia for information. Wikipedia, the world's sixth most used website, is by far the most widely used open-source information site. Among its nearly four million English-language encyclopedia articles, how thorough is coverage of key…

  1. Integrating the Internet with the Curriculum of Office Education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Internet is one of the latest technological breakthroughs in the history of Information and Communication Technology (ICT). Many government establishments, parastatals and private organizations use it for business transactions. Consequently, these organizations demand secretaries that are very knowledgeable and ...

  2. Impact of nutrition education on diabetes knowledge and attitudes of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of a nutrition education (NE) programme on diabetes knowledge and attitudes of adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods: Eighty-two adults (40–70 years) with poorly controlled T2DM (HbA1c ≥ 8%) and attending two community health centres in Moretele, North West Province ...

  3. Gender Differences in Availability, Internet Access and Rate of Usage of Computers among Distance Education Learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atan, Hanafi; Sulaiman, Fauziah; Rahman, Zuraidah Abd; Idrus, Rozhan Mohammed

    2002-01-01

    Explores the level of availability of computers, Internet accessibility, and the rate of usage of computers both at home and at the workplace between distance education learners according to gender. Results of questionnaires completed at the Universiti Sains Malaysia indicate that distance education reduces the gender gap. (Author/LRW)

  4. Learning Online? Educational Internet Use and Participation in Adult Learning, 2002 to 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Patrick; Selwyn, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Covering a decade during which the "digital divide" came to popular and political attention, and written at a time when the Internet continues to be championed as a means of widening access to educational opportunities, this paper presents an analysis of the social, economic and educational characteristics associated with using the…

  5. Integrating Internet Protocol Television (IPTV) in Distance Education: A Constructivist Framework for Social Networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuzer, T. Volkan; Kurubacak, Gulsun

    2011-01-01

    New communication technologies and constructivist pedagogy have the great potential to build very powerful paradigm shifts that enhance Internet Protocol Television (IPTV) in distance education. Therefore, the main purpose of this chapter is to explore the new concerns, issues and potentials for the IPTV delivery of distance education to…

  6. Internet Plagiarism in Higher Education: Tendencies, Triggering Factors and Reasons among Teacher Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eret, Esra; Ok, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    While plagiarism has been a growing problem in higher education for a long time, the use of the Internet has made this increasing problem more unmanageable. In many countries, this problem has become a matter of discussion, and higher education institutions feel obliged to review their policies on academic dishonesty. As part of these efforts, the…

  7. A Comparison of Internet Marketing Methods Utilized by Higher Education Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Joseph C.

    2011-01-01

    Use of Internet marketing techniques in higher education to attract prospective students is relatively new. While the research is recent, there are several studies that identify what is most valuable to students seeking information on college web sites. Higher education is now facing increasing competition from for-profit schools and reduced…

  8. PREFERENCES ON INTERNET BASED LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS IN STUDENT-CENTERED EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuhal CUBUKCU

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, educational systems are being questionned to find effective solutions to problems that are being encountered, and discussions are centered around the ways of restructuring systems so as to overcome difficulties. As the consequences of the traditional teaching approach, we can indicate that the taught material is not long-lasting but easily forgotten, that students do not sufficiently acquire the knowledge and skills that are aimed at developing, and that students lack transferring their knowledge to real life. In our current situation, individuals prefer to use educational resources where and when they want, based on their individual skills and abilities. Throughout the world, because the internet infrastructure has developed quite rapidly, it has been offered as an alternative way for a rich learning and teaching environment. This study aims at determining teacher candidates’ preferences regarding internet-based learning environments in student-centered education by involving the teacher candidates enrolled at Osmangazi University, Faculty of Education, Primary School Teaching, Mathematics Teaching and Computer and Educational Technologies Education programmes. This study is a descriptive study. The data collection scale consists of the “Constructivist Internet-based Education of Science Scale (CILES-S”. The sample group of teacher candidates in the study showed differences with respect to their preferences regarding internet-based learning in student-centered education. The candidates scored higher in the internet-based learning environments of Cognitive Development and Critical Judgement. The lowest average scores of the sample group were observed in the internet-based learning environment of Episthemologic awareness.

  9. Oncology Nurses' Use of the Internet for Continuing Education: A Survey of Oncology Nursing Society Congress Attendees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Susan C.; Baird, Susan B.

    1999-01-01

    A survey to determine whether oncology nurses (n=670) use the Internet and for what purpose revealed that they use it for drug information, literature searches, academic information, patient education, and continuing education. Results suggest that continuing-education providers should pursue the Internet as a means of meeting the need for quick,…

  10. Educational attainment moderates the associations of diabetes education with health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su Hyun

    2016-10-01

    Diabetes education is a critical element of care for people with diabetes. However, the associations between diabetes education and self-care or health outcomes have not been clearly demonstrated at a national level. The aims of this study were to examine the associations of attendance of diabetes education classes with health behaviours and glycaemic control, and to understand whether these associations were moderated by level of educational attainment. Data were analysed for 456 adults from the 2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey V, collected from January 2010 to December 2012. No significant differences were observed between patients who had attended diabetes education classes and those who had never attended for factors such as smoking, drinking, exercise, nutrition therapy or glycaemic control. There was a significant interaction effect between receiving diabetes education and level of educational attainment on obtaining optimal glycaemic control. Attending diabetes education was positively associated with optimal glycaemic control among patients with more than a high school education but was negatively associated with it among those with less than middle school education. Diabetes education programmes need to be tailored to the needs and cognitive capacities of the target population. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  11. Diabetes education in primary care: A practical approach using the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Analyse the factors that are important in the design of a diabetic education ... setting as described in the section on analysis. ... Table I is an example of the structure and content recommended .... structure, systems and preparation to ensure.

  12. The Internet in EFL Teacher Education: Investigating the Possibilities and Challenges in a Pre-Service Teacher Education Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Mahmoud Mohammad Sayed

    2011-01-01

    The paper reported on a small-scale qualitative study on EFL (English as a Foreign Language) teacher education with a two-fold objective, investigating the possibility of integrating the Internet for academic purposes in the context of a pre-service English teacher education programme in Egypt, and suggesting some guidelines based on the specific…

  13. Association between education and quality of diabetes care in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flatz, Aline; Casillas, Alejandra; Stringhini, Silvia; Zuercher, Emilie; Burnand, Bernard; Peytremann-Bridevaux, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Low socioeconomic status is associated with higher prevalence of diabetes, worse outcomes, and worse quality of care. We explored the relationship between education, as a measure of socioeconomic status, and quality of care in the Swiss context. Data were drawn from a population-based survey of 519 adults with diabetes during fall 2011 and summer 2012 in a canton of Switzerland. We assessed patients and diabetes characteristics. Eleven indicators of quality of care were considered (six of process and five of outcomes of care). After bivariate analyses, regression analyses adjusted for age, sex, and diabetic complications were performed to assess the relationship between education and quality of care. Of 11 quality-of-care indicators, three were significantly associated with education: funduscopy (patients with tertiary versus primary education were more likely to get the exam: odds ratio, 1.8; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.004-3.3) and two indicators of health-related quality of life (patients with tertiary versus primary education reported better health-related quality of life: Audit of Diabetes-Dependent Quality of Life: β=0.6 [95% CI, 0.2-0.97]; SF-12 mean physical component summary score: β=3.6 [95% CI, 0.9-6.4]). Our results suggest the presence of educational inequalities in quality of diabetes care. These findings may help health professionals focus on individuals with increased needs to decrease health inequalities.

  14. [Efficacy of health education on patients with hip replacement based on the Internet].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yang; Yang, Tubao; Li, Yinglan; Yu, Jie; Zeng, Biyun

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of health education on patients with hip replacement based on the Internet, and to establish a new health education model through modern technology. A total of 300 patients with hip replacement from March to August, 2015 were enrolled in this study. The participants were divided into a control group and an experimental group according to months surgeries performed. Traditional education was applied in the control group while the multimedia source material plus the Internet platform of Joint Registration System were applied in the experimental group. Levels of anxiety, degree of satisfaction, and postoperative complications were analyzed. The levels of knowledge, attitude and behavior compliance in the patients of the experimental group were significantly improved, while the levels of postoperative anxiety were decreased compared with those in the control group (PEducation based on the Internet platform of Joint Registration System and the computer video could improve patients' knowledge, attitude, and behavior, which is worthy of clinical spread.

  15. "Computers, The Internet, and Cheating Among Secondary School Students: Some Implications for Educators "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacey Conradson

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates in greater depth one particular aspect of cheating within secondary education and..some implications for measuring academic achievement. More specifically, it examines how secondary..students exploit the Internet for plagiarizing schoolwork, and looks at how a traditional method of..educational assessment, namely paper-based report and essay writing, has been impacted by the growth of..Internet usage and the proliferation of computer skills among secondary school students. One of the..conclusions is that students' technology fluency is forcing educators to revisit conventional assessment..methods. Different options for combating Internet plagiarism are presented, and some software tools as well..as non-technology solutions are evaluated in light of the problems brought about by - cyberplagiarism.-

  16. Educational benefits of Internet and computer-based programmes for prostate cancer patients: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salonen, Anne; Ryhänen, Anne M; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to review systematically the available literature on Internet and computer-based patient education programmes, assess the quality of these studies and analyze the benefit of these programmes for prostate cancer patients. Complete databases were searched. Studies were included if they concerned patient education of prostate cancer patients, were qualitative or quantitative and examined Internet or interactive CD-ROM use. Eighteen studies met the inclusion criteria. The majority of the studies reported a significant increase in the knowledge of the disease, satisfaction with treatment options and support for men. The benefit of the programmes was that the patients felt more empowered and obtained a heightened sense of control over their disease. The Internet or computer-based programmes had a positive impact on prostate cancer patient education. Most papers reported that the programmes were beneficial, but few presented data from studies with rigorous research methodologies to support these claims. Internet and computer-based programmes can be useful tools in prostate cancer patient education. In order to improve the benefits of the programmes, more Internet and computer-based programmes need to be developed and studied. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The Impact of Patient Education on Diabetes Empowerment Scale (DES) and Diabetes Attitude Scale (DAS-3) in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    ATAK, Nazlı; KÖSE, Kenan; GÜRKAN, Tanju

    2008-01-01

    Aim: This study was conducted to assess the impact of a brief, patient-centered education program on perceived self-efficacy and attitudes towards diabetes of patients with type 2 diabetes. Materials and Methods: A randomized controlled study was designed and conducted to assess the impact of education using the DES (Diabetes Empowerment Scale) and DAS-3 (Diabetes Attitude Questionnaire-3), which were administered using a pre- and post-test design. A patient-centered education program was d...

  18. La Universidad conectada The wired tower perspectives on the impact of the Internet on higher education.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guevara Cruz Horacio

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available La universidad conectada, Perspectivas del impacto de Internet en la educación superior de Matthew Serbin nos acerca a los líderes de opinión (y protagonistas en acción de los Estados Unidos en este campo desde una visión global y sin divagaciones abordan el impacto del internet con sus transformaciones y desafíos. The wired tower perspectives on the impact of the Internet on higher education of Matthew Serbin us to opinion leaders (and players in action of the United States in this field from an overall and ramblings without addressing the impact of the internet with their transformations and challenges.

  19. UNI C - A True Internet Pioneer, the Danish Computing Centre for Research and Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Dorte

    2015-01-01

    that small computers could now be purchased for local use by the university departments whereas the need for high performance computing could only be satisfied by a joint national purchase and advanced network access to this central computer facility.The new center was named UNI-C and succeeded in helping...... Danish frontline research to use innovative computing techniques and have major breakthroughs using the first massively parallel computer architectures, but the greatest impact of UNI-C on Danish society was the successful early roll out of the Internet to universities with a follow-up of establishing...... the first Danish Internet service to ordinary PC users. This very first Internet service became a great success and helped to put Denmark on the international map as one of the very early Internet adopters. It also meant that UNI-C was tasked by the Ministry of Education with delivering a number...

  20. Approaches to integrating paediatric diabetes care and structured education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murphy, H. R.; Wadham, C.; Rayman, G.

    2007-01-01

    .11% in non-attenders (P = 0.04). Conclusion: This family-centred education programme has been integrated into paediatric diabetes care with potential benefits on parental involvement and glycaemic control, but further study is warranted before routine application into clinical care.......Aims: The Families, Adolescents and Children's Teamwork Study (FACTS) is a family-centred structured education programme for children and adolescents with Type 1 diabetes. It aims to integrate group-based diabetes education into routine care, enhance parental responsibility for self management...... and improve glycaemic control. Methods: A randomized wait-list control group study allocated participants to either the immediate (four educational sessions during year 1) or delayed intervention (four educational sessions during year 2). In both groups, glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) was measured 3-monthly...

  1. Service user preferences for diabetes education in remote and rural areas of the Highlands and Islands of Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jenny; Skinner, Fiona; Tilley, Phil; MacRury, Sandra

    2018-03-01

    Diabetes prevalence in Scotland is 5.3%, with type 2 diabetes accounting for 86.7% of all cases in the National Health Service Highlands health board area and 85.7% in the Western Isles. Structured education is a key component in the management of this chronic disease. However, current group session models are less feasible in lower-population non-urban environments due to distance, participant numbers and access to appropriately trained healthcare professionals. Group sessions may also be a less attractive option in small communities, where people tend to have close day-to-day personal contact. This study assesses the access and delivery preferences of remote and rural service users in the Highlands and Western Isles to structured diabetes education programs. The study used a mixed methods approach of focus groups and questionnaires with people with type 2 diabetes in the Highlands and Islands of Scotland. Both modes of participation were designed to explore perception of diabetes knowledge, diabetes education and use of technology. One-to-one delivery was the delivery method of choice; however, there was a preference for a digital approach over group education sessions. Service users expressed a strong desire to be able to learn at their own pace, when and where they wanted to, and with no requirement to travel. To address these requirements an online resource, providing access to both learning sessions and trusted sources of information, was the preferred mode of delivery. People with type 2 diabetes living in remote and rural areas of the Scottish Highlands and Islands who already use the internet are receptive to the use of digital technology for delivery of diabetes education and are interested in learning more about management of their condition through this medium. They believe that a technology approach will provide them with more control over the pace of learning, and where and when this learning can take place.

  2. The Internet and the therapeutic education of patients: A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gremeaux, V; Coudeyre, E

    2010-12-01

    To evaluate from a review of the literature the interest of using the Internet as a tool for the therapeutic education of patients. A systematic review of Pubmed was carried out using the key words: the Internet, or World Wide Web and patient education, or patient preference, or self-care. The search was restricted to articles in English published between 1990 and 2009. References to the selected articles were also analyzed. Only randomized controlled studies were retained. Thirty-nine articles concerning 20 different diseases met the inclusion criteria and were analyzed. Different types of programs were proposed: informative, interactive, cognitive-behavioral and programs concerning self-management of the disease and the treatment. These different approaches were sometimes compared. The use of quality Internet sites made it possible to induce beneficial changes in lifestyle habits, and to diminish subjective and/or objective symptom severity in chronic invalidating diseases when used as a complement to traditional management. By using the Internet, patients were also able to improve decision-making skills to a degree that was at least as good as that obtained using traditional paper documents. The Internet is an effective complementary tool that can contribute to improving therapeutic education. Nonetheless, healthcare professionals should work with patients to create quality sites that correspond more closely to their expectations. It is also essential for learned societies such as the SOFMER to invest in therapeutic education on the Internet to make quality therapeutic education modules based on factual medical data and complying with good practices available on line. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. High school students educational usage of Internet and their learning approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Betül Yılmaz, Feza Orhan

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the Internet usage of high school students for educational needs in respect to their learning approaches. The “learning approach” categorizes individuals as ‘surface learners’ and ‘deep learners’. Surface learners mainly choose to rehearse and memorize the course material they work on and they acquire the information they need to learn in a disconnected way, by memorization. On the other hand, deep learners want to grasp the meaning of the course material. In the study, adapted Turkish version of Learning Process Questionnaire (LPQ was used to determine high school students’ learning approaches. 921 secondary school students were subjected and the Cronbach alpha values were 0.73 for a deep approach and 0.66 for a surface approach. According to the data obtained, surface learners use the Internet more when compared to deep learners, though they use it for non-instructional purposes. The ratios of the Internet use of deep learners for educational needs are higher when compared to those of surface learners. Ratios of the Internet use for educational needs by the students who are given assignments requiring the use of the Internet are higher.

  4. Assessment of Ramadan Education and Knowledge Among Diabetic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almalki, Mussa Hussain; Hussen, Ibtihal; Khan, Shawana A; Almaghamsi, Abdulrahman; Alshahrani, Fahad

    2018-01-01

    During Ramadan, Muslims fast from dawn until dusk for one lunar month every year. Most of the Muslim patients with diabetes are unaware of the potential complications that can occur while fasting, such as hypoglycemia. The aim of this study is to assess the the patient education level and patients' overall awareness of any possible complications that could occur while fasting during Ramadan and to determine how these patients deal with these complications. We conducted a cross-sectional study and surveyed diabetic patients about their diabetes-related knowledge over a period of 4 months from the outpatient clinic at the Obesity, Endocrine, and Metabolism Center at King Fahad Medical City. Patients were included if they were ≥16 years and if they had been receiving treatment for at least 1 year before the study, irrespective of the medications used; patients were also asked about the presence or absence of complications. This study included 477 patients (325 women and 152 men). Most patients (297; 62.3%) had type 2 diabetes. The patients' mean age was 39.72 ± 15.29 years, and the mean duration of diabetes was 10.80 ± 5.88 years. During the preceding Ramadan, 76% of patients reported fasting, whereas 58% said that they monitored their blood glucose levels once per day. Hypoglycemic episodes were reported in 60.3% of cases with type 2 diabetes and in 8.3% of cases with type 1 diabetes. Among those who had hypoglycemia, 2.8% of patients with type 1 diabetes and 17.8% with type 2 diabetes broke their fast. Finally, 54% of patients reported that their health care providers offered them instructions on diabetes management during Ramadan. Ramadan health education in diabetes can encourage, improve, and guide patients to change their lifestyles during Ramadan while minimizing the risk of acute complications.

  5. Science Education on the Internet: Conference for Developers of OnLine Curricula ''Learning Strategies for Science Education Websites''; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gesteland, Raymond F.; Dart, Dorothy S.; Logan, Jennifer; Stark, Louisa

    2000-01-01

    Internet-based science education programs are coming of age. Educators now look seriously to the Internet as a source of accessible classroom materials, and they are finding many high-quality online science programs. Beyond providing solid curriculum, these programs have many advantages. They provide materials that are far more current than what textbooks offer and are more accessible to disadvantaged and rural population. Students can engage in inquiry-based learning online through interactive and virtual activities, accessing databases, tracking nature occurrences in real time, joining online science communities and conversing with scientists

  6. A Study of Faculty Attitudes toward Internet-Based Distance Education: A Survey of Two Jordanian Public Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasaymeh, Al-Mothana M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes toward internet-based distance education by the faculty members of two Jordanian public universities, Al-Hussein Bin Talal University and Yarmouk University, as well as to explore the relationship between their attitudes toward internet-based distance education and their perceptions of their…

  7. Diabetes Educators' Intended and Reported Use of Common Diabetes-Related Technologies: Discrepancies and Dissonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Steven; Perry, Lin; Gallagher, Robyn; Lowe, Julia

    2016-11-01

    Technology provides adjuvant and/or alternative approaches to care and may promote self-care, communication, and engagement with health care services. Common recent technologies for diabetes include continuous subcutaneous insulin infusions (insulin pumps), continuous glucose monitoring systems, smartphone and tablet applications, and telehealth (video conferencing). This study reports Australian diabetes educators' intentions and reported professional use of these technologies for people with type 1 diabetes, and factors predictive of this. An anonymous, web-based questionnaire based on the technology acceptance model was distributed to members of the Australian Diabetes Educators Association through their electronic newsletter. Exploratory factor analysis revealed a 5-factor solution comprising confidence and competence, improving clinical practice, preparation (intentions and training), ease of use, and subjective norms. Logistic regression analyses identified factors predicting intention and use of technology. Respondents (n = 228) had high intentions to use technology. The majority reported using continuous subcutaneous insulin infusions, continuous glucose monitoring systems, and applications with patients, but usage was occasional. Confidence and competence independently predicted both intentions and use of all 4 technologies. Preparation (intentions and training) independently predicted use of each technology also. Discrepancies and dissonance appear between diabetes educators' intentions and behavior (intentions to use and reported technology use). Intentions were higher than current use, which was relatively low and not likely to provide significant support to people with type 1 diabetes for disease management, communication, and engagement with health care services. Continuing education and experiential learning may be key in supporting diabetes educators to align their intentions with their practice. © 2016 Diabetes Technology Society.

  8. HAVE WE DONE ENOUGH WITH DIABETIC EDUCATION? A PILOT STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KHAIRANI O

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients’ education and empowerment are essential parts of a disease management. Patients have to be educated on the disease as well as lifestyle changes that they need to practise for a holistic and consistent improvement in their disease status. This study examined patients’ knowledge on diabetes and nutrition as well as the role of dietician in the patient education. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of patients aged more than 18 years, in a primary care centre in Kuala Lumpur. Patients responded to a pre-tested self-administered questionnaire which contains socio-demographic profiles of patients, knowledge on diabetes and nutrition. Patients were also asked on dietician consultation and the number of dietician visits. Patients were conveniently selected on the data collection days. Only consented patients and those who could understand Malay or English language were selected. Results: There were 110 patients who participated in the study. Overall the patients had good knowledge on diabetes and nutrition. The mean total knowledge score was 71.2% ± 9.34. Domains such as diabetes complications, exercise, meal practice, food sources and proportion need reinforcement. Only 60 (54.9% patients had seen a dietician. Patients who had seen dietician showed significantly higher level of knowledge score (p=0.04. However frequent meeting with the dietician did not show any significant improvement in the knowledge (p=0.10. Factors such as patients’ gender, ethnicity, level of education, employment status, glycaemic level, duration of illness and body mass index did not show any significant association with the overall diabetic and nutrition knowledge. Conclusion: There is still a need to improve the overall diabetic education particularly in areas that patients were lacking such as diabetes complications, exercise, meal practice, food sources and proportion. It is equally necessary to encourage all diabetics to see a dietician

  9. The Outcomes of Peer-Led Diabetes Education in Comparison to Education Delivered by Health Professionals in Iranian Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Zakieh; Sadeghi, Tabandeh; Loripoor, Marzeyeh

    2018-01-01

    Education is an important aspect of care for diabetic patients. This study aimed to compare the effect of education by health care provider and peer on self-care behaviors among Iranian patients with diabetes. In this clinical randomized control trial, we enrolled 120 patients with type 2 diabetes who were referred to the Diabetes Clinic at a…

  10. Views of patients on a group diabetes education programme using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: This study was a qualitative assessment of a diabetes group education programme presented in community health centres of the Cape Town Metro District. The programme offered four sessions of group education and was delivered by trained health promoters using a guiding style derived from motivational ...

  11. Social Media in Diabetes Education: A Viable Option?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Julie; Cox, Jill N.; Corbin, Marilyn A.

    2012-01-01

    As Extension educators are encouraged to implement more cost-effective and efficient means of programming, the use of Web-based social media has become a popular option. Penn State Extension implemented a social media awareness survey among participants in its community-based diabetes education program to determine familiarity with this medium,…

  12. Readability evaluation of Internet-based patient education materials related to the anesthesiology field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Oliveira, Gildasio S; Jung, Michael; Mccaffery, Kirsten J; McCarthy, Robert J; Wolf, Michael S

    2015-08-01

    The main objective of the current investigation was to assess the readability of Internet-based patient education materials related to the field of anesthesiology. We hypothesized that the majority of patient education materials would not be written according to current recommended readability grade level. Online patient education materials describing procedures, risks, and management of anesthesia-related topics were identified using the search engine Google (available at www.google.com) using the terms anesthesia, anesthesiology, anesthesia risks, and anesthesia care. Cross-sectional evaluation. None. Assessments of content readability were performed using validated instruments (Flesch-Kincaid Grade Formulae, the Gunning Frequency of Gobbledygook, the New Dale-Chall Test, the Fry graph, and the Flesch Reading Ease score). Ninety-six Web sites containing Internet patient education materials (IPEMs) were evaluated. The median (interquartile range) readability grade level for all evaluated IPEMs was 13.5 (12.0-14.6). All the evaluated documents were classified at a greater readability level than the current recommended readability grade, P Internet-based patient education materials related to the field of anesthesiology are currently written far above the recommended readability grade level. High complexity of written education materials likely limits access of information to millions of American patients. Redesign of online content of Web sites that provide patient education material regarding anesthesia could be an important step in improving access to information for patients with poor health literacy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Can the internet in tertiary education in Africa contribute to social and economic development?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bon, Anna

    2007-01-01

    Poor internet connectivity is one of the serious underlying causes of the digital divide between developing and industrialized countries, and is hampering the transition to the global information society. The recent emergence of national and regional research and education data communication

  14. Blurring the Lines: Leveraging Internet Technology for Successful Blending of Secondary/Post-Secondary Technical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Kenneth; Kopischke, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    The Remote Automation Management Platform (RAMP) is a real-time, interactive teaching tool which leverages common off-the-shelf internet technologies to provide high school learners extraordinary access to advanced technical education opportunities. This outreach paradigm is applicable to a broad range of advanced technical skills from automation…

  15. Analysis of Relationships between Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge and Educational Internet Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Ismail; Celik, Ismail; Akturk, Ahmet Oguz; Aydin, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    This study analyzes the relationships between preservice teachers' technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK) and their self-efficacy beliefs in educational Internet use. Findings show statistically significant relationships among the knowledge domains in technology, pedagogy, content, and their intersections. Also, results from the…

  16. The internet of things technologies in teaching, learning and basic education management

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dlodlo, N

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available South Africa's push for universal access to education and for improved teaching and learning calls for a number of appropriate measures to be put in place. This paper proposes the adoption of internet of things technologies (IoT) in improving...

  17. Internet Usage Habits as a Part of Distance Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufan, Firat

    2016-01-01

    Within the scope of this study, which deals with distance education method as a communication process, a focus group interview was conducted with voluntary students who were randomly selected from various areas/majors at the Department of Distance Education in Istanbul University in order to determine the relationship between their general…

  18. The PRIDE (Partnership to Improve Diabetes Education) Toolkit: Development and Evaluation of Novel Literacy and Culturally Sensitive Diabetes Education Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Kathleen; Chambers, Laura; Bumol, Stefan; White, Richard O; Gregory, Becky Pratt; Davis, Dianne; Rothman, Russell L

    2016-02-01

    Patients with low literacy, low numeracy, and/or linguistic needs can experience challenges understanding diabetes information and applying concepts to their self-management. The authors designed a toolkit of education materials that are sensitive to patients' literacy and numeracy levels, language preferences, and cultural norms and that encourage shared goal setting to improve diabetes self-management and health outcomes. The Partnership to Improve Diabetes Education (PRIDE) toolkit was developed to facilitate diabetes self-management education and support. The PRIDE toolkit includes a comprehensive set of 30 interactive education modules in English and Spanish to support diabetes self-management activities. The toolkit builds upon the authors' previously validated Diabetes Literacy and Numeracy Education Toolkit (DLNET) by adding a focus on shared goal setting, addressing the needs of Spanish-speaking patients, and including a broader range of diabetes management topics. Each PRIDE module was evaluated using the Suitability Assessment of Materials (SAM) instrument to determine the material's cultural appropriateness and its sensitivity to the needs of patients with low literacy and low numeracy. Reading grade level was also assessed using the Automated Readability Index (ARI), Coleman-Liau, Flesch-Kincaid, Fry, and SMOG formulas. The average reading grade level of the materials was 5.3 (SD 1.0), with a mean SAM of 91.2 (SD 5.4). All of the 30 modules received a "superior" score (SAM >70%) when evaluated by 2 independent raters. The PRIDE toolkit modules can be used by all members of a multidisciplinary team to assist patients with low literacy and low numeracy in managing their diabetes. © 2015 The Author(s).

  19. Evaluation of US Veterans Nutrition Education for Diabetes Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Megan; Braun, Katie; List, Riesa; Utech, Anne; Moore, Carolyn; White, Donna L; Garcia, Jose M

    2016-09-01

    Evaluate the effectiveness of nutrition education interventions for diabetes prevention. Retrospective cohort design. Tertiary-care US Veterans' Hospital, July 2007 to July 2012, using pre-existing database. Prediabetic, adult veterans (n = 372), mostly men (94.4%, n = 351). Visits with existing nutrition education classes were collected. diabetes status; predictors: visits/encounters, age, body mass index, weight change, and hemoglobin A1c. Cox proportional hazards method, χ(2) test, and logistic regression. In this sample, prediabetic veterans who received nutrition education were less likely to develop diabetes when compared with prediabetic veterans who did not receive nutrition education (hazard ratio, 0.71; 95% confidence interval, 0.55-0.92; P Nutrition education was significantly associated with preventing the progression from prediabetes to diabetes in US Veterans participating in a nutrition education intervention at the Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Copyright © 2016 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. All rights reserved.

  20. Educational and psychosocial programmes for adolescents with diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gage, Heather; Hampson, Sarah; Skinner, T. Chas

    2004-01-01

    Diabetes incurs heavy personal and health system costs. Self-management is required if complications are to be avoided. Adolescents face particular challenges as they learn to take responsibility for their diabetes. A systematic review of educational and psychosocial programmes for adolescents...... with diabetes was undertaken. This aimed to: identify and categorise the types of programmes that have been evaluated; assess the cost-effectiveness of interventions; identify areas where further research is required. Sixty-two papers were identified and subjected to a narrative review. Generic programmes focus...

  1. Implementation of a Diabetes Educator Care Model to Reduce Paediatric Admission for Diabetic Ketoacidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeb, Asma; Yousef, Hana; Abdelrahman, Layla; Tomy, Mary; Suliman, Shaker; Attia, Salima; Al Suwaidi, Hana

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious complication that can be life-threatening. Management of DKA needs admission in a specialized center and imposes major constraints on hospital resources. Aim. We plan to study the impact of adapting a diabetes-educator care model on reducing the frequency of hospital admission of children and adolescents presenting with DKA. Method. We have proposed a model of care led by diabetes educators for children and adolescents with diabetes. The team consisted of highly trained nurses. The model effectiveness is measured by comparing the rate of hospital admission for DKA over 4-year period to the baseline year prior to implementing the model. Results. There were 158 admissions for DKA over a 5-year period. Number of patients followed up in the outpatient diabetes clinics increased from 37 to 331 patients at the start and the end of the study years. Admission rate showed a downward trend over the five-year period. Percentage of admission for DKA is reduced from 210% to 1.8% (P 0.001). Conclusion. Diabetes educator care model is an effective and a sustainable measure to reduce hospital admission for DKA in children and adolescents.

  2. Issues in Informal Education: Event-Based Science Communication Involving Planetaria and the Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, M.; Gallagher, D. L.; Whitt, A.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    For the past four years the Science Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center has carried out a diverse program of science communication through the web resources on the Internet. The program includes extended stories about NAS.4 science, a curriculum resource for teachers tied to national education standards, on-line activities for students, and webcasts of real-time events. Events have involved meteor showers, solar eclipses, natural very low frequency radio emissions, and amateur balloon flights. In some cases broadcasts accommodate active feedback and questions from Internet participants. We give here, examples of events, problems, and lessons learned from these activities.

  3. eLearning: a review of Internet-based continuing medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wutoh, Rita; Boren, Suzanne Austin; Balas, E Andrew

    2004-01-01

    The objective was to review the effect of Internet-based continuing medical education (CME) interventions on physician performance and health care outcomes. Data sources included searches of MEDLINE (1966 to January 2004), CINAHL (1982 to December 2003), ACP Journal Club (1991 to July/August 2003), and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (third quarter, 2003). Studies were included in the analyses if they were randomized controlled trials of Internet-based education in which participants were practicing health care professionals or health professionals in training. CME interventions were categorized according to the nature of the intervention, sample size, and other information about educational content and format. Sixteen studies met the eligibility criteria. Six studies generated positive changes in participant knowledge over traditional formats; only three studies showed a positive change in practices. The remainder of the studies showed no difference in knowledge levels between Internet-based interventions and traditional formats for CME. The results demonstrate that Internet-based CME programs are just as effective in imparting knowledge as traditional formats of CME. Little is known as to whether these positive changes in knowledge are translated into changes in practice. Subjective reports of change in physician behavior should be confirmed through chart review or other objective measures. Additional studies need to be performed to assess how long these new learned behaviors could be sustained. eLearning will continue to evolve as new innovations and more interactive modes are incorporated into learning.

  4. Dermatology education and the Internet: traditional and cutting-edge resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Anne H; Krause, L Kendall; Simmons, Rachel N; Ellis, Jeffrey I; Gamble, Ryan G; Jensen, J Daniel; Noble, Melissa N; Orser, Michael L; Suarez, Andrea L; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2011-10-01

    The number and variety of dermatological medical resources available online has grown exponentially over the past decade. Internet-based resources allow for immediate and easy access to information for both medical education and reference purposes. Although clinicians continue to turn to the Internet for clinical information and still images, tech-savvy medical students are currently accessing a variety of exciting new resources, including discussion boards, wikis, streaming video, podcasts, journal clubs, online communities, and interactive diagnostic experiences to augment their medical education. The objective of this study was to identify traditional and cutting-edge online dermatology resources. We present a sampling of the top dermatology Internet resources, as assessed by a group of medical students in our university dermatology research lab. These resources were ranked by using a matrix derived from the Silberg Criteria, which assessed authorship, attribution, disclosure, currency, and content. Results indicate comparable ranking and approval of cutting-edge resources as traditional online sources. The ranked resources in each category are provided with URLs for readers' use. These cutting-edge online dermatology resources represent excellent sources for continuing education for students and clinicians alike. Resources such as these likely represent the future of medical education, as they allow for self-directed and supplementary education as well as remote access. Copyright © 2010 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Fog Computing and Edge Computing Architectures for Processing Data From Diabetes Devices Connected to the Medical Internet of Things.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klonoff, David C

    2017-07-01

    The Internet of Things (IoT) is generating an immense volume of data. With cloud computing, medical sensor and actuator data can be stored and analyzed remotely by distributed servers. The results can then be delivered via the Internet. The number of devices in IoT includes such wireless diabetes devices as blood glucose monitors, continuous glucose monitors, insulin pens, insulin pumps, and closed-loop systems. The cloud model for data storage and analysis is increasingly unable to process the data avalanche, and processing is being pushed out to the edge of the network closer to where the data-generating devices are. Fog computing and edge computing are two architectures for data handling that can offload data from the cloud, process it nearby the patient, and transmit information machine-to-machine or machine-to-human in milliseconds or seconds. Sensor data can be processed near the sensing and actuating devices with fog computing (with local nodes) and with edge computing (within the sensing devices). Compared to cloud computing, fog computing and edge computing offer five advantages: (1) greater data transmission speed, (2) less dependence on limited bandwidths, (3) greater privacy and security, (4) greater control over data generated in foreign countries where laws may limit use or permit unwanted governmental access, and (5) lower costs because more sensor-derived data are used locally and less data are transmitted remotely. Connected diabetes devices almost all use fog computing or edge computing because diabetes patients require a very rapid response to sensor input and cannot tolerate delays for cloud computing.

  6. Educational booklet on diabetes construction and content validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jéssica Azevedo de Aquino

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Patients with Diabetes Mellitus (DM require support for self-management education and care. This study aimed to present the results of the construction and content validation of the educational booklet to be used in an educational program for empowerment of patients with DM. The educational booklet was developed containing the standards needed for self-care in diabetes proposed by the American Association of Diabetes Educators and subjected to evaluation by specialists using the Delphi Technique. The specialists valuation was performed in three stages, an online questionnaire with eight questions was used to get a consensus higher than 80% of all the items that makes up the final material. Later, the educational booklet was subjected to assessment of patients in a pilot study. Twelve specialists in DM participated in the first stage and three items initially did not reach 80% consensus. The booklet was reformulated and six specialists attended the second stage, in which he consensus higher than 80% was obtained. In a third stage, five patients contributed to the assessment of the final version. The educational booklet presents good characteristics of content validate to be used in educational program to empower DM patients in self-management and health care.

  7. Negative infl uence of internet on the conduct studies in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. B. Ershteyn

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper shows that nowadays the Internet is increasingly used in higher education. It is argued that the main directions of research use the Internet show a positive effect of using a global network of higher education. It was revealed that in addition to the positive influence of the Internet network has a signifi cant negative impact. Identifi ed such negative factors as the widespread learning task solving and quick copying in the case of the emergence of new jobs. Not shown the ability to publish new textbooks in applying active methods lectures, due to these facilities benefi ts the Internet. The prevalence of false information on the Internet. The question of providing students with the information as it is fi nished, it is shown that in some cases it is not advisable to do. It is said that the publication of the full study guides is suitable only in the case when it comes to the basic disciplines, in other cases it is doubtful. Analyzed the shortcomings of such methods of struggle with the designated program to identify factors such as plagiarism, limiting the exchange of scientifi c and methodological experience. Revealed such disadvantages of using plagiarism detection software as programs to combat the use of these programs, and others. It is shown that the use of new teaching jobs, may lead to the fact that completed assignments will be distributed by students via the Internet, and thus the depreciation of these tasks will occur. Revealed the following pattern of use of new teaching jobs in higher education: the more effective is the learning task, the greater the likelihood that it will be devalued. The question required a waiver of such types of learning tasks as translation work, which is due to the fact that students are copying term papers or materials to them without even reading them. The ways of using reports and abstracts that allow overcome the negative trend. It is shown that the use of the

  8. THE MOBILE SPACE AND MOBILE TARGETING ENVIRONMENT FOR INTERNET USERS: FEATURES OF MODEL SUBMISSION AND USING IN EDUCATION

    OpenAIRE

    V. Bykov

    2013-01-01

    Article submitted the results of the analysis of the use of mobile devices in education. The substantiation of the definition of user mobility in the Internet space, taking into account the variability of mobile devices and communications. The use of mobile devices in the educational process is based on the paradigm of open and equal access to quality education. Considered the technology of using different types of devices and their functions . The conditions of user mobility in the internet ...

  9. Undergraduate physiotherapy students’ knowledge of Diabetes Mellitus: Implications for education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Steyl

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes  mellitus  is  a  growing  public  health  concern  and its prevalence is  escalating  exponentially,  with  a  high  frequency  of morbidity, premature mortality, disability and loss of productivity.  Since health education has  become  an  important  part  of  medical  care physiotherapy  students  are potentially  well  suited  to  assist  with  the combat  of  this  disease.    The  study aimed  to  determine  the  knowledge of  diabetes  mellitus  and  its  risk  factors  of undergraduate physiotherapy students  in  the  Western  Cape.  The  study  incorporated  a  quantitative, cross-sectional design.  Three hundred and thirty eight (338 students completed the structured, self-administered questionnaire consisting of three sections, namely  socio-demographic information, diabetes mellitus risk factors and the validated 24-item diabetes Knowledge Questionnaire (dKQ-24. Both descriptive and inferential statistics were employed  and the alpha level was set at p < 0.05.  overall, 60.7% of the study sample had adequate knowledge of diabetes mellitus (≥ 75% correct answers, while 32.5% and 6.8% had marginal (≥60 ≤ 74% correct answers and inadequate knowledge (<59% correct answers respectively. Seven of the nine diabetes mellitus risk factors could readily be identified by 89.7% of the participants.  Smoking (64.8% and high blood pressure (69.0% were not readily identified as common diabetes mellitus risk factors. Significant associations with diabetes risk factors were found for gender and year of study. The study has reinforced the need for continuous education of physiotherapy students regarding diabetes mellitus and its risk factors, as inadequate knowledge of diabetes mellitus could influence the effectiveness of patient education and therefore have dangerous consequences for the patient diagnosed with diabetes mellitus.

  10. Aging IQ Intervention with Older Korean Americans: A Comparison of Internet-Based and In-Class Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yuri; Yoon, Hyunwoo; Marti, C. Nathan; Kim, Miyong T.

    2015-01-01

    Using the translated contents of the National Institute on Aging (NIA)'s Aging IQ, an educational intervention was delivered to older Korean Americans. The educational program was delivered via two different modalities, Internet-based education (n = 12) and in-class education (n = 11), and the overall feasibility and efficacy were evaluated by the…

  11. A pragmatic comparison of two diabetes education programs in improving type 2 diabetes mellitus outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorland, Katherine; Liddy, Clare

    2014-03-28

    Although it is clear that education programs constitute key elements of improved diabetes management, uncertainty exists regarding the optimal method of delivering that education. In addition to the lack of consensus regarding the most appropriate delivery methods for these programs, there is a paucity of research which evaluates these methods in terms of specific clinical outcomes. This pragmatic study compares the effectiveness of two distinct diabetes education programs in improving clinical outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in a primary care setting. The two diabetes education classes (n = 80 enrolled) retrospectively evaluated were 'the ABC's of Diabetes' (one 2-hour didactic teaching session) and 'Conversation Maps' (3 highly interactive weekly classes, 6 hours in total). Eligible participants (n = 32) had their charts reviewed and outcome measures (i.e., glycosylated hemoglobin levels (HbA1c), low density lipoprotein (LDL), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and weight) recorded 1 year prior to and 6 months following the class. Pre- and post-class outcome measures were compared. A trend towards lower HbA1c was observed after completion of both classes, with an average reduction of 0.2%, and 0.6% after 6 months in the 'ABC's of Diabetes' class and 'Conversation Maps' class respectively. A significant decrease in weight was observed 6 months after the 'ABC's of Diabetes' class (p = 0.028), and in LDL after the 'Conversation Maps' class (p = 0.049). Patients with HbA1c ≥ 8% showed a drop of 1.1% in HbA1c 3 months after either class (p = 0.004). No significant difference in outcomes was found between the two diabetes education classes assessed. There was a trend towards improved glycemic control after both classes, and patients with high HbA1c levels demonstrated statistically significant improvements. This indicates that shorter sessions using didactic teaching methods may be equally

  12. Pre-Service Teachers’ Internet Usage a Function of Demographic Factors: The Case of a Nigerian College of Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bede Blaise Chukwunyere Onwuagboke

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available With the overreaching acceptance of ICT in education and access to Internet occasioned by advancement in technology, this paper investigates pre-service teachers’ use of Internet in a college of education. The study was a descriptive survey. Data was collected using a researcher designed instrument tagged “Student Internet Use Scale” (SIUS. The population comprised of all NCE pre-service teachers in Alvan Ikoku Federal College of Education Owerri Nigeria. Findings show that  mobile phones remains the most widely used mode of internet access with social networking, searching for information on school assignments, chatting forming the major reasons why they surf the net. Social networking is the major purpose for Internet use by female pre-service teachers while school related activities are of priority to males. The difference in purpose of internet use according to gender is however not statistically significant; similarly, there is no statically significant difference between male and female pre-service teachers in the frequency of Internet usage. The result has far reaching implication for provision and use of Internet facilities to enhance teaching and learning in the College and colleges of education in Nigeria.

  13. Development of culturally sensitive dialog tools in diabetes education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nana Folmann Hempler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Person-centeredness is a goal in diabetes education, and cultural influences are important to consider in this regard. This report describes the use of a design-based research approach to develop culturally sensitive dialog tools to support person-centered dietary education targeting Pakistani immigrants in Denmark with type 2 diabetes. The approach appears to be a promising method to develop dialog tools for patient education that are culturally sensitive, thereby increasing their acceptability among ethnic minority groups. The process also emphasizes the importance of adequate training and competencies in the application of dialog tools and of alignment between researchers and health care professionals with regards to the educational philosophy underlying their use.

  14. Comprehensive Diabetes and Non-Communicable Disease Educator in the Low-Resource Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattarai, M D

    2016-01-01

    The role of self-management education in diabetes and other major non-communicable diseases is clearly evident. To take care of and educate people with diabetes and other major NCD under the supervision of medical professionals and for education of other health care professionals, Comprehensive Diabetes and NCD Educators are needed in the routine service in peripheral health clinics and hospitals. The areas of training of CDNCD educator should match with the cost-effective interventions for diabetes and other major NCD that are feasible and planned for implementation in primary care in the low resource settings. Most of such interventions are part of diabetes education as required for Diabetes Self-Management Education programmes and traditional Diabetes Educator. The addition of use of inhaled steroids and bronchodilator in chronic respiratory disease and identification of presenting features of cancer, also required for many people with diabetes with various such common co-morbidities, will complete the areas of training of traditional Diabetes Educator as that of CDNCD Educator. Staff nurse and health assistants, who are as such already providing routine clinical service to all patients including with diabetes and major NCD in peripheral health clinics and hospitals, are most appropriate for CDNCD Educator training. The training of CDNCD Educator, like that of traditional Diabetes Educator, requires fulfilment of sufficient hours of practical work experience under supervision and achievement of the essential competencies entailing at least 6 month or more of intensive training schedules to be eligible to appear in its final certifying examination.

  15. Readability of Orthopedic Trauma Patient Education Materials on the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Rohith; Yi, Paul H; Morshed, Saam

    In this study, we used the Flesch-Kincaid Readability Scale to determine the readability levels of orthopedic trauma patient education materials on the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) website and to examine how subspecialty coauthorship affects readability level. Included articles from the AAOS online patient education library and the AAOS OrthoPortal website were categorized as trauma or broken bones and injuries on the AAOS online library or were screened by study authors for relevance to orthopedic trauma. Subsequently, the Flesch-Kincaid scale was used to determine each article's readability level, which was reported as a grade level. Subspecialty coauthorship was noted for each article. A total of 115 articles from the AAOS website were included in the study and reviewed. Mean reading level was grade 9.1 for all articles reviewed. Nineteen articles (16.5%) were found to be at or below the eighth-grade level, and only 1 article was at or below the sixth-grade level. In addition, there was no statistically significant difference between articles coauthored by the various orthopedic subspecialties and those authored exclusively by AAOS. Orthopedic trauma readability materials on the AAOS website appear to be written at a reading comprehension level too high for the average patient to understand.

  16. Diabetes Education Needs of Chinese Australians: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Tammie S. T.; Walker, Karen Z.; Ralston, Robin A.; Palermo, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate a type 2 diabetes education programme for Chinese Australians, based on the experience of participants and by exploring the unique needs of Chinese patients, their health beliefs and their cultural behaviours. Design and setting: A qualitative ethnographic study was undertaken in a community health…

  17. Impact of diabetes continuing education on health care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of a continuing education (CE) program on the attitudes of health care professionals (HCPs) towards diabetes care in Yemen. Methods: A pre- and post-intervention study was carried out in Mukalla City, Hadramout, Yemen and was offered to all physicians, pharmacists, and nurses ...

  18. Health Education in Gestational Diabetes Mellitus and Quality of Life

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    Mani Mirfeizi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Incidence rate of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM has been estimated to be 18.5%. GDM is associated with various challenges in terms of care and public health. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of health education and behavioral interventions on the quality of life in the patients diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM. Methods: This randomized controlled trial was conducted on 149 eligible participants, who were randomly assigned to the intervention and control group with the allocation ratio of 1:1. Participants were divided into four groups, including nutrition therapy with and without education and insulin therapy with and without education. Follow-up of the patients was performed during 12 weeks (January 2014-April 2015. The educational intervention consisted of various aspects, including diet, exercise, glycemic control, postpartum diabetes control and recommendations for delivery. Primary and secondary outcomes were the effects of the educational intervention on the metabolic control and quality of life, respectively. All the women completed the Iranian version of the Diabetes Quality of Life Brief Clinical Inventory (IDQL-BCI prior to and after the educational intervention. Data analysis was performed using variance, covariance and Chi-square in SPSS version 15, at the significance level of 0.05. Results: No significant difference was observed between the four groups in terms of the quality of life score in the DQOL-BCL before the educational program. However, this score increased in all study groups, especially in the insulin therapy group (mean difference=16.43. Conclusion: According to the results, health education program could be effective in enhancing health-related quality of life in the women with GDM.

  19. Use of a Connected Glucose Meter and Certified Diabetes Educator Coaching to Decrease the Likelihood of Abnormal Blood Glucose Excursions: The Livongo for Diabetes Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Janelle; Bollyky, Jenna; Schneider, Jennifer

    2017-07-11

    The Livongo for Diabetes Program offers members (1) a cellular technology-enabled, two-way messaging device that measures blood glucose (BG), centrally stores the glucose data, and delivers messages back to the individual in real time; (2) unlimited BG test strips; and (3) access to a diabetes coaching team for questions, goal setting, and automated support for abnormal glucose excursions. The program is sponsored by at-risk self-insured employers, health plans and provider organizations where it is free to members with diabetes or it is available directly to the person with diabetes where they cover the cost. The objective of our study was to evaluate BG data from 4544 individuals with diabetes who were enrolled in the Livongo program from October 2014 through December 2015. Members used the Livongo glucose meter to measure their BG levels an average of 1.8 times per day. We estimated the probability of having a day with a BG reading outside of the normal range (70-180 mg/dL, or 3.9-10.0 mmol/L) in months 2 to 12 compared with month 1 of the program, using individual fixed effects to control for individual characteristics. Livongo members experienced an average 18.4% decrease in the likelihood of having a day with hypoglycemia (BG 180 mg/dL) in months 2-12 compared with month 1 as the baseline. The biggest impact was seen on hyperglycemia for nonusers of insulin. We do not know all of the contributing factors such as medication or other treatment changes during the study period. These findings suggest that access to a connected glucose meter and certified diabetes educator coaching is associated with a decrease in the likelihood of abnormal glucose excursions, which can lead to diabetes-related health care savings. ©Janelle Downing, Jenna Bollyky, Jennifer Schneider. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 11.07.2017.

  20. The Role of Internet of Things for a Continuous Improvement in Education

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    Constantin-Eugen CORNEL

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This research is concentrated on the value that Internet of Things (IoT can add to the education process, by using it in development of online virtual laboratories, which is a major requirement for any education system, in order to be qualitative and competitive. Practical experimentation is possible even with distance learning approach and today students may have access to a multitude of teaching resources, including IoT services used for various real world experiments. This is possible due to low costs and high performance of new electronic modules, on one hand, and the development of many high scalable web services, which permits data processing and communication over the Internet, on the other hand. The paper also presents an example of using IoT, by connecting an Arduino platform with the Xively web service, in order to read and display data received from a temperature sensor.

  1. Educational strategies for the prevention of diabetes, hypertension, and obesity

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    Alexandre Paulo Machado

    Full Text Available Summary Objective: The main goal of this work was to produce a review of educational strategies to prevent diabetes, hypertension, and obesity. Method: PubMed database was consulted using combined descriptors such as [Prevention], [Educational Activities], [Diabetes], [Hypertension], and [Obesity]. Data from randomized trials published between 2002 and 2014 were included in spreadsheets for analysis in duplicate by the reviewers. Results: A total of 8,908 articles were found, of which 1,539 were selected about diabetes mellitus (DM, n=369, arterial systemic hypertension (ASH, n=200, and obesity (OBES, n=970. The number of free full text articles available was 1,075 (DM = 276, ASH = 118 and OBES = 681. In most of these studies, demographic characteristics such as gender and age were randomized, and the population mainly composed by students, ethnic groups, family members, pregnant, health or education professionals, patients with chronic diseases (DM, ASH, OBES or other comorbidities. Group dynamics, physical activity practices, nutritional education, questionnaires, interviews, employment of new technologies, people training and workshops were the main intervention strategies used. Conclusion: The most efficient interventions occurred at community level, whenever the intervention was permanent or maintained for long periods, and relied on the continuous education of community health workers that had a constant interference inside the population covered. Many studies focused their actions in children and adolescents, especially on students, because they were more influenced by educational activities of prevention, and the knowledge acquired by them would spread more easily to their family and to society.

  2. Barriers to diabetes education in urban patients: perceptions, patterns, and associated factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Mary K; Cook, Curtiss B; El-Kebbi, Imad; Lyles, Robert H; Dunbar, Virginia G; Panayioto, Rita M; Berkowitz, Kathy J; Boyd, Barbara; Broussard, Sandra; George, Christopher D

    2005-01-01

    This study explored patients' perceptions of barriers to diabetes education among a mostly African American population of adults with diabetes. A survey was conducted among 605 new patients attending an urban outpatient diabetes clinic. The questionnaire gathered information on issues patients believed would adversely affect their ability to learn about diabetes. The type and frequency of education barriers were evaluated, and variables associated with reporting an obstacle were analyzed. Average patient age was 50 years, diabetes duration was 5.6 years, body mass index was 32 kg/m2, and hemoglobin A1C was 9.1%. The majority (56%) were women, 89% were African American, and 95% had type 2 diabetes. Most respondents (96%) had received some prior instruction in diabetes care; however, 53% anticipated future difficulties learning about diabetes. The most commonly cited concerns were poor vision (74%) and reading problems (29%). Patients with a perceived barrier to diabetes education were older (P barrier, and they differed in both employment and educational status (both P education or less were associated with a significantly increased likelihood of having a barrier to diabetes education, whereas having a college education decreased the odds. Higher hemoglobin A1C levels also tended to be associated with a greater chance of reporting an education barrier (P = .05). A substantial number of persons anticipated a barrier to diabetes education. Interventions at multiple levels that address the demographic and socioeconomic obstacles to diabetes education are needed to ensure successful self-management training.

  3. Nuclear education and training in the Internet age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bereznai, G.; Garland, W.

    2001-01-01

    Student enrolment in nuclear engineering programs offered by Canadian universities has been declining, and at some universities has fallen below the minimum level needed to sustain the program. At the same time, a significant number of engineers working in the nuclear industry have retired and many more will be reaching retirement age in the next few years. The operation and maintenance of the 14 in-service CANDU units, the refurbishment of the four Pickering 'A' units and of the four Bruce 'A' units will require a significant level of new engineers and scientists. Service support for the CANDU units operating overseas, the construction of two units in China, the completion of Cernavoda 2, and the market for several more CANDU units in Asia, will also require significant numbers of new graduates. The vast amount of information that the future practitioners of the nuclear power industry need to be aware of will be increasingly difficult to disseminate with the traditional classroom-based education and training methods. Almost all of the documents required for the design, analysis, procurement and operation of a nuclear unit are now generated by computer, and increasingly such information is accessible where and when needed via the company lntranet. The authors have developed an lnternet/Intranet compatible self-paced interactive multimedia approach to deliver a course on CANDU Systems and Operations. The course has been offered at ten universities in six countries, including Thailand, China, Indonesia, Vietnam, the Philippines, as well as Canada. (author)

  4. Impact of an acceptance facilitating intervention on diabetes patients' acceptance of Internet-based interventions for depression: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, H; Nowoczin, L; Lin, J; Seifferth, H; Seufert, J; Laubner, K; Ebert, D D

    2014-07-01

    To (1) determine diabetes patients' acceptance of Internet-based interventions (IBIs) for depression, to (2) examine the effectiveness of an acceptance facilitating intervention (AFI) and to (3) explore subgroup specific effects. 141 diabetes patients from two inpatient rehabilitation units and one outpatient clinic in Germany were randomly allocated to an intervention (IG) and a no-intervention control group (CG). The IG received an AFI consisting of a personal information session before filling-out a questionnaire on patients' acceptance of IBIs, predictors of acceptance (performance expectancy, effort expectancy, social influence, facilitating conditions, and Internet anxiety) as well as sociodemographic, depression-related and diabetes-related variables. The CG filled out the questionnaire immediately. Patients' acceptance of IBIs was measured with a four-item scale (sum-score ranging from 4 to 20). The CG showed a low (50.7%) to medium (40.8%) acceptance with only 8.5% of all diabetes patients reporting a high acceptance of IBIs for depression. The AFI had no significant effect on acceptance (IG: M=10.55, SD=4.69, n=70; KG: M=9.65, SD=4.27, n=71; d=0.20 [95%-CI: -0.13;0.53]) and the predictors of acceptance. Yet, subgroup analyses yielded a trend for depressed, diabetes-related distressed, female and younger (Internet to profit from the AFI. Diabetes patients show a rather low acceptance toward IBIs for depression. Findings indicate that the AFI is likely to be effective in the subgroup of depressed, diabetes-related distressed, female or younger diabetes patients, but not in the whole target population. Hence, AFIs might need to be tailored to the specific needs of subpopulations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Assessing the effect of an educational intervention program based on Health Belief Model on preventive behaviors of internet addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheri, Aghbabak; Tol, Azar; Sadeghi, Roya

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Internet addiction refers to the excessive use of the internet that causes mental, social, and physical problems. According to the high prevalence of internet addiction among university students, this study aimed to determine the effect of an educational intervention on preventive behaviors of internet addiction among Tehran University of Medical Sciences students. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study was a quasi-experimental study conducted among female college students who live in the dormitories of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Two-stage cluster sampling was used for selection of eighty participants in each study groups; data were collected using “Young's Internet Addiction” and unstructured questionnaire. Validity and reliability of unstructured questionnaire were evaluated by expert panel and were reported as Cronbach's alpha. Information of study groups before and 4 months after the intervention was compared using statistical methods by SPSS 16. RESULTS: After the intervention, the mean scores of internet addiction, perceived barriers construct, and the prevalence of internet addiction significantly decreased in the intervention group than that in the control group and the mean scores of knowledge and Health Belief Model (HBM) constructs (susceptibility, severity, benefits, self-efficacy) significantly increased. CONCLUSIONS: Education based on the HBM was effective on the reduction and prevention of internet addiction among female college students, and educational interventions in this field are highly recommended. PMID:28852654

  6. Goal setting with type 2 diabetes: a hermeneutic analysis of the experiences of diabetes educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Susan E; Boyd, Angela; Ballejos, Miriam; Kynast-Gales, Susan A; Malemute, Charlene L; Armstrong Shultz, Jill; Vandermause, Roxanne K

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explicate and interpret common experiences of diabetes educators (DEs) with patient goal setting for patients with type 2 diabetes in diabetes education. Transcripts (n = 10) from semi-structured interviews were analyzed using a hermeneutic phenomenological approach to more deeply explore the accounts of DEs' goal setting with patients with type 2 diabetes. The overarching pattern that emerged was "Striking a Balance," which subsumed 4 subthemes: Applying Theoretical-Practical Principles When Setting Goals, Identifying Idealistic-Realistic Expectations, Creating Patient-Educator-Centered Plans, and Readying-Living With Goal Setting. The pattern, "Striking a Balance," revealed a common meaning of DEs as experiences requiring balance and nuance in goal setting with patients. The results of this study combined with the tenets of the self-determination theory can provide the DEs with real-life exemplars and a theoretical framework to encourage their patients to self-manage, increase intrinsic motivation, and improve adherence related to their lifestyle changes and glycemic control. DEs, as facilitators of change, can implement these changes with flexible and reciprocal activities with their patients. The DEs owned these activities and they are: "building the bond," "sharing the session," "readying for change," "sending them home," and "bringing them back."

  7. A mobile diabetes management and educational system for type-2 diabetics in Saudi Arabia (SAED).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alotaibi, Mohammed M; Istepanian, Robert; Philip, Nada

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic disease, with high prevalence across many nations, which is characterized by elevated level of blood glucose and risk of acute and chronic complication. The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) has one of the highest levels of diabetes prevalence globally. It is well-known that the treatment of diabetes is complex process and requires both lifestyle change and clear pharmacologic treatment plan. To avoid the complication from diabetes, the effective behavioural change and extensive education and self-management is one of the key approaches to alleviate such complications. However, this process is lengthy and expensive. The recent studies on the user of smart phone technologies for diabetes self-management have proven to be an effective tool in controlling hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels especially in type-2 diabetic (T2D) patients. However, to date no reported study addressed the effectiveness of this approach in the in Saudi patients. This study investigates the impact of using mobile health technologies for the self-management of diabetes in Saudi Arabia. In this study, an intelligent mobile diabetes management system (SAED), tailored for T2D patients in KSA was developed. A pilot study of the SAED system was conducted in Saudi Arabia with 20 diabetic patients for 6 months duration. The patients were randomly categorized into a control group who did not use the SAED system and an intervention group whom used the SAED system for their diabetes management during this period. At the end of the follow-up period, the HbA1c levels in the patients in both groups were measure together with a diabetes knowledge test was also conducted to test the diabetes awareness of the patients. The results of SAED pilot study showed that the patients in the intervention group were able to significantly decrease their HbA1c levels compared to the control group. The SAED system also enhanced the diabetes awareness amongst the patients in the intervention group during the trial

  8. [Patient education: an indispensable element of care of patients with diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidvégi, Tibor

    2011-11-27

    Diabetes is a chronic and progressive disorder that impacts upon almost every aspect of life. The number of people with diabetes is continuously growing and diabetes is associated with a high mortality rate. Diabetes education is a critical element of care of people with diabetes in order to improve clinical outcomes. The therapeutic patient education is a planned and structured program that is comprehensive in scope, flexible in content, responsive to an individual's clinical and psychological needs, and adaptable to patients' educational and cultural background. The diabetes educator should control the implementation of education and should evaluate the patient's knowledge. The educator should be trained for care of patients with chronic diseases and for education of patients with diabetes mellitus.

  9. Parents of adolescents with type 1 diabetes--their views on information and communication needs and internet use. A qualitative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Nordfeldt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Little is known about parents' views on the use of online resources for information, education and support regarding childhood type 1 diabetes (T1DM. Considering the rapidly evolving new communication practices, parents' perspectives need to be explored. The main purpose of this paper was to explore parents' perceptions of their information-seeking, Internet use, and social networking online. This applied to their everyday life, including the contexts of T1DM and contact with peers. A second aim was to identify implications for future development of Internet use in this respect. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Twenty-seven parents of 24 young persons aged 10-17 with T1DM participated in eight focus group interviews during their regular visits to a county hospital. Focus group discussions were video/audio-taped, transcribed and analysed using inductive qualitative content analysis. Self-reported demographic and medical information was also collected. A main theme was Finding things out, including two sub-themes, Trust and Suitability. The latter were key factors affecting parents' perceptions of online resources. Parents' choice of information source was related to the situation, previous experiences and knowledge about sources and, most importantly, the level of trust in the source. A constantly present background theme was Life situation, including two sub-themes, Roles and functions and Emotions and needs. Parents' information-seeking regarding T1DM varied greatly, and was closely associated with their life situation, the adolescents development phases and the disease trajectory. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Health practitioners and system developers need to focus on creating trust and suitability for users' needs. They should understand the children's diverse needs, which depend on their life situation, on the children's development, and on the disease trajectory. To enhance trust in online health information and support services

  10. Need for education on footcare in diabetic patients in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, V; Shobhana, R; Snehalatha, C; Seena, R; Ramachandran, A

    1999-11-01

    The patient himself plays the crucial role in the prevention of diabetic foot disease and therefore education on foot care is important. In this study, we have evaluated the knowledge of the diabetic subjects regarding the foot problems and the care of feet in order to identify areas that require stress in the education programme. Two hundred and fifty, consecutive cases of Type 2 diabetes (M:F, 176:74, age 57.2 +/- 9.7 yrs, duration 12.9 +/- 7.9 yrs) were selected for this study from the out-patient department of our hospital. A questionnaire was filled up for each patient by personal interview. The total score was 100 and a score of women (78.5%) than in men (62.5%) (chi 2 = 5.26, P = 0.022). Low scores (women with low educational status. Significant foot problems like gangrene, foot ulcers were present in 27.2% and low scores were more common among those with these complications (82% vs 62%) (chi 2 = 8.3, P = 0.004). In general the scores on awareness of general foot care principles and basic facts about the foot complications were poor. Most of them (72%) had good knowledge about the right usage of foot wear. There was a trend to have lower scores with poor formal education (chi 2 = 51.1, P < 0.0001) and also with increasing age. There was no correlation between the scores and the number of hospital visits. Multiple linear regression analyses showed that 31.2% of the variations in the scores were explained by the level of education. This study underscores the importance of patient education on foot care principles, especially so, considering the magnitude of the problem of diabetes and the lower levels of literacy and poor socio economic status of many patients in this country.

  11. Prototype for Internet support of pregnant women and mothers with type 1 diabetes: focus group testing

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    Adolfsson A

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Annsofie Adolfsson,1,2 Malin Jansson1,21School of Life Sciences, University of Skovde, Skovde, Sweden; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Skaraborg Hospital, Skovde, SwedenBackground: The aim of this study was to pilot test a prototype website called MODIAB-web designed to support pregnant women and mothers with type 1 diabetes.Method: A focus group was undertaken and the results were analyzed using qualitative content analysis.Results: Eight subthemes were identified, comprising "blood glucose versus insulin," "application for smart phones," "the time aspect," "interface and technology," "forum," "direct link to the diabetes midwife," "ask the expert," and "lack of contact information." These subthemes were condensed into two main themes. The first theme was "easily understood interface, but in need of a more blood-glucose focused orientation" and the second theme was "forum for interaction with both equals and experts." Conclusion: The women in this study had positive impressions of several of the MODIAB-web functions, including a forum for pregnant mothers with type 1 diabetes and the possibility of being able to put their blood glucose levels into a diagram which could be sent directly to the diabetes midwife. Access to articles and information via the "fact" tab and the ability to ask questions of experts were also significantly helpful to women in the focus group. Pregnant women and mothers with type 1 diabetes can gain support from such a Web-based self-help system.Keywords: type 1 diabetes, web support, pregnancy, focus group interview

  12. Digital Health Interventions for Adults With Type 2 Diabetes: Qualitative Study of Patient Perspectives on Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Kingshuk; Dack, Charlotte; Ross, Jamie; Michie, Susan; May, Carl; Stevenson, Fiona; Farmer, Andrew; Yardley, Lucy; Barnard, Maria; Murray, Elizabeth

    2018-01-29

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing globally, and health services in many countries are struggling with the morbidity, mortality, and costs associated with the complications of this long-term condition. Diabetes self-management education (DSME) and behavioral support can reduce the risks of developing diabetes-related complications and improve glycemic control. However, their uptake is low. Digital health interventions (DHI) can provide sustained support and may overcome challenges associated with attending diabetes self-management sessions. They have the potential for delivery at multiple locations at convenient times, anonymity, and presentation of content in attractive and tailored formats. This study investigates the needs and wants of patients with type 2 diabetes to inform the development of digital self-management education and support. The objective of this study was to explore patient perspectives on unmet needs for self-management and support and the role of DHI in adults living with type 2 diabetes. This study used a qualitative approach based on data generated from 4 focus groups with 20 patients. The data generated by the focus groups illustrated the significant burden that the diagnosis of diabetes places on many patients and the negative impacts on their emotional well-being, work, social life, and physical health. Although patients' experiences of the health care services varied, there was agreement that even the best services were unable to meet all users' needs to support the emotional regulation, psychological adjustment, and behavioral changes needed for successful self-management. By focusing on medical management and information provision, existing health care services and education programs may not be adequately meeting all the needs of patients with type 2 diabetes. DHIs have the potential to improve access to DSME and behavioral support and extend the range of content offered by health services to fit with a wider range of

  13. Diabetes Camp as Continuing Education for Diabetes Self-Management in Middle-Aged and Elderly People with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Young Park

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundDespite the established benefits of diabetes camps for the continuing education of children with type 1 diabetes mellitus, little is known about the long-term metabolic benefits of diabetes camps for middle-aged and elderly people with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, especially in terms of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c variability.MethodsThe 1-year mean and variability of HbA1c before and after the diabetes camp was compared between the participants of the diabetes camp (n=57; median age 65 years [range, 50 to 86 years]; median diabetes duration 14 years [range, 1 to 48 years]. Additional case-control analysis compared the metabolic outcomes of the participants of the diabetes camp and their propensity score-matched controls who underwent conventional diabetes education (n=93.ResultsThe levels of HbA1c during the first year after the diabetes camp were comparable to those of the matched controls (P=0.341. In an analysis of all participants of the diabetes camp, the 1-year mean±standard deviation (SD of HbA1c decreased (P=0.010 and P=0.041 after the diabetes camp, whereas the adjusted SD and coefficient of variance (CV of HbA1c did not decrease. The adjusted SD and CV significantly decreased after the diabetes camp in participants whose 1-year mean HbA1c was ≥6.5% before the diabetes camp (n=40 and those with a duration of diabetes less than 15 years (n=32.ConclusionThe 1-year mean and SD of HbA1c decreased after the diabetes camp, with significant reduction in the adjusted SD and CV in those with higher baseline HbA1c and a shorter duration of diabetes.

  14. INTEGRATING INTERNET PROTOCOL TELEVISION (IPTV IN DISTANCE EDUCATION: A Constructivist Framework for Social Networking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Volkan YUZER

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available New communication technologies and constructivist pedagogy have the great potential to build very powerful paradigm shifts that enhance Internet Protocol Television (IPTV in distance education. Therefore, the main purpose of this chapter is to explore the new concerns, issues and potentials for the IPTV delivery of distance education to multicultural populations. In this study, the design strategies and principles of how to build social networking based on constructivist learning theory are discussed in order to generate a theoretical framework that provides everyday examples and experiences for IPTV in distance education. This framework also shows the needs, expectations and beliefs, and strengths-weaknesses of IPTV in distance. In short, this framework concentrates on discussing the main characteristics of IPTV in distance education and describes how those characteristics can help build constructivist online communities.

  15. Identifying user preferences for a digital educational solution for young seniors with diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Molen, P.; Maas, A.H.; Chen, W.; van Pul, C.; Cottaar, E.J.E.; van Riel, N.A.W.; Hilbers, P.A.J.; Haak, H.R.

    2017-01-01

    The Eindhoven Diabetes Education Simulator project was initiated to develop an educational solution that helps diabetes patients understand and learn more about their diabetes. This article describes the identification of user preferences for the development of such solutions. Young seniors (aged

  16. Identifying User Preferences for a Digital Educational Solution for Young Seniors With Diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Molen, Pieta; Maas, Anne H.; Chen, Wei; van Pul, Carola; Cottaar, Eduardus J. E.; van Riel, Natal A. W.; Hilbers, Peter A. J.; Haak, Harm R.

    2017-01-01

    The Eindhoven Diabetes Education Simulator project was initiated to develop an educational solution that helps diabetes patients understand and learn more about their diabetes. This article describes the identification of user preferences for the development of such solutions. Young seniors (aged

  17. The Internet as an emerging patient education tool among African American men with prostate cancer: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallington, Sherrie Flynt

    2008-06-01

    The lives of African American men with prostate cancer are greatly influenced by the information available to them, some of which is accessed on the Internet. Research indicates that the Internet can enhance consumer health knowledge but has not reached socioeconomic groups at highest risk for health disparities, such as African American men with prostate cancer. In this study, focus groups were used to explore the perceptions and uses of the Internet as a patient education tool among 39 African American men aged 39 years and older with diverse socioeconomic backgrounds. Nineteen (49%) participants reported using the Internet, 15 (38%) reported no use but indicated it was used on their behalf, and 5 (13%) reported no use and no use on their behalf. The findings revealed varying degrees of Internet use for information and social support. Prostate cancer diagnosis, poor patient-doctor communications, and accessibility influenced Internet use. Accessibility related more to lack of ease and familiarity with Internet use than lack of computer access. With training and awareness, the Internet has potential as a patient education tool among African American men with prostate cancer.

  18. Issues in Informal Education: Event-Based Science Communication Involving Planetaria and the Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Mitzi L.; Gallagher, D. L.; Whitt, A.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    For the last several years the Science Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center has carried out a diverse program of Internet-based science communication. The program includes extended stories about NASA science, a curriculum resource for teachers tied to national education standards, on-line activities for students, and webcasts of real-time events. The focus of sharing real-time science related events has been to involve and excite students and the public about science. Events have involved meteor showers, solar eclipses, natural very low frequency radio emissions, and amateur balloon flights. In some cases broadcasts accommodate active feedback and questions from Internet participants. Panel participation will be used to communicate the problems and lessons learned from these activities over the last three years.

  19. Mobile communication using a mobile phone with a glucometer for glucose control in Type 2 patients with diabetes: as effective as an Internet-based glucose monitoring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jae-Hyoung; Lee, Hye-Chung; Lim, Dong-Jun; Kwon, Hyuk-Sang; Yoon, Kun-Ho

    2009-01-01

    A mobile phone with a glucometer integrated into the battery pack (the 'Diabetes Phone') was launched in Korea in 2003. We compared its effect on management of type 2 diabetes to the Internet-based glucose monitoring system (IBGMS), which had been studied previously. We conducted a randomized trial involving 69 patients for three months. Participants were assigned to an Internet group or a phone group. The phone group communicated with medical staff through the mobile phone only. Their glucose-monitoring data were automatically transferred to individual, web-based charts and they received medical recommendations by short message service. The Internet group used the IBGMS. There were no significant differences between the groups at baseline. After three months' intervention, HbA(1c) levels of both groups had decreased significantly, from 7.6% to 6.9% for the Internet group and from 8.3% to 7.1% for the phone group (P glucose control as the previously-studied Internet-based monitoring system and it was good for patient satisfaction and adherence.

  20. A small Internet controllable observatory for research and education at the University of North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardersen, P. S.; de Silva, S.; Reddy, V.; Cui, P.; Kumar, S.; Gaffey, M. J.

    2006-06-01

    One of the challenges in astronomy education today is to introduce college students to the real-world practice and science of observational astronomy. Along with a good theoretical background, college students can gain an earlier, deeper understanding of the astronomy profession through direct observational and data reduction experience. However, building and managing a modest observatory is still too costly for many colleges and universities. Fortunately, advances in commercial astronomical hardware and software now allow universities to build and operate small Internet controllable observatories for a modest investment. The advantages of an Internet observatory include: 1) remote operation from a comfortable location, 2) immediate data access, 3) telescope control via a web browser, and 4) allowing both on-campus and distance education students the ability to conduct a variety of observing projects. Internet capabilities vastly expand the number of students who will be able to use the observatory, thus exposing them to astronomy as a science and as a potential career. In September 2005, the University of North Dakota (UND) Department of Space Studies began operating a small, recently renovated Internet controllable observatory. Housed within a roll-off roof 10 miles west of UND, the observatory includes a Meade 16-inch, f/10 Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope, an SBIG STL-6303e CCD with broadband filters, ACP observatory control software, focuser, and associated equipment. The observatory cost \\25,000 to build in 1996; 2005 renovation costs total \\28,000. An observatory operator prepares the telescope for use each night. Through remote operation, the roof is opened and the telescope/CCD power is turned on. The telescope is then aligned and focused before allowing students to access the observatory. Students communicate with the observatory operator via an online chat room and via telephone, if necessary, to answer questions and resolve any problems. Additional

  1. Bringing Internet-based education and intervention into mental health practice: afterdeployment.org

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef I. Ruzek

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Internet-facilitated interventions may offer numerous advantages in reaching the large numbers of military service men and women exposed to traumatic events. The Internet is now a primary source of health-related information for consumers and research has shown the effectiveness of web-based interventions in addressing a range of mental health problems.Clinicians can learn how to bring Internet education and intervention into routine care, to help clients better understand mental health issues and learn skills for self-management of problems.The Afterdeployment.org (AD Internet site can be used by health care professionals serving U.S. military personnel returning from Iraq and Afghanistan, and their families. The site currently addresses 18 key domains of functioning, including post-traumatic stress, sleep, anger, alcohol and drugs, and military sexual trauma. It provides an extensive amount of client and family education that is suitable for immediate use by clients and providers, as well as the kinds of interactive workshop content and self-assessment tools that have been shown to be helpful in other treatment contexts. AD can be utilized in clinical practice in a variety of ways: as an adjunct to treatment for PTSD, to supplement existing treatments for a range of post-deployment problems, or as the primary focus of treatment for a client.AD represents a kind of service that is likely to become increasingly available in coming years and that is important for mental health providers to actively explore as a tool for extending their reach, improving their efficiency, and improving quality of care.For the abstract or full text in other languages, please see Supplementary files under Reading Tools online.

  2. Are we failing to communicate? Internet-based patient education materials and radiation safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansberry, David R.; Ramchand, Tekchand; Patel, Shyam; Kraus, Carl; Jung, Jin; Agarwal, Nitin; Gonzales, Sharon F.; Baker, Stephen R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Patients frequently turn to the Internet when seeking answers to healthcare related inquiries including questions about the effects of radiation when undergoing radiologic studies. We investigate the readability of online patient education materials concerning radiation safety from multiple Internet resources. Methods: Patient education material regarding radiation safety was downloaded from 8 different websites encompassing: (1) the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, (2) the Environmental Protection Agency, (3) the European Society of Radiology, (4) the Food and Drug Administration, (5) the Mayo Clinic, (6) MedlinePlus, (7) the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and (8) the Society of Pediatric Radiology. From these 8 resources, a total of 45 articles were analyzed for their level of readability using 10 different readability scales. Results: The 45 articles had a level of readability ranging from 9.4 to the 17.2 grade level. Only 3/45 (6.7%) were written below the 10th grade level. No statistical difference was seen between the readability level of the 8 different websites. Conclusions: All 45 articles from all 8 websites failed to meet the recommendations set forth by the National Institutes of Health and American Medical Association that patient education resources be written between the 3rd and 7th grade level. Rewriting the patient education resources on radiation safety from each of these 8 websites would help many consumers of healthcare information adequately comprehend such material

  3. Are we failing to communicate? Internet-based patient education materials and radiation safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansberry, David R., E-mail: hansbedr@njms.rutgers.edu; Ramchand, Tekchand, E-mail: ramchate@njms.rutgers.edu; Patel, Shyam, E-mail: patel288@njms.rutgers.edu; Kraus, Carl, E-mail: krauscf@njms.rutgers.edu; Jung, Jin, E-mail: jungjk@njms.rutgers.edu; Agarwal, Nitin, E-mail: nitin.agarwal@rutgers.edu; Gonzales, Sharon F., E-mail: gonzalsh@njms.rutgers.edu; Baker, Stephen R., E-mail: bakersr@njms.rutgers.edu

    2014-09-15

    Introduction: Patients frequently turn to the Internet when seeking answers to healthcare related inquiries including questions about the effects of radiation when undergoing radiologic studies. We investigate the readability of online patient education materials concerning radiation safety from multiple Internet resources. Methods: Patient education material regarding radiation safety was downloaded from 8 different websites encompassing: (1) the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, (2) the Environmental Protection Agency, (3) the European Society of Radiology, (4) the Food and Drug Administration, (5) the Mayo Clinic, (6) MedlinePlus, (7) the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and (8) the Society of Pediatric Radiology. From these 8 resources, a total of 45 articles were analyzed for their level of readability using 10 different readability scales. Results: The 45 articles had a level of readability ranging from 9.4 to the 17.2 grade level. Only 3/45 (6.7%) were written below the 10th grade level. No statistical difference was seen between the readability level of the 8 different websites. Conclusions: All 45 articles from all 8 websites failed to meet the recommendations set forth by the National Institutes of Health and American Medical Association that patient education resources be written between the 3rd and 7th grade level. Rewriting the patient education resources on radiation safety from each of these 8 websites would help many consumers of healthcare information adequately comprehend such material.

  4. Are we failing to communicate? Internet-based patient education materials and radiation safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansberry, David R; Ramchand, Tekchand; Patel, Shyam; Kraus, Carl; Jung, Jin; Agarwal, Nitin; Gonzales, Sharon F; Baker, Stephen R

    2014-09-01

    Patients frequently turn to the Internet when seeking answers to healthcare related inquiries including questions about the effects of radiation when undergoing radiologic studies. We investigate the readability of online patient education materials concerning radiation safety from multiple Internet resources. Patient education material regarding radiation safety was downloaded from 8 different websites encompassing: (1) the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, (2) the Environmental Protection Agency, (3) the European Society of Radiology, (4) the Food and Drug Administration, (5) the Mayo Clinic, (6) MedlinePlus, (7) the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and (8) the Society of Pediatric Radiology. From these 8 resources, a total of 45 articles were analyzed for their level of readability using 10 different readability scales. The 45 articles had a level of readability ranging from 9.4 to the 17.2 grade level. Only 3/45 (6.7%) were written below the 10th grade level. No statistical difference was seen between the readability level of the 8 different websites. All 45 articles from all 8 websites failed to meet the recommendations set forth by the National Institutes of Health and American Medical Association that patient education resources be written between the 3rd and 7th grade level. Rewriting the patient education resources on radiation safety from each of these 8 websites would help many consumers of healthcare information adequately comprehend such material. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  5. Internet based patient pathway as an educational tool for breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryhänen, Anne M; Rankinen, Sirkku; Tulus, Kirsi; Korvenranta, Heikki; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this paper was to describe the process of developing an Internet-based empowering patient education program for breast cancer patients and to evaluate the quality of the program from the perspective of patients. In this program, the patient pathway was used as an educational tool. The Breast Cancer Patient Pathway (BCPP) was developed and tested at one Finnish university hospital in 2005-2007. Thirty-eight newly diagnosed breast cancer patients used the program during their treatment process until the end of all treatments (average 9 months) in 2008-2010. After the treatments the patients evaluated the content, language and structure, instructiveness, external appearance and technical characteristics of the web site as subcategories with the Evaluating Internet Pages of Patient Education instrument, which is a 37-item Likert scale (1-4) questionnaire. Comparison between the subcategories was done with Friedman's test. Dependencies between demographic variables and evaluation values were tested with Pearson correlation coefficients. The mean value of all evaluation criteria was 3.40. However, patients' evaluations between different subcategories varied, being the highest in language and structure (mean 3.48) and lowest in content (mean 3.13). Language and structure, external appearance and technical characteristics were significantly better than content, and language and structure better than instructiveness. Significant correlations were not found between demographic variables and evaluation values. Patients evaluated the quality of the BCPP to be best in language and structure and weakest in content. In terms of future development of the BCPP, the most improvement is needed in content and instructiveness. There is also a need for further development and study of Internet-based patient education. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The internet radiation oncology journal club - a multi-institutional collaborative education project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldsmith, Brian J.; Donaldson, Sarah S.; Mendenhall, William M.; Recht, Abram; Hoppe, Richard T.; Grigsby, Perry W.; Turrisi, Andrew T.; Tepper, Joel E.; Roach, Mack; Larson, David A.; Withers, H. Rodney; Purdy, James A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The high volume of literature publication in radiation oncology poses a substantial selection and reading challenge. Busy health care providers may, from time to time, fail to identify and read important papers, resulting in delays in improvement of practice standards. Residency training programs have historically used journal clubs as a solution to this education challenge. In June 1995, radiation oncologists and scientists from nine institutions began the Internet Radiation Oncology Journal Club (IROJC) - a pilot project created to improve radiation oncology education worldwide by identifying noteworthy literature and stimulating an internet-based forum for literature discussion. Materials and Methods: The IROJC is a free-of-charge, moderated e-mailing list hosted by BIOSCI - a set of electronic communication forums used by biological scientists worldwide. Eleven radiation oncologists and scientists with internationally-recognized subspecialty expertise serve as IROJC editors. Each month, editors select noteworthy contemporary literature for inclusion. Selected references, often accompanied by editorial comments, are transmitted over the internet to IROJC readers. Readers request subscription by sending an e-mail message to biosci-server at net.bio.net, with 'subscribe radoncjc' in the body of the message. A website (www.bio.net/hypermail/RADIATION-ONCOLOGY), which includes an archive of back issues, is also available. Results: By February 1997, the IROJC's email-format enrollment numbered more than 670 readers from over 14 countries, its website was browsed by an average of 25 unique readers per week, and both figures were increasing steadily. An exciting online dialogue of literature- and practice-based comments and questions had emerged with increasing readership participation. Conclusion: Our pilot experience with the IROJC project has been promising. The observed increase in enrollment, website use, and readership discourse suggests

  7. Modification of an Internet-based patient education program for adults with schizophrenia spectrum disorder to suit adolescents with psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, Anna; Anttila, Minna; Välimäki, Maritta

    2016-01-01

    The overall goal of this study was to produce a user-friendly and high quality Internet-based patient education program for adolescents with psychosis. To achieve this, we ascertained the adolescents' and health care professionals' needs and expectations of patient education using Internet and the improvement proposals for an existing MentalNet program originally developed for adults with schizophrenia. The research process was conducted in two phases. First, adolescents' and healthcare professionals' needs for patient education and Internet were ascertained by interviewing adolescents and in two educational sessions with staff members (Phase I). Second, the preliminary evaluation of the Internet-based patient education program MentalNet was gathered from adolescents by an iterative process (see cyclic, recurring, repeating method), in one educational session with staff members and a questionnaire via email from other health care professionals (Phase II). The needs and expectations of adolescents and health care professionals were related to the content, usability, design and realization of Internet-based patient education. Based on the information obtained the MentalNet program was modified to satisfy adolescents' needs. The usefulness and effectiveness of the program will require scrutiny in future studies.

  8. Improvement of diabetic patients nursing care by the development of educational programs

    OpenAIRE

    Bakalis Vissarion; Maria Malliarou; Paraskevi Theofilou; Sofia Zyga

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a major health problem with many social and economic consequences in general population. The importance of education in the diabetic patient and his family, led to the development of diabetes clinical nurse specialist. The role of diabetes clinical nurse specialist is essential and crucial to the hospitals and the community, in order to form a relationship with the diabetic patient and his/her family. In this way health is promoted to the maximum extent possible. In conclusion edu...

  9. [A blood glucose slide chart for improving diabetes patient education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potteau, Marie-Hélène

    2015-03-01

    A blood glucose slide chart has been developed in order to help patients with type 2 diabetes who do not speak French or who have comprehension difficulties. Combined with pictograms to help patients visualise the action they need to take depending on the recorded glucose level, it constitutes a therapeutic education tool which can be useful on a day-to-day basis both for patients as well as caregivers.

  10. Hands on CERN an education project on the Internet using real high energy particle collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Johansson, E K

    1999-01-01

    An educational project primarily aimed at teachers and 15 to 18 year- old students describing the essential features of a modern high energy physics experiment has been created. The whole education package is available on the Internet. It gives a detailed description of the physics processes involved and the Standard Model of Microcosm. Real particle collisions produced with the facilities at the European particle physics laboratory (CERN) are displayed using the platform-independent programming language Java, enabling interaction with the user. The project has been used by several groups of teachers and students, and has increased their knowledge of, and interest in, particle physics. This project complements the traditional physics education and introduces students to contemporary fundamental physics. (7 refs).

  11. Evaluation of the impact of a diabetes education eLearning program for school personnel on diabetes knowledge, knowledge retention and confidence in caring for students with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Nehad A; Rahme, Zahra; Mesbah, Naglaa; Mahmoud, Fatma; AlKandari, Sarah; Othman, Nashwa; Sharaikha, Hanan; Lari, Bashayer S; AlBeloushi, Shaima; Saad, Eglal; Arefanian, Hossein; Sukkar, Faten F

    2018-05-01

    To study the impact of a novel comprehensive eLearning approach in delivering diabetes related education program that includes knowledge and sets of practices to the school personnel in Kuwait to enable them to provide a supportive environment for students with diabetes. The program was designed with three components namely; knowledge, skills and recommendations. The diabetes knowledge was delivered through an interactive eLearning program, the effectiveness of which was assessed using diabetes knowledge questionnaires which were deployed pre- and post-course delivery. Additionally, the participants' knowledge retention and confidence in caring for a student with diabetes were evaluated at 6 or 12 months post-intervention. A total of 124 public schools' personnel participated in the program. Post e-Learning delivery, diabetes knowledge increased significantly from baseline (p eLearning diabetes education for school personnel increases their knowledge which can be retained for up to 12 months and imparts confidence in caring for students with diabetes. This novel approach of delivering diabetes education will help school personnel in managing students with diabetes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Internet-Based Asthma Education -- A Novel Approach to Compliance: A case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy O'hara

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Asthma costs Canadians over $1.2 billion per annum and, despite advances, many asthmatic patients still have poor control. An action plan, symptom diary and measurement of peak expiratory flow have been shown to improve clinical outcomes. Effective educational interventions are an important component of good care. However, many rural sites lack not only access to education but physician care as well. It is reasonable, therefore, that an Internet-based asthma management program may be used as an approach. In the present case report, a novel approach that may increase access in these poorly serviced areas is presented. In an Internet-based asthma management program, patients are reviewed by a physician, receive education and are given a unique password that provides program access. Patients record symptoms and peak expiratory flow rates. The present case report shows that a patient can be assisted through an exacerbation, thus averting emergency intervention and stabilizing control, even when travelling on another continent.

  13. Readability assessment of Internet-based patient education materials related to endoscopic sinus surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherla, Deepa V; Sanghvi, Saurin; Choudhry, Osamah J; Liu, James K; Eloy, Jean Anderson

    2012-08-01

    Numerous professional societies, clinical practices, and hospitals provide Internet-based patient education materials (PEMs) to the general public, but not all of this information is written at a reading level appropriate for the average patient. The National Institutes of Health and the US Department of Health and Human Services recommend that PEMs be written at or below the sixth-grade level. Our purpose was to assess the readability of endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS)-related PEMs available on the Internet and compare readability levels of PEMs provided by three sources: professional societies, clinical practices, and hospitals. A descriptive and correlational design was used for this study. The readability of 31 ESS-related PEMs was assessed with four different readability indices: Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level (FKGL), Flesch Reading Ease Score (FRES), Simple Measure of Gobbledygook (SMOG), and Gunning Frequency of Gobbledygook (Gunning FOG). Averages were evaluated against national recommendations and between each source using analysis of variance and t tests. The majority of PEMs (96.8%) were written above the recommended sixth-grade reading level, based on FKGL (P Internet-based PEMs related to ESS, regardless of source type, were written well above the recommended sixth-grade level. Materials from the hospitals/university-affiliated websites had lower readability scores, but were still above recommended levels. Web-based PEMs pertaining to ESS should be written with the average patient in mind. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  14. The 6-month effectiveness of Internet-based guided self-help for depression in adults with Type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, D D; Nobis, S; Lehr, D; Baumeister, H; Riper, H; Auerbach, R P; Snoek, F; Cuijpers, P; Berking, M

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this research is to examine the 6-month effects of an Internet-based guided self-help intervention for comorbid depressive symptoms in people with diabetes. Participants (n = 260) with Type 1 or 2 diabetes and elevated depressive symptoms [Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) ≥ 23] were randomly assigned to a guided Internet-based self-help intervention or a control condition (treatment as usual + online psychoeducation about depression). The primary outcome was a change in depressive symptom severity (CES-D) from baseline to 6-month follow-up. The secondary outcomes included numbers of people achieving treatment response (reliable change of depressive symptoms) and remission (CES-D ≤ 16), as well as the effects on glycaemic control, diabetes-related emotional distress and diabetes acceptance. Repeated measures analysis of variance examined between-group differences using intent-to-treat principles. Both conditions showed improvements in depression severity: intervention condition, d = 1.48 [95% confidence interval (95% CI): 1.21 to 1.76]; control condition d = 0.55 (95% CI: 0.30 to 0.80). Changes were significantly greater in the intervention condition with a large between-group effect size (d = 0.83, 95% CI: 0.57 to 1.08). Accordingly, effects on response [relative risk (RR) = 2.60 (95% CI: 2.01 to 3.36), P 1] and remission [RR = 3.36 (95% CI: 2.98 to 5.44), P 1] were in favour of the intervention group, as were differences in change in diabetes emotional distress (d = 0.50, 95% CI: 0.04 to 0.54), and physical and mental functioning [Short Form Health Survey (SF-12) Physical d = 0.27 (95% CI: 0.01 to 0.51) and SF-12 Mental d = 0.68 (95% CI: 0.11 to 0.40)]. The intervention group was not superior with regard to glycaemic control, diabetes self-management and diabetes acceptance. The trial indicates that Internet-based guided self-help treatments for depression in people with diabetes can have sustained effects on depressive

  15. Identifying User Preferences for a Digital Educational Solution for Young Seniors With Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Molen, Pieta; Maas, Anne H; Chen, Wei; van Pul, Carola; Cottaar, Eduardus J E; van Riel, Natal A W; Hilbers, Peter A J; Haak, Harm R

    2017-08-01

    The Eindhoven Diabetes Education Simulator project was initiated to develop an educational solution that helps diabetes patients understand and learn more about their diabetes. This article describes the identification of user preferences for the development of such solutions. Young seniors (aged 50-65 years) with type 2 diabetes were chosen as the target group because they are likely to have more affinity with digital devices than older people and because 88% of the Dutch diabetes population is >50 years of age. Data about the target group were gathered through literature research and interviews. The literature research covered data about their device use and education preferences. To gain insight into the daily life of diabetes patients and current diabetes education processes, 20 diabetes patients and 10 medical experts were interviewed. The interviews were analyzed using affinity diagrams. Those diagrams, together with the literature data, formed the basis for two personas and corresponding customer journey maps. Literature showed that diabetes prevalence is inversely correlated to educational level. Computer and device use is relatively low within the target group, but is growing. The interviews showed that young seniors like to play board, card, and computer games, with others or alone. Family and loved ones play an important role in their lives. Medical experts are crucial in the diabetes education of young senior diabetes patients. These findings are translated into a list of design aspects that can be used for creating educational solutions.

  16. Rethinking internet skills: the contribution of gender, age, education, internet experience, and hours online to medium- and content-related internet skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Deursen, Alexander Johannes Aloysius Maria; van Dijk, Johannes A.G.M.; Peters, O.

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on one of the factors that appears to be important in several conceptualizations of how to approach the digital divide: the differential possession of so-called Internet skills. Three large-scale performance tests are conducted to reveal the contributions of gender, age,

  17. Barrier Factors to the Completion of Diabetes Education in Korean Diabetic Adult Patients: Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys 2007-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee-Tae; Lee, Kiheon; Jung, Se Young; Oh, Seung-Min; Jeong, Su-Min; Choi, Yoon-Jung

    2015-09-01

    Diabetes is a disease with high social burdens and is expected to increase gradually. A long-term management is essential for the treatment of diabetes, requiring patient self-cares. Diabetes education is important for such self-cares, but it does not sufficiently take place. In addition, little studies have been conducted on the barriers to the completion of diabetes education. This study, thus, aimed to analyze the factors related to the completion of diabetes education and investigate its barriers. Of 50,405 respondents to the fourth and fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, a total of 3,820 were selected for the analysis, excluding those aged 29 or younger and those with missing values. The completion of diabetes education was set as a dependent variable and an analysis was made on the factors that affect the dependent variable. A multivariable logistic regression was employed for the analysis. Lower educational level was associated with less diabetes education, and the degree of diabetes education was lower in the group with male, the group that didn't have a family history or was not aware of a family history, the group that was not currently aware of diabetes and the group without a spouse. There was no difference in the completion of diabetes education by underlying diseases, family income level, age, residing area, economic activity status, insurance coverage, smoking, and drinking. Diabetes education is of importance for the treatment and management of diabetes. Currently, however, diabetes education is not sufficiently carried out in Korea. The completion rate of diabetes education was low in male, patients without or not knowing a family history, patients who were not currently aware of their diabetes, patients without a spouse, and patients with low educational level. Therefore, encouraging these patients to take the education will be a more effective approach to increase the completion rate of diabetes education.

  18. Therapeutic Lifestyle Changes for Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levesque, Celia

    2017-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a common chronic disease affecting approximately 9% of the United States population. Successful management of diabetes demands constant self-management on the part of the patient. The patient has to balance diabetes medications, blood glucose monitoring, food intake, physical activity, and management of diabetes-related acute and chronic complications. The patient is often bombarded with misinformation from friends, relatives, and such sources as the Internet and social media. This article discusses the current recommendations for diabetes self-management education and skills including medical nutrition therapy, physical activity, smoking cessation, and assessment for diabetes distress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A Comparison Of Internet-Based Learning And Traditional Classroom Lecture To Learn Cpr For Continuing Medical Education

    OpenAIRE

    HEMMATI, Nima; OMRANI, Soghra; HEMMATI, Naser

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the satisfaction and effectiveness of Internet-based learning (IBL) and traditional classroom lecture (TCL) for continuing medical education (CME) programs by comparing final resuscitation exam results of physicians who received the newest cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) curriculum guidelines training either by traditional or by an Internet-based CME. A randomized two-group pretest-posttest quasi-experimental design was used. Postgraduate general ...

  20. How Primary and Secondary School Systems Are Dealing with the Internet Paradox: Educational Value vs. Liability Preservation. Chalk Talk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Law and Education, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Educators today see the vast network of online information resources known as the Internet as the key to a lifetime of educational learning and development. Discusses pornography, obscenity, defamation, and intellectual property issues, especially the uploading and downloading of information. Concludes with the Shelby County (Kentucky) Schools…

  1. Web-Searching to Learn: The Role of Internet Self-Efficacy in Pre-School Educators' Conceptions and Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Chia-Pin; Chien, Hui-Min

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to explore the relationships between pre-school educators' conceptions of and approaches to learning by web-searching through Internet Self-efficacy. Based on data from 242 pre-school educators who had prior experience of participating in web-searching in Taiwan for path analyses, it was found in this study that…

  2. Diabetes Self-Management Education: Miles to Go

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Altman Klein

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This meta-analysis assessed how successfully Diabetes Self-Management Education (DSME interventions help people with type 2 diabetes achieve and maintain healthy blood glucose levels. We included 52 DSME programs with 9,631 participants that reported post-intervention A1c levels in randomized controlled trials. The training conditions resulted in significant reductions in A1c levels compared to control conditions. However, the impact of intervention was modest shifting of only 7.23% more participants from diabetic to pre-diabetic or normal status, relative to the control condition. Most intervention participants did not achieve healthy A1c levels. Further, few DSME studies assessed long-term maintenance of A1c gains. Past trends suggest that gains are difficult to sustain over time. Our results suggested that interventions delivered by nurses were more successful than those delivered by non-nursing personnel. We suggest that DSME programs might do better by going beyond procedural interventions. Most DSME programs relied heavily on rules and procedures to guide decisions about diet, exercise, and weight loss. Future DSME may need to include cognitive self-monitoring, diagnosis, and planning skills to help patients detect anomalies, identify possible causes, generate corrective action, and avoid future barriers to maintaining healthy A1c levels. Finally, comprehensive descriptions of DSME programs would advance future efforts.

  3. Best nursing practices in diabetes education for the hospitalized child: an integrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luíza de Oliveira Messias Ortiz

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of Diabetes Mellitus type 1 (DM1 has increased in the last years, with a consequent growth of child hospitalizations due to diabetic prime decompensation, with growing need of an educational process. Thus, our objective was to identify in the literature the best nursing practices in diabetes education for hospitalized children with DM1 and their families. We conducted an integrative review with the descriptors: Diabetic Ketoacidosis, Diabetes Education, Nursing and Child, Hospitalized, and the free search in reference journals and similar articles. We selected four studies, and we identified three categories: Family Involvement and Empowerment in the Diabetes Educational Process; Performance of the Multi-professional Team; Definition and Content of the Educational Process. We concluded that the educational process should include the family, it should be conducted by a multi-professional team and based on scientific evidence. We identified few studies, showing the need for more studies in the field.

  4. Internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy for depression in people with diabetes: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robins, Lisa; Newby, Jill; Wilhelm, Kay; Smith, Jessica; Fletcher, Therese; Ma, Trevor; Finch, Adam; Campbell, Lesley; Andrews, Gavin

    2015-01-01

    Depression substantially contributes to the personal burden and healthcare costs of living with diabetes mellitus (DM). Comorbid depression and DM are associated with poorer quality of life, poorer self-management and glycemic control, increased risk for DM complications and higher mortality rates, and higher health service utilization. Depression remains under-recognized and undertreated in people with DM, which may, in part, result from barriers associated with accessing face-to-face treatment. This study will examine the efficacy of an internet-based cognitive behaviour therapy programme for major depressive disorder (iCBT-MDD) in people with DM. A CONSORT 2010 compliant, registered randomised controlled trial of the intervention (iCBT-MDD) versus a treatment as usual control group will be conducted. The study will include 100 adults aged 18 years and over with a diagnosis of type 1 or type 2 DM and self-reported symptoms that satisfy MDD which will enable us to detect a statistically significant difference with a group effect size of 0.6 at a power of 80% and significance level of p=0.05. Participants will be randomised to receive the iCBT-MDD programme immediately, or to wait 10 weeks before accessing the programme. Primary outcomes will be self-reported depression severity, DM-related distress, and glycemic control (glycosylated hemoglobin). Secondary outcomes will be general distress and disability, generalized anxiety, lifestyle behaviours, somatization, eating habits, alcohol use, and acceptability of the iCBT programme to participants, and practicality for clinicians. Data will be analyzed with linear mixed models for each outcome measure. The Human Research Ethics Committee of St Vincent's Hospital Australia have given ethics approval (HREC/13/SVH/291). Results will be disseminated via peer-reviewed publication and social media channels of Australian Diabetes Consumer Representative Bodies. The trial is registered with the Australian and New Zealand

  5. Internet-based virtual classroom and educational management software enhance students' didactic and clinical experiences in perfusion education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Jeffrey B; Austin, Jon W; Holt, David W; Searles, Bruce E; Darling, Edward M

    2004-09-01

    A challenge faced by many university-based perfusion education (PE) programs is the need for student clinical rotations at hospital locations that are geographically disparate from the main educational campus. The problem has been addressed through the employment of distance-learning environments. The purpose of this educational study is to evaluate the effectiveness of this teaching model as it is applied to PE. Web-based virtual classroom (VC) environments and educational management system (EMS) software were implemented independently and as adjuncts to live, interactive Internet-based audio/video transmission from classroom to classroom in multiple university-based PE programs. These Internet environments have been used in a variety of ways including: 1) forum for communication between the university faculty, students, and preceptors at clinical sites, 2) didactic lectures from expert clinicians to students assigned to distant clinical sites, 3) small group problem-based-learning modules designed to enhance students analytical skills, and 4) conversion of traditional face-to-face lectures to asynchronous learning modules. Hypotheses and measures of student and faculty satisfaction, clinical experience, and learning outcomes are proposed, and some early student feedback was collected. For curricula that emphasize both didactic and clinical education, the use of Internet-based VC and EMS software provides significant advancements over traditional models. Recognized advantages include: 1) improved communications between the college faculty and the students and clinical preceptors, 2) enhanced access to a national network of clinical experts in specialized techniques, 3) expanded opportunity for student distant clinical rotations with continued didactic course work, and 4) improved continuity and consistency of clinical experiences between students through implementation of asynchronous learning modules. Students recognize the learning efficiency of on

  6. Clinical outcomes of a diabetes education program for patients with diabetes mellitus in the Micronesian community in Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Mok Thoong

    2016-01-01

    Hawaii has diverse population made up of a cultural mix of different races. Due to different cultural and social influences and language barrier, many of the under-served population who migrated to Hawaii and having diabetes mellitus may be susceptible to long-term complications due to uncontrolled hyperglycemia and medication nonadherence. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of a diabetes education program on the clinical outcomes in patients with diabetes mellitus in the Micronesian community of Hawaii. This study included patients over age 18 years, with a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The diabetes education program was customized for its weekly classes to fit to the under-served population. Data were collected on participants on the 1(st) day and then 6 months after attending the education program. Data on primary and secondary endpoints were collected and analyzed. The mean glycosylated hemoglobin A1c, fasting blood glucose, and triglyceride levels of participants fell significantly from baseline after attending the diabetes education program for 6 months. No significant changes were observed in other secondary outcomes during the study time period. Based on our findings, the diabetes education program that was tailored to the Micronesian population was successful in achieving glycemic goals, enhancing medication adherence, improving clinical outcomes, and also preventing long-term complications among its participants.

  7. Impact of diabetes education on type 1 diabetes mellitus control in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso Martín, Daniel E; Roldán Martín, M Belén; Álvarez Gómez, M Ángeles; Yelmo Valverde, Rosa; Martín-Frías, María; Alonso Blanco, Milagros; Barrio Castellanos, Raquel

    2016-12-01

    Diabetes education is an essential tool to achieve treatment objectives in type1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). The aim of this study was to determine if understanding of diabetes by caregivers/patients or sociodemographic factors affect blood glucose control in children and adolescents with T1DM. The level of knowledge of 105 caregivers of children and adolescents with T1DM was assessed using a survey adapted to the type of treatment used (multiple dose insulin [MDI] or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion [CSII]). Mean HbA1c levels in the previous year was considered as metabolic control marker. Mean HbA1c levels were similar in both treatment groups, with slightly higher values in children over 12years of age. Patients on CSII had a longer time since disease onset and had poorer results, maybe because the items were more difficult due to the higher level of knowledge required for this treatment modality (P=.005). Caregivers with lower educational levels achieved poorer scores in the survey, but mean HbA1c levels of their children were lower, probably because of their greater involvement in disease care. The level of knowledge of caregivers and/or patients with T1DM was high, and this was associated to good metabolic control. Studies to assess the impact of caregiver knowledge on metabolic control of children are needed. Copyright © 2016 SEEN. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Diabetes education of patients and their entourage: out-of-hospital national study (EDUCATED 2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapostolle, Frédéric; Hamdi, Nadia; Barghout, Majed; Soulat, Louis; Faucher, Anna; Lambert, Yves; Peschanski, Nicolas; Ricard-Hibon, Agnès; Chassery, Carine; Roti, Maryline; Bounes, Vincent; Debaty, Guillaume; Mokni, Tarak; Egmann, Gérald; Fort, Pierre-Arnaud; Boudenia, Karim; Alayrac, Laurent; Safraou, Mohamed; Galinski, Michel; Adnet, Frédéric

    2017-04-01

    To determine the contributing factors in the successful diabetes education of patients and their entourage. Prospective observational study conducted in a pre-hospital setting by 17 emergency services across France (September 2009-January 2011) included all insulin-treated patients (≥18 years) provided that at least one family member was present on scene. Data were collected from patients and their entourage: (1) personal details including language proficiency and educational attainment, (2) treatments, (3) diabetes-related data (log sheets, glucose meter, glucagon, glycated hemoglobin, prior hypoglycemic episodes); (4) care by diabetologist, general practitioner and/or visiting nurse. The main end points were ability to measure capillary blood sugar (patient) and awareness of hypoglycemia symptoms and ability to administer glucagon (entourage). Overall, 561 patients and 736 family members were included; 343 patients (61%) were experiencing a hypoglycemic episode (patients and 343 (50%) family members could measure capillary blood sugar. They could name a median of 2 [0-3‰] hypoglycemia symptoms although 217 (39%) patients and 262 (39%) family members could name no symptom. Few patients (33%) had glucagon available. In multivariate analyses, the main factor associated with better patient education was care by a diabetologist. Lack of an educational qualification and visits by a nurse were associated with poor patient education, and French mother tongue and care by a diabetologist with better education of the entourage. In France, diabetic patients and their entourage are inadequately educated. Their education benefits most from care by a diabetologist.

  9. Centralized Outpatient Education Center for Patients with Diabetes at Walter Reed Army Medical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-05-16

    rated into the study where appropriate. Interviews with education coordinators from nonmilitary diabetes treatment facilities were evaluated and...personnel were evaluated to determine the acceptance of the concept of an outpatient education center for diabetic patients. 12 The data from the...step was to evaluate the data from 100 outpatients to ascertain the degree of acceptance of an outpatient education center for diabetic patients. The

  10. Use of a Supplementary Internet Based Education Program Improves Sleep Literacy in College Psychology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Stuart F.; Anderson, Janis L.; Hodge, Gordon K.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Knowledge regarding the importance of sleep in health and performance and good sleep hygiene practices is low, especially among adolescents and young adults. It is important to improve sleep literacy. Introductory psychology is one of the most highly enrolled courses at colleges and universities. This study tested the impact of an Internet-based learning module on improving sleep literacy in this venue. Methods: An Internet-based supplementary learning module containing sleep physiology and hygiene information was developed using content from the Harvard Medical School sleep educational website http://www.understandingsleep.org. Access to the module was provided as an extra credit activity for 2 of 4 sections (Supplemental Sleep, SS, N = 889) of an introductory college psychology course during their standard instruction on sleep and dreaming. The remaining 2 sections (Standard Instruction, SI, N = 878) only were encouraged to visit the website without further direction. Level of knowledge was assessed before and after availability to the module/website and at the end of the semester. Students were asked to complete a survey at the end of the semester inquiring whether they made any changes in their sleep behaviors. Results: Two hundred fifty students participated in the extra credit activity and had data available at all testing points. Students in the SS Group had a significant improvement in sleep knowledge test scores after interacting with the website in comparison to the SI group (19.41 ± 3.15 vs. 17.94 ± 3.08, p sleep habits after participation in the extra credit sleep activity (p sleep learning module has the potential to enhance sleep literacy and change behavior among students enrolled in an introductory college psychology course. Citation: Quan SF; Anderson JL; Hodge GK. Use of a supplementary internet based education program improves sleep literacy in college psychology students. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(2):155-160. PMID:23372469

  11. Supporting Participation in Physical Education at School in Youth with Type 1 Diabetes: Perceptions of Teachers, Youth with Type 1 Diabetes, Parents and Diabetes Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacMillan, Freya; Kirk, Alison; Mutrie, Nanette; Moola, Fiona; Robertson, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    It is not clear how best to support youth with type 1 diabetes to participate in physical education (PE) at school. The aim of this study was to explore perceptions of facilitators and barriers to PE in youth with type 1 diabetes and to determine how schools can help these individuals to be physically active. Interviews and focus groups were…

  12. Responsible Internet Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truett, Carol; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Provides advice for making school Internet-use guidelines. Outlines responsible proactive use of the Internet for educators and librarians, discusses strengths and weaknesses of Internet blocking software and rating systems, and describes acceptable-use policies (AUP). Lists resources for creating your own AUP, Internet filtering software, and…

  13. A Low-Cost Remote Lab for Internet Services Distance Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Sissom

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Academic departments seeking to reach students via distance education course offerings find that some on-line curricula require a traditional hands-on lab model for student evaluation and assessment. The authors solve the problem of providing distance education curriculum and supporting instruction lab components by using a low-cost remote lab. The remote lab is used to evaluate student performance in managing web services and website development, solving security problems, patch management, scripting and web server management. In addition, the authors discuss assessment and evaluation techniques that will be used to determine instructional quality and student performance. Discussed are the remote lab architecture, use of disk images and utilization of Windows 2003 Internet Information Service, and Linux Red Hat 9.0 platforms.

  14. Effective intervention or child's play? A review of video games for diabetes education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeShazo, Jonathan; Harris, Lynne; Pratt, Wanda

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study is (1) to identify diabetes education video games and pilot studies in the literature, (2) to review themes in diabetes video game design and evaluation, and (3) to evaluate the potential role of educational video games in diabetes self-management education. Studies were systematically identified for inclusion from Medline, Web of Science, CINAHL, EMBASE, Psychinfo, IEEE Xplore, and ACM Digital Library. Features of each video game intervention were reviewed and coded based on an existing taxonomy of diabetes interventions framework. Nine studies featuring 11 video games for diabetes care were identified. Video games for diabetes have typically targeted children with type 1 diabetes mellitus and used situation problem-solving methods to teach diet, exercise, self-monitored blood glucose, and medication adherence. Evaluations have shown positive outcomes in knowledge, disease management adherence, and clinical outcomes. Video games for diabetes education show potential as effective educational interventions. Yet we found that improvements are needed in expanding the target audience, tailoring the intervention, and using theoretical frameworks. In the future, the reach and effectiveness of educational video games for diabetes education could be improved by expanding the target audience beyond juvenile type 1 diabetes mellitus, the use of tailoring, and increased use of theoretical frameworks.

  15. Can Internet information on vertebroplasty be a reliable means of patient self-education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, T Barrett; Anderson, Joshua T; Ahn, Uri M; Ahn, Nicholas U

    2014-05-01

    regarding vertebroplasty is not only inadequate for proper patient education, but also potentially misleading as sites are more likely to present benefits of the procedure than risks. Although academic sites might be expected to offer higher-quality information than private, industry, or other sites, our data would suggest that they do not. HONCode certification cannot be used reliably as a means of qualifying website information quality. Academic sites should be expected to set a high standard and alter their Internet presence with adequate information distribution. Certification bodies also should alter their standards to necessitate provision of complete information in addition to emphasizing accurate information. Treating physicians may want to counsel their patients regarding the limitations of information present on the Internet and the pitfalls of current certification systems. Level IV, economic and decision analyses. See the Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  16. Comparison of neurological healthcare oriented educational resources for patients on the internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punia, Vineet; Dagar, Anjali; Agarwal, Nitin; He, Wenzhuan; Hillen, Machteld

    2014-12-01

    The internet has become a major contributor to health literacy promotion. The average American reads at 7th-8th grade level and it is recommended to write patient education materials at or below 6th grade reading level. We tried to assess the level of literacy required to read and understand online patient education materials (OPEM) for neurological diseases from various internet resources. We then compared those to an assumed reference OPEM source, namely the patient education brochures from the American Academy of Neurology (AAN), the world's largest professional association of neurologists. Disease specific patient education brochures were downloaded from the AAN website. OPEM for these diseases were also accessed from other common online sources determined using a predefined criterion. All OPEM were converted to Microsoft Word (Microsoft Corp., Redmond, WA, USA) and their reading level was analyzed using Readability Studio Professional Edition version 2012.1 (Oleander Software, Vandalia, OH, USA). Descriptive analysis and analysis of variance were used to compare reading levels of OPEM from different resources. Medline Plus, Mayo clinic and Wikipedia qualified for OPEM analysis. All OPEM from these resources, including the AAN, were written above the recommended 6th grade reading level. They were also found to be "fairly difficult", "difficult" or "confusing" on the Flesch Reading Ease scale. AAN OPEM on average needed lower reading level, with Wikipedia OPEM being significantly (pread compared to the other three resources. OPEM on neurological diseases are being written at a level of reading complexity higher than the average American and the recommended reading levels. This may be undermining the utility of these resources. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Social media for diabetes health education - inclusive or exclusive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, B Rani

    2014-01-01

    Technological innovations are rising rapidly and are inevitably becoming part of the health care environment. Patients frequently access Social media as a forum for discussion of personal health issues; and healthcare providers are now considering ways of harnessing social media as a source of learning and teaching. This review highlights some of the complex issues of using social media as an opportunity for interaction between public- patient-healthcare staff; considers the impact of self- education and self-management for patients with diabetes, and explores some recent advances in delivering education for staff. When using any information technology, the emphasis should rely on being assessed rigorously to show it promotes health education safely, can be recognized as delivering up-to- date health information effectively, and should ensure there is no bias in selective communication, or disadvantage to isolated patient groups.

  18. Potentials of Web 2.0 for Diabetes Education of Adolescent Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabestari, Omid; Roudsari, Abdul

    Diabetes is a very common chronic disease which produces compli-cations in almost all body organs and consumes a huge amount of the health budget. Although education has proved to be useful in diabetes management, there is a great need to improve the availability of these courses for the increasing number of diabetic patients. E-learning can facilitate this service, but the current education system should be tailored towards e-learning standards. Amongst diabetic patients, adolescents as computer natives are suggested as the best target to e-learning diabetes education. With regards to its features, Web 2.0 can be a very good technology to build a framework for diabetes education and consequent evaluation of this education.

  19. Effectiveness of an internet-based education on maternal satisfaction in NICUs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadivar, Maliheh; Seyedfatemi, Naiemeh; Mokhlesabadi Farahani, Tahereh; Mehran, Abbas; Pridham, Karen F

    2017-05-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of internet-based education on the satisfaction of the mothers of the preterm neonates in the NICUs. This quasi-experimental study was conducted on 80 mothers of preterm neonates hospitalized in the NICUs of two hospitals in Iran during 9 months. The mothers were assigned in two groups as cases and controls. The satisfaction level of the mothers was evaluated by using WBPL-Revised 1 in both groups on the first and tenth day of the study. Mothers in the case group received the educational program available at www.iranlms.ir/myinfant for 10days. After 10days, the satisfaction level of the mothers in both groups was measured by questionnaire again. the satisfaction of the mothers increased in both groups after this intervention. However, comparison of the mean scores revealed that the satisfaction of the mothers in the case group increased significantly following the intervention (Pinternet-based education, its utilization in mothers education programs in NICUs is recommended. The results of this study show nurses in the NICU is a way to improve communication and education to parents of infants hospitalized in NICU. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Diabetes structured self-management education programmes: a narrative review and current innovations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chatterjee, Sudesna; Davies, Melanie J.; Heller, Simon; Speight, Jane; Snoek, Frank J.; Khunti, Kamlesh

    2018-01-01

    Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are associated with long-term complications that can be prevented or delayed by intensive glycaemic management. People who are empowered and skilled to self-manage their diabetes have improved health outcomes. Over the past 20 years, diabetes self-management education

  1. Diabetes self-management education: acceptability of using trained lay educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandalia, P K; Stone, M A; Davies, M J; Khunti, K; Carey, M E

    2014-11-01

    The use of lay people to deliver education programmes for people with chronic conditions is a potential method of addressing healthcare staff capacity and increasing the cost efficiency of delivering education. This qualitative substudy is embedded within an equivalence trial (2008-2011 including development stage). In the qualitative substudy, we aimed to elicit the views of key stakeholders (patients, educators) about using lay people to deliver education to people recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, alongside a healthcare professional educator with an equal role. In this way, we sought to explore perceptions about acceptability and also contribute to understanding the reasons underlying positive or negative quantitative findings from main trial. We conducted 27 telephone interviews with a purposive sample of patients, lay educators and healthcare professional educators involved in the main trial. Thematic analysis of transcribed data was underpinned by the constant comparative approach and structured using Framework methodology. Overall, the data suggested that the use of lay educators was acceptable to educators and patients. Perceived difference in knowledge levels between lay and healthcare professional educators did not appear to have an impact on perceived acceptability or the effectiveness of the education received. Additional themes explored were related to peer status of educators and feasibility. Some concerns were raised about lay educators with diabetes, transferring personal issues and about the impact of healthcare professional time taken up by mentoring and supporting lay educators. Positive perceptions about the use of lay educators support the positive quantitative findings from the main trial. Acceptability is an important consideration in relation to implementation of the model of delivery studied. Concerns raised within the interviews should be considered in the design of training for lay educators. ISRCTN 99350009. Published by the BMJ

  2. The impact of diabetes self-management education on glucose management and empowerment in ethnic Armenians with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naccashian, Zarmine

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of diabetes self-management education on glycemic control and perceptions of empowerment in Armenian American immigrants diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. A quasi-experimental pre and post design was used to investigate the impact of using education on self-management as measured by A1C levels and empowerment scores. Nine hours of diabetes self-management education classes were offered in the Armenian language to 75 clients at 2 adult health day care centers over 6 weeks. The participants were mostly first-generation Armenian immigrants aged 65 years and older. A1C results, the 8-item Diabetes Empowerment Scale (DES), and the 15-item Armenian Ethnic Orientation Questionnaire-Revised (AEOQ-R) were used to determine the impact of education on self-care management. After institutional review board approval was obtained, 75 participants completed the study. A paired t test indicated that the postintervention mean A1C level was significantly lower than the preintervention mean A1C level. The postintervention mean DES score was significantly greater than the preintervention mean DES score. No mediating effects of age, gender, acculturation, and number of years with the disease were identified for either A1C or DES score. The findings demonstrate the efficacy of the diabetes self-management education classes in improving diabetes self-care management skills. © 2014 The Author(s).

  3. Readability of internet-sourced patient education material related to “labour analgesia”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boztas, Nilay; Omur, Dilek; Ozbılgın, Sule; Altuntas, Gözde; Piskin, Ersan; Ozkardesler, Sevda; Hanci, Volkan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract We evaluated the readability of Internet-sourced patient education materials (PEMs) related to “labour analgesia.” In addition to assessing the readability of websites, we aimed to compare commercial, personal, and academic websites. We used the most popular search engine (http://www.google.com) in our study. The first 100 websites in English that resulted from a search for the key words “labour analgesia” were scanned. Websites that were not in English, graphs, pictures, videos, tables, figures and list formats in the text, all punctuation, the number of words in the text is less than 100 words, feedback forms not related to education, (Uniform Resource Locator) URL websites, author information, references, legal disclaimers, and addresses and telephone numbers were excluded. The texts included in the study were assessed using the Flesch Reading Ease Score (FRES), Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level (FKGL), Simple Measure of Gobbledygook (SMOG), and Gunning Frequency of Gobbledygook (FOG) readability formulae. The number of Latin words within the text was determined. Analysis of 300-word sections of the texts revealed that the mean FRES was 47.54 ± 12.54 (quite difficult), mean FKGL and SMOG were 11.92 ± 2.59 and 10.57 ± 1.88 years of education, respectively, and mean Gunning FOG was 14.71 ± 2.76 (very difficult). Within 300-word sections, the mean number of Latin words was identified as 16.56 ± 6.37. In our study, the readability level of Internet-sourced PEM related to “labour analgesia” was identified to be quite high indicating poor readability. PMID:29137057

  4. Readability of internet-sourced patient education material related to "labour analgesia".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boztas, Nilay; Omur, Dilek; Ozbılgın, Sule; Altuntas, Gözde; Piskin, Ersan; Ozkardesler, Sevda; Hanci, Volkan

    2017-11-01

    We evaluated the readability of Internet-sourced patient education materials (PEMs) related to "labour analgesia." In addition to assessing the readability of websites, we aimed to compare commercial, personal, and academic websites.We used the most popular search engine (http://www.google.com) in our study. The first 100 websites in English that resulted from a search for the key words "labour analgesia" were scanned. Websites that were not in English, graphs, pictures, videos, tables, figures and list formats in the text, all punctuation, the number of words in the text is less than 100 words, feedback forms not related to education, (Uniform Resource Locator) URL websites, author information, references, legal disclaimers, and addresses and telephone numbers were excluded.The texts included in the study were assessed using the Flesch Reading Ease Score (FRES), Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level (FKGL), Simple Measure of Gobbledygook (SMOG), and Gunning Frequency of Gobbledygook (FOG) readability formulae. The number of Latin words within the text was determined.Analysis of 300-word sections of the texts revealed that the mean FRES was 47.54 ± 12.54 (quite difficult), mean FKGL and SMOG were 11.92 ± 2.59 and 10.57 ± 1.88 years of education, respectively, and mean Gunning FOG was 14.71 ± 2.76 (very difficult). Within 300-word sections, the mean number of Latin words was identified as 16.56 ± 6.37.In our study, the readability level of Internet-sourced PEM related to "labour analgesia" was identified to be quite high indicating poor readability.

  5. Education, Health, and Earnings – Type 1 Diabetes in Children and Young Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Lovén, Ida

    2015-01-01

    This thesis consists of four independent exploratory research papers contributing to the economic literature on child and adolescent health, and adult educational and labor market outcomes. Each paper considers type 1 diabetes and focuses on onset over a specific age span. An overall conclusion of this thesis is that individuals with type 1 diabetes deviate from peers without diabetes, irrespective of which outcome or the timing of onset studied. Type 1 diabetes has statistically and quantita...

  6. A novel internet-based geriatric education program for emergency medical services providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Manish N; Swanson, Peter A; Nobay, Flavia; Peterson, Lars-Kristofer N; Caprio, Thomas V; Karuza, Jurgis

    2012-09-01

    Despite caring for large numbers of older adults, prehospital emergency medical services (EMS) providers receive minimal geriatrics-specific training while obtaining their certification. Studies have shown that they desire further training to improve their comfort level and knowledge in caring for older adults, but continuing education programs to address these needs must account for each EMS provider's specific needs, consider each provider's learning styles, and provide an engaging, interactive experience. A novel, Internet-based, video podcast-based geriatric continuing education program was developed and implemented for EMS providers, and their perceived value of the program was evaluated. They found this resource to be highly valuable and were strongly supportive of the modality and the specific training provided. Some reported technical challenges and the inability to engage in a discussion to clarify topics as barriers. It was felt that both of these barriers could be addressed through programmatic and technological revisions. This study demonstrates the proof of concept of video podcast training to address deficiencies in EMS education regarding the care of older adults, although further work is needed to demonstrate the educational effect of video podcasts on the knowledge and skills of trainees. © 2012, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2012, The American Geriatrics Society.

  7. Proceedings of the International Conferences on Internet Technologies & Society (ITS), Education Technologies (ICEduTECH), and Sustainability, Technology and Education (STE) (Melbourne, Australia, December 6-8, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kommers, Piet, Ed.; Issa, Tomayess, Ed.; Issa, Theodora, Ed.; McKay, Elspeth, Ed.; Isias, Pedro, Ed.

    2016-01-01

    These proceedings contain the papers and posters of the International Conferences on Internet Technologies & Society (ITS 2016), Educational Technologies (ICEduTech 2016) and Sustainability, Technology and Education (STE 2016), which have been organised by the International Association for Development of the Information Society and…

  8. Understanding who benefits at each step in an internet-based diabetes self-management program: application of a recursive partitioning approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasgow, Russell E; Strycker, Lisa A; King, Diane K; Toobert, Deborah J

    2014-02-01

    Efforts to predict success in chronic disease management programs have been generally unsuccessful. To identify patient subgroups associated with success at each of 6 steps in a diabetes self-management (DSM) program. Using data from a randomized trial, recursive partitioning with signal detection analysis was used to identify subgroups associated with 6 sequential steps of program success: agreement to participate, completion of baseline, initial website engagement, 4-month behavior change, later engagement, and longer-term maintenance. The study was conducted in 5 primary care clinics within Kaiser Permanente Colorado. Different numbers of patients participated in each step, including 2076, 544, 270, 219, 127, and 89. All measures available were used to address success at each step. Intervention. Participants were randomized to receive either enhanced usual care or 1 of 2 Internet-based DSM programs: 1) self-administered, computer-assisted self-management and 2) the self-administered program with the addition of enhanced social support. Two sets of potential predictor variables and 6 dichotomous outcomes were created. Signal detection analysis differentiated successful and unsuccessful subgroups at all but the final step. Different patient subgroups were associated with success at these different steps. Demographic factors (education, ethnicity, income) were associated with initial participation but not with later steps, and the converse was true of health behavior variables. Analyses were limited to one setting, and the sample sizes for some of the steps were modest. Signal detection and recursive partitioning methods may be useful for identifying subgroups that are more or less successful at different steps of intervention and may aid in understanding variability in outcomes.

  9. A Comparative Study of University of Wisconsin-Stout Freshmen and Senior Education Majors Computing and Internet Technology Skills / Knowledge and Associated Learning Experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Sveum, Evan Charles

    2010-01-01

    A study comparing University of Wisconsin-Stout freshmen and senior education majors’ computing and Internet technology skills/knowledge and associated learning experiences was conducted. Instruments used in this study included the IC³® Exam by Certiport, Inc. and the investigator’s Computing and Internet Skills Learning Experiences survey. UW-Stout freshmen education majors participating in the study demonstrated poor computing and Internet technology skills/knowledge. UW-Stout senior educat...

  10. Impact of the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balajthy, Ernest

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the impact and the potential of the Internet on education. Suggests that educators and parents need to deal with the lack of quality assurance of the Internet. Addresses readability and appropriateness for children. Notes that successful use of the Internet by children requires that teachers provide instruction in multiple sources and…

  11. Readability and quality assessment of internet-based patient education materials related to laryngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narwani, Vishal; Nalamada, Keerthana; Lee, Michael; Kothari, Prasad; Lakhani, Raj

    2016-04-01

    Patients are increasingly using the internet to access health-related information. The purpose of this study was to assess the readability and quality of laryngeal cancer-related websites. Patient education materials were identified by performing an internet search using 3 search engines. Readability was assessed using Flesch Reading Ease Score (FRES), Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level (FKGL), and Gunning Fog Index (GFI). The DISCERN instrument was utilized to assess quality of health information. A total of 54 websites were included in the analysis. The mean readability scores were as follows: FRES, 48.2 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 44.8-51.6); FKGL, 10.9 (95% CI = 10.3-11.5); and GFI, 13.8 (95% CI = 11.3-16.3). These scores suggest that, on average, online information about patients with laryngeal cancer is written at an advanced level. The mean DISCERN score was 49.8 (95% CI = 45.4-54.2), suggesting that online information is of variable quality. Our study suggests much of the laryngeal cancer information available online is of suboptimal quality and written at a level too difficult for the average adult to read comfortably. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Are current psychometric tools suitable for measuring outcomes of diabetes education?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eigenmann, C. A.; Colagiuri, R.; Skinner, T. C.

    2009-01-01

    Aims To critically appraise the suitability, validity, reliability, feasibility and sensitivity to change of available psychometric tools for measuring the education outcomes identified in the (Australian) National Consensus on Outcomes and Indicators for Diabetes Patient Education. Methods Poten...

  13. Effects of diabetes self-management education on glycaemic control in children with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qayyum, A.A.; Lone, S.W.; Ibrahim, M.N.; Raza, J.

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of diabetes self-management education (DSME) on glycaemic control (HbA1c) in Pakistani children suffering from type-1 diabetes mellitus. Study Design: Quasi-experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: This study was conducted at the Diabetic OPD of National Institute of Child Health, Karachi, from April to September 2009. Methodology: Sixty children with a mean age of 9.94 years with type-1 Diabetes mellitus (T1DM) were selected conveniently from the diabetic OPD. The patients along with their parents/caregivers attended a modular series of diabetes self-management education program consisting of 2 sessions. Customized program was designed to educate children regarding general information about the disease, basic insulin therapy, planning for hypoglycaemia, hyperglycaemia, activity, traveling and basic nutritional management. It was conducted by a multidisciplinary paediatric diabetes team including an endocrinologist, general paediatrician, nutritionist and diabetic nurse. The educational sessions were followed by monthly revision exercises. HbA1c levels were measured at baseline and after 3 months and compared using paired sample t-test. Results: Out of a total of 60 patients, 50 completed the trial. There was a significant decrease in the HbA1c levels after the DSME program. The mean pre- and post intervention HbA1c levels were 9.67 +- 0.65 and 8.49 +- 0.53 respectively with a p-value < 0.001. Conclusion: In the studied group, DSME programs helped to improve glycaemic control. It should be an integral part of patient treatment in diabetic care setups. (author)

  14. Multinational Internet-based survey of patient preference for newer oral or injectable Type 2 diabetes medication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco daCosta DiBonaventura

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Marco daCosta DiBonaventura1, Jan-Samuel Wagner1, Cynthia J Girman2, Kimberly Brodovicz2, Qiaoyi Zhang3, Ying Qiu3, Sri-Ram Pentakota3, Larry Radican31Health Sciences Practice, Kantar Health, New York; 2Epidemiology, 3Global Health Outcomes, Merck, Whitehouse Station, New Jersey, USABackground: The prevalence of Type 2 diabetes mellitus continues to rise. Although glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 analog and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4 inhibitor medications are effective, there are differences between these products, including method of administration (injectable versus oral. The objective of this study was to examine patient preferences (and predictors of preferences for two different medication profiles, one similar to a GLP-1 analog (liraglutide and another similar to a DPP-4 inhibitor (sitagliptin.Methods: Internet survey data were collected in two waves (wave 1, n = 2402; wave 2, n = 1340 using patients from the US and Europe. Patients were presented with two hypothetical medication profiles (“drug A” and “drug B”, resembling sitagliptin and liraglutide, respectively and asked to report their preferences.Results: Most patients in wave 1 and wave 2 reported that overall they would prefer a drug with the sitagliptin-like profile (81.9% and 84.4%, respectively over a drug with the liraglutide-like profile (18.1% and 15.6%, respectively, and >80% of patients reported that they would be able to take a drug with the sitagliptin-like profile as directed by their physician for a longer period. The likelihood of preferring the sitagliptin-like profile significantly increased as age (odds ratio [OR] = 1.02 and importance placed on method of administration (OR = 1.32 increased (P < 0.05. Although the sitagliptin-like profile was preferred by the majority of patients in all subgroups, a lower proportion of patients with obesity, with weight gain, with A1C values above target, and who exercised preferred the sitagliptin-like profile compared with

  15. [Sexuality education on the Internet : From Dr. Sommer to Dr. Google].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döring, Nicola

    2017-09-01

    Female and male adolescents in Germany are increasingly using the Internet to find information about sexuality and sexual health. This review paper summarizes what we know about the status quo of online sexuality education in Germany.Based on a systematic literature review including 40 papers from international, peer-reviewed journals spanning 2010-2017, this paper first describes different aspects of the sexuality-related online search behavior of adolescents: its prevalence, predictors, topics and contexts. One main finding is the fact that adolescents use a computer or smartphone to type their sexuality-related questions into the search engine Google or the search engine of the video platform YouTube.Based on 54 online searches, this paper subsequently presents the kind of sexuality-related online content adolescents find if they ask "Dr. Google" for sexual advice; a collection of 1236 authentic sexuality-related questions of adolescents was used for this analysis. It turned out that online sexuality education offered by leading professional organizations like the BZgA ("Bundeszentrale für gesundheitliche Aufklärung") or pro familia was nearly invisible, while numerous other providers of online sex education consistently appeared in the top Google search results. Among them were the "Dr. Sommer" team of the youth magazine Bravo; online healthcare and advice portals; online forums; the online encyclopedia Wikipedia and, above all, sex education channels on YouTube. In this paper, the latter are presented in more detail for the first time.The third part of the paper addresses the quality of online sexual education over four main areas of quality evaluation. The presentation of the status quo ends with some recommendations both for future research and for sexuality education in practice.

  16. Internet of Things in Higher Education: A Study on Future Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldowah, Hanan; Rehman, Shafiq Ul; Ghazal, Samar; Naufal Umar, Irfan

    2017-09-01

    In the coming years, technology will impact the learning experience in many ways. Internet of Things (IoT) continues to confirm its important position in the context of Information and Communication Technologies and the development of society. With the support of IoT, institutions can enhance learning outcomes by providing more affluent learning experiences, improved operational efficiency, and by gaining real-time, actionable insight into student performance. The purpose of this study is to find out the potential of IoT in higher education and how to maximize its benefits and reducing the risks involved with it. Further efforts are necessary for releasing the full potential of IoT systems and technologies. Therefore, this paper presents a study about the impact of IoT on higher education especially universities. IoT stands to change dramatically the way universities work, and enhance student learning in many disciplines and at any level. It has huge potential for universities or any other educational institutions; if well prepared to ensure widespread and successful implementation by leadership, staff, and students. IoT needs development where universities can lead. Academics, researchers, and students are in a unique place to lead the discovery and development of IoT systems, devices, applications, and services. Moreover, this paper provides an evidences about the future of IoT in the higher education during the next few years, which have offered by a number of research organizations and enterprises. On the other hand, IoT also brings tremendous challenges to higher education. Hence, this paper also presents the perspective on the challenges of IoT in higher education.

  17. Physician education programme improves quality of diabetes care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    diabetes have been compiled and circulated to health care workers, but ... studied and attempted to improve the quality of diabetes care in primary care ..... project indicators in the Indian Health Service primary care setting. Diabetes Care ...

  18. Diabetes self-management education and support delivered by mobile health (m-health) interventions for adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boels, Anne Meike; Vos, Rimke C.; Metzendorf, Maria-Inti; Rutten, Guy E.H.M.

    2017-01-01

    This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (Intervention). The objectives are as follows: To assess the effects of diabetes self-management education and support delivered by mobile health interventions in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  19. 77 FR 44255 - Medicare Program; Application by the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-27

    ...] Medicare Program; Application by the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) for Continued... Register (77 FR 11130) entitled, ``Application by the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) for... Notice. SUMMARY: This final notice announces the approval of an application from the American Association...

  20. A Web-Based Model for Diabetes Education and Decision Support for the Home Care Nurse

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, Michelle; Kirby, Judy

    1998-01-01

    Diabetes education for the home care population requires expert knowledge to be available at the point-of-care, the patient's home. This poster displays a model for Web-based diabetes education and decision support for the home care nurse. The system utilizes the line of reasoning (LOR) model to organize and represent expert decision-making thought processes.

  1. Audit diabetes-dependent quality of life questionnaire: usefulness in diabetes self-management education in the Slovak population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmanová, Elena; Ziaková, Katarína

    2009-05-01

    This paper reports a study to test validity and internal consistency of the audit diabetes-dependent quality of life questionnaire in the Slovak population and to evaluate its usefulness in the context of education of people with diabetes. The individualised instruments designed to measure individuals' perceptions of the impact of diabetes on their quality of life may be helpful to identify individuals' preferences, motivational deficits in diabetes management and to tailor individual treatment strategies. Survey. After linguistic validation, the structure of the questionnaire was tested using factor analysis on 104 patients who were recruited from the National Institute of Endocrinology and Diabetology in Lubochna. Internal consistency was evaluated by computing Cronbach's alpha. Clinical variables related to the quality of life were analysed using one-way ANOVA, multifactor ANOVA, Pearson's and Spearman's rank correlation coefficients. A one-dimensional scale structure was supported and internal consistency was high (alpha = 0.93). Variance in impact of diabetes on quality of life was explained by age, presence of late complications and type of insulin regimen. The audit diabetes-dependent quality of life is culturally appropriate, valid and reliable in the sample of Slovak patients attending the educational programme. Our results agreed with previous European and Asian studies supporting its usefulness in the context of diabetes self-management education. Individualised diabetes-specific quality of life measures allow better understanding of patients' treatment preferences and, consequently, more effective prioritizing and targeting of appropriate educational interventions. This instrument may be useful in routine clinical practice and as an outcome measure for international clinical research trials evaluating effectiveness of educational programmes.

  2. EDUCATIONAL WEB-QUEST IN NEW INTERNET-EDUCATION ELECTIVE COURSES IN PHYSICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Grabchak

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The article reveals the essence of the concept of "educational web-Quest" proved its application in the study of elective courses in physics, methodical advice for teachers on the design features of elective courses in physics through the use of educational web-quest.

  3. New approaches to health promotion and informatics education using Internet in the Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvárová, J

    2005-01-01

    The paper describes nowadays information technology skills in the Czech Republic. It focuses on informatics education using Internet, ECDL concept and the links between computer literacy among health care professionals and quality of health care. Everyone understands that the main source of wealth of any nation is information management and the efficient transformation of information into knowledge. There appear completely new decisive factors for the economics of the near future based on circulation and exchange information. It is clear that modern health care cannot be built without information and communication technologies. We discuss several approaches how to contribute to some topics of information society in health care, namely the role of electronic health record, structured information, extraction of information from free medical texts and sharing knowledge stored in medical guidelines.

  4. Systematic review of peer education intervention programmes among individuals with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatlin, Tricia K; Serafica, Reimund; Johnson, Michael

    2017-12-01

    To systematically review published randomised controlled trials of peer education interventions among adults with type 2 diabetes. Systematic reviews have shown mixed results for peer support interventions to improve diabetes self-management. Given the effectiveness of diabetes education by healthcare professionals, peer education interventions may be a useful alternative approach. This review addressed that gap. Systematic review. A systematic search of published randomised controlled trials between 2006-2016 was conducted using the keywords diabetes, type 2 diabetes, randomised controlled trials, self-management, peer education and peer support. The methodological quality of each study was assessed using the Jadad scale. Seven studies were included in the final review, and the Jadad scores ranged from 8-10 of a possible 13 points. There was no consistent design, setting, or outcome measurement among the studies. There were two types of peer education interventions compared to traditional diabetes education: face-to-face or a combination of face-to-face and telephone/texting. The most common clinical outcome measure was HbA1c. Two of six studies showed statistically significant improvement in HbA1c between intervention and control groups. An increase in diabetes knowledge was also statistically significant in two of five studies. Peer education could be successful in improving clinical outcomes. No evidence was found indicating that healthcare provider education was superior in regard to clinical knowledge or behavioural or psychological outcome measures than peer education. HbA1c was statistically significantly lower in some peer education groups compared to control groups. There is evidence that peer education can be useful in achieving positive clinical outcomes such as decreasing HbA1c levels and increasing diabetes knowledge. A certified diabetes educator or a trained healthcare professional should not be overlooked though when using peer educators. © 2017

  5. A Diabetes Mobile App With In-App Coaching From a Certified Diabetes Educator Reduces A1C for Individuals With Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Shefali; Moseson, Heidi; Uppal, Jaspreet; Juusola, Jessie L

    2018-06-01

    Purpose There are currently many diabetes apps available, but there is limited evidence demonstrating clinical impact. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact of a diabetes mobile app with in-app coaching by a certified diabetes educator on glycemic control for individuals with type 2 diabetes. Methods A 12 week-long single-arm intent-to-treat trial evaluated the impact of a diabetes mobile app and coaching program (One Drop | Mobile With One Drop | Experts), which facilitated tracking of self-care and included an in-app diabetes education program, on A1C for individuals with type 2 diabetes and an A1C ≥7.5% (58 mmol/mol). An online study platform (Achievement Studies, Evidation Health Inc, San Mateo, CA) was used to screen, consent, and enroll participants; collect study data; and track participants' progress throughout the study. Baseline and study end A1C measurements as well as questionnaire data from participants were collected. Results Participants (n = 146) were 52 ± 9 years old, 71% female, 25% black or Hispanic, diagnosed with diabetes for 11 ± 7 years, and with a mean baseline A1C of 9.87% ± 2.0 (84 mmol/mol). In adjusted repeated measures models, mean A1C improved by -0.86% among study completers (n = 127), -0.96% among active users of the app and coaching program (n = 93), and -1.32% among active users with a baseline A1C ≥9.0% (75 mmol/mol) (n = 53). Conclusions This program was associated with a clinically meaningful and significant reduction in A1C and can potentially increase access to effective diabetes self-management education and support for individuals with diabetes.

  6. Readability Assessment of Internet-Based Patient Education Materials Related to Parathyroid Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Chirag R; Sanghvi, Saurin; Cherla, Deepa V; Baredes, Soly; Eloy, Jean Anderson

    2015-07-01

    Patient education is critical in obtaining informed consent and reducing preoperative anxiety. Written patient education material (PEM) can supplement verbal communication to improve understanding and satisfaction. Published guidelines recommend that health information be presented at or below a sixth-grade reading level to facilitate comprehension. We investigate the grade level of online PEMs regarding parathyroid surgery. A popular internet search engine was used to identify PEM discussing parathyroid surgery. Four formulas were used to calculate readability scores: Flesch Reading Ease (FRE), Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level (FKGL), Gunning Frequency of Gobbledygook (GFOG), and Simple Measure of Gobbledygook (SMOG). Thirty web-based articles discussing parathyroid surgery were identified. The average FRE score was 42.8 (±1 standard deviation [SD] 16.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 36.6-48.8; range, 6.1-71.3). The average FKGL score was 11.7 (±1 SD 3.3; 95% CI, 10.5-12.9; range, 6.1-19.0). The SMOG scores averaged 14.2 (±1 SD 2.6; 95% CI, 13.2-15.2; range, 10.7-21.9), and the GFOG scores averaged 15.0 (±1 SD 3.5; 95% CI, 13.7-16.3; range, 10.6-24.8). Online PEM on parathyroid surgery is written above the recommended sixth-grade reading level. Improving readability of PEM may promote better health education and compliance. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Racial/ethnic differences in video game and Internet use among US adolescents with mental health and educational difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Nicholas; Lê Cook, Benjamin; Chen, Chih-Nan; Alegria, Margarita

    2013-01-01

    Video game and Internet use can be associated with poor mental health and educational outcomes among adolescents. Racial/ethnic minority youth use these media more than White youth. Video game and Internet use among adolescents with mental health and educational difficulties may therefore differ by race/ethnicity in clinically meaningful ways. We analyzed a representative sample of 8th grade students in the United States from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Survey-Kindergarten (N=6,700). Stratifying by gender, we assessed racial/ethnic differences in the associations between video game and Internet use, mental health, and reading and math achievement. Significant minority-White differences were identified in associations between media use and mental health and educational achievement. Video game use was relatively high among black females with prior mental health diagnoses and Asian-American males with high internalizing symptoms. Understanding video game and Internet use among racial/ethnic minority youth with mental health and educational difficulties may improve clinical practice. PMID:29167696

  8. A Comparison of Internet-Based Learning and Traditional Classroom Lecture to Learn CPR for Continuing Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmati, Nima; Omrani, Soghra; Hemmati, Naser

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the satisfaction and effectiveness of Internet-based learning (IBL) and traditional classroom lecture (TCL) for continuing medical education (CME) programs by comparing final resuscitation exam results of physicians who received the newest cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) curriculum guidelines training…

  9. Effects of an Internet-Based Educational Intervention to Prevent High-Risk Sexual Behavior in Mexican Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doubova, Svetlana V.; Martinez-Vega, Ingrid Patricia; Infante-Castañeda, Claudia; Pérez-Cuevas, Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of an internet-based educational intervention to increase knowledge of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), attitudes and self-efficacy toward consistent condom use in Mexican adolescents. A field trial with an intervention and control group was conducted in 14- to 15-year-old students in two secondary schools. The…

  10. Racial/ethnic differences in video game and Internet use among US adolescents with mental health and educational difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Nicholas; Lê Cook, Benjamin; Chen, Chih-Nan; Alegria, Margarita

    2012-01-01

    Video game and Internet use can be associated with poor mental health and educational outcomes among adolescents. Racial/ethnic minority youth use these media more than White youth. Video game and Internet use among adolescents with mental health and educational difficulties may therefore differ by race/ethnicity in clinically meaningful ways. We analyzed a representative sample of 8 th grade students in the United States from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Survey-Kindergarten (N=6,700). Stratifying by gender, we assessed racial/ethnic differences in the associations between video game and Internet use, mental health, and reading and math achievement. Significant minority-White differences were identified in associations between media use and mental health and educational achievement. Video game use was relatively high among black females with prior mental health diagnoses and Asian-American males with high internalizing symptoms. Understanding video game and Internet use among racial/ethnic minority youth with mental health and educational difficulties may improve clinical practice.

  11. Toward Digital Citizenship: Examining Factors Affecting Participation and Involvement in the Internet Society among Higher Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zahrani, Abdulrahman

    2015-01-01

    The current study aims to understand digital citizenship, based on the assumptions of Ribble (2014), by examining factors affecting participation and involvement in the Internet virtual societies among higher education students. A quantitative approach using a survey questionnaire was implemented. The participants were 174 students from the…

  12. Instructor and Adult Learner Perceptions of the Use of Internet-Enabled Devices in Residential Outdoor Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolliger, Doris U.; Shepherd, Craig E.

    2018-01-01

    As more adults frequent wilderness areas, they bring Internet-enabled devices (e.g., smart phones, tablets) with them. This study focuses on adults' perceptions of these devices in relation to desired outdoor learning experiences. Specifically, researchers examined the perspectives of naturalists who taught outdoor education programs and park…

  13. Healthcare professionals' views of group structured education for people with newly diagnosed Type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkley, K; Upsher, R; Keij, S M; Chamley, M; Ismail, K; Forbes, A

    2018-04-06

    To determine healthcare professionals' (HCP) views of group structured education for people with newly diagnosed Type 2 diabetes. This was a qualitative study using semi-structured interviews to ascertain primary care HCPs' views and experiences of education for people with newly diagnosed Type 2 diabetes. A thematic framework method was applied to analyse the data. Participants were HCPs (N = 22) from 15 general practices in three south London boroughs. All but one HCP viewed diabetes education favourably and all identified that low attendance was a problem. Three key themes emerged from the qualitative data: (1) benefits of diabetes education, including the group mode of delivery, improved patient interactions, saving HCPs' time and improved patient outcomes; (2) factors limiting uptake of education, including patient-level problems such as access and the appropriateness of the programme for certain groups, and difficulties communicating the benefits to patients and integration of education management plans into ongoing diabetes care; and (3) suggestions for improvement, including strategies to improve attendance at education with more localized and targeted marketing and enhanced programme content including follow-up sessions and support for people with pre-existing psychological issues. Most HCPs valued diabetes education and all highlighted the lack of provision for people with different levels of health literacy. Because there was wide variation in terms of the level of knowledge regarding the education on offer, future studies may want to focus on how to help HCPs encourage their patients to attend. © 2018 Diabetes UK.

  14. Client perceptions of group education in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus in South Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Cynthia; McNaughton, Darlene A; Meyer, Samantha

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a progressive chronic disease that requires significant self-surveillance and adherence to the treatment protocols for successful management and future health. There is a growing body of evidence suggesting that diabetes education is beneficial for patient outcomes. However, there is some debate about how best to deliver diabetes education, whether individually or in groups. Although several studies have investigated the role of group education in improving the management of T2DM, few studies have examined this issue from the client's perspective. It is here that this study makes a contribution to understanding diabetes management. Drawing on systematic observation of group education sessions provided by diabetic resource nurses and in-depth interviews with clients, this paper describes the experiences, perspectives and significance of these sessions to clients. Our results suggest that group education sessions were seen as valuable to the clients for: the opportunity they provided to meet others living with diabetes; to improve motivation for managing the disease; and to enhance knowledge of diabetes, its management and long-term implications. In short, this study demonstrates that the clients value group education sessions for the social contact, increasing knowledge about the disease for self-management and support they provide; factors recognised as important to maintaining health. In addition, group education sessions appear to be a cost-effective method for diabetes self-management that funders need to consider.

  15. The Relationship between Internet Addiction and Communication, Educational and Physical Problems of Adolescents in North Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcinar, Zehra

    2011-01-01

    The Internet today, beyond being a source of information and communication, has become an "addiction" for some people. The rate of Internet addiction is rapidly increasing in the world. The aim of this study was to examine the extent of Internet addiction among adolescents in North Cyprus. Eight hundred and fifty-one participants between…

  16. The Value of Internet Tools in Undergraduate Surgical Education: Perspective of Medical Students in a Developing Country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekenze, S O; Okafor, C I; Ekenze, O S; Nwosu, J N; Ezepue, U F

    2017-03-01

    Advances in information technology (IT) in the past decade present opportunities and challenges in undergraduate surgical education. There may be need to evaluate the knowledge base and the use of Internet tools among medical students in settings where traditional mode of education is preeminent. This may help to establish a conceptual framework for integrating e-learning into the traditional teaching to enhance learning experience. In this study, we evaluated the medical students' knowledge and use of Internet tools, and their opinion on the application of these tools in surgical education. We undertook a cross-sectional survey of 2013 and 2014 graduating medical class of College of Medicine University of Nigeria, Enugu using structured self-administered questionnaire. The survey assessed the knowledge, utility, and application of Internet tools in surgical education using 5-point Likert scale. Overall response rate was 78% (227/291) comprising 151 (66.5%) males and 76 (33.5%) females. The median age was 24 years (range 20-33 years). Although 106 (46.7%) had formal training on information technology, 223 (98.2%) can access Internet, and 162 (71.4%) use one or more of the Internet tools, 90.6% (96/106) of those trained on ICT use Internet for education/learning compared to 88.4% (107/121) of those without ICT training (p = 0.76). Google™ search tool had the highest rating in terms of familiarity and utility for education/learning (mean rating 4.3 on a scale of 5.0), while Skype™ had the least rating (mean 2.0). Overall, 89% of respondents (mean rating 4.5 on a scale of 5.0) indicated that Internet tools could be effectively applied in surgical education specifically in areas of lectures, assignments, real-time procedure demonstration, case discussion, and interaction with surgical experts. The key benefits are utility as a regular self-assessment tool (mean rating = 4.6) and offer of flexible learning schedule (mean rating = 4.0). Fifty-two percent (118

  17. Who is downloading the free AIDA v4.3a interactive educational diabetes computer software? A 1-year survey of 3864 downloads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Eldon D

    2003-01-01

    AIDA is a free diabetes computer program that permits the interactive simulation of plasma insulin and blood glucose profiles for educational, demonstration, self-learning, and research purposes. To date over 70000 copies of the software have been downloaded from the AIDA Website, www.2aida.org. This column documents a survey of downloaders of the latest release of the program (AIDA v4.3a). The Internet-based survey methodology was confirmed to be robust and reliable. Over a 1-year period (from March 2001 to February 2002) in total 3864 responses were received. During the corresponding period some 8578 actual downloads of the software were independently logged via the same route at the AIDA Website, giving a response rate for this survey of 45%. Responses were received from participants in 66 countries - over half of these (n = 2,137; 55.3%) were from the United States and the United Kingdom. There were 2318 responses (60.0%) received from patients with diabetes and 443 (11.5%) from relatives of patients, with fewer responses from doctors, students, diabetes educators, nurses, pharmacists, and other end users. This study highlights considerable interest amongst patients and their relatives to learn more about balancing insulin and diet in diabetes, as well as possibly to get more involved in self-management of insulin dosages. More computer applications that can cater for this interest in diabetes patient self-care need to be developed and made available. The Internet provides an ideal medium for the distribution of such educational tools.

  18. Evaluation of a school-based diabetes education intervention, an extension of Program ENERGY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, Matthew David

    . The second questionnaire, adapted from a survey developed for the Starr County Diabetes Education Study (Garcia et al, 2001), measured general diabetes and diabetes management knowledge. A comparison group, a total of 19 students, also completed both surveys during the study period. Results: Significant increases (p<0.05) were seen in the post-intervention study group in general diabetes knowledge, diabetes management knowledge, and awareness of diabetes prevention strategies, when compared to the baseline study group and comparison group.

  19. Frequency of Internet, Social Network and Mobile Devices use in Prospective Teachers from Faculty of Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Tezer

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The basic aim of this study was to determine the relationship between university students’ frequency of internet use, duration of internet connection, environments that they connect to the internet, duration use of mobile devices, frequency of social networking leisure activities and internet addiction levels. The participants included a total of 363 university students of whom 255 were female and 108 were male. Quantitative research methods were used in this study. A survey was developed by the researchers and administered to the students. Based on statistical analysis; it was revealed that the frequency of internet use was every day throughout the week, students frequently stayed connected to the internet at home with their computers and the frequency of mobile devices and social network use was found as “Always”. In addition, university students stated that they connected to the internet in their leisure time.

  20. Assessment of two culturally competent diabetes education methods: individual versus individual plus group education in Canadian Portuguese adults with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gucciardi, Enza; Demelo, Margaret; Lee, Ruth N; Grace, Sherry L

    2007-04-01

    To examine the impact of two culturally competent diabetes education methods, individual counselling and individual counselling in conjunction with group education, on nutrition adherence and glycemic control in Portuguese Canadian adults with type 2 diabetes over a three-month period. The Diabetes Education Centre is located in the urban multicultural city of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. We used a three-month randomized controlled trial design. Eligible Portuguese-speaking adults with type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned to receive either diabetes education counselling only (control group) or counselling in conjunction with group education (intervention group). Of the 61 patients who completed the study, 36 were in the counselling only and 25 in the counselling with group education intervention. We used a per-protocol analysis to examine the efficacy of the two educational approaches on nutrition adherence and glycemic control; paired t-tests to compare results within groups and analysis of covariance (ACOVA) to compare outcomes between groups adjusting for baseline measures. The Theory of Planned Behaviour was used to describe the behavioural mechanisms that influenced nutrition adherence. Attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behaviour control, and intentions towards nutrition adherence, self-reported nutrition adherence and glycemic control significantly improved in both groups, over the three-month study period. Yet, those receiving individual counselling with group education showed greater improvement in all measures with the exception of glycemic control, where no significant difference was found between the two groups at three months. Our study findings provide preliminary evidence that culturally competent group education in conjunction with individual counselling may be more efficacious in shaping eating behaviours than individual counselling alone for Canadian Portuguese adults with type 2 diabetes. However, larger longitudinal studies are needed to

  1. Randomized trial of a diabetes self-management education and family teamwork intervention in adolescents with Type1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murphy, H. R.; Wadham, C.; Hassler-Hurst, J.

    2012-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the effectiveness of a family-centred group education programme, in adolescents with Type1 diabetes. Methods Three hundred and five adolescents with Type1 diabetes; age 13.1±1.9years, diabetes duration 5.6±3.3years, BMI 20.9±3.7kg/m 2, HbA 1c 78±6mmol/mol (9.3±1.9%) were randomly...... attendance of group education sessions delivered in routine clinics was a major challenge. More personalized educational approaches may be required to support and motivate families who are struggling to integrate the demands of intensive insulin regimens into their daily lives....

  2. Action research as a method for changing patient education practice in a clinical diabetes setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voigt, Jane Rohde; Hansen, Ulla M.; Glindorf, Mette

    2014-01-01

    with researchers developed and implemented a participatory, group-based diabetes education program in a diabetes clinic in the Danish health care system. The research process included a variety of qualitative methods: workshops, classroom observations, video recordings and semi-structured interviews. These methods......Action research is potentially a useful method for changing clinical practice by involving practitioners in the process of change. The aim of this study was to explore the utility of action research in bridging the gap between research and practice. Diabetes educators in collaboration...... aimed at obtaining contextual sensitivity, allowing dynamic interactions with educators and people with diabetes. Despite challenges, the study demonstrates how action research methods contribute to development and change of diabetes education practice while simultaneously adding knowledge to the action...

  3. Randomized controlled trial for assessment of Internet of Things system to guide intensive glucose control in diabetes outpatients : Nagoya Health Navigator Study protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Onoue, Takeshi; Goto, Motomitsu; Kobayashi, Tomoko; Tominaga, Takashi; Ando, Masahiko; Honda, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Yasuko; Tosaki, Takahiro; Yokoi, Hisashi; Kato, Sawako; Maruyama, Shoichi; Arima, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Internet of Things (IoT) allows collecting vast amounts of health-relevant data such as daily activity, body weight (BW), and blood pressure (BP) automatically. The use of IoT devices to monitor diabetic patients has been studied, but could not evaluate IoT-dependent effects because health data were not measured in control groups. This multicenter, open-label, randomized, parallel group study will compare the impact of intensive health guidance using IoT and conventional medical ...

  4. Dynamic Interactive Educational Diabetes Simulations Using the World Wide Web: An Experience of More Than 15 Years with AIDA Online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Eldon D; Dewolf, Dennis K; Novotny, Christopher A; Reed, Karen; Gotwals, Robert R

    2014-01-01

    Background. AIDA is a widely available downloadable educational simulator of glucose-insulin interaction in diabetes. Methods. A web-based version of AIDA was developed that utilises a server-based architecture with HTML FORM commands to submit numerical data from a web-browser client to a remote web server. AIDA online, located on a remote server, passes the received data through Perl scripts which interactively produce 24 hr insulin and glucose simulations. Results. AIDA online allows users to modify the insulin regimen and diet of 40 different prestored "virtual diabetic patients" on the internet or create new "patients" with user-generated regimens. Multiple simulations can be run, with graphical results viewed via a standard web-browser window. To date, over 637,500 diabetes simulations have been run at AIDA online, from all over the world. Conclusions. AIDA online's functionality is similar to the downloadable AIDA program, but the mode of implementation and usage is different. An advantage to utilising a server-based application is the flexibility that can be offered. New modules can be added quickly to the online simulator. This has facilitated the development of refinements to AIDA online, which have instantaneously become available around the world, with no further local downloads or installations being required.

  5. Dynamic Interactive Educational Diabetes Simulations Using the World Wide Web: An Experience of More Than 15 Years with AIDA Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Eldon D.; DeWolf, Dennis K.; Novotny, Christopher A.; Reed, Karen; Gotwals, Robert R.

    2014-01-01

    Background. AIDA is a widely available downloadable educational simulator of glucose-insulin interaction in diabetes. Methods. A web-based version of AIDA was developed that utilises a server-based architecture with HTML FORM commands to submit numerical data from a web-browser client to a remote web server. AIDA online, located on a remote server, passes the received data through Perl scripts which interactively produce 24 hr insulin and glucose simulations. Results. AIDA online allows users to modify the insulin regimen and diet of 40 different prestored “virtual diabetic patients” on the internet or create new “patients” with user-generated regimens. Multiple simulations can be run, with graphical results viewed via a standard web-browser window. To date, over 637,500 diabetes simulations have been run at AIDA online, from all over the world. Conclusions. AIDA online's functionality is similar to the downloadable AIDA program, but the mode of implementation and usage is different. An advantage to utilising a server-based application is the flexibility that can be offered. New modules can be added quickly to the online simulator. This has facilitated the development of refinements to AIDA online, which have instantaneously become available around the world, with no further local downloads or installations being required. PMID:24511312

  6. Undergraduate physiotherapy students’ knowledge of Diabetes Mellitus: Implications for education

    OpenAIRE

    T. Steyl

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes  mellitus  is  a  growing  public  health  concern  and its prevalence is  escalating  exponentially,  with  a  high  frequency  of morbidity, premature mortality, disability and loss of productivity.  Since health education has  become  an  important  part  of  medical  care physiotherapy  students  are potentially  well  suited  to  assist  with  the combat  of  this  disease.    The  study aimed  to  determine  the  knowledge of  diabetes  mellitus  and  its  risk  factors  of und...

  7. Survey of the Effectiveness of Internet Information on Patient Education for Bone Morphogenetic Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Meng; Briceño, Valentina; Lam, Sandi K; Luerssen, Thomas G; Jea, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    In light of recent reports of potential short- and long-term complications of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and increasing "off-label" use among spine surgeons, we wished to analyze online information on BMP and its controversial uses, as patients frequently search the Internet for medical information, even though the quality and accuracy of available information are highly variable. Between December 2014 and January 2015, we conducted a Google search to identify the 50 most accessed websites providing BMP information using the search phrase "bone morphogenetic protein." Websites were classified based on authorship. Each website was examined for the provision of appropriate patient inclusion and exclusion criteria, surgical and nonsurgical treatment alternatives, purported benefits, disclosure of common and potential complications, peer-reviewed literature citations, and discussion of off-label use. Two percent of websites were authored by private medical groups, 2% by academic medical groups, 10% by insurance companies, 16% by biomedical industries, 4% by news sources, 0% by lawyers, and 66% by others. Sixty-two percent referenced peer-reviewed literature. Benefits and complications were reported in 44% and 26% of websites, respectively. Surgical and nonsurgical treatment alternatives were mentioned in 16% and 4% of websites, respectively. Discussion of off-label BMP use occurred in 18% of websites. Our study showed the ineffectiveness of the Internet in reporting quality information on BMP use. We found that websites authored by insurance companies provide an acceptable foundation for patient education. This, however, cannot replace the need for a thorough dialogue between doctor and patient about risks, benefits, and indications. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Readability assessment of internet-based patient education materials related to mammography for breast cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlKhalili, Rend; Shukla, Pratik A; Patel, Ronak H; Sanghvi, Saurin; Hubbi, Basil

    2015-03-01

    The US Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS) recommends that Internet-based patient education materials (IPEMs) be written below the sixth-grade reading level to target the average American adult. This study was designed to determine the readability of IPEMs regarding mammography for breast cancer screening. Three-hundred mammography-related Web sites were reviewed for IPEMs. Forty-two IPEMs that met the Health on the Net Foundation Code of Conduct were assessed for readability level with four readability indices that use existing algorithms based on word and sentence length to quantitatively analyze Internet sources for language intricacy including the following: Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level (FKGL), Flesch Reading Ease Score (FRES), Simple Measure of Gobbledygook (SMOG), and Gunning Frequency of Gobbledygook (Gunning FOG; GFOG). Results were compared to national recommendations, and intergroup analysis was performed. No IPEMs (0%) regarding mammography were written at or below the sixth-grade reading level, based on FKGL. The mean readability scores were as follows: FRES, 49.04 ± 10.62; FKGL, 10.71 ± 2.01; SMOG, 13.33 ± 1.67; and Gunning FOG, 14.32 ± 2.18. These scores indicate that the readability of mammography IPEMs is written at a "difficult" level, significantly above the recommended sixth-grade reading level (P < .05) determined by the USDHHS. IPEMs related to mammography are written well above the recommended sixth-grade level and likely reflect other IPEMs in diagnostic radiology. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Use of a supplementary internet based education program improves sleep literacy in college psychology students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Stuart F; Anderson, Janis L; Hodge, Gordon K

    2013-02-01

    Knowledge regarding the importance of sleep in health and performance and good sleep hygiene practices is low, especially among adolescents and young adults. It is important to improve sleep literacy. Introductory psychology is one of the most highly enrolled courses at colleges and universities. This study tested the impact of an Internet-based learning module on improving sleep literacy in this venue. An Internet-based supplementary learning module containing sleep physiology and hygiene information was developed using content from the Harvard Medical School sleep educational website http://www.understandingsleep.org. Access to the module was provided as an extra credit activity for 2 of 4 sections (Supplemental Sleep, SS, N = 889) of an introductory college psychology course during their standard instruction on sleep and dreaming. The remaining 2 sections (Standard Instruction, SI, N = 878) only were encouraged to visit the website without further direction. Level of knowledge was assessed before and after availability to the module/website and at the end of the semester. Students were asked to complete a survey at the end of the semester inquiring whether they made any changes in their sleep behaviors. Two hundred fifty students participated in the extra credit activity and had data available at all testing points. Students in the SS Group had a significant improvement in sleep knowledge test scores after interacting with the website in comparison to the SI group (19.41 ± 3.15 vs. 17.94 ± 3.08, p students enrolled in an introductory college psychology course.

  10. Perceptions of the Internet and Education: A Study with Physics Education Website Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokalp, Muhammed Sait

    2013-01-01

    The use of the web in teaching and learning and research studies on this issue are increasingly common in science education. In most of these studies, teachers' and students' perceptions of and their attitudes toward the specific web-assisted/based learning activities and the effects of these activities on their achievement and attitudes have been…

  11. The Effects of Intensive Nutrition Education on Late Middle-Aged Adults with Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ye; Xu, Meihong; Fan, Rui; Ma, Xiaotao; Gu, Jiaojiao; Cai, Xiaxia; Liu, Rui; Chen, Qihe; Ren, Jinwei; Mao, Ruixue; Bao, Lei; Zhang, Zhaofeng; Wang, Junbo; Li, Yong

    2016-09-08

    Many patients with type 2 diabetes find it difficult to maintain good glycemic control. Undesirable glycemic control occurs greatly due to deficiencies of nutritional knowledge and difficulty in obtaining dietary prescriptions. The late middle-aged and elder individuals are the main populations that are affected by type 2 diabetes. The main purpose of this study was to investigate whether intensive nutrition education would make benefits for late middle-aged patients with type 2 diabetes. 196 patients between 50 to 65 years old meeting type 2 diabetes criteria and eligible for the program were included in a single-blinded, 30-day centralized management of an education program in China. Participants in the program were randomly divided into a usual nutrition education group or an intensive nutrition education group. The usual nutrition education group was used as a control group and received only basic health advice and principles of diabetic diets at the beginning and the end of the study. Participants in the intensive nutrition education group were arranged to receive intensive nutritional lectures about diabetes for 30 days. The primary outcomes were the changes in weight, body mass index (BMI), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 2-h postprandial plasma glucose (PG), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), total glycerin (TG), total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c). After 30 days of intervention, FPG, PG, and HbA1c in the treatment group decreased significantly than the control group (p nutrition education group. However, there was no statistical significance between groups. Intensive nutrition education has significant effects on blood glucose control in late middle-aged adults with type 2 diabetes. Intensive education can cultivate good diet habits and increase physical activity, which are important for diabetes patients in the short and long terms. These findings may contribute to improving

  12. Distance education and diabetes empowerment: A single-blind randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Zirak, Mohammad; Hemmati Maslakpak, Masomeh; Parizad, Naser

    2017-11-01

    Diabetes is one of the biggest problems in healthcare systems and kills many people every year. Diabetes management is impossible when only utilizing medication. So, patients must be educated to manage their diabetes. This study aims to assess the effect of education by telephone and short message service on empowering patients with type 2 diabetes (primary outcome). A single-blind randomized controlled trial was conducted in the Urmia diabetes association in Iran. Sixty six participants with definitive diagnosis of type 2 diabetes entered into the study. Patients with secondary health problems were excluded. Patients were selected by simple random sampling then allocated into intervention (n=33) and control (n=33) groups. The intervention group received an educational text message daily and instructive phone calls three days a week for three months along with usual care. The Diabetes Empowerment Scale (DES) with confirmed validity and reliability was used for collecting data. Data was analyzed using SPSS V6.1. Independent t-test, paired t-test and chi-square were used to analyze the data. The empowerment of the intervention group compared with the control group significantly improved after three months of distance education (p<0.00, EF=1. 16). The study findings show that the distance education has a significant effect on empowering patients with type 2 diabetes. Therefore, using distance education along with other diabetes management intervention is highly effective and should be part of the care in diabetes treatment. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Feasibility of an internet-based intervention for improving diabetes outcomes among low-income patients with a high risk for poor diabetes outcomes followed in a community clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, John G; Schwartz, Robert; Jennings, Terri; Fedders, Mark; Vittoria, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of an Internet-based intervention, targeting very low-income minority patients with a high risk for not engaging in diabetes self-management, to increase diabetes self-management and improve diabetes outcomes. Patients with diabetes followed in a community clinic were enrolled in the 13-month trial. Participants were requested to test blood sugar and upload glucometer data every day and login to the program at least once every second day. Feasibility data included process measures; diabetes outcomes consisted of changes from baseline to follow-up for levels of glycosylated hemoglobin (A1C), LDL, HDL, triglyceride and total cholesterol, and health-related quality of life using the SF-36. Only 22% of participants had health insurance. Participants had an average of 4.39 comorbidities and 7.06 prescriptions. Participants uploaded glucometer data at least twice each week and logged into the application at least once each week. Participants demonstrated reductions statistically or clinically important changes in A1C, LDL cholesterol, total cholesterol, and triglyceride levels. Participants engaging in more frequent chat messages and interactive activities demonstrated greater reductions in LDL cholesterol levels; however, engaging in more frequent chat messages also was associated with increased triglyceride levels. Participants rated fewer role limitations from physical health problems at follow-up. The intervention produced good outcomes; however, an alternative platform may be a less expensive approach.

  14. An assessment of patient education and self-management in diabetes disease management--two case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzner, Karen; Greenwood, Deborah; Payne, Hildegarde; Thomson, John; Vukovljak, Lana; McCulloch, Amber; Specker, James E

    2008-12-01

    Diabetes affects 7.8% of Americans, nearly 24 million people, and costs $174 billion yearly. People with diabetes benefit from self-management; disease management (DM) programs are effective in managing populations with diabetes. Little has been published on the intersection of diabetes education and DM. Our hypothesis was that diabetes educators and their interventions integrate well with DM and effectively support providers' care delivery. A literature review was conducted for papers published within the past 3 years and identified using the search terms "diabetes educator" and "disease management." Those that primarily addressed community health workers or the primary care/community setting were excluded. Two case studies were conducted to augment the literature. Ten of 30 manuscripts identified in the literature review were applicable and indicate that techniques and interventions based on cognitive theories and behavioral change can be effective when coupled with diabetes DM. Better diabetes self-management through diabetes education encourages participation in DM programs and adherence to recommended care in programs offered by DM organizations or those that are provider based. Improved health outcomes and reduced cost can be achieved by blending diabetes education and DM. Diabetes educators are a critical part of the management team and, with their arsenal of goal setting and behavior change techniques, are an essential component for the success of diabetes DM programs. Additional research needs to be undertaken to identify effective ways to integrate diabetes educators and education into DM and to assess clinical, behavioral, and economic outcomes arising from such programs.

  15. Deficiencies in postgraduate training for healthcare professionals who provide diabetes education and support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byrne, J. L.; Davies, Melanie J; Willaing, I.

    2017-01-01

    : The present study shows that healthcare professionals report being insufficiently equipped to provide diabetes self-management education, including emotional and psychological aspects of diabetes, and many are not receiving postgraduate training in any part (including medical care) of the management......Aims: To consider the global provision of self-management diabetes education and training for healthcare professionals using data from the second Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs (DAWN2) study. Methods: A total of 4785 healthcare professionals caring for people with diabetes were surveyed in 17.......6–70.6% variation). Training in psychological management was low (19.1%), ranging from 3.6 to 36.5%, while 20.4% (a range of 3.6–36.4% across countries) had received no postgraduate training. Overall, the greatest training need was in the management of psychological aspects of diabetes (59.5%). For some, training...

  16. Education as prescription for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: compliance and efficacy in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi Yeon; Suh, Sunghwan; Jin, Sang-Man; Kim, Se Won; Bae, Ji Cheol; Hur, Kyu Yeon; Kim, Sung Hye; Rha, Mi Yong; Cho, Young Yun; Lee, Myung-Shik; Lee, Moon Kyu; Kim, Kwang-Won; Kim, Jae Hyeon

    2012-12-01

    Diabetes self-management education has an important role in diabetes management. The efficacy of education has been proven in several randomized trials. However, the status of diabetes education programs in real Korean clinical practice has not yet been evaluated in terms of patient compliance with the education prescription. We retrospectively analyzed clinical and laboratory data from all patients who were ordered to undergo diabetes education during 2009 at Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Korea (n=2,291). After excluding ineligible subjects, 588 patients were included in the analysis. Among the 588 patients, 433 received education. The overall compliance rate was 73.6%, which was significantly higher in the subjects with a short duration or living in a rural area compared to those with a long duration (85.0% vs. 65.1%, respectively; Ppatients refuse to get education despite having a prescription from their physician. This refusal rate was higher in the patients with long-standing diabetes or in urban residence. Furthermore, education was more effective in patients with a short duration of diabetes in clinical practice.

  17. Educational interventions for knowledge on the disease, treatment adherence and control of diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueira, Ana Laura Galhardo; Boas, Lilian Cristiane Gomes Villas; Coelho, Anna Claudia Martins; Freitas, Maria Cristina Foss de; Pace, Ana Emilia

    2017-04-20

    to assess the effect of educational interventions for knowledge on the disease, medication treatment adherence and glycemic control of diabetes mellitus patients. evaluation research with "before and after" design, developed in a sample of 82 type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. To collect the data, the Brazilian version of the Diabetes Knowledge Scale (DKN-A), the Measure of Adherence to Treatments and the electronic system at the place of study were used. The data were collected before and after the end of the educational interventions. The educational activities were developed within 12 months, mediated by the Diabetes Conversation Maps, using the Cognitive Social Theory to conduct the interventions. the knowledge on the disease (pknowledge about diabetes mellitus, the medication treatment adherence and the glycated hemoglobin rates.

  18. THE MOBILE SPACE AND MOBILE TARGETING ENVIRONMENT FOR INTERNET USERS: FEATURES OF MODEL SUBMISSION AND USING IN EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Bykov

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Article submitted the results of the analysis of the use of mobile devices in education. The substantiation of the definition of user mobility in the Internet space, taking into account the variability of mobile devices and communications. The use of mobile devices in the educational process is based on the paradigm of open and equal access to quality education. Considered the technology of using different types of devices and their functions . The conditions of user mobility in the internet environment, the factors influencing it, the creation and storage of mobile communications resources . Provided with basic mathematical model of user behavior in a virtual network. A model of migration as a user from device to device , and its geographic move , and then use the resulting model for the design of distance learning systems . Preliminary forecasts have been made on the development of education in the transition from the remote technology to open. It is assumed the appearance of new types of personal devices that will combine the power of a desktop PC and the autonomy of smartphones with constant access for broadband wireless connection to the Internet. The use of cloud technology to store and process information resources training helps centralize and synchronize data and access to them from different devices.

  19. Internet Sexualities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döring, Nicola

    The term “internet sexuality” (or OSA, online sexual activities) refers to sexual-related content and activities observable on the internet (cf. Adams, Oye, & Parker, 2003; Cooper, McLoughlin, & Campbell, 2000; Leiblum & Döring, 2002). It designates a variety of sexual phenomena (e.g., pornography, sex education, sexual contacts) related to a wide spectrum of online services and applications (e.g., websites, online chat rooms, peer-to-peer networks). If an even broader range of computer networks - such as the Usenet or bulletin board systems - is included in this extensional definition, one speaks of “online sexuality” or “cybersexuality.”

  20. A Comparative Study of University of Wisconsin-Stout Freshmen and Senior Education Major's Computing and Internet Technology Skills/Knowledge and Associated Learning Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sveum, Evan Charles

    2010-01-01

    A study comparing University of Wisconsin-Stout freshmen and senior education majors' computing and Internet technology skills/knowledge and associated learning experiences was conducted. Instruments used in this study included the IC[superscript 3][R] Exam by Certiport, Inc. and the investigator's Computing and Internet Skills Learning…

  1. Improving Diabetes Outcomes Using a Web-Based Registry and Interactive Education: A Multisite Collaborative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Robert W.; Fletcher, Jason; Kelly, Kim F.; Shea, Laura A.; Spence, Maureen M.; Sullivan, Janet N.; Cerniglia, Joan R.; Yang, YoonJung

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: To support the adoption of guideline concordant care by primary care practices, the New York Diabetes Coalition (NYDC) promoted use of an electronic diabetes registry and developed an interactive educational module on using the registry and improving patient communication. The NYDC hypothesized that use of a registry with immediate…

  2. Interest of the therapeutic education in patients with type 2 diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Henda Jamoussi

    2016-01-28

    Jan 28, 2016 ... type 2 diabetes observing the fast of Ramadan. Henda Jamoussi ... Objectives: Evaluate the impact of a structured protocol of therapeutic education in a sample of type 2 diabetes ... Ensure a balanced food intake in both qualitative and .... favored by a bad adaptation of hypoglycemic therapy and the jump ...

  3. Using a robot to personalise health education for children with diabetes type 1: a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanson Henkemans, O.A.; Bierman, B.P.B.; Janssen, J.; Neerincx, M.A.; Looije, R.; Bosch, H. van der; Giessen, J.A.M. van der

    2013-01-01

    Objective Assess the effects of personalised robot behaviours on the enjoyment and motivation of children (8–12) with diabetes, and on their acquisition of health knowledge, in educational play. Methods Children (N = 5) played diabetes quizzes against a personal or neutral robot on three occasions:

  4. Role of Health Educators in Assisting Youth and Adolescents with Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, Gail A.; Evert, Alison; Shea, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Management of diabetes in children requires balancing nutrition, physical activity and medication on a daily basis in order to achieve blood glucose targets. The health educator can assist children and their families in meeting their diabetes management goals by better understanding the current recommendations and tasks involved to achieve them.…

  5. An Analysis, Using Concept Mapping, of Diabetic Patients' Knowledge, before and after Patient Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, C.; d'Ivernois, J. F.; Assal, J. P.; Slama, G.; Hivon, R.

    2002-01-01

    Assesses whether concept maps used with diabetic patients could describe their cognitive structure, before and after having followed an educational program. Involves 10 diabetic patients and shows that concept maps can be a suitable technique to explore the type and organization of the patients' prior knowledge and to visualize what they have…

  6. Gender, diabetes education, and psychosocial factors are associated with persistent poor glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes in the Joint Asia Diabetes Evaluation (JADE) program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Junmei; Yeung, Roseanne; Luk, Andrea; Tutino, Greg; Zhang, Yuying; Kong, Alice; Chung, Harriet; Wong, Rebecca; Ozaki, Risa; Ma, Ronald; Tsang, Chiu-Chi; Tong, Peter; So, Wingyee; Chan, Juliana

    2016-01-01

    Factors associated with persistent poor glycemic control were explored in patients with type 2 diabetes under the Joint Asia Diabetes Evaluation (JADE) program. Chinese adults enrolled in JADE with HbA1c ≥8% at initial comprehensive assessment (CA1) and repeat assessment were analyzed. The improved group was defined as those with a ≥1% absolute reduction in HbA1c, and the unimproved group was those with patients with HbA1c ≥8% at baseline, 1450 underwent repeat CA. After a median interval of 1.7 years (interquartile range[IQR] 1.1-2.2) between CA1 and CA2, the unimproved group (n = 677) had a mean 0.4% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.3%, 0.5%) increase in HbA1c compared with a mean 2.8% reduction (95% CI -2.9, -2.6%) in the improved group (n = 773). The unimproved group had a female preponderance with lower education level, and was more likely to be insulin treated. Patients in the improved group received more diabetes education between CAs with improved self-care behaviors, whereas the unimproved group had worsening of health-related quality of life at CA2. Apart from female gender, long disease duration, low educational level, obesity, retinopathy, history of hypoglycemia, and insulin use, lack of education from diabetes nurses between CAs had the strongest association for persistent poor glycemic control. These results highlight the multidimensional nature of glycemic control, and the importance of diabetes education and optimizing diabetes care by considering psychosocial factors. © 2015 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. Geophysics education on the Internet: Course production and assessment of our MOOC, "Deep Earth Science"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Y.; Tazawa, K.; Sugie, K.; Sakuraba, H.; Hideki, M.; Tagawa, S.; Cross, S. J.

    2016-12-01

    Recently, massive open online courses (MOOC or MOOCs) have gained wide-spread attention as a new educational platform delivered via the internet. Many leading institutions all over the world have provided many fascinating MOOC courses in various fields. Students enrolled in MOOCs study their interested topic in a course not only by watching video lectures, reading texts, and answering questions, but also by utilizing interactive online tools such as discussion boards, Q&A sessions and peer assessments. MOOC is also gaining popularity as a way to do outreach activity and diffuse research results. Tokyo Institute of Technology provided its 1st MOOC, "Introduction to Deep Earth Science Part1" on edX, which is one of the largest MOOC providers. This four-week-long course was designed for 1st year college students and with two learning goals in this course; 1) to introduce students to the fascinating knowledge of solid Earth, 2) to provide an opportunity to use scientific thinking as well as to show how interesting and exciting science can be. This course contained materials such as 1) structure of inside of the Earth 2) internal temperature of the earth and how it is estimated and 3) chemical compositions and dynamics inside the earth. After the end of the provision of Part1, this course was re-made as "Introduction to Deep Earth Science"(so to speak, Part2) on the basis of opinions obtained from students who have attended our course and student teaching assistants (TA) who have run and produced this course. In this presentation, we will explain our MOOC making model, which is a team based course creation effort between the course instructor, Tokyo Tech Online Education Development Office (OEDO) staff and TA students. Moreover, we will share details and feedback of Part1 received from some of the 5000 enrolled students from 150 counties and regions, and report the implementation of Part2 in the light of challenges resulted from Part1.

  8. Reasons why patients referred to diabetes education programmes choose not to attend: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horigan, G; Davies, M; Findlay-White, F; Chaney, D; Coates, V

    2017-01-01

    To identify the reasons why those offered a place on diabetes education programmes declined the opportunity. It is well established that diabetes education is critical to optimum diabetes care; it improves metabolic control, prevents complications, improves quality of life and empowers people to make informed choices to manage their condition. Despite the significant clinical and personal rewards offered by diabetes education, programmes are underused, with a significant proportion of patients choosing not to attend. A systematic search of the following databases was conducted for the period from 2005-2015: Medline; EMBASE; Scopus; CINAHL; and PsycINFO. Studies that met the inclusion criteria focusing on patient-reported reasons for non-attendance at structured diabetes education were selected. A total of 12 studies spanning quantitative and qualitative methodologies were included. The selected studies were published in Europe, USA, Pakistan, Canada and India, with a total sample size of 2260 people. Two broad categories of non-attender were identified: 1) those who could not attend for logistical, medical or financial reasons (e.g. timing, costs or existing comorbidities) and 2) those who would not attend because they perceived no benefit from doing so, felt they had sufficient knowledge already or had emotional and cultural reasons (e.g. no perceived problem, denial or negative feelings towards education). Diabetes education was declined for many reasons, and the range of expressed reasons was more diverse and complex than anticipated. New and innovative methods of delivering diabetes education are required which address the needs of people with diabetes whilst maintaining quality and efficiency. © 2016 Diabetes UK.

  9. Use of Internet for Academic Purposes among Students in Malaysian Institutions of Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayub, Ahmad Fauzi Mohd; Hamid, Wan Hamzari Wan; Nawawi, Mokhtar Hj.

    2014-01-01

    Students in institutions of higher learning should take advantage of information available on the Internet in their coursework. The Internet is also utilised for social and other non-academic functions. Hence, it is desirable, for students to strike a balance in the time spent online for academic and non-academic purposes. In this study, the…

  10. The significant impact of education, poverty, and race on Internet-based research participant engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartz, Sarah M; Quan, Tiffany; Ibiebele, Abiye; Fisher, Sherri L; Olfson, Emily; Salyer, Patricia; Bierut, Laura J

    2017-02-01

    Internet-based technologies are increasingly being used for research studies. However, it is not known whether Internet-based approaches will effectively engage participants from diverse racial and socioeconomic backgrounds. A total of 967 participants were recruited and offered genetic ancestry results. We evaluated viewing Internet-based genetic ancestry results among participants who expressed high interest in obtaining the results. Of the participants, 64% stated that they were very or extremely interested in their genetic ancestry results. Among interested participants, individuals with a high school diploma (n = 473) viewed their results 19% of the time relative to 4% of the 145 participants without a diploma (P Internet-based research was low despite high reported interest. This suggests that explicit strategies should be developed to increase diversity in Internet-based research.Genet Med 19 2, 240-243.

  11. Differences in High School and College Students' Basic Knowledge and Perceived Education of Internet Safety: Do High School Students Really Benefit from the Children's Internet Protection Act?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zheng

    2009-01-01

    The Children's Internet Protection Act (CIPA; 2000) requires an Internet filtering and public awareness strategy to protect children under 17 from harmful visual Internet depictions. This study compared high school students who went online with the CIPA restriction and college students who went online without the restriction in order to…

  12. The role of primary health care in patient education for diabetes control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koura, M R; Khairy, A E; Abdel-Aal, N M; Mohamed, H F; Amin, G A; Sabra, A Y

    2001-01-01

    The major components of diabetes management are dietary therapy, exercise and drug treatment. Therefore, education of people with diabetes is the cornerstone of management. The aim of the present work was to study the role of primary health care (PHC) in patient education for diabetes control in Alexandria. Accordingly, the knowledge and perception concerning diabetes and its management of all 88 PHC physicians and 104 nurses working in the two rural health centers and two randomly chosen urban health centers of Alexandria governorate were assessed by pre-designed self-administered questionnaire. All diabetic patients over 20 years of age attending the study health facilities over a period of two months were assessed for their knowledge and attitude concerning diabetes and self-management and asked about their degree of satisfaction with the provided PHC services by a pre-designed interview questionnaire. They amounted to 560 diabetic patients. The results revealed that the PHC physicians had sufficient knowledge about causes and complications of the disease, but insufficient knowledge about diagnosis and management, as only 10.2% & 4.5% of the physicians recognized the importance of regular exercise and patient education for diabetes management. Some misconceptions and false beliefs were observed among PHC nurses, as many of them considered diabetes a contagious disease or primarily caused by stress; that liver failure, hearing impairment and splenomegaly are among the complications of diabetes and that young age and immunodeficiency disorders are among the risk factors for developing diabetes. Moreover, most of them believed that the amount of carbohydrates given to diabetic patients should be reduced or even completely restricted; that vitamins are essential for all diabetic patients and that hot-water bottles are good for providing warmth to the diabetic feet. They also disagreed on the use of artificial sweeteners as sugar substitutes. Most of the diabetic

  13. Pilot trial of diabetes self-management education in the hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korytkowski, Mary T; Koerbel, Glory L; Kotagal, Lindsey; Donihi, Amy; DiNardo, Monica M

    2014-10-01

    Diabetes self-management education (DSME) is recommended for all patients with diabetes. Current estimates indicate that patients receive DSME, increasing risk for hospitalization which occurs more frequently with diabetes. Hospitalization presents opportunities to provide DSME, potentially decreasing readmissions. To address this, we investigated the feasibility of providing DSME to inpatients with diabetes. Patients hospitalized on four medicine units were randomized to receive DSME (Education Group) (n=9) prescribed by a certified diabetes educator and delivered by a registered nurse, or Usual Care (n=12). Participants completed Diabetes Knowledge Tests (DKT), Medical Outcomes Short Form (SF-36), Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire (DTSQ), and the DTSQ-inpatient (DTSQ-IP). Bedside capillary blood glucoses (CBG) on day of admission, randomization and discharge were compared. There were no group differences in demographics, diabetes treatment, admission CBG (186±93 mg/dL vs. 219±84 mg/dL, p=0.40), DKT scores (Education vs. Usual Care 48±25 vs. 68±19, p=0.09), SF-36, and DTSQ scores (28±6 vs. 25±7, p=0.41). Patients receiving education reported more satisfaction with inpatient treatment (83±13 vs. 65±19, p=0.03), less hyperglycemia prior to (2.7±4.5 vs. 4.5±1.4, p=0.03) and during hospitalization (3.9±1.9 vs. 5.5±1.2, p=0.04); and had lower mean discharge CBG (159±38 mg/dL vs. 211±67 mg/dL, p=0.02). Inpatient diabetes education has potential to improve treatment satisfaction, and reduce CBG. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Randomized controlled trial for assessment of Internet of Things system to guide intensive glucose control in diabetes outpatients: Nagoya Health Navigator Study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onoue, Takeshi; Goto, Motomitsu; Kobayashi, Tomoko; Tominaga, Takashi; Ando, Masahiko; Honda, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Yasuko; Tosaki, Takahiro; Yokoi, Hisashi; Kato, Sawako; Maruyama, Shoichi; Arima, Hiroshi

    2017-08-01

    The Internet of Things (IoT) allows collecting vast amounts of health-relevant data such as daily activity, body weight (BW), and blood pressure (BP) automatically. The use of IoT devices to monitor diabetic patients has been studied, but could not evaluate IoT-dependent effects because health data were not measured in control groups. This multicenter, open-label, randomized, parallel group study will compare the impact of intensive health guidance using IoT and conventional medical guidance on glucose control. It will be conducted in outpatients with type 2 diabetes for a period of 6 months. IoT devices to measure amount of daily activity, BW, and BP will be provided to IoT group patients. Healthcare professionals (HCPs) will provide appropriate feedback according to the data. Non-IoT control, patients will be given measurement devices that do not have a feedback function. The primary outcome is glycated hemoglobin at 6 months. The study has already enrolled 101 patients, 50 in the IoT group and 51 in the non-IoT group, at the two participating outpatient clinics. The baseline characteristics of two groups did not differ, except for triglycerides. This will be the first randomized, controlled study to evaluate IoT-dependent effects of intensive feedback from HCPs. The results will validate a new method of health-data collection and provision of feedback suitable for diabetes support with increased effectiveness and low cost.

  15. Evaluation of a Worksite Diabetes Education Program at a Large Urban Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renda, Susan; Baernholdt, Marianne; Becker, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Evidence suggests that diabetes education can be delivered at the worksite to better support employees' diabetes self-management and improve productivity and health care costs. This study was conducted to address the feasibility of a diabetes worksite education program for employees at a large urban academic health care institution. The diabetes education program was delivered in the diabetes center at the institution, a resource that was previously underutilized by employees. Through collaboration with groups in the institution, 20 employees of diverse ethnicity participated in the worksite diabetes education program with positive outcomes: improved glycemic control measured (HbA1c), attainment of self-management goals, and satisfaction with the program. Work absences trended downward, but numbers of hospitalizations and emergency department visits were unchanged in the 3 months following education. Recommendations include replication of the study with more employee participation and program evaluation over a longer period of time to continue assessment of employees' educational needs. © 2015 The Author(s).

  16. Critical assessment of pediatric neurosurgery patient/parent educational information obtained via the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Michael; Daugherty, Christopher; Ben Khallouq, Bertha; Maugans, Todd

    2018-05-01

    OBJECTIVE The Internet is used frequently by patients and family members to acquire information about pediatric neurosurgical conditions. The sources, nature, accuracy, and usefulness of this information have not been examined recently. The authors analyzed the results from searches of 10 common pediatric neurosurgical terms using a novel scoring test to assess the value of the educational information obtained. METHODS Google and Bing searches were performed for 10 common pediatric neurosurgical topics (concussion, craniosynostosis, hydrocephalus, pediatric brain tumor, pediatric Chiari malformation, pediatric epilepsy surgery, pediatric neurosurgery, plagiocephaly, spina bifida, and tethered spinal cord). The first 10 "hits" obtained with each search engine were analyzed using the Currency, Relevance, Authority, Accuracy, and Purpose (CRAAP) test, which assigns a numerical score in each of 5 domains. Agreement between results was assessed for 1) concurrent searches with Google and Bing; 2) Google searches over time (6 months apart); 3) Google searches using mobile and PC platforms concurrently; and 4) searches using privacy settings. Readability was assessed with an online analytical tool. RESULTS Google and Bing searches yielded information with similar CRAAP scores (mean 72% and 75%, respectively), but with frequently differing results (58% concordance/matching results). There was a high level of agreement (72% concordance) over time for Google searches and also between searches using general and privacy settings (92% concordance). Government sources scored the best in both CRAAP score and readability. Hospitals and universities were the most prevalent sources, but these sources had the lowest CRAAP scores, due in part to an abundance of self-marketing. The CRAAP scores for mobile and desktop platforms did not differ significantly (p = 0.49). CONCLUSIONS Google and Bing searches yielded useful educational information, using either mobile or PC platforms. Most

  17. Implementation and evaluation of a low health literacy and culturally sensitive diabetes education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swavely, Deborah; Vorderstrasse, Allison; Maldonado, Edgardo; Eid, Sherrine; Etchason, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Low health literacy is more prevalent in persons with limited education, members of ethnic minorities, and those who speak English as a second language, and is associated with multiple adverse diabetes-related health outcomes. This study examined the effectiveness of a low health literacy and culturally sensitive diabetes education program for economically and socially disadvantaged adult patients with type 2 diabetes. A pre-post prospective study design was used to examine outcomes over 12 months. Outcome measures included diabetes knowledge, self-efficacy, and self-care, measured using reliable and valid survey tools, and A1C. Over this period of time 277 patients were enrolled in the program, with 106 participants completing survey data. At the completion of the program patients had significant improvements in diabetes knowledge (p literacy improves short-term outcomes. © 2013 National Association for Healthcare Quality.

  18. The effects of Internet or interactive computer-based patient education in the field of breast cancer: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryhänen, Anne M; Siekkinen, Mervi; Rankinen, Sirkku; Korvenranta, Heikki; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to analyze what kind of Internet or interactive computer-based patient education programs have been developed and to analyze the effectiveness of these programs in the field of breast cancer patient education. Patient education for breast cancer patients is an important intervention to empower the patient. However, we know very little about the effects and potential of Internet-based patient education in the empowerment of breast cancer patients. Complete databases were searched covering the period from the beginning of each database to November 2008. Studies were included if they concerned patient education for breast cancer patients with Internet or interactive computer programs and were based on randomized controlled, on clinical trials or quasi-experimental studies. We identified 14 articles involving 2374 participants. The design was randomized controlled trial in nine papers, in two papers clinical trial and in three quasi-experimental. Seven of the studies were randomized to experimental and control groups, in two papers participants were grouped by ethnic and racial differences and by mode of Internet use and three studies measured the same group pre- and post-tests after using a computer program. The interventions used were described as interactive computer or multimedia programs and use of the Internet. The methodological solutions of the studies varied. The effects of the studies were diverse except for knowledge-related issues. Internet or interactive computer-based patient education programs in the care of breast cancer patients may have positive effect increasing breast cancer knowledge. The results suggest a positive relationship between the Internet or computer-based patient education program use and the knowledge level of patients with breast cancer but a diverse relationship between patient's participation and other outcome measures. There is need to develop and research more Internet-based patient education

  19. Effectiveness of a diabetes education and self management programme (DESMOND) for people with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khunti, Kamlesh; Gray, Laura J.; Skinner, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To measure whether the benefits of a single education and self management structured programme for people with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus are sustained at three years. Design: Three year follow-up of a multicentre cluster randomised controlled trial in primary care....... Intervention: A structured group education programme for six hours delivered in the community by two trained healthcare professional educators compared with usual care. Main outcome measures: The primary outcome was glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) levels. The secondary outcomes were blood pressure, weight, blood...... lipid levels, smoking status, physical activity, quality of life, beliefs about illness, depression, emotional impact of diabetes, and drug use at three years. Results: HbA1c levels at three years had decreased in both groups. After adjusting for baseline and cluster the difference was not significant...

  20. Diabetes Case Management in Primary Care: The New Brunswick Experience and Expanding the Practice of the Certified Diabetes Educator Nurse into Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Shelley L

    2015-08-01

    The role of the outreach diabetes case manager in New Brunswick, Canada, was first developed in the Moncton Area of Horizon Health Network in response to a physician-identified gap between patients' diagnoses of diabetes and their attendance at the local diabetes education centre. This model of collaborative interprofessional practice increases support for primary care providers and people living with diabetes in that they are being provided the services of certified diabetes educators who can address knowledge gaps with respect to evidence-based guidelines and best practice, promote advancement of diabetes and chronic-disease management therapies and support adherence to treatment plans and self-management practices. This report chronicles a review of the implementation, expansion and evaluation of the outreach diabetes case manager model in the province of New Brunswick, Canada, along with the rationale for development of the role for registered nurses in other jurisdictions. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. CDE Perspectives of Providing New-Onset Type 1 Diabetes Education Using Formal Vignettes and Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramchandani, Neesha; Johnson, Kim; Cullen, Karen; Hamm, Terri; Bisordi, Jean; Sullivan-Bolyai, Susan

    2017-02-01

    Purpose The purpose of this article is to describe the 4 Parent Education Through Simulation-Diabetes (PETS-D) nurse certified diabetes educators' (CDEs) perspectives of teaching parents of children with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) early diabetes management skills using formal vignettes and a human patient simulator/human patient simulation (HPS) to augment/enhance the teaching-learning process. Methods A qualitative descriptive approach was used. Four CDEs were interviewed by phone about their teaching experiences. Meticulous notes were taken. Data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results The vignettes (and use of HPS) provided structure, especially for parents who were struggling to learn. Certified diabetes educators described a short learning curve to master the use of the HPS manikin. Human patient simulation-enhanced education was described as helpful for teaching multiple caregivers about diabetes. Certified diabetes educators also described factors that affect parent learning, mechanical issues with the HPS, and additional space requirements for HPS-enhanced education. Conclusion Vignettes and HPS-enhanced education can successfully be used to educate parents of children with new-onset T1DM and were preferred by the CDEs when compared with previous teaching strategies. The results of this study support the use of both vignette-based and HPS-enhanced education when a child is newly diagnosed with T1DM. Further studies need to be done to see if these effects persist with different populations, during different stages of the disease, and for individuals with other chronic illnesses.

  2. Type 2 Diabetes Education and Support in a Virtual Environment: A Secondary Analysis of Synchronously Exchanged Social Interaction and Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewinski, Allison A; Anderson, Ruth A; Vorderstrasse, Allison A; Fisher, Edwin B; Pan, Wei; Johnson, Constance M

    2018-02-21

    Virtual environments (VEs) facilitate interaction and support among individuals with chronic illness, yet the characteristics of these VE interactions remain unknown. The objective of this study was to describe social interaction and support among individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2D) who interacted in a VE. Data included VE-mediated synchronous conversations and text-chat and asynchronous emails and discussion board posts from a study that facilitated interaction among individuals with T2D and diabetes educators (N=24) in 2 types of sessions: education and support. VE interactions consisted of communication techniques (how individuals interact in the VE), expressions of self-management (T2D-related topics), depth (personalization of topics), and breadth (number of topics discussed). Individuals exchanged support more often in the education (723/1170, 61.79%) than in the support (406/1170, 34.70%) sessions or outside session time (41/1170, 3.50%). Of all support exchanges, 535/1170 (45.73%) were informational, 377/1170 (32.22%) were emotional, 217/1170 (18.55%) were appraisal, and 41/1170 (3.50%) were instrumental. When comparing session types, education sessions predominately provided informational support (357/723, 49.4%), and the support sessions predominately provided emotional (159/406, 39.2%) and informational (159/406, 39.2%) support. VE-mediated interactions resemble those in face-to-face environments, as individuals in VEs engage in bidirectional exchanges with others to obtain self-management education and support. Similar to face-to-face environments, individuals in the VE revealed personal information, sought information, and exchanged support during the moderated education sessions and unstructured support sessions. With this versatility, VEs are able to contribute substantially to support for those with diabetes and, very likely, other chronic diseases. ©Allison A Lewinski, Ruth A Anderson, Allison A Vorderstrasse, Edwin B Fisher, Wei Pan, Constance

  3. The effects of Internet-based exercise compared with supervised group exercise in people with type 2 diabetes: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinci, Buket; Yeldan, Ipek; Satman, Ilhan; Dirican, Ahmet; Ozdincler, Arzu Razak

    2018-06-01

    To compare the effects of Internet-based exercise on glycaemic control, blood lipids, body composition, physical activity level, functional capacity, and quality of life with supervised group exercise in patients with type 2 diabetes. Single-blind, randomized controlled study. A Faculty of Health Sciences. A total of 65 patients with type 2 diabetes (47 women, 18 men). Group A ( n = 22), control group - physical activity counselling once with a brochure. Group B ( n = 22), supervised group-based exercise, three days per week for eight weeks. Group C ( n = 21), Internet-based exercise following the same programme via a website. Primary outcomes - glycosylated haemoglobin, fasting blood glucose, high-density and low-density lipoprotein, triglyceride, and cholesterol. Secondary outcomes - waist and hip circumferences, body mass index, number of steps, six-minute walking test, and Euro-Quality of Life-5 Dimension. After treatment, glycaemic control (mean change for Group B; Group C; -0.80%, -0.91%, P = 0.003), waist circumference (-4.23 cm, 5.64 cm, P = 0.006), and quality of life (0.26, 0.15, P = 0.013) significantly improved in both training groups compared with the control group. Fasting blood glucose (-46.86 mg/dL, P = 0.009) and hip circumference (-2.7 cm, P = 0.011) were significantly decreased in Group B and total cholesterol (-16.4 mg/dL, P = 0.028), six-minute walking distance (30.5 m, P = 0.01), and number of steps (1258.05, P = 0.023) significantly improved in Group C compared with control group. Group B and Group C changed with equal magnitude. In type 2 diabetes, supervised group-based and Internet-based exercise can improve equally glycaemic control, waist circumference, and quality of life, and both are better than simply counselling.

  4. Design and evaluation of an Internet based data repository and visualization system for science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalphond, James M.

    In modern classrooms, scientific probes are often used in science labs to engage students in inquiry-based learning. Many of these probes will never leave the classroom, closing the door on real world experimentation that may engage students. Also, these tools do not encourage students to share data across classrooms or schools. To address these limitations, we have developed a web-based system for collecting, storing, and visualizing sensor data, as well as a hardware package to interface existing classroom probes. This system, The Internet System for Networked Sensor Experimentation (iSENSE), was created to address these limitations. Development of the system began in 2007 and has proceeded through four phases: proof-of-concept prototype, technology demonstration, initial classroom deployment, and classroom testing. User testing and feedback during these phases guided development of the system. This thesis includes lessons learned during development and evaluation of the system in the hands of teachers and students. We developed three evaluations of this practical use. The first evaluation involved working closely with teachers to encourage them to integrate activities using the iSENSE system into their existing curriculum. We were looking for strengths of the approach and ease of integration. Second, we developed three "Activity Labs," which teachers used as embedded assessments. In these activities, students were asked to answer questions based on experiments or visualizations already entered into the iSENSE website. Lastly, teachers were interviewed after using the system to determine what they found valuable. This thesis makes contributions in two areas. It shows how an iterative design process was used to develop a system used in a science classroom, and it presents an analysis of the educational impact of the system on teachers and students.

  5. Readability assessment of internet-based patient education materials related to facial fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanghvi, Saurin; Cherla, Deepa V; Shukla, Pratik A; Eloy, Jean Anderson

    2012-09-01

    Various professional societies, clinical practices, hospitals, and health care-related Web sites provide Internet-based patient education material (IPEMs) to the general public. However, this information may be written above the 6th-grade reading level recommended by the US Department of Health and Human Services. The purpose of this study is to assess the readability of facial fracture (FF)-related IPEMs and compare readability levels of IPEMs provided by four sources: professional societies, clinical practices, hospitals, and miscellaneous sources. Analysis of IPEMs on FFs available on Google.com. The readability of 41 FF-related IPEMs was assessed with four readability indices: Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level (FKGL), Flesch Reading Ease Score (FRES), Simple Measure of Gobbledygook (SMOG), and Gunning Frequency of Gobbledygook (Gunning FOG). Averages were evaluated against national recommendations and between each source using analysis of variance and t tests. Only 4.9% of IPEMs were written at or below the 6th-grade reading level, based on FKGL. The mean readability scores were: FRES 54.10, FKGL 9.89, SMOG 12.73, and Gunning FOG 12.98, translating into FF-related IPEMs being written at a "difficult" writing level, which is above the level of reading understanding of the average American adult. IPEMs related to FFs are written above the recommended 6th-grade reading level. Consequently, this information would be difficult to understand by the average US patient. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  6. Solving the barriers to diabetes education through the use of multimedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isarankura-Na-Ayudhya, Chartchalerm; Nantasenamat, Chanin; Dansethakul, Prabhop; Saetum, Pradermchai; Laosrivijit, Sirikul; Prachayasittikul, Virapong

    2010-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease that affects > 180 million people worldwide. It is persistent in Thai communities in spite of much effort in prevention and control. This study examined the knowledge capacity of villagers in the Klongmai community of Nakhon Pathom, Thailand, regarding diabetes by way of action research. A health status assessment and a survey of the community were carried out and used as the basis for designing an educational video on diabetes that is accessible regardless of age and educational background. Evaluations of the pre- and poststudy questionnaires were carried out using statistical analysis. The results indicated that the devised educational materials were effective in encouraging the community's self-awareness and perception of diabetes at the significance level of 0.05. Most importantly, the participants demonstrated proficiency in adapting the knowledge gained from the workshop to their own lifestyle.

  7. Higher Referrals for Diabetes Education in a Medical Home Model of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manard, William T; Syberg, Kevin; Behera, Anit; Salas, Joanne; Schneider, F David; Armbrecht, Eric; Hooks-Anderson, Denise; Crannage, Erica; Scherrer, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    The medical home model has been gaining attention from the health care community as a strategy for improved outcomes for management of chronic disease, including diabetes. The purpose of this study was to compare referrals for diabetes education among patients receiving care from a medical home model versus a traditional practice. Data were obtained from a large, university-affiliated primary care patient data registry. All patients (age 18-96 years) with a diagnosis of prediabetes or diabetes and seen by a physician at least twice during 2011 to 2013 were selected for inclusion. Multivariate regression models measuring the association between medical home status and referral to diabetes education were computed before and after adjusting for covariates. A significantly (P patients in a medical home than without a medical home (23.9% vs 13.5%) received a referral for diabetes education. After adjusting for covariates, medical home patients were 2.7 times more likely to receive a referral for diabetes education (odds ratio, 2.70; 95% confidence interval, 1.69-4.35). Patients in a medical home model were more likely to receive referrals for diabetes education than patients in a standard university-affiliated family medicine practice. Future longitudinal designs that match characteristics of patients with a medical home with those of patients without one will provide strong evidence to determine whether referral to diabetes education is a result of the medical home model of care independent of confounding factors. © Copyright 2016 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  8. Sugar Free with Justin T.: Diabetes Education through Community Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Justin B.; Donaldson, Joseph L.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the design, development, and delivery of an Extension community cable television program, "Sugar Free with Justin T.," in Roane County, Tennessee. The program targets diabetics, pre-diabetics, and those who care for them, with practical information and demonstrations to improve dietary quality. In addition to…

  9. Role of footcare education in diabetic foot status and glycaemic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Prevalence of type 2 diabetes among the adult population is rising globally. As the case detection rates of diabetes increase in adult Nigerians, managing the attendant (foot) complications has become an important health challenge. Poor practice of foot care and poor glycaemic control is potential risk for ...

  10. Myths about type 1 diabetes: Awareness and education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Kanungo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Not all healthcare professionals (HCPs are aware of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM and various myths still exist in the society and among HCPs. The medical challenge in treating T1DM is the confusion between T1DM and T2DM and its management, which is very common and is observed with both general practitioners and parents of children with diabetes. There are multiple medical and social myths associated with diabetes, especially T1DM, prevalent in society. Diabetes management requires support and collaboration from family, school and society, which is sometimes difficult, as they are more discouraging than positive. The launch of the Changing Diabetes in Children program in India has created a lot of awareness and is helping patients and their parents understand the disease.

  11. Audit of a diabetic health education program at a large Primary Health Care Center in Asir region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khaldi, Y M; Khan, M Y

    2000-09-01

    To evaluate the health education program in a large Primary Health Care Center, to find out the problems faced by the staff and to suggest the practical and relevant solutions. This study was carried out at Wasat Abha Primary Health Care Center, Asir region during 1997. The files of diabetics who attended the center were evaluated for health education topics by using a checklist. The essential structure of diabetic health education program was assessed by using another check list designed by the investigators. Data entry and analysis was carried out through SPSS package. Chi-square test was applied wherever necessary. The total number of diabetics who attended Wasat Abha Primary Health Care Center was 198. The duration of diabetes mellitus was 7.7+5.8 years. Ninety percent of these were married, 50.5% were educated and 79% were employed. Compliance to appointment was good in 60% and poor in 30% of diabetics. About 73% of the diabetics received at least one health education topic while 27% did not receive any health education at all. Only 33% of diabetic patients had adequate health education. Ninety one percent were provided with diabetic identification cards, 80% were explained about diabetes and 77% were educated about the role of diet. Essential structure for diabetes education program was found to be unsatisfactory. Effective diabetic health education program needs the availability of all essential structures, community participation and integration of the government and private sectors. The deficiencies in the structures and the process of health education programs in our practice are almost universal to other Primary Health Care Centers in the Asir region. Providing the Primary Health Care Centers with all essential structures and annual auditing are complimentary to a successful diabetic health education program.

  12. The effectiveness of multimedia education for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mei-Chuan; Hung, Chich-Hsiu; Yu, Ching-Yun; Berry, Diane C; Shin, Shyi-Jang; Hsu, Yu-Yun

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the effectiveness of two types of health education on improving knowledge concerning diabetes and insulin injection, insulin injection skills and self-efficacy, satisfaction with health education and glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and creatinine levels among patients with type 2 diabetes who began insulin therapy using a pen injector. Insulin therapy is recommended to facilitate the regulation of plasma glucose; however, patient's acceptance of insulin therapy is generally low. Healthcare providers should help them improve their knowledge of diabetes and insulin injection, as well as their insulin injection skills. A randomized repeated measures experimental study design. The experimental (n = 21) and control (n = 21) groups received multimedia and regular health education programmes, respectively from October 2013-August 2014. Four structured questionnaires were used and videotapes were applied to demonstrate injection skills. Generalized estimating equations showed that the experimental group's scores were significantly higher than those of the control group for diabetes and insulin injection knowledge, insulin injection skills, self-efficacy in insulin injection and satisfaction with health education. On the other hand, an analysis of covariance revealed glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and creatinine levels did not differ significantly between the two groups. Implementation of a multimedia diabetes education programme could improve patients' diabetes and insulin injection knowledge, insulin injection skills, self-efficacy in insulin injection and satisfaction with health education. Healthcare providers should improve quality of patient care by providing multimedia diabetes health education. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Physician-Directed Diabetes Education without a Medication Change and Associated Patient Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hun-Sung Kim

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundWhen patients with diabetes mellitus (DM are first referred to a hospital from primary health care clinics, physicians have to decide whether to administer an oral hypoglycemic agent (OHA immediately or postpone a medication change in favor of diabetes education regarding diet or exercise. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of diabetes education alone (without alterations in diabetes medication on blood glucose levels.MethodsThe study was conducted between January 2009 and December 2013 and included patients with DM. The glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c levels were evaluated at the first visit and after 3 months. During the first medical examination, a designated doctor also conducted a diabetes education session that mainly covered dietary management.ResultsPatients were divided into those who received no diabetic medications (n=66 and those who received an OHA (n=124. Education resulted in a marked decrease in HbA1c levels in the OHA group among patients who had DM for 10 years showed a slightly lower HbA1c target achievement rate of <6.5% (odds ratio, 0.089; P=0.0024.ConclusionFor patients who had DM for more than 5 years, higher doses or changes in medication were more effective than intensive active education. Therefore, individualized and customized education are needed for these patients. For patients with a shorter duration of DM, it may be more effective to provide initial intensive education for diabetes before prescribing medicines, such as OHAs.

  14. Effects of cancer comorbidity on disease management: making the case for diabetes education (a report from the SOAR program).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irizarry, Lauren; Li, Qijuan E; Duncan, Ian; Thurston, Andrew L; Fitzner, Karen A; Edwards, Beatrice J; McKoy-Bent, Judith M; Tulas, Katrina M; McKoy, June M

    2013-02-01

    Individuals with type II diabetes have an increased risk of cancer diagnosis (relative risk [RR]=1.12-2.50) and mortality (RR=1.4) compared to normoglycemic individuals. Biologic mechanisms, including mitogenic effects of insulin, hyperglycemia, and increased oxidative stress, as well as behavioral factors (eg, difficulty managing the comorbidity) may explain the elevated risk. To investigate the effects of the comorbidity on disease management, the authors compared diabetes education utilization in individuals with diabetes-cancer co-morbidity to utilization by individuals with diabetes in the absence of cancer. The effect of diabetes education on outcomes was further assessed in the subset of individuals with diabetes-cancer comorbidity. Administrative claims data were used for this analysis. The study population included individuals >60 years of age and members of both commercial and Medicare Advantage health plans from a private national database of payer data, but excluded Medicare fee for service and Medicaid patients. Most of these individuals were eligible to receive reimbursement for diabetes education. Diabetes education utilization was identified using procedure codes. Outcomes were assessed for a 3-year time period. There was little difference in diabetes education utilization between individuals with diabetes in the absence of cancer (3.8% utilization) and those with diabetes-cancer comorbidity (3.5% utilization). Individuals who receive diabetes education are more likely to have multiple HbA1c tests per year, fewer emergency department visits, fewer hospital admissions, and lower care-associated costs (except for outpatient and pharmacy averages). When diabetes coexists with cancer, management of diabetes often lags, making diabetes education an imperative.

  15. Epidemiological multicentre study on the education provided to patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in the Spanish Health Care System. The Forma2 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Donaire, J A; Franch-Nadal, J; Rodríguez-Fortúnez, P; Labrador-Barba, E; Orera-Peña, M L; Rodríguez de Miguel, M

    The purpose of the present study was to characterize the education that patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus receive, and to identify differences as regards the presence of insulin therapy or not. This crossover, multicentre and descriptive study involved 1066 Spanish physicians who completed a questionnaire on Internet. The physicians that responded had a mean of 26.0 years of experience in healthcare, and mainly worked in a walk-in clinic in an urban area. Physicians rated the level of patient knowledge about their disease on a 5.0 point-scale. Fifty percent of them indicated that they spent between 15 and 30min in educating patients at the time of diagnosis. Previous control with HbA1c>9%, presence of microvascular complications, and a low socio-cultural level, were factors associated with spending more time in education. This is the first study designed to evaluate the education provided to patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus from Spain. The time spent and the individualization of the education are important factors associated with better long-term control of the disease, and thus with the effectiveness of the clinical management. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. The National Diabetes Education Program at 20 Years: Lessons Learned and Plans for the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siminerio, Linda M; Albright, Ann; Fradkin, Judith; Gallivan, Joanne; McDivitt, Jude; Rodríguez, Betsy; Tuncer, Diane; Wong, Faye

    2018-02-01

    The National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) was established to translate findings from diabetes research studies into clinical and public health practice. Over 20 years, NDEP has built a program with partnership engagement that includes science-based resources for multiple population and stakeholder audiences. Throughout its history, NDEP has developed strategies and messages based on communication research and relied on established behavior change models from health education, communication, and social marketing. The program's success in continuing to engage diverse partners after 20 years has led to time-proven and high-quality resources that have been sustained. Today, NDEP maintains a national repository of diabetes education tools and resources that are high quality, science- and audience-based, culturally and linguistically appropriate, and available free of charge to a wide variety of audiences. This review looks back and describes NDEP's evolution in transforming and communicating diabetes management and type 2 diabetes prevention strategies through partnerships, campaigns, educational resources, and tools and identifies future opportunities and plans. © 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.

  17. The Effects of Intensive Nutrition Education on Late Middle-Aged Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Many patients with type 2 diabetes find it difficult to maintain good glycemic control. Undesirable glycemic control occurs greatly due to deficiencies of nutritional knowledge and difficulty in obtaining dietary prescriptions. The late middle-aged and elder individuals are the main populations that are affected by type 2 diabetes. The main purpose of this study was to investigate whether intensive nutrition education would make benefits for late middle-aged patients with type 2 diabetes. Method: 196 patients between 50 to 65 years old meeting type 2 diabetes criteria and eligible for the program were included in a single-blinded, 30-day centralized management of an education program in China. Participants in the program were randomly divided into a usual nutrition education group or an intensive nutrition education group. The usual nutrition education group was used as a control group and received only basic health advice and principles of diabetic diets at the beginning and the end of the study. Participants in the intensive nutrition education group were arranged to receive intensive nutritional lectures about diabetes for 30 days. The primary outcomes were the changes in weight, body mass index (BMI, fasting plasma glucose (FPG, 2-h postprandial plasma glucose (PG, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c, total glycerin (TG, total cholesterol (TC, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c. Results: After 30 days of intervention, FPG, PG, and HbA1c in the treatment group decreased significantly than the control group (p < 0.05. HbA1c reduced significantly by 0.6% in the intervention group. No significant differences in the change of blood lipids were observed between groups. However, TG, TC, and HDL-c made improvements compared with the baseline in the experimental group. Both groups had a reduction in weight and BMI within groups, especially in intensive nutrition education group. However

  18. Interest of the therapeutic education in patients with type 2 diabetes observing the fast of Ramadan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henda Jamoussi

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: Our results justify the interest of patient education centered on the month of Ramadan in all type 2 diabetic patients observing the fast of the holy month. This education should be continued during Ramadan in order to fulfill this religious rite safely.

  19. Psycho-educational interventions for children and young people with Type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murphy, H. R.; Rayman, G.; Skinner, T. C.

    2006-01-01

    Background: A systematic review of the literature in 2000 revealed numerous methodological shortcomings in education research, but in recent years progress has been made in the quantity and quality of psycho-educational intervention studies. Summary of contents: This review focuses on diabetes ed...

  20. Association of Education and Smoking Status on Risk of Diabetes Mellitus: A Population-Based Nationwide Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Hyeong; Noh, Juhwan; Choi, Jae-Woo; Park, Eun-Cheol

    2017-06-19

    Background: Exposure to smoke, including environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), is a well-known risk factor for diabetes. Low socioeconomic status, especially lack of education, is also a risk factor for diabetes. Therefore, we assessed the association of demographic, socioeconomic, clinical, and behavior risk factor-related variables and smoking status, including ETS exposure, with the prevalence of diabetes. Methods: Data were from the 2007-2013 Korea National Health and Nutritional Evaluation Survey (KNHANES). Multivariable logistic regression examined associations between various lifestyle and health factors and the prevalence of diabetes while controlling for potential confounding variables. Subgroup analysis was performed according to smoking status to determine factors associated with diabetes. Results: Of 19,303 individuals analyzed, 1325 (11.4%) had diabetes. Greater average age, male sex, lower educational level, unemployment, and coexisting health problems were significantly associated with diabetes. Individuals with only elementary, middle, or high school level education had significantly greater odds ratios ( p education, urban residence, National Health Insurance (NHI), hypertension, a lack of alcohol intake, and a lack of moderate physical activity. For diabetic smokers, there were significant associations ( p education, urban residence, a lack of moderate physical activity, a lack of alcohol intake, and NHI. Conclusions: The results suggested that smoking status, as well as ETS exposure, was associated with a higher prevalence of diabetes, especially in populations with less education. Thus, we should direct efforts for controlling diabetes toward individuals with lower levels of education and those who are smokers and nonsmokers exposed to ETS.

  1. Evaluating the Impact of Diabetes Self-Management Education Methods on Knowledge, Attitudes and Behaviours of Adult Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Laura; O'Connor, Colleen; Garcia, Alicia C

    2017-11-23

    Diabetes self-management refers to all activities patients undertake to care for their illness, promote health and prevent the long- and short-term effects of diabetes. This study compared the effectiveness of 2 diabetes self-management education methods by examining changes in glycated hemoglobin (A1C) levels and knowledge, attitudes and behaviours (KABs) after traditional group education (TE) or with diabetes conversation maps (CMs). The CMs group was postulated to show greater decrease in A1C levels and improved KABs scores compared to the TE group. A sample of 21 eligible clients from Diabetes Care Guelph were randomly assigned into 2 groups, 10 receiving education through CMs and 11 through TE. Changes in knowledge and attitude were determined by using questionnaires and repeated-measures pretest and post-test design before and after the education sessions. Changes in A1C levels were determined by comparing values at baseline and at 3 months after receiving diabetes education. Two focus groups were conducted to obtain participants' perceptions of the education methods and self-reported KABs changes. Significant differences in knowledge and attitude score changes were observed from baseline/initial education and after 3 months. Both groups had significant decreases in A1C levels from baseline to 3 months afterward. Focus groups revealed themes common to both groups, such as benefits of early education, need for multiple lifestyle behaviour changes and feelings of social support. CMs had significant impact and are effective for group education. The changes observed may lead to improved diabetes self-management, thus reducing costly health complications related to poorly controlled diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Education as Prescription for Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Compliance and Efficacy in Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Yeon Kim

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundDiabetes self-management education has an important role in diabetes management. The efficacy of education has been proven in several randomized trials. However, the status of diabetes education programs in real Korean clinical practice has not yet been evaluated in terms of patient compliance with the education prescription.MethodsWe retrospectively analyzed clinical and laboratory data from all patients who were ordered to undergo diabetes education during 2009 at Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Korea (n=2,291. After excluding ineligible subjects, 588 patients were included in the analysis.ResultsAmong the 588 patients, 433 received education. The overall compliance rate was 73.6%, which was significantly higher in the subjects with a short duration or living in a rural area compared to those with a long duration (85.0% vs. 65.1%, respectively; P<0.001 or living in an urban area (78.2% vs. 70.4%, respectively; P=0.037. The hemoglobin A1c decreased greater in the compliant group (from 7.84±1.54 at baseline to 6.79±1.06 at 3 months and 6.97±1.20 at 12 months after prescription in the compliant group vs. from 7.74±1.25 to 7.14±1.02 and 7.24±1.24 in the non-compliant group; P=0.001. The decrease in hemoglobin A1c was greater in the subjects with a short duration (P=0.032.ConclusionIn our study a large percent of patients refuse to get education despite having a prescription from their physician. This refusal rate was higher in the patients with long-standing diabetes or in urban residence. Furthermore, education was more effective in patients with a short duration of diabetes in clinical practice.

  3. Political, citizen and educational challenges of the use of Internet at school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Aróstegui Plaza

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on different topics related to democracy underpinning the current development and use of the Internet. In the three first sections, different concepts of democratic theory are discussed (what democracy at large is, what liberalism and neoliberalism are, and the meaning of radical or deliberative democracy. Then, the implications of the Internet for the society in general and for schools in particular are analysed. Finally, it is concluded that schools should not only train on how to use Information Technologies. Students’ training on searching for and selecting information is not enough either. It is also imperative to train students to use the Internet as a tool to get involved in the problems of our world as responsible citizens who act knowingly.

  4. A Systematic Review of Reviews Evaluating Technology-Enabled Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Deborah A; Gee, Perry M; Fatkin, Kathy J; Peeples, Malinda

    2017-09-01

    Since the introduction of mobile phones, technology has been increasingly used to enable diabetes self-management education and support. This timely systematic review summarizes how currently available technology impacts outcomes for people living with diabetes. A systematic review of high quality review articles and meta analyses focused on utilizing technology in diabetes self-management education and support services was conducted. Articles were included if published between January 2013 and January 2017. Twenty-five studies were included for analysis. The majority evaluated the use of mobile phones and secure messaging. Most studies described healthy eating, being active and metabolic monitoring as the predominant self-care behaviors evaluated. Eighteen of 25 reviews reported significant reduction in A1c as an outcome measure. Four key elements emerged as essential for improved A1c: (1) communication, (2) patient-generated health data, (3) education, and (4) feedback. Technology-enabled diabetes self-management solutions significantly improve A1c. The most effective interventions incorporated all the components of a technology-enabled self-management feedback loop that connected people with diabetes and their health care team using 2-way communication, analyzed patient-generated health data, tailored education, and individualized feedback. The evidence from this systematic review indicates that organizations, policy makers and payers should consider integrating these solutions in the design of diabetes self-management education and support services for population health and value-based care models. With the widespread adoption of mobile phones, digital health solutions that incorporate evidence-based, behaviorally designed interventions can improve the reach and access to diabetes self-management education and ongoing support.

  5. Design and evaluation of a personal robot playing a self-management education game with children with diabetes type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanson Henkemans, O.A.; Bierman, B.P.B.; Janssen, J.; Looije, R.; Neerincx, M.A.; Dooren, M.M.M. van; Vries, J.L.E. de; Burg, G.J. van der; Huisman, S.D.

    2017-01-01

    Objective To assess the effects of a personal robot, providing diabetes self-management education in a clinical setting on the pleasure, engagement and motivation to play a diabetes quiz of children (7–12) with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), and on their acquisition of knowledge about their

  6. Contexts of Learning: The PATOIS project and Internet-based teaching and learning in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Kilbride

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available This article is a reflection on the problems, challenges and strengths of network-based distance learning in archaeology. Based on the experience of one project - the PATOIS (Publications and Archives Teaching with Online Information Systems Project - it looks at how archaeologists might best respond (and by implication how they ought not to respond to the use of information technology in teaching. The PATOIS project is an attempt on behalf of a consortium of UK higher education institutions and allied research bodies to tell students about the information tools that are emerging in archaeology, and which are changing the culture of scholarship. Funded by the Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC and led by the Archaeology Data Service (ADS, PATOIS presents students with these new research tools and novel forms of academic literacy by direct exposure to 'primary' datasets. The PATOIS project is producing a set of Internet-based tutorials that lead students through different datasets and show how they may be deployed in research. This article describes the institutional and intellectual background to the project, and reports on the content of the tutorials themselves. Perhaps more importantly, it looks at the process through which PATOIS was developed, reviewing the challenges and constraints that the development team faced. Thereafter, we turn to the implementation of PATOIS in real teaching scenarios and look at how and when these have been successful as well as the challenges that remain unanswered. The project is not yet complete, so at this stage we can come to no firm conclusions about the long-term impact of PATOIS in facilitating change in undergraduate research training. Nonetheless, from the perspective of development work, the project has largely been completed, so those conclusions that may be drawn are most appropriately addressed to developers hoping or planning to undertake similar work in the future, or academics looking to

  7. Ideas and Inspirations: Good News about Diabetes Prevention and Management in Indian Country

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Standards of Care Diabetes Treatment Algorithms Diabetes Foot Care Training Tools for Diabetes Educators and Community Members Diabetes Educator Tools Diabetes Education Lesson Plan ...

  8. [Therapeutic education didactic techniques].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valverde, Maite; Vidal, Mercè; Jansa, Margarida

    2012-10-01

    This article includes an introduction to the role of Therapeutic Education for Diabetes treatment according to the recommendations of the American Diabetes Association (ADA), the Diabetes Education Study Group (DESG) of the "European Association for Study of Diabetes (EASD) and the clinical Practice Guidelines (CPG) of the Spanish Ministry of Health. We analyze theoretical models and the differences between teaching vs. learning as well as current trends (including Internet), that can facilitate meaningful learning of people with diabetes and their families and relatives. We analyze the differences, similarities, advantages and disadvantages of individual and group education. Finally, we describe different educational techniques (metaplan, case method, brainstorming, role playing, games, seminars, autobiography, forums, chats,..) applicable to individual, group or virtual education and its application depending on the learning objective.

  9. What do Diabetic Patients Search for on Internet – The Five Year Diabetes Specialized Website Experience Based on Analysis with Google Analytics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brož, J.; Cibulková, I.; Grygarová, D.; Janíčková Žďárská, D.; Brabec, Marek; Kulichová, D.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 17, Suppl. 1 (2015), A116-A117 ISSN 1520-9156. [ATTD 2015. International Conference on Advanced Technologies & Treatments for Diabetes /8./. 18.02.2015-21.02.2015, Paris] Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science

  10. An interactive internet-based continuing education course on sexually transmitted diseases for physicians and midwives in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canchihuaman, Fredy A; Garcia, Patricia J; Gloyd, Stephen S; Holmes, King K

    2011-05-09

    Clinicians in developing countries have had limited access to continuing education (CE) outside major cities, and CE strategies have had limited impact on sustainable change in performance. New educational tools could improve CE accessibility and effectiveness. The objective of this study was to evaluate an interactive Internet-based CE course on Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) management for clinicians in Peru. Participants included physicians and midwives in private practice drawn from a census of 10 Peruvian cities. The CE included a three-hour workshop for improving Internet skills, followed by a 22-hour online course on STD-syndrome-management, with subsequent educational support. The course used case-based clinical vignettes tailored to local STD problems. Knowledge and reported practices on STD management were assessed before, immediately after and at four months after completion of the course. Statistical analysis included parametric tests-linear regression multivariate analysis, paired t-test and repeated measures ANOVA using SPSS 14.0. Of 1,071 eligible clinicians, 510 agreed to participate, as did an additional 132 public sector clinicians. Of these 642 participants, 619 (96.4%) completed the course, and 596 (96.3%) took the four-month follow-up evaluation. Physician and midwife scores improved from 64.2% correct answers on the pre-test to 77.9% correct on the four-month follow-up test (pPeru, an Internet-based CE course was feasible, acceptable with high participation rates, and led to sustained improvement in knowledge at four months. Further studies are needed to test it as a model for improving the training of physicians, midwives, and other health care providers.

  11. An interactive internet-based continuing education course on sexually transmitted diseases for physicians and midwives in Peru.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredy A Canchihuaman

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Clinicians in developing countries have had limited access to continuing education (CE outside major cities, and CE strategies have had limited impact on sustainable change in performance. New educational tools could improve CE accessibility and effectiveness.The objective of this study was to evaluate an interactive Internet-based CE course on Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs management for clinicians in Peru. Participants included physicians and midwives in private practice drawn from a census of 10 Peruvian cities. The CE included a three-hour workshop for improving Internet skills, followed by a 22-hour online course on STD-syndrome-management, with subsequent educational support. The course used case-based clinical vignettes tailored to local STD problems. Knowledge and reported practices on STD management were assessed before, immediately after and at four months after completion of the course. Statistical analysis included parametric tests-linear regression multivariate analysis, paired t-test and repeated measures ANOVA using SPSS 14.0. Of 1,071 eligible clinicians, 510 agreed to participate, as did an additional 132 public sector clinicians. Of these 642 participants, 619 (96.4% completed the course, and 596 (96.3% took the four-month follow-up evaluation. Physician and midwife scores improved from 64.2% correct answers on the pre-test to 77.9% correct on the four-month follow-up test (p<0.001. Most participants (95% found the online course useful for their work needs. Self reported STD management practices did not change.Among physicians and midwives in Peru, an Internet-based CE course was feasible, acceptable with high participation rates, and led to sustained improvement in knowledge at four months. Further studies are needed to test it as a model for improving the training of physicians, midwives, and other health care providers.

  12. The effect of an education program on the knowledge level and attitudes about Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Paola de Pádua Gandra

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the impact of an education program on the knowledge level and attitudes about diabetes in diabetic patients. Methods: It was a before-and-after intervention study carried out in two moments: before and twelve months after implementation of theDiabetes Education Program (PED. We evaluated 23 patients with diabetes mellitus followed by two Basic Health Units from Diamantina-MG, Brazil. The data collection instrument was a semi-structured questionnaire with questions about personal data, educational level, disease definition, duration, causes, treatment, and difficulties in controlling it and the source of information on diabetes. The effect of the program on knowledge and attitudes was evaluated by comparing the number of correct answers before and after 12 months of its start, as well as changing attitudes about the disease. Results: We observed an increase in the number of correct answers on the diabetes symptoms and complications. The same occurred on the recognition of the importance of physical activity (27% and on the self-application of insulin(40% for treatments. In both moments, more than 50% of subjects reported having difficultyin the treatment of diabetes, and following the diet was the most referred. Only 4% answered correctly on the causes of diabetes in both moments. Conclusion: There was an improvement of the conceptual notions of the patients, especially on the definition of the disease, its symptoms and complications. Factors such as education level, age and income may have influenced the acquisition and incorporation of knowledge, changing it into concrete actions.

  13. Making diabetes self-management education culturally relevant for Filipino Americans in Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finucane, Melissa L; McMullen, Carmit K

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the cultural values, traditions, and perceptions of diabetes risk and self-care among Filipino Americans in Hawaii with type 2 diabetes that facilitate or impede engagement in diabetes self-management behaviors and education classes. This qualitative study used 2 rounds of semistructured focus groups and interviews. Participants included 15 patients with type 2 diabetes recruited from a large health-maintenance organization in Hawaii and 7 health care and cultural experts recruited from the community. The taped and transcribed focus groups and interviews were coded thematically. Participants evaluated example materials for diabetes self-management education (DSME) with Filipino Americans. Several aspects of Filipino American culture were identified as central to understanding the challenges of engaging in self-management behaviors and DSME: (1) undertaking self-management while prioritizing the family and maintaining social relationships, (2) modifying diet while upholding valued symbolic and social meanings of food, (3) participating in storytelling in the face of stigma associated with diabetes, and (4) reconciling spiritual and biomedical interpretations of disease causality and its management. Respondents also emphasized the role of several qualitative aspects of perceived risk (eg, dread, control) in moderating their behaviors. Participants suggested ways to make DSME culturally relevant. Awareness of cultural values and qualitative aspects of perceived risk that influence Filipino Americans' engagement in diabetes self-care behaviors and classes may help to improve teaching methods, materials, and recruitment strategies.

  14. The impact of health literacy on diabetes self-management education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandenbosch, Jessica; Van den Broucke, Stephan; Schinckus, Louise

    2018-01-01

    Background: Diabetes self-management education (DSME) is generally considered to be a key determinant of the treatment outcomes and related costs of diabetes mellitus. While DSME programmes generally have positive outcomes, their effects may depend on certain factors, such as the type of programmes...... HL, but all patients described benefiting from DSME. Individual and group-based programmes resulted in more positive effects on several diabetes outcomes than self-help groups, but no interaction with HL was found. Conclusion: Our findings confirm those of previous studies showing that DSME...

  15. From Froot Loops to Fitness: My Journey as an Educator and Person With Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colberg-Ochs, Sheri R

    2017-02-01

    EDITOR'S NOTE : This article is adapted from the address Dr. Colberg delivered as the recipient of the American Diabetes Association's Outstanding Educator in Diabetes Award for 2016. She delivered the address in June 2016 at the association's 76th Annual Meeting and Scientific Sessions in New Orleans, La. A webcast of this speech is available for viewing at the ADA website (http://professional.diabetes.org/search/site?f%5B0%5D=im_field_dbp_ct%3A7&f%5B1%5D=sm_field_wcast_mname%3Anode%3A120&retain-filters=1).

  16. Type 1 diabetes, quality of life, occupational status and education level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Helena B.; Ovesen, Louise L.; Mortensen, Laust H.

    2016-01-01

    among women, as compared to men. No significant differences were found with regard to working hours. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that type 1 diabetes is associated with lower health-related quality of life, higher unemployment and additional sick leave. The negative association with type 1 diabetes......, occupational status (level of employment, working hours and sick leave) and education level. METHODS: 2415 adults (aged 18-98years) with type 1 diabetes were compared to 48,511 adults (aged 18-103years) from the general population. Data were obtained from two cross-sectional surveys conducted in 2010 and 2011...... is more pronounced in women and older adults....

  17. Evaluation of the Impact of a Diabetes Education Curriculum for School Personnel on Disease Knowledge and Confidence in Caring for Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Cory T.; Chen, Aleda M. H.; Plake, Kimberly S.; Nash, Christiane L.

    2012-01-01

    Background: School personnel may lack knowledge of diabetes and be unprepared to address the needs of students with type 1 diabetes. This project evaluated the effectiveness of a type 1 diabetes education program for school personnel on increasing knowledge of diabetes and confidence in caring for students with diabetes. Methods: Two types of…

  18. Health Sensors, Smart Home Devices, and the Internet of Medical Things: An Opportunity for Dramatic Improvement in Care for the Lower Extremity Complications of Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basatneh, Rami; Najafi, Bijan; Armstrong, David G

    2018-05-01

    The prevalent and long-neglected diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) and its related complications rank among the most debilitating and costly sequelae of diabetes. With the rise of the Internet of medical things (IoMT), along with smart devices, the med-tech industry is on the cusp of a home-care revolution, which could also create opportunity for developing effective solutions with significant potential to reduce DFU-associated costs and saving limbs. This article discusses potential applications of IoMT to the DFU patient population and beyond. To better understand potential opportunities and challenges associated with implementing IoMT for management of DFU, the authors reviewed recent relevant literatures and included their own expert opinions from a multidisciplinary point of view including podiatry, engineering, and data security. The IoMT has opened digital transformation of home-based diabetic foot care, as it enables promoting patient engagement, personalized care and smart management of chronic and noncommunicable diseases through individual data-driven treatment regimens, telecommunication, data mining, and comprehensive feedback tailored to individual requirements. In particular, with recent advances in voice-activated commands technology and its integration as a part of IoMT, new opportunities have emerged to improve the patient's central role and responsibility in enabling an optimized health care ecosystem. The IoMT has opened new opportunities in health care from remote monitoring to smart sensors and medical device integration. While it is at its early stage of development, ultimately we envisage a connected home that, using voice-controlled technology and Bluetooth-radio-connected add-ons, may augment much of what home health does today.

  19. Internet Based Distance Education and Departments of Information and Records Management Internet Tabanlı Uzaktan Eğitim ve Bilgi ve Belge Yönetimi Bölümleri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin Odabaş

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in Internet and computer technology caused radical changes in education, as in all areas. The utilization of the Internet in the area of education provided new and better solutions to educational problems hitherto unthinkable. It is concluded that, a more effective and efficient education can be provided by using contemporary methods by the side of traditional methods. This article is concerned with the nature of distance education based on the Internet, its emergence and its advantages and disadvantages. Furthermore, the article deals with the applicability of distance education programs in the departments of information and records management in Turkey. Finally, an evaluation was made. Internet ve bilgisayar teknolojisindeki son gelişmeler, bütün alanlarda olduğu gibi, eğitimde de köklü değişimlere neden olmuştur. Internet'in eğitim alanında kullanılmaya başlamasıyla, o zamana kadar çözüm getirilemeyen bazı eğitim sorunlarına çözümler bulunmuştur. Geleneksel modellerin yanısıra, çağdaş yöntemleri uygulayarak daha etkin ve verimli bir eğitimin verilebileceği sonucuna varılmıştır. Bu makale, uzaktan eğitimin ne olduğu, ortaya çıkışı, Internet'e dayalı uzaktan eğitimin avantaj ve dezavantajları üzerinde durmaktadır. Ayrıca, uzaktan eğitim programlarının Türkiye'nin bilgi ve belge yönetimi bölümlerinde uygulanabilirliği de ele alınmış; bu açıdan bir değerlendirme yapılmıştır.

  20. Dietary education must fit into everyday life: a qualitative study of people with a Pakistani background and type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hempler NF

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Nana F Hempler,1 Sara Nicic,1 Bettina Ewers,2 Ingrid Willaing1 1Health Promotion Research, Steno Diabetes Center, Gentofte, Denmark; 2Nutrition and Food Services Department, Steno Diabetes Center, Gentofte, Denmark Background: The high prevalence of diabetes among South Asian populations in European countries partially derives from unhealthy changes in dietary patterns. Limited studies address perspectives of South Asian populations with respect to utility of diabetes education in everyday life. This study explores perspectives on dietary diabetes education and healthy food choices of people living in Denmark who have a Pakistani background and type 2 diabetes. Methods: In-depth interviews were conducted between October 2012 and December 2013 with 12 participants with type 2 diabetes who had received dietary diabetes education. Data analysis was systematic and was based on grounded theory principles. Results: Participants described the process of integrating and utilizing dietary education in everyday life as challenging. Perceived barriers of the integration and utilization included a lack of a connection between the content of the education and life conditions, a lack of support from their social networks for dietary change, difficulty integrating the education into everyday life, and failure to include the participants’ taste preferences in the educational setting. Conclusion: Dietary education that is sensitive to the attitudes, wishes, and preferences of the participants and that aims at establishing a connection to the everyday life of the participants might facilitate successful changes in dietary practices among people with a Pakistani background and type 2 diabetes. The findings suggest that more focus should be placed on collaborative processes in the dietary educational setting in order to achieve appropriate education and to improve communication between this population and health care professionals. Keywords: dietary diabetes

  1. Diabetes Awareness of Low-Income Middle School Students Participating in the Help a Friend, Help Yourself Youth Diabetes Awareness Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wroten, Kathryn; Reames, Elizabeth S.; Tuuri, Georgianna

    2012-01-01

    The study reported here investigated the effectiveness of the LSU AgCenter Help a Friend, Help Yourself youth diabetes education curriculum to increase knowledge and awareness of diabetes and its symptoms in low-income middle school students participating in the Boys and Girls Club after-school program. The curriculum includes four lessons with…

  2. Toward a Miami University Model for Internet-Intensive Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Christopher R.; Crider, Linda; Mayer, Larry; McBride, Mark; Sherman, Richard; Vogel, Robert

    1998-01-01

    Describes principles underlying an emerging model for Internet-intensive undergraduate instruction at Miami University (Ohio) in which students learn by creating online materials themselves; faculty facilitate active learning; student intellectual exchanges are enriched; and the seminar sensibility is extended. Four applications are examined: a…

  3. Impact of Menu Sequencing on Internet-Based Educational Module Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensley, Robert; Brusk, John J.; Rivas, Jason; Anderson, Judith V.

    2006-01-01

    Patterns of Internet-based menu item selection can occur for a number of reasons, many of which may not be based on interest in topic. It then becomes important to ensure menu order is devised in a way that ensures the greatest accuracy in matching user need with selection. This study examined the impact of menu rotation on the selection of…

  4. A Concept Analysis of Digital Citizenship for Democratic Citizenship Education in the Internet Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Moonsun

    2016-01-01

    Despite the importance of promoting socially responsible citizenship in the Internet age, there is a paucity of research on how digital citizenship or digital citizens might be defined and/or investigated. This study found 4 major categories that construct digital citizenship: "Ethics," "Media and Information Literacy,"…

  5. The Need for Continuing Education on Rapidly Changing Business Issues: Internet Privacy as a Telling Example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozman, Carl S.; Pettit-O'Malley, Kathy L.

    2002-01-01

    A survey of 75 business faculty revealed that 80% spent less than 3 hours per year covering Internet privacy issues. There was a discrepancy between self-perceptions of their knowledge of the issues and their ability to answer questions about them. Better-informed faculty were not those who spent the most time addressing the issues. (Contains 22…

  6. The Relationship between the Information Technology Skills Acquired by Secretarial Teachers in Nigeria Colleges of Education and Their Utilization of Internet for Effective Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeshina, Tunde Joel; Udoh, Abasido; Ndomi, Benjamin; Aliyu, Muhibeedeen

    2013-01-01

    This study established the relationship between the Information Technology skills acquired by Secretarial Teachers in Nigerian Colleges of Education and their utilization of Internet for effective teaching. 250 Secretarial Teachers drawn from 58 Accredited Nigerian Colleges of Education responded to the questionnaire that was divided into 4 parts.…

  7. Examining Internet Access and Social Media Application Use for Online Nutrition Education in SNAP-Ed Participants in Rural Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loehmer, Emily; Smith, Sylvia; McCaffrey, Jennifer; Davis, Jeremy

    2018-01-01

    To examine Internet access and interest in receiving nutrition education via social media applications among low-income adults participating in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education (SNAP-Ed). A cross-sectional survey was distributed during 25 SNAP-Ed classes throughout the 16 southernmost counties of Illinois. From 188 responses, the majority of participants had Internet access (76%). Among participants aged 18-32 years (n = 51), 92% owned a smartphone with Internet access and 57% indicated that they would use online nutrition education, with most interest in e-mail (41%), Facebook (40%), and text messaging (35%). There was little interest in using blogs, Vine, Twitter, Tumblr, and Pinterest. Overall, 49% of middle-aged adults aged 33-64 years and 87% of seniors aged ≥65 years reported they would not use online nutrition education. Results indicated similar Internet accessibility in southern Illinois among low-income populations compared with national rural rates. Interest in using online nutrition education varied among SNAP-Ed participants according to age. Young adults appeared to be the most captive audience regarding online nutrition education. Results may be useful to agencies implementing SNAP-Ed to supplement current curriculum with online nutrition education for audiences aged ≤32 years. Copyright © 2017 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Outcomes of educational interventions in type 2 diabetes: WEKA data-mining analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurdardottir, Arun K; Jonsdottir, Helga; Benediktsson, Rafn

    2007-07-01

    To analyze which factors contribute to improvement in glycemic control in educational interventions in type 2 diabetes reported in randomized controlled trials (RCT) published in 2001-2005. Papers were extracted from Medline and Scopus using educational intervention and adults with type 2 diabetes as keywords. Inclusion criteria were RCT design. Data were analyzed with a data-mining program. Of 464 titles extracted, 21 articles reporting 18 studies met the inclusion criteria. Data mining showed that for initial glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level education intervention achieved a small change in HbA1c level, or from +0.1 to -0.7%. For initial HbA1c > or = 8.0%, a significant drop in HbA1c level of 0.8-2.5% was found. Data mining indicated that duration, educational content and intensity of education did not predict changes in HbA1c levels. Initial HbA1c level is the single most important factor affecting improvements in glycemic control in response to patient education. Data mining is an appropriate and sufficiently sensitive method to analyze outcomes of educational interventions. Diversity in conceptualization of interventions and diversity of instruments used for outcome measurements could have hampered actual discovery of effective educational practices. Participation in educational interventions generally seems to benefit people with type 2 diabetes. Use of standardized instruments is encouraged as it gives better opportunities to identify conclusive results with consequent development of clinical guidelines.

  9. Patient explanations for non-attendance at type 2 diabetes self-management education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwennesen, Nete; Henriksen, Jan Erik; Willaing, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To explore reasons for non-attendance at type 2 diabetes self-management education. METHODS: To elicit the main themes explaining non-attendance, 15 semi-structured interviews were conducted with persons referred to, but not attending, self-management education. Systematic text condensation...... as reasons for non-attendance. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, patients cited both individual and organisational factors as explaining non-attendance at type 2 diabetes self-management education. Further studies should take into account the importance of timing and of tailoring schedules and content...... to individuals' life situations and resources. As organisational factors are likely to vary across programmes and settings, more case studies are needed to further elucidate the dynamic relationship between individual and organisational factors to explain non-attendance at type 2 diabetes self...

  10. Diabetes education and self-management for ongoing and newly diagnosed (DESMOND)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skinner, T. Chas; Carey, Marian E.; Cradock, Sue

    2006-01-01

    diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes changes key illness beliefs and that these changes predict quality of life and metabolic control at 3-month follow-up. Practice implications: Newly diagnosed individuals are open to attending self-management programs and, if the program is theoretically driven, can......Objective: To determine the effects of a structured education program on illness beliefs, quality of life and physical activity in people newly diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. Methods: Individuals attending a diabetes education and self-management for ongoing and newly diagnosed (DESMOND) program...... in 12 Primary Care Trusts completed questionnaire booklets assessing illness beliefs and quality of life at baseline and 3-month follow-up, metabolic control being assessed through assay of HbA1c. Results: Two hundred and thirty-six individuals attended the structured self-management education sessions...

  11. Internet enlightens; Internet eclaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueiredo, S. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2009-07-15

    Numerous Internet sites are given in relation with radiotherapy, nuclear activity, radiation protection, and environment shared by sites in France, Europe, big agencies and non-ionizing radiations. (N.C.)

  12. Internet enlightens; Internet eclaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueiredo, S. [Societe Francaise de Radioprotection, 75 - Paris (France)

    2008-04-15

    Numerous Internet sites are given in relation with radiotherapy, nuclear activity, radiation protection,radioecology, nuclear laws. To note three sites treat the accident of radiotherapy arisen to Toulouse. (N.C.)

  13. Internet enlightens; Internet eclaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2010-01-15

    This part of the issue gives Internet addresses in relation with nuclear energy, safety, radiation protection, legislation, at the national level and European and international level. A special part is devoted to non ionizing radiation. (N.C.)

  14. Internet enlightens; Internet eclaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueiredo, S. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, IRSN, 92 - Fontenay aux Roses (France)

    2009-10-15

    Numerous Internet sites are given in relation with radiotherapy, nuclear medicine and ionizing radiation, nuclear activity, radiation protection for populations, radioactive waste management in France and Europe. (N.C.)

  15. International Mathematical Internet Olympiad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Domoshnitsky

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Modern Internet technologies open new possibilities in wide spectrum of traditional methods used in mathematical education. One of the areas, where these technologies can be efficiently used, is an organization of mathematical competitions. Contestants can stay at their schools or universities and try to solve as many mathematical problems as possible and then submit their solutions through Internet. Simple Internet technologies supply audio and video connection between participants and organizers.

  16. Preferences and opinions of patients with type 2 diabetes on education and self-care: a cross-sectional survey.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorter, K.J.; Tuytel, G.J.; Leeuw, J.R.J. de; Bijl, J.J. van der; Bensing, J.M.; Rutten, G.E.H.M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the preferences of patients with Type 2 diabetes regarding self-care activities and diabetes education. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Questionnaire survey carried out in general practices and outpatient clinics across the Netherlands. Outcomes: preferred setting for education,

  17. Impact of a District-Wide Diabetes Prevention Programme Involving Health Education for Children and the Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheeladevi, Sethu; Sagar, Jayanthi; Pujari, Siddharth; Rani, Padmaja Kumari

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To present results from a district-wide diabetes prevention programme involving health education for school children and the local community. Method: The model of health education that was utilized aimed to secure lifestyle changes and the identification of diabetes risk by school children (aged 9-12 years). The children acted as health…

  18. Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you, discussing your symptoms, and going over your health history, your doctor may test for diabetes if he or she suspects you are at risk. To check for diabetes, your doctor may request the following tests: Fasting blood sugar test. This test is usually done ...

  19. Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, Peter; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R

    2015-01-01

    For >30 years, insulin has been the drug of choice for the medical treatment of gestational diabetes mellitus. However, the use of oral hypoglycaemic agents has increased during the past 1–2 decades, so a recent comparison of treatment with glibenclamide, metformin or insulin in women...... with gestational diabetes mellitus is highly relevant....

  20. Communication Barriers in Distance Education: "Text-Based Internet-Enabled Online Courses"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabaj, Fahme; Isman, Aytekin

    2004-01-01

    With the rapid technological changes and the diverse people demands and conditions, traditional educational systems and institutions are forced to provide additional educational opportunities. A number of educational establishments are contributing to these conditions and demands by developing and offering distance education programs. Distance…

  1. Telehealth--an effective delivery method for diabetes self-management education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzner, Karen; Moss, Gail

    2013-06-01

    Diabetes is a chronic disease that is often comorbid with cardiovascular disease, hypertension, kidney disease, and neuropathy. Its management is complex, requiring ongoing clinical management, lifestyle changes, and self-care. This article examines recent literature on telehealth and emerging technological tools for supporting self-management of diabetes and identifies best practices. The authors conducted a PubMed search (January 2008-2012) that was supplemented by review of meeting materials and a scan of the Internet to identify emerging technologies. Fifty-eight papers were reviewed; 12 were selected for greater analysis. This review supports earlier findings that the delivery of diabetes self-management and training (DSME/T) via telehealth is useful, appropriate, and acceptable to patients and providers. Best practices are emerging; not all technology is appropriate for all populations--interactive technology needs to be appropriate to the patient's age, abilities, and sensitivities. Telehealth is scalable and sustainable provided that it adds value, does not add to the provider's workload, and is fairly reimbursed. However, there are multiple barriers (patient, provider, health system) to remotely provided DSME/T. DSME/T delivered via telehealth offers effective, efficient, and affordable ways to reach and support underserved minorities and other people with diabetes and related comorbidities. The new generation of smartphones, apps, and other technologies increase access, and the newest interventions are designed to meet patient needs, do not increase workloads, are highly appropriate, enhance self-management, and are desired by patients.

  2. Internet: An Innovative Environment for Information Dissemination, Access, and Retrieval in Distance Education

    OpenAIRE

    Tonta, Yaşar

    1995-01-01

    Information sources available through the networks such as the Internet and Bitnet have proliferated and diversified in recent years. Nowadays, in addition to textual information, multimedia databases containing `documents' with graphics, images, sound and animation can often be found on the network. Government agencies, various institutions, commercial companies, and, more recently, individuals themselves, can disseminate information and open their own databases to the use of others who have...

  3. Comparative analysis of diabetes self-management education programs in the European Union Member States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Sarama; Riemenschneider, Henna; Müller, Gabriele; Levin-Zamir, Diane; Van den Broucke, Stephan; Schwarz, Peter E H

    2017-12-01

    Diabetes self-management education (DSME) is generally considered as an integral part of diabetes care. The availability of different types of self-management in the European Union Member States (EUMS) remains uncertain. The aim of this study is to perform a comparative analysis of existing DSME programs (DSMEP) implemented in EUMS. Unpublished data regarding DSME in the EUMS was assessed with Diabetes Literacy Survey using wiki tool (WT) targeting patients and different stakeholders. An additional literature review (LR) was performed in PubMed to identify published studies regarding DSMEP in the EUMS from 2004 to 2014. A total of 102 DSMEP implemented in EUMS were reported in the WT and 154 programs were identified from the LR. Comparative analysis of the data indicated that a majority of programs are aimed at adults and only a minority at children and elderly. Only a small percentage of the programs utilize information technology for teaching and learning, and only one out of five programs pay attention to depression. The identified DSMEP aimed primarily to empower patients through increasing knowledge and changing attitudes and beliefs towards diabetes. This study provides an overview of the present state-of-the-art on diabetes self-management education programs in the 28 EUMS. To increase participation, existing DSMEP should be made more accessible to the patients as well as tailored to specific patient groups. Copyright © 2017 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Development of E-learning and Reflections of the Internet on the Process of Education: A Case Study at Gazi University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Toplu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Since the second half of the 20th century, the developments in the field of information technologies and the Internet have introduced significant changes in both traditional and distance learning and e-learning has become one of the fundamental elements of education. While e-learning and educational use of the Internet have been getting more common, higher education institutions have been reviewing and restructuring their own positions in line with the developments in these areas. Around 50 universities in Turkey started remote education programs. Furthermore new tools to promote face to face education continue to exist on the Internet and to increase the efficiency of the courses. Since the beginning of the second part of2000s, the Turkish Academy of Sciences (TÜBA has been leading the work for the implementation of the project of open course materials in order to improve the effectiveness of face to face courses and it has been supported by a number of universities. In the study, the situation in Gazi University was evaluated; the informatics system and the open course materials developed by the university in the process of e-learning were examined and the study also determined the extent to which students use the Internet for educational purposes. The result of the research shows that the efforts for creating open course materials in Gazi University have not proved sufficient yet. According to the results of the research, it was determined that the students’ belief in their self-efficacy in the educational use of the Internet was at medium level. Gender and educational status of father were found to be related with self-efficacy. On the other hand, it was revealed that self-efficacy was not linked to the educational status of mother, having a computer, or taking computer classes in high school.

  5. Creating Pupils' Internet Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bognar, Branko; Šimic, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    This article presents an action research, which aimed to improve pupils' literary creativity and enable them to use computers connected to the internet. The study was conducted in a small district village school in Croatia. Creating a pupils' internet magazine appeared to be an excellent way for achieving the educational aims of almost all…

  6. [Diabetic foot syndrome from the perspective of internist educated in podiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirkovská, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Podiatry is the science dealing with the diagnostics and treatment of the foot and ankle and associated tissues and structures by all appropriate methods and also with the local manifestation of the overall processes in this area. Diabetic foot disease is defined as infection, ulceration or destruction of tissues of the foot associated with neuropathy and/or peripheral artery disease in the lower extremity of people with diabetes according to the latest edition of the International Consensus. Successful treatment and prevention of diabetic foot syndrome depends on a holistic approach, in which it is seen as part of the multiple organ involvement. Teamwork of series of experts is therefore necessary. Internist with diabetes and podiatric education plays a key role in this team in particular, when control diabetes and in the prevention and treatment of co-morbidities, in the diagnosis of malnutrition and in the nutritional therapy and in the early diagnosis and effective treatment of infections. Last but not least, internist in collaboration with other professionals works when treatment of lower limb ischemia, suitable offloading of the ulcer and topical therapy and in the prevention of ulcers. Recurrent ulcerations are the major problem in podiatry and it can occur in up to 40% of patients in the first year after healing. Follow-up of patients with diabetic foot syndrome by experienced internist can help reduce the serious consequences, including amputation and cardiovascular mortality.Key words: diabetic foot - internal medicine - podiatry.

  7. [The process of creating guidebooks for orienting self-care in the Diabetes educational program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Heloisa Carvalho; Candido, Naiara Abrantes; Alexandre, Luciana Rodrigues; Pereira, Flávia Lobato

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed at describing the experience of creating guidebooks on self-care, performed with individuals with diabetes of the Teaching Hospital, by professors and undergraduate students of the Nursing School at Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais. Problems and issues related to self-care and diabetes were raised in the healthcare workshops held with professors and students. Based on Freire's methodology, meetings were held with individuals with diabetes according to directives for the construction of the guidebooks that included the selection of content, style and format of the material. The creativity present in the images during the topic discussions made the meetings into a rich moment of exchange, where the participants could express ideas, values, beliefs and life histories. The messages were well-planned, comprehensible and attractive, and the individuals considered them effective in helping them in the educational activities and diabetes self-care.

  8. Update on type 2 diabetes | Dave | Continuing Medical Education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Type 2 diabetes is increasingly common and we need to offer our patients better outcomes. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More ...

  9. Educational Gaming for Pharmacy Students - Design and Evaluation of a Diabetes-themed Escape Room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eukel, Heidi N; Frenzel, Jeanne E; Cernusca, Dan

    2017-09-01

    Objective. To design an educational game that will increase third-year professional pharmacy students' knowledge of diabetes mellitus disease management and to evaluate their perceived value of the game. Methods. Faculty members created an innovative educational game, the diabetes escape room. An authentic escape room gaming environment was established through the use of a locked room, an escape time limit, and game rules within which student teams completed complex puzzles focused on diabetes disease management. To evaluate the impact, students completed a pre-test and post-test to measure the knowledge they've gained and a perception survey to identify moderating factors that could help instructors improve the game's effectiveness and utility. Results. Students showed statistically significant increases in knowledge after completion of the game. A one-sample t -test indicated that students' mean perception was statistically significantly higher than the mean value of the evaluation scale. This statically significant result proved that this gaming act offers a potential instructional benefit beyond its novelty. Conclusion. The diabetes escape room proved to be a valuable educational game that increased students' knowledge of diabetes mellitus disease management and showed a positive perceived overall value by student participants.

  10. The development and pilot testing of a multimedia CD-ROM for diabetes education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaldini, M; Saltmarch, M; Luck, S; Sucher, K

    1998-01-01

    The multimedia CD-ROM program, Take Charge of Diabetes, was found to be accurate, easy to use, and enjoyable by the clients and health professionals who completed the pilot study. Participants perceived an increase in knowledge after completing the five modules. Two of the participants verbally stated that the program clarified information for them and they wished they had had such a program when they were first diagnosed with diabetes. Further evaluation is needed to generalize the effect of the program on knowledge of diabetes because the pilot study was not designed to fully evaluate the effectiveness of the program on knowledge level or behavior change. Behavior change resulting in better control of blood sugar levels and hemoglobin A1c within normal range is the goal for diabetes education. The person who lives with diabetes must learn self-care methods. To accomplish that, the person must be able to comprehend the material presented. CAI programs provide an individualized, interactive, and interesting way to learn about diabetes and self-care, using visual effects and audio to support the written text. CAI can provide an element of excitement that is not available with other conventional methods. Providing prompt reinforcement of correct answers in quiz sections and including positive written messages can increase patients' self-confidence and self-esteem. Computer-assisted instruction is not intended to replace personal contact with physicians and diabetes educators, but rather complement this contact, reinforce learning, and possibly increase self-motivation to take charge of one's diabetes.

  11. [Experience with games in operative groups as part of health education for diabetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Heloisa de Carvalho; Hortale, Virginia Alonso; Schall, Virginia

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents and discusses an educational strategy implemented in a specialized hospital clinic. The goal was to stimulate individuals to reflect on their everyday lifestyles as related to their disease, specifically diabetes mellitus. The strategy can be characterized as an educational tool from the perspective of health promotion and disease prevention and control. The experience was implemented on an interactive basis (health professionals and individual patients) with educational games in operative groups. Pedagogical techniques were used: orientation concerning diabetes mellitus, individual consultation, the operative group, and educational games (communications and learning). The techniques enabled participants to improve knowledge and exchange experiences. In addition, the health professionals gained a better understanding of the participants' experience with their illness.

  12. Foot care education and self management behaviors in diverse veterans with diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan M Olson

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Jonathan M Olson1, Molly T Hogan2, Leonard M Pogach3, Mangala Rajan3, Gregory J Raugi4, Gayle E Reiber51University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA, USA; 2Department of Internal Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA, USA; 3Department of Veterans Affairs, New Jersey Healthcare System, Center for Healthcare Knowledge Management, East Orange, NJ, USA; 4Division of Dermatology, VA Puget Sound Healthcare System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA, USA; 5Research and Development, VA Puget Sound Healthcare System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA, USAAbstract: The objective of this study was to examine differences in self-reported diabetes foot care education, self management behaviors, and barriers to good foot care among veterans with diabetes by race and ethnicity. Data was collected using the Veterans Health Administration Footcare Survey, a validated tool that assessed demographic, general health, diabetes and foot self-care information, barriers to foot self-care, receipt of professional foot care, and satisfaction with current care. We mailed surveys to a random sample of patients with diabetes from eight VA medical centers. Study participants were 81% White; 13% African American; 4% Asian, and 2% American Indian and Pacific Islanders. The majority of respondents felt that they did not know enough about foot self-care. There were large gaps between self-reported knowledge and actual foot care practices, even among those who reported “knowing enough” on a given topic. There were significant differences in self-reported foot care behaviors and education by race and ethnicity. These findings document the need for culturally-specific self-management education to address unique cultural preferences and barriers to care.Keywords: diabetes mellitus, diabetic foot, patient self-management, ethnic groups, education

  13. Persian Diabetes Self-Management Education (PDSME) program: evaluation of effectiveness in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakibazadeh, Elham; Bartholomew, Leona Kay; Rashidian, Arash; Larijani, Bagher

    2016-09-01

    Despite increasing rate of diabetes, no standard self-management education protocol has been developed in Iran. We designed Persian Diabetes Self-Management Education (PDSME) program using intervention mapping. Effectiveness of program was assessed in newly diagnosed people with type 2 diabetes and those who had received little self-management education. Individuals aged 18 and older (n = 350) were recruited in this prospective controlled trial during 2009-2011 in Tehran, Iran. Patients were excluded if they were pregnant, were housebound or had reduced cognitive ability. Participants were randomly allocated in intervention and control groups. PDSME patients attended eight workshops over 4-week period following two follow-up sessions. Validated questionnaires assessed cognitive outcomes at baseline, 2 and 8 weeks. HbA1c was assessed before and 18-21 months after intervention in both groups. The CONSORT statement was adhered to where possible. A total of 280 individuals (80%) attended the program. By 18-21 months, the PDSME group showed significant improvements in mean HbA1c (-1.1 versus +0.2%, p =0.008, repeated measure ANOVA (RMA)). Diabetes knowledge improved more in PDSME patients treated with oral antidiabetic agents than in those receiving usual care over time (RMA, F = 67.08, p intervention mapping for planning effective interventions. Given the large number of people with diabetes and lack of affordable diabetes education, PDSME deserves consideration for implementation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. The Impacts of Type 1 Diabetes on the K-12 Educational Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKerns-O'Donnell, Monica A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative research study was to uncover the impacts that type 1 diabetes have on a child's or adolescent's school educational experience. The study used a phenomenological approach based upon the work of Moustakas (1994). Purposeful sampling was used to identify participants. The participant group was comprised of 10…

  15. Effective Nutrition Education for Aboriginal Australians: Lessons from a Diabetes Cooking Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Penelope A.; Davison, Joyce E.; Moore, Louise F.; Rubinstein, Raechelle

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the experiences of Aboriginal Australians with or at risk of diabetes who attended urban community cooking courses in 2002-2007; and to develop recommendations for increasing the uptake and effectiveness of nutrition education in Aboriginal communities. Methods: Descriptive qualitative approach using semistructured…

  16. Interest of the therapeutic education in patients with type 2 diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: This prospective study was conducted among 54 type 2 diabetic patients (28 men and 26 women) aged 36–65 years, recruited from National Nutrition Institute. Patients were divided into two groups: the first group (n=26) received an education session one to two weeks before the month of Ramadan; the second ...

  17. The medicine wheel nutrition intervention: a diabetes education study with the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattelmann, Kendra K; Conti, Kibbe; Ren, Cuirong

    2009-09-01

    The Northern Plains Indians of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe have experienced significant lifestyle and dietary changes over the past seven generations that have resulted in increased rates of diabetes and obesity. The objective of this study was to determine if Northern Plains Indians with type 2 diabetes mellitus who are randomized to receive culturally adapted educational lessons based on the Medicine Wheel Model for Nutrition in addition to their usual dietary education will have better control of their type 2 diabetes than a nonintervention, usual care group who received only the usual dietary education from their personal providers. A 6-month, randomized, controlled trial was conducted January 2005 through December 2005, with participants randomized to the education intervention or usual care control group. The education group received six nutrition lessons based on the Medicine Wheel Model for Nutrition. The usual care group received the usual dietary education from their personal providers. One hundred fourteen Northern Plains Indians from Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe aged 18 to 65 years, with type 2 diabetes. Weight, body mass index (BMI), hemoglobin A1c, fasting serum glucose and lipid parameters, circulating insulin, and blood pressure were measured at the beginning and completion. Diet histories, physical activity, and dietary satiety surveys were measured at baseline and monthly through completion. Differences were determined using Student t tests, chi(2) tests, and analysis of variance. The education group had a significant weight loss (1.4+/-0.4 kg, Pnutrition intervention promoted small but positive changes in weight. Greater frequency and longer duration of educational support may be needed to influence blood glucose and lipid parameters.

  18. Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... including: Blurry vision Excess thirst Fatigue Frequent urination Hunger Weight loss Because type 2 diabetes develops slowly, ... must be authorized in writing by ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get ...

  19. Diabetes

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — These datasets provide de-identified insurance data for diabetes. The data is provided by three managed care organizations in Allegheny County (Gateway Health Plan,...

  20. Discrete choice as a method for exploring education preferences in a Danish population of patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiøtz, Michaela; Bøgelund, Mette; Almdal, Thomas; Willaing, Ingrid

    2012-05-01

    To determine preferences among patients with type 2 diabetes for content and format of patient education. Using discrete choice methods, we surveyed patients about their preferences for patient education. We investigated preferred content and format regarding education on living well with diabetes, preventing complications, healthy eating, exercising, and psychosocial issues related to diabetes. We obtained usable responses from 2187 patients with type 2 diabetes. Acquiring competencies to live a fulfilling life with diabetes, adjust diet and exercise habits, and prevent complications was significantly more highly valued than was simply being informed about these topics. Patients preferred to be involved in the planning of their diabetes care and valued individually tailored content higher than prescheduled content. Women and younger patients found diet and exercise significantly more important than did men, and patients with poorly controlled diabetes valued all education and support more highly than did patients in better control. Patients with type 2 diabetes prefer to be actively involved in educational activities, to develop competencies to prevent and manage complications, and to involve their social network in supporting them. Future patient education should enhance participation and competence development and include relatives. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Internet-Based Digital Simulation for Cleft Surgery Education: A 5-Year Assessment of Demographics, Usage, and Global Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantar, Rami S; Plana, Natalie M; Cutting, Court B; Diaz-Siso, Jesus Rodrigo; Flores, Roberto L

    2018-01-29

    In October 2012, a freely available, internet-based cleft simulator was created in partnership between academic, nonprofit, and industry sectors. The purpose of this educational resource was to address global disparities in cleft surgery education. This report assesses demographics, usage, and global effect of our simulator, in its fifth year since inception. Evaluate the global effect, usage, and demographics of an internet-based educational digital simulation cleft surgery software. Simulator modules, available in five languages demonstrate surgical anatomy, markings, detailed procedures, and intraoperative footage to supplement digital animation. Available data regarding number of users, sessions, countries reached, and content access were recorded. Surveys evaluating the demographic characteristics of registered users and simulator use were collected by direct e-mail. The total number of simulator new and active users reached 2865 and 4086 in June 2017, respectively. By June 2017, users from 136 countries had accessed the simulator. From 2015 to 2017, the number of sessions was 11,176 with a monthly average of 399.0 ± 190.0. Developing countries accounted for 35% of sessions and the average session duration was 9.0 ± 7.3 minutes. This yields a total simulator screen time of 100,584 minutes (1676 hours). Most survey respondents were surgeons or trainees (87%) specializing in plastic, maxillofacial, or general surgery (89%). Most users found the simulator to be useful (88%), at least equivalent or more useful than other resources (83%), and used it for teaching (58%). Our internet-based interactive cleft surgery platform reaches its intended target audience, is not restricted by socioeconomic barriers to access, and is judged to be useful by surgeons. More than 4000 active users have been reached since inception. The total screen time over approximately 2 years exceeded 1600 hours. This suggests that future surgical simulators of this kind may be sustainable by

  2. A COMPARISON OF INTERNET-BASED LEARNING AND TRADITIONAL CLASSROOM LECTURE TO LEARN CPR FOR CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser HEMMATI

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare the satisfaction and effectiveness of Internet-based learning (IBL and traditional classroom lecture (TCL for continuing medical education (CME programs by comparing final resuscitation exam results of physicians who received the newest cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR curriculum guidelines training either by traditional or by an Internet-based CME. A randomized two-group pretest-posttest quasi-experimental design was used. Postgraduate general physician trainees of Iran medical schools were participated. Two methods were compared for teaching the newest curriculum guidelines of the American Heart Association: lecture method in which the teacher follows a Power point presentation with linear layout, and with interactive self-assessment and Scenario-based learning, feedback, multimedia with linear and nonlinear layout with the same power point presentation as lecture in terms of text and photography. The data on final CPR exam grades, collected both groups trained physicians, were obtained for a total of 80 physicians in 2011. An independent sample t-test analysis indicated that participants in the IBL format reported significantly higher mean ratings for this format (62.5 ±2.32 than TCL format (54.6±2.18 (p=.001. There were no significant differences between the two groups in cognitive gains (p<0.05. well-designed IBL content can be effective or a supplement component to CME.

  3. Evolución y utilización de internet en la educación = Evolution and Use of Internet in the Education

    OpenAIRE

    Tesouro i Cid, Montserrat; Puiggalí, Joan

    2004-01-01

    Internet se ha convertido en la actualidad en una herramienta muy importante en la Educación. A los aspectos positivos que ya conllevaba el uso del ordenador en el aula se le han añadido los correspondientes al hecho de compartir conocimientos de una forma más global. Internet también se usa dentro de la educación como herramienta administrativa, formación continuada, educación a distancia, etc. En los últimos años se han creado las redes telemáticas educativas donde se engloban todos los con...

  4. Expectations of family circles/guardians of diabetics within the scope of education in diabetes – in the light of nationwide research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Abramczyk

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A family is a significant asset, which may support a diabetic in his efforts and strengthen his concern for health. Properly prepared families/guardians may protect the patient from many medical mistakes and also help ensure suitable conditions for treatment and satisfactory care. Recommendations required in the process of diabetes treatment are better complied with if the needs, expectations as well as previous experience of both patients and supporting family members are respected in the planned care. The aim of the work: The paper presents the expectations of family circles/guardians of diabetes patients within the scope of education in diabetes and their conditions. Material and methods: To meet the objective , research was carried out by the author of this work on 1366 family patients with diabetes from 61 randomly chosen national primary health service units, within the scope of NCSR grant no 6P05D02320. The research was conducted on the basis of: guided nursing interviews, relative assessment of fitness and independence of the patients, anonymous questionnaire completed by the patients, anonymous questionnaire completed by families/guardians and analysis of medical records. Results: Results of the research show that: most families are open to increase their level of competence and expect education on diabetes. Openness to education shown by families/guardians of diabetics is determined by many factors. Conclusions: Education of families/guardians of diabetics may lead to lower demand for professional care, reduced costs of care as well as increased satisfaction with this care and effects of diabetics treatment.

  5. Impact of internet vs traditional Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children nutrition education on fruit and vegetable intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensley, Robert J; Anderson, Judith V; Brusk, John J; Mercer, Nelda; Rivas, Jason

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this project was to compare the impact of Internet nutrition education to traditional nutrition education on Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) participant fruit and vegetable consumption. Interventions were delivered at 15 WIC clinics after normal WIC clinic operations or delivered online. A total of 692 and 872 participants from eight WIC agencies self-enrolled into two phases. A quasi-experimental design using an interrupted time series to determine the impact of two methods of nutrition education and follow-up nutrition counseling was used. Data were collected online and at Michigan WIC clinics during 2005-2007 at 3-month intervals during a 9-month period (per phase). Two Internet nutrition education modules were compared to WIC traditional nutrition education, which included either group classes or a self-guided nutrition education information mall. All interventions were based on the same program learning objectives. Optional motivational negotiation counseling followed 3 months post-intervention. Stage of change progression, belief in ability to change, and fruit and vegetable consumption were measured at baseline, immediately after the intervention, and 3 and 6 months post-intervention. Significance (PInternet group experienced substantial positive differences in stage of change progression, perception that the intervention was helpful and easy to use, and fruit and vegetable consumption. Traditional nutrition education required follow-up counseling to achieve fruit and vegetable consumption levels similar to the Internet nutrition education group. Based on these findings, this study supports Internet nutrition education as a viable alternative to traditional nutrition education for increasing fruit and vegetable consumption in some WIC clients. Copyright © 2011 American Dietetic Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A systematic literature review of diabetes self-management education features to improve diabetes education in women of Black African/Caribbean and Hispanic/Latin American ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gucciardi, Enza; Chan, Vivian Wing-Sheung; Manuel, Lisa; Sidani, Souraya

    2013-08-01

    This systematic literature review aims to identify diabetes self-management education (DSME) features to improve diabetes education for Black African/Caribbean and Hispanic/Latin American women with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. We conducted a literature search in six health databases for randomized controlled trials and comparative studies. Success rates of intervention features were calculated based on effectiveness in improving glycosolated hemoglobin (HbA1c), anthropometrics, physical activity, or diet outcomes. Calculations of rate differences assessed whether an intervention feature positively or negatively affected an outcome. From 13 studies included in our analysis, we identified 38 intervention features in relation to their success with an outcome. Five intervention features had positive rate differences across at least three outcomes: hospital-based interventions, group interventions, the use of situational problem-solving, frequent sessions, and incorporating dietitians as interventionists. Six intervention features had high positive rate differences (i.e. ≥50%) on specific outcomes. Different DSME intervention features may influence broad and specific self-management outcomes for women of African/Caribbean and Hispanic/Latin ethnicity. With the emphasis on patient-centered care, patients and care providers can consider options based on DSME intervention features for its broad and specific impact on outcomes to potentially make programming more effective. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A socioeconomic and behavioral survey of patients with difficult-to-control type 2 diabetes mellitus reveals an association between diabetic retinopathy and educational attainment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emoto N

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Naoya Emoto,1,2 Fumitaka Okajima,1,2 Hitoshi Sugihara,2 Rei Goto3 1Department of Endocrinology, Nippon Medical School Chiba-Hokusoh Hospital, Chiba, 2Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Graduate School of Medicine, Nippon Medical School, Tokyo, 3Graduate School of Business Administration, Keio University, Kanagawa, Japan Background: We have recently reported that the attitude of patients toward risk could be a factor in the progression of diabetic complications. In general, risk preference is closely related to socioeconomic status (SES, which includes factors such as age, sex, income, and educational attainment.Objective: We aimed to determine the effect of SES and behavioral propensity on the progress of diabetic complications in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM.Methods: We conducted a survey of 238 patients with difficult-to-control T2DM treated at a hospital in Japan using a modified behavioral economics questionnaire that included questions related to SES. The patients had been referred by general practitioners or other departments in the hospital because of poor metabolic control or unstable complications.Results: Educational attainment was significantly associated with progression of retinopathy in patients <65 years of age. Educational attainment of a high school diploma (12 years of education or lower was a significant risk factor, but there were no differences among levels of attainment beyond high school (13–16 years or more of education. Behavioral propensities were also weakly associated with complications, but not as much as educational attainment. Personal income level and economic status did not show an association with the retinopathy levels.Conclusion: Lower educational attainment is a strong risk factor for diabetic retinopathy, and it is independent of the economic status. The result suggests that cognitive function may play an important role in the progression of diabetic retinopathy in

  8. Internet enlightens; Internet eclaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueiredo, S. [IRSN, 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2010-04-15

    This part of the issue gives Internet addresses in relation with nuclear energy, safety, radiation protection in nuclear medicine, legislation, at the national level and European and international level. A special part is devoted to non ionizing radiation. (N.C.)

  9. Internet Civil Defense: Feasibility Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    LaPorte, Ron

    2002-01-01

    ... (and ultimately, international) system of information sharing, education and analysis via the Internet to connect the general public, community networked cells, emergency responders, local and national investigative authorities...

  10. An augmented reality game to support therapeutic education for children with diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés-Marcelo Calle-Bustos

    Full Text Available Therapeutic education in diabetes helps patients take responsibility for self-control of their disease, and providing technological support systems facilitates this education. In this paper, we present an augmented reality game to support therapeutic education for patients with diabetes. Our game helps children (aged 5-14 years to learn carbohydrate (carb content of different foods. The game shows virtual foods on a real dish. The number of carb choices corresponding to the visualized food is also shown (1 carb choice = 10 grams of carbs. A study to determine the effectiveness of the game in terms of learning and perceived satisfaction and usability was carried out. A total of seventy children with diabetes participated in the study. From the results, we observed that the initial knowledge about carb choices of the children who participated in the study was low (a mean of 2 on a scale from 0 to 9. This indicates that therapeutic education for patients with diabetes is needed. When the results for the pre-knowledge questionnaire and the post-knowledge questionnaire were compared, it was shown that the children learned about carb choices by playing our game. We used two post-knowledge questionnaires (one post-knowledge questionnaire that contained the same foods as the pre-knowledge questionnaire and a second post-knowledge questionnaire that contained foods that were different from the ones on the pre-knowledge questionnaire. There were no statistically significant differences between these two different post-knowledge questionnaires. Moreover, the knowledge acquired was independent of gender and age. We also evaluated usability and perceived satisfaction. The children were satisfied with the game and considered that the game offers a high degree of usability. This game could be a valuable therapeutic education tool for patients with diabetes.

  11. Education of people with type 2 diabetes through peers with diabetes: is it cost effective?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena González

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCCIÓN La inadecuada calidad de atención brindada a personas con diabetes tipo 2, genera un gran impacto socioeconómico y un grave problema de salud pública. La educación de estas personas a través de pares con diabetes mellitus es una alternativa, a la brindada por equipos profesionales (educación tradicional, que logra resultados no inferiores a esta última. Sin embargo, hay escasa evidencia de costo-efectividad de la educación a través de pares respecto de la tradicional. OBJETIVO Evaluar la relación costo-efectividad de la educación de personas con diabetes tipo 2, durante un año por un equipo profesional (educación tradicional, versus educación y apoyo impartida por un par con diabetes mellitus (educación de pares. MÉTODOS Análisis de costo-efectividad basado en un estudio clínico prospectivo aleatorizado, desarrollado en la ciudad de La Plata sobre 199 personas con diabetes tipo 2, organizados en dos grupos: uno que recibió educación tradicional y otro educación a través de pares con diabetes mellitus. Como indicador primario de efectividad se consideró el cambio en la hemoglobina glicosilada y como secundarios otros como índice de masa corporal, presión arterial sistólica, presión arterial diastólica, glucemia en ayunas, colesterol total y triglicéridos. Se estimó el costo directo de cada estrategia basándose en recursos utilizados en el estudio clínico y evaluándose tres escenarios de costos para la educación de pares. La robustez de los resultados se evaluó mediante análisis de sensibilidad univariado. RESULTADOS El costo por unidad de descenso (% de hemoglobina glicosilada con educación tradicional fue de $2621 pesos argentinos; y con educación a través de pares fue de $1508, $1779 y $2071 pesos argentinos, para cada uno de los tres escenarios considerados (escenario 1, escenario 2 y escenario 3, respectivamente. Por cada $100 pesos argentinos invertidos se logró descender 0,04% de

  12. Awareness of diabetes mellitus among diabetic patients in the Gambia: a strong case for health education and promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foma, Mafomekong Ayuk; Saidu, Yauba; Omoleke, Semeeh Akinwale; Jafali, James

    2013-12-05

    Awareness of various aspects of Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is essential for the prevention, management and control of the disease. However, several studies have consistently shown that awareness of DM in the general population is low. None of these studies, however, was conducted in The Gambia, even though the condition constitutes a major public health problem in the country. In this paper, we assessed the awareness of DM among diabetic patients attending the Medical Out-Patient Department (MOPD) of Royal Victoria Teaching Hospital (RVTH), Banjul. We interviewed 200 patients attending the MOPD of RVTH. We used a tool containing questions on patient's demographic characteristics and awareness of various aspects of DM including general knowledge on DM, causes, complications, management and prevention. Of the 199 patients who were aware of their condition, only 47% said they knew what DM is. Similarly, 53% of the study participants had no knowledge of the causes of DM and about 50% were not aware of the methods of prevention. 67% knew that DM can result to loss of sight while 46.5% knew that DM can cause poor wound healing. Few respondents knew that DM can lead to kidney failure (13.5%), skin sepsis (12.0%), heart failure (5.5%) and stroke (4.5%). Close to 50% of the respondent did not know how DM can be prevented. Level of education, duration of illness and knowledge of a family member with diabetes were important predictors of knowledge in our study. Our study shows that the majority of patients attending the MOPD have poor knowledge on several aspects of DM. Hence, there is need for conscious efforts towards improving the level of awareness through health education and promotion, not limited to the hospital but also within the general population, as part of strategies to prevent, manage and control DM.

  13. Increasing capacity to deliver diabetes self-management education: results of the DESMOND lay educator non-randomized controlled equivalence trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, M E; Mandalia, P K; Daly, H; Gray, L J; Hale, R; Martin Stacey, L; Taub, N; Skinner, T C; Stone, M; Heller, S; Khunti, K; Davies, M J

    2014-11-01

    To develop and test a format of delivery of diabetes self-management education by paired professional and lay educators. We conducted an equivalence trial with non-randomized participant allocation to a Diabetes Education and Self Management for Ongoing and Newly Diagnosed Type 2 diabetes (DESMOND) course, delivered in the standard format by two trained healthcare professional educators (to the control group) or by one trained lay educator and one professional educator (to the intervention group). A total of 260 people with Type 2 diabetes diagnosed within the previous 12 months were referred for self-management education as part of routine care and attended either a control or intervention format DESMOND course. The primary outcome measure was change in illness coherence score (derived from the Diabetes Illness Perception Questionnaire-Revised) between baseline and 4 months after attending education sessions. Secondary outcome measures included change in HbA1c level. The trial was conducted in four primary care organizations across England and Scotland. The 95% CI for the between-group difference in positive change in coherence scores was within the pre-set limits of equivalence (difference = 0.22, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.52). Equivalent changes related to secondary outcome measures were also observed, including equivalent reductions in HbA1c levels. Diabetes education delivered jointly by a trained lay person and a healthcare professional educator with the same educator role can provide equivalent patient benefits. This could provide a method that increases capacity, maintains quality and is cost-effective, while increasing access to self-management education. © 2014 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2014 Diabetes UK.

  14. Developing a diabetes prevention education programme for community health-care workers in Thailand: formative findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sranacharoenpong, Kitti; Hanning, Rhona M

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate barriers to and supports for implementing a diabetes prevention education programme for community health-care workers (CHCWs) in Chiang Mai province, Thailand. The study also aimed to get preliminary input into the design of a tailored diabetes prevention education programme for CHCWs. Thailand has faced under-nutrition and yet, paradoxically, the prevalence of diseases of over-nutrition, such as obesity and diabetes, has escalated. As access to diabetes prevention programme is limited in Thailand, especially in rural and semi-urban areas, it becomes critical to develop a health information delivery system that is relevant, cost-effective, and sustainable. Health-care professionals (n = 12) selected from health centres within one district participated in in-depth interviews. In addition, screened people at risk for diabetes participated in interviews (n = 8) and focus groups (n = 4 groups, 23 participants). Coded transcripts from audio-taped interviews or focus groups were analysed by hand and using NVivo software. Concept mapping illustrated the findings. Health-care professionals identified potential barriers to programme success as a motivation for regular participation, and lack of health policy support for programme sustainability. Health-care professionals identified opportunities to integrate health promotion and disease prevention into CHCWs' duties. Health-care professionals recommended small-group workshops, hands-on learning activities, case studies, and video presentations that bring knowledge to practice within their cultural context. CHCWs should receive a credit for continuing study. People at risk for diabetes lacked knowledge of nutrition, diabetes risk factors, and resources to access health information. They desired two-way communication with CHCWs. Formative research supports the need for an effective, sustainable programme to support knowledge translation to CHCWs and at-risk populations in the

  15. World tour through the internet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Ji Hwan; Kang, Ho Seong; Kim, Jong Hun

    1994-03-01

    This book deals with basic knowledge and familiarity with internet use, which is composed of seven chapters ; the world of internet, the basic knowledge for internet use such as telnet, mail, talk, basic command on Unix and command for communication, to access to the internet, if you get on the internet for the first time, useful service of internet such as archie service, gopher service, who is service, Use net, IRC and Netiquette on IRC, interesting internet trip like Billboard charts, TV-Rating, Solar Report, Agricultural Info, CARL, Nat'l Education BBS, internet service in Sydney university FEDIX, CAIR, NOAA, SDDAS, Stock, MUD and international Go server. The last chapter is computer networks connected to the internet ; computer services, BITNET, and FidoNet.

  16. World tour through the internet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Ji Hwan; Kang, Ho Seong; Kim, Jong Hun

    1994-03-15

    This book deals with basic knowledge and familiarity with internet use, which is composed of seven chapters ; the world of internet, the basic knowledge for internet use such as telnet, mail, talk, basic command on Unix and command for communication, to access to the internet, if you get on the internet for the first time, useful service of internet such as archie service, gopher service, who is service, Use net, IRC and Netiquette on IRC, interesting internet trip like Billboard charts, TV-Rating, Solar Report, Agricultural Info, CARL, Nat'l Education BBS, internet service in Sydney university FEDIX, CAIR, NOAA, SDDAS, Stock, MUD and international Go server. The last chapter is computer networks connected to the internet ; computer services, BITNET, and FidoNet.

  17. CONTINUING EDUCATION TEACHER OF INDIGENOUS AND NON-INDIGENOUS MEDIATED SOCIAL NETWORK ON THE INTERNET: A PERSPECTIVE INTERCULTURAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Lima Paniago Lopes

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to analyze continuous training of teachers indigenous and non-indigenous, mediated by a social network on Ning called Internet under an intercultural perspective. This social network has come up as a virtual community as they have been established emotional ties, webs of connections and relationships between its participants. This is a qualitative research and collaborative in the sense that the experiences of researchers and teachers are valued and shared within a social context. The results show that participants in the group continuing of education, despite their difficulties using the technology itself and with little technological infrastructure, they see these virtual spaces as a possibility for new discoveries, creations and knowledge production, not forsaking the customs, traditions and their own culture.

  18. An empirical study of factors influencing adoption of Internet banking among students of higher education: Evidence from Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Kabeer Kazi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Thispaper investigated the influence of factors on the intention to adopt Internetbanking services among students of higher education in Pakistan. Theoreticalframework used for this study has been adopted from Technology Acceptance Model(TAM with four independent variables. Convenience sampling method was usedwith a total of valid 220 respondents, which included students of Khadim AliShah Bukhari Institute of Technology (KASBIT, Karachi, Pakistan.  Data was collected through self administeredquestionnaire of two parts: Demographic and Likert scale multi-item scale forvariables under study. Results indicated that convenience, perceivedcredibility, and perceived usefulness had significant positive influence amongstudents on the intention to adopt Internet banking. The findings from thisresearch would be useful for banks in the subject area, particularly forstudents in Pakistan.

  19. Application Use, Online Relationship Types, Self-Disclosure, and Internet Abuse among Children and Youth: Implications for Education and Internet Safety Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blau, Ina

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the relationships between Internet abuse (IA)--self-disclosure, online application usage, and relationship types--traditional long-distance, purely virtual, and migratory mixed-mode. An online questionnaire was administered to 2884 children and youth. According to the hypotheses, applications differed in their relationships…

  20. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diabetes Information on WebMD Order Free Women's Health Publications Women's Health Information on Twitter Information from Other Government Agencies and Offices National Diabetes Education Program Diabetes Information on MedlinePlus Diabetes and Depression ...

  1. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from Other Government Agencies and Offices National Diabetes Education Program Diabetes Information on MedlinePlus Diabetes and Depression in Older Women More in Women's Health Topics Mammography Women and Diabetes HPV, HIV, Birth ...

  2. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diabetes: Lindsey's Story (Video) Diabetes Center Movie: Endocrine System Diabetes Center Diabetes: ... All information on KidsHealth® is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and ...

  3. Educational strategies for diabetic people at risk for foot neuropathy: synthesis of good evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Catunda Gomes de Menezes

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to identify the best evidence concerning health education strategies used in teaching-learning for people with diabetes mellitus who are at risk for foot neuropathy. An integrative review was conducted in the databases PubMed, LILACS, CINAHL and SCOPUS in January 2015; a total of 14 papers was analyzed in detail. The results are shown in a summary table and categories are discussed, covering various health education strategies for prevention and management with patients at risk of foot neuropathy (group; individual in face-to-face visits or via telephone; and using interactive technologies, and a synthesis of the best evidence for the effectiveness of these interventions in reducing diabetic foot complications. It was concluded that all the educational strategies are effective in promoting diabetic foot self-care. However, the group strategies showed greater effectiveness, enabling significant improvements in the knowledge, attitude, and practices of care for feet and general health of diabetic patients.

  4. Education for type 2 diabetes mellitus self-care: from compliance to empowerment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Pithon Cyrino

    Full Text Available Through a critical review of the literature on education for diabetes self-care and self-management, it was sought to point out the inappropriateness of traditional approaches towards compliance with treatment and transmission of information, considering the complexity of self-care under chronic conditions. The influence of the social sciences on the field of studies on chronic degenerative diseases in general, and diabetes in particular, was explored. From this perspective, it can be recognized that the fields of anthropology and sociology have been incorporated into research focusing more on individuals as patients, and on the experience gained through this process. Recently, there has been a slight change within the field of health education research relating to diabetes, with the introduction of strategies that seek to value the experience and autonomy of patients as self-care agents. This paper discusses the strategy for empowerment in education for diabetes self-care and self-management, as a dialogue-focused practice that respects patients' moral and cognitive autonomy.

  5. Education for type 2 diabetes mellitus self-care: from compliance to empowerment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Pithon Cyrino

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Through a critical review of the literature on education for diabetes self-care and self-management, it was sought to point out the inappropriateness of traditional approaches towards compliance with treatment and transmission of information, considering the complexity of self-care under chronic conditions. The influence of the social sciences on the field of studies on chronic degenerative diseases in general, and diabetes in particular, was explored. From this perspective, it can be recognized that the fields of anthropology and sociology have been incorporated into research focusing more on individuals as patients, and on the experience gained through this process. Recently, there has been a slight change within the field of health education research relating to diabetes, with the introduction of strategies that seek to value the experience and autonomy of patients as self-care agents. This paper discusses the strategy for empowerment in education for diabetes self-care and self-management, as a dialogue-focused practice that respects patients' moral and cognitive autonomy.

  6. Diabetes self-management education in South Auckland, New Zealand, 2007-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Martha; Clinton, Janet; Appleton, Sarah; Flanagan, Pat

    2011-03-01

    Self-management education programs seek to help patients realize that they are their own principal caregivers and that health care professionals are consultants who support them in this role. The aim of this study was to evaluate a diabetes self-management education program implemented as part of a district-wide approach in South Auckland, New Zealand, which has some of the highest prevalence rates for diabetes and is one of the most ethnically diverse and deprived regions of New Zealand. Self-management attitudes and behaviors were monitored with the use of questionnaires before and after program implementation. Clinical outcomes such as hemoglobin A1c, body mass index, and blood pressure were also tracked before the program began and 3 months after the program ended. Participant focus groups and facilitator interviews were conducted to explore perceptions of the program. Participants showed improvement in attitudes toward their own ability to manage their diabetes; in diet, physical activity, and foot care; and in hemoglobin A1c levels 3 months after the end of participation. Participants also reduced their sense of isolation when dealing with their diabetes. However, catering to the needs of a multiethnic community is extremely resource-intensive because of the need to provide adequate language and cultural interpretation. Self-management education can work in multiethnic, high-needs communities in New Zealand. Programs must ensure they enable the appropriate mechanisms and have appropriate resources to support the community's needs.

  7. Education and training for people working with and caring for those with diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Lloyd, Cathy; Banks, Duncan

    2007-01-01

    The growing need for healthcare workers to be given education and training in diabetes care, along with the focus on improving self-management of the condition, prompted The Open University to launch 'Diabetes Care', a 20-week, first-level course, in 2005. The course was designed to meet the needs of lay people as well as those wishing to undertake a nationally accredited programme of study. It was immediately oversubscribed and continues to be extremely popular. The course model is being rep...

  8. Educating families from ethnic minorities in type 1 diabetes-experiences from a Danish intervention study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Povlsen, Lene; Olsen, Birthe; Ladelund, Steen

    2004-01-01

    focusing on immigrant families with children with type 1 diabetes is described. The intervention included the development of adapted educational material and guidelines, and a subsequent re-education of children, adolescents and parents from 37 families. The study demonstrated that it was possible......Ethnic minorities may constitute vulnerable groups within Western health care systems as their ability to master severe chronic diseases could be affected by barriers such as different culture and health/illness beliefs, communication problems and limited educational background. An intervention...... to improve health outcome. During the study, the knowledge of diabetes increased, but with considerable differences between the families. HbA(1c) also decreased significantly during the intervention, but increased during follow-up. The paper discusses possible explanations and suggestions for optimising...

  9. Utilization of the Internet to deliver educational materials to healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallgren, R C; Gorbis, S

    1997-01-01

    We have developed a computer-based learning module which uses three-dimensional animation sequences to enhance the acquisition of physical concepts and skills necessary for clinical evaluation and treatment of the cervical spine. This teaching tool, designed to serve as an adjunct to teaching strategies that faculty may be currently using, is available to students through the Kobiljak Resource Center at Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine (MSUCOM) and via the Internet (http:/(/)hal.bim.msu.edu/EdTech) to individuals and groups who are physically removed from the MSU campus. While we are restricting this initial effort to the upper cervical spine, it is planned that future materials will include other parts of the body and, in addition, will enable students to not only visualize the effects of pathology on motion mechanics, but also give them the ability to interactively control an articulation in three-dimensional space.

  10. Urinary protein as a marker for systolic blood pressure reduction in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus participating in an in-hospital diabetes education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Kenta; Miyamoto, Michiaki; Kotani, Kazuhiko; Yagyu, Hiroaki; Osuga, Junichi; Nagasaka, Shoichiro; Ishibashi, Shun

    2011-10-01

    Increased blood pressure (BP) and urinary protein (UP)/microalbuminuria are risk factors for cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. Although the management of BP in patients with diabetes should involve a multidisciplinary therapy, there are no reports in which modulators have been identified in an in-hospital diabetes education program. The aim of the present study was to investigate the change in BP levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) during a short-term (2-week) in-hospital education program on lifestyle modifications. A total of 167 patients with T2DM (101 men, 66 women; mean age, 61.1 years; glycated hemoglobin, 9.2%) were divided into 2 groups on the basis of their urinary albumin levels: 1 group without UP (urinary albumin level patients with T2DM.

  11. Tried and true: self-regulation theory as a guiding framework for teaching parents diabetes education using human patient simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan-Bolyai, Susan; Johnson, Kimberly; Cullen, Karen; Hamm, Terry; Bisordi, Jean; Blaney, Kathleen; Maguire, Laura; Melkus, Gail

    2014-01-01

    Parents become emotionally upset when learning that their child has type 1 diabetes, yet they are expected to quickly learn functional diabetes management. The purpose of this article is to describe the application of self-regulation theory to guide a family-focused education intervention using human patient simulation to enhance the initial education of parents in diabetes management. A brief description is provided of the intervention framed by self-regulation theory. On the basis of the literature, we describe the educational vignettes used based on self-regulation in the randomized controlled trial entitled "Parent Education Through Simulation-Diabetes." Examples of theory-in-practice will be illustrated by parental learning responses to this alternative educational innovation.

  12. The Internet as a Tool for Informal Education: A Case of Uyghur Language Websites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clothey, Rebecca A.

    2017-01-01

    The 200th year since Jullien published his influential book "Esquisse et vues preliminaries d'un ouvrage sur l'éducation comparée" (Preliminary plan and views of a work of comparative education) is an opportunity to reflect on the field of comparative education and potential new research and theoretical directions. This paper will…

  13. Educational-researching and Information Resources In Interdisciplinary Automated Training System Based On Internet Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Savitskaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research is the study of the functionality of modular object-oriented dynamic learning environment (Moodle to development the informational and educational and educational research resource for training students in the disciplines of natural-scientific and engineer science. Have considered scientific-practical and methodological experience in the development, implementation and use of the interdisciplinary automated training system based on the Moodle system in the educational process. Presented the structure of the typical training course and set out recommendations for the development of information and educational resources different types of lessons and self-study students.Have considered the features of preparation of teaching-research resources of the assignments for lab using the software package MatLab. Also has considered the experience of implementing the discipline “Remote educational technologies and electronic learning in the scientific and the educational activities” for the training of graduate students at the Mendeleev University of Chemical Technology of Russia. The proposed an article approaches to the implementation of informational and educational and educational research resources in the interdisciplinary automated training system can be applied for a wide range of similar disciplines of natural-scientific and engineering sciences in a multilevel system of training of graduates.

  14. DISTANCE EDUCATION IN THE UNITED STATES: From Correspondence Courses to the Internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gail D. CARUTH

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Online learning is a descendent of distance education. Online education has a shared history with correspondence learning. In 1873, Anna Eliot Ticknor founded the Society to Encourage Studies at Home. Ticknor's Society established one of America’s first correspondence schools, a distance learning option conducted through the mail. This Society was aimed at the education of women and enrolled more than seven thousand women. Education by mail was a quality approach to provide education for all because it allowed universities to access an infinite number of potential students. Today there are institutions that offer only online courses. At the same time, brick and mortar or traditional institutions offer online courses in addition to their face-to-face courses. A review of the literature suggests that as indicated by enrollment figures, the number of students taking online courses is growing and continued growth can be expected in the future.

  15. Simplicity, flexibility, and respect: preferences related to patient education in hardly reached people with type 2 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Torenholt, Rikke; Varming, Annemarie; Engelund, Gitte; Vestergaard, Susanne; M?ller, Birgitte Lund; Pals, Regitze Anne Saurbrey; Willaing, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Rikke Torenholt,1 Annemarie Varming,1 Gitte Engelund,1 Susanne Vestergaard,2 Birgitte Lund Møller,3 Regitze Anne Saurbrey Pals,1 Ingrid Willaing1 1Health Promotion Research, Steno Diabetes Center A/S, Gentofte, 2Danish Diabetes Association, Copenhagen, 3Region of Southern Denmark, Vejle, Denmark Abstract: Individuals with lower income and less education are two to four times more likely to develop diabetes than more advantaged individuals. In response to this, there is a need for d...

  16. The Effect of Internet-Based Education on Student Success in Teaching of 8th Grade Triangles Subject

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Deniz; Kesan, Cenk; Izgiol, Dilek

    2013-01-01

    In the study, it was researched the effect of internet-based application on student success. Internet-based application was used at the teaching of triangles subject which is included in 8th grade units of triangles and algebra. The study was carried out over the internet with a computer software program: Vitamin Program. The study was carried out…

  17. Education and technology used to improve the quality of life for people with diabetes mellitus type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Brooke; Heiland, Brianne; Kohler-Rausch, Elizabeth; Kovic, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of type II diabetes mellitus (DMT2) is expected to continue to rise. Current research has analyzed various tools, strategies, programs, barriers, and support in regards to the self-management of this condition. However, past researchers have yet to analyze the education process; including the adaptation of specific strategies in activities of daily living and roles, as well as the influence of health care providers in the integration of these strategies. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to identify the strengths and limitations of the current model of diabetes education in the United States and hypothesize how technology can impact quality of life. Key informants on diabetes education were recruited from diabetes education centers through the American Association of Diabetes Educators. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with participants. Health care practitioners convey limited knowledge of DMT2. Individuals with DMT2 often have limited understanding of the implications of poor self-management. There appears to be no consistent standard of care for how to effectively incorporate self-management strategies. There is limited education for the use of technology in self-management. Diabetes educators describe that technology could be beneficial. Findings suggest the importance of the role of care providers in emphasizing the implications of poor self-management strategies; that a multidisciplinary approach may enhance the education process; and a need for further developments in technology to address DMT2 self-management strategies.

  18. Impact of Education on Disease Knowledge and Glycaemic Control Among Type 2 Diabetic Patients in Family Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Herenda

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available In patients with diabetes type 2, good knowledge about disease often doesn’t follow appropriate behavior in their life. Therefore, we wanted to find out basic level of disease knowledge and glycemic control among type 2 diabetic patients, and after that impact of passive and intensive education on knowledge and glycemic control. Starting with 130 participants, 91 patients with type 2 diabetes, from four family medicine services in Tuzla Canton, completed six months education about their disease. Disease Knowledge Test of Michigan Diabetes Training and Research Center was used to evaluate knowledge about diabetes and glycaemic control was assessed by HbAic. Participants were tested at the beginning of survey, after 3 months of passive education and additional 3 months of intensive one. Basic test showed good knowledge of participants (score 8,3 out of 15, improved knowledge after passive education (score 9,23 and intensive one (11,19 (P<0,0001. Demographic characteristics of patients (age, sex, living area, level of education, duration of disease and type of treatment had no influence on disease knowledge and glycaemic control during education. Generally, patient education improved significantly glycaemic control by HbA1c reduction 0,45% (P=0,011 without significant differences between passive and intensive one. Education of patients improves both disease knowledge and glycaemic control among type 2 diabetic patients.

  19. Babies Need Healthy Moms: an innovative postpartum screening and education class for women who had gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazzitta, Marie A; Anderson, Michele; Egan, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Healthy Babies Need Healthy Moms (HBNHM) is an innovative education program that combines the recommended 2-hour postpartum oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) with diabetes prevention education for women who had gestational diabetes mellitus. During the class, the 2-hour OGTT is performed, and in the time between venipunctures, the women participate in group education focused on evidence-based diabetes prevention strategies that promote healthy family nutrition and lifestyle behavior, importance of preconception care for subsequent pregnancies, and the need for follow-up care for women who screen positive for abnormal glucose levels. The purpose of this article is to describe this model to encourage replication in other diabetes programs. The HBNHM program is a low-budget education program that provides postpartum OGTT screening for women who had gestational diabetes mellitus during their pregnancies while simultaneously offering education designed to improve future outcomes. For those women whose screening is positive for overt diabetes or prediabetes, the educational strategies are directed at encouraging follow-up care. For those patients who have normal screening results, the program is designed to help the patient prevent the future development of type 2 diabetes. Preconception counseling is included in an effort to improve outcomes in future pregnancies and provide patients with the tools needed to help enhance the health of their families.

  20. Exploring why young people with Type 1 diabetes decline structured education with a view to overcoming barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, V E; Horigan, G; Davies, M; Davies, M T

    2017-08-01

    To identify factors that influence lack of engagement of young adults with Type 1 diabetes (aged 13-21 years) with structured diabetes education (SDE) to inform and broaden the reach of future SDE. A quantitative, cross-sectional survey was undertaken of 227 young people with Type 1 diabetes drawn from 11 health trusts across Northern Ireland and England, deemed to be representative of the wider population. Participants were asked to complete a questionnaire exploring non-attendance, along with the Diabetes Care Profile, the Diabetes Empowerment Scale (Short Form), the Diabetes Knowledge Test and the 12-item General Health Questionnaire. Demographic, health and diabetes-specific variables including HbA 1c were also collected. The five most commonly cited reasons for non-attendance were 'Had other things to do' (68.3%), 'No time' (62.2%), 'Could not get time off school/college or work' (60.8%), 'Learnt about diabetes from other sources' (55.5%) and 'Feel able to cope on own' (52.9%). Greater emphasis is required on communication with young people about the benefits of SDE. In addition, efforts need to be directed to making diabetes education more accessible without losing the quality of structured programmes. © 2017 Diabetes UK.

  1. Health education on diabetes at a South African national science ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... with a major negative impact on the health and development of South Africans. ... To determine the effects of a health education programme on increasing ... models, word-search games, information leaflets and a computer-based quiz ...

  2. The Effect of an Education Program Utilising PRECEDE Model on the Quality of Life in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghdisi, M. H.; Borhani, M.; Solhi, M.; Afkari, M. E.; Hosseini, F.

    2012-01-01

    Background and objective: The problems caused by diabetes have direct and indirect impacts on the quality of life of diabetic patients. An increase of these problems means a decrease in a patient's quality of life. This study was conducted to assess the effect of the educational programme based on the precede model in promoting quality of life of…

  3. The Effects and Costs of a Group-Based Education Programme for Self-Management of Patients with Type 2 Diabetes. A Community-Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molsted, Stig; Tribler, Jane; Poulsen, Peter B.; Snorgaard, Ole

    2012-01-01

    The worldwide epidemic of Type 2 diabetes necessitates evidence-based self-management education programmes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects and costs of an empowerment-based structured diabetes self-management education programme in an unselected group of patients with Type 2 diabetes. Seven hundred and two patients…

  4. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from Other Government Agencies and Offices National Diabetes Education Program Diabetes Information on MedlinePlus Diabetes and Depression ... Information Safety Emergency Preparedness International Programs News & ... & Continuing Education Inspections & Compliance Federal, State & Local Officials ...

  5. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from Other Government Agencies and Offices National Diabetes Education Program Diabetes Information on MedlinePlus Diabetes and Depression ... Emergency Preparedness International Programs News & Events Training & Continuing Education Inspections & Compliance Federal, State & Local Officials Consumers Health ...

  6. Developing, Implementing, and Evaluating the Educational Module Students Active Learning via Internet Observations (SALIO) in Undergraduate Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzmann-Erikson, Martin; Bjuhr, Marie; Mårtensson, Gunilla

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed not only to describe the development and implementation of the module but also to evaluate the nursing students' perceptions. A cross-sectional design including 101 students who were asked to participate and answer a survey. We describe the development of the pedagogic module Students Active Learning via Internet Observations based on situated learning. The findings show that learning about service users' own lived experiences via web-based platforms was instructive according to the students: 81% agreed to a high or very high degree. Another important finding was that 96% of students responded that the module had clinical relevance for nursing work. We argue that learning that engages students with data that are contextually and culturally situated is important for developing competence in caregiving. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Screening, monitoring, and educating patients with diabetes in an independent community pharmacy in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, F J; Monsanto, H A

    2001-03-01

    Increase the awareness about the importance of Diabetes mellitus (DM) management and assess the educational and monitoring needs of patients visiting a community pharmacy in Puerto Rico. A community service activity focusing on DM was held in a community pharmacy. The educational and monitoring needs of the participants were assessed using a questionnaire. Glucose tests were conducted in the pharmacy by medical technologists. Educational activities consisted of presentations and printed materials. Two-thirds of the fasting people had blood glucose levels higher than 140 mg/dl. Seventy-nine percent of the patients with diabetes were not aware of the glycosilated hemoglobin test. Most of the patients were interested in learning more about how to manage their condition. A greater understanding is needed among patients with DM that blood glucose control decreases diabetes related complications. Community pharmacists are in an excellent position to collaborate with other health professionals in screening, monitoring and educating patients with DM to prevent long-term complications.

  8. [Impact of an educational institutional program in the control of the diabetic patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Romo, Miguel Angel; Velasco-Chávez, José Fernando; Nieva de Jesús, Rafael Natividad; Andrade-Rodríguez, Héctor de Jesús; Rodríguez-Pérez, Carlos Vicente; Palou-Fraga, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    to assess the impact of an educational institutional program in the control of type 2 diabetic patient. intervention educational study, with quasi-experimental and self-controlled subjects. A convenience non-probabilistic sample was used including 151 patients from the program for the integral care of diabetic patients. Demographic variables: gender, age, type of insurance, somatometric and metabolic profile. The assistance to a one-year length, educational program was necessary. Descriptive and inferential parametric statistics were used. 106 women and 45 men, with age range between 15 and 87 years, and with an average of 57.22 ± 11.47, were studied. A significant decrease in body mass index, waist circumference, venous glucose fasting and post-prandial values, cholesterol, systolic blood pressure, triglycerides and glycosylated hemoglobin (t Student semi-detached, p education for the control of the diabetic patient shown a favorable pattern in most of somatometric and metabolic parameters. We suggest to extend this study over a longer period to determine if the effects persist over time.

  9. Evaluation of internet-based patient education materials from internal medicine subspecialty organizations: will patients understand them?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansberry, David R; Agarwal, Nitin; John, Elizabeth S; John, Ann M; Agarwal, Prateek; Reynolds, James C; Baker, Stephen R

    2017-06-01

    The majority of Americans use the Internet daily, if not more often, and many search online for health information to better understand a diagnosis they have been given or to research treatment options. The average American reads at an eighth-grade level. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the readability of online patient education materials on the websites of 14 professional organizations representing the major internal medicine subspecialties. We used ten well-established quantitative readability scales to assess written text from patient education materials published on the websites of the major professional organizations representing the following subspecialty groups: allergy and immunology, cardiology, endocrinology, gastroenterology, geriatrics, hematology, hospice and palliative care, infectious disease, nephrology, oncology, pulmonology and critical care, rheumatology, sleep medicine, and sports medicine. Collectively the 540 articles analyzed were written at an 11th-grade level (SD 1.4 grade levels). The sleep medicine and nephrology websites had the most readable materials, written at an academic grade level of 8.5 ± 1.5 and 9.0 ± 0.2, respectively. Material at the infectious disease site was written at the most difficult level, with average readability corresponding to grades 13.9 ± 0.3. None of the patient education materials we reviewed conformed to the American Medical Association (AMA) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) guidelines requiring that patient education articles be written at a third- to seventh-grade reading level. If these online resources were rewritten, it is likely that more patients would derive benefit from reading them.

  10. The effectiveness of nutritional education on the knowledge of diabetic patients using the health belief model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Sharifirad

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available

    • BACKGROUND: Patients have a major role in the control and treatment of type 2 diabetes. So, knowledge of different aspects of this disease especially diet therapy is very important for these patients. This study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of the Health Belief Model (HBM on nutrition education in type 2 diabetic patients.
    • METHOD: Eighty eight type 2 diabetic patients attending Iranian Diabetes Association seminars were randomly selected to participate in the study (44 in intervention group and 44 in control group. The intervention was consisted of two educational sessions each one for 80 minutes. Data were collected by a validated and reliable questionnaire (58 questions before intervention and one month after intervention.
    • RESULTS: After intervention, knowledge scores increased in the intervention group compared to the control group (Mean differences in the intervention and test group: 22.68 ± 15.90 vs - 2.27 ± 17.30, P < 0.001. Perceived susceptibility increased significantly in the intervention group compared to the control group (27.5 ± 18.5 vs 3.9 ± 17.2, P < 0.001. The result was the same for perceived severity, perceived threatened and perceived benefits (P < 0.001. In contrast perceived barriers reduced in the intervention group compared to the control diet (-14.7 ± 13.3 vs 0.9 ± 13.9, P < 0.001. In the intervention group, behavior grades increased more than control group (34.61 ± 14.93 vs -0.23 ± 8.52, P < 0.001.
    • CONCLUSION: The efficacy of the health belief model in nutritional education to the diabetic patients was confirmed in the present study.

  11. Evaluation of pharmacists' educational and counselling impact on patients' clinical outcomes in a diabetic setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winifred Aitalegbe Ojieabu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nigeria had the highest number of people living with diabetes mellitus in the African region in year 2013. Previous researchers have found that patients with knowledge of their diseases including their treatment methods have a high likelihood to succeed in managing the disease conditions. Many pharmaceutical care programmes which have been successfully applied in various countries to enhance clinical outcomes and health-related quality of life are not very common in Nigeria. Objective: This study was to evaluate pharmacist's educational and counselling impact on diabetic patients' outcomes in a diabetic setting. Materials and Methods: The 4-month randomised controlled study involved 150 elderly Type 2 diabetic patients. Sociodemographic and clinical parameters were measured. We educated and counselled the 75 patients in our intervention group at least four times during the study period, but the control group was deprived of the pharmacist's intervention. Results: Female to male participants was in the ratio of 9:6 and 9:5 in both control and intervention groups, respectively. Majority (>40% of the patients in both groups had primary education. Baseline and 4-month mean fasting blood sugar in the control group was 162.2 ± 69.1 and 159.9 ± 57.2, respectively (P = 0.825, whereas the intervention group had 156.7 ± 30.5 and 131.8 ± 40.4, respectively (P < 0.001. Mean systolic blood pressure in both groups was 146.4 ± 13.9 and 133.8 ± 18.5 (P < 0.001, respectively. Adherence levels to medication taking in both groups were 42.7%:94.7%, respectively (P = 0.001. Conclusion: This study encourages the inclusion of clinical pharmacists into multidisciplinary healthcare groups in hospital and clinic settings as well as incorporation of this type of intervention into diabetic management programmes for optimal patients' outcomes.

  12. Education and patient preferences for treating type 2 diabetes: a stratified discrete-choice experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janssen EM

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Ellen M Janssen,1 Daniel R Longo,2 Joan K Bardsley,3 John FP Bridges1 1Department of Health Policy and Management, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, 2Department of Family Medicine and Population Health, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, 3MedStar Health Research Institute and MedStar Nursing, Hyattsville, MD, USA Purpose: Diabetes is a chronic condition that is more prevalent among people with lower educational attainment. This study assessed the treatment preferences of patients with type 2 diabetes by educational attainment. Methods: Patients with type 2 diabetes were recruited from a national online panel in the US. Treatment preferences were assessed using a discrete-choice experiment. Participants completed 16 choice tasks in which they compared pairs of treatment profiles composed of six attributes: A1c decrease, stable blood glucose, low blood glucose, nausea, treatment burden, and out-of-pocket cost. Choice models and willingness-to-pay (WTP estimates were estimated using a conditional logit model and were stratified by educational status. Results: A total of 231 participants with a high school diploma or less education, 156 participants with some college education, and 165 participants with a college degree or more completed the survey. Participants with a college degree or more education were willing to pay more for A1c decreases ($58.84, standard error [SE]: 10.6 than participants who had completed some college ($28.47, SE: 5.53 or high school or less ($17.56, SE: 3.55 (p≤0.01. People with a college education were willing to pay more than people with high school or less to avoid nausea, low blood glucose events during the day/night, or two pills per day. Conclusion: WTP for aspects of diabetes medication differed for people with a college education or more and a high school education or less. Advanced statistical methods might overcome limitations of stratification and advance understanding

  13. Preventive intervention in diabetes: a new model for continuing medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaser, Richard S; Brown, Julie A

    2013-04-01

    Competence and skills in overcoming clinical inertia for diabetes treatment, and actually supporting and assisting the patient through adherence and compliance (as opposed to just reiterating what they "should" be doing and then assigning them the blame if they fail) is a key component to success in addressing diabetes, and to date it is a component that has received little formal attention. To improve and systematize diabetes care, it is critical to move beyond the "traditional" continuing medical education (CME) model of imparting knowledge as the entirety of the educational effort, and move toward a focus on Performance Improvement CME. This new approach does not just teach new information but also provides support for improvements where needed most within practice systems based on targeted data-based on self-assessments for the entire system of care. Joslin data conclude that this new approach will benefit support, clinical, and office teams as well as the specialist. In short, the Performance Improvement CME structure reflects the needed components of the successful practice today, particularly for chronic conditions such as diabetes, including the focus on interdisciplinary team care and on quality improvement, which is becoming more and more aligned with reimbursement schemes, public and private, in the U.S. Copyright © 2013 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. What role could community pharmacists in Malaysia play in diabetes self-management education and support? The views of individuals with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, E Lyn; Wong, Pei Se; Tan, Ming Yeong; Sheridan, Janie

    2018-04-01

    This study explored the experiences and views of individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) on their diabetes self-management and potential roles for community pharmacists in diabetes self-management education and support (DSME/S) in Malaysia. A qualitative study, using semi-structured, face-to-face interviews, was conducted with patients with T2D attending a primary care health clinic in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed inductively. Fourteen participants with T2D were interviewed. Data were coded into five main themes: experience and perception of diabetes self-management, constraints of the current healthcare system, perception of the community pharmacist and community pharmacies, perceived roles for community pharmacists in diabetes care, and challenges in utilising community pharmacies to provide DSME/S. There were misconceptions about diabetes management that may be attributed to a lack of knowledge. Although participants described potential roles for community pharmacists in education, medication review and continuity of care, these roles were mostly non-clinically oriented. Participants were not confident about community pharmacists making recommendations and changes to the prescribed treatment regimens. While participants recognised the advantages of convenience of a community pharmacy-based diabetes care service, they raised concerns over the retail nature and the community pharmacy environment for providing such services. This study highlighted the need to improve the care provision for people with T2D. Participants with T2D identified potential, but limited roles for community pharmacists in diabetes care. Participants expressed concerns that need to be addressed if effective diabetes care is to be provided from community pharmacies in Malaysia. © 2017 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  15. Internet based patient education improves informed consent for elective orthopaedic surgery: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraval, Andrew; Chandrananth, Janan; Chong, Yew M; Coventry, Lillian S; Tran, Phong

    2015-02-07

    Obtaining informed consent is an essential step in the surgical pathway. Providing adequate patient education to enable informed decision making is a continued challenge of contemporary surgical practice. This study investigates whether the use of a patient information website, to augment patient education and informed consent for elective orthopaedic procedures is an effective measure. A randomised controlled trial was conducted comparing the quality of informed consent provided by a standard discussion with the treating surgeon compared to augmentation of this discussion with an online education resource (www.orthoanswer.org). Participants were recruited from orthopaedic outpatient clinics. Patients undergoing five common orthopaedic procedures were eligible to participate in the trial. The primary outcome measure was knowledge about their operation. Satisfaction with their informed consent and anxiety relating to their operation were the secondary outcome measures. There was a statistically significant increase in patient knowledge for the intervention arm as compared to the control arm (p education website as an augment to informed consent improves patient knowledge about their planned operation as well as satisfaction with the consent process whilst not increasing their anxiety levels. We recommend that all patients be directed to web based education tools to augment their consent. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR) ACTRN12614001058662 .

  16. Internet Factories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strijkers, R.J.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis contributes a novel concept for introducing new network technologies in network infrastructures. The concept, called Internet factories, describes the methodical process to create and manage application-specific networks from application programs, referred to as Netapps. An Internet

  17. Internet factories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strijkers, R.J.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis contributes a novel concept for introducing new network technologies in network infrastructures. The concept, called Internet factories, describes the methodical process to create and manage application-specific networks from application programs, referred to as Netapps. An Internet

  18. Internet Economics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henten, Anders; Skouby, Knud Erik; Øst, Alexander Gorm

    1998-01-01

    Article descibing and analysing the influence of the commercialisation of Internet on end-user and interconnect pricing.......Article descibing and analysing the influence of the commercialisation of Internet on end-user and interconnect pricing....

  19. Internet economics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henten, Anders; Skouby, Knud Erik; Øst, Alexander Gorm

    1997-01-01

    A paper on the economics of the Internet with respect to end user pricing and pricing og interconnect.......A paper on the economics of the Internet with respect to end user pricing and pricing og interconnect....

  20. Communities of practice: pedagogy and internet-based technologies to support educator's continuing technology professional development in higher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maurice Schols

    2011-01-01

    Advances in information and communication technologies (ICTs) as well as modern pedagogical perspectives have created new possibilities to facilitate and support learning in higher education (HE). Emerging technologies bring opportunities to reconsider teaching and learning. New ideas and concepts