WorldWideScience

Sample records for international womens day

  1. International Women's Day speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazibwe, S W

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of the International Women's Day are: 1) to celebrate the struggle for women's rights in the economic, social, political, and cultural domain; 2) to reaffirm women's solidarity in the struggle for peace; 3) and to show what women have achieved. In 1988, Uganda's government of the National Resistance Movement created the Ministry of Women in Development. The period 1988-1990 was one of consultations, needs assessment, planning, and recruiting staff for the Ministry. From 1990 to 1993, measurable results have been achieved. The Ministry's gender concerns pertained to the sector policies of the Ministries of Agriculture, Animal Industry and Fisheries, Education, Health, Water, Energy, Minerals, and Environment Protection. Under the Umbrella Project for Women in Development, gender sensitization has been achieved with policy makers in ministries, at district level, and in the media. Gender issues have also been incorporated in the National Political School Curriculum. The Ministry has also trained a corps of 73 women trainers from 38 districts. The Ministry, with funding from DANIDA, collected women's views on the constitution through meetings and seminars in all the districts in the country. Recommendations were submitted in a consolidated report to the Constitution Commission. A pilot para-legal scheme is successfully being implemented in Kamuli district. A community-based pool of legal advisors has been developed. Legal matters that affect both women and men are undertaken at the community level. The economic emancipation of women is a crucial part of the Ministry's mandate. In conjunction with NGOs, pilot credit programs are being run in Mukono, Jinja, Mbale, and Kapchorwa districts. Cross-sectoral programs are in close collaboration with the rural water and sanitation program, the Northern Uganda rehabilitation program, and the integrated Basic Education Pilot Project to be implemented in 8 districts.

  2. Women of ATLAS - International Women's Day 2016

    CERN Multimedia

    Biondi, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Women play key roles in the ATLAS Experiment: from young physicists at the start of their careers to analysis group leaders and spokespersons of the collaboration. Celebrate International Women's Day by meeting a few of these inspiring ATLAS researchers.

  3. IDRC Bulletin — International Women's Day 2018 | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    In this issue we celebrate women worldwide. Women wearing traditional Darfuri outfits participate at the parade. International Women's Day 2018. Empowering women. In recognition of International Women's Day, we invite you to celebrate women's accomplishments and to learn more about the challenges they face ...

  4. "International Women's Day" 100 周年記念によせて -"International solidarity is needed for international women's day"

    OpenAIRE

    南コニー; Connie MINAMI

    2011-01-01

    The "International Women's Day" celebrated its 100th anniversary in 2010. The 2010 International Women's Conference was held in Copenhagen commemorating the day proposed by female activist Clara Zetkin at the International Socialist Conference in 1910. At theconference, feminists and politicians mainly from western countries had panel discussions in which they engaged in a number of debates concerning the necessity and the problems of modern feminism. According to the Gender Gap Report at the...

  5. May 28 International Day of Action for Women's Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The 1993 Day of Action for Women's Health focused on the number of deaths which occur as a result of unsafe and illegal abortion. In Argentina, a signature campaign to support decriminalization of abortion enlisted the aid of more than 100 influential citizens. The campaign in Brazil coincided with the introduction of reforms which would decriminalize abortion. In Chile, a nationwide campaign was launched to reinstate therapeutic abortion. The day was commemorated in Colombia with several events which advocated the decriminalization of abortion. Women in Costa Rica demanded being treated as subjects, not objects, of health policies, while Ecuadorian activists spent the day distributing an article analyzing the importance of the day and discussing the health problems of Ecuadorian women, especially those related to overwork, subordinate status, and illegal abortion. A new study was released in Mexico which revealed that four women die every day of pregnancy and child-birth related causes (40% of these are the complications of induced abortion). Nationwide activities were coordinated in Nicaragua including forums, theater presentations, festivals, and a women's march. A labor group joined the campaign in Peru, and efforts in Puerto Rico centered on preventing and surviving breast cancer. Elsewhere in the world, genital mutilation was the topic of a seminar in Canada, women in the Philippines launched a campaign against "needless" maternal mortality, and a Spanish group issued a publication analyzing abortion around the world and discussing the introduction of RU-486 to Spain. The next important date is September 28, when women's health groups in Latin America and the Caribbean will join to call for the legalization of abortion.

  6. Is innovation sexist? International Women's Day 2017 | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-04-21

    Apr 21, 2017 ... From Mundia's perspective, the future will improve once everyone — women and men — have access to equal opportunities through widespread internet access. Despite how far we have come, there is still progress to be made in order to reduce sexism in the research/STEM fields. However, we are likely ...

  7. Celebrating International Women's Day, March 8. A Curriculum Sample. Women's Issues Series, Vol. I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refugee Women's Alliance, Seattle, WA.

    The Refugee Women's Alliance, a nonprofit organization helping refugee and immigrant women achieve self-sufficiency in the United States, has developed a class integrating English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) instruction and discussion of family issues, child-rearing, and related problems in a new cultural context. The project focuses on developing…

  8. What we do and do not know about women and kidney diseases; questions unanswered and answers unquestioned: Reflection on World Kidney Day and International Woman's Day

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgina B. Piccoli

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease affects approximately 10% of the world's adult population: it is within the top 20 causes of death worldwide, and its impact on patients and their families can be devastating. World Kidney Day and International Women's Day in 2018 coincide, thus offering an opportunity to reflect on the importance of women's health and specifically their kidney health, on the community, and the next generations, as well as to strive to be more curious about the unique aspects of kidney disease in women so that we may apply those learnings more broadly.Girls and women, who make up approximately 50% of the world's population, are important contributors to society and their families. Gender differences continue to exist around the world in access to education, medical care, and participation in clinical studies. Pregnancy is a unique state for women, offering an opportunity for diagnosis of kidney disease, but also a state where acute and chronic kidney diseases may manifest, and which may impact future generations with respect to kidney health. There are various autoimmune and other conditions that are more likely to impact women with profound consequences for child bearing, and on the fetus. Women have different complications on dialysis than men, and are more likely to be donors than recipients of kidney transplants.In this editorial, we focus on what we do and do not know about women, kidney health, and kidney disease, and what we might learn in the future to improve outcomes worldwide. Keywords: Women, Access to care, Kidney health, Acute and chronic kidney disease, Inequities

  9. What we do and do not know about women and kidney diseases; Questions unanswered and answers unquestioned: Reflection on World Kidney Day and International Woman’s Day

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgina B Piccoli

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic Kidney Disease affects approximately 10% of the world’s adult population: it is within the top 20 causes of death worldwide, and its impact on patients and their families can be devastating. World Kidney Day and International Women’s Day in 2018 coincide, thus offering an opportunity to reflect on the importance of women’s health and specifically their kidney health, on the community, and the next generations, as well as to strive to be more curious about the unique aspects of kidney disease in women so that we may apply those learnings more broadly. Girls and women, who make up approximately 50% of the world’s population, are important contributors to society and their families. Gender differences continue to exist around the world in access to education, medical care, and participation in clinical studies. Pregnancy is a unique state for women, offering an opportunity for diagnosis of kidney disease, but also a state where acute and chronic kidney diseases may manifest, and which may impact future generations with respect to kidney health. There are various autoimmune and other conditions that are more likely to impact women with profound consequences for child bearing, and on the fetus. Women have different complications on dialysis than men, and are more likely to be donors than recipients of kidney transplants. In this editorial, we focus on what we do and do not know about women, kidney health, and kidney disease, and what we might learn in the future to improve outcomes worldwide

  10. Programme for International Women’s Day

    CERN Multimedia

    Laëtitia Pedroso

    2010-01-01

    CERN will be organising a number of actions to mark International Women’s Day on 8 March. Women working in differents sectors of CERN. As the main aim of the event is to enhance the visibility of women working at CERN, women will be in the majority at the controls of the experiments and accelerators throughout the day, as well as acting as guides for CERN’s official visits. There will also be several photo and poster exhibitions, mainly in the “Pas Perdus” area of the Main Building, but also at various points open to the public. An exhibition by Italy's National Institute for Particle Physics (INFN) on Italian women working in the LHC experiments and other photo collections will also be on display. Paola Catapano of the Communication Group will interview women physicists at work in the control rooms of all four experiments and in the CCC throughout the day.     On CERN’s initiative, other laboratories will also take part in th...

  11. Ending violence against women | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2012-11-13

    Nov 13, 2012 ... As the world observes the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women on November 25th and the National Day of Remembrance and ... One victim of sexual slavery who spoke at a truth commission was very bitter about how she was acknowledged, and then abandoned by the system.

  12. Why land rights for women are critical | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-05-16

    May 16, 2017 ... Burundi women celebrating International Women's Day focusing on the issue of environmental protection for food security. Photo credit: UN Women Burundi ... We need to change the gender and cultural norms and attitudes that still prevent women from owning land. This has to happen from the bottom up, ...

  13. [Day hospital in internal medicine: A chance for ambulatory care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasland, A; Mortier, E

    2018-04-16

    Internal medicine is an in-hospital speciality. Along with its expertise in rare diseases, it shares with general medicine the global care of patients but its place in the ambulatory shift has yet to be defined. The objective of our work was to evaluate the benefits of an internal medicine day-hospital devoted to general medicine. Named "Centre Vi'TAL" to underline the link between the city and the hospital, this novel activity was implemented in order to respond quickly to general practitioners having difficulties to synthesize their complex patients or facing diagnostic or therapeutic problems. Using preferentially email for communication, the general practitioners can contact an internist who is committed to respond on the same day and take over the patient within 7 days if day-hospital is appropriate for his condition. The other patients are directed either to the emergency department, consultation or full hospitalization. In 14 months, the center has received 213 (144 women, 69 men) patients, mean age 53.6, addressed by 88 general practitioners for 282 day-hospital sessions. Requests included problem diagnoses (n=105), synthesis reviews for complex patients (n=65), and treatment (n=43). In the ambulatory shift advocated by the authorities, this experience shows that internal medicine should engage in the recognition of day-hospital as a place for diagnosis and synthesis reviews connected with the city while leaving the general practitioners coordinator of their patient care. This activity of synthesis in day-hospital is useful for the patients and efficient for our healthcare system. Copyright © 2018 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. 78 FR 53231 - Women's Equality Day, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-28

    ... women graduate college at higher rates than men, they still make less money after graduation and often... August, in the year of our Lord two thousand thirteen, and of the Independence of the United States of...

  15. 75 FR 53559 - Women's Equality Day, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-31

    ... families, and we will continue coordinating with Federal agencies to make quality child care more affordable, promote work policies that improve work-family balance, and advance the economic development and... importance of women's empowerment in all aspects of our foreign policy. From Afghanistan to the Democratic...

  16. DAY CARE CENTRES | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    DAY CARE CENTRES. CRECHES. Colour. #1BAEA7. Trouver un juste équilibre entre s'occuper des enfants et générer des revenus est un problème auquel sont confrontées les mères autour du monde. Read more about Des services de garde abordables pourraient-ils permettre aux femmes de gagner un revenu en ...

  17. Summary of day 1 - International perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, A.

    2005-01-01

    The interest of this first session was to have presentations by genuine policy makers, i.e., by people directly involved in the political process by which society deals with its technological challenges. There was general agreement that progress is continuously being made, to the point that technological aspects of geologic disposal may be considered to have been solved. Although further progress will surely be made, no major breakthrough is expected in this area and many consider the technology to be mature. This is only one side of the waste disposal issue however. The other side, which covers socio-political issues, is far from having been resolved. Progress has been made, in the sense that technologists accept that they need help from other, non technical groups in society. This is a complex issue because whereas technology, like science, is universal and easily lends itself to international co-operation, socio-political issues are closely connected to the continuous evolution of one particular national society. Here, international co-operation may mean following what others are doing, but not necessarily copying their approach. All national societies may draw technical help from a common international pool of knowledge, but each one will weave it into its national fabric, in its own specific way. As one example, the so-called 'Swedish model' for geologic disposal cannot necessarily be directly transposed to other countries. Little was said in presentations about 'the future' except for the fact that because of the very long lead times that are usual in this field (20 to 50 years ) there may exist a trend to believe that the future, 20 or 30 years from now will be a continuation of the present. This is a plausible assumption for technologies, but need not be true for socio-political developments. We cannot predict the future but we should not assume that we know what it will look like. In our policies we must therefore not only have a clear idea of where we

  18. Day-to-day variation in iron-status measures in young iron-deplete women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belza, A.; Ersbøll, Annette Kjær; Henriksen, M.

    2005-01-01

    -status parameters in young Fe-depleted women and to investigate the effect of menstrual cycle on these measures. Twelve women (aged 23-30 years), non-anaemic but with low Fe stores, participated in the study. Venous blood samples were collected under standardised conditions on fifteen non-consecutive days during...

  19. Growing Women-Owned Businesses | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This project will help women-owned businesses connect to global markets and enhance their growth prospects. WEConnect International, a leading international certification body for women's business enterprises, is leading the project. The organization connects women-owned businesses to large private companies' ...

  20. A day with the women physicists of Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasnain, Aziz Fatima; Islam, Aquila; Ali, Asima; Qureshi, Riffat Mehmood; Qamar, Anisa

    2015-12-01

    The Working Group on Women in Physics successfully organized a national-level meeting of women physicists at the National Centre for Physics, Quaid-e-Azam University, to discuss the agenda for the 5th IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics. This report describes the outcome of the meeting and the status of female physicists in Pakistan. It also includes a comparative study of the enrollment of women in undergraduate and graduate programs in physics, along with a brief description of factors that create hurdles for female students opting for higher education in this field.

  1. The Day-to-Day Impact of Urogenital Aging: Perspectives from Racially/Ethnically Diverse Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luft, Janis; Grady, Deborah; Kuppermann, Miriam

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT BACKGROUND Urogenital symptoms affect up to half of women after menopause, but their impact on women’s day-to-day functioning and wellbeing is poorly understood. METHODS Postmenopausal women aged 45 to 80 years reporting urogenital dryness, soreness, itching, or pain during sex were recruited to participate in in-depth focus groups to discuss the impact of their symptoms. Focus groups were homogenous with respect to race/ethnicity and stratified by age (for White or Black women) or language (for Latina women). Transcripts of sessions were analyzed according to grounded theory. RESULTS Six focus groups were conducted, involving 44 women (16 White, 14 Black, 14 Latina). Five domains of functioning and wellbeing affected by symptoms were identified: sexual functioning, everyday activities, emotional wellbeing, body image, and interpersonal relations. For some participants, symptoms primarily affected their ability to have and enjoy sex, as well as be responsive to their partners. For others, symptoms interfered with everyday activities, such as exercising, toileting, or sleeping. Participants regarded their symptoms as a sign that they were getting old or their body was deteriorating; women also associated symptoms with a loss of womanhood or sexuality. Additionally, participants reported feeling depressed, embarrassed, and frustrated about their symptoms, and expressed reluctance to discuss them with friends, family, or health care providers. CONCLUSIONS Urogenital symptoms can have a marked impact on sexual functioning, everyday activities, emotional wellbeing, body image, and interpersonal relations after menopause. Clinicians may need to question women actively about these symptoms, as many are reluctant to seek help for this problem. PMID:19908103

  2. Women, reproductive health and international human rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    This article addresses the issue concerning the reproductive health and international human rights of women. The modern era of human rights applied to women's health started with the adoption of the UN Charter in 1946 and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights adopted by the General Assembly in 1948. However, the leading instrument of women's equal rights is the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women adopted in 1979. This treaty assumed the legal responsibility to eradicate all forms of discrimination against women, particularly in the field of health care, thus ensuring that women will have access to health and family planning services. The concept of health as "the state of physical, mental and social well-being" as described by WHO emphasizes the significance of the social well-being in which the social, cultural, and economic factors plays a pivotal role in women's health status. In other parts of the world however, women are considered as relatively insignificant and are made to suffer discrimination in health because of their sex role. Such disadvantages against the female gender include injustices in the light of human rights law, particularly in the context of reproductive health services. Addressing the health disadvantages of women calls for actions gearing towards the promotion of women's empowerment. Efforts to advance the reproductive health through human rights of women should be rooted on the existing framework of human rights as recognized in most national constitutions and international human rights treaties.

  3. Beijing diary: ten days at the women's conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craft, N

    1995-10-14

    A British Medical Journal editor recorded her impressions and experiences at the Fourth World Conference on Women in the form of a 10-day diary. She described a logistical nightmare extending from her attempt to check into the hotel where she had a reservation to workshops and meetings held in unfinished buildings, overcrowded classrooms, and public areas of a hotel (even after hotel management extinguished the lights). The journalist's movements were dutifully recorded by a uniformed attendant, and taxi drivers refused to take her to the conference center. Early lobbying and strategy meetings revolved around the issues to be discussed at the conference. The opening of the Conference was marked with pomp and ceremony while workshops held at the nongovernmental (NGO) forum 50 miles away provided an opportunity for women to describe their attempts to improve their status. Rain forced Hilary Clinton to speak inside and disappointed thousands of women who had waited in line for hours to hear her comments. Betty Friedan described the conference as a metaphor for women's experience in the world and called for a "new vision of equality." Debates at the NGO forum centered around the rights of parents to have access to their children's medical records and punitive measures for women who have had abortions. At the Conference, the UN was unable to explain the paucity of women in positions of under secretary general or higher. By the end of the first week, the governments of Australia, India, Tanzania, China, the US, Ghana, the UK, Turkey, and Cambodia had all made commitments to improve the status of women. During the second week of the Conference the wording for the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action was passed through various committees. The resulting document represents a significant contribution to the gradual progress towards equity for women, instead of a major shift in world view, but grassroots organizations will find in it the ammunition to hold governments

  4. WOMEN'S EMPLOYMENT | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... there's nothing you can do to help, that feeling is very hard for a mother,” said the 34-year-old, whose husband's part-time work was not enough to support the family. “We had no money for medicine. I was always afraid.” Read more about Could affordable daycare be the key to unlocking women's earning power in Africa?

  5. An APPRAISAL analysis of a Women's Day rant, rally and reflection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gender equality is an issue affecting all South African women. Women's Day is celebrated to draw attention to the plight of women and to celebrate their empowerment. Rape in South Africa is prolific and evidences inequality faced by women. Helen Moffett, David Moseley and Lulu Xingwana all reacted to Women's Day, ...

  6. From the CERN Web: in theory, SuperKEKB, International Women’s Day and more

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This section highlights articles, blog posts and press releases published in the CERN web environment over the past weeks. This way, you won’t miss a thing...     (Images: Silvia Biondi/ATLAS © CERN) ATLAS and CERN celebrate International Women’s Day 8 March – ATLAS Collaboration and Paola Catapano In honour of International Women’s Day, the ATLAS experiment shared the stories of seven women from the collaboration. “There are many misconceptions about our work as physicists,” says ATLAS physicist Reina Coromoto Camacho Toro. “Physics relates to everyday events but it still remains foreign to most people and this needs to change." CERN showcases some of the great women who have broken down barriers in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) through the six decades of CERN’s history.  Continue to read here&...

  7. Campaign for the prevention of maternal mortality and morbidity. Abortion: we shall no longer be silent about it] Sixth call for action, International Day of Action for Women's Health, May 28, 1993.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The annual Campaign for the Prevention of Maternal Mortality and Morbidity to be held on May 28 will focus upon abortion-related maternal mortality with the goal of mobilizing women to discuss abortion and turn it into an issue of public debate. First, however, people must stop blaming women for abortion. People say women are responsible for abortion because they failed to use contraception, they had sexual intercourse outside of marriage, they were behaving immorally, and/or they violated religious precepts. However, blaming women for abortion simply denies reality. This paper explains what is known and not known about abortion and its related maternal morbidity and mortality, and counters some myths about the criminalization and legalization of abortion, religious prohibition of abortion, who has abortions, whether women will always be traumatized by an abortion, the health risks of induced abortion, and the need for abortion services. The history of the campaign is also described.

  8. Women and International Intellectual Co-Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Joyce

    2012-01-01

    The article explores ways in which intellectual co-operation at the League of Nations [SDN] provided a space for the engagement of culturally elite women in intellectual co-operation circles in Geneva, Paris and a range of national contexts stretching across Europe, Latin America and Asia. It discusses the language of the "international mind" and…

  9. Proceedings of IDMP 2013: first international day of medical physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinello, Ginette; Mazal, Alejandro; Francois, P.; Fournier-Bidoz, N.; Belshi, R.; Dutreix, M.; Heinrich, S.; Wessels, C.; Fourquet, A.; Aubert, Bernard; Le Du, Dominique; Lisbona, Albert; Dedieu, Veronique; Makovicka, Libor; Taisant, Daniel; Metayer, Yann; Roue, Amelie; Besbes, Mounir; Van Dyk, Jake; Hammadi, Akli; Meghzifene, Ahmed; Nuesslin, Fridtjof; Pipman, Yakov; Keller, Marc; Cheung, Kin Yin; Meghzifene, Ahmed; ); Maria del Rosario Perez; Buvat, Irene; Rosenwald, Jean-Claude; Cosset, Jean-Marc; Dutreix, Andree

    2013-11-01

    November 7 was the birth day of Marie Curie and was chosen by the International Organisation of Medical Physics (IOMP) to celebrate his 50 years of existence at the Institut Curie, the exact place of Marie Curie's lab. The aim of this conference day was to promote medical physics and to give grounds for common reflection about international cooperation, the medical physicist profession, medical physics teaching and research. The conference was jointly organised by the French Society of Medical Physics and the Paris area medical centres specialised in cancer and in the training of medical physicists. This document brings together the presentations (slides) presented during the conference and dealing with: 1 - 26 years of French-Chinese cooperation in radiotherapy and medical radio-physics (G. Marinello); 2 - Activities conducted by Medical Physicists Without Borders (PMSF, Daniel Taisant); 3 - Cooperation in response to MAE and IAEA request (Y. Metayer); 4 - Teaching in France provided to foreigners by the National Institute for Nuclear Sciences and Technologies (INSTN, A. Roue); 5 - Radiation oncology and medical physics in Tunisia (M. Besbes); 6 - Medical physics education and training in the Global village: issues, strategies and experiences (J. Van Dyk); 7 - CEA/INSTN participation to training courses abroad (A. Hammadi); 8 - Medical physics to the benefit of patients: the role of IAEA (A. Meghzifene); 9 - Actions, results and perspectives of national and international organisations directly involved in medical physics and oncology (F. Nuesslin); 10 - The AAPM's Cooperation in Medical Physics with Low and Middle Income Countries: Actions, Achievements and Future Prospects (Y. Pipman); 11 - Alliance of African and Mediterranean French Speaking leagues against cancer (ALIAM, M.R. Keller); 12 - Opening talk for the first international day of medical physics (F. Nuesslin); 13 - IAEA support 14 - Marie Curie's contribution to medical physics (J.C. Rosenwald); 15

  10. An International Perspective on Women in Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelman-Ribeiro, Ariel

    2006-03-01

    The 1^st International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP) Conference on Women in Physics, held in 2002 in Paris, France, highlighted a number of issues facing women physicists around the world. A second conference was held in May 2005 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, with the goal of examining the progress made since the last conference and also to provide an opportunity for the delegates to present their research, both physics research and gender-related research, and to make contacts for future collaborations. The conference was attended by 145 delegates from 42 countries, including a very diverse delegation of 22 women and men from the U.S. The conference was organized by the Working Group on Women in Physics of IUPAP, which is charged with making recommendations to IUPAP on how to attract, retain, and increase the participation of women in physics at all levels. The conference included a round table discussion on ``Research Funding and Women in Physics,'' several plenary talks, a poster session on women in physics in each country, a poster session on research by individual delegates, and discussion groups on six topics including attracting girls into physics, launching a successful career, getting women into leadership, improving the institutional climate, learning from regional differences, and balancing family and career. Conference proceedings have been published that include research abstracts, summaries from the discussion groups, articles on the plenary talks, and papers from each country on the status of women in physics in their country (proceedings can be found at http://proceedings.aip.org/proceedings/confproceed/795.jsp). This talk will discuss the U. S. delegation and their country paper on the situation for women in physics in the U.S. as well as highlights from the information presented by the delegates from other nations. The outcomes of the 2002 conference will be described briefly and then the signs of progress noted in 2005 will be summarized.

  11. 100th International Women’s Day Celebrated at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Katarina Anthony

    2011-01-01

    In celebration of the 100th year of International Women’s Day on 8 March, a special colloquium looking at high energy physics from a gender studies perspective was held at CERN.   Addressing a packed conference room, Helene Goetschel, a visiting gender studies researcher from Uppsala University, gave a presentation on a subject unfamiliar to most physicists: sociology. And more specifically, on the findings of gender researchers examining the field of high energy physics. “It was heartening to see so many CERN physicists interested in hearing how sociologists and historians see their community,” said Helene. “Examining our personal issues with gender is difficult, and I applaud anyone who takes an interest in the subject.” Helene Goetschel began her academic career in high-energy physics, but encountered a 'glass ceiling' in her work. In 1990, she decided to change the focus of her studies to the history of science – specifically looking ...

  12. Easing rural womens' working day in Sub-Saharan Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bryceson, D.F.

    1993-01-01

    This paper examines the interface between work conditions of rural women in Africa and Western perceptions and interventions to address them. From a schematic review of Western attitudes towards African rural women's work, the paper moves on to consider donor intervention directed at improving rural

  13. Easing rural women's working day in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryceson, D F

    1994-03-01

    Western donor agencies in their development projects to increase the income for rural women have neglected the domestic residence as a unit of production of food, water, and fuel: 1) directly produced by sources in the field, 2) physically delivered to the residence, 3) processed, and 4) distributed to household members for consumption. An alternative approach to home economics and market-oriented production is suggested. Homestead economics is the study of women's labor as a scarce resource consisting of daily livelihood management. The detailed mechanics (time, effort, and spatial dynamics) of women's work needs to be dissected in order to determine the appropriate tools or organizational improvements that would improve the satisfaction of basic needs and the standard of living, in specific circumstances. When a participatory research approach is used, women can be involved in self-discovery, and researchers can be a useful resource. Outreach to women must entail more than training courses, publication of practical handbooks for literate women, and activation of women's groups. The influence of Western feminism on donor project design in Africa has not been realized, partly because there are real differences in the role of women and the value of children, and the physical environment. Although reproductive-age women have heavy work schedules, their children, who have completed primary school, are part of the homestead work force, and are waiting for betrothal, do have available time. Some indirect advantages of involving teenaged girls in training are a delay in age at marriage, and an affect on lifetime attitudes. The main components, which would have to be adapted to the local situation, are training in nontraditional skills related to homestead management and maintenance, and promoting formation of female youth groups for support and income-generating activities. Gender stereotyping is not an issue, because improvements in women's homestead work is part of

  14. National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-03-05

    This podcast provides information on the impact of HIV and AIDS on women and girls and the importance of getting tested for HIV.  Created: 3/5/2009 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 3/5/2009.

  15. The Gendered International School: Barriers to Women Managers' Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Ruth Elizabeth; Whitehead, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the barriers women identify to their promotion in international schools and also the ways in which women can overcome these barriers. Design/methodology/approach: The field of enquiry is international schools, with the study drawing on qualitative research. The researchers interviewed 11 women from…

  16. 78 FR 62315 - International Day of the Girl, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-16

    ... the belief that all men and women are created equal, and we advance the vision of a world where girls... committed to expanding opportunity for girls on the world stage. We are promoting gender equality in... the world to pursue careers in science and technology. And because child marriage is a threat to...

  17. 78 FR 73683 - International Day of Persons With Disabilities, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-06

    ... anniversary of the Rehabilitation Act, we updated rules to improve hiring of veterans and people with..., I have hereunto set my hand this second day of December, in the year of our Lord two thousand...

  18. Learning in and from the West: International Students and International Women's Organisations in the Interwar Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandell, Marie

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the importance of higher education to international women's organisations such as the International Federation of University Women, the International Council of Women, the International Alliance of Women and Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, and asks how studying abroad contributed to the…

  19. World Food Day 2015 | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-05-25

    May 25, 2016 ... Our $124-million Canadian International Food Security Research Fund (CIFSRF) with Global Affairs Canada, and $15-million Cultivating Africa's ... Read the latest results ... Four former IDRC researchers have won the prestigious World Food Prize, also known as the “Nobel Prize for Food and Agriculture.”.

  20. Women's care responsibilities | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    From double burden of women to a “double boon”. The brief examines the causes and consequences of women's double burden (paid work and unpaid care work) on the wellbeing of women and their children from low income households in India, as well as the potential of women's economic empowerment programs.

  1. Daily social enjoyment interrupts the cycle of same-day and next-day fatigue in women with fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Ellen W; Davis, Mary C; Aiken, Leona S; Tennen, Howard A

    2015-06-01

    Fatigue is a debilitating symptom of fibromyalgia (FM) that has limited treatment options. Some evidence, however, has linked positive social engagement with reduced within-day fatigue. This study elaborated longitudinal within-day and across-day relations between FM fatigue and social enjoyment. One hundred seventy-six women with FM completed 21-day automated diaries assessing morning and end-of-day fatigue, and both afternoon social enjoyment and stress within two social domains: non-spousal and spousal. In the non-spousal domain, analysis supported a mediational path from lower morning fatigue to higher afternoon social enjoyment, which predicted lower end-of-day fatigue, and subsequently, lower next-morning fatigue. Enjoyment exerted a greater impact on within-day fatigue than did stress. Patterns in the spousal domain were similar, but the mediated path was nonsignificant. Positive social engagement offers relief from FM fatigue that carries over across days and may provide an additional target to enhance the effectiveness of current interventions.

  2. Women, work and health between the nineteenth and twentieth centuries from a national and international perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Silvana

    2014-11-16

    A few years after a series of meetings of Italian scientists were convened prior to the unification of Italy, the first women qualified in medicine and other dedicated women participated in founding a movement for the improvement of living and working conditions of women and children in Italy. analysis of Italian women's contributions in the proceedings of the International Council of Women Congresses and their impact on increasing the number of women's occupational health studies presented at the fourth National Congress on Occupational Diseases held in Rome in 1914. Analysis of the proceedings of the International Council of Women Congresses (Washington, Chicago, London), and of the Women's National Council and other documents so as to obtain a picture of Italian women's working conditions at that time. Women and children worked an excessive number of hours per day, were underpaid, and had a legal status of inferiority. The main work sectors were sewing, embroidery, lace making, ironing, cooking, washing, dressmaking, millinery, fashion design, typing, weaving, artificial flowers, etc. The same sort of work was available to Italian women who emigrated to the United States of America. The success achieved by the women's movement is shown in the paper presented by Irene de Bonis "Occupational diseases among women" and published in the proceedings of the fourth National Congress on Occupational Diseases held in Rome, 9-14 June 1914. The article outlines the main features of the women's movement at the turn of the twentieth century, focussing on their publications describing Italian women's working conditions, considered in an international context. The movement's engagement in the promotion of women's occupational health at international and national level was successful but the First World War was to transform this achievement into the women's peace movement.

  3. Day

    OpenAIRE

    Chapman, Neil; Stahl, Ola

    2014-01-01

    Contribution for a publication by Nico Dockx & Clara Meister entitled, 'A Poem A Day'.\\ud \\ud "When in 2012, Nico and I talked about utopias and the upcoming Utopia Station exhibition, our conversation quickly turned towards his poster A Poem a Day (2003). Very soon our verbal exchange turned into an idea, into a plan, into an open invitation to friends, asking them to respond to this idea of a poem for every day of the year. Open in the sense that poetry—especially in daily situations—an hap...

  4. Arab women continue rights struggle | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2013-01-29

    Jan 29, 2013 ... A campaign that won legal recognition for Arab women's citizenship rights in nine jurisdictions is providing inspiration and tactical lessons for women facing growing discrimination across the Middle East.

  5. Including women in work | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-06-13

    Jun 13, 2017 ... Teresa hired a handful of women living near the production site to limit their travel to and from work, and she designed a business model that aligns daily work hours and vacations with school schedules. The IDRC-funded research project Counting Women's Work found that the time women and girls spend ...

  6. Women's access to jobs | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    GrOW projects studied the enabling and constraining factors that impact women's participation in the labour market, including: the age of marriage for women; access to education and skills development; and the role of women's collective groups, among others. In addition to the project-related briefs below, the following ...

  7. Rural women in the wired world | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2011-01-31

    Jan 31, 2011 ... Cumulatively, the winning entries form a fascinating snapshot of how a variety of tools and tactics — for instance, providing access to cellular phones, getting women connected to the Internet, and creating educational video — serve both rural women's day-to-day needs and the longer-term goal of ...

  8. International women's movement comes of age at FWCW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'haire, H

    1996-02-01

    This article focuses on what the women's conference achieved for women. The Fourth World Conference on Women (FWCW) recognized an international women's movement. Governments agreed that women were entitled to full human rights, reproductive rights, and equality in all aspects of life. Women were to become full and equal partners in the development process. Women are likely to demand action based on the paper declarations. The success of the conference is attributed to a powerful network of women's groups. A striking feature was the heading of most national delegations by women. It was recognized that women were full but neglected partners in families and societies. Governments acknowledged that women suffered discrimination within the family and society. Wording was rejected that would have given women the guaranteed right to determine the size and spacing of their families and the information and services to do so. The activity among women's groups in working together to restore this view strengthened the bonds between women's groups and created worldwide awareness and support for women's organizations. Networks that were established at Rio de Janeiro made their presence and position on reproductive health felt at the preparatory meetings to the UN Population Conference in Cairo. It was argued that a target-driven approach had the effect of treating women as reproduction machines. Women's groups also expressed strong positions on how women were to be treated in the formation of population policy and programs. 1) It was insisted that governments and population groups must stop dictating fertility regimes to women. 2) The concept of family planning must include reproductive health. 3) Women should have the freedom to exercise choice in planning their families. 4) Women should also have equal access to education and employment. Women came thus to Beijing with a clear vision of what they wanted. At Beijing domestic violence was for the first time condemned. Beijing

  9. WISE-2005: Integrative Cardiovascular Responses with LBNP during 60-Day Bed Rest in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughson, R. L.; Kerbeci, P.; Arbeille, Ph.; Mattar, L.; Shoemaker, J. K.

    2005-01-01

    During 2005, 24 women will take part in the Women International Space-simulation for Exploration (WISE). In this paper we report on the first phase that studied 4 Exercise (EX+LBNP), 4 nutrition (NUT), and 4 no countermeasure control (CON) subjects. The EX+LBNP group completed regular exercise on a treadmill inside LBNP, flywheel resistive exercise and static periods of LBNP, and had recovery days. The NUT group received daily protein supplements. Integrative cardiovascular responses were obtained and here we report data for heart rate during LBNP, blood volume and angiotensin 11. LBNP was applied at 0, -10, -20 and -30 mmHg for 2-minutes for each stage. Blood was sampled prebed rest and on HDT-60. After 60-days head down bed rest, HR in the CON group increased by 6.1+/-2.8 bpm at rest and by 20.7+/-5.0 bpm at -30 mmHg LBNP. The EX+LBNP group had increases of 3.6+/-5.6 and 11.6+/-5.4 bpm, while the NUT group HR increased 2.6+/-3.1 and 9.4+/-3.6 bpm. The EX+LBNP group had almost no change in blood volume or plasma angiotensin II from pre-bed rest to HDT60, while both the CON and NUT groups had larger increases in plasma volume and almost double concentrations of angiotensin II. These data show a positive effect in the EX+LBNP group on the heart rate response as well as an unexpected possible benefit in the NUT group. Further studies are required to confirm possible cardiovascular benefits of the protein supplement.

  10. Getting Women Into the Physics Leadership Structure Nationally and Internationally

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Elvira S.; Diaz, Lilliam Alvarez; Gebbie, Katharine B.; El-Sayed, Karimat

    2005-10-01

    The underrepresentation of women among physicists around the world, especially in leadership positions, has broad implications for industries and government agencies with a strong need for a technologically educated workforce. The dearth of women physicists in academia exacerbates the situation in that female students lack exposure to successful women in the field. Three years ago, an international group of women met for a round table discussion at the First IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics and discussed the importance of having women in leadership positions. They shared their experiences and successes, and drew up and reported a set of recommendations addressing the preparation of women for leadership, the selection process, and the responsibilities of institutions. They acknowledged that implementation of their recommendations would differ among countries. At the Second IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics an international group of women met again to review, revise, and move forward on revamped recommendations from the first conference. This is a report on the new set of revamped recommendations, which address why women should be in leadership positions, goal setting, best practices, commitments, and follow-up actions for the attendees of the second conference.

  11. Comparison of self-reported week-day and weekend-day sitting time and weekly time-use: results from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Uffelen, Jannique G Z; Watson, Melanie J; Dobson, Annette J; Brown, Wendy J

    2011-09-01

    The study of sedentary behavior is a relatively new area in population health research, and little is known about patterns of sitting time on week-days and weekend-days. To compare self-reported week-day and weekend-day sitting time with reported weekly time spent in other activities. Data were from 8,717 women born between 1973 and 1978 ('younger'), and 10,490 women born between 1946 and 1951 ('mid-age') who completed surveys for the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health in 2003 and 2001, respectively. They were asked about time spent sitting on week-days and weekend-days. The women were also asked to report time spent in employment, active leisure, passive leisure, home duties, and studying. Mean week-day and weekend-day sitting times were compared with time-use using analysis of variance. Younger women sat more than mid-aged women, and sitting time was higher on week-days than on weekend-days in both cohorts. There were marked positive associations between week-day and weekend-day sitting times and time spent in passive leisure in both cohorts, and with time spent studying on week-days for the younger women. Week-day sitting time was markedly higher in women who reported >35 h in employment, compared with those who worked day sitting time was higher than weekend-day sitting time, the patterns of the relationships between week-day and weekend-day sitting and time-use were largely similar, except for time spent in employment.

  12. Counting women into the workforce | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2015-07-30

    Jul 30, 2015 ... Women play an increasingly important role in Asian economies. Yet most work in the informal sector, where wages are low and there are few social protections. Many programs are targeting women's perceived skills gaps, to better equip them for the workplace. Yet for many reasons, they are not always ...

  13. Counting Women's Work in Vietnam | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-07-31

    Jul 31, 2017 ... The Institute of Labor Science and Social Affairs, in the Vietnamese Ministry of Labor, Invalids and Social Affairs, carried out the research in Vietnam. To learn more: Read the report "Counting Women's Work in Vietnam" · View the infographic · See the IDRC's project profile of Counting Women's Work · Visit ...

  14. 78 FR 24220 - Submission for OMB Review; 30-Day Comment Request: Women's Health Initiative Observational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Submission for OMB Review; 30-Day Comment Request: Women's... allow an additional 30 days for public comment. The NHLBI, National Institutes of Health, may not...

  15. Women and kidney disease: reflections on World Kidney Day 2018: Kidney Health and Women's Health: a case for optimizing outcomes for present and future generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccoli, Giorgina B; Alrukhaimi, Mona; Liu, Zhi-Hong; Zakharova, Elena; Levin, Adeera

    2018-02-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) affects ∼10% of the world's adult population: it is one of the top 20 causes of death worldwide and its impact on patients and their families can be devastating. World Kidney Day and International Women's Day coincide in 2018, thus offering an opportunity to reflect on the importance of women's health, and specifically their kidney health, on the community and the next generations, as well as to strive to be more curious about the unique aspects of kidney disease in women so that we may apply these learnings more broadly. Girls and women, who make up ∼50% of the world's population, are important contributors to society and their families. Gender differences continue to exist around the world in access to education, medical care and participation in clinical studies. Pregnancy is a unique state for women, offering an opportunity for the diagnosis of kidney disease, and also a state where acute and chronic kidney diseases may manifest and that may impact future generations with respect to kidney health. There are various autoimmune and other conditions that are more likely to impact women with profound consequences for childbearing and on the fetus. Women have different complications on dialysis than men and are more likely to be donors than recipients of kidney transplants. In this editorial we focus on what we do and do not know about women, kidney health and kidney disease and what we might learn in the future to improve outcomes worldwide. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  16. Women in global science advancing academic careers through international collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    Zippel, Kathrin

    2017-01-01

    Scientific and engineering research is increasingly global, and international collaboration can be essential to academic success. Yet even as administrators and policymakers extol the benefits of global science, few recognize the diversity of international research collaborations and their participants, or take gendered inequalities into account. Women in Global Science is the first book to consider systematically the challenges and opportunities that the globalization of scientific work brings to U.S. academics, especially for women faculty. Kathrin Zippel looks to the STEM fields as a case study, where gendered cultures and structures in academia have contributed to an underrepresentation of women. While some have approached underrepresentation as a national concern with a national solution, Zippel highlights how gender relations are reconfigured in global academia. For U.S. women in particular, international collaboration offers opportunities to step outside of exclusionary networks at home. International ...

  17. International Women's Soccer and Gender Inequality: Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Joshua Congdon-Hohman; Victor Matheson

    2011-01-01

    A number of authors have identified the determinants of success in international sporting competitions such as the Olympics and soccer’s World Cup. This paper serves to update past work on international women’s soccer performance given the rapid development of the game over the past decade. We compare the determinants of men’s international soccer team performance with that of their female counterparts and find that a different set of variables are important in explaining success for the two ...

  18. Protecting women's rights | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-08-12

    Aug 12, 2016 ... In Cameroon, Ghana, and Uganda, researchers are looking specifically at how women are affected by LSLAs, what can be done to empower them in related ... As a result, they receive inadequate compensation and they are losing access to water, fuel, and other resources needed to support their families.

  19. Empowering women | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2018-03-08

    Mar 8, 2018 ... a mother holding her daughther. “It would have been better if I had never known”: why Swazi women avoid cancer screening. by Nomthandazo Malambo. a mother holding her baby. Birth registration is the basis for advancing gender equality and children's rights. by Irina Dincu, Shaida Badiee, and Deidre ...

  20. Determining women's destiny | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-09-06

    Sep 6, 2016 ... The Mahila Samakyha program has helped educate and empower women in rural India for nearly 30 years. An IDRC-funded study examines how it does so to lend it even greater credibility. This article is part of an ongoing series of stories about innovative projects in the developing world, a partnership ...

  1. Women's job participation | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Addressing the barriers to young women's economic empowerment in Bangladesh. Reducing child marriage and increasing girls' schooling in Bangladesh. Findings from a study in rural Bangladesh evaluate how early child marriage may be decreased by investing in education programs for girls and providing incentives to ...

  2. Report on IUPAP's International Conference on Women in Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karplus Hartline, Beverly

    2002-03-01

    Teams of physicists from more than 60 countries are expected to participate in IUPAP's International Conference on Women in Physics in Paris, France from 7-9 March 2002. Discussions and resolutions will focus on (1) Attracting Girls into Physics, (2) Launching a Successful Physics Career, (3) Improving the Institutional Structure and Climate for Women in Physics, (4) Getting Women into the Power Structure of Physics, Nationally and Internationally, (5) Learning from Regional Differences, and (6) Balancing Family and Career. This talk will summarize the results and insights from the conference, with an emphasis on followup actions and strategies applicable to the United States.

  3. 4th IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The 4th IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics (ICWIP 2011) will be held in April 2011 in the tranquil, historic town of Stellenbosch, South Africa. This triennial meeting is organized under the auspices of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP) and will be hosted by the South African ...

  4. International women physicians' perspectives on choosing an academic medicine career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Nicole J; Grover, Amelia C; Navarro, Anita M; Raque-Bogdan, Trisha L; Elton, Caroline

    2013-06-01

    Concerns about recruiting physicians into academic careers is an international issue. A qualitative study with United States (US) women physicians revealed insights into how, when, and why physicians choose an academic career in medicine. The current study explored international women physicians' perspectives on their career choice of academic medicine and determined if different themes emerged. We expanded the 2012 study of US women physicians by interviewing women physicians in Canada, Pakistan, Mexico, and Sweden to gain an international perspective on choosing an academic career. Interviews were thematically analyzed against themes identified in the previous study. Based on themes identified in the study of US physicians, qualitative analysis of 7 international women physicians revealed parallel themes for the following areas: Why academic medicine? Fit; People; Aspects of academic health centre environment. How the decision to enter academic medicine was made? Decision-making style; Emotionality When the decision to enter academic medicine was made? Practising physician; Fellowship; Medical student. Work-life balance, choosing academic medicine by default, serendipity, intellectual stimulation, mentors, research and teaching were among the areas specifically highlighted. Parallel themes exist regarding how, why, and when US and international women physicians choose academic medicine as a career path.

  5. An International Look at Women in Open Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathy Malmrose

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available When attending conferences, working with various open source teams, and generally interacting with people in the open source world, we see women as a small representative minority. The disparity leaves us wondering: "How to activate the other 50% of the population?". The question, "How do we include more women?" has been asked many times and answered in many ways. Cathy Malmrose, CEO of ZaReason, a Linux hardware company, stated, "possibly the most immediately effective solution is to showcase women internationally and their contributions. By simply talking about what women are doing all over the world, it creates an atmosphere of acceptance, encouraging more women to try contributing, no matter where they are located or what their situation is. Our goal is to normalize the experience of having women on open source projects". This issue of OSBR is a powerful effort to do just that. This article provides a glance at women in open source internationally. It is by no means comprehensive and is based solely on a random sampling of women who are currently contributing. The goal of this article is to give you a sense of the breadth and depth of women contributing to open source.

  6. Between Theory and History: "The Remains of the Day" in the International Relations Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Anthony F., Jr.; Lang, James M.

    1998-01-01

    Recommends using Kazuo Ishiguro's "The Remains of the Day" to teach international relations by focusing on the normative elements of international relations, the importance of history, and the relationship between theory and history. Explores the use of one theory, feminism, in the novel and provides suggestions for other novels. (CMK)

  7. Women's health custom made: building on the 40 days postpartum for Arab women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundt, G L; Beckerleg, S; Kassem, F; Abu Jafar, A M; Belmaker, I; Abu Saad, K; Shoham-Vardi, I

    2000-09-01

    The 40-day postpartum period is characterised in the Middle East and elsewhere by an observance of seclusion, congratulatory visiting, the reciprocal exchange of gifts and money, and a special diet. Based on primary data from in-depth interviews among the Negev Bedouin in Israel, health enhancing practices are reviewed. The data are a subset from a larger study carried out in this setting. Often postnatal checkups, family planning counselling, and immunization services may not be routinely available or used. It is argued that these health services could be provided at the end of the 40-day period for mother and child, as in a pilot study in Tunisia some years ago. Health service provision would thus build on the health enhancing practices of the 40-day period.

  8. 16 Days of Activism for No Violence Against Women and Children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To mark the beginning of the 16 Days of Activism for No Violence Against Women and Children (25. November–10 December) the University of South. Africa's Institute for Social and Health Sciences. (Unisa–ISHS) held a dialogue at the Don Mateman Hall in Eldorado Park. The convener of the event was Royal Lekoba.

  9. International regulation of the ban on trafficking in women

    OpenAIRE

    Suská, Veronika

    2010-01-01

    Resumé The theme of my diploma thesis is The International Regulations of Trafficking in Women. Trafficking in people, especially with women is very old and unfortunately still actual phenomenon. Nowadays it is a fastest-growing form of criminal industry in the world. People are in the position of commodity that is trafficked. Universal human rights of victims and fundamental principles of democratic societies are breached, particularly the principle of protection of life, human integrity and...

  10. Women's Homelessness: International Evidence on Causes, Consequences, Coping and Policies

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Guy; Ribar, David C.; Zhu, Anna

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews international evidence regarding women's homelessness. It discusses different definitions of homelessness and how women are frequently part of the "hidden homeless" population and less a part of the unsheltered homeless population. It also considers the data that are used to enumerate and study homeless people. The structural, personal, and random causes of homelessness are discussed, with evidence pointing to highly gendered patterns. The paper also describes the consequen...

  11. Skirting the issue: women and international health in historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birn, A E

    1999-03-01

    Over the last decades women have become central to international health efforts, but most international health agencies continue to focus narrowly on the maternal and reproductive aspects of women's health. This article explores the origins of this paradigm as demonstrated in the emergence of women's health in the Rockefeller Foundation's public health programs in Mexico in the 1920s and 1930s. These efforts bore a significant reproductive imprint; women dispensed and received services oriented to maternal and childbearing roles. Women's health and social advocacy movements in Mexico and the United States partially shaped this interest. Even more important, the emphasis on women in the Rockefeller programs proved an expedient approach to the Foundation's underlying goals: promoting bacteriologically based public health to the government, medical personnel, business interests, and peasants; helping legitimize the Mexican state; and transforming Mexico into a good political and commercial neighbor. The article concludes by showing the limits to the maternal and reproductive health model currently advocated by most donor agencies, which continue to skirt--or sidestep--major concerns that are integral to the health of women.

  12. Seeking "a place where one belongs": elderly Korean immigrant women using day care services in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kumsun; Herrera C, Lourdes R; Lee, Setsuko; Nakamura, Yasuhide

    2012-10-01

    The study examined the subjective life experiences of elderly first-generation Korean women living in Japan and investigated their adjustment to the local Japanese community. The study group comprised 14 elderly Korean women residents at a Korean-oriented, insurance-based, day services center in midwestern Japan. They were interviewed in depth, and the data were analyzed using the modified grounded theory approach. The study designated the core category as "conservation of ethnic identity" and identified five subcategories: (a) loneliness, (b) returning to one's homeland culture, (c) physical decline as a result of aging, (d) family ties, and (e) a place where one belongs. The results elucidated that although the participants had adapted to Japanese culture, they were strongly influenced by the memories of their hometowns and wished to return to their homeland. The study suggests that elderly immigrants need day care support that provides an environment where they can enjoy their culture.

  13. A women's support group for Asian international students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Joetta L; Koyama, Miki; Thiagarajan, Monica

    2003-01-01

    International students underuse counseling services, which are grounded in Western cultural values. The authors describe a support group for Asian international students that they launched at a large midwestern university to help students feel at ease with American university life, address homesickness, language problems, and academic and social stressors. Co-leaders created a safe and culturally sensitive atmosphere where the women could network, socialize, and address their issues. Group treatment offers many advantages over individual counseling and can enhance the health of international students.

  14. Violence against women in war: rape, AIDS, sex slavery. International.

    Science.gov (United States)

    At an international conference attended by 2000 delegates, violence against women in Rwanda, former Yugoslavia, and Kurdistan was discussed. Kalliope Migirou, of the United Nations Human Rights Field Operation in Rwanda, described the slaughter of between 500,000 and 1.5 million Tutsis and moderate Hutus in 1994; estimates of the number of rapes ranged from 15,700 (Rwandan government) to 250,000-500,000 (UN special representative). Women were gang-raped and sexually mutilated; fathers were forced to rape their daughters, and sons, their mothers. The transmission of HIV was used as a weapon to murder women and their communities. Women were taken to refugee camps as sex slaves and have written their families about their "new marriages" to Hutu militia men. No rape charge is found among the more than 4000 cases prepared for the Rwandan war crimes trial. 80,000 Rwandans are in prison on suspicion of participating in the genocide; 8% are women. Violete Krasnic, of the Autonomous Women's Center Against Sexual Violence in Belgrade, spoke about the war in former Yugoslavia, which increased all forms of violence against women: 1) domestic violence, particularly in inter-ethnic marriages; 2) death threats against women (up 30-50%); 3) rape (up 30%); and 4) threats with weapons (40%). Men, upon exposure to nationalistic propaganda, used violence against their wives. Nazaneen Rasheed, a London-based representative of the Women's Union of Kurdistan, stated that women in northern Iraq had no power or land. While some turned to prostitution to survive, hundreds were killed by male relatives because of shame to the family.

  15. Chronotype and diurnal cortisol profile in working women: differences between work and leisure days.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dockray, Samantha; Steptoe, Andrew

    2011-06-01

    The influence of chronotype on the diurnal profile of salivary cortisol was examined in a sample of 187 healthy women: 21 evening chronotype, 24 morning chronotype and 142 intermediate chronotype. Saliva samples were collected at waking, 30 min post-awakening, at 1000 h, 1200 h, 1500 h, 1700 h and at bedtime on one work and one leisure day. Several components of the diurnal profile were examined including the cortisol awakening response, the total cortisol output and the diurnal profile on both the work and the leisure day, a significant main effect of time emerged (both pworking day. However, on the leisure day, total cortisol output was greater in evening-types than intermediate or morning-types, after adjustment for covariates (p=0.029). The present data indicate that chronotype has a limited impact on the diurnal cortisol profile of healthy women, and may be somewhat impervious to individual preferences for morning or evening activity. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Horticulture take-home messages. Grower Day Summary: 2011 International HLB Meeting, Orlando, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    The 2nd International Research Conference on Huanglongbing covered 3 full days, with 400 participants from 20 countries. There were 75 oral presentations, 96 posters, and I took 20 pages of notes. Urgency of HLB as a threat to citrus production and the engine of substantial grower investment has fu...

  17. Influence of Day Length and Physical Activity on Sleep Patterns in Older Icelandic Men and Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brychta, Robert J; Arnardottir, Nanna Yr; Johannsson, Erlingur; Wright, Elizabeth C; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Marinac, Catherine R; Davis, Megan; Koster, Annemarie; Caserotti, Paolo; Sveinsson, Thorarinn; Harris, Tamara; Chen, Kong Y

    2016-02-01

    To identify cross-sectional and seasonal patterns of sleep and physical activity (PA) in community-dwelling, older Icelandic adults using accelerometers. A seven-day free-living protocol of 244 (110 female) adults aged 79.7 ± 4.9 years was conducted as part of a larger population-based longitudinal observational-cohort study in the greater Reykjavik area of Iceland. A subpopulation (n = 72) repeated the 7-day measurement during seasonal periods with greater (13.4 ± 1.4 h) and lesser (7.7 ± 1.8 h) daylight. Cross-sectional analyses using multiple linear regression models revealed that day length was a significant independent predictor of sleep duration, mid-sleep, and rise time (all p sleep patterns of the repeaters were rather subtle between periods of longer and shorter day-lengths. Compared to women, men had a shorter sleep duration (462 ± 80 vs. 487 ± 68 minutes, p = 0.008), earlier rise time, and a greater number of awakenings per night (46.5 ± 18.3 vs. 40.2 ± 15.7, p = 0.007), but sleep efficiency and onset latency were similar between the two sexes. Daily PA was also similar between men and women and between periods of longer and shorter day-lengths. BMI, age, gender, and overall PA all contributed to the variations in sleep parameters using multiple regression analysis. The sleep and PA characteristics of this unique population revealed some gender differences, but there was limited variation in response to significant daylight changes which may be due to long-term adaptation. © 2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  18. International Human Rights and the Mistreatment of Women During Childbirth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosla, Rajat; Zampas, Christina; Vogel, Joshua P; Bohren, Meghan A; Roseman, Mindy; Erdman, Joanna N

    2016-12-01

    International human rights bodies have played a critical role in codifying, setting standards, and monitoring human rights violations in the context of sexual and reproductive health and rights. In recent years, these institutions have developed and applied human rights standards in the more particular context of maternal mortality and morbidity, and have increasingly recognized a critical human rights issue in the provision and experience of care during and after pregnancy, including during childbirth. However, the international human rights standards on mistreatment during facility-based childbirth remain, in an early stage of development, focused largely on a discrete subset of experiences, such as forced sterilization and lack of access to emergency obstetric care. As a consequence, the range of mistreatment that women may experience has not been adequately addressed or analyzed under international human rights law. Identifying human rights norms and standards related to the full range of documented mistreatment is thus a first step towards addressing violations of human rights during facility-based childbirth, ensuring respectful and humane treatment, and developing a program of work to improve the overall quality of maternal care. This article reviews international human rights standards related to the mistreatment of women during childbirth in facility settings under regional and international human rights law and lays out an agenda for further research and action.

  19. International Human Rights and the Mistreatment of Women During Childbirth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampas, Christina; Vogel, Joshua P.; Bohren, Meghan A.; Roseman, Mindy; Erdman, Joanna N.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract International human rights bodies have played a critical role in codifying, setting standards, and monitoring human rights violations in the context of sexual and reproductive health and rights. In recent years, these institutions have developed and applied human rights standards in the more particular context of maternal mortality and morbidity, and have increasingly recognized a critical human rights issue in the provision and experience of care during and after pregnancy, including during childbirth. However, the international human rights standards on mistreatment during facility-based childbirth remain, in an early stage of development, focused largely on a discrete subset of experiences, such as forced sterilization and lack of access to emergency obstetric care. As a consequence, the range of mistreatment that women may experience has not been adequately addressed or analyzed under international human rights law. Identifying human rights norms and standards related to the full range of documented mistreatment is thus a first step towards addressing violations of human rights during facility-based childbirth, ensuring respectful and humane treatment, and developing a program of work to improve the overall quality of maternal care. This article reviews international human rights standards related to the mistreatment of women during childbirth in facility settings under regional and international human rights law and lays out an agenda for further research and action. PMID:28559681

  20. Internal maternal position of women who became pregnant using IVF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera A. Yakupova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays in vitro fertilization procedure is widespread. Due to improvements in medical technology parenting has become possible for couples who were doomed to childlessness. Practical request for psychological support couples who have decided to take part in the IVF program has been raised. Shaping the internal position of the IVF parent takes place in special psychological conditions. The IVF procedure is preceded by a period of infertility, the procedure is often the last chance to have a baby alone. Participation in the IVF program involves regular contact with doctors, medical personnel access to the intimate sphere of life couples. The paper analyzes the attitude of women participating in the IVF pregnancy program, the unborn baby and parenting - the elements constituting the parent position. The study which was attended by 224 pregnant women, 62 participants of IVF program and 162 women with physiological pregnancy was carried out on the basis of Kulakov Scientific Centre for Obstetrics, Gynecology and Perinatology. When analyzing the data obtained we were able to identify features of the internal position of women who became pregnant using IVF. In comparison with a group of women with physiological pregnancy, the IVF program participants tend to romanticize the role of parent and child. IVF program participants demonstrate unwillingness to take on the role of parent. The main motivation of mothers in the IVF group concentrated on the very fact of pregnancy and childbirth, proper parenting, while care and support for children is not appealing to women who became pregnant using IVF. Important conditions for becoming a parent are the experience of motherhood and the time of pregnancy expectation.

  1. Using International Polar Days to Engage and Experiment with Science - Outreach Partnerships in IPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, R. A.; Munro, N.; Carlson, D.; Pauls, M.; Zicus, S.

    2008-12-01

    The International IPY Education, Outreach, and Communication Committee developed quarterly International Polar Days in response to pressure from educators and media wishing to remain involved in IPY, throughout IPY. Between September 2007 and March 2009 these events focus on aspects of polar research that are both specific enough to allow depth of understanding, but also broad enough to highlight the interconnectivity of polar science. Each day has experimented with different communication tools including multilingual activity and summary sheets, live radio and web events, press releases, local lectures and engagement at conferences. A virtual balloon launch helps us to assess our reach and develop plans for the next event. The talk will present an evaluation from the balloon launch as well as lessons learnt from activities that had varying degrees of success.

  2. Day-to-day discrimination and health among Asian Indians: a population-based study of Gujarati men and women in Metropolitan Detroit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihama, Mieko; Bybee, Deborah; Blazevski, Juliane

    2012-10-01

    This study examined the relationship between experiences of day-to-day discrimination and two measures of health among Gujaratis, one of the largest ethnic groups of Asian Indians in the U.S. Data were collected via computer-assisted telephone interviews with a random sample of Gujarati men and women aged 18-64 in Metropolitan Detroit (N = 423). Using structural equation modeling, we tested two gender-moderated models of the relationship between day-to-day discrimination and health, one using the single-item general health status and the other using the 4-item emotional wellbeing measure. For both women and men, controlling for socio-demographic and other relevant characteristics, the experience of day-to-day discrimination was associated with worse emotional wellbeing. However, day-to-day discrimination was associated with the single-item self-rated general health status only for men. This study identified not only gender differences in discrimination-health associations but also the importance of using multiple questions in assessing perceived health status.

  3. 5 mg/day finasteride treatment for normoandrogenic Asian women with female pattern hair loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeon, J H; Jung, J Y; Choi, J W; Kim, B J; Youn, S W; Park, K C; Huh, C H

    2011-02-01

    Various treatments have been attempted for female pattern hair loss (FPHL), including topical minoxidil, oral antiandrogen and finasteride. But, there is no consensus on the standard treatment options. Clinical efficacy of finasteride in treating FPHL is still in controversy, but there is a tendency to high dose finasteride, which is more effective than lower dose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy of high dose (5 mg/day) oral finasteride in normoandrogenic Asian women with FPHL. Total of 87 normoandrogenic, pre and post-menopausal women with FPHL were enrolled in this study. They were treated with oral finasteride (Proscar(®)), 5 mg daily for 12 months. Efficacy was evaluated with hair density and thickness changes assessed by phototrichogram and global photographs using 7-point scale. Eighty-six patients completed 12 months of finasteride treatment schedule. One patient (1.1%) withdrew due to headache. At initial visits, mean hair density was 90 ± 22/cm(2) and mean hair thickness was 64 ± 11 μm. After 12 months of finasteride treatment, hair density was significantly increased to 107 ± 23/cm(2) (Phair thickness was also significantly increased to 70 ± 9 μm (P=0.02). In global photographs, 70 (81.4%) of the 86 patients were improved (57 were slightly, 10 were moderately and four were greatly improved). Patients without any changes were 13 (15.1%) and 3 (3.5%) patients reported slightly aggravated. Four patients (4.6%) reported adverse events (headache, menstrual irregularity, dizziness and increased body hair growth). However, these adverse events were mild and disappeared soon.   Oral finasteride, 5 mg/day, may be an effective and safe treatment for normoandrogenic women with FPHL. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2010 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  4. The 3^rd International Conference on Women in Physics: Global Perspectives, Common Concerns, Worldwide Views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zastavker, Yevgeniya V.

    2009-03-01

    The 3^rd International Conference on Women in Physics (ICWIP), held in Seoul, Korea, in October 2008, brought together 300 participants from 57 countries, including a diverse 22-member U.S. Delegation, for a 3-day summit of stimulating discussions, thought-provoking presentations, inspirational posters, and networking. Held under the auspices of the Working Group on Women in Physics of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP), this meeting built on the successes of the 1^st (Paris, 2002) and 2^nd (Rio de Janeiro, 2005) Conferences and further clarified the importance of diversifying the field of physics worldwide. Although considerable progress has been made since 2002, it was clear that the global scientific workforce is still under-utilizing a large percentage of the available female talent pool. If human society is to benefit to its fullest from various contributions that the field of physics can offer in addressing global issues of economic crisis, energy, environment, water, health, poverty, and hunger, women of all races and nationalities need to become fully included and engaged in the national and international physical community. To address these and many other issues, the ICWIP unanimously approved a five-part resolution to IUPAP recommending actions to promote the recruitment, retention, and advancement of women in physics and related fields.

  5. Fear of childbirth in pregnant women: External and internal factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kashshapova, E. V.

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Fear of childbirth (FOC is an important psychological problem that is studied worldwide because it affects the well-being of pregnant women. However, in Russia, this problem does not receive adequate attention among researchers. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the conditionality of fear of childbirth (FOC in pregnant women by external and internal factors, which we assumed were the reasons for this fear. As external factors, we considered socio-demographic indicators (e.g., age, marital status, level of education, housing, and the attitude of relatives towards pregnancy as well as indicators of gynecological history (e.g., the term of pregnancy, the outcome of previous pregnancies, and pregnancy complications. As internal (psychological factors of the fear of childbirth, we considered personal anxiety as well as general inclination towards and negative consequences of different fears (20 types of fears and phobias were examined. The study was conducted with a Russian sample of 76 women at different stages of pregnancy and with different socio-demographic indicators and gynecological histories. The analysis of the results showed the absence of significant differences between women who were pregnant with FOC and those without this fear in terms of the external factors considered in this study. According to the study’s data, a general inclination of women to fear is associated with fear of childbirth. However, the findings for the women with FOC did not indicate significant positive correlations between the level of this fear and exposure to any of the 20 types of fear and phobias measured in the study. Furthermore, the results did not detect relationships between the FOC level and women’s personal anxiety. The results allow us to conclude that FOC is a separate phenomenon that is not dependent on other phobias and fears. Fear of childbirth has a subjective and highly individual genesis. It is not a direct consequence of

  6. Politics of Internationalism - Danish Women's Movements Participating in the Building of International Women's Organizations (1888-1919)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiig, Christina; Nielsen, Jytte

    2016-01-01

    & Siim 2008: 61). The context for this political and ideological struggle was primarily local and national; however there are reasons to investigate the international inspiration and activism as a central part of the debate and struggle for enfranchisement. In this article, we move beyond the “national......The struggle for universal enfranchisement in Denmark went on for almost 70 years and was part of a broader struggle for democratization. Granting women the vote was controversial and affected fundamental power structures and male privileges in marriage, in the labor market and in politics (Fiig...... container” (Beck XX) of Denmark in the time period of 1888-1915 and analyze both the international inspiration in relation to the women’s organizations and the Danish women’s movements’ important role on the international scene....

  7. Fertility of women after exposure to internal and external radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polednak, A.P.

    1982-01-01

    Fertility was examined in 199 women exposed to internal and external radiation while employed in the radium watch-dial painting industry in Illinois between 1916 and 1929. In women with at least one live birth, mean log live-birth rate was significantly lower in the highest (estimated) ovarian-dose group (i.e., greater than or equal to 20 rem) than in the lowest group (<5 rem). In multiple regression analysis, intake dose (proportional to alpha-particle dose to ovaries) but not duration of employment (relevant to external gamma-ray dose to ovaries) was a statistically significant predictor of log live-birth rate. There was no evidence for an increase in fetal deaths with increasing ovarian dose level (rem). This suggests that the findings on live-birth rate may not involve post-implantation dominant lethal mutations, but pre-implantation losses could not be evaluated. Some possible explanations for these findings are discussed

  8. Fertility of women after exposure to internal and external radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polednak, A.P.

    1980-01-01

    Fertility was examined in 199 women exposed to internal and external radiation while employed in the radium watch-dial painting industry in Illinois between 1916 and 1929. In women with at least one live birth, mean log live-birth rate was significantly lower in the highest (estimated) ovarian-dose group (i.e., greater than or equal to 20 rem) than in th lowest group (<5 rem). In multiple regression analysis, intake dose (proportional to alpha-particle dose to ovaries) but not duration of employment (relevant to external gamma-ray dose to ovaries) was a statistically significant predictor of log live-birth rate. There was no evidence for an increase in fetal deaths with increasing ovarian dose level (rem). This suggests that the findings on live-birth rate may not involve post-implantation dominant lethal mutations, but preimplantation losses could not be evaluated. Some possible explanations for these findings are discussed

  9. From Field Days to Olympic Gold: How Black Women Revitalized Track and Field in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilreath, Erin Lea; Zupin, Dagny; Judge, Lawrence W.

    2017-01-01

    The sport of track and field in the United States has a storied but tumultuous past, especially in women's collegiate athletics. In the late 19th century, it was enjoyed by women at elite colleges in the form of a "field day," but would have trouble surpassing that level, among middle class Whites especially. This hurdle in large part…

  10. Effects of 30-, 60-, and 90-Day Bed Rest on Postural Control in Men and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, Julie; Taylor, Laura C.; Vanya, Robert D.; Dean, S. Lance; Wood, Scott J.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Head-down-tilt bed rest (HDT) has been used as a safe gr ound-based analog to mimic and develop countermeasures for the physiological effects of spaceflight, including decrements in postural stability. The purpose of this investigation was to characterize the effects of 30-, 60-, and 90-day bed rest on postural control in men and women. METHODS Twenty-nine subjects (18M,11F) underwent 13 days of ambula tory acclimatization and were placed in 6? HDT for 30 (n=12), 60 (n=8), or 90 (n=9) days, followed by 14 days of ambulatory recovery. Computerized dynamic posturography (CDP) was used to assess changes in sensory and motor components of postural control, and recovery after HDT. Sensory Organization Tests (SOTs) objectively evaluate one?s ability to effectively use or suppress visual, vestibular, and proprioceptive information for postural control. Stability during the SOTs was assessed using peak-to-peak sway and convergence toward stability limits to derive an equilibrium score. Motor Control Tests (MCTs) evaluate one?s ability to recover from unexpected support surface perturbations, with performance determined by center-of-pressure path length. Whole-body kinematic data were collected to determine body-sway strategy used to maintain stability during each condition. Baselines were determined pre-HDT. Recovery was tracked post-HDT on days 0, 1, 2, and 4. RESULTS Immediately after HDT, subjects showed decreased performance on most SOTs, primarily on sway-referenced support conditions, typically returning to baseline levels within 4 days. MCT performance was not significantly affected. There were no significant gender or duration differences in performance. Kinematic data revealed a tendency to use ankle strategy to maintain an upright stance during most SOT conditions. Interestingly, six subjects (2M,4F) experienced orthostatic intolerance and were unable to complete day 0 testing. CONCLUSION HDT mimics some un loading mechanisms of spaceflight and

  11. Day-3 embryo metabolomics in the spent culture media is altered in obese women undergoing in vitro fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellver, José; De Los Santos, María J; Alamá, Pilar; Castelló, Damià; Privitera, Laura; Galliano, Daniela; Labarta, Elena; Vidal, Carmen; Pellicer, Antonio; Domínguez, Francisco

    2015-06-01

    To determine whether the global metabolomic profile of the spent culture media (SCM) of day-3 embryos is different in obese and normoweight women undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF). Prospective cohort analysis. IVF clinic. Twenty-eight young, nonsmoking women with normoweight, nonsmoking male partners with mild/normal sperm factors undergoing a first IVF attempt for idiopathic infertility, tubal factor infertility, or failed ovulation induction: obese ovulatory women (n = 12); obese women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS; n = 4); normoweight ovulatory women (n = 12). Fifty μl of SCM collected from two day-3 embryos of each cohort. Metabolomic profiling via ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry of SCM from a total of 56 embryos. The untargeted metabolomic profile was different in obese and normoweight women. Partial least squares discriminant analysis resulted in a clear separation of samples when a total of 551 differential metabolites were considered. A prediction model was generated using the most consistent metabolites. Most of the metabolites identified were saturated fatty acids, which were detected in lower concentrations in the SCM of embryos from obese women. The metabolomic profile was similar in obese women with or without PCOS. The metabolomic profile in the SCM of day-3 embryos is different in normoweight and obese women. Saturated fatty acids seem to be reduced when embryos from obese patients are present. NCT01448863. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. From Bonding Wires to Banding Women. Proceedings of the International Consultation on Micro-Chips Technology (Manila, Philippines, October 1986).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Women's Resources, Quezon City (Philippines).

    In October 1986, 40 women from 12 countries gathered in the Philippines for a 10-day meeting of organizers, educators, and workers affected by and confronting the international electronics industry in microchip plants and in automated offices. Participants were from Malaysia, Indonesia, Thailand, the Philippines, Hong Kong, Japan, the Netherlands,…

  13. Violence Against Women in Hong Kong: Results of the International Violence Against Women Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhours, Brigitte; Broadhurst, Roderic

    2015-11-01

    In Hong Kong, nearly 1,300 women participated by telephone in the International Violence Against Women Survey in 2006. One in five respondents had experienced violence since age 16. Sexual violence (13.4%) was more frequent than physical violence (11.7%). Women were more likely to be abused by men they knew (13.5%) than by strangers (8%). Compared with other surveyed countries, Hong Kong recorded among the lowest rates of violence by both intimate partners and non-partners. These results suggest that cultural influences linked to the interaction of modernization and some protective factors found in the adherence to traditional Chinese values are relevant. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. International Clinical Trial Day and clinical trials in Ethiopia and Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekadu, Abebaw; Teferra, Solomon; Hailu, Asrat; Gebre-Mariam, Tsige; Addissie, Adamu; Deressa, Wakgari; Yimer, Getnet; Reja, Ahmed

    2014-12-19

    Low income countries like Ethiopia are underrepresented in clinical research. As a major public commitment to clinical research, Ethiopia celebrated the International Clinical Trial Day (ICTD) for the first time on 20 May 2014 under the auspices of Addis Ababa University. The motto for the day was 'Clinical Trials for Excellence in Patient Care'. The celebration offered an opportunity to inform academic staff, researchers, students and the leadership about clinical trials being conducted and to discuss the future of clinical trials in the country. Although clear challenges to the conduct of trials abound, clinical trials registered from Ethiopia in trial registration databases is increasing. Cross-country collaborations, international funding support, motivation of academic staff to conduct clinical trials and the commitment and engagement of the leadership in research are all improving. The overall impact of clinical trials is also encouraging. For example, some of the trials conducted in Ethiopia have informed treatment guidelines. However, administrative capacity, research infrastructure as well as financial support remain weak. There is a need for enhanced university-industry linkage and translation of research findings into locally relevant evidence. Ethiopia, as well as the whole of Africa, has an unparalleled opportunity to lead the way in clinical trials, given its prospect of development and the need to have locally relevant evidence for its growing population. In this commentary we reflect on the celebration of ICTD, the status and opportunities for conducting clinical trials and the way forward for facilitating clinical trials in Ethiopia and Africa.

  15. MO-D-16A-01: International Day of Medical Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, K; Damilakis, J

    2014-01-01

    International Organization for Medical Physics (IOMP) which represents medical physicists in more than 80 countries decided to celebrate 7th November, birth date of the Polish and naturalized-French physicist Marie Sklodowska-Curie, as International Day of Medical Physics (IDMP). The main purpose of the initiative is to raise the visibility and awareness of medical physicist in the global community, to introduce ourselves to the general public, and bring a message to the community that a group of health professionals, the medical physicists are there to help the patients and other health professionals. First celebration was done in 2013 and now IDMP will be celebrated every year. The theme of IDMP will be different each year. The theme for 2013 was ‘Radiation exposure from medical procedures, ask the Medical Physicist’. The inaugural event was celebrated in 23 countries and the amount of attention gained was remarkable. Main IDMP events were held in Poland, birthplace of Marie Curie, and France, workplace of Marie Curie. This year IOMP celebrates the 2nd IDMP and theme will be ‘Looking into the body-Advancement in Imaging through Medical Physics’ to draw attention to the profound contributions Medical Physics has made to the use of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation for the imaging of human body. A number of countries have informed about events that they are going to organize on IDMP. This gives wide attention to medical physics globally. AAPM is a major and important member of IOMP. It is hoped that AAPM will join in organizing activities. Learning Objectives: To learn about International Day of Medical Physics To become familiar with how first IDMP was celebrated in 2013 and learning achieved To understand on future plans for IDMPs

  16. The ESWN network as a platform to increase international collaboration between women in the Earth Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braker, Gesche; Wang, Yiming; Glessmer, Mirjam; Kirchgaessner, Amelie

    2014-05-01

    The Earth Science Women's Network (ESWN; ESWNonline.org) is an international peer-mentoring network of women in the Earth Sciences, many in the early stages of their careers. ESWN's mission is to promote career development, build community, provide opportunities for informal mentoring and support, and facilitate professional collaborations. This has been accomplished via email and a listserv, on Facebook, at in-person networking events, and at professional development workshops. In an effort to facilitate international connections among women in the Earth Sciences, ESWN has developed a password protected community webpage supported by AGU and a National Science Foundation ADVANCE grant where members can create an online presence and interact with each other. For example, groups help women to connect with co-workers or center around a vast array of topics ranging from research interests, funding opportunities, work-life balance, teaching, scientific methods, and searching for a job to specific challenges faced by women in the earth sciences. Members can search past discussions and share documents like examples of research statements, useful interview materials, or model recommendation letters. Over the last 10 years, ESWN has grown by word of mouth to include more than 1600 members working on all 7 continents. ESWN also offers professional development workshops at major geologic conferences around the world and at ESWN-hosted workshops mostly exclusively throughout the United States. In 2014, ESWN offers a two day international workshop on communication and networking skills and career development. Women working in all disciplines of Earth Sciences from later PhD level up to junior professors in Europe are invited to the workshop that will be held in Kiel, Germany. The workshop offers participants an individual personality assessment and aims at providing participants with improved communication and networking skills. The second focus will be to teach them how to

  17. Celebrate Women's History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Carolyn M.; Baradar, Mariam

    This teachers' guide to activities celebrating Women's History Month focuses on women whose important contributions have been omitted from history textbooks. Women's History Month grew from a 1977 celebration of Women's History Week and is intended to bring women's history into the school curriculum. International Women's Day, celebrated on March…

  18. Women and the Justice System in Cambodia | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    They will compare the views of different groups - women in authority, men in authority, nongovernmental organization staff, traditional leaders, women defendants, women victims of crime, rural women and men - on women's access to justice. And, they will help build the capacity of the Cambodian legal staff involved in the ...

  19. Thirty-day postoperative mortality after hysterectomy in women with liver cirrhosis: a Danish population-based cohort study.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lesnikova, Iana

    2002-01-01

    , Building 260, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark.BACKGROUND: Women with liver cirrhosis have a higher incidence of hysterectomy than the general population, generally because of abnormal bleeding. They may also have an increased risk of postoperative mortality and morbidity. METHODS: In the nationwide Danish National......Thirty-day postoperative mortality after hysterectomy in women with liver cirrhosis: a Danish population-based cohort study.Nielsen IL, Thulstrup AM, Nielsen GL, Larsen H, Vilstrup H, Sorensen HT.Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus and Aalborg University Hospitals, Vennelyst Boulevard 6...... Patients Register (NPR) we identified all women diagnosed with liver cirrhosis from 1977 to 1993. From this cohort we selected all women undergoing hysterectomy. A random sample of women without liver cirrhosis undergoing hysterectomy was selected as controls. Outcome was defined as mortality within...

  20. 78 FR 32406 - Submission for OMB Review; 30-Day Comment Request: Women's Health Initiative Observational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-30

    ... provide additional information on the common causes of frailty, disability and death for postmenopausal women, namely, coronary heart disease, breast and colorectal cancer, and osteoporotic fractures...

  1. Metropol Health Day Women's Health in a Global Perspective 11 May 2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robertson, Aileen

    collaboration where different actors work within silos within their own sectors, but SDGs could provide an opportunity to link sectors to improve gender inequalities, women's health and their rights. POSTIVE SIGNS •Globally - CEDAW (UN committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against women) adopted...... food is key and most food is produced by subsistence farmers in developing countries. Over 80% of these farmers are women. Women are discriminated against and if they had the same rights as men they would be able to produce around 30% more food of nutritious quality. •There is a lack of intersectoral...

  2. Diurnal and Seasonal Variations in Mid-Latitude Geomagnetic Field During International Quiet Days: BOH Magnetometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junga Hwang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute researchers have installed and operated magnetometers at Bohyunsan Observatory to measure the Earth's magnetic field variations in South Korea. In 2007, we installed a fluxgate magnetometer (RFP-523C to measure H, D, and Z components of the geomagnetic field. In addition, in 2009, we installed a Overhauser proton sensor to measure the absolute total magnetic field F and a three-axis magneto-impedance sensor for spectrum analysis. Currently three types of magnetometer data have been accumulated. In this paper, we use the H, D, Z components of fluxgate magnetometer data to investigate the characteristics of mid-latitude geomagnetic field variation. To remove the temporary changes in Earth’s geomagnetic filed by space weather, we use the international quiet days’ data only. In other words, we performed a superposed epoch analysis using five days per each month during 2008-2011. We find that daily variations of H, D, and Z shows similar tendency compared to previous results using all days. That is, H, D, Z all three components’ quiet intervals terminate near the sunrise and shows maximum 2-3 hours after the culmination and the quiet interval start from near the sunset. Seasonal variations show similar dependences to the Sun. As it becomes hot season, the geomagnetic field variation’s amplitude becomes large and the quiet interval becomes shortened. It is well-known that these variations are effects of Sq current system in the Earth’s atmosphere. We confirm that the typical mid-latitude geomagnetic field variations due to the Sq current system by excluding all possible association with the space weather.

  3. 'Soccer Matters Very Much, Every Day': Player Migration and Motivation in Professional Women's Soccer.

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Using elite interviews with PR China women's national team goalkeeper Gao Hong, Australia's Alison Forman and Irish-Canadian Ciara McCormack, this chapter explores the role of movement, migration and assimilation in professional women's soccer (Association Football) from 1971 onwards.

  4. CELEBRATED APRIL 2nd – INTERNATIONAL DAY OF PERSONS WITH AUTISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela KRCHANOSKA

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available On April 2nd, the Macedonian Scientific Society for Autism, for the fourth time organized an event on the occasion of the International Day of Persons with Autism. The event with cultural and artistic character was held at the Museum of the Macedonian Struggle under the motto “They are not alone, we are with them”. The huge number of citizens only confirmed the motto. It seemed that the hall of the Museum of the Macedonian Struggle is too small for the warm hearts of the audience. More than 300 guests were present in the hall, among which there were children with autism and their families, prominent professors, doctors, special educators and rehabilitators, psychologists, students and other citizens with glad heart and will who decided to enrich the event with their presence. The event was opened by the violinist Plamenka Trajkovska, which performed one song. After her, the President of the Macedonian Scientific Society for Autism, PhD. Vladimir Trajkovski delivered his speech. The professor told the parents of autistic children, who were present in large number, not to lose hope, to fight for their children, and that the Macedonian Scientific Society for Autism will provide tremendous support and assistance in this struggle.

  5. PREDICTING THE MATCH OUTCOME IN ONE DAY INTERNATIONAL CRICKET MATCHES, WHILE THE GAME IS IN PROGRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Bailey

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Millions of dollars are wagered on the outcome of one day international (ODI cricket matches, with a large percentage of bets occurring after the game has commenced. Using match information gathered from all 2200 ODI matches played prior to January 2005, a range of variables that could independently explain statistically significant proportions of variation associated with the predicted run totals and match outcomes were created. Such variables include home ground advantage, past performances, match experience, performance at the specific venue, performance against the specific opposition, experience at the specific venue and current form. Using a multiple linear regression model, prediction variables were numerically weighted according to statistical significance and used to predict the match outcome. With the use of the Duckworth-Lewis method to determine resources remaining, at the end of each completed over, the predicted run total of the batting team could be updated to provide a more accurate prediction of the match outcome. By applying this prediction approach to a holdout sample of matches, the efficiency of the "in the run" wagering market could be assessed. Preliminary results suggest that the market is prone to overreact to events occurring throughout the course of the match, thus creating brief inefficiencies in the wagering market

  6. Engendering world conferences: the international women's movement and the United Nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M A

    1995-01-01

    This article gives a brief history of how women's groups internationally have shaped UN and World Conferences for Women, the changes in the relationship between women's nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and the UN over time, and effective strategies for putting the women's agenda on international agendas. The article focuses on three recent UN conferences: the Rio conference on the environment, the Vienna conference on human rights, and the Cairo conference on population. The UN Decade for Women reshaped the international women's movement by including new players and by increasing the number and types of women's groups, particularly in developing countries. Women's NGOs learned how to operate on a global scale and to gain attention. New NGO alliances and networks were formed that were cross-regional and crossed North-South divisions. An increasing number of women's groups contributed to national and international policy-making situations. Women's groups were successful in receiving international and national recognition because of the effort expended to become well prepared in collecting, knowing, and analyzing their facts and in building broad-based coalitions. The key strategies that were used in participating effectively in the conference preparatory process and formal policy-making groups involved five types of activities: 1) NGOs mounted global campaigns on a variety of issues having to do with women's rights and women's involvement in the process; 2) NGOs held multiple strategic planning meetings and built coalitions and consensus at all levels; 3) women's NGOs drafted policy documents, resolutions, treaties, protocols, conventions, and platform documents; 4) women's NGOs gained seating on official delegations by publishing reports, holding meetings, and lobbying and nominating women as representatives; and 5) women's NGOs formed caucuses that met at a daily time and place for holding dialogues with official delegates and policy-makers.

  7. 76 FR 81005 - The Secretary of State's International Council on Women's Business Leadership; Notice of Open...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice 6628] The Secretary of State's International Council on Women's Business Leadership; Notice of Open Meeting The Secretary of State's International Council on Women's... and the Economy. Subcommittee discussions will be led by the Access to Markets Subcommittee, the...

  8. 77 FR 65928 - The Secretary of State's International Council on Women's Business Leadership; Notice of Open...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-31

    ... DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice 8079] The Secretary of State's International Council on Women's Business Leadership; Notice of Open Meeting The Secretary of State's International Council on Women's... and the Economy. Subcommittee discussions will be led by the Access to Markets Subcommittee, the...

  9. Estimation of injury simulation in international women's football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Daryl A; Sanghani, Ravi R; Woolen, Travis; Davis, Stephen W

    2011-01-01

    This study attempted to determine the frequency of apparent injury incidents in women's international football and estimate what proportion was authentic. Broadcast recordings of 47 games from 2 tournaments were reviewed to identify incidents in which a player behaved as if injured. Apparent injuries were considered definite if a player withdrew from participation within 5 minutes or if bleeding was visible. Remaining incidents were considered questionable. A total of 270 apparent injuries were observed at a rate of 5.74/game compared with 11.26/game previously reported in men's football. The definite injury rate was only 0.78/game vs. 4.96/game for questionable injuries. Definite injuries were associated with on-field treatment (P < 0.010), stretcher (P < 0.010), and second half (P = 0.022), while questionable injuries were associated with fouls (P = 0.036), contact (P < 0.010), and being tackled (P = 0.025). Questionable injuries were not associated with the final third of a half or with team success.

  10. Women's Right to Land in Pakistan | Page 2 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Unequal access to land is a systemic barrier to gender equality in Pakistan, one that is both a cause and an effect of women's marginalization. ... determine how women's land rights are mediated through social, legal and religious practices; and assess the role of the State in according women land rights through land reform.

  11. Media Coverage of International Women's Decade: Feminism and Conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Anne; Davenport, Lucinda

    A study examined changes in the treatment of women's issues and feminism from 1975 to 1985--the United Nations (UN) designated "Women's Decade"--by two nationally circulated newspapers. The purpose was to find out how much and what kind of news was reported during the three UN World conferences for women held in 1975, 1980, and 1985;…

  12. Agency and Women's Choices in Argentina | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC's Democratic Governance, Women's Rights and Gender Equality initiative is supporting a body of comparative research on whether and how democratic processes and institutions are responding to women's rights and gender equality. The projects under this initiative will investigate issues surrounding women's ...

  13. Agency and Women's Choices in Chile | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC's Democratic Governance, Women's Rights and Gender Equality initiative is supporting a body of comparative research on whether and how democratic processes and institutions are responding to women's rights and gender equality. ... IDRC “unpacks women's empowerment” at McGill University Conference.

  14. Agency and Women's Choices in Chile | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC's Democratic Governance, Women's Rights and Gender Equality initiative is supporting a body of comparative research on whether and how democratic processes and institutions are responding to women's rights and gender equality. The projects under this initiative will investigate issues surrounding women's ...

  15. The effects of advertisements that sexually objectify women on state body dissatisfaction and judgments of women: The moderating roles of gender and internalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, Ross; Thompson, J Kevin

    2015-09-01

    Experimental studies have demonstrated that exposure to idealized images of women increases state body image disturbance. However, little work has experimentally examined the effects of exposure to images that sexually objectify women, especially as it relates to women and men's state body dissatisfaction and judgments of women. In the current study, 437 women and men were randomly assigned to view advertisements that sexually objectify women and portray appearance ideals, or to view non-appearance-related advertisements. Results indicated that state body dissatisfaction increased for women and men exposed to advertisements that sexually objectified women, although this effect was larger for women. Trait internalization of appearance ideals moderated this effect, indicating that women and men with higher internalization exhibited greater state body dissatisfaction after viewing women sexually objectified in advertisements. Exposure to women sexually objectified in advertisements did not affect women's or men's attractiveness or competence ratings of women in university advertisements. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Weight and weddings: women's weight ideals and weight management behaviors for their wedding day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neighbors, Lori A; Sobal, Jeffery

    2008-01-01

    We conducted a descriptive cross-sectional survey to examine wedding-specific body weight ideals and weight management behaviors among women preparing for their wedding (n=272). The average bride-to-be was overweight according to clinical body mass index standards and idealized a significantly lower wedding weight. Most were attempting to lose weight and reported a small but significant weight loss using a combination of weight loss behaviors. Many women used one or more extreme weight loss behaviors. Additionally, some women reported purchasing a smaller-sized wedding dress, potentially to constrain behavior. Prior to weddings, interventions promoting a healthy, sustainable lifestyle may be useful to discourage extreme weight loss behaviors and emphasize healthy long-term weight management.

  17. Prevalence of Suicidal Ideation and Its Association with Positive Affect in Working Women: A Day Reconstruction Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lili; Yang, Ying; Yang, Huijing; Huebner, E Scott

    2017-01-01

    The suicide rate for females in China is the second highest worldwide, and China is the only country in the world in which the rate of suicides is higher for women than men. Affective instability has been shown to be a strong predictor of suicidal ideation, particularly among women. However, prior research has mainly focused on the impact of women's negative affect on suicidal ideation, ignoring the influence of positive affect on suicidal ideation. Studies have revealed that hopelessness, which is 1.3 times more important than depression for explaining suicidal ideation, is driven more by low levels of positive affect than by high levels of negative affect. Although positive affect has also been found to be related to suicidal ideation, and it demonstrates independent, beneficial effects on mental health, much remains to be learned about the association between positive affective instability and suicidal ideation. Therefore, we investigated the prevalence of suicidal ideation among Chinese working women and explored the differences between working women with and without suicidal ideation in the intensity and daily variability of positive affect. A total of 222 young working women of ages 22-36 years ( M = 27.64, SD = 3.73) were recruited from a free weekend psychology lecture. The women subsequently completed a daily diary Day Reconstruction Method (DRM) as well as a suicidal ideation questionnaire. We used hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) to analyze the data, and the results showed that: (1) 10.81% of participates reported suicidal ideation, the intensity of positive affect (happiness, warmth/friendliness, interest and relaxation/calmness) was significantly lower for women with suicidal ideation compared to women without suicidal ideation; (2) differing diurnal patterns of positive emotions were observed between women with and without suicidal ideation; women with suicidal ideation demonstrated a significantly lower trend of growth and a higher volatility in

  18. "KETONURIA AND SERUM GLUCOSE OF FASTING PREGNANT WOMEN AT THE END OF A DAY IN RAMADAN"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Arab

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Moslem pregnant women are inclined to fast during the month of Ramadan. Ketonuria and hypoglycemia are harmful in pregnancy. The aim of this study was to find out whether clinical symptoms and/ or calorie deficiency of fasting pregnant women before Eftar (ending of the daily fast can accurately predict ketonuria and hypoglycemia. In a descriptive study, 185 volunteer fasting pregnant women in Ramadan of 1999 were tested just before Eftar taking into account their clinical symptoms, intake of the previous 24 hours and testing their ketonuria and serum glucose. The positive predictive values of clinical symptoms before breaking the fast for ketonuria and hypoglycemia were 32% and 56%, respectively. The negative predictive values of clinical symptoms for ketonuria and hypoglycemia were 70% and 33%. The positive predictive values of over 500 Kcal deficiency in ketonuria and hypoglycemia were 33% and 57%. Severe calorie deficiency (more than 2000 Kcal positively predicts ketonuria in 70% of cases and sufficient calorie intake (less than 500 Kcal deficiency negatively predicts ketonuria in 93% of women. Clinical symptoms and calorie intake were not appropriate criteria for predicting ketonuria and hypoglycemia except in asymptomatic or severely calorie deficient cases or those with sufficient calorie intake whose ketonuria was predicted accurately.

  19. Giving women a voice in government | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-10-26

    Oct 26, 2010 ... At the same time, a woman in Nigeria complains, “I went for councillorship in my own ward and discovered that in these things women are men's followers. Whatever music they play, women have to follow and dance to the music. Everything is manipulated, hijacked, and handled by men.” To get the full ...

  20. Women's Access to Land : Call for Proposals | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Reports. Women's gains from the implementation of succession law in Uganda : voices from Wakiso and Mpigi districts; final report. Download PDF. Reports. Advocacy phase : final report. Download PDF. Reports. Voices of women's aspirations over land and land matters : the case of Kibaale district. Download PDF ...

  1. Don't Cut Women's Programs. Embed Them! | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-07-27

    Jul 27, 2017 ... This includes providing women's toilets in public places like markets or transportation hubs. ... gives a specific focus on gender equality and empowerment of girls, while also prioritizing women and girls in other key areas such as environment and climate action, inclusive governance, peace and security.

  2. Women's Rights and Living Customary Law | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Women's Rights and Living Customary Law. This action-research project focuses on the interface between custom and rights in the context of a constitution that recognizes and protects both customary law and the Bill of Rights. It will explore how this interplay affects the rights - particularly land rights - of black women living ...

  3. Women build peace on the memories of war | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2011-04-12

    Apr 12, 2011 ... Fear haunts the survivors, says Erazo, and a widespread cultural stigma around sexual violence prevents them from talking about their experiences. Violence against women has also infected civilian life, with killings of women having risen dramatically after the 1996 peace accord. In 2009, Guatemala had ...

  4. Bringing the Flipped Classroom to Day 1: A Novel Didactic Curriculum for Emergency Medicine Intern Orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrie, Michael G; Amick, Christopher; Mitzman, Jennifer; Way, David P; King, Andrew M

    2018-01-01

    Most emergency medicine (EM) residency programs provide an orientation program for their incoming interns, with the lecture being the most common education activity during this period. Our orientation program is designed to bridge the gap between undergraduate and graduate medical education by ensuring that all learners demonstrate competency on Level 1 Milestones, including medical knowledge (MK). To teach interns core medical knowledge in EM, we reformulated orientation using the flipped-classroom model by replacing lectures with small group, case-based discussions. Interns demonstrated improvement in medical knowledge through higher scores on a posttest. Evaluation survey results were also favorable for the flipped-classroom teaching format.

  5. Posture analysis on young women before and after 60 days of -6 degrees head down bed rest (Wise 2005).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viguier, Marion; Dupui, Philippe; Montoya, Richard

    2009-02-01

    Twenty-four women divided into three groups: control, exercise and nutrition, have been involved in a -6 degrees head down bed rest (HDBR) experiment for 60 days. The objective was to analyse the effects of microgravity on balance function regulation. Group comparisons assessed the efficiency of countermeasures (specific exercises and in particular diet) on the deleterious effects of simulated microgravity. Measurements of orthostatic and dynamic balance were taken 9 and 2 days prior to the experiment, on the first day of getting up, the following day and 4 and 10 days after, under two visual conditions: eyes open and eyes closed. The results confirmed that, as in any other test performed with ordinary subjects, the postural balance performances are better with eyes open than with eyes closed. The static and dynamic postural performances were impaired on the first day of recovery (R0) following HDBR. This impairment lasted up to 4 days after getting up and, afterwards the volunteers recovered their initial performances. The exercise group recovered static postural performances more quickly than the other groups whereas there were no differences in the recovery of the dynamic balance performances.

  6. 78 FR 6171 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: INTERNational Connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-29

    ... candidates who have an interest in, and are qualified, to become future Department employees. Naturally, HR... who served from 2005 through spring 2008. The intern alumni were queried as to their motivation in...

  7. 77 FR 65602 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: INTERNationalConnections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-29

    ..., to become future Department employees. The legal authorities pertaining to this collection include... from 2005 through spring 2008. The intern alumni were queried as to their motivation in seeking an...

  8. Women Moving Within Borders: Gender and Internal Migration ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Internal migration is an inherent part of the processes of development and structural transformation in any region. In Africa, while the focus is often on international migration, internal migration is far more significant for development in terms of the numbers of people moving and their poverty reduction potential and well-being ...

  9. CELEBRATION OF DECEMBER 3RD, INTERNATIONAL DAY OF PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja FILIPOVSKA

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available On December 2nd 2016 in the main amphitheater at the Faculty of Philosophy in Skopje, was held the celebration of December 3rd, the International Day of Persons with Disabilities, in organization of the Institute of Special Education and Rehabilitation. The official part of the program was started with a speech by Goran Ajdinski, PhD, the Dean of the Faculty of Philosophy in Skopje. The guests at the celebration were also greeted by the Rector of the University “Ss. Cyril and Methodius” – Skopje, Nikola Jankulovski, PhD and the Minister of Labor and Social Policy of Republic of Macedonia, Frosina Tashevska-Remenski, PhD. After the speeches, which highlighted the current efforts and future commitment to inclusion and accessibility of persons with disabilities, two awards were presented by the Humanitarian foundation “Prof. d-r Ljupco Ajdinski”. The first award was given to Simona Kostadinova as the student with achieved highest grade point average of 9.65 in the generation 2011/12 during the studies of Special education and rehabilitation. The second award was intended for the highest ranked student at the university admission in 2016/2017. This award belonged to Nadica Gjerasimova who had 97.70 points on the official rank list. Beside the awards, two acknowledgements for humanity were also given by the Foundation “Prof. d-r Ljupco Ajdinski”. For the longstanding human activity in preparation of special education and rehabilitation staff and education and rehabilitation of persons with disabilities, the first acknowledgement was given to the Institute of Special education and rehabilitation. The second acknowledgement was meant for Kiril Temkov, PhD, about his numerous initiated and organized human activities, especially for the published paper on the ethical dimensions of special education and rehabilitation and introduction of Ethics in the education system in Republic of Macedonia. The last part of the program was intended for

  10. WISE 2005: Aerobic and resistive countermeasures prevent paraspinal muscle deconditioning during 60-day bed rest in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Jacquelyn A; Macias, Brandon R; Schneider, Suzanne M; Watenpaugh, Donald E; Lee, Stuart M C; Chang, Douglas G; Hargens, Alan R

    2016-05-15

    Microgravity-induced lumbar paraspinal muscle deconditioning may contribute to back pain commonly experienced by astronauts and may increase the risk of postflight injury. We hypothesized that a combined resistive and aerobic exercise countermeasure protocol that included spinal loading would mitigate lumbar paraspinal muscle deconditioning during 60 days of bed rest in women. Sixteen women underwent 60-day, 6° head-down-tilt bed rest (BR) and were randomized into control and exercise groups. During bed rest the control group performed no exercise. The exercise group performed supine treadmill exercise within lower body negative pressure (LBNP) for 3-4 days/wk and flywheel resistive exercise for 2-3 days/wk. Paraspinal muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) was measured using a lumbar spine MRI sequence before and after BR. In addition, isokinetic spinal flexion and extension strengths were measured before and after BR. Data are presented as means ± SD. Total lumbar paraspinal muscle CSA decreased significantly more in controls (10.9 ± 3.4%) than in exercisers (4.3 ± 3.4%; P Earth may mitigate spinal deconditioning during long-duration space travel.

  11. The world needs more women scientists | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-10-23

    Oct 23, 2017 ... Women are significantly underrepresented in science, making up only 28% of all researchers globally — and the disparity is even greater in the fields of natural sciences and engineering.

  12. Gender in International Conflict: Women Representation in Security Discourse

    OpenAIRE

    Fitriani, Fitriani

    2012-01-01

    Security discourse that was long cons idered as scientific, objective and gender neutral is one subject that had received numerous feminist critics. It is not only that feminist observed security discourse as minority – including women and victims – blind; it is also masculine and prostatus quo. This article reviews the building of security discourse from feminist perspective that detects, since the theoretical building to the practical level, women are given weak position to justified the st...

  13. Internal contamination: what challenges for tomorrow? Proceedings of the Research and Health Section technical day

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berard, Philippe; Lecoix, Geraldine; Menetrier, Florence; Menetrier, Florence; Leiterer, Alexandra; Gremy, Olivier; Mougnard, Philippe; Gonin, Michele; Paquet, Francois; Davesne, Estelle; Bertho, Jean-Marc; Metivier, Henri; Abergel, Rebecca

    2015-10-01

    The Research and Health Section of the French Society of Radiation Protection (SFRP) organized a technical meeting on the radiation protection aspects of dismantlement, from the dismantling work to the risk, the measurement of body contamination, the potentially harmful health effects, the available medical treatments, the actual needs and the developments in progress. This document brings together the abstracts and the presentations (slides) of the different talks given at the meeting: 1 - Situation: what radionuclides, what situations? (Philippe BERARD, CEA); 2 - Dismantling workplace experience feedback with internal contamination hazard (Philippe MOUGNARD, AREVA); 3 - Experience feedback on internal exposure monitoring at power plants in France (Michele GONIN, EDF); 4 - Evolution of routine and intervention measurement methods (Geraldine LECOIX, CEA); 5 - Evolution of radiation dose calculation models (Francois PAQUET, IRSN); 6 - Taking uncertainties into account in internal contamination monitoring protocols (Estelle DAVESNE, IRSN); 7 - Radionuclides behaviour and effects in men (Florence MENETRIER, CEA); 8 - The plutonium case (Henri METIVIER, SFRP); 9 - Cesium-137 and internal contamination: status and perspectives (Jean-Marc BERTHO, IRSN); 10 - Iodine and thyroid (Florence MENETRIER, CEA); 11 - Actual treatments and research pathways (Alexandra LEITERER, CEA); 12 - Radionuclide contamination treatment: new developments in the US (Rebecca ABERGEL, Berkeley USA); 13 - Internal contaminations treatment: French recent effort for its improvement (Olivier GREMY, CEA)

  14. The Buddhist Institute at Phnom Penh, the International Council of Women, and the Rome International Institute for Educational Cinematography: Intersections of Internationalism and Imperialism, 1931-1934

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Joyce

    2018-01-01

    This article explores the intersection of aspects of imperialism and internationalism in discussion of cinematography at the League of Nations, at the International Council of Women (ICW), and as they played out in the imperial, national and local flows around educational cinematography in the work of Suzanne Karpelès at the Institute of Buddhist…

  15. Impact of national immunization days on polio-related knowledge and practice of urban women in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaiyum, M A; Tuñon, C; Hel Baqui, A; Quayyum, Z; Khatun, J

    1997-12-01

    Bangladesh began to hold National Immunization Days (NIDs) from 1995 as part of the country's goal to eradicate poliomyelitis by the turn of the century. The NIDs brought together government agencies, the media, voluntary organisations and individual volunteers in social mobilization and service delivery activities. This paper assesses the impact of the first two polio NIDs in terms of the immunization coverage and change in knowledge about the disease among women living in Dhaka city, the capital of the country. Data were collected through pre- and post-NID cross-sectional surveys in a sample of one area of Dhaka city which included slum and non-slum households. Knowledge data were collected from 525 women with at least one child aged less than five years. The oral polio vaccine (OPV) coverage during NIDs was obtained from 720 children. Knowledge of polio as a vaccine preventable disease increased after NIDs among both slum and non-slum women. The knowledge gap between the two groups was significantly reduced. Field workers, who regularly visit women at their homes to promote health and family planning services, were the main source of information for the slum women while television was cited as the most important source of information by non-slum women. The study revealed that 88% of children under five years received at least one dose of oral polio vaccine (OPV) during NIDs, and 67% received two stipulated doses with no significant differences between slum (65%) and non-slum (69%) groups. In addition, 68% of the children contacted during the NIDs were given vitamin A supplementation. The study suggests that strategies like NID can be effectively used to tap into community resources and to generate political commitments for health programmes.

  16. Index/Directory of Women's Media. To Increase Communication Nationally and Internationally among Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Women's Inst. for Freedom of the Press, Washington, DC.

    This directory includes two sections: women's media groups, and individual media women and media-concerned women. In the first section, there are listings of periodicals, presses/publishers, news services, columns, radio-TV groups, regular programs-radio, regular programs-TV, video and cable, film, multi-media, music, arts, writers groups, public…

  17. Influence of Day Length and Physical Activity on Sleep Patterns in Older Icelandic Men and Women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brychta, Robert J; Arnardóttir, Nanna Ýr; Jóhannsson, Erlingur

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To identify cross-sectional and seasonal patterns of sleep and physical activity (PA) in community-dwelling, older Icelandic adults using accelerometers. Methods: A seven-day free-living protocol of 244 (110 female) adults aged 79.7 +/- 4.9 years was conducted as part of a larger......, but there was limited variation in response to significant daylight changes which may be due to long-term adaptation....

  18. International career motives, repatriation and career success of Indian women in science & technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valk, Reimira; van der Velde, E.G.; van Engen, Marloes; Godbole, R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to gain insight into international career motives, repatriation and career success of Indian women in Science and Technology. Design/methodology/approach In total, 30 semi-structured interviews were conducted with (upper) middle-class Indian women in Science and

  19. Choices of Training Programs and Career Paths by Women in Internal Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Phyllis; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Using data on 3,569 women and 15,582 men trained in internal medicine, this study investigated gender differences in choice of primary care practice and their possible relationship to training program type, traditional or primary care. Results indicate women pursued primary care more often than did men, regardless of training program completed.…

  20. Human Rights and International Labour Law issues concerning Migrant Women Working as Domestic Helpers in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peng, Q.

    2017-01-01

    This book addresses the human rights and international labour law issues concerning rural migrant women workers as domestic helpers in China and offers several legislative suggestions to the Chinese government. By describing the current de facto and de jure condition of rural migrant women working

  1. Internal cavity characteristics of northern long-eared bat (Myotis septentrionalis) maternity day-roosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander Silvis; R. Edward Thomas; W. Mark Ford; Eric R. Britzke; Meryl J. Friedrich

    2015-01-01

    This report discusses characteristics of seven tree cavities used as day-roosts by female northern long-eared bats (Myotis septentrionalis) during the maternity season in a deciduous forest in north-central Kentucky. Understanding the characteristics of cavities selected by bats will help us better understand the ecology of cavity roosting bats and...

  2. Women's Networks towards the Twenty-first Century. Proceedings of the International Fourm on Women and Life-long Learning (Saitama, Japan, November 14-16, 1997).

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Women's Education Centre, Saitama (Japan).

    The role of women's centers and other facilities for women has become increasingly important in promoting a variety of opportunities for women's learning and participation in society. This conference, with the theme of women's networks for the future, was designed to promote the international exchange of information and cooperative development…

  3. Postmenopausal obesity: 12,500 steps per day as a remedy? Relationships between body composition and daily steps in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroemeke, Aleksandra; Zając-Gawlak, Izabela; Pośpiech, Dariusz; Gába, Aleš; Přidalová, Miroslava; Pelclová, Jana

    2014-09-01

    To verify relationships between physical activity (steps per day) and obesity (components of body composition) among postmenopausal women. Physical activity (ActiGraph GT1M accelerometer; worn for 7 days) and obesity (body composition analyzer InBody 720) were assessed among 79 healthy postmenopausal women (age 63.25 ± 5.51 years; range: 51-81 years). In order to determine differences in body composition in women with different levels of physical activity, one-way analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was conducted, with age of participants as a covariate. Significant intergroup differences in almost all analyzed components of the body composition (weight, body mass index, waist-hip ratio, visceral fat area, body fat mass and percent of body fat) were obtained. Highly active women (≥ 12,500 steps/day) had lower weight and adiposity parameters than those that represented low (< 7,500 steps/day) or somewhat active (7,500-9,999 steps/day) groups. Besides, a noteworthy difference between active (10,000-12,499 steps/day) and low active women was recorded. Noticeably, only in the most active group was the BMI within normal ranges. The higher physical activity, the lower obesity in postmenopausal women. The recommended 10,000 steps/day seems insufficient for this age group. Based on the obtained results, postmenopausal women should walk at least 12,500 steps per day to improve their health.

  4. Postmenopausal obesity: 12,500 steps per day as a remedy? Relationships between body composition and daily steps in postmenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Kroemeke

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To verify relationships between physical activity (steps per day and obesity (components of body composition among postmenopausal women. Material and methods: Physical activity (ActiGraph GT1M accelerometer; worn for 7 days and obesity (body composition analyzer InBody 720 were assessed among 79 healthy postmenopausal women (age 63.25 ± 5.51 years; range: 51-81 years. In order to determine differences in body composition in women with different levels of physical activity, one-way analysis of covariance (ANCOVA was conducted, with age of participants as a covariate. Results : Significant intergroup differences in almost all analyzed components of the body composition (weight, body mass index, waist-hip ratio, visceral fat area, body fat mass and percent of body fat were obtained. Highly active women (≥ 12,500 steps/day had lower weight and adiposity parameters than those that represented low (< 7,500 steps/day or somewhat active (7,500-9,999 steps/day groups. Besides, a noteworthy difference between active (10,000-12,499 steps/day and low active women was recorded. Noticeably, only in the most active group was the BMI within normal ranges. Conclusions : The higher physical activity, the lower obesity in postmenopausal women. The recommended 10,000 steps/day seems insufficient for this age group. Based on the obtained results, postmenopausal women should walk at least 12,500 steps per day to improve their health.

  5. Variation of urinary protein to creatinine ratio during the day in women with suspected pre-eclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdonk, K; Niemeijer, I C; Hop, W C J; de Rijke, Y B; Steegers, E A P; van den Meiracker, A H; Visser, W

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the stability throughout the day of the protein to creatinine ratio (PCR) in spot urine, to demonstrate whether the PCR is a valid alternative for 24-hour protein investigation in pregnant women. Prospective study. Tertiary referral university centre. Women suspected of having pre-eclampsia, admitted to the Erasmus Medical Centre. Twenty-four-hour urine collections and simultaneously three single voided 5-ml aliquots were obtained at 8 a.m., 12 a.m. (noon) and 5 p.m. A PCR was measured in each specimen and compared with the 24-hour protein excretion. The 24-hour proteinuria and PCR measured in spontaneous voids. The PCRs correlated strongly with each other and with the 24-hour protein excretion but did show variation throughout the day (mean coefficient of variation 36%; 95% confidence interval 31-40%). The coefficient of variation was unrelated to the degree of 24-hour proteinuria. Receiver operating characteristics curves to discriminate between values below and greater than or equal to the threshold of 0.3 g protein per 24-hour had an area under the curve of respectively 0.94 (8 a.m.), 0.96 (noon) and 0.97 (5 p.m.). Sensitivities at 8 a.m., noon and 5 p.m. were respectively 89%, 96% and 94%; specificities were 75%, 78% and 78% with the proposed PCR cut-off of 30 mg/mmol (0.26 g/g) (National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines).There is no evidence of a difference between the three measurement times regarding the sensitivities and specificities. The PCR determined in spot urine varies throughout the day but is a valid alternative for 24-hour urine collections in pregnant women. It is especially useful to rapidly identify clinically relevant proteinuria. © 2014 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  6. Preventing child marriages: first international day of the girl child “my life, my right, end child marriage”

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    On 17 November 2011, the United Nations General Assembly adopted a resolution (A/RES/66/170) designating 11 October as the first International Day of the Girl Child choosing ending child marriages as the theme of the day. Child marriage is a fundamental human rights violation and impacts all aspects of a girl’s life. These marriages deny a girl of her childhood, disrupts her education, limits her opportunities, increases her risk of violence and abuse, and jeopardizes her health. The article presents data about the prevalence and effects, contributing factors and recommends action for prevention. PMID:23163964

  7. Preventing child marriages: first international day of the girl child "my life, my right, end child marriage".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svanemyr, Joar; Chandra-Mouli, Venkatraman; Christiansen, Charlotte Sigurdson; Mbizvo, Michael

    2012-11-20

    On 17 November 2011, the United Nations General Assembly adopted a resolution (A/RES/66/170) designating 11 October as the first International Day of the Girl Child choosing ending child marriages as the theme of the day. Child marriage is a fundamental human rights violation and impacts all aspects of a girl's life. These marriages deny a girl of her childhood, disrupts her education, limits her opportunities, increases her risk of violence and abuse, and jeopardizes her health. The article presents data about the prevalence and effects, contributing factors and recommends action for prevention.

  8. Preventing child marriages: first international day of the girl child “my life, my right, end child marriage”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svanemyr Joar

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract On 17 November 2011, the United Nations General Assembly adopted a resolution (A/RES/66/170 designating 11 October as the first International Day of the Girl Child choosing ending child marriages as the theme of the day. Child marriage is a fundamental human rights violation and impacts all aspects of a girl’s life. These marriages deny a girl of her childhood, disrupts her education, limits her opportunities, increases her risk of violence and abuse, and jeopardizes her health. The article presents data about the prevalence and effects, contributing factors and recommends action for prevention.

  9. A new window on the world for women | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2011-07-12

    Jul 12, 2011 ... And like Jertrudes, feeding, clothing, and keeping their children in school keeps them in their market stalls until well after dark. Making telecentres relevant to women like ... Reducing urban violence: Understanding why some men choose violence – and others don't. What determines whether or not men ...

  10. Family Conflicts and Violence against Women - An International Comparison

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rendlová, Eliška

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 3 (2002), s. 6-8 ISSN 1213-9920 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IBS7028205 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z7028912 Keywords : public opinion * family conflicts * violence against women Subject RIV: AO - Sociology, Demography

  11. Improving crop yields for Sahelian Women | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-06-07

    Jun 7, 2016 ... This serves as collateral against which they receive credit from microfinance institutions. About 20 microfinance institutions offer credit for microdosing within the project area. So far more than 1,000 farmers - 30% of whom are women - have been trained in microdosing and received access to credit in each ...

  12. Educating Women about HIV/AIDS: Some International Comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulman, Donna; Coben, Diana; Nguyen, Van Anh

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes current trends in the HIV/AIDS epidemic. It looks at issues and strategies involved in educating women about HIV/AIDS in the context of the global pandemic, focusing particularly on Canada and Vietnam. These strategies are essential steps in preventing the spread of HIV and in caring for those who have already developed AIDS.…

  13. The Status of Women in East Jerusalem | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Introduction to concepts and theories on women's rights and citizenship;; Research design and planning;; Qualitative and quantitative research methodologies;; Feminist research methodologies;; Fieldwork and research paper writing; and; Development of research project proposals. Through the project, INSAN will engage ...

  14. Giving girls and women the power to decide | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2018-03-28

    Mar 28, 2018 ... An IMCHA grant supports training for community health workers to educate adolescents and women about family planning options, including safe sexual behaviours. It builds on an existing South-South and North-South research collaboration between The Catholic University of Health and Allied Sciences ...

  15. A randomized treatment trial: single versus 7-day dose of metronidazole for the treatment of Trichomonas vaginalis among HIV-infected women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissinger, Patricia; Mena, Leandro; Levison, Judy; Clark, Rebecca A; Gatski, Megan; Henderson, Harold; Schmidt, Norine; Rosenthal, Susan L; Myers, Leann; Martin, David H

    2010-12-15

    To determine if the metronidazole (MTZ) 2-gm single dose (recommended) is as effective as the 7-day 500 mg twice a day dose (alternative) for treatment of Trichomonas vaginalis (TV) among HIV+ women. Phase IV randomized clinical trial; HIV+ women with culture confirmed TV were randomized to treatment arm: MTZ 2-gm single dose or MTZ 500 mg twice a day 7-day dose. All women were given 2-gm MTZ doses to deliver to their sex partners. Women were recultured for TV at a test-of-cure (TOC) visit occurring 6-12 days after treatment completion. TV-negative women at TOC were again recultured at a 3-month visit. Repeat TV infection rates were compared between arms. Two hundred seventy HIV+/TV+ women were enrolled (mean age = 40 years, ±9.4; 92.2% African American). Treatment arms were similar with respect to age, race, CD4 count, viral load, antiretroviral therapy status, site, and loss-to-follow up. Women in the 7-day arm had lower repeat TV infection rates at TOC [8.5% (11 of 130) versus 16.8% (21 of 125) (relative risk: 0.50, 95% confidence interval = 0.25, 1.00; P TV among HIV+ women.

  16. Health of International Marriage Immigrant Women in South Korea: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jeong-Ah; Kim, Tiffany; Roh, Eun Ha; Song, Ju-Eun

    2017-06-05

    International marriage migration is now one of the most prominent forms of migration in Asia, and the number of women migrating to South Korea for marriage has increased dramatically in the last two decades. In this article, we provide a systematic review regarding the health status and health-related issues of international marriage immigrant women. The literature search identified 620 articles, of which 53 studies are presented in the article. Three overarching categories including six subcategories were identified according to the research focus; 'Environmental factors of health' including social support and barriers, 'Health status' including physical, psychological and social health, and quality of life as 'Outcome of health'. Overall women immigrants by marriage showed relatively poor health outcomes. Social support was an important factor affecting the health status and quality of life in this population. We offer recommendations to develop and implement culturally and linguistically appropriate health promoting programs for international marriage immigrant women in South Korea.

  17. Allocation of Internal Medicine Resident Time in a Swiss Hospital: A Time and Motion Study of Day and Evening Shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Nathalie; Méan, Marie; Castioni, Julien; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Waeber, Gérard; Garnier, Antoine

    2017-04-18

    Little current evidence documents how internal medicine residents spend their time at work, particularly with regard to the proportions of time spent in direct patient care versus using computers. To describe how residents allocate their time during day and evening hospital shifts. Time and motion study. Internal medicine residency at a university hospital in Switzerland, May to July 2015. 36 internal medicine residents with an average of 29 months of postgraduate training. Trained observers recorded the residents' activities using a tablet-based application. Twenty-two activities were categorized as directly related to patients, indirectly related to patients, communication, academic, nonmedical tasks, and transition. In addition, the presence of a patient or colleague and use of a computer or telephone during each activity was recorded. Residents were observed for a total of 696.7 hours. Day shifts lasted 11.6 hours (1.6 hours more than scheduled). During these shifts, activities indirectly related to patients accounted for 52.4% of the time, and activities directly related to patients accounted for 28.0%. Residents spent an average of 1.7 hours with patients, 5.2 hours using computers, and 13 minutes doing both. Time spent using a computer was scattered throughout the day, with the heaviest use after 6:00 p.m. The study involved a small sample from 1 institution. At this Swiss teaching hospital, internal medicine residents spent more time at work than scheduled. Activities indirectly related to patients predominated, and about half the workday was spent using a computer. Information Technology Department and Department of Internal Medicine of Lausanne University Hospital.

  18. Middle east and North African oil in international relations (from 1970 to these days)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafie, Hossein

    1999-01-01

    Petroleum is not purely an economical product, its main role in world economy and its concentration in Middle East and North Africa (two third of world reserves) made influence international politics. Knowing the nature of the region, petroleum and politics make one. The politicization of oil in the region starts, first of all, with the efforts of some powers, through their companies, to dominate oil countries, which by reaction incite these countries to eliminate foreign domination and establish their national control on oil matters. The situation is changing progressively. The position of productive states got stronger with the beginning of the 1970's which permitted the use of oil, in a way relatively efficient, as an instrument of power. Consequently, the balance of power shifted deeply in the favor of producers. On this basis, the argument consists of three parts: the first puts theoretic bases - theory of economical arm - and defines geographical and historical environment of the research. The second part studies the period of force of the oil countries, from the fourth Israel-Arab war and oil embargo that followed it, to the end of the second oil slump. The third part explains the shift of power on the international scene and the relative decline of oil power for the states of the region. The analysis of impact of the oil slump in 1986 and the mini impact of the second Persian Gulf war, quickly dominated, lead to clear the actual situation and outline the viewpoint of the future. (author)

  19. The criminal victimization of children and women in international perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Jan; Kury, Helmut; Redo, Slawomir; Shea, Evelyn

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In this article we will present an overview of the results of the national and international crime victims surveys regarding the distribution of victimization according to age and gender with a focus on violent crime. The results show a consistent inversed relationship between age and

  20. Women Academics and Research Productivity: An International Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiston, Sarah Jane; Jung, Jisun

    2015-01-01

    In the prestige economy of higher education, research productivity is highly prized. Previous research indicates, however, a gender gap with respect to research output. This gap is often explained by reference to familial status and responsibilities. In this article, we examine the research productivity gender gap from an international perspective…

  1. A changing Asia, especially for women | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-03-23

    Mar 23, 2016 ... All of India now has a standardized protocol for forensic investigations into rapes, and it can help build evidence against the guilty parties. ... Thanks to international reconstruction aid and the exceptional resilience of its citizens, it now has a generation of young thirty-somethings who are looking for ...

  2. Population and women's reproductive health: an international perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, K; Rosenfield, A

    1996-01-01

    This paper gives a brief overview of current world population or demographic issues, followed by a discussion of the ICPD proceedings and various notable aspects of the ICPD Programme of Action. It then focuses on six of the most pressing reproductive health concerns facing women today: gender inequalities, access to contraceptive services, sexually transmitted diseases (including HIV), maternal mortality, unsafe abortion, and adolescent pregnancy. Because the ICPD Programme of Action is intended to have far-reaching consequences for each of these issues, it is taken as a focal point of analysis.

  3. Transforming 'Female' Programmes: Don’t Tell the Bride from International TV to Italian Digital Channels for Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Penati

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary Italian digital channels explicitly targeting women (such as Real Time, Lei, Fox Life, La5, and La7d represent a privileged observatory for some general trends in the international circulation of content and incorporation of foreign formats into national television (TV. In fact, their schedules rely heavily on the genre of factual entertainment, which was first devised and used in international contexts, such as the UK and the US, and only in the second phase was imported into other national TV environments.After introducing this scenario and the main issues connected to the circulation of international content on these channels, the article will focus on the BBC docu-reality Don’t Tell the Bride. The show was extensively circulated (UK and US versions in the circuit of Italian women channels before a national version was produced by the pay-TV brand Lei. The article will reflect on how the national version Non ditelo alla sposa added further shades to the original meaning of the format. While the international version only allowed the Italian audience to engage with the programme through a romantic and escapist approach, the local adaptation inserted practical advice in the storytelling on how to arrange a low budget yet traditional wedding day, coupled with the sarcastic and ironic points of view of the characters involved.

  4. Different-day and same-session combined strength and endurance training : adaptations in neuromuscular and cardiorespiratory performance, body composition, metabolic health and wellbeing in men and women

    OpenAIRE

    Eklund, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    This thesis investigated 1) acute neuromuscular and hormonal responses to combined strength and endurance loadings with different orders and their long-term adaptations (women), 2) adaptations in neuromuscular, hormonal, cardiorespiratory and health variables following 24 weeks of volume-equated protocols of combined training (men and women). Subjects were assigned to one of three groups: strength and endurance training on different days (DD: men n=21, women n=18), trainin...

  5. Sixty women a day examined with world-unique mammography system from Sectra. Breast disease centre in Sweden offers lowest radiation dose in the world

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Sectra's digital mammography system, Sectra MicroDose Mammography(TM), has been used to examine more than 1,500 women in the Helsingborg Hospital mammography screening program. This was accomplished in the record time of two months in clinical operation. The system is now being used to examine more than sixty women every day" (1 page).

  6. A 21 day Daniel Fast improves selected biomarkers of antioxidant status and oxidative stress in men and women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canale Robert E

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dietary modification via both caloric and nutrient restriction is associated with multiple health benefits, some of which are related to an improvement in antioxidant status and a decrease in the production of reactive oxygen species. The Daniel Fast is based on the Biblical book of Daniel, is commonly partaken for 21 days, and involves food intake in accordance with a stringent vegan diet. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of a 21 day Daniel Fast on biomarkers of antioxidant status and oxidative stress. Methods 43 subjects (13 men; 30 women; 35 ± 1 yrs; range: 20-62 yrs completed a 21 day Daniel Fast following the guidelines provided by investigators. Subjects reported to the lab in a 12 hour post-absorptive state both pre fast (day 1 and post fast (day 22. At each visit, blood was collected for determination of malondialdehyde (MDA, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, nitrate/nitrite (NOx, Trolox Equivalent Antioxidant Capacity (TEAC, and Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (ORAC. Subjects recorded dietary intake during the 7 day period immediately prior to the fast and during the final 7 days of the fast. Results A decrease was noted in MDA (0.66 ± 0.0.03 vs. 0.56 ± 0.02 μmol L-1; p = 0.004, while H2O2 demonstrated a trend for lowering (4.42 ± 0.32 vs. 3.78 ± 0.21 μmol L-1; p = 0.074. Both NOx (18.79 ± 1.92 vs. 26.97 ± 2.40 μmol L-1; p = 0.003 and TEAC (0.47 ± 0.01 vs. 0.51 ± 0.01 mmol L-1; p = 0.001 increased from pre to post fast, while ORAC was unchanged (5243 ± 103 vs. 5249 ± 183 μmol L-1 TE; p = 0.974. As expected, multiple differences in dietary intake were noted (p Conclusion Modification of dietary intake in accordance with the Daniel Fast is associated with an improvement in selected biomarkers of antioxidant status and oxidative stress, including metabolites of nitric oxide (i.e., NOx.

  7. Educating Women for Peace: The United States Section of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom and Political Organization during the 1930s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pois, Anne Marie

    The focus of this paper is the U.S. section of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom (US WILPF) and its efforts to mobilize an activist and durable women's peace reform organization in the 1930s. Members wished US WILPF to serve as an avenue for expanding women's political power and for reaching the goals of nonviolent change and…

  8. The Virtual International Day of the Midwife: A Synchronous Open Online Conference for Continuing Professional Development and Learning for Midwives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidebotham, Mary; Dalsgaard, Annette; Davis, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To examine the contribution of the Virtual International Day of the Midwife (VIDM) conference to midwives' continuing professional development (CPD). BACKGROUND: Knowledge and understanding of CPD for midwives as synchronous online learning is limited. Studies of e-learning programs for CPD...... have underlined the need for interaction with others. The VIDM is a synchronous online 24-hour conference freely available for midwives designed to provide a unique CPD opportunity. METHOD: An online survey with a mix of fixed-response, multiple-response, and open-ended freetext questions was available...

  9. Half the human race: the international women's movement at the end of the twentieth century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloud, K

    1996-01-01

    This overview of the current status of the international women's movement traces the growth of the movement from a "trickle to a torrent" during the past 150 years and credits the UN with providing the framework necessary for expanding the international policy dialogue about women's rights. The next section asks why this great burst of women's energy in public settings is occurring now and proposes that the answer can be found in the fact that a major transformation is creating a smaller, more interdependent world marked by rising productivity and environmental pressures. This transformation has also led to increased life expectancy and reduced fertility, thus giving women more productive time to be applied to education, to outside employment, to political organizing and community work, and to the support of nongovernmental organizations. The article continues by reviewing the diverse strategies used by women's groups, including "boring from within," applying political pressure, and demonstrating alternatives. After noting the existence of international networks that exchange successful strategies, the article concludes with an analysis of the processes and achievements of the 1995 Fourth Conference on Women and its Non-Governmental Forum.

  10. Violence and abuse of internally displaced women survivors of the 2010 Haiti earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Doris W; Campbell, Jacquelyn C; Yarandi, Hossein N; O'Connor, Annie Lewis; Dollar, Emily; Killion, Cheryl; Sloand, Elizabeth; Callwood, Gloria B; Cesar, Nicole M; Hassan, Mona; Gary, Faye

    2016-11-01

    Limited research following disasters suggests that internally displaced women are disproportionately vulnerable to violence and abuse. An interdisciplinary collaborative of researchers and practitioners in Haiti, the US Virgin Islands, and the US Mainland investigated gender-based violence (GBV) pre- and post-earthquake and health outcomes among Haitian women living in tent cities/camps following the 2010 earthquake. A comparative descriptive correlational design using culturally sensitive and language appropriate computer-assisted interviews of 208 internally displaced women 2011-2013. Found high rates of violence and abuse both before (71.2 %) and after (75 %) p = 0.266, the earthquake primarily perpetrated by boy friends or husbands. Significantly more mental and physical health problems were reported by abused than non-abused women. The majority (60-78 %) of abused women did not report personal or community tolerance for violence and abuse, but acknowledged a community context of limited involvement. Coordinated planning and implementation of needed interventions are essential to provide a balanced approach to the care of displaced women after natural disasters with sensitivity to the abusive experiences of many women both before and after the disasters.

  11. Self-objectification, weight bias internalization, and binge eating in young women: Testing a mediational model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehak, Adrienne; Friedman, Aliza; Cassin, Stephanie E

    2018-01-18

    Self-objectification and weight bias internalization are two internalization processes that are positively correlated with binge eating among young women. However, the mechanisms underlying these relationships are understudied. Consistent with objectification theory, this study examined appearance anxiety and body shame as mediators between self-objectification, weight bias internalization and binge eating. Female undergraduates (N = 102) completed self-report measures of self-objectification, weight bias internalization, appearance anxiety, body shame, and binge eating. Results indicated that women who self-objectified and internalized negative weight-related attitudes reported greater binge eating (r s  = .43 and r s  = .57, respectively) and these associations were mediated by the combined effects of body shame and appearance anxiety. The contrast between the two mediators was also significant, such that body shame emerged as a stronger mediator within both mediational models. Results demonstrated that these internalization processes contribute to negative affect in young women, which may in turn lead to binge eating. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. International Archves Day

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana Jurić

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available -200 years of the Cadastral Survey under Emperor Franz I: Exhibition in the Croatian State Archive in Zagreb -200 years of the Cadastral Survey under Emperor Franz I: Exhibition at the Faculty of Geodesy, University of Zagreb -From Pen to Satellite – Bjelovar on Cadastral Maps: Exhibition in the Small Gallery of the City Museum in Bjelovar -The Lika Cadastre: Exhibition at the State Archives in Gospić -The Stable Cadastre Material in the State Archives in Osijek: Exhibition and Catalogue by Danijel Jelaš -Story of the Maps Archive for Istria and Dalmatia – 200 Years of the Imperial Patent: Exhibition, State Archives in Split -Our Islands (Škoji on Cadastral Maps in the State Archives in Zadar: Exhibition at the State Archives in Zadar -The Faculty Farm, Maksimir: Exhibition at the State Archives in Zagreb

  13. Increased seroprevalence of IgG-class antibodies against cytomegalovirus, parvovirus B19, and varicella-zoster virus in women working in child day care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Rijckevorsel Gini

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary maternal infection with cytomegalovirus (CMV, parvovirus B19 (B19V, and varicella-zoster virus (VZV may result in adverse pregnancy outcomes like congenital infection or foetal loss. Women working in child day care have an increased exposure to CMV, B19V, and VZV. By comparing the seroprevalence of IgG-class antibodies against CMV, VZV and B19V in female day care workers (DCW with the seroprevalence in women not working in day care this study aimed to assess the association between occupation and infection. Methods A cross-sectional design was used. Out of a random sample of 266 day care centres, demographic data, data on work history, and blood samples were collected from 285 women from 38 centres. In addition, blood samples and basic demographics from women who participated in a cross-sectional survey of the Amsterdam population (2004 were used. All blood samples were tested for IgG-class antibodies against CMV, B19V, and VZV. Results Twenty-seven percent of the DCW were still susceptible to B19V or CMV. Working in day care was independently associated with B19V infection in all DCW (prevalence ratio [PR] 1.2; 95 % CI 1.1–1.3, and with CMV infection in DCW of European origin only (PR 1.7; 95 % CI 1.3–2.3. Almost all women born outside Europe tested seropositive for CMV (96 %. All DCW tested seropositive for VZV, compared to only 94 % of the women not working in day care. Conclusion This study confirms the clear association between employment in child day care centres and infection with CMV and B19V. Intervention policies, like screening of new employees and awareness campaigns emphasizing hygienic measures among DCW, should be implemented urgently to improve the maternal health of these women and the health of their offspring.

  14. Report from the Third IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeland, Emily E.; Murphy, N.; Jang-Condell, H.; Gomez Maqueo Chew, Y.

    2009-12-01

    The Third IUPAP (International Union of Pure and Applied Physics) International Conference on Women in Physics was held in Seoul, South Korea from October 8-10, 2008 with 283 participants from 57 countries. Topics discussed included personal and professional development, attracting girls to physics, site visits for assessing and improving the climate for women, fundraising and leadership, and organizing women in physics working groups. Resolutions unanimously passed by the conference assembly recommend (1) the formation of additional regional or national working groups for women in physics, (2) promotion of site visits as an effective tool for improving the climate of the physics workplace, (3) increased professional development opportunities and outreach activities associated with conferences, and (4) a global survey of physicists in 2009 to assess the status of women in physics. See http://www.icwip2008.org/ for the text of the resolutions and the conference program. In this poster, AAS members who participated will report on this conference as well as resolutions from the first (Paris, 2002) and second (Rio de Janeiro, 2005) conferences. The next IUPAP Conference on Women in Physics is expected to occur in South Africa in 2011.

  15. International summit on the nutrition of adolescent girls and young women: consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Nancy; Bagby, Susan; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Dewey, Kathryn; Fall, Caroline; Gregory, Fred; Hay, William; Rhuman, Lisa; Caldwell, Christine Wallace; Thornburg, Kent L

    2017-07-01

    An international summit focusing on the difficult challenge of providing adequate nutrition for adolescent girls and young women in low- and middle-income countries was held in Portland, Oregon in 2015. Sixty-seven delegates from 17 countries agreed on a series of recommendations that would make progress toward improving the nutritional status of girls and young women in countries where their access to nutrition is compromised. Delegate recommendations include: (1) elevate the urgency of nutrition for girls and young women to a high international priority, (2) raise the social status of girls and young women in all regions of the world, (3) identify major knowledge gaps in the biology of adolescence that could be filled by robust research efforts, (4) and improve access to nutrient-rich foods for girls and young women. Attention to these recommendations would improve the health of young women in all nations of the world. © 2017 The Authors. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences published by Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of New York Academy of Sciences.

  16. 75 FR 82424 - The Secretary of State's International Council on Women's Business Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-30

    ... DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice: 7237] The Secretary of State's International Council on Women's Business Leadership AGENCY: Department of State. ACTION: Notice of intent to establish an advisory... Business Leadership, in accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act. Nature and Purpose: The Council...

  17. Eating Disorders of White American, Racial and Ethnic Minority American, and International Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osvold, Lise Leigh; Sodowsky, Gargi Roysircar

    1993-01-01

    Considers eating attitudes and behaviors related to anorexia nervosa, bulimia, and obesity of white American, African-American, Native American, and some international women from the point of view of cultural influences such as sex role, the media, socioeconomic class, and acculturation to Western society. (Author/NB)

  18. Qatari Women in a Corporatized Higher Education Setting: International Reforms and Their Local Bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Muftah, Esraa

    2017-01-01

    Discussions of the difficulties Qatari women experience in higher educational settings are unlikely to be found in international organization or government reports on the State of Qatar. Instead, recent reports have tended to gloss over gender inequalities raising a "successful girl discourse." Drawing on my own teaching experience at…

  19. Control of the population growth and women in Mexico: international organizations, civil society and public policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Ileana García Gossio

    2015-07-01

    subjects of the public demographic policies. For their part, the international organizations considered them, at first, as the key factor in birth control, but also as a beginning of development. Later, women were identified in public discourse according to feminist demands: as subjects with rights and with positions with a generic perspective.

  20. Complex Collaborations: India and International Agendas on Girls' and Women's Education, 1947-1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Rosie Peppin

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the dynamics of global campaigns for education through a study of the movement for girls' and women's education in India since independence in 1947. In particular, it uses the trajectory of ideas within India to theorise about international collaboration on educational goals, with UNESCO and the World Bank being two of the…

  1. Consuming Iron Biofortified Beans Increases Iron Status in Rwandan Women after 128 Days in a Randomized Controlled Feeding Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Jere D; Luna, Sarah V; Lung'aho, Mercy G; Wenger, Michael J; Murray-Kolb, Laura E; Beebe, Stephen; Gahutu, Jean-Bosco; Egli, Ines M

    2016-08-01

    Food-based strategies to reduce nutritional iron deficiency have not been universally successful. Biofortification has the potential to become a sustainable, inexpensive, and effective solution. This randomized controlled trial was conducted to determine the efficacy of iron-biofortified beans (Fe-Beans) to improve iron status in Rwandan women. A total of 195 women (aged 18-27 y) with serum ferritin Beans, with 86 mg Fe/kg, or standard unfortified beans (Control-Beans), with 50 mg Fe/kg, 2 times/d for 128 d in Huye, Rwanda. Iron status was assessed by hemoglobin, serum ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR), and body iron (BI); inflammation was assessed by serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP). Anthropometric measurements were performed at baseline and at end line. Random weekly serial sampling was used to collect blood during the middle 8 wk of the feeding trial. Mixed-effects regression analysis with repeated measurements was used to evaluate the effect of Fe-Beans compared with Control-Beans on iron biomarkers throughout the course of the study. At baseline, 86% of subjects were iron-deficient (serum ferritin beans/d. The Fe-Beans group consumed 14.5 ± 1.6 mg Fe/d from biofortified beans, whereas the Control-Beans group consumed 8.6 ± 0.8 mg Fe/d from standard beans (P Beans group had significantly greater increases in hemoglobin (3.8 g/L), log serum ferritin (0.1 log μg/L), and BI (0.5 mg/kg) than did controls after 128 d. For every 1 g Fe consumed from beans over the 128 study days, there was a significant 4.2-g/L increase in hemoglobin (P beans significantly improved iron status in Rwandan women. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01594359. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  2. Diurnal and menstrual cycles in body temperature are regulated differently: a 28-day ambulatory study in healthy women with thermal discomfort of cold extremities and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kräuchi, Kurt; Konieczka, Katarzyna; Roescheisen-Weich, Corina; Gompper, Britta; Hauenstein, Daniela; Schoetzau, Andreas; Fraenkl, Stephan; Flammer, Josef

    2014-02-01

    Diurnal cycle variations in body-heat loss and heat production, and their resulting core body temperature (CBT), are relatively well investigated; however, little is known about their variations across the menstrual cycle under ambulatory conditions. The main purpose of this study was to determine whether menstrual cycle variations in distal and proximal skin temperatures exhibit similar patterns to those of diurnal variations, with lower internal heat conductance when CBT is high, i.e. during the luteal phase. Furthermore, we tested these relationships in two groups of women, with and without thermal discomfort of cold extremities (TDCE). In total, 19 healthy eumenorrheic women with regular menstrual cycles (28-32 days), 9 with habitual TDCE (ages 29 ± 1.5 year; BMI 20.1 ± 0.4) and 10 controls without these symptoms (CON: aged 27 ± 0.8 year; BMI 22.7 ± 0.6; p temperature measurements of distal (mean of hands and feet) and proximal (mean of sternum and infraclavicular regions) skin regions, thighs, and calves were carried out under real-life, ambulatory conditions (i-Buttons® skin probes, sampling rate: 2.5 min). The distal minus proximal skin temperature gradient (DPG) provided a valuable measure for heat redistribution from the core to the shell, and, hence, for internal heat conduction. Additionally, basal body temperature was measured sublingually directly after waking up in bed. Mean diurnal amplitudes in skin temperatures increased from proximal to distal skin regions and the 24-h mean values were inversely related. TDCE compared to CON showed significantly lower hand skin temperatures and DPG during daytime. However, menstrual cycle phase did not modify these diurnal patterns, indicating that menstrual and diurnal cycle variations in skin temperatures reveal additive effects. Most striking was the finding that all measured skin temperatures, together with basal body temperature, revealed a similar menstrual cycle variation

  3. Effect and safety of high-dose dienogest (20 mg/day) in the treatment of women with endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Adolf E; Henkel, Alexandra; Moore, Claudia; Oettel, Michael

    2010-11-01

    Hormonal treatment of endometriosis is often continued for long periods and has the potential to affect many essential metabolic processes. The current study aimed to determine the effects and safety of high-dose dienogest as a medical endometriosis therapy. The effects and safety of high-dose dienogest, 20-30 mg/day for 24 weeks, were examined in 21 women aged 18-52 years with laparoscopically and histologically proven endometriosis stage I-IV (according to revised American Society of Reproductive Medicine criteria). At baseline and week 24, sera were obtained and stored at -20°C prior to analysis. The study showed no clinically significant effect of high-dose dienogest on thyroid or adrenal function, electrolyte balance or haematopoiesis. High-dose dienogest therapy also had no appreciable effects on glucose and lipid metabolism, liver enzymes or haemostasis. For instance, although dienogest mediated small increases in the haemostatic variables prothrombin fragment 1 + 2, antithrombin III and protein C, final levels (at week 24) remained within normal reference ranges for these parameters. The exception was the HDL-3 cholesterol concentration at week 24 (0.97 mmol/l), which increased beyond the normal range of 0.28-0.64 mmol/l. This investigation yielded a unique dataset on the safety of high-dose dienogest in endometriosis stage I-IV. High-dose dienogest (20-30 mg/day) had little influence upon all the parameters measured. It is therefore likely that lower doses of dienogest would have similarly neutral safety effects: an important consideration in the use of dienogest for the treatment of endometriosis.

  4. Polydextrose and soluble corn fiber increase five-day fecal wet weight in healthy men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, Derek A; Thomas, William; Boileau, Thomas W; Williamson-Hughes, Patricia S; Slavin, Joanne L

    2013-04-01

    Dietary fiber has well-established beneficial effects on laxation. Many fibers have been developed with positive sensory properties and 2 such fibers are polydextrose (PDX) and soluble corn fiber (SCF), which can be added to many commercially produced products. We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study comparing the laxative effects of PDX and SCF at a dose of 20 g/d with a low fiber control (LFC) eaten daily as a muffin and cereal in 36 healthy men and women. Each treatment period was 10 d with a 2-wk washout period between. Participants collected fecal samples during the last 5 d of each treatment and completed food diaries and gastrointestinal tolerance questionnaires on d 1, 2, and 10 of each treatment period. Five-day fecal wet weight was higher after the PDX and SCF treatments than the LFC treatment (P ≤ 0.0007). The number of stools per day and daily fecal output also were significantly greater during the PDX treatment compared with the LFC treatment. The whole gut transit time did not differ among treatments. The PDX treatment resulted in a softer stool (P = 0.002) than the SCF and LFC treatments. Fecal pH was lowered by the PDX treatment (P = 0.02), whereas SCF tended to lower it compared with the LFC treatment (P = 0.07). When the participants consumed PDX and SCF, they reported significantly more flatulence and borborygmi compared with when they consumed the LFC. Consumption of PDX and SCF at a dose of 20 g/d results in a mild laxative effect with nominal gastrointestinal tolerance issues.

  5. Aspects of UN Activities on the International Protection of Women's Rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Maftei

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Human rights and their protection represent the regulation object of a major part of all the legal rules encompassing the international public law. The Members’ efforts to protect women's rights and to promote gender equality have resulted in the adoption of important documents, fundamental to all mankind. In the light of these international regulations, States have assumed obligations and they have created mechanisms to achieve them. Through the analytical approach we have highlighted the activities of the United Nations and international bodies for protecting women's rights and gender equality in all sectors of public and private life. In preparing this article we used as research methods the analysis of problems generated by the subject in question with reference to the doctrinal views expressed in the Treaties and specialized articles, documentary research, interpretation of legal norms in the field.

  6. Balloon atrial septostomy through internal jugular vein in a 45-day-old child with transposition of great arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padhi Sumanta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Balloon atrial septostomy is a common palliative procedure in D-transposition of great arteries. It is technically easy before 2-3 weeks of age when the septum primum is thin. Femoral vein or umbilical vein, when available, is the common access used for this procedure. In situations when these accesses are not available or in case of inferior vena cava interruption, trans-hepatic access is used. Internal jugular vein (IJV access is not used as it is difficult to enter the left atrium through this route. We describe a case of successful Balloon atrial septostomy done through IJV in a 45-day-old child with emphasis on the technique, hardware and precautions necessary during the procedure.

  7. Women in International Policing: Replacing an “Old Boys Club”?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saskia Hufnagel

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Globalisation has increased the importance of international police cooperation. While cross-border law enforcement can be traced back as far as the Nineteenth Century, police cooperation today—such as Joint Investigation Teams, International Liaison Officers, and Interpol—only came about in the Twentieth Century. It was developed to counter transnational organised crime, such as drug crime and immigration crime, as well as terrorism. But, another aspect of international policing is that of peacekeeping; that is, the deployment of national police to countries during or after conflict to maintain law and order where the local police do not have sufficient capacities. This paper examines how women have been elevated in this police cooperation role, particularly Interpol and international peacekeeping. The discussion focuses on whether there are indications that internationally related tasks and agencies provide a more accepting environment for female police officers as opposed to a national police force setting.

  8. Effect of a 21 day Daniel Fast on metabolic and cardiovascular disease risk factors in men and women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bloomer Richard J

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dietary modification via caloric restriction is associated with multiple effects related to improved metabolic and cardiovascular health. However, a mandated reduction in kilocalories is not well-tolerated by many individuals, limiting the long-term application of such a plan. The Daniel Fast is a widely utilized fast based on the Biblical book of Daniel. It involves a 21 day ad libitum food intake period, devoid of animal products and preservatives, and inclusive of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, nuts, and seeds. The purpose of the present study was to determine the efficacy of the Daniel Fast to improve markers of metabolic and cardiovascular disease risk. Methods 43 subjects (13 men; 30 women; 35 ± 1 yrs; range: 20-62 yrs completed a 21 day period of modified food intake in accordance with detailed guidelines provided by investigators. All subjects purchased and prepared their own food. Following initial screening, subjects were given one week to prepare for the fast, after which time they reported to the lab for their pre-intervention assessment (day 1. After the 21 day fast, subjects reported to the lab for their post-intervention assessment (day 22. For both visits, subjects reported in a 12 hr fasted state, performing no strenuous physical activity during the preceding 24-48 hrs. At each visit, mental and physical health (SF-12 form, resting heart rate and blood pressure, and anthropometric variables were measured. Blood was collected for determination of complete blood count, metabolic panel, lipid panel, insulin, HOMA-IR, and C-reactive protein (CRP. Subjects' self-reported compliance, mood, and satiety in relation to the fast were also recorded. Diet records were maintained by all subjects during the 7 day period immediately prior to the fast (usual intake and during the final 7 days of the fast. Results Subjects' compliance to the fast was 98.7 ± 0.2% (mean ± SEM. Using a 10 point scale, subjects

  9. Paying for Prejudice: A Report on Midlife and Older Women in America's Labor Force. 1991 Mother's Day Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Christine L.; Koblenz, Esther

    Although midlife and older women comprise an increasing portion of the work force, gains in work force participation will not mean a decent living, security, or equal opportunity in the workplace of the future. Several factors influence the wage gap for older women: higher education does not mean higher earnings; women are less likely than men to…

  10. International population and development: the United Nations' Cairo Action Plan for women's health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, M; Proctor, S; Regev, H; Barnes, D; Sawyer, L; Messias, D; Yoder, L; Meleis, A I

    1996-01-01

    The report of the International Conference on Population and Development (Cairo Action Document) was sponsored by 180 national governments and 1,200 nongovernmental organizations during the United Nations' conference on women, population, and development in Cairo, Egypt 1994. Many international conferences preceded the one in Cairo but it was there that women participated at an unprecedented level in shaping the debate. The resulting document represents a quantum leap for women's health. Nurses can play a major role in using the principles in the Cairo Action Document by empowering women and enhancing their health care. To invite dialogue, the authors provide an analysis of the Cairo Plan from a nursing perspective and identify three paradoxes that may hinder progress: Universal values and local cultures, global policy and local implementation, and national development and women's empowerment. Clinicians, scholars, and members of professional organizations are asked to consider the assumptions that underlie the recommendations for action and to propose ways to resolve the problems that may evolve during implementation.

  11. First childbirth experience of international marriage migrant women in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Min Sun; Park, Minna; Kim, Jung A

    2017-08-01

    Since the mid-1990s, a large number of foreign women have migrated from developing countries to South Korea by means of international marriages. These nulliparous foreign women may experience more difficulties in pregnancy and childbirth than native Koreans. This study aimed to describe the meaning of the first childbirth experiences of international marriage migrant women marrying Korean men in South Korea. This is a descriptive phenomenological study that included 10 participants using the purposive and snowball sampling in one multicultural support center in Seoul, South Korea. Colaizzi's data analysis method was used to inductively determine themes and formulate meanings. The meanings of first childbirth were categorized into four themes-'coming to a crisis,' 'depending on others,' 'searching for solutions,' and 'strengthening family unity.' Inadequate antenatal care is associated with obstacles such as language barriers, social isolation, lack of knowledge, different midwifery practice and dependent lifestyle. Meanwhile, their children were a source of energy for the women to fulfill their emotional needs and improve family relationships. Childbirth is a life-changing event for these women, in which they face challenges as well as opportunities to develop new coping skills and a new role identity in their family. It is important for healthcare providers and policy makers to identify obstacles and unmet needs to improve maternity care in light of the distinctive challenges of immigrant living in multicultural families. Copyright © 2017 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. International Active Surveillance Study of Women Taking Oral Contraceptives (INAS-OC Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assmann Anita

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A 24-day regimen of contraceptive doses of drospirenone and ethinylestradiol (DRSP/EE 24d was recently launched. This regimen has properties which may be beneficial for certain user populations (e.g., women suffering from premenstrual dysphoric disorder or acne. However, it is unknown whether this extended regimen has an impact on the cardiovascular risk associated with the use of oral contraceptives (OCs. The INternational Active Surveillance study of women taking Oral Contraceptives (INAS-OC is designed to investigate the short- and long-term safety of the new regimen in a population which is representative for the typical user of oral contraceptives. Methods/Design A large, prospective, controlled, non-interventional, long-term cohort study with active surveillance of the study participants has been chosen to ensure reliable and valid results. More than 2,000 gynecologists in the US and 5 European countries (Austria, Germany, Italy, Poland, and Sweden will recruit more than 80,000 OC users. The two to five year follow-up of these women will result in at least 220,000 documented women-years. The main clinical outcomes of interest for the follow-up are deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, acute myocardial infarction and cerebrovascular accidents. Secondary objectives are general safety, effectiveness and drug utilization pattern of DRSP/EE 24d, return to fertility after stop of OC use, as well as the baseline risk for users of individual OC formulations. Because of the non-interference character of this study, potential participants (first-time users or switchers are informed about the study only after the decision regarding prescription of a new OC. There are no specific medical inclusion or exclusion criteria. Study participation is voluntary and a written informed consent is required. After the baseline questionnaire, follow-up questionnaires will be mailed to the participants every 6 months for up to 5 years after

  13. A day to celebrate

    CERN Multimedia

    Laëtitia Pedroso

    2010-01-01

    After several weeks of preparations and hard work on the part of many people, the events to mark International Women's Day at CERN on 8 March were a genuine success. They were followed with great interest by the outside world, judging by the flurry of activity on twitter, various blogs and the media coverage they generated.   Women on shift in the CERN control rooms. Women were overwhelmingly in the majority at the controls of the experiments and accelerators throughout the day, as well as acting as the guides for all official visits. There was no shortage of enthusiasm! "I'm very happy that CERN has supported the project, and I'm especially encouraged by the enthusiastic response from everyone who's taken part", says Pauline Gagnon, a physicist from the Indiana University group and a member of the ATLAS collaboration, who was behind the idea. "I hope that this kind of initiative will help to show that women have a place in science and that young women thinkin...

  14. [Women are human: Brief guide on international human rights law for psychiatrists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobredo, Laura D

    2017-07-01

    Violence against women has gained public awareness in Argentina over the last few years. As any other social phenomena, gender violence is present in the work of psychiatrists, especially in the way they approach to clinical practice. International human rights' law enshrines the right of every women to live free from violence and to be treated with dignity and respect. This legal framework might nourish the practice of psychiatrists as a proposal for seeking cultural and social common grounds. The paper tries to get readers attention on the potentiality of this legal framework which ultimately, might in?uence not only everyday life but clinical practice as well.

  15. Delphi survey of international pharmacology experts: an attempt to derive international recommendations for use of medicine in breastfeeding women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Lisa H; Ryan, Kath; Barnett, Clare

    2015-04-01

    There are currently no common guidelines used by health professionals to aid decision-making around the use of medicines during breastfeeding. Several specialized books, Web sites, and drug information services exist; however, all use slightly different criteria to derive their "safety hierarchy." The aim of this study was to build consensus among international experts in pharmacology and breastfeeding to develop an agreed-upon classification system for safety of medicine use in breastfeeding women. A three-round Web-based Delphi qualitative research design was used. Seventeen experts in pharmacy/pharmacology and breastfeeding identified 15 key parameters that are used to inform decisions about medicines and breastfeeding. The most important parameters about the infant were the age and health of the child, and those of the medicine were the safety profile and experience of use in infants. The experts had a clear understanding of the complexity of decision-making when prescribing for breastfeeding women. Although the current number or letter classification systems do not incorporate important considerations such as infant age, a longer "descriptive text" incorporating all considerations may be impractical in busy clinical practice. Although clinicians and lay people would appreciate a simple classification scheme, in practice, decision-making about the safety of medicines for breastfeeding women is complex.

  16. Beauty and Body dissatisfaction experienced by young Indian women exposed to foreign print advertisements found in International fashion Magazines targeted at women.

    OpenAIRE

    Batra, Radhika

    2007-01-01

    This dissertation has been greatly concerned with the impact of the advertising images in international mass media, mainly women�s fashion magazines. Three advertisements, two from Cosmopolitan and one from Elle magazine, United Kingdom were used in order to test the impact of beauty and body image concerns in young Indian women. Literature has mainly concentrated on the portrayal of white women as advertising and cultural stereotypes in a global environment. Many studies have revealed t...

  17. Literature review: Afghanistan women's health crisis, health service delivery, and ethical issues for international aid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Helen

    2006-09-01

    The literature indicates that the health of women in Afghanistan is poor. In 1997 maternal mortality in Afghanistan was one of the worst in the world. Difficulties in establishing health services revolve around fundamentalist Islamic ideas and ongoing violence within Afghanistan. The literature holds advice on key behaviours for health professionals who may chose to work in Afghanistan. The literature also identifies the local level action that is occurring as the issue of women's health is recognised. Humanitarian assistance has been provided, with international aid agencies having to weigh the ethical responsibilities they hold and one agency tragically facing the violent loss of its own staff. Easy answers are not in the literature, merely an opportunity to understand, consider, and take action about what is facing women in Afghanistan and those who try to help.

  18. Peran International Organization For Migration dalam Menanggulangi Masalah Women Trafficking di India (2008-2013)

    OpenAIRE

    Fachri, Yuli; Elfitriani, Yori

    2015-01-01

    This research aims to find out the role of International Organization for Migration (IOM) against women trafficking in India. IOM started its operations in India in the year 2001 to provide emergency relief in Gujarat when it was hit by an earthquake. While implementing the project in Gujarat, IOM was planning to expand its operations in India, it decided to work on the counter trafficking issue which was one of its mandated service areas. IOM, in close collaboration with Ministry of Overseas...

  19. Empire, internationalism, and the campaign against the traffic in women and children in the 1920s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    This article assesses the inter-war campaign against trafficking in women and children, with a particular focus on the leading role played by British and British-dominated voluntary associations. This humanitarian campaign was conducted by social relief organizations such as the Association for Moral and Social Hygiene (AMSH) and the International Bureau for the Suppression of the Traffic in Women and Children (IBSTWC). While organized opposition to trafficking in persons was not new, these groups consciously 'internationalized' their advocacy and lobbying efforts in the 1920s and 1930s. Although their work against trafficking in the Straits Settlements, or the prostitution rings operating in the Mediterranean, was driven in part by the desire to protect Britain's national prestige, their moral impetus and their cooperation with non-British bodies reflected wider international concerns. The article also explores the use of public diplomacy as a new political tool, with a particular focus on the public-private cooperation evident in the League of Nations' work to combat the trade. Finally, the article advances some conclusions as to why British women's political organizations in particular were some of the earliest 'internationalists', how successful internationalists were in combating transnational social problems, and to what extent inter-war internationalists established a precedent for the subsequent growth of international social relief organizations.

  20. Increased seroprevalence of IgG-class antibodies against cytomegalovirus, parvovirus B19, and varicella-zoster virus in women working in child day care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijckevorsel, Gini G. C.; Bovee, Lian P. M. J.; Damen, Marjolein; Sonder, Gerard J. B.; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F.; van den Hoek, Anneke

    2012-01-01

    Background: Primary maternal infection with cytomegalovirus (CMV), parvovirus B19 (B19V), and varicella-zoster virus (VZV) may result in adverse pregnancy outcomes like congenital infection or foetal loss. Women working in child day care have an increased exposure to CMV, B19V, and VZV. By comparing

  1. Low levels of breast cancer risk awareness in young women: an international survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacey, Victoria; Steptoe, Andrew; Davídsdóttir, Sigurlína; Baban, Adriana; Wardle, Jane

    2006-10-01

    At least a fifth of breast cancer cases in Western countries are likely to be due to modifiable lifestyle factors. Previous work has found that while women in Western countries are aware that breast cancer can be hereditary, their knowledge of the influence of lifestyle is poor. This survey investigated on the awareness of breast cancer risk factors in university students from 23 countries between 1999 and 2001. Data were collected on awareness of links with heredity, alcohol use, exercise, obesity, stress, smoking and diet. Almost a third of women were not aware that any of these factors influenced breast cancer. Just 57% were aware of the genetic link and fewer than 1 in 20 women correctly identified alcohol, exercise or obesity as factors influencing breast cancer. Stress and smoking were the most commonly chosen lifestyle risk factors although current data suggest that they have little actual impact on breast cancer risk. There was considerable international variation, with highest levels of awareness in students in the United States of America (USA). Knowledge of risk in this sample was poorer than previously observed in older women. Health messages concerning cancer in general may be more relevant for this age group, because of the lower salience of breast cancer for younger women.

  2. An open-label study of the effects of a 24-day regimen of gestodene 60 microg/ethinylestradiol 15 microg on endometrial histological findings in healthy women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterbaan, H P

    1999-11-01

    This open-label, non-comparative study was conducted at a single center to evaluate the effects on the endometrium of a 24-day regimen of a combined oral contraceptive containing gestodene (GTD) 60 microg and ethinylestradiol (EE) 15 microg. Healthy parous women who were > or = 18 years old and had had regular menstrual cycles for the prior 3 months were randomly assigned to one of two groups. Subjects in group A underwent endometrial biopsies during the late luteal phase of the pretreatment cycle and between days 15 and 24 of cycle 6. Subjects in group B had biopsies between days 15 and 24 of cycle 3 and during the late luteal phase of the post-treatment cycle. GTD 60 microg/EE 15 microg was taken for the first 24 days of a 28-day cycle, followed by placebo pills for 4 days, for a total of six cycles. Data from 27 women were included in the analyses. Eleven of the 13 evaluable baseline biopsies were classified as secretory. Three of nine subjects with evaluable biopsies at cycle 3 and four of nine subjects with evaluable biopsies at cycle 6 had an atrophic endometrium. Post-treatment biopsies showed a typical secretory endometrium in seven of 11 subjects with evaluable biopsies. The results of this study show that the 24-day regimen of GTD 60 microg/EE 15 microg produced effective endometrial suppression.

  3. Women with congenital factor VII deficiency: clinical phenotype and treatment options from two international studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napolitano, M; Di Minno, M N D; Batorova, A; Dolce, A; Giansily-Blaizot, M; Ingerslev, J; Schved, J-F; Auerswald, G; Kenet, G; Karimi, M; Shamsi, T; Ruiz de Sáez, A; Dolatkhah, R; Chuansumrit, A; Bertrand, M A; Mariani, G

    2016-09-01

    A paucity of data exists on the incidence, diagnosis and treatment of bleeding in women with inherited factor VII (FVII) deficiency. Here we report results of a comprehensive analysis from two international registries of patients with inherited FVII deficiency, depicting the clinical picture of this disorder in women and describing any gender-related differences. A comprehensive analysis of two fully compatible, international registries of patients with inherited FVII deficiency (International Registry of Factor VII deficiency, IRF7; Seven Treatment Evaluation Registry, STER) was performed. In our cohort (N = 449; 215 male, 234 female), the higher prevalence of mucocutaneous bleeds in females strongly predicted ensuing gynaecological bleeding (hazard ratio = 12.8, 95% CI 1.68-97.6, P = 0.014). Menorrhagia was the most prevalent type of bleeding (46.4% of patients), and was the presentation symptom in 12% of cases. Replacement therapies administered were also analysed. For surgical procedures (n = 50), a receiver operator characteristic analysis showed that the minimal first dose of rFVIIa to avoid postsurgical bleeding during the first 24 hours was 22 μg kg(-1) , and no less than two administrations. Prophylaxis was reported in 25 women with excellent or effective outcomes when performed with a total weekly rFVIIa dose of 90 μg kg(-1) (divided as three doses). Women with FVII deficiency have a bleeding disorder mainly characterized by mucocutaneous bleeds, which predicts an increased risk of ensuing gynaecological bleeding. Systematic replacement therapy or long-term prophylaxis with rFVIIa may reduce the impact of menorrhagia on the reproductive system, iron loss and may avoid unnecessary hysterectomies. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. All quiet on election day? International election observation and incentives for pre-election violence in African elections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daxecker, U.E.

    2014-01-01

    This article argues that the increasing international interest in elections as exemplified by the rise of international election monitoring induces temporal shifts in the use of violent intimidation by political actors. The presence of international electoral missions lowers the potential for

  5. Social integration and heath policy issues for international marriage migrant women in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Sil

    2010-01-01

    Until very recently, Korea was largely considered to be a homogenous, racially intolerant country that had little or no experience with large-scale immigration. However, this paradigm is in the process of changing. For the first time in the country's history, large numbers of foreigners are immigrating to work and live in Korea, and many are seeking to become Koreans. In particular, international marriage migrations, especially those of women entering the country through marriages to Korean men, have become common in South Korea. This has given rise to serious challenges within the country. Although conventional ideologies portray Korea as a country of a single race, culture, and language, the growing number of immigrants has disrupted this homogenous monoculture. Indeed, there are signs that Korea has reached a turning point, with an increasingly permanent and visible migrant population challenging the country's national identity. This article explores the statistics and trends related to international marriage migrant women in South Korea, particularly in terms of their social insecurities and health-related problems. In addition, some aspects of Korean governmental policies for the social integration and health promotion of these women are examined, and some suggestions are made for ways in which public health nursing and nursing education may be changed in response to the current trends. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Evaluation and management of acute menorrhagia in women with and without underlying bleeding disorders: consensus from an international expert panel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    James, Andra H.; Kouides, Peter A.; Abdul-Kadir, Rezan; Dietrich, Jennifer E.; Edlund, Mans; Federici, Augusto B.; Halimeh, Susan; Kamphuisen, Pieter Willem; Lee, Christine A.; Martínez-Perez, Oscar; McLintock, Claire; Peyvandi, Flora; Philipp, Claire; Wilkinson, Jeffrey; Winikoff, Rochelle

    2011-01-01

    Acute menorrhagia is a common gynecological disorder. Prevalence is high among women with inherited bleeding disorders and recent guidance for optimal management is lacking. Following a comprehensive review of the literature, an international expert panel in obstetrics, gynecology and hematology

  7. Two-day fasting evokes stress, but does not affect mood, brain activity, cognitive, psychomotor, and motor performance in overweight women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solianik, Rima; Sujeta, Artūras

    2018-02-15

    The physiological, cognitive state, and motor behavior changes that occur during acute fasting are not completely understood. Thus, the aim of this study was to estimate the effect of 2-day total fasting on evoked stress, mood, brain activity, and cognitive, psychomotor, and motor function in overweight women. Eleven overweight women (body mass index above 25kg/m 2 ) aged 20-30 years were tested under two conditions allocated randomly: 2-day zero-calorie diet with water provided ad libitum and 2-day usual diet. One week before the experiment, aerobic fitness was evaluated. Subjective stress ratings in relation to the diet, autonomic function, prefrontal cortex activity, cognitive performance, psychomotor coordination, and grip strength were evaluated before and after each diet. The study demonstrated that fasting decreased log-transformed high-frequency (HF) power, without affecting heart rate. The relative maximum oxygen uptake was negatively correlated with subjective stress rating and changes in log-transformed HF. Fasting did not affect mood, brain activity, and cognitive, motor, and psychomotor performance. Thus, 2-day total fasting evoked moderate stress with a shift of the autonomic nervous system balance toward sympathetic activity in overweight women. Better aerobic endurance is likely to facilitate the capacity for dealing with acute fasting. Regardless of the evoked stress, cognitive state and motor behavior remained intact. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Just a Book in a Library? The Sybil Campbell Library Collection Fostering International Friendship amongst Graduate Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    In 1927 the British Federation of University Women (BFUW) established Crosby Hall in London as a hall of residence for women graduates from overseas. The Federation aimed to foster international understanding and peace at a time of social and political turmoil. Accessions to the library at the Hall were on a somewhat ad hoc basis and provide an…

  9. International careers and career success of Indian women in science & technology : The importance of career capital and organizational capital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valk, R.; van der Velde, E.G.; van Engen, Marloes

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a study on international careers and career success of Indian women in Science & Technology (S&T). We conducted interviews with 30 (upper) middle class Indian women in New Delhi and Bangalore (India) who pursued careers abroad as self-initiated expatriates (SIEs). Important

  10. Risk factors for preterm birth in an international prospective cohort of nulliparous women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustaaf Albert Dekker

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To identify risk factors for spontaneous preterm birth (birth <37 weeks gestation with intact membranes (SPTB-IM and SPTB after prelabour rupture of the membranes (SPTB-PPROM for nulliparous pregnant women. DESIGN: Prospective international multicentre cohort. PARTICIPANTS: 3234 healthy nulliparous women with a singleton pregnancy, follow up was complete in 3184 of participants (98.5%. RESULTS: Of the 3184 women, 156 (4.9% had their pregnancy complicated by SPTB; 96 (3.0% and 60 (1.9% in the SPTB-IM and SPTB-PPROM categories, respectively. Independent risk factors for SPTB-IM were shorter cervical length, abnormal uterine Doppler flow, use of marijuana pre-pregnancy, lack of overall feeling of well being, being of Caucasian ethnicity, having a mother with diabetes and/or a history of preeclampsia, and a family history of low birth weight babies. Independent risk factors for SPTB-PPROM were shorter cervical length, short stature, participant's not being the first born in the family, longer time to conceive, not waking up at night, hormonal fertility treatment (excluding clomiphene, mild hypertension, family history of recurrent gestational diabetes, and maternal family history of any miscarriage (risk reduction. Low BMI (<20 nearly doubled the risk for SPTB-PPROM (odds ratio 2.64; 95% CI 1.07-6.51. The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC, after internal validation, was 0.69 for SPTB-IM and 0.79 for SPTB-PPROM. CONCLUSION: The ability to predict PTB in healthy nulliparous women using clinical characteristics is modest. The dissimilarity of risk factors for SPTB-IM compared with SPTB-PPROM indicates different pathophysiological pathways underlie these distinct phenotypes. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ACTR.org.au ACTRN12607000551493.

  11. The Interrelations Between Internalized Homophobia, Depressive Symptoms, and Suicidal Ideation Among Australian Gay Men, Lesbians, and Bisexual Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Internalized homophobia has been linked to depression among gay men, lesbians, and bisexuals. Relatively little research has investigated the link between internalized homophobia and suicidal thoughts and behaviors. The current research investigated the interrelations among internalized homophobia, depressive symptoms, and suicidal ideation by testing additive, mediation, and moderation models. Self-identified Australian gay men (n = 360), lesbians (n = 444), and bisexual women (n = 114) completed the Internalized Homophobia Scale, the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale, and the suicide subscale of the General Health Questionnaire. Results supported the additive and partial mediation models for gay men and the mediation and moderation models for lesbians. None of the models were supported for bisexual women. The findings imply that clinicians should focus on reducing internalized homophobia and depressive symptoms among gay men and lesbians, and depressive symptoms among bisexual women, to reduce suicidal ideation.

  12. Evolution of activities in international biological standardization since the early days of the Health Organisation of the League of Nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizaret, P

    1988-01-01

    The main activities in international biological standardization during the 18 years that followed the first international biological standardization meeting in London in 1921 were concerned with expressing the potencies of test preparations in comparison with reference materials. After the Second World War, however, it became clear that the testing of biological substances against international reference materials was only one among several measures for obtaining safe and potent products. The activities in international biological standardization were therefore widened so that, by the strict observance of specific manufacturing and control requirements, it was possible to gain further in safety and efficacy. At the end of 1987, 42 international requirements for biological substances were available and were being used as national requirements, sometimes after minor modification, by the majority of WHO's Member States. This is of utmost importance for the worldwide use of safe and potent biological products, including vaccines.

  13. The sexual and reproductive rights of internally displaced women: the embodiment of Colombia's crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzate, Mónica M

    2008-03-01

    As of 30 June 2006, more than 3.5 million Colombians are internally displaced persons (IDPs), the second largest IDP population in the world after that of Sudan. While most IDP studies treat the plight of internally displaced women (IDW) as an isolated phenomenon, this paper demonstrates that their situation reflects Colombia's chronic cultural, political and socio-economic crisis. This paper uses a sexual and reproductive rights framework to establish a connection between IDW and Colombia's culture of violence, discrimination and inequality. The effects of this culture of violence, discrimination and inequality are highlighted during a discussion of the rights to health, reproduction, privacy, physical integrity, education, and freedom from violence and sexual exploitation. This paper argues that a holistic understanding of Colombia's humanitarian emergency is essential to improving the lives of IDPs. It ends with some concrete, short-term recommendations to meet some of the needs of IDPs and other vulnerable populations.

  14. Investigating the widely held belief that men and women with learning disabilities receive poor quality healthcare when admitted to hospital: a single-site study of 30-day readmission rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, C L; Thomson, K; Wagner, A P; Waters, J P; Thompson, A; Jones, S; Holland, A J; Redley, M

    2015-09-01

    This study aims to use 30-day readmission rates to investigate the presumption that men and women with learning disabilities (LDs, known internationally as intellectual disabilities) receive poorer quality hospital care than their non-disabled peers. A 12-month retrospective audit was conducted using Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) at a single acute hospital in the East of England. This identified all in-patient admissions; admissions where the person concerned was recognised as having a LD; and all emergency readmissions within 30 days of discharge. Additionally, the healthcare records of all patients identified as having a LD and readmitted within 30 days as a medical emergency were examined in order to determine whether or not these readmissions were potentially preventable. Over the study period, a total of 66 870 adults were admitted as in-patients, among whom 7408 were readmitted as medical emergencies within 30 days of discharge: a readmission rate of 11%. Of these 66 870 patients, 256 were identified as having a LD, with 32 of them experiencing at least one emergency readmission within 30 days: a readmission rate of 13%. When examined, the healthcare records pertaining to these 32 patients who had a total of 39 unique 30-day readmissions revealed that 69% (n = 26) of these readmissions were potentially preventable. Although overall readmission rates were similar for patients with LDs and those from the general population, patients with LDs had a much higher rate of potentially preventable readmissions when compared to a general population estimate from van Walraven et al. This suggests that there is still work to be done to ensure that this patient population receives hospital care that is both safe and of high quality. © 2015 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Internalized racism, body fat distribution, and abnormal fasting glucose among African-Caribbean women in Dominica, West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Cleve; Tull, Eugene S; Chambers, Earle C; Taylor, Jerome

    2002-03-01

    The current study examined the relationship of internalized racism to glucose intolerance in a population of Afro-Caribbean women aged 18 to 55. Also of interest was whether this relationship would be differentially influenced by the type of body fat distribution or confounded by the level of hostility. A total of 244 women were selected from a systematic sample of households on the island of Dominica, West Indies. Demographic data together with information on internalized racism were collected by questionnaire. Anthropometric information and fasting blood glucose were also measured. Women with high levels of internalized racism exhibited an increased risk of elevated fasting glucose compared to those with low levels of internalized racism (odds ratio (OR) = 2.4; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.1-5.5). There was no difference in mean body mass index (BMI) by level of internalized racism. However those with high internalized racism had a significantly larger waist circumference after adjusting for age, education, hostility, and elevated fasting glucose status. In multivariate analyses controlling for age, education, hostility, and either weight or BMI, internalized racism remained independently associated with elevated fasting glucose. However, once waist circumference was included in the model, the relationship of internalized racism to elevated fasting glucose was not statistically significant. This study demonstrates a significant relationship between internalized racism and abnormal levels of fasting glucose which may be mediated through abdominal fat. The exact nature of the relationship of internalized racism to glucose intolerance may be an important area of future study.

  16. COPING AS A MEDIATOR OF INTERNALIZED HOMOPHOBIA AND PSYCHOLOGICAL DISTRESS AMONG YOUNG ADULT SEXUAL MINORITY WOMEN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaysen, Debra; Kulesza, Magdalena; Balsam, Kimberly F; Rhew, Isaac C; Blayney, Jessica A; Lehavot, Keren; Hughes, Tonda L

    2014-09-01

    Sexual minorities have higher rates of depression and anxiety than their heterosexual counterparts. This elevated risk of psychological distress has generally been hypothesized to be a result of the effects of discrimination including internalized negative beliefs about sexual minorities. However, little research has examined the role of various types of coping in mediating between internalized homophobia and mental health. We tested the direct relationship between internalized homophobia and psychological distress and evaluated general and sexual minority-specific coping strategies as potential mediators using structural equation modeling. Data are from a national sample of 1,099 young adult sexual minority women who were on average 20.86 ( SD = 2.12) years old, participating in a study on mental health and substance use. The model demonstrated acceptable fit, χ 2 (83) = 402.9, p homophobia and psychological distress, sexual minority-specific coping did not. Our findings support previous studies that have demonstrated the impact of internalized homophobia on psychological distress as well as the role of coping as a protective/risk factor in this relationship.

  17. An individually randomized controlled trial to determine the effectiveness of the Women for Women International Programme in reducing intimate partner violence and strengthening livelihoods amongst women in Afghanistan: trial design, methods and baseline findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Andrew; Corboz, Julienne; Shafiq, Mohammed; Marofi, Frozan; Mecagni, Anna; Mann, Carron; Karim, Fazal; Chirwa, Esnat; Maxwell-Jones, Charlotte; Jewkes, Rachel

    2018-01-22

    Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) is the most common form of violence in conflict and post-conflict settings, but there are few evaluations of interventions to prevent IPV in such settings. The Women for Women International (WfWI) intervention is a year-long combined economic and social empowerment intervention for marginalized women survivors of conflict. Primarily, it seeks to support women to achieve four key outcomes: women earn and save money; women improve their health and well-being; women influence decisions in their homes and communities; women connect to networks for support. The organization recognizes Violence Against Women and Girls (VAWG) as a significant barrier to women's empowerment and expects to see reduction in VAWG, and specifically IPV, as part of building women's social and economic empowerment. This program is being quantitatively evaluated through an individually randomized control trial amongst women in Afghanistan, with a 24-month follow up. A comparison of baseline characteristics of participants is also included as well as a discussion of implementation of the baseline research. There is a high demand amongst Afghan women for such interventions, and this posed challenges in completing the randomization and baseline. In addition, the complex security situation in Afghanistan also posed challenges. However, despite these issues, recruitment was successfully achieved and the arms were balanced on socio-demographic measures. The evaluation will contribute to the limited evidence base on interventions to prevent IPV in conflict-affected settings. NCT03236948 . Registered 28 July 2017, retrospectively registered.

  18. Barriers to Women in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Rosemary

    2013-01-01

    The Presiding Officer of the National Assembly for Wales, Rosemary Butler AM, has put the issue of barriers to women in public life at the top of the political agenda in Wales. She has held sessions with women across Wales to find out what those barriers are and how they can be tackled. On International Women's Day in February, she invited…

  19. Networking among women snowboarders: a study of participants at an International Woman Snowboard Camp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisjord, M K

    2012-02-01

    The article focuses on women snowboarders' networking and relationships with national snowboard associations and commercial organizers. The study was conducted at an International Women Snowboard Camp, which attracted women snowboarders from five different countries. A qualitative interview was undertaken with participants from each country, eight in total, plus an interview with one of the organizers (a woman). The results indicate that participants from the Nordic countries adopt a more proactive stand to promote snowboarding by organizing specific groups in relation to national associations, particularly the Norwegians and the Finnish. Furthermore, some collaboration across national boarders appeared. The only Swedish participant was associated with several snowboarding communities; whereas the Italian (only one) and the Latvian snowboarders had links with commercial organizers, apparently male dominated in structure. The findings are discussed in the light of Castells' network theory and identity construction in social movements, and gender perspectives. The participants' doing/undoing gender reveals different strategies in negotiating hegemonic masculinity and the power structure in the organizations. Narratives from the Nordic participants reflect undoing gender that impacts on identity constructions in terms of project and/or resistance identity. The Italians and Latvians seemingly do gender while undertaking a subordinate position in the male-dominated structure. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. A comparison of methods used for quantifying internal training load in women soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexiou, Helen; Coutts, Aaron J

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the session-RPE method for quantifying internal training load (TL) with various HR-based TL quantification methods in a variety of training modes with women soccer players. Fifteen elite women soccer players took part in the study (age: 19.3 +/- 2.0 y and VO2max: 50.8 +/- 2.7 mL x kg(-1) x min(-1)). Session-RPE, heart rate, and duration were recorded for 735 individual training sessions and matches over a period of 16 wk. Correlation analysis was used to compare session-RPE TLs with three commonly used HR-based methods for assessing TL. The mean correlation for session-RPE TL with Banister's TRIMP, LTzone TL and Edwards's TL were (r = 0.84, 0.83, and 0.85, all P soccer. Higher correlations were found with less intermittent, aerobic-based training sessions and suggest that HR-based TLs relate better to session-RPE TLs in less intermittent training activities. These results support previous findings showing that the session-RPE TL compares favorably with HR-based methods for quantifying internal TL in a variety of soccer training activities.

  1. WATER POLO GAME-RELATED STATISTICS IN WOMEN'S INTERNATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS: DIFFERENCES AND DISCRIMINATORY POWER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Escalante

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were (i to compare women's water polo game-related statistics by match outcome (winning and losing teams and phase (preliminary, classificatory, and semi-final/bronze medal/gold medal, and (ii identify characteristics that discriminate performances for each phase. The game-related statistics of the 124 women's matches played in five International Championships (World and European Championships were analyzed. Differences between winning and losing teams in each phase were determined using the chi-squared. A discriminant analysis was then performed according to context in each of the three phases. It was found that the game-related statistics differentiate the winning from the losing teams in each phase of an international championship. The differentiating variables were both offensive (centre goals, power-play goals, counterattack goal, assists, offensive fouls, steals, blocked shots, and won sprints and defensive (goalkeeper-blocked shots, goalkeeper-blocked inferiority shots, and goalkeeper-blocked 5-m shots. The discriminant analysis showed the game-related statistics to discriminate performance in all phases: preliminary, classificatory, and final phases (92%, 90%, and 83%, respectively. Two variables were discriminatory by match outcome (winning or losing teams in all three phases: goals and goalkeeper-blocked shots

  2. Immunophenotypic profiles of peripheral blood lymphocytes on the day of embryo transfer in women undergoing in vitro fertilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Baczkowski

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of different types of lymphocyte subpopulations in the peripheral blood has unknown and controversial significance in diagnosis of infertility. The aim of the study was to evaluate selected blood lymphocytes in patients treated with intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS
    women were divided into three groups: (1 control fertile group (n=18, (2 infertile women that achieved (n=32, and (3 did not achieve a pregnancy after ICSI (n=26. The following types of leukocytes were analyzed by three-colour flow cytometry by detection of specific CD antigens: lymphocytes T (CD3+, B (CD19+ and CD5+CD19+, T and B (CD5+, NK cells (CD56+CD16-, CD56-CD16+, CD56+CD16+, CD56brightCD16-, CD56dimCD16+. Additionally, the antigen of early activation (CD69 was evaluated on T, B and NK cells. The results were presented as a percentage and total counts of all lymphocytes.

    RESULTS
    The percentage of total NK cells (CD56+CD16+, CD56+CD16- and CD56-CD16+ did not differ between pregnant and non pregnant women and was lower comparing to control group. Fractions of CD56-CD16+ cells were higher in pregnant vs. non-pregnant women. The percentages of CD56brightCD16- NK cells were higher in control group comparing to both ICSI treated groups. Other fractions of lymphocyte subpopulations, including activated cells (with CD69 expression did not differ between the analyzed groups. Total counts of CD56-CD16+ cells were higher in pregnant vs. non-pregnant group, and the CD56brightCD16- cells was more abundant in control group vs. women with unsuccessful ICSI.

    CONCLUSIONS
    Testing of peripheral blood NK cells and the others lymphocytes has limited value as a prognostic factor in ICSI treated patients. The antigen of early lymphocytic activation (CD69 has not any predictive value in prognosis of ICSI outcome.

  3. Effect of a 91 day long stay in weightlessness on the International Space Station on mouse skin physiology

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Comparitive gene expression in skin between mice maintained in microgravity (0g) and normogravity (1g) environment. Six male C57Bl/J10 mice were housed for 91 days...

  4. The effects of modified alternate-day fasting diet on weight loss and CAD risk factors in overweight and obese women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eshghinia Samira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity is a worldwide health problem with increasing prevalence. Decrease in energy intake has been shown to lower the risk of coronary artery disease in obese subjects. The common form of dietary restriction is daily calorie restriction (CR. Another form is alternate-day fasting (ADF. This study examined the ability of modified ADF to facilitate weight loss and lower cardiovascular risk factors in overweight and obese women. Methods 15 adult subjects completed an 8 weeks trial (2 weeks observed and 6 weeks ADF. All women consumed very low calorie diet on the fast day and usually diet in every other day. Body weight (BW, fat mass and blood pressure (BP were measured. Fasting blood samples were collected at the first and 57th day of trial for biochemical analysis. Results During the course of the trial, BW of the subjects decreased (p Conclusion These finding suggest that short time ADF is a viable dietary option to help obese individuals lose weight and decrease some CAD risk factors. More and longer-term studies in human subjects are needed to support this important result.

  5. Pre-treatment attachment anxiety predicts change in depressive symptoms in women who complete day hospital treatment for anorexia and bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Leah; Tasca, Giorgio A; Bissada, Hany

    2015-03-01

    Individuals with eating disorders are prone to depressive symptoms. This study examines whether depressive symptoms can change in women who complete intensive day treatment for anorexia and bulimia nervosa (BN), and whether these changes are associated with pre-treatment attachment insecurity. Participants were 141 women with anorexia nervosa restricting type (n = 24), anorexia nervosa binge purge type (n = 30), and BN (n = 87) who completed a day hospital treatment programme for eating disorders. They completed a pre-treatment self-report measure of attachment, and a pre-treatment and post-treatment self-report measure of depressive symptoms. Participants experienced significant reductions in depressive symptoms at post-treatment. Eating disorder diagnosis was not related to these improvements. However, participants lower in attachment anxiety experienced significantly greater improvement in depressive symptoms than those who were higher in attachment anxiety. These results suggest that clinicians may tailor eating disorders treatments to patients' attachment patterns and focus on their pre-occupation with relationships and affect regulation to improve depressive symptoms. That depressive symptoms can decrease in women who complete day hospital treatment for anorexia and BN. That improvements in depressive symptoms do not vary according to eating disorder diagnosis in these women. That patients who complete treatment and who have higher attachment anxiety experience less improvements in depressive symptoms compared to those lower in attachment anxiety. That clinicians may attend to aspects of attachment anxiety, such as need for approval and up-regulation of emotions, to improve depressive symptoms in female patients with eating disorders. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  6. The Women's international study of long-duration oestrogen after menopause (WISDOM: a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meade Tom W

    2007-02-01

    The trial was prematurely closed during recruitment following publication of early results from the Women's Health Initiative. At the time of closure, 56583 had been screened, 8980 entered run-in, and 5694 (26% of target of 22,300 randomised. Those women randomised had received a mean of one year of therapy, mean age was 62.8 years and total follow-up time was 6491 person years. Discussion The WISDOM experience leads to some simple messages. The larger a trial is the more simple it needs to be to ensure cost effective and timely delivery. When a trial is very costly and beyond the resources of one country, funders and investigators should make every effort to develop international collaboration with joint funding.

  7. The Women's international study of long-duration oestrogen after menopause (WISDOM): a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Madge R; Martin, Jeannett; Meade, Tom W

    2007-02-26

    publication of early results from the Women's Health Initiative. At the time of closure, 56583 had been screened, 8980 entered run-in, and 5694 (26% of target of 22,300) randomised. Those women randomised had received a mean of one year of therapy, mean age was 62.8 years and total follow-up time was 6491 person years. The WISDOM experience leads to some simple messages. The larger a trial is the more simple it needs to be to ensure cost effective and timely delivery. When a trial is very costly and beyond the resources of one country, funders and investigators should make every effort to develop international collaboration with joint funding.

  8. Equal Improvement in Men and Women in the Treatment of Urologic Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome Using a Multi-modal Protocol with an Internal Myofascial Trigger Point Wand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Rodney U; Wise, David; Sawyer, Tim; Nathanson, Brian H; Nevin Smith, J

    2016-06-01

    Both men and women require treatment for urologic chronic pelvic pain syndromes (UCPPS), which includes interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome, pelvic floor dysfunction, and chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome. However, it is unknown if men and women respond differently to a protocol that includes specific physical therapy self-treatment using an internal trigger point wand and training in paradoxical relaxation. We performed a retrospective analysis by gender in a single arm, open label, single center clinical trial designed to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a protocol for the treatment of UCPPS from October, 2008 to May, 2011. 314 adult men (79.9 %) and 79 (20.1 %) women met inclusion criteria. The median duration of symptoms was 60 months. The protocol required an initial 6-day clinic for training followed by a 6-month self-treatment period. The treatment included self-administered pelvic floor trigger point release with an internal trigger point device for physical therapy along with paradoxical relaxation training. Notable gender differences in prior treatments were observed. Men had a lower median [Interquartile Range] NIH-CPSI score at baseline than women (27 [21, 31] vs. 29 [22, 33], p = 0.04). Using a 1-10 scale with 10 = Most Severe, the median reduction in trigger point sensitivity was 3 units for both men and women after 6 months therapy (p = 0.74). A modified Intention to Treat analysis and a multivariate regression analysis found similar results. We conclude that men and women have similar, significant reductions in trigger point sensitivity with this protocol.

  9. Optimizing the number of cleavage stage embryos to transfer on day 3 in women 38 years of age and older: a Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology database study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Judy E; Goldman, Marlene B; Hatasaka, Harry; MacKenzie, Todd A; Surrey, Eric S; Racowsky, Catherine

    2009-03-01

    To determine the optimal number of day 3 embryos to transfer in women >or=38 years by conducting an evidence-based evaluation. Retrospective analysis of 2000-2004 national SART data. National writing group. A total of 36,103 day 3 embryo transfers in women >or=38 years undergoing their first assisted reproductive technology cycle. None. Logistic regression was used to model the probability of pregnancy, delivery, and multiple births (twin or high order) based on age- and cycle-specific parameters. Pregnancy rates, delivery rates, and multiple rates increased up to transfer of three embryos in 38-year-olds and four in 39-year-olds; beyond this number, only multiple rates increased. In women >or=40 years, delivery rates and multiple rates climbed steadily with increasing numbers transferred. Multivariate analysis confirmed the statistically significant effect of age, number of oocytes retrieved, and embryo cryopreservation on delivery and multiple rates. Maximum FSH level was not an independent predictor by multivariate analysis. Use of intracytoplasmic sperm injection was associated with lowered delivery rate. No more than three or four embryos should be transferred in 38- and 39-year-olds, respectively, whereas up to five embryos could be transferred in >or=40-year-olds. Numbers of embryos to transfer should be adjusted according to number of oocytes retrieved and availability of excess embryos for cryopreservation.

  10. The International Society for the Study of Women's Sexual Health Process of Care for Management of Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder in Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Anita H; Goldstein, Irwin; Kim, Noel N; Althof, Stanley E; Faubion, Stephanie S; Faught, Brooke M; Parish, Sharon J; Simon, James A; Vignozzi, Linda; Christiansen, Kristin; Davis, Susan R; Freedman, Murray A; Kingsberg, Sheryl A; Kirana, Paraskevi-Sofia; Larkin, Lisa; McCabe, Marita; Sadovsky, Richard

    2018-03-09

    The International Society for the Study of Women's Sexual Health process of care (POC) for management of hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) algorithm was developed to provide evidence-based guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of HSDD in women by health care professionals. Affecting 10% of adult females, HSDD is associated with negative emotional and psychological states and medical conditions including depression. The algorithm was developed using a modified Delphi method to reach consensus among the 17 international panelists representing multiple disciplines. The POC starts with the health care professional asking about sexual concerns, focusing on issues related to low sexual desire/interest. Diagnosis includes distinguishing between generalized acquired HSDD and other forms of low sexual interest. Biopsychosocial assessment of potentially modifiable factors facilitates initiation of treatment with education, modification of potentially modifiable factors, and, if needed, additional therapeutic intervention: sex therapy, central nervous system agents, and hormonal therapy, guided in part by menopausal status. Sex therapy includes behavior therapy, cognitive behavior therapy, and mindfulness. The only central nervous system agent currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for HSDD is flibanserin in premenopausal women; use of flibanserin in postmenopausal women with HSDD is supported by data but is not FDA approved. Hormonal therapy includes off-label use of testosterone in postmenopausal women with HSDD, which is supported by data but not FDA approved. The POC incorporates monitoring the progress of therapy. In conclusion, the International Society for the Study of Women's Sexual Health POC for the management of women with HSDD provides a rational, evidence-based guideline for health care professionals to manage patients with appropriate assessments and individualized treatments. Copyright © 2017 Mayo Foundation for Medical

  11. Termination of pregnancy under French law: from criminalization to a right in accordance with international developments on women's rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madanamoothoo, Allane

    2011-12-01

    Termination of pregnancy is the premature exit of the products of conception, which include the placenta, bag of waters, embryo or fetus from the uterus. In general, the term "termination of pregnancy" refers to non-medical termination of pregnancy, which is requested for different reasons other than medical ones. When such a request is made in countries where it is lawful, women have access to induced termination of pregnancy under lawful and limited conditions. However, in countries where the practice is illegal, women tend to suffer and die of complications from unsafe termination of pregnancy. Nowadays, there seems to be a worldwide trend towards the legalization of termination of pregnancy. The impact of international developments on women's rights has played an increasing role in improving access to termination of pregnancy. This article aims at describing how legalization of termination of pregnancy in France has become a right which is in accordance with international developments on women's rights.

  12. Racial Disparities in Health Behaviors and Conditions Among Lesbian and Bisexual Women: The Role of Internalized Stigma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Yamile; Lehavot, Keren; Beadnell, Blair; Simoni, Jane

    2013-01-01

    There are documented disparities in physical health behaviors and conditions, such as physical activity and obesity, with regard to both race/ethnicity and sexual orientation. However, physical health disparities for lesbian and bisexual (LB) women who are also racial minorities are relatively unexplored. Minority stressors, such as internalized stigma, may account for disparities in such multiply marginalized populations. We sought to (1) characterize inequalities among non-Hispanic white and African American LB women and (2) examine the roles of internalized sexism and homophobia in disparities. Data on health behaviors (diet, physical activity); physical health (hypertension, diabetes, overweight/obesity); internalized sexism; and internalized homophobia were collected via a web-based survey. Recruitment ads were sent electronically to over 200 listservs, online groups, and organizations serving the lesbian, gay, and bisexual community in all 50 U.S. states. The analytic sample consisted of 954 white and 75 African American LB women. African American participants were more likely than white participants to report low fruit/vegetable intake and physical activity, a higher body mass index, and a history of diabetes and hypertension. There were no racial differences in internalized homophobia, but African American women reported higher levels of internalized sexism. Internalized sexism partially mediated racial disparities in physical activity and diabetes, but not in the other outcomes. Findings suggest that African American LB women may be at greater risk than their white counterparts for poor health and that internalized sexism may be a mediator of racial differences for certain behaviors and conditions. PMID:25364769

  13. Restaurant Management : Case: Pop-up Restaurant 'International Women's Day' on 7th March 2015 at Linnala Restaurant

    OpenAIRE

    Hoang, Uyen

    2015-01-01

    This is a project-based thesis, and it has two main objectives. Firstly, arranging the pop-up restaurant provided the author with an opportunity to carry out deeper study into restaurant business, especially managerial aspects. In details, the focuses were on restaurant operations, human resources, and marketing communications. Secondly, the project created an educational occasion for freshman students to practice and earn hand-on experiences. This work was commissioned by Saimaa University o...

  14. Prophylactic balloon occlusion of internal iliac arteries in women with placenta accreta: Literature review and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dilauro, M.D.; Dason, S. [McMaster University, Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine (Canada); Athreya, S., E-mail: sathreya@stjoes.ca [Diagnostic Imaging, St Joseph' s Healthcare Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-06-15

    Aim: To review the literature on the use of prophylactic balloon occlusion alone and in conjunction with arterial embolization of the internal iliac arteries in women with placenta accreta. Materials and methods: The PubMed, MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases were searched for keywords related to this technique and its use in the avoidance of caesarean hysterectomy. The relevant published articles were selected and then searched for further references. Results: The literature search found 15 case reports and five studies for a total of 20 articles. The use of balloon catheters to prevent post-partum haemorrhage in women with placenta accreta is controversial with some investigators reporting reduced blood loss and transfusion requirements while others reporting no benefit. This procedure does not appear to reduce operative time or hospital stay. Some groups have described catheter-related complications, such as maternal thromboembolic events and the need for stent placement and/or arterial bypass. Thus far, there is no reported maternal or foetal mortality related to this procedure. Conclusion: Current evidence is based upon case reports and small retrospective studies. Larger studies or randomized controlled trials are essential in order to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of bilateral iliac balloon occlusion. The creation of a data registry would also facilitate the reporting of this technique.

  15. Latter-day Mother Irelands: The Role of Women in Michael Collins and The Wind that Shakes the Barley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Villar-Argáiz

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite the experimental and subversive work of Irish feminist filmmakers such as Pat Murphy and Margo Harkin in the 1980s, as Gerardine Meaney has contended, “the image of woman as Ireland, Ireland as woman, remains powerful and pervasive in the new Irish cinema” (1998: 250. The cinematic convention of representing Ireland through female characters becomes particularly relevant in two recent Irish historical films: Michael Collins (1996, directed and written by Irish Neil Jordan, and The Wind that Shakes the Barley (2006, written by Scottish Paul Laverty and directed by English Ken Loach. In their dealing with themes such as military occupation, colonisation and the heated debate about the Treaty, both films maintain the nationalist rhetoric that represents Ireland as a woman/mother in a direct manner. Over the course of this essay, I shall try to chart the implications of both films’ representations of women, with a view to demonstrating how, even at present, the trope of Mother Ireland continues to be deep in the national unconscious.

  16. Suppression of ovarian activity with a low-dose 21/7-day regimen oral contraceptive containing ethinylestradiol 20 mcg/drospirenone 3 mg in Japanese and Caucasian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzai, Yuzuru; Heger-Mahn, Doris; Schellschmidt, Ilka; Marr, Joachim

    2012-07-01

    Two studies assessed the effect of a low-estrogen-dose 21/7-day oral contraceptive containing ethinylestradiol and drospirenone (EE 20 mcg/drsp 3 mg) on ovarian activity in Japanese and Caucasian women. Study 1 was conducted in Japanese women (20-35 years), and Study 2 was conducted in Caucasian women (18-35 years). All women received EE 20 mcg/drsp 3 mg in a 21-day active pill regimen. The primary endpoint was the proportion of women with ovulation inhibition (Hoogland score day regimen provides comparable ovarian suppression in Japanese and Caucasian women, with normal ovarian function resuming shortly after treatment end in both populations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Some Present-Day Asylum Seekers in the U.S.: Machismo and “Women on the Run”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Eisold

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Following a brief review of international asylum law (The Geneva Conventions, and the role of American mental health professionals in the asylum process, this paper attempts to understand the ways in which the often trauma-creating custom of machismo is transferred across generations in Central American families. Using as background the work of self psychologist Alan Roland (1989,1996, 2005, I have described families from these areas as so powerfully father-centric that children develop a sense of themselves based largely on their ability to sustain their father’s positive regard. In addition, without discussion, they present a positive image of him to the outside world, even when his behavior at home is brutal. To do otherwise would be humiliating. Having no place to reflect on these customs, often they are acted upon/acted out in the next generation. Note:We publish thi paper also tranlated in italian by Francesca Tessitore (Francesca Tessitore, Psychologist, PhD Student in Mind, Gender and Languages, her research fields are the processes of female immigration and motherhood at risk through a psychodynamic framework. francitessitore@gmail.com.

  18. Quasi-experimental Study of Systematic Screening for Family Planning Services among Postpartum Women Attending Village Health and Nutrition Days in Jharkhand, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramaniam, Sudharsanam; Kumar, Somesh; Sethi, Reena; Charurat, Elaine; Lalchandani, Kamlesh; Schuster, Anne; Sood, Bulbul

    2018-01-25

    Systematic screening helps increase family planning uptake through integration with other services, including immunization. Though successfully demonstrated at health facilities, this strategy has not been demonstrated in communities. This study assessed the effectiveness of systematic screening to increase postpartum family planning use during community health days in India without adversely affecting immunization services. The study was conducted during 180 individual Village Health and Nutrition Days in Jharkhand, India. All health workers were trained in postpartum family planning counseling. Intervention providers were also trained in systematic screening. 217 postpartum women aged 15-49 years participated in baseline and endline exit interviews and routine service statistics were analyzed from 2,485 facility visits at affiliated health centers. No difference in family planning service use was found in the intervention group, but significantly fewer interviewed women reported receiving family planning services at endline in the comparison group (p = 0.014). Family planning acceptance at affiliated health centers increased significantly in intervention areas (p family planning services when integrated with community-based services in Jharkhand.

  19. International FItness Scale (IFIS): Construct Validity and Reliability in Women With Fibromyalgia: The al-Ándalus Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Gallardo, Inmaculada C; Soriano-Maldonado, Alberto; Segura-Jiménez, Víctor; Carbonell-Baeza, Ana; Estévez-López, Fernando; McVeigh, Joseph G; Delgado-Fernández, Manuel; Ortega, Francisco B

    2016-03-01

    To examine the construct validity of the International FItness Scale (IFIS) (ie, self-reported fitness) against objectively measured physical fitness in women with fibromyalgia and in healthy women; and to study the test-retest reliability of the IFIS in women with fibromyalgia. Cross-sectional study. Fibromyalgia patient support groups. Women with fibromyalgia (n=413) and healthy women (controls) (n=195) for validity purposes and women with fibromyalgia (n=101) for the reliability study. The total sample was N=709. Not applicable. Fitness level was both self-reported (IFIS) and measured using performance-based fitness tests. For the reliability study the IFIS was completed on 2 occasions, 1 week apart. Women with fibromyalgia who reported average fitness had better measured fitness than those reporting very poor fitness (all Pfibromyalgia who had very low fitness and distinguish them from those with higher fitness levels. Furthermore, the IFIS was moderately reliable in women with fibromyalgia. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Predictive value of serum progesterone level on β-hCG check day in women with previous repeated miscarriages after in vitro fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Jin; Shin, Jung Ho; Hur, Jun Yong; Kim, Hoon; Ku, Seung-Yup; Suh, Chang Suk

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the predictive value of the progesterone level at the beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG) check day for ongoing pregnancy maintenance in in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles in women with previous unexplained repeated miscarriages. One hundred and forty-eight women, with visible gestational sac after IVF, were recruited in this observational study. All subjects had unexplained recurrent miscarriages in more than two previous IVF cycles. The progesterone level at the β-hCG check day (i.e. 14 days after oocyte retrieval) was assessed. The area under the curve (AUC) of the progesterone level was evaluated to predict the ongoing pregnancy or miscarriage outcomes. The overall ongoing pregnancy rate was 60.8% (90/148). The cut-off value with β-hCG levels higher than 126.5 mIU/mL and with progesterone levels higher than 25.2 ng/mL could be the predictive factors for ongoing pregnancy maintenance (AUC = 0.788 and 0.826; sensitivity = 0.788 and 0.723; specificity = 0.689 and 0.833; P hCG > 126.5 mIU/mL and 13.0% (10/77) in those with > 25.2 ng/mL. In the comparison of the ROC curves between both values, a similar significance was found. The subjects with β-hCG > 126.5 mIU/mL and progesterone > 25.2 ng/mL showed higher ongoing pregnancy rates [98.0% (49/50) vs. 41.8% (41/98)] than those with β-hCG ≤ 126.5 mIU/mL or progesterone ≤ 25.2 ng/mL. The progesterone level at 14 days after oocyte retrieval can be a good predictive marker for ongoing pregnancy maintenance in women with repeated IVF failure with miscarriage, together with the β-hCG level. The combined cut-off value of progesterone > 25.2 ng/mL and β-hCG > 126.5 mIU/mL may suggest a good prognosis.

  1. Comparison of 4- versus 5-day Co-Synch + controlled internal drug release (CIDR) + timed artificial insemination protocols in dairy heifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomares, Roberto A; Fishman, Heidi J; Jones, Arthur L; Ferrer, Maria S; Jenerette, Mathews; Vaughn, Aimee

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the pregnancy rate after timed artificial insemination (P/TAI) in dairy heifers treated with 4- versus 5-day Co-Synch + controlled internal drug release (CIDR) protocols. A total of 120 Holstein heifers were randomly assigned to one of two groups. The heifers received an intravaginal CIDR insert containing 1.38 g of progesterone for 4 days (Monday-Friday 4-day Co-Synch + CIDR; n = 60) or 5 days (5-day Co-Synch + CIDR; n = 60). At the time of CIDR removal, 25 mg of PGF2α was injected intramuscularly, and 72 hours after CIDR removal, the heifers received 100 μg of GnRH intramuscularly and were artificially inseminated. Artificial insemination was performed by an experienced technician, using commercial frozen-thawed semen from a single sire. Pregnancy diagnosis was performed by ultrasonography per rectum 32 days after TAI. Categorical data were analyzed using proc logistic and the chi-square test, whereas continuous variables were analyzed using the t-test of Statistical Analysis Systems. Heifers in the 4-day Co-Synch + CIDR group had an acceptable P/TAI32 (55.0%, 33 of 60), which was not different (P = 0.35) from that observed in the 5-day Co-Synch + CIDR group (63.3%, 38 of 60). Progesterone concentration at CIDR insertion or estradiol concentration at TAI did not influence the pregnancy outcomes. Interestingly, estradiol concentration at TAI was greater in the 4-day Co-Synch + CIDR group compared to the 5-day Co-Synch + CIDR group (P < 0.01). In conclusion, the Monday to Friday 4-day Co-Synch + CIDR protocol resulted in adequate P/TAI in dairy heifers, which was similar to that of the 5-day Co-Synch + CIDR protocol. This novel protocol might represent a promising hormonal treatment for TAI in dairy heifers, facilitating their reproductive management routine, while maintaining an adequate fertility. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. International Guidelines on Human Rights and Drug Control: A Tool for Securing Women's Rights in Drug Control Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleifer, Rebecca; Pol, Luciana

    2017-06-01

    Discrimination and inequality shape women's experiences of drug use and in the drug trade and the impact of drug control efforts on them, with disproportionate burdens faced by poor and otherwise marginalized women. In recent years, UN member states and UN drug control and human rights entities have recognized this issue and made commitments to integrate a 'gender perspective' into drug control policies, with 'gender' limited to those conventionally deemed women. But the concept of gender in international law is broader, rooted in socially constructed and culturally determined norms and expectations around gender roles, sex, and sexuality. Also, drug control policies often fail to meaningfully address the specific needs and circumstances of women (inclusively defined), leaving them at risk of recurrent violations of their rights in the context of drugs. This article explores what it means to 'mainstream' this narrower version of gender into drug control efforts, using as examples various women's experiences as people who use drugs, in the drug trade, and in the criminal justice system. It points to international guidelines on human rights and drug control as an important tool to ensure attention to women's rights in drug control policy design and implementation.

  3. Transforming 'Female' Programmes: Don’t Tell the Bride from International TV to Italian Digital Channels for Women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penati, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    textabstractContemporary Italian digital channels explicitly targeting women (such as Real Time, Lei, Fox Life, La5, and La7d) represent a privileged observatory for some general trends in the international circulation of content and incorporation of foreign formats into national television (TV). In

  4. Activity Profiles in International Women's Team Handball Using PlayerLoad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wik, Eirik H; Luteberget, Live S; Spencer, Matt

    2017-08-01

    Team handball matches place diverse physical demands on players, which may result in fatigue and decreased activity levels. However, previous speed-based methods of quantifying player activity may not be sensitive for capturing short-lasting team-handball-specific movements. To examine activity profiles of a women's team handball team and individual player profiles, using inertial measurement units. Match data were obtained from 1 women's national team in 9 international matches (N = 85 individual player samples), using the Catapult OptimEye S5. PlayerLoad/min was used as a measure of intensity in 5- and 10-min periods. Team profiles were presented as relative to the player's match means, and individual profiles were presented as relative to the mean of the 5-min periods with >60% field time. A high initial intensity was observed for team profiles and for players with ≥2 consecutive periods of play. Substantial declines in PlayerLoad/min were observed throughout matches for the team and for players with several consecutive periods of field time. These trends were found for all positional categories. Intensity increased substantially in the final 5 min of the first half for team profiles. Activity levels were substantially lower in the 5 min after a player's most intense period and were partly restored in the subsequent 5-min period. Possible explanations for the observed declines in activity profiles for the team and individual players include fatigue, situational factors, and pacing. However, underlying mechanisms were not accounted for, and these assumptions are therefore based on previous team-sport studies.

  5. International migration and dietary change in Mexican women from a social practice framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojorquez, Ietza; Rosales, Cecilia; Angulo, Alexandra; de Zapien, Jill; Denman, Catalina; Madanat, Hala

    2018-02-02

    Migration from lower- and middle-income to high-income countries is associated with dietary change, and especially with the adoption of a modern, less healthy diet. In this article we analyze the dietary changes experienced by Mexican migrants, employing as a theoretical framework the concept of social practice. According to this framework, practices integrate material elements, meanings and competences that provide their conditions of possibility. Practices are shared by members of social groups, and interact with other competing or reinforcing practices. Between 2014 and 2015, we conducted semi-structured interviews with 27 women, international return migrants living in Tijuana, Mexico. The interview guide asked about history of migration and dietary change. We found three main areas of dietary change: from subsistence farming to ready meals, abundance vs. restriction, and adoption of new food items. The first one was associated with changes in food procurement and female work: when moving from rural to urban areas, participants substituted self-produced for purchased food; and as migrant women joined the labor force, consumption of ready meals increased. The second was the result of changes in income: participants of lower socioeconomic position modified the logic of food acquisition from restriction to abundance and back, depending on the available resources. The third change was relatively minor, with occasional consumption of new dishes or food items, and was associated with exposure to different cuisines and with learning how to cook them. Public health efforts to improve the migrants' diets should take into account the constitutive elements of dietary practices, instead of isolating individuals from their social contexts. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Same-day diagnosis based on histology for women suspected of breast cancer: high diagnostic accuracy and favorable impact on the patient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten W Barentsz

    Full Text Available Same-day diagnosis based on histology is increasingly being offered to patients suspected of breast cancer. We evaluated to which extent same-day diagnosis affected diagnostic accuracy and patients' anxiety levels during the diagnostic phase.All 759 women referred for same-day evaluation of suspicious breast lesions between November 2011-March 2013 were included. Diagnostic accuracy was assessed by linking all patients to the national pathology database to identify diagnostic discrepancies, in which case slides were reviewed. Patients' anxiety was measured in 127 patients by the State Trait and Anxiety Inventory on six moments during the diagnostic workup and changes over time (< = 1 week were analyzed by mixed effect models.Core-needle biopsy was indicated in 374/759 patients (49.3% and in 205/759 (27% patients, invasive or in situ cancer was found. Final diagnosis on the same day was provided for 606/759 (79.8% patients. Overall, 3/759 (0.4% discordant findings were identified. Anxiety levels decreased significantly over time from 45.2 to 30.0 (P = <0.001. Anxiety levels decreased from 44.4 to 25.9 (P = <0.001 for patients with benign disease, and remained unchanged for patients diagnosed with malignancies (48.6 to 46.7, P = 0.933. Time trends in anxiety were not affected by other patient or disease characteristics like age, education level or (family history of breast cancer.Same-day histological diagnosis is feasible in the vast majority of patients, without impairing diagnostic accuracy. Patients' anxiety rapidly decreased in patients with a benign diagnosis and remained constant in patients with malignancy.

  7. Acculturation, Acculturative Stress, and Depressive Symptoms in International Migrants: A Study with Vietnamese Women in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yong Ju; Jang, Yuri; Ko, Jung Eun; Lee, Sun Hae; Moon, Soo Kyung

    2017-10-10

    Globally, there have been increasing numbers of migrant women; these women are at an increased risk for depressive symptoms. The purpose of this study was to examine the associations among acculturation, acculturative stress and depressive symptoms in Vietnamese women who migrated to South Korea through marriages. We hypothesized that acculturative stress would serve as a mediator in the relationship between acculturation and depressive symptoms. Our findings from surveys with 217 Vietnamese immigrant women showed that the indirect effect of acculturation on depressive symptoms, mediated through acculturative stress [- .15 (.04)], was significant (bias corrected 95% confidence interval for the indirect effect = - .25, - .08). Low levels of acculturation increased acculturative stress, which in turn led to the elevated symptoms of depression. Our findings not only illuminate the adaptation processes of international, female migrants but also suggest avenues to protect and promote their mental well-being.

  8. In vitro fertilization outcome in frozen versus fresh embryo transfer in women with elevated progesterone level on the day of HCG injection: An RCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Aghahosseini

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The effect of elevated progesterone level on human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG day in in vitro fertilization cycles is controversial. Some suppose that rise in progesterone level seems to have a negative impact on implantation and pregnancy by desynchronizing the endometrium, while others disagree. Objective: To evaluate the superiority of the frozen cycle over fresh cycle on live birth in patients with elevated progesterone level on HCG day. Materials and Methods: In this double-blind, randomized clinical trial, 72 women undergoing assisted reproductive technology with elevated progesterone level (≥1.8 ng/dl on HCG day were included. The participants were grouped by fresh versus frozen embryo transfer, randomly. Finally, the clinical pregnancy and live birth rate were compared. Results: The implantation rate was 21.51%. The clinical pregnancy rate was 47.22% in fresh embryo transfer group (17/36 and 41.66% in frozen group (15/36 (p=0. 40. The live birth rate was not significantly difference between two groups (p=0.56. Conclusion: None of the fresh and frozen cycles are superior to the other and we recommend individualizing the decision for each patient. The frozen cycle may impose more emotional stress on patients

  9. Exercícios físicos, força muscular e atividades de vida diária em mulheres idosas Physical exercise, muscle strength and the day-to-day activities of elderly women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Helena Martins Ribeiro

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo foi investigar as relações entre força muscular nos membros inferiores e nos superiores, prática de exercícios físicos e atividades de vida diária em mulheres idosas recrutadas na comunidade. Um mil quinhentas e trinta e oito idosas com idade média = 72,07 ± 5,46, renda familiar média = 3,59 ± 3,96 SM, sem déficit cognitivo sugestivo de demência. Foram submetidas a medidas de força de preensão manual e velocidade de marcha; a itens de autorrelato sobre prática regular de exercícios físicos; de desempenho de 13 atividades avançadas de vida diária (AAVD de natureza social (ex: trabalhar, viajar e frequentar igreja e de 3 atividades instrumentais de vida diária (AIVD manejar dinheiro, fazer compras e usar transporte, 1.538 idosas com idade média = 72,07 ± 5,46, renda familiar média = 3,59 ± 3,96 SM, sem déficit cognitivo sugestivo de demência. Foram preditivos de pior desempenho em atividades de vida diária (AVD: baixa força muscular (OR = 2,48 para comprometimento da preensão e da marcha e 1,66 para comprometimento em qualquer dos critérios, baixa renda (OR = 2,46 e 2,45 para The scope of this study was to investigate relationships between muscle strength of the upper and lower limbs, physical exercise, and functionality to perform complex activities of day-to-day life in elderly women recruited from the community. 1538 elderly women with mean age = 72.07 ± 5.46 and average household income = 3.59 ±3.96 MW, without cognitive deficit suggestive of dementia, were submitted to tests of grip strength and walking speed. They were asked to self-report on regular practice of physical exercise and performance of 13 social AADLs (e.g. working, travelling and church attendance and 3 IADLs (handling money, doing the shopping and using public transport. The worst performance key factors were low grip strength and low gait speed in ADL (OR = 2.48 if both; OR = 1.66 if either were present, as well as low income (OR

  10. 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence | CRDI - Centre ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    25 nov. 2017 ... The World Health Organization reports that 35% of the world's women and girls experience sexual or physical violence in their lifetime. The International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women on November 25 — which marks the first of 16 days of activism against gender-based violence and ...

  11. Following the Fourth World Conference on Women -- Let's Expand Grass-Roots Networking! Proceedings of the International Forum on Intercultural Exchange (Saitama, Japan, November 15-17, 1995).

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Women's Education Centre, Saitama (Japan).

    Based on the success of the Fourth World Conference on Women, the National Women's Education Centre of Japan planned and carried out the 1995 International Forum on Intercultural Exchange to search for an up-to-date understanding of the problems of women and ways to solve them and to develop a network of already existing groups. This Forum focused…

  12. Innovation processes navigated by women groups in the Malian shea sector: How targeting of international niche markets results in fragmentation and obstructs coordination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sidibe, A.; Vellema, S.; Dembele, M.M.; Traore, K.; Kuyper, T.W.

    2012-01-01

    The incorporation of women and their associations into international markets and value chains is proposed increasingly as a development pathway in Sub-Saharan Africa. The underlying assumption is that exclusion of individual women from groups specialized in supplying a single international niche

  13. A 5-day dialectical behavior therapy partial hospital program for women with borderline personality disorder: predictors of outcome from a 3-month follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Shirley; Johnson, Jennifer; Costello, Ellen; Simpson, Elizabeth B

    2009-05-01

    This study describes naturalistic 3-month follow-up after discharge from a 5-day partial hospitalization dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) program for women diagnosed with borderline personality disorder (BPD). We also examined individual BPD criteria as predictors of treatment response. Fifty women diagnosed with BPD were consecutively recruited from a partial hospital DBT program, 47 of whom (94%) completed all assessments including baseline (prior to discharge) and 3-months post-discharge assessments. Most continued with some combination of individual psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy, and all had the option of continuing with weekly DBT skills classes. Baseline scores were compared to 3-month scores using paired two-tailed non-parametric (sign) tests. Regression analyses were conducted to identify predictors of outcome. Depression, hopelessness, anger expression, dissociation, and general psychopathology scores significantly decreased over the 3-month follow-up interval, although scores on several measures remained in the clinical range. Those who endorsed emptiness, impulsivity, and relationship disturbance demonstrated improvement on a number of outcomes, while those who endorsed identity disturbance and fear of abandonment had less improvement on some outcomes. These findings illustrate (1) that improvement occurred over a 3-month interval on a number of measures in patients receiving treatment as usual following discharge from a partial hospitalization program, and (2) that BPD is a complex, heterogeneous disorder for which there is no single pathognomonic criterion, so that each criterion should be considered individually in determining its potential effect on treatment outcomes.

  14. Comparison of a Full Food-Frequency Questionnaire with the Three-Day Unweighted Food Records in Young Polish Adult Women: Implications for Dietary Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalkowska, Joanna; Slowinska, Malgorzata A.; Slowinski, Dariusz; Dlugosz, Anna; Niedzwiedzka, Ewa; Wadolowska, Lidia

    2013-01-01

    The food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and the food record (FR) are among the most common methods used in dietary research. It is important to know that is it possible to use both methods simultaneously in dietary assessment and prepare a single, comprehensive interpretation. The aim of this study was to compare the energy and nutritional value of diets, determined by the FFQ and by the three-day food records of young women. The study involved 84 female students aged 21–26 years (mean of 22.2 ± 0.8 years). Completing the FFQ was preceded by obtaining unweighted food records covering three consecutive days. Energy and nutritional value of diets was assessed for both methods (FFQ-crude, FR-crude). Data obtained for FFQ-crude were adjusted with beta-coefficient equaling 0.5915 (FFQ-adjusted) and regression analysis (FFQ-regressive). The FFQ-adjusted was calculated as FR-crude/FFQ-crude ratio of mean daily energy intake. FFQ-regressive was calculated for energy and each nutrient separately using regression equation, including FFQ-crude and FR-crude as covariates. For FR-crude and FFQ-crude the energy value of diets was standardized to 2000 kcal (FR-standardized, FFQ-standardized). Methods of statistical comparison included a dependent samples t-test, a chi-square test, and the Bland-Altman method. The mean energy intake in FFQ-crude was significantly higher than FR-crude (2740.5 kcal vs. 1621.0 kcal, respectively). For FR-standardized and FFQ-standardized, significance differences were found in the mean intake of 18 out of 31 nutrients, for FR-crude and FFQ-adjusted in 13 out of 31 nutrients and FR-crude and FFQ-regressive in 11 out of 31 nutrients. The Bland-Altman method showed an overestimation of energy and nutrient intake by FFQ-crude in comparison to FR-crude, e.g., total protein was overestimated by 34.7 g/day (95% Confidence Interval, CI: −29.6, 99.0 g/day) and fat by 48.6 g/day (95% CI: −36.4, 133.6 g/day). After regressive transformation of FFQ, the

  15. Emerging Issues in Women's Rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Intergroup Relations, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Provides a summary of discussion at an international conference of human rights professionsls in 1982. Covers a wide range of subjects, from women's access to positions of economic power, to day care facilities as a means of expanding choices of both women and men who work in or out of the home. (KH)

  16. Material Hardship and Internal Locus of Control Over the Prevention of Child Obesity in Low-Income Hispanic Pregnant Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Rachel S; Mendelsohn, Alan L; Gross, Michelle B; Scheinmann, Roberta; Messito, Mary Jo

    2016-07-01

    To determine the relations between household material hardships and having a low internal locus of control over the prevention of child obesity in low-income Hispanic pregnant women. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of baseline data collected during a third trimester prenatal visit from women participating in the Starting Early Study, a randomized controlled trial to test the efficacy of a primary care-based family-centered early child obesity prevention intervention. Using multiple logistic regression analyses, we determined whether 4 domains of material hardship (food insecurity, difficulty paying bills, housing disrepair, neighborhood stress), considered individually and also cumulatively, were associated with having a low internal locus of control over the prevention of child obesity. The sample included 559 low-income Hispanic pregnant women, with 60% having experienced at least 1 hardship. Food insecurity was independently associated with a low internal locus of control over the prevention of child obesity (adjusted odds ratio, 2.38; 95% confidence interval, 1.50-3.77), controlling for other hardships and confounders. Experiencing a greater number of material hardships was associated in a dose-dependent relationship with an increased odds of having a low internal locus of control. Prenatal material hardships, in particular food insecurity, were associated with having a lower prenatal internal locus of control over the prevention of child obesity. Longitudinal follow-up of this cohort is needed to determine how relations between material hardships and having a low internal locus of control will ultimately affect infant feeding practices and child weight trajectories. Copyright © 2016 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. International Violence Against Women: U.S. Response and Policy Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-03

    domestic efforts and programs to combat VAW, see CRS Report RL30871, Violence Against Women Act: History and Federal Funding, by Garrine P. Laney. 2...157-161, at [http://www.who.int/violence_injury_prevention/ violence / world_report/en/]. 10 Eleanor Lyon, “Welfare and Domestic Violence Against Women...6, 2007, and Summary Report: WHO Multi-Country Study on Women’s Health and Domestic Violence Against Women, Initial Results on Prevalence, Health

  18. Three generations of human rights of women in the 20th century : an analysis of international legal documents

    OpenAIRE

    Birdal, Sevcan

    2014-01-01

    Ankara : The Department of International Relations İhsan Doğramacı Bilkent University, 2014. Thesis (Master's) -- Bilkent University, 2014. Includes bibliographical references leaves 129-142 This thesis focuses on the generations of human rights of women based on Vasak’s notion of three generations of human rights - in which the first generation rights refer political and civil rights; the second generation rights include economic, social and cultural rights while the third ...

  19. Engineering education research: Impacts of an international network of female engineers on the persistence of Liberian undergraduate women studying engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimer, Sara; Reddivari, Sahithya; Cotel, Aline

    2015-11-01

    As international efforts to educate and empower women continue to rise, engineering educators are in a unique position to be a part of these efforts by encouraging and supporting women across the world at the university level through STEM education and outreach. For the past two years, the University of Michigan has been a part of a grassroots effort to encourage and support the persistence of engineering female students at University of Liberia. This effort has led to the implementation of a leadership camp this past August for Liberian engineering undergraduate women, meant to: (i) to empower engineering students with the skills, support, and inspiration necessary to become successful and well-rounded engineering professionals in a global engineering market; and (ii) to strengthen the community of Liberian female engineers by building cross-cultural partnerships among students resulting in a international network of women engineers. This session will present qualitative research findings on the impact of this grassroots effort on Liberian female students? persistence in engineering, and the future directions of this work.

  20. Evaluation of the efficacy and tolerance of a short 7 day third-generation cephalosporin treatment in the management of acute pyelonephritis in young women in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustafa, F; Nguyen, G; Mathevon, T; Baud, O; Saint-Denis, J; Dublanchet, N; Pereira, B; Shinjo, C; Romaszko, J P; Dopeux, L; Dutheil, F; Schmidt, J

    2016-06-01

    Urinary tract infections, among the leading causes of antibiotic prescriptions in adult women, are complicated by increasing antibiotic resistance. Current recommendations propose a 7 day treatment with fluoroquinolones or a 10-14 day course of third-generation cephalosporins (3GC). Our aim was to study the efficiency and tolerance of a short 7 day treatment with 3GC in uncomplicated acute pyelonephritis in women aged between 18 and 65 years. This study was an open, prospective, non-comparative, monocentric pilot study with consecutive patients. We included women between 18 and 65 years old who had been admitted to the emergency department with a diagnosis of acute pyelonephritis. The treatment consisted of 1 g of ceftriaxone injection followed by 6 days of 400 mg of cefixime per day. The primary endpoint was negative urine cultures on day 9. We opted for Fleming's multistage design for this trial. ClinicalTrials.gov number: NCT01390623. Thirty-seven patients were analysed. The bacteriological response consisted of negative urine cultures for all 37 patients on day 9. On day 9, 30 patients were completely asymptomatic, while 7 exhibited clinical improvement though persistence of bladder irritation or flank pain. On day 37, there were no remaining symptoms and no recurrences of urinary tract infection, as noted during the last follow-up visits. These results suggest that acute pyelonephritis in women could be successfully treated with a short-term course of 1 g of ceftriaxone on the first day followed by 400 mg of cefixime per day for 6 days. These positive results must be confirmed by a non-inferiority study. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Influence of the time of day and fasting duration on glucose level following a 1-hour, 50-gram glucose challenge test in pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Panchalli; Lu, Mei-Chun; Yu, Cheng-Wei; Yan, Yuan-Horng

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the time of day (TD) of glucose measurement and the fasting duration (FD) influence the glucose levels in adults. Few studies have examined the effects of the TD and FD on the glucose level following a 1-hour, 50-gram glucose challenge test (GCT) in pregnant women in screening for or diagnosing gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of the TD (morning, afternoon, night) and the FD (the time of the last food ingestion as follows: ≤1 hour, 1-2 hours, and >2 hours) by examining their combined effects on the glucose levels following a 50-gram GCT in pregnant women. We analyzed the data of 1,454 non-diabetic pregnant Taiwanese women in a prospective study. Multiple linear regression and multiple logistic regression were used to estimate the relationships between the 9 TD-FD groups and the continuous and binary glucose levels (cut-off at 140 mg/dL) following a 50-gram GCT, after adjusting for maternal age, nulliparity, pre-pregnancy body mass index, and weight gain. Different TD and FD groups were associated with variable glucose responses to the 50-gram GCT, some of which were significant. The estimate coefficients (β) of the TD-FD groups "night, ≤1 hr" and "night, 1-2 hr" revealed significantly lower glucose concentrations [β (95% confidence interval [CI]): -6.46 (-12.53, -0.38) and -6.85 (-12.50, -1.20)] compared with the "morning, >2 hr" group. The TD-FD groups "afternoon, ≤1 hr" and "afternoon, 1-2 hr" showed significantly lower odds ratios (OR) of a positive GCT; the adjusted ORs (95% CI) were 0.54 (0.31-0.95) and 0.58 (0.35-0.96), respectively. Our findings demonstrate the importance of standardizing the TD and FD for the 1-hour, 50-gram GCT. In screening for and diagnosing GDM, the TD and FD are modifiable factors that should be considered in clinical practice and epidemiological studies.

  2. Influence of the time of day and fasting duration on glucose level following a 1-hour, 50-gram glucose challenge test in pregnant women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panchalli Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous studies have shown that the time of day (TD of glucose measurement and the fasting duration (FD influence the glucose levels in adults. Few studies have examined the effects of the TD and FD on the glucose level following a 1-hour, 50-gram glucose challenge test (GCT in pregnant women in screening for or diagnosing gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of the TD (morning, afternoon, night and the FD (the time of the last food ingestion as follows: ≤1 hour, 1-2 hours, and >2 hours by examining their combined effects on the glucose levels following a 50-gram GCT in pregnant women. METHODS AND RESULTS: We analyzed the data of 1,454 non-diabetic pregnant Taiwanese women in a prospective study. Multiple linear regression and multiple logistic regression were used to estimate the relationships between the 9 TD-FD groups and the continuous and binary glucose levels (cut-off at 140 mg/dL following a 50-gram GCT, after adjusting for maternal age, nulliparity, pre-pregnancy body mass index, and weight gain. Different TD and FD groups were associated with variable glucose responses to the 50-gram GCT, some of which were significant. The estimate coefficients (β of the TD-FD groups "night, ≤1 hr" and "night, 1-2 hr" revealed significantly lower glucose concentrations [β (95% confidence interval [CI]: -6.46 (-12.53, -0.38 and -6.85 (-12.50, -1.20] compared with the "morning, >2 hr" group. The TD-FD groups "afternoon, ≤1 hr" and "afternoon, 1-2 hr" showed significantly lower odds ratios (OR of a positive GCT; the adjusted ORs (95% CI were 0.54 (0.31-0.95 and 0.58 (0.35-0.96, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings demonstrate the importance of standardizing the TD and FD for the 1-hour, 50-gram GCT. In screening for and diagnosing GDM, the TD and FD are modifiable factors that should be considered in clinical practice and epidemiological studies.

  3. The Women's Movement in the Seventies: An International English-Language Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krichmar, Albert; And Others

    This partially annotated bibliography lists more than 8,600 English language books, periodical articles, reference works, and review essays concerning the status of women. The emphasis is on change, attempted change, and continuing problems confronting women in nearly 100 countries in Africa, Asia, Australia and Oceania, Europe, Latin America, the…

  4. The Impact of Network Relationships, Prison Experiences, and Internal Transformation on Women's Success after Prison Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Hoan N.; Morash, Merry

    2010-01-01

    Using data obtained from retrospective, in-depth interviews with 20 successful female parolees, the present study examines the effects of women offenders' relationships with people in their social networks (i.e., their network relationships) before, during, and after incarceration on their postrelease desistence from crime. Because women's social…

  5. Education, Internationalism and Empire at the 1928 and 1930 Pan-Pacific Women's Conferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Joyce

    2014-01-01

    In order to explore education at the first two Pan-Pacific Women's Conferences, this article builds on Campbell and Sherington's account of education in Oceania and on empirical research undertaken by Selleck and others, along with relevant primary source material. It traces elements of empire as they played out in inter-war women's education and…

  6. Invest in women to reduce post-harvest losses | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-05-25

    May 25, 2017 ... But as the first Africa post-harvest congress was held last week in Nairobi, the good news is that we can invest in innovations to reduce food loss while at the same time reducing women's drudgery in harvesting, storage and processing. Here are some ways we can invest in supporting women to reduce ...

  7. What style of leadership do women in STEMM fields perform? Findings from an international survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Meredith; Davies, Amanda; Moore, Robyn

    2017-01-01

    It is widely acknowledged that women in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and medicine (STEMM) fields are underrepresented in leadership globally. However, little is known about how leadership styles of women in STEMM relate to this underrepresentation. This article discusses findings from a survey examining how 61 women in STEMM define leadership and describe their own leadership styles. Using content analysis and drawing on Full Range Leadership Model factors, findings suggest that women define leadership and describe their own leadership styles using transformational factors. However, there was no consistency in how participants defined ideal leadership or how they defined their own leadership styles. This finding unsettles ideas of distinctly gendered leadership styles. We argue that expectations that leadership will be performed in distinctly gendered styles may be contributing to the underrepresentation of women in leadership roles in STEMM.

  8. Toward Earlier Inclusion of Pregnant and Postpartum Women in Tuberculosis Drug Trials: Consensus Statements From an International Expert Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Amita; Mathad, Jyoti S; Abdel-Rahman, Susan M; Albano, Jessica D; Botgros, Radu; Brown, Vikki; Browning, Renee S; Dawson, Liza; Dooley, Kelly E; Gnanashanmugam, Devasena; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Hernandez-Diaz, Sonia; Jean-Philippe, Patrick; Kim, Peter; Lyerly, Anne D; Mirochnick, Mark; Mofenson, Lynne M; Montepiedra, Grace; Piper, Jeanna; Sahin, Leyla; Savic, Radojka; Smith, Betsy; Spiegel, Hans; Swaminathan, Soumya; Watts, D Heather; White, Amina

    2016-03-15

    Tuberculosis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in women of childbearing age (15-44 years). Despite increased tuberculosis risk during pregnancy, optimal clinical treatment remains unclear: safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetic data for many tuberculosis drugs are lacking, and trials of promising new tuberculosis drugs exclude pregnant women. To advance inclusion of pregnant and postpartum women in tuberculosis drug trials, the US National Institutes of Health convened an international expert panel. Discussions generated consensus statements (>75% agreement among panelists) identifying high-priority research areas during pregnancy, including: (1) preventing progression of latent tuberculosis infection, especially in women coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus; (2) evaluating new agents/regimens for treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis; and (3) evaluating safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of tuberculosis drugs already in use during pregnancy and postpartum. Incorporating pregnant women into clinical trials would extend evidence-based tuberculosis prevention and treatment standards to this special population. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. International organizations and NGOs: an example of international collaboration to improve women's health by preventing unsafe abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Shahida; Hassan, Ezzeldin Osman; Hodorogea, Stelian; Leke, Robert J I; Távara, Luis; de Gil, Marina Padilla

    2010-07-01

    International collaboration with organizations and agencies is a basic requirement for the success of the FIGO Initiative for the Prevention of Unsafe Abortion and its Consequences. Many activities being carried out by the organizations form a part of the plans of action of all countries participating in the Initiative. It was, therefore, not difficult to obtain their collaboration in implementing the plans of action. The many ways in which they have collaborated and continue to do so are described in this article. This collaboration has saved time, avoided duplication of effort, and has also satisfied the Accra Agenda of Action by reducing fragmentation of funding. It has already contributed toward preventing unsafe abortion and reducing abortion-related maternal deaths and morbidities, and is expected to contribute even more significantly in the coming months and years. (c) 2010 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A 21-day Daniel fast with or without krill oil supplementation improves anthropometric parameters and the cardiometabolic profile in men and women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trepanowski John F

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Daniel Fast is a vegan diet that prohibits the consumption of animal products, refined foods, white flour, preservatives, additives, sweeteners, flavorings, caffeine, and alcohol. Following this dietary plan for 21 days has been demonstrated to improve blood pressure, LDL-C, and certain markers of oxidative stress, but it has also been shown to lower HDL-C. Krill oil supplementation has been shown to increase HDL-C. Methods We investigated the effects of following a Daniel Fast dietary plan with either krill oil supplementation (2 g/day or placebo supplementation (coconut oil; 2 g/day for 21 days. The subjects in this study (12 men and 27 women were heterogeneous with respect to body mass index (BMI (normal weight, overweight, and obese, blood lipids (normolipidemic and hyperlipidemic, blood glucose (normal fasting glucose, impaired fasting glucose, and type 2 diabetic, and blood pressure (normotensive and hypertensive. Results Krill oil supplementation had no effect on any outcome measure (all p > 0.05, and so the data from the krill oil group and the placebo group were collapsed and analyzed to examine the effects of following a 21-day Daniel Fast. Significant reductions were observed in LDL-C (100.6 ± 4.3 mg/dL vs. 80.0 ± 3.7 mg/dL, the LDL:HDL ratio (2.0 ± 0.1 vs. 1.7 ± 0.1, fasting blood glucose (101.4 ± 7.5 mg/dL vs. 91.7 ± 3.4 mg/dL, fasting blood insulin (7.92 ± 0.80 μU/mL vs. 5.76 ± 0.59 μU/mL, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR (2.06 ± 0.30 vs. 1.40 ± 0.21, systolic BP (110.7 ± 2.2 mm Hg vs. 105.5 ± 1.7 mm Hg, and body weight (74.1 ± 2.4 kg vs. 71.5 ± 2.3 kg (all p  Conclusion Following a Daniel Fast dietary plan improves a variety of cardiometabolic parameters in a wide range of individuals in as little as 21 days, and these improvements are unaffected by krill oil supplementation. Trial registration

  11. The Effect of Breakfast Prior to Morning Exercise on Cognitive Performance, Mood and Appetite Later in the Day in Habitually Active Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel C. Veasey

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Pre-exercise nutritional practices for active females exercising for mood, cognitive and appetite benefits are not well established. Results from an initial field pilot study showed that higher energy intake at breakfast was associated with lower fatigue and higher overall mood and alertness post-exercise (all p < 0.05. In a follow-up, randomised, controlled trial, 24 active women completed three trials in a balanced, cross-over design. At 0815 h participants completed baseline cognitive tasks, mood and appetite visual analogue scales (VAS and were administered a cereal breakfast (providing 118 or 236 kcal or no breakfast. After 45 min, they completed a 30 min run at 65% heart rate reserve (HRR. Parameters were re-assessed immediately after exercise, then hourly until lunch (~1240 h, immediately post-lunch and at 1500 and 1900 h via a mobile phone. Breakfast enhanced feelings of relaxation before lunch (p < 0.05, d > 0.40, though breakfast was detrimental for working memory mid-afternoon (p = 0.019, d = 0.37 and mental fatigue and tension later in the day (all p < 0.05, d > 0.038. Breakfast was also beneficial for appetite control before lunch irrespective of size (all p < 0.05, d > 0.43. These data provide information on pre-exercise nutritional practices for active females and suggest that a small breakfast eaten prior to exercise can benefit post-exercise mood and subjective appetite ratings.

  12. "I Know It Was Every Week, but I Can't Be Sure if It Was Every Day": Domestic Violence and Women with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Michelle; Hunt, Siobhan; Milne-Skillman, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Background: Domestic violence against women is well researched in the general population, but much less so in relation to women with learning disabilities. This qualitative research study interviewed 15 women with learning disabilities who had experienced domestic violence about their experiences, the impact of the violence on them and their…

  13. IMPRESS YOUR FRIENDS AND PREDICT THE FINAL SCORE: An analysis of the psychic ability of four target resetting methods used in One-Day International Cricket

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara J. O'Riley

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available One-Day cricket's eternal problem is how to fairly account for an interruption that occurs during a team's innings. Several methods have been applied in the past, some more successfully than others. Numerous articles have been written about different target resetting methods applicable in one-day international cricket and how they "favour" one team over another. In this paper we use an alternative approach looking at the psychic ability of four target resetting methods and compare how well they predict the final score based on the present state of the first innings. We attempt to convert each of methods we investigate into a ball-by-ball predictive tool. We introduce a terminal interruption to the first innings at every ball and compute the predicted final score. We ascribe a nominal value to the difference between the final achieved score and the prediction given by each method. We compute our own 'Psychic Metric' to enable a comparison between the four methods. We also develop a computer package to manipulate the data from matches in which the first innings was completed

  14. Early results of endovascular treatment of patients with bilateral stenoses of the internal carotid arteries using proximal protection systems at 30-day follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latacz, Paweł; Simka, Marian; Popiela, Tadeusz; Kazibudzki, Marek; Mrowiecki, Tomasz

    Although surgical endarterectomy remains the treatment of choice for carotid artery stenosis, carotid artery stenting (CAS) with use of proximal protection systems (PPS) plays an very important role as alternative treatment modality, especially in patients with critical, symptomatic lesions. This study was single-centre study to evaluate the technical and clinical success of proximal protection devices as the first choice for embolic protection in symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid stenosis in patients with bilateral, advanced lesions of carotid arteries (bilateral stenoses or stenosis and occlusion). This was a post hoc analysis, with 30-day follow up. We analyzed results of treatment of 38 patients who underwent 38 CAS with PPS, 17 such procedures in asymptomatic (group A), and 21 in symptomatic individuals (group B). The GORE ® Flow Reversal System (W.L. Gore, Flagstaff, AZ, USA) was used in 2 patients, and the Mo.Ma Ultra device (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN, USA) in 36 patients. Mean age was 68±7 years, 65% percent of patient were male. There were no procedural and during 30-day follow-up neurologic events. Intolerance of occlusion system occurred in 4 patients (11%) in both groups with any later symptoms. Risk factors of this adverse event comprised: lesions of the left internal carotid lesion and coexisiting diabetes mellitus. CAS in high risk patients with bilateral lesions of carotid arteries with the use of PPS seems to be a relatively very safe procedure. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o.

  15. Meeting Report: International nephrology days - In honor of the 75(th) anniversary of acad. Momir Polenakovic and 50 years of scientific work, 26-27 September 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spasovski, G

    2015-01-01

    The International Nephrology Days in honor of the 75(th) anniversary of Academician Momir Polenakovic and 50 years of his scientific work were held in the Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts (MASA) on 26 and 27 September 2014. Organizers of the meeting were the Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts and the Macedonian Society of Nephrology, Dialysis, Transplantation and Artificial Organs (MSNDTAO). The days were programmed with the VII Macedonian-Croatian Nephrology Meeting and the Continuing Medical Education (CME) Course on "Renal Replacement Therapy - when & how - update on the outcome and cost-efficacy" organized by the MSNDTAO in cooperation with the European Renal Association (ERA-EDTA). Prominent academicians, researchers and nephrologists from Europe and neighboring countries contributed with their lectures and discussion at this scientific event. On September 26, 2014 the opening talk was given by Acad. V. Kambovski, President of the MASA, about the Life and Work of Academician Momir Polenakovic. In honor of his anniversary and valuable scientific opus, during the meeting Acad. Momir Polenakovic was awarded with Certificate of the European Renal Association (ERA-EDTA) for his significant role in the development of nephrology in the Balkan region and couple of other diplomas and acknowledgement. Prof. Polenakovic is founder of the MSNDTAO and his lifetime honorary president.

  16. International Violence Against Women: U.S. Response and Policy Issues

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Blanchfield, Luisa; Margesson, Rhoda; Seelke, Clare R; Salaam-Blyther, Tiaji; Serafino, Nina M

    2008-01-01

    ... of violence than those in developed countries. Many experts view VAW as a symptom of the historically unequal power relationship between men and women, and argue that over time this imbalance has led to pervasive cultural stereotype...

  17. Linking of assessment scales for women with urinary incontinence and the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas, Thaissa Hamana de Macedo; Castaneda, Luciana; Magalhães, Adriana Gomes; Dantas, Diego de Sousa

    2018-01-29

    This study aimed to link the content of four most used questionnaires to assess the quality of life of women with urinary incontinence (International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire; King's Health Questionnaire; Incontinence Quality of Life Questionnaire and Bristol Female Urinary Tract Symptoms Questionnaire) with the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Linking the questionnaires content and the ICF was performed by two independent reviewers, with an excellent concordance level (k = 0.941), using the method described by Cieza et al. A total of 94 items were analyzed, in which 154 meaningful concepts were identified and linked to 48 ICF categories, of which 49% were from activities and participation component (d) and 36.8% from body functions (b). The scales are linked with the classification at different levels. The International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire was the most limited instrument. Bristol Female Urinary Tract Symptoms Questionnaire and Incontinence Quality of Life Questionnaire presented greater agreement with the ICF, but the concepts in their items are mostly linked to body functions, denoting a biomedical vision. King's Health Questionnaire demonstrated greater affinity with the ICF, and most concepts were related to the activities and participation categories, approaching more effectively the biopsychosocial model. Implications for Rehabilitation Choosing the right instrument to assess the quality of life of women with urinary incontinence can be a difficult task, since the instruments have different approaches. The use of International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health as a reference among health professionals involved in rehabilitation of women with urinary incontinence will promote unification of the language about this group functioning. The comparison among instruments presented here will help the professional to choose the one that provides the greatest

  18. International variation in lung cancer mortality rates and trends among women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre, Lindsey A; Siegel, Rebecca L; Ward, Elizabeth M; Jemal, Ahmedin

    2014-06-01

    There is no recent comprehensive global analysis of lung cancer mortality in women. We describe contemporary mortality rates and trends among women globally. We used the World Health Organization's Cancer Mortality Database covering 65 populations on six continents to calculate age-standardized (1960 Segi world standard) lung cancer death rates during 2006 to 2010 and annual percent change in rates for available years from 1985 to 2011 and for the most recent five data years by population and age group (30-49 and 50-74 years). Lung cancer mortality rates (per 100,000) among young women (30-49 years) during 2006 to 2010 ranged from 0.7 in Costa Rica to 14.8 in Hungary. Rates among young women were stable or declining in 47 of 52 populations examined. Rates among women 50 to 74 years ranged from 8.8 in Georgia and Egypt to 120.0 in Scotland. In both age groups, rates were highest in parts of Europe (Scotland, Hungary, Denmark) and North America and lowest in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Rates in older women were increasing for more than half (36/64) of populations examined, including most countries in Southern, Eastern, and Western Europe and South America. Although widespread reductions in lung cancer in young women provide evidence of tobacco control success, rates continue to increase among older women in many countries. More concentrated efforts to initiate or expand tobacco control programs in these countries globally will be required to attenuate the future lung cancer burden. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 23(6); 1025-36. ©2014 AACR. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Dietary Patterns and Their Associations with the Diet Quality Index-International (DQI-I) in Korean Women with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Moon-Kyung; Kim, Yoo-Sun; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Yuri

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine dietary pattern, nutritional intake, and diet quality of Korean pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Between October 2008 and May 2012, 166 pregnant women diagnosed with GDM completed a questionnaire and dietary intake was assessed using a 3-day food record. Blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) concentrations were measured and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed. Two major dietary patterns ("carbohydrate and vegetable" and "western" patterns) were identified through factor analysis. Dietary pattern scores for each dietary pattern were categorized into tertiles. The dietary quality index-international (DQI-I) was used to measure overall diet quality. Subjects with higher carbohydrate and vegetable pattern scores reported less physical activity (p pattern scores were associated with higher sodium intakes (p = 0.02), but lower intakes of fat (p = 0.002) and other micronutrients. On the other hand, higher western pattern scores were associated with higher fat intake (p = 0.0001), but lower intakes of sodium (p = 0.01) and other micronutrients. Higher scores for both dietary patterns were associated with lower scores in the moderation category of the DQI-I (p dietary pattern.

  20. A Psycho-Educational HIV/STI Prevention Intervention for Internally Displaced Women in Leogane, Haiti: Results from a Non-Randomized Cohort Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Logie, Carmen H.; Daniel, CarolAnn; Newman, Peter A.; Weaver, James; Loutfy, Mona R.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little evidence exists regarding efficacious HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STI) prevention interventions with internally displaced populations. Internally displaced women are at elevated risk for HIV/STI due to limited access to health services, heightened poverty and social network breakdown. The FASY (Famn an Aksyon Pou Sante' Yo) (Women Taking Action For Their Health) study examined the effectiveness of a peer health worker (PHW) delivered psycho-educational HIV/STI ...

  1. Movement profiles of elite women soccer players during international matches and the effect of opposition's team ranking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Adam; Norton, Kevin; Lyons, Keith

    2014-12-01

    Abstract Movement patterns in elite men's soccer have been reported in depth, but less research exists for women's soccer. Aims of the study were to identify the movement profiles of elite women soccer players in international competition and examine the effect the level of opposition, based on Federation Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) rankings, had on the physical demands of the game. MinimaxX athlete tracking devices were used by 15 players during 13 international matches against opponent teams of varying ability. Total distance covered averaged 9292 ± 175 m. There was a decrease in high-intensity running (HIR) in the 60- to 75-min and 75- to 90-min periods compared to the 0- to 15-min period of 22.4% and 26.1%, respectively (P = 0.022, P = 0.004) although sprint distances remained unchanged across game periods. HIR distances covered were significantly greater for midfielders versus defenders, while defenders had lower sprinting compared to both midfielders and attackers. Stronger opponents elicited less HIR and greater low-speed activity (LSA) compared to playing teams of similar or lower ranking. These results are important to coaches to prepare players for international competition and show the differing demands required depending on the ability of the opponents.

  2. Women and mental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unaiza Niaz

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Issues related to the mental health of women are a priority these days. Many international organisations working in the field of psychiatry are having sections on it now. This approach can go a long way in the improvement of the available mental health services for this population.

  3. International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health in women with breast cancer: a proposal for measurement instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Flávia Nascimento de; Koifman, Rosalina Jorge; Bergmann, Anke

    2013-06-01

    The International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) aims at standardization, but its applicability requires consistent instruments. In Brazil, invasive therapeutic approaches are frequent, leading to functional alterations. The current study thus aimed to identify and discuss instruments capable of measuring ICF core set codes for breast cancer. The review included ICF studies in women with breast cancer diagnosis and studies with the objective of translating and validating instruments for the Brazilian population, and consistent with the codes. Review studies, systematic or not, were excluded. Eight instruments were selected, and the WHOQOL-Bref was the most comprehensive. The use of various instruments showed 19 coinciding codes, and the instruments as a whole covered 58 of the total of 81 codes. The use of multiple instruments is time-consuming, so new studies are needed to propose parsimonious tools capable of measuring functioning in women treated for breast cancer.

  4. Injuries in women's international ice hockey: an 8-year study of the World Championship tournaments and Olympic Winter Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuominen, Markku; Stuart, Michael J; Aubry, Mark; Kannus, Pekka; Tokola, Kari; Parkkari, Jari

    2016-11-01

    We report the incidence, type, mechanism and severity of ice hockey injuries in women's international ice hockey championships. All injuries in the International Ice Hockey Federation World Women's Championship, World Women's under-18 Championship and Olympic Winter Games tournaments were analysed over an 8-year period using a strict injury definition, standardised reporting and team physician diagnosis. 168 injuries were recorded in 637 games over an 8-year period resulting in an injury rate (IR) of 6.4 per 1000 player-games and 22.0/1000 player-game hours. The IRs were 2.7/1000 player-games for the lower body, 1.4 for the upper body, 1.3 for the head and face and 0.9 for the spine and trunk. Contusion was the most common injury followed by a sprain. The most commonly injured site was the knee (48.6% of lower body injuries; IR 1.3/1000 player-games). The Medial collateral ligament sprain occurred in 37.1% and ACL rupture in 11.4% of knee injuries. A concussion (74.3%; IR 1.0/1000 player-games) was the most common head injury. The risk of injury to female ice hockey players at World Championship and Olympic tournaments was about half of that observed in the men's Championships. Full facial protection decreases the risk of lacerations and should be continued in all future female tournaments. More effective prevention strategies for knee, ankle and shoulder injuries are needed in women's ice hockey. Improved concussion education is necessary to promote more consistent diagnosis and return to play protocols. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  5. International Networking for Young Scientists Event with Jenny Simanowitz and Symposium Gender and Science: Women Making Difference?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Červinková, Alice; Linková, Marcela

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 4, 1-2 (2005), s. 23-31 ISSN 1214-1909. [International Networking for Young Scientists Event with Jenny Simanowitz and. Vídeň, 28.02.05-01.03.05] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1P05OK459 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70280505 Keywords : young women researchers * networking Subject RIV: AO - Sociology, Demography http://www.zenyaveda.cz/html/index.php?s1=1&s2=3&s3=4&lng=12&PHPSESSID=f20860b9711b5929d6c2a4dbc16511bb

  6. Relationships between perceived stress, coping behavior and cortisol secretion in women with high and low levels of internalized racism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tull, Eugene S; Sheu, Yah-Tyng; Butler, Cleve; Cornelious, Karimah

    2005-02-01

    It is hypothesized that a chronic defeat response to social or environmental stressors increases the likelihood of dysfunction of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis with dysregulation of cortisol, accumulation of abdominal fat and development of glucose intolerance. Recent studies show that African-Caribbean women who have a high level of internalized racism (INR) are at increased risk for abdominal obesity and glucose intolerance. The aim of the current study was to determine if African-Caribbean women with high and low INR differ in their levels of perceived stress and defeat coping style, and in the relationship of these factors to cortisol secretion. On the island of Dominica, information on perceived stress and coping style was collected from age- and body mass index-matched samples of nondiabetic women aged 25-60 with high (n = 27) and low (n = 26) INR. Cortisol levels for each participant were determined from saliva specimens collected at 8:30 am and 10:30 pm. A higher mean perceived stress score (PSS) and greater tendency to use "restraint," "denial" and "behavioral disengagement" (defeated) coping (BDC) styles were found among women with high INR compared to those with low INR. In the combined sample, PSS and BDC were significantly correlated with an indicator of dysregulation of cortisol. However, in group-specific analyses, adjusting for age and education, these correlations remained significant only among women with high INR. These findings support the view that high perceived stress and defeated coping style may be factors that link high INR to dysregulation of cortisol and, perhaps, also to greater risk of metabolic abnormalities.

  7. International Marriages and Marital Citizenship. Southeast Asian Women on the Move

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fresnoza-Flot, A.; Ricordeau, G.

    2017-01-01

    While marriage has lost its popularity in many developed countries and is no longer an obligatory path to family formation, it has gained momentum among binational couples as states reinforce their control over human migration. Focusing on the case of Southeast Asian women who have been epitomized

  8. African American Women Scholars and International Research: Dr. Anna Julia Cooper's Legacy of Study Abroad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Stephanie Y.

    2009-01-01

    EIn this article, the author presents a little-known but detailed history of Black women's tradition of study abroad. Specifically, she situates Dr. Anna Julia Cooper within the landscape of historic African American students who studied in Japan, Germany, Jamaica, England, Italy, Haiti, India, West Africa, and Thailand, in addition to France. The…

  9. Russian Contribution to the International Kant Studies from the Late 19th Century until the Present Day: An Analysis of Publications in “Kant-Studien”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey Salikov

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This article gives a general characteristic of the publications of the Russian philosophers in the oldest Kantian Journal “Kant-Studien”. The study embraces the entire period of the existence of this magazine, from the very beginning down to our days. In general, after compiling all materials related to Russia published in “Kant-Studien”, I became aware of get a picture of a significant presence of Russian philosophers in this periodical. This gives me a good reason to conclude that even if the impact of the Russian philosophical thought on the international Kant studies was not decisive, then, at least, it was tangible. This influence was due to the phenomenon which was later called the “Silver Age of Russian philosophy”, as well as the phenomenon of Russian emigration, arising as a result of wars and revolutions in Russia and the exodus of the Russian philosophers of the West, where one of their main initial shelters was Germany.

  10. Beyond a curricular design of convenience: replacing the noon conference with an academic half day in three internal medicine residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalden, Maren K; Warm, Eric J; Logio, Lia S

    2013-05-01

    Several residency programs have created an academic half day (AHD) for the delivery of core curriculum, and some program Web sites provide narrative descriptions of individual AHD curricula; nonetheless, little published literature on the AHD format exists. This article details three distinctive internal medicine residency programs (Cambridge Health Alliance, University of Cincinnati, and New York Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical College) whose leaders replaced the traditional noon conference curriculum with an AHD. Although each program's AHD developed independently of the other two, retrospective comparative review reveals instructive similarities and differences that may be useful to other residency directors. In this article, the authors describe the distinct approaches to the AHD at the three institutions through a framework of six core principles: (1) protect time and space to facilitate learning, (2) nurture active learning in residents, (3) choose and sequence curricular content deliberately, (4) develop faculty, (5) encourage resident preparation and accountability for learning, and (6) employ a continuous improvement approach to curriculum development and evaluation. The authors chronicle curricular adaptations at each institution over the first three years of experience. Preliminary outcome data, presented in the article, suggests that the transition from the traditional noon conference to an AHD may increase conference attendance, improve resident and faculty satisfaction with the curriculum, and improve resident performance on the In Training Examination.

  11. [Women interned due to aggression at an emergency hospital: the (in)visibility of violence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilha, Michele Mazza; Leal, Sandra Maria Cezar; Soares, Joannie dos Santos Fachinelli

    2010-06-01

    This is a cross-sectional study that aims to characterize the hospitalization of female victims of aggression at Hospital de Pronto Socorro de Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, over the year 2005. The data collection was done through the analysis of the records of women above 18 years old who had been victims of aggression. The analysis was described through the use of Epi-Info Software, with the categorization of the events and the crossing of descriptive variables and absolute and relative frequency indexes. Over the studied time frame, 73 women, victims of aggression, entered the hospital; 49.3% of them were between the ages of 18 and 29; 41.1% were assaulted with firearm and 37% with white weapon. In nearly all records, data were incomplete or lacked registrations at all, an indication that many cases of aggression were not identified during the hospitalization time and that the treatment was restricted to physical lesions.

  12. Chinese Urban Young Women's Preferences And Perceptions Toward International Cosmetic Magazine Advertising

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Xi

    2006-01-01

    Advertising is regarded as the most effective tool for multinationals to communicate with their target consumers. Further, understanding target consumers' perceptions and preferences can help advertisers implement advertising strategy more easily and effectively. However, as the implementation of China reform and openness policy in 1979, the society has a tendency toward modernisation and Westernisation, and Chinese urban young women become more opened, experienced, and affluent for shopping ...

  13. Annexe 2 - Charter of The Women's International War Crimes Tribunal On Japan's Military Sexual Slavery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available (Incorporating Modifications Agreed upon During the Hague Meeting, 26-27 October 2000 PreambleWitnessing the passage of the 20th century without any justice done to women victims and survivors of sexual slavery committed by the Japanese Military in various Asian countries under its colonial domination and military occupation before and during the Second World War, being one of the most horrendous forms of wartime sexual violence known in this century;Witnessing also that violence against wom...

  14. Annexe 2 - Charter of The Women's International War Crimes Tribunal On Japan's Military Sexual Slavery

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    (Incorporating Modifications Agreed upon During the Hague Meeting, 26-27 October 2000) PreambleWitnessing the passage of the 20th century without any justice done to women victims and survivors of sexual slavery committed by the Japanese Military in various Asian countries under its colonial domination and military occupation before and during the Second World War, being one of the most horrendous forms of wartime sexual violence known in this century;Witnessing also that violence against wom...

  15. Panels target women's response to the global economic crisis and ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    To celebrate International Women's Day, IDRC held two public panels on March 9 at its head office in Ottawa. The event was hosted by IDRC 's Women's Rights and Citizenship ( WRC ) and Rural Poverty and Environment programs, and Staff Association. More than 200 people attended the event that focused on women's ...

  16. Prevalence of the overactive bladder among Iranian women based on the International Continence Society definition: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safarinejad, Mohammad Reza

    2009-01-01

    There is a continuing debate on the accurate prevalence estimates of overactive bladder (OAB) among different ethnicities and regions. The aims of our study were to determine the prevalence of OAB, associated risk factors, and the impact of OAB on the quality of life and sexual function of Iranian women. A total of 8748 women between 15 and 55 years of age enrolled in this cross-sectional study. The definition of the 2002 International Continence Society (ICS) was applied to assess the prevalence of OAB. All participants underwent a detailed history and physical examination that included an evaluation of quality of life, coping strategies and treatment-seeking behavior, laboratory tests, urinalysis and current or previous therapy. The degree of bother was quantified using s visual analog scale (VAS). The overall prevalence of OAB was found to be 18.2% and increased with age from 10.9% in adults aged 15-29 years to 26.2% in those aged >50 years old (test for trend, P = 0.001). A negative impact of OAB on sexual function was reported by 72.3% of the women. Frequency was the most commonly reported symptom (67% of women), followed by urgency (54%). Subjects with OAB had a higher prevalence of anxiety (28.2 vs. 8.8%; P = 0.001), depression (38.2 vs. 18.2%; P = 0.02) and tiredness (16.4 vs. 2.7%; P = 0.001), and they reported significant impairment in carrying out household chores (P = 0.01), physical activities (P = 0.01) and work-related activities (P = 0.01) as well as negative effects on education (P = 0.02), sleep (P = 0.001), relationships (P = 0.001) and annual income (P = 0.01). The prevalence of OAB in Iranian women is higher than that reported in many previous studies in developed and developing countries. Our results reveal that OAB is a highly prevalent condition among Iranian women and that is has a serious impact on quality of life and sexual function.

  17. Dinosaur Day!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Sandra; Baptiste, H. Prentice

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe how they capitalized on their first-grade students' love of dinosaurs by hosting a fun-filled Dinosaur Day in their classroom. On Dinosaur Day, students rotated through four dinosaur-related learning stations that integrated science content with art, language arts, math, and history in a fun and time-efficient…

  18. The Role of an International Higher Education Partnership to Improve Gender Equality and Empower Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Sandra Louise Clements

    2014-01-01

    This is a research case study of an International Higher Education Partnership (IHEP) between Vanguard University of Southern California (VUSC) and the University of Duhok (UoD) in the Kurdistan Region of northern Iraq funded by the British Council DelPHE-Iraq project targeting Millennial Development Goal (MDG) #3 to promote gender equality and…

  19. Late Miocene to present-day exhumation and uplift of the Internal Zone of the Rif chain: Insights from low temperature thermochronometry and basin analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romagny, A.; Ph. Münch; Cornée, J.-J.; Corsini, M.; Azdimousa, A.; Melinte-Dobrinescu, M. C.; Drinia, H.; Bonno, M.; Arnaud, N.; Monié, P.; Quillévéré, F.; Ben Moussa, A.

    2014-07-01

    Located on the margin of the west Alboran basin, the Gibraltar Arc (Betic-Rif mountain belt) displays post-Pliocene vertical movements evidenced by uplifted marine sedimentary basins and marine terraces. Quantification of vertical movements is an important clue to understand the origin of present-day relief generation in the Betic-Rif mountain chain together with the causes of the Messinian Salinity Crisis. In this paper, we present the results of a pluridisciplinary study combining an analysis of low temperature thermochronology and Pliocene basins evolution to constrain the exhumation history and surface uplift of internals units of the Rif belt (Northern Morocco). The mean (U-Th)/He apatite ages obtained from 11 samples are comprised between 14.1 and 17.8 Ma and display a wide dispersion, which could be explained by a great variability of apatite chemistries in the analyzed samples. No correlations between altitude and age have been found along altitudinal profile suggesting a rapid exhumation during this period. Thermal modeling using our (U-Th)/He apatite ages and geochronological data previously obtained in the same area (40Ar/39Ar and K/Ar data on biotite, zircon and apatite fission track) allow us to propose a cooling history. The rocks suffered a rapid cooling at 60-100 °C/Ma between 22.5 and 19 Ma, then cooled to temperatures around 40 °C between 19 and 18 Ma. They were re-heated at around 110 °C between 18 and 15 Ma then rapidly cooled and exhumed to reach the surface temperature at around 13 Ma. The re-heating could be related to a renewal in thrusting and burying of the inner zones. Between 15 and 13 Ma the cooling resumed at a rate of 50 °C/Ma indicating an exhumation rate of 0.8 mm/y considering an average 40 °C/km geothermal gradient. This exhumation may be linked to the extension in the Alboran Sea. Otherwise biostratigraphic and sedimentological analysis of Pliocene basins of the internal Rif provided informations on the more recent events

  20. Internalized weight bias mediates the relationship between depressive symptoms and disordered eating behavior among women who think they are overweight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sienko, Rachel M; Saules, Karen K; Carr, Meagan M

    2016-08-01

    This study tested the potential mediating role of Internalized Weight Bias (IWB) in the relationship between depressive symptoms (DEP-SX) and disordered eating behavior. In particular, we hypothesized that IWB may be an intervening variable in the well documented association between depression and disordered eating. College women (N=172) who were taking undergraduate psychology courses and who endorsed thinking they were overweight completed the Patient Health Questionnaire depression screener (PHQ-9), the Weight Bias Internalization Scale (WBIS), and the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q). Bootstrapping mediation analyses were conducted to explore the relationships between these variables. IWB was significantly correlated with eating disorder symptoms and DEP-SX, but not Body Mass Index. Mediation analyses supported a model in which IWB mediated the relationship between DEP-SX and disordered eating behavior. Results indicate that individuals with elevated DEP-SX may be likely to internalize weight bias, which may in turn lead to maladaptive approaches to eating and weight control, regardless of one's actual weight status. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. An international comparison of women's occupational health issues in the Philippines, Thailand, Malaysia, Canada, Hong Kong and Singapore: the CIDA-SEAGEP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Bernard C K

    2005-10-01

    An international comparison study of women's occupational health issues was carried out in 2000 for the Philippines, Thailand, Malaysia, Canada, Hong Kong and Singapore. The study was funded by the Canadian International Development Agency's Southeast Asia Gender Equity Program. The objective was to compare the issues, risk factors, social determinants, and challenges in women's occupational health, according to the status of economic development as defined by the World Bank. Data were collected through 27 key informant interviews of high-ranking government officials and senior researchers, self-administered questionnaires on country or regional statistics and 16 courtesy calls. Results indicated that women's occupational health problems common in these countries or regions included women's long hours of work (double workday), shift work and a caring role for family and friends. Problems reported in developing countries but not developed countries included poor access to training and protective equipment, and insufficient legislation to protect women's rights. Problems reported in developed countries but not in developing countries included obesity, smoking and not including women in health research. This paper provides insights into the changing environment in the workplace, such as increasing participation of women in the paid workforce and changes in gender differences due to the changing country economy, for improving women's occupational health.

  2. Thinking about internal states, a qualitative investigation into metacognitions in women with eating disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background There is a need for qualitative research to help develop case conceptualisations to guide the development of Metacognitive Therapy interventions for Eating Disorders. Method A qualitative study informed by grounded theory methodology was conducted involving open-ended interviews with 27 women aged 18–55 years, who were seeking or receiving treatment for a diagnosed ED. Results The categories identified in this study appeared to be consistent with a metacognitive model including constructs of a Cognitive Attentional Syndrome and metacognitive beliefs. These categories appear to be transdiagnostic, and the interaction between the categories is proposed to explain the maintenance of EDs. Conclusions The transdiagnostic model proposed may be useful to guide the development of future metacognitive therapy interventions for EDs with the hope that this will lead to improved outcomes for individuals with EDs. PMID:24999403

  3. Functionality in Women with Breast Cancer: The Use of International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) in Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento de Carvalho, Flávia; Bergmann, Anke; Koifman, Rosalina Jorge

    2014-05-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the functionality of women diagnosed with breast cancer according to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). [Subjects and Methods] This was a cross-sectional study. We applied instruments consistent with the summary of ICF codes for breast cancer: quality of life questionnaire (WHOQOL), upper limb symptoms and function (DASH), social support, physical examination and functional medical record data. [Results] The study included 105 women who were 55 years old and subjected to surgical treatment within an average of 1.63 year previously. The 'function' component considered in the WHOQOL, the DASH and physical examination. There were high prevalences of positive responses for most codes, and only b130, d430, d445, d640, d650, d920 and codes of environmental factors considered by the Social Support Questionnaire showed high prevalences of negative responses (47.6%, 61%, 43.8%, 63.8%, 56.2%, 52.4%, and 35.2%, respectively). [Conclusion] There was a lower prevalence of disability, with the exception of issues related to strenuous activity and load. Some findings showed conflicting results between different instruments that measure the same code, and studies that propose more accurate tools and are able to consider the ICF codes specific to this pathology are necessary.

  4. A proposed new international convention supporting the rights of pregnant women and girls and their newborn infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winrow, Benjamin; Bile, Khalif; Hafeez, Assad; Davies, Hugh; Brown, Nick; Zafar, Shamsa; Cham, Mamady; Phillips, Barbara; MacDonald, Rhona; Southall, David P

    2012-05-01

    For a multitude of eminently modifiable reasons, death rates for pregnant women and girls and their newborn infants in poorly resourced countries remain unacceptably high. The concomitant high morbidity rates compound the situation. The rights of these vulnerable individuals are incompletely protected by existing United Nations human rights conventions, which many countries have failed to implement. The authors propose a novel approach grounded on both human rights and robust evidence-based clinical guidelines to create a 'human rights convention specifically for pregnant women and girls and their newborn infants'. The approach targets the 'right to health' of these large, vulnerable and neglected populations. The proposed convention is designed so that it can be monitored, audited and evaluated objectively. It should also foster a sense of national ownership and accountability as it is designed to be relevant to local situations and to be incorporated into local clinical governance systems. It may be of particular value to those countries that are not yet on target to meet the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), especially MDGs 4 and 5, which target child and maternal mortality, respectively. To foster a sense of international responsibility, two additional initiatives are integral to its philosophy: the promotion of twinning between well and poorly resourced regions and a raising of awareness of how some well-resourced countries can damage the health of mothers and babies, for example, through the recruitment of health workers trained by national governments and taken from the public health system.

  5. The influence of low job control on ambulatory blood pressure and perceived stress over the working day in men and women from the Whitehall II cohort.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steptoe, A.; Willemsen, A.H.M.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Work stress contributes to risk of coronary heart disease and hypertension. This study tested the influence of job control on ambulatory blood pressure, and ratings of perceived stress and happiness in men and women systematically sampled by socio-economic status from the Whitehall II

  6. "Because we missed the way that we eat at the middle of the day:" Dietary acculturation and food routines among Dominican women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisberg-Shapiro, Pamela; Devine, Carol M

    2015-12-01

    Better understanding of dietary change mechanisms among growing immigrant populations is needed in light of increased risk for diet-related chronic health conditions and inconsistent associations between acculturation and diet. This grounded theory research aimed to understand the lived experiences of interactions between food culture and social, economic, and physical environments in an immigrating population, Dominican women living in the Dominican Republic and New York City. Twenty-nine Dominican women participated in qualitative interviews about food and eating behaviors, life course experiences, and environments. Daily food and eating routines, framed by shopping for, preparation of, and consumption of 'la comida' or the main meal, emerged as dominant themes reflecting differences in women's economic, social, and physical environments. Routines were shaped by employment, household characteristics, and the food environment. Participating women attributed weight gain to changes in their food routines following immigration. The construction, disruption, and reconstruction of food and eating routines in response to differing economic, social, and physical environments in the sending and the receiving cultures provided new insights into the relationship between structural and cultural contexts of food and eating in an immigrant population. A food routines framework provides new insights into behavioral and weight changes with immigration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Gender Differences in Internalizing Symptoms and Suicide Risk Among Men and Women Seeking Treatment for Cannabis Use Disorder from Late Adolescence to Middle Adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Katherine T; Li, Ningfei; McClure, Erin A; Sonne, Susan C; Gray, Kevin M

    2016-07-01

    Cannabis continues to rise in popularity as the perception of its harmfulness decreases and evidence of its deleterious developmental effect increases. While internalizing distress and suicide risk have been linked with cannabis use problems [DSM-5 cannabis use disorder (CUD); DSM-IV cannabis abuse and dependence] it remains unclear how this association varies over the course of development in treatment-seeking men and women. The current study utilized the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network (NIDA CTN) to conduct a cross-sectional comparison of internalizing distress and suicide risk among men (n=437) and women (n=163) spanning ages 18-50 who met DSM-5 criteria for CUD. Interactions between gender and developmental stage (i.e., late adolescence, early adulthood, and middle adulthood) were observed for suicide risk and anxiety but not depression problems. Specifically, women seeking CUD treatment in late adolescence and middle adulthood exhibited significantly higher rates of anxiety and suicide risk compared to men seeking treatment during the same developmental stages. Internalizing distress and suicide risk did not differ between treatment-seeking men and women in the early adult stage. Overall, results suggest that the structure of risk for CUD may differ in men and women across the lifespan and that women presenting for CUD treatment during late adolescence and middle adulthood may uniquely benefit from intervention designed to address these elevations in anxiety and suicide risk. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Mechanisms for the Negative Effects of Internalized HIV-Related Stigma on Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence in Women: The Mediating Roles of Social Isolation and Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, Bulent; Smith, Whitney; Cohen, Mardge H; Wilson, Tracey E; Adimora, Adaora A; Merenstein, Daniel; Adedimeji, Adebola; Wentz, Eryka L; Foster, Antonina G; Metsch, Lisa; Tien, Phyllis C; Weiser, Sheri D; Turan, Janet M

    2016-06-01

    Internalization of HIV-related stigma may inhibit a person's ability to manage HIV disease through adherence to treatment regimens. Studies, mainly with white men, have suggested an association between internalized stigma and suboptimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). However, there is a scarcity of research with women of different racial/ethnic backgrounds and on mediating mechanisms in the association between internalized stigma and ART adherence. The Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS) is a multicenter cohort study. Women living with HIV complete interviewer-administered questionnaires semiannually. Cross-sectional analyses for the current article included 1168 women on ART for whom data on medication adherence were available from their last study visit between April 2013 and March 2014, when the internalized stigma measure was initially introduced. The association between internalized stigma and self-reported suboptimal ART adherence was significant for those in racial/ethnic minority groups (AOR = 0.69, P = 0.009, 95% CI: 0.52 to 0.91), but not for non-Hispanic whites (AOR = 2.15, P = 0.19, 95% CI: 0.69 to 6.73). Depressive symptoms, loneliness, and low perceived social support mediated the association between internalized stigma and suboptimal adherence in the whole sample, as well as in the subsample of minority participants. In serial mediation models, internalized stigma predicted less-perceived social support (or higher loneliness), which in turn predicted more depressive symptoms, which in turn predicted suboptimal medication adherence. Findings suggest that interconnected psychosocial mechanisms affect ART adherence, and that improvements in adherence may require multifaceted interventions addressing both mental health and interpersonal factors, especially for minority women.

  9. Brachytherapy days

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peiffert, D.

    2002-01-01

    The loco regional control of cancers stays the absolute objective of the treatment. The thought of these days has allowed to evaluate the equipment and the practices, and to consider the developments to undertake in harmony with the investments of external radiotherapy. (N.C.)

  10. [A clinical case of young, oral combined contraceptive using women, heterozygous carrier of the Factor V (Leiden) which revealed thrombosis of the left internal jugular vein and brain ischemia with cerebral infarction and ischemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovachev, S; Ramshev, K; Ramsheva, Z; Ivanov, A; Ganovska, A

    2013-01-01

    Thrombophilia is associated with increased risks of venous thrombosis in women taking oral contraceptive preparations. Universal thrombophilia screening in women prior to prescribing oral contraceptive preparations is not supported by current evidence. The case is presented of a 23 year-old women with a personal history of interruption and on the same day started with oral contraceptive (0.03 microg ethynil estradiol - 0.075 microg gestodene), which due on a 18 pill/day to acute headache, increasing vomiting and speaking defects. Physical/neurologic/gynecologic examinations observed a normal status. The MRI and CT revealed thrombosis of the left internal jugular vein and brain ischemia with cerebral infarction and ischemic stroke. The acute therapy of thrombotic findings was accompanied with many tests. The thrombophilia PCR-Real time - test finds heterozygous carrier of the Factor V (Leiden). This case shows the need of large prospective studies that should be undertaken to refine the risks and establish the associations of thrombophilias with venous thrombosis among contraceptive users. The key to a prompt diagnosis is to know the risk factors. The relative value of a thrombophilia screening programme before contraceptive using needs to be established.

  11. The Internalized Homophobia Scale for Vietnamese Sexual Minority Women: Conceptualization, Factor Structure, Reliability, and Associations With Hypothesized Correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Trang Quynh; Poteat, Tonia; Bandeen-Roche, Karen; German, Danielle; Nguyen, Yen Hai; Vu, Loan Kieu-Chau; Nguyen, Nam Thi-Thu; Knowlton, Amy R

    2016-08-01

    We developed the first Vietnamese Internalized Homophobia (IH) scale for use with Vietnamese sexual minority women (SMW). Drawing from existing IH scales in the international literature and based on prior qualitative research about SMW in the Viet Nam context, the scale covers two domains: self-stigma (negative attitudes toward oneself as a sexual minority person) and sexual prejudice (negative attitudes toward homosexuality/same-sex relations in general). Scale items, including items borrowed from existing scales and items based on local expressions, were reviewed and confirmed by members of the target population. Quantitative evaluation used data from an anonymous web-based survey of Vietnamese SMW, including those who identified as lesbian (n = 1187), or as bisexual (n = 641) and those who were unsure about their sexual identity (n = 353). The scale was found to consist of two highly correlated factors reflecting self-stigma (not normal/wholesome and self-reproach and wishing away same-sex sexuality) and one factor reflecting sexual prejudice, and to have excellent internal consistency. Construct validity was evidenced by subscale associations with a wide range of hypothesized correlates, including perceived sexual stigma, outness, social support, connection to other SMW, relationship quality, psychological well-being, anticipation of heterosexual marriage, and endorsement of same-sex marriage legalization. Self-stigma was more strongly associated with psychosocial correlates, and sexual prejudice was more associated with endorsement of legal same-sex marriage. The variations in these associations across the hypothesized correlates and across sexual identity groups were consistent with the minority stress model and the IH literature, and exhibited context-specific features, which are discussed.

  12. Appearance Self-Attitudes of African American and European American Women: Media Comparisons and Internalization of Beauty Ideals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferson, Deana L.; Stake, Jayne E.

    2009-01-01

    African American (AA) women have reported less body image disturbance than European American (EA) women, but questions remain about the nature and extent of this difference. This study examined differences in the body image of 80 AA women and 89 EA women with an improved methodology that controlled for body size, distinguished between satisfaction…

  13. Pamphlet day

    OpenAIRE

    Eastwood, Phil; Dunne, Chris; Fowler, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Pamphlet Day: A Political Protest Pamphlet and Zine Event focused around the occupation of Loughborough Public Library, Granby Street, Loughborough, LE11 3DZ, UK. ABSTRACT “Throughout the 20th Century artists have engaged provocatively with text, images and performance, publishing writings, pamphlets, and manifestos that challenge the status quo.” (1) Loughborough Echo, May 2017 https://www.loughboroughecho.net/whats-on/arts-culture-news/pamphlet-art-feature-events-13038989 A s...

  14. Prevalence and Associated Factors of Secondhand Smoke Exposure among Internal Chinese Migrant Women of Reproductive Age: Evidence from China's Labor-Force Dynamic Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xiao; Luo, Xiaofeng; Ling, Li

    2016-04-01

    Secondhand smoke (SHS) is a major risk factor for poor health outcomes among women in China, where proportionately few women smoke. This is especially the case as it pertains to women's reproductive health, specifically migrant women who are exposed to SHS more than the population at large. There are several factors which may increase migrant women's risk of SHS exposure. This paper aims to investigate the prevalence and associated factors of SHS exposure among internal Chinese migrant women of reproductive age. The data used were derived from the 2014 Chinese Labor Dynamic Survey, a national representative panel survey. The age-adjusted rate of SHS exposure of women of reproductive age with migration experience was of 43.46% (95% CI: 40.73%-46.40%), higher than those without migration experience (35.28% (95% CI: 33.66%-36.97%)). Multivariate analysis showed that participants with a marital status of "Widowed" had statistically lower exposure rates, while those with a status of "Cohabitation" had statistically higher exposure. Those with an undergraduate degree or above had statistically lower SHS exposure. Those with increasing levels of social support, and those who currently smoke or drink alcohol, had statistically higher SHS exposure. Participants' different work-places had an effect on their SHS exposure, with outdoor workers statistically more exposed. Our findings suggest that urgent tobacco control measures should be taken to reduce smoking prevalence and SHS exposure. Specific attention should be paid to protecting migrant women of reproductive age from SHS.

  15. 'My body is mine': Qualitatively exploring agency among internally displaced women participants in a small-group intervention in Leogane, Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logie, Carmen H; Daniel, CarolAnn

    2016-01-01

    The 2010 earthquake resulted in the breakdown of Haiti's social, economic and health infrastructure. Over one-quarter of a million people remain internally displaced (ID). ID women experience heightened vulnerability to intimate partner violence (IPV) due to increased poverty and reduced community networks. Scant research has examined experiences of IPV among ID women in post-earthquake Haiti. We conducted a qualitative study to explore the impact of participating in Famn an Aksyon Pou Santé Yo (FASY), a small-group HIV prevention intervention, on ID women's agency in Leogane, Haiti. We conducted four focus groups with ID women, FASY participants (n = 40) and in-depth individual interviews with peer health workers (n = 7). Our study was guided by critical ethnography and paid particular attention to power relations. Findings highlighted multiple forms of IPV (e.g., physical, sexual). Participants discussed processes of intrapersonal (confidence), interpersonal (communication), relational (support) and collective (women's rights) agency. Yet structural factors, including patriarchal gender norms and poverty, silenced IPV discussions and constrained women's agency. Findings suggest that agency among ID women is a multi-level, non-linear and incremental process. To effectively address IPV among ID women in Haiti, interventions should address structural contexts of gender inequity and poverty and concurrently facilitate multi-level processes of agency.

  16. Feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of the unity workshop: an internalized stigma reduction intervention for African American women living with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Deepa; Desmond, Michelle; Andrasik, Michele; Rasberry, Tonya; Lambert, Nina; Cohn, Susan E; Simoni, Jane

    2012-10-01

    Observational studies have examined the prevalence and impact of internalized stigma among African American women living with HIV, but there are no intervention studies investigating stigma reduction strategies in this population. Based on qualitative data previously collected, we adapted the International Center for Research on Women's HIV Stigma Toolkit for a domestic population of African American women to be consistent with Corrigan's principles of strategic stigma change. We implemented the intervention, led by an African American woman living with HIV, as a workshop across two afternoons. The participants discussed issues "triggered" by videos produced specifically for this purpose, learned coping mechanisms from each other, and practiced them in role plays with each other. We pilot tested the intervention with two groups of women (total N=24), measuring change in internalized stigma with the Stigma Scale for Chronic Illness before and after workshop participation. Sixty-two percent of the participants self-reported acquiring HIV through heterosexual sexual contact, 17% through intravenous drug use, 4% in utero, and 13% did not know the route of transmission. The intervention was feasible, enthusiastically accepted by the women, and led to decreased stigma from the start of the workshop to the end (p=0.05) and 1 week after (p=0.07) the last session of workshop. Findings suggest the intervention warrants further investigation.

  17. [Factorial analysis and internal consistency of the French version of the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS 20), in obese women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinaquy, S; Chabrol, H; Barbe, P

    2002-01-01

    The term alexithymia is derived from the Greek and means no words for feeling and is used to describe a personality trait characterized by the inability to experience and express emotion. Alexithymia is a relevant feature in subjects with eating disorders. The Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS) is the more used scale to assess alexithymia. The TAS 20 represents the latest revised and short version of the TAS, with psychometric properties clearly superior to the other alexithymia scales. The TAS 20 is a 20-items self-administered questionnaire including three subscales: ability to identify feelings, ability to describe feelings and externally oriented thinking. The TAS 20 was sparsely used in obese people and its validity was not studied at the present time in this specific population. The aim of this study was to assess the internal consistency and the factorial structure of the TAS 20 in a group of obese women. Method-The TAS 20 was administered to 192 obese women willing to loose weight, aged from 18 to 60 years. Their body mass index (BMI) was ranged from 27.5 to 55,0 kg/m2. The patients also completed a depression scale (Beck Depression Inventory 13). Cronbach's alpha coefficient was used to investigate the internal consistency of the scale. A confirmatory factorial analysis was performed to examine the validity of the initial three-factor structure in this population. The confirmatory factor analysis was conducted using STATISTICA 5.0((R)). Results-An exploratory factorial analysis using the principal components method was performed to search for a more relevant factorial structure. The global internal consistency value (a) was 0,74 for the full scale. The a coefficients were 0.78 and 0.67 respectively, for the two first subscales, (ability to identify feelings and ability to describe feelings), but was low (a=0.33) for the last subscale (externally oriented thinking). This result questionned the initial three-factor solution and conducted us to perform a

  18. Actual Daily Intakes of Tea Catechins and Thier Estimation According to Four Season 3 Day Weighed Dietary Records and a Short Food Frequency Questionnaire among Japanese Men and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endoh, Kaori; Matsui, Yuji; Takeshita, Masao; Katashima, Mitsuhiro; Yasunaga, Koichi; Kuriki, Kiyonori

    2017-01-01

    Background: Tea catechins are considered to be important preventive factors of cancer on several organs; however, the relationships of the actual daily intakes (ADIs) on the preventive effects have not been adequately addressed. We measured the ADIs of tea catechins as annual averages derived from every their ingested cups recorded by each subject, and the estimation models were established considering tea origin. Methods: Fifty-nine Japanese men and women completed four season 3 day weighed dietary records (WDRs) and a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ), and samples of green, oolong and black teas, ingested during a total 12 days were collected for the analysis. The ADIs of the total and composed catechins of all tea samples were measured by a high-performance liquid chromatography. The estimation models for the ADIs (R2: coefficient of determination) based on the WDRs and FFQ were established with multiple regression analysis using appropriate confounding factors. V Results: The ADIs of total catechins and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCg) were 110 and 21.4 mg/day in men and 157 and 34.7 mg/day in women, respectively. The total catechins ADIs were positively associated with green tea consumption based on WDRs and FFQ (adjusted R2 =0.421 and 0.341 for men and 0.346 and 0.238 for women, p<0.05 for all, respectively). Likewise, the EGCg ADIs were associated with green tea intake derived from WDRs and FFQ, respectively. Conclusions: We revealed the ADIs of total catechins and EGCg as annual averages could establish their estimation models. These provide reference information to clarify their relationships with cancer risks. PMID:29072829

  19. Pregnancy outcomes associated with extended use of the 52-mg 20 μg/day levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system beyond 60 months: A chart review of 776 women in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahamondes, Luis; Fernandes, Arlete; Bahamondes, M Valeria; Juliato, Cassia T; Ali, Moazzam; Monteiro, Ilza

    2018-03-01

    To assess the contraceptive performance of the 52-mg 20 μg/day levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS, Mirena; Bayer Oy, Turku, Finland) among women who maintain the same device without changes after 60 months. This is a chart review study in which we assessed the charts of 766 women who continue the same LNG-IUS for contraception beyond 60 months. The women were evaluated at the Family Planning clinic, University of Campinas Medical School, Campinas, SP, Brazil, from November 1990 to March 2011. We obtained sociodemographic data, duration of use, continuation and discontinuation rates and reasons, bleeding pattern at the recorded last visit. The statistical analysis was performed using Kaplan-Meier analysis. A total of 776 charts were identified of women who used the LNG-IUS beyond 60 months. The mean age (±S.E.M.) at LNG-IUS placement was 32.0±0.2 years (ranged 15 to 44 years; median was 32 years). The distribution of number of pregnancies was 0-1 (45%); 2-4 (54.1%) and≥5 (0.9%). The median length of the LNG-IUS' use was 73 months after placement (ranged 61-184 months). Zero pregnancies were reported and the main reasons for discontinuation were expiration of approved effective lifespan, menopause and planning pregnancy. The cumulative women-years (W-Y) of exposure were 967 and 1403 up to seven and 15 years, respectively. The main bleeding pattern reported by the women was amenorrhea. The 52-mg 20 μg/day LNG-IUD (Mirena) showed continue contraceptive efficacy beyond 5 years of use with no pregnancies detected over 967 and 1403 W-Y up to seven and 15 years after placement. The 52-mg 20 μg/day LNG-IUD presented a very high contraceptive efficacy beyond the first 5 years of lifetime labeled. Increasing data support that efficacy beyond 5 years of use, and new data suggested efficacy as long as 15 years. Healthcare professionals, policy makers and stakeholders could take advantage of the present information to decide to maintain the same device

  20. An enquiry of 'Every3Days' a drama-based workshop developing professional collaboration for women experiencing domestic violence during pregnancy in the South East of England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Kathleen; Salmon, Debra

    2012-12-01

    this exploratory work examined and assessed the experiences of participants (n=90) using an interactive drama workshop to facilitate the planning and understanding of multiagency working around domestic violence during pregnancy. a descriptive research design was utilised to collect data from field observations, participant reflective feedback sheets and semi-structured telephone interviews. participants invited to the workshop originated from a wide range of backgrounds including health and social care, criminal justice and the third sector. All participants were invited to complete the reflective feedback evaluation form. To enhance the comprehensiveness of the enquiry, semi-structured interviews were also conducted with 10 of the participants. shared themes emerging from the data analysis included improved awareness of the consequences of domestic violence; greater understanding of multiple professional roles including the policy context and enhanced skill development. However, participants questioned the extent to which this approach impacted upon longer term practice and policy development. by centring attention on the emic perspective of women themselves, the drama approach developed professional's awareness, relationships, understanding and skills. Nevertheless, drama can be an expensive education tool. It is therefore essential that further research explores the longer term impacts on practice and outcomes for women that include cost-benefit analysis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. International

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    This rubric reports on 10 short notes about international economical facts about nuclear power: Electricite de France (EdF) and its assistance and management contracts with Eastern Europe countries (Poland, Hungary, Bulgaria); Transnuclear Inc. company (a 100% Cogema daughter company) acquired the US Vectra Technologies company; the construction of the Khumo nuclear power plant in Northern Korea plays in favour of the reconciliation between Northern and Southern Korea; the delivery of two VVER 1000 Russian reactors to China; the enforcement of the cooperation agreement between Euratom and Argentina; Japan requested for the financing of a Russian fast breeder reactor; Russia has planned to sell a floating barge-type nuclear power plant to Indonesia; the control of the Swedish reactor vessels of Sydkraft AB company committed to Tractebel (Belgium); the renewal of the nuclear cooperation agreement between Swiss and USA; the call for bids from the Turkish TEAS electric power company for the building of the Akkuyu nuclear power plant answered by three candidates: Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), Westinghouse (US) and the French-German NPI company. (J.S.)

  2. Incidence and Prevalence of Sexual Dysfunction in Women and Men: A Consensus Statement from the Fourth International Consultation on Sexual Medicine 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Marita P; Sharlip, Ira D; Lewis, Ron; Atalla, Elham; Balon, Richard; Fisher, Alessandra D; Laumann, Edward; Lee, Sun Won; Segraves, Robert T

    2016-02-01

    The incidence and prevalence of various sexual dysfunctions in women and men are important to understand to designate priorities for epidemiologic and clinical research. This manuscript was designed to conduct a review of the literature to determine the incidence and prevalence of sexual dysfunction in women and men. Members of Committee 1 of the Fourth International Consultation on Sexual Medicine (2015) searched and reviewed epidemiologic literature on the incidence and prevalence of sexual dysfunctions. Key older studies and most studies published after 2009 were included in the text of this article. The outcome measures were the reports in the various studies of the incidence and prevalence of sexual dysfunction among women and men. There are more studies on incidence and prevalence for men than for women and many more studies on prevalence than incidence for women and men. The data indicate that the most frequent sexual dysfunctions for women are desire and arousal dysfunctions. In addition, there is a large proportion of women who experience multiple sexual dysfunctions. For men, premature ejaculation and erectile dysfunction are the most common sexual dysfunctions, with less comorbidity across sexual dysfunctions for men compared with women. These data need to be treated with caution, because there is a high level of variability across studies caused by methodologic differences in the instruments used to assess presence of sexual dysfunction, ages of samples, nature of samples, methodology used to gather the data, and cultural differences. Future research needs to use well-validated tools to gather data and ensure that the data collection strategy is clearly described. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Von Willebrand disease and other bleeding disorders in women: consensus on diagnosis and management from an international expert panel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    James, Andra H.; Kouides, Peter A.; Abdul-Kadir, Rezan; Edlund, Mans; Federici, Augusto B.; Halimeh, Susan; Kamphuisen, Pieter W.; Konkle, Barbara A.; Martínez-Perez, Oscar; McLintock, Claire; Peyvandi, Flora; Winikoff, Rochelle

    2009-01-01

    Reproductive tract bleeding in women is a naturally occurring event during menstruation and childbirth. In women with menorrhagia, however, congenital bleeding disorders historically have been underdiagnosed. This consensus is intended to allow physicians to better recognize bleeding disorders as a

  4. Validation of the Sinhala translation of the International Consultation on Incontinence Modular Questionnaire for female lower urinary tract symptoms among women in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Silva, Gayan; Furukan, Rameez; Goonewardene, Malik

    2017-12-01

    The objective of this study was to translate the International Consultation on Incontinence Modular Questionnaire for female lower urinary tract symptoms (ICIQ-FLUTS) into Sinhala and validate the Sinhala translation for use in clinical practice. The ICIQ-FLUTS was translated into Sinhala in accordance with the ICIQ validation protocol. The Sinhala translation was validated by administering it to 133 women with FLUTS, mainly urinary incontinence and or urgency, and to 118 women with symptoms other than FLUTS during the period 25 October 2013 to 23 December 2016, in the Academic Obstetrics and Gynaecology Unit, Teaching Hospital Mahamodara, Galle, Sri Lanka. The Sinhala translation had good content validity (assessed by a panel of clinicians including a content specialist, and a group of women with and without FLUTS), good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha coefficient in the range 0.69-0.75) was stable (no significant differences between median test-retest scores in a subgroup of 24 women with FLUTS), had good construct validity (marked difference between median scores in women presenting with and without FLUTS, p urinary incontinence and/or urgency.

  5. Clinical efficacy of oral administration of finasteride at a dose of 2.5 mg/day in women with female pattern hair loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Yong-Yon; Lew, Bark-Lynn; Sim, Woo-Young

    2018-03-01

    Female pattern hair loss (FPHL) presents with diffuse thinning over the mid-frontal scalp, for which various treatment modalities have been tried. Although currently, oral 5 α-reductase inhibitors such as finasteride are being used, their clinical efficacy remains controversial. We retrospectively investigated 544 premenopausal or postmenopausal patients with FPHL who were prescribed finasteride at a dose of 2.5 mg/day. Our study excluded patients with a follow-up period of < 3 months and patients who were prescribed other FPHL treatment modalities including topical minoxidil. Finally, 112 patients were evaluated based on their medical records and clinical photographs. Based on assessment using the Ludwig scale at the time of their initial visit, among 112 patients studied, 59 patients were classified as belonging to grade I, 47 were grade II, and 6 were grade III. Using global photographs, we found that 33 (29.5%) of the 112 patients studied showed slight improvement, 73 (65.2%) showed significant improvement, whereas no change was recorded in 6 (5.4%). We could demonstrate efficacy of administration of finasteride at a dose of 2.5 mg/day for patients with FPHL and also found that finasteride has a better effect on hair growth when patients had a lower Ludwig score and an older age at onset. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. A psycho-educational HIV/STI prevention intervention for internally displaced women in Leogane, Haiti: results from a non-randomized cohort pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen H Logie

    Full Text Available Little evidence exists regarding efficacious HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STI prevention interventions with internally displaced populations. Internally displaced women are at elevated risk for HIV/STI due to limited access to health services, heightened poverty and social network breakdown. The FASY (Famn an Aksyon Pou Sante' Yo (Women Taking Action For Their Health study examined the effectiveness of a peer health worker (PHW delivered psycho-educational HIV/STI pilot study with internally displaced women in Leogane, Haiti.This was a non-randomized cohort pilot study. Participants completed a computer-assisted pre-test programmed on Android tablet PCs followed by an HIV/STI educational video-based session and a 6-week psycho-educational group program of weekly meetings. Participants completed a post-test upon completion of group sessions. The primary outcome was HIV knowledge; our pre-specified index of clinically significant change was an effect size of 0.30. Secondary outcomes included: STI knowledge, condom use, social support, resilient coping, depression and relationship control. We used mixed-effects regression to calculate mean outcome pre-post score change. This study was registered (clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01492829.Between January 1-April 30, 2012 we assigned 200 participants to the study. The majority of participants (n = 176, 88% completed the study and were followed up at 8 weeks, finishing April 30, 2012. Adjusted for socio-demographic characteristics, HIV knowledge (β = 4.81; 95% CI 4.36-5.26, STI knowledge (β = 0.84; 95% CI 0.70-0.99, condom use (AOR = 4.05, 95% CI 1.86-8.83, and depression (β = -0.63, 95% CI -0.88--0.39 scores showed statistically significant change post-intervention (p<0.05.This pilot study evaluated a PHW psycho-educational HIV/STI prevention intervention among internally displaced women in post-earthquake Haiti. Pilot studies are an important approach to understand feasibility and scientific

  7. Factors that Can Promote or Impede the Advancement of Women as Leaders in Surgery: Results from an International Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase, Kazumi; Carpelan-Holmström, Monika; Kwong, Ava; Sanfey, Hilary

    2016-02-01

    Compared with male surgeons, women have less success advancing their careers and are underrepresented in leadership positions in surgery. The purpose of this study is to identify the qualifications necessary to become leaders in surgery and the career barriers faced by women surgeons in various cultural environments. A survey was performed with women surgeons in Japan, USA, Finland, and Hong Kong, China, to assess various barriers faced by women surgeons in the respective countries. To develop appropriate survey tool, a preliminary questionnaire was distributed to leaders in surgery and also in various organizations worldwide. The response rate was 23 % with 225 of 964 survey returned. Japanese women surgeons identify lacked family support as impeding a successful surgical career. US women surgeons feel more latent gender discrimination. Finnish women surgeons are less likely to need to sacrifice work-life balance, when holding leadership positions. Women surgeons worldwide are highly motivated to develop their career and agree the percentage of women surgeons in leadership positions should be increased. Women surgeons in different countries perceive different challenges. We must develop strategies and should not hesitate to negotiate to overcome these issues to reach leadership positions in surgery. This may be accomplished through networking worldwide to improve current conditions and obstacles.

  8. The Effect of Breakfast Prior to Morning Exercise on Cognitive Performance, Mood and Appetite Later in the Day in Habitually Active Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veasey, Rachel C.; Haskell-Ramsay, Crystal F.; Kennedy, David O.; Tiplady, Brian; Stevenson, Emma J.

    2015-01-01

    Pre-exercise nutritional practices for active females exercising for mood, cognitive and appetite benefits are not well established. Results from an initial field pilot study showed that higher energy intake at breakfast was associated with lower fatigue and higher overall mood and alertness post-exercise (all p breakfast (providing 118 or 236 kcal) or no breakfast. After 45 min, they completed a 30 min run at 65% heart rate reserve (HRR). Parameters were re-assessed immediately after exercise, then hourly until lunch (~1240 h), immediately post-lunch and at 1500 and 1900 h via a mobile phone. Breakfast enhanced feelings of relaxation before lunch (p 0.40), though breakfast was detrimental for working memory mid-afternoon (p = 0.019, d = 0.37) and mental fatigue and tension later in the day (all p 0.038). Breakfast was also beneficial for appetite control before lunch irrespective of size (all p 0.43). These data provide information on pre-exercise nutritional practices for active females and suggest that a small breakfast eaten prior to exercise can benefit post-exercise mood and subjective appetite ratings. PMID:26184302

  9. The Effect of Breakfast Prior to Morning Exercise on Cognitive Performance, Mood and Appetite Later in the Day in Habitually Active Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veasey, Rachel C; Haskell-Ramsay, Crystal F; Kennedy, David O; Tiplady, Brian; Stevenson, Emma J

    2015-07-14

    Pre-exercise nutritional practices for active females exercising for mood, cognitive and appetite benefits are not well established. Results from an initial field pilot study showed that higher energy intake at breakfast was associated with lower fatigue and higher overall mood and alertness post-exercise (all p breakfast (providing 118 or 236 kcal) or no breakfast. After 45 min, they completed a 30 min run at 65% heart rate reserve (HRR). Parameters were re-assessed immediately after exercise, then hourly until lunch (~1240 h), immediately post-lunch and at 1500 and 1900 h via a mobile phone. Breakfast enhanced feelings of relaxation before lunch (p 0.40), though breakfast was detrimental for working memory mid-afternoon (p = 0.019, d = 0.37) and mental fatigue and tension later in the day (all p 0.038). Breakfast was also beneficial for appetite control before lunch irrespective of size (all p 0.43). These data provide information on pre-exercise nutritional practices for active females and suggest that a small breakfast eaten prior to exercise can benefit post-exercise mood and subjective appetite ratings.

  10. Risk Factors for Sexual Dysfunction Among Women and Men: A Consensus Statement From the Fourth International Consultation on Sexual Medicine 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Marita P; Sharlip, Ira D; Lewis, Ron; Atalla, Elham; Balon, Richard; Fisher, Alessandra D; Laumann, Edward; Lee, Sun Won; Segraves, Robert T

    2016-02-01

    This article presents a review of previous research concerning risk factors for sexual dysfunction in women and men. The aim is to evaluate past research studies to determine the contribution of all risk factors to the development and maintenance of sexual dysfunction among women and men. Studies were organized under a biopsychosocial framework, with the bulk of studies of women and men having investigated the role of biological factors. The outcome measures were the data on factors for sexual dysfunction. Many more studies investigated risk factors for sexual dysfunction in men than in women. For women and men, diabetes, heart disease, urinary tract disorders, and chronic illness were significant risk factors for sexual dysfunction. Depression and anxiety and the medications used to treat these disorders also were risk factors for sexual dysfunction in women and men. In addition, substance abuse was associated with sexual dysfunction. Many other social and cultural factors were related to sexual dysfunction in women and men. Psychosocial factors are clearly risk factors for sexual dysfunction. Women and men with sexual dysfunction should be offered psychosocial evaluation and treatment, if available, in addition to medical evaluation and treatment. The impact of social and cultural factors on sexual function requires substantially more research. The evidence that erectile dysfunction is a harbinger of other forms of cardiovascular disease is strong enough to recommend that clinical evaluation for occult cardiovascular disease should be undertaken in men who do not have known cardiovascular disease but who develop organic erectile dysfunction, especially in men younger than 70 years. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [The opening of the internal cervical os predicts cervical ripening better than Bishop's score in nulliparous women at 41 weeks gestation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehila, Mehdi; Abouda, Hassine Saber; Hmid, Rim Ben; Touhami, Omar; Miled, Cyrine Ben; Godcha, Imen; Mahjoub, Sami; Chanoufi, Mohamed Badis

    2016-01-01

    The objectif was to evaluate ultrasound measurement of the opening of the internal cervical os in the prediction of cervical ripening and to compare it with Bishop's score. We conducted a prospective study of 77 nulliparous women admitted to hospital in labor at 41w gestation, with Bishop's Score os was performed using transvaginal ultrasound and Bishop's score was determined by clinical examination. All patients received prostaglandins for cervical ripening. Cervical ripening was successful among 63 patients (81%). Bishop's score and the opening of the internal cervical os were statistically associated with the success or failure of cervical ripening. The success rate of cervical ripening was 100% when the opening of the internal cervical os was equal to or greater than 5 mm (sensitivity: 54%, specificity: 86%). ROC curves showed that the measurement of the internal cervical os was more predictive of cervical ripening than Bishop's score (area under the curve: 0.733 and 0.704 respectively). Compared to Bishop's score, echographic measurement of the opening of the internal cervical os is more predictive of the success of cervical ripening in nulliparous women at 41 weeks of pregnancy with an unfavourable cervix.

  12. Women of the Second Republic and the Civil War from the present-day democratic perspective | Las mujeres de la República y la Guerra Civil desde la perspectiva democrática actual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Moreno Seco

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The strong social interest which women of the Second Republic and the civil war arouse, together with the wealth of solid historical works with a gender perspective, justify female experiences having a place in the debate on the memory of these two periods. The survival to the present day of stereotypes and myths about Republican women, despite the historiographical progress, has served to consolidate a depoliticized view of the past, which presents women as heroines without a clear ideological profile and as innocent victims of the changes and upheaval of the 1930s. These myths and stereotypes, which emphasize the idea of change experienced by women, rather than continuity and resistance to change, have influenced the current perception of the extension of female citizenship in Spanish society. | El especial interés social que las mujeres de la República y la Guerra Civil despiertan, así como la existencia de una nutrida y sólida historiografía de género justifican que las experiencias femeninas ocupen un lugar en el debate sobre la memoria de estos dos periodos. La pervivencia, en la actualidad, de estereotipos y mitos sobre las mujeres republicanas, a pesar de los avances historiográficos, contribuye a consolidar una visión despolitizada del pasado, que presenta a las mujeres como heroínas sin un perfil ideológico claro y víctimas inocentes de las transformaciones y convulsiones de los años treinta. Estos mitos y estereotipos, que refuerzan la idea del cambio experimentado por las mujeres, olvidando las permanencias y las resistencias al mismo, influyen en la percepción actual sobre la ampliación de la ciudadanía femenina en la sociedad española.

  13. An HIV/STI prevention intervention for internally displaced women in Leogane, Haiti: study protocol for an N-of-1 pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Logie, Carmen H; Daniel, CarolAnn; Newman, Peter A; Loutfy, Mona R

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Haiti has the highest HIV infection rate in the Western hemisphere, with approximately one in 50 people infected. The January 2010 earthquake led to the collapse of Haiti's social, economic and health infrastructure, exacerbating social and structural HIV risk factors. Internally displaced (ID) women are particularly at high risk for HIV infection due to breakdown of community networks, increased poverty and sexual violence. The authors present the rationale and study protocol fo...

  14. Women's exposure to thin-and-beautiful media images: body image effects of media-ideal internalization and impact-reduction interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamiya, Yuko; Cash, Thomas F; Melnyk, Susan E; Posavac, Heidi D; Posavac, Steven S

    2005-03-01

    Exposure to media images of thin-and-beautiful women negatively affects the body image and mood states of young women. However, not all women are equally susceptible to these effects. The present experimental investigation with 123 young college women evaluated the moderating effects of the extent of internalization of media ideals. It also examined the preventative impact of two brief interventions (i.e., media literacy information with and without a dissonance-induction procedure). Results indicated that relative to a control group, the exposure to thin-and-beautiful media images adversely influenced the state body image of participants with high internalization levels. Media-literacy psychoeducation prior to the media exposure prevented this adverse effect. Adding a pre-exposure dissonance-induction procedure did not significantly enhance the preventative effects relative to psychoeducation alone. These results and their implications for the treatment and prevention of body image disturbances are discussed in the context of the empirical literature on the media's effects on body image.

  15. The impact of a 17-day training period for an international championship on mucosal immune parameters in top-level basketball players and staff members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Alexandre; Arsati, Franco; Cury, Patrícia Ramos; Franciscon, Clóvis; Simões, Antonio Carlos; de Oliveira, Paulo Roberto; de Araújo, Vera Cavalcanti

    2008-10-01

    This investigation examined the impact of a 17-d training period (that included basketball-specific training, sprints, intermittent running exercises, and weight training, prior to an international championship competition) on salivary immunoglobulin A (SIgA) levels in 10 subjects (athletes and staff members) from a national basketball team, as a biomarker for mucosal immune defence. Unstimulated saliva samples were collected at rest at the beginning of the preparation for the Pan American Games and 1 d before the first game. The recovery interval from the last bout of exercise was 4 h. The SIgA level was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and expressed as absolute concentrations, secretion rate, and SIgA level relative to total protein. The decrease in SIgA levels following training was greater in athletes than in support staff; however, no significant differences between the two groups were detected. A decrease in SIgA level, regardless of the method used to express IgA results, was verified for athletes. Only one episode of upper respiratory tract illness symptoms was reported, and it was not associated with changes in SIgA levels. In summary, a situation of combined stress for an important championship was found to decrease the level of SIgA-mediated immune protection at the mucosal surface in team members, with greater changes observed in the athletes.

  16. Internalizing sexism within close relationships: Perceptions of intimate partners' benevolent sexism promote women's endorsement of benevolent sexism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Matthew D; Overall, Nickola C; Cross, Emily J

    2016-02-01

    The current research demonstrated that women's adoption of benevolent sexism is influenced by their perceptions of their intimate partners' agreement with benevolent sexism. In 2 dyadic longitudinal studies, committed heterosexual couples reported on their own sexism and perceptions of their partner's sexism twice across 9 months (Study 1) and 5 times across 1 year (Study 2). Women who perceived that their male partner more strongly endorsed benevolent sexism held greater and more stable benevolent sexism across time, whereas lower perceptions of partners' benevolent sexism predicted declines in women's benevolent sexism across time. Changes in men's endorsement of sexism were unrelated to perceptions of their partner's sexist attitudes. The naturalistic change in sexist attitudes shown in Studies 1 and 2 was supported by experimental evidence in Studies 3 and 4: Manipulations designed to increase perceptions of partner's benevolent sexism led women (but not men) to report greater benevolent sexism. Studies 3 and 4 also provided evidence that perceptions of partner's benevolent sexism fosters perceived regard and relationship security in women, but not men, and these relationship factors enhance attitude alignment. Discriminant analyses demonstrated that these effects were specific to women's perceptions of partner's, rather than societal, levels of sexism. In sum, these studies illustrate that women endorse benevolent sexism when they perceive that the reverence and security that benevolent sexism promises women are accessible in their relationships. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Women at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    To mark International Women's Day on 8 March, the Weekly Bulletin has looked at the careers of six female physicists, engineers and administrators working at CERN. A frequent question on the lips of newcomers to CERN as they take a quick look around them is 'But where are the women?' However, while it's true that the Laboratory has never had a huge number of female personnel, a closer look reveals that there are in fact quite a few around. To mark International Women's Day, the Bulletin has interviewed six women working at CERN to find out how they see the Organization, what they do and what they think about their daily working lives. Creating a link 'Maybe because I grew up during World War II, my parents always taught me to respect people of other nationalities, religions, colour, etc., so one thing I have always appreciated about CERN is that it promotes this tolerance and understanding by giving us the great privilege of working side by side with colleagues from many cultures and walks of life.' Pegg...

  18. Is diabetes mellitus a heart disease equivalent in women? Results from an international study of postmenopausal women in the Raloxifene Use for the Heart (RUTH) Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daniels, L.B.; Grady, D.; Mosca, L.; Collins, P.; Mitlak, B.H.; Amewou-Atisso, M.G.; Wenger, N.K.; Barrett-Connor, E.; Suryapranata, H.; et al.,

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several studies have concluded that diabetes mellitus and heart disease carry similar risk for future cardiovascular disease (CVD). Most of these studies were too small to quantify independent risks specific to women. The purpose of this study was to determine whether diabetes mellitus

  19. A psycho-educational HIV/STI prevention intervention for internally displaced women in Leogane, Haiti: results from a non-randomized cohort pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logie, Carmen H; Daniel, CarolAnn; Newman, Peter A; Weaver, James; Loutfy, Mona R

    2014-01-01

    Little evidence exists regarding efficacious HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STI) prevention interventions with internally displaced populations. Internally displaced women are at elevated risk for HIV/STI due to limited access to health services, heightened poverty and social network breakdown. The FASY (Famn an Aksyon Pou Sante' Yo) (Women Taking Action For Their Health) study examined the effectiveness of a peer health worker (PHW) delivered psycho-educational HIV/STI pilot study with internally displaced women in Leogane, Haiti. This was a non-randomized cohort pilot study. Participants completed a computer-assisted pre-test programmed on Android tablet PCs followed by an HIV/STI educational video-based session and a 6-week psycho-educational group program of weekly meetings. Participants completed a post-test upon completion of group sessions. The primary outcome was HIV knowledge; our pre-specified index of clinically significant change was an effect size of 0.30. Secondary outcomes included: STI knowledge, condom use, social support, resilient coping, depression and relationship control. We used mixed-effects regression to calculate mean outcome pre-post score change. This study was registered (clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01492829). Between January 1-April 30, 2012 we assigned 200 participants to the study. The majority of participants (n = 176, 88%) completed the study and were followed up at 8 weeks, finishing April 30, 2012. Adjusted for socio-demographic characteristics, HIV knowledge (β = 4.81; 95% CI 4.36-5.26), STI knowledge (β = 0.84; 95% CI 0.70-0.99), condom use (AOR = 4.05, 95% CI 1.86-8.83), and depression (β = -0.63, 95% CI -0.88--0.39) scores showed statistically significant change post-intervention (pHaiti. Pilot studies are an important approach to understand feasibility and scientific impacts of HIV prevention strategies in disaster contexts. Study results may inform HIV prevention interventions among internally displaced women in

  20. The Mediating Roles of Rejection Sensitivity and Proximal Stress in the Association Between Discrimination and Internalizing Symptoms Among Sexual Minority Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyar, Christina; Feinstein, Brian A; Eaton, Nicholas R; London, Bonita

    2018-01-01

    The negative impact of discrimination on mental health among lesbian, gay, and bisexual populations has been well documented. However, the possible mediating roles of sexual orientation rejection sensitivity and rejection-based proximal stress in the association between discrimination and internalizing symptoms remain unclear. Rejection-based proximal stress is a subset of proximal stressors that are theorized to arise from concerns about and expectations of sexual orientation-based rejection and discrimination. Drawing on minority stress theory, we tested potential mediating effects using indirect effects structural equation modeling in a sample of 300 sexual minority women. Results indicated that the indirect effect of discrimination on internalizing symptoms (a latent variable indicated by depression and anxiety symptoms) through sexual orientation rejection sensitivity and rejection-based proximal stress (a latent variable indicated by preoccupation with stigma, concealment motivation, and difficulty developing a positive sexual identity) was significant. Additionally, the indirect effects of discrimination on rejection-based proximal stress through sexual orientation rejection sensitivity and of sexual orientation rejection sensitivity on internalizing symptoms through rejection-based proximal stress were also significant. These findings indicate that sexual orientation rejection sensitivity plays an important role in contributing to rejection-based proximal stress and internalizing symptoms among sexual minority women.

  1. Prevalence, symptoms and management of uterine fibroids: an international internet-based survey of 21,746 women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zimmermann Anne

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2009 the Uterine Bleeding and Pain Women's Research Study (UBP-WRS was conducted interviewing 21,479 women across 8 countries in order to gain patient-based prevalence data on uterine pain and bleeding indications and investigate uterine symptoms and women's treatment experiences. This article shows relevant results of the study for the indication uterine fibroids providing data on self-reported prevalence, symptomatology and management of uterine fibroids. Methods 2,500 women (USA: 4,500 women in each country (Brazil, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, South Korea, the UK, the USA completed an online survey. Women included were in their reproductive age (age group 15-49 years; USA: 18-49 years and had ever experienced menstrual bleedings. Quotas were applied for age, region, level of education and household income of respondents. Variables have been analyzed descriptively and exploratory statistical tests have been performed. Results The self-reported prevalence of uterine fibroids ranged from 4.5% (UK to 9.8% (Italy, reaching 9.4% (UK to 17.8% (Italy in the age group of 40-49 years. Women with a diagnosis of uterine fibroids reported significantly more often about bleeding symptoms than women without a diagnosis: heavy bleedings (59.8% vs. 37.4%, prolonged bleedings (37.3% vs. 15.6%, bleeding between periods (33.3% vs. 13.5%, frequent periods (28.4% vs. 15.2%, irregular and predictable periods (36.3% vs. 23.9%. Furthermore women with diagnosed uterine fibroids reported significantly more often about the following pain symptoms: pressure on the bladder (32.6% vs. 15.0%, chronic pelvic pain (14.5% vs. 2.9%, painful sexual intercourse (23.5% vs. 9.1% and pain occurring mid-cycle, after and during menstrual bleeding (31.3%, 16.7%, 59.7%, vs. 17.1%, 6.4%, 52.0%. 53.7% of women reported that their symptoms had a negative impact on their life in the last 12 month, influencing their sexual life (42.9%, performance at work (27

  2. Proceedings of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases International Symposium on Epidemiologic Issues in Urinary Incontinence in Women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, Jeanette S.; Nyberg, Leroy M.; Kusek, John W.

    2003-01-01

    The Epidemiologic Issues in Urinary Incontinence: Current Databases and Future Collaborations Symposium included an international group of 29 investigators from 10 countries. The purpose of the symposium was to discuss the current understanding and knowledge gaps of prevalence, incidence, associa......The Epidemiologic Issues in Urinary Incontinence: Current Databases and Future Collaborations Symposium included an international group of 29 investigators from 10 countries. The purpose of the symposium was to discuss the current understanding and knowledge gaps of prevalence, incidence......, associated risk factors, and treatment outcomes for incontinence in women. During the symposium, investigators identified existing large databases and ongoing studies that provide substantive information on specific incontinence research questions. The investigators were able to form an international...

  3. Celebrating women in physics

    CERN Multimedia

    Rolf Heuer

    2010-01-01

    Next Monday the 8th of March is International Women’s Day. In an ideal world, there would be no need for such an event – equality would be taken as read. But since the world is not there yet, let’s take the opportunity to celebrate women in physics, and indeed the full cultural diversity of our field. Perceived as a discipline dominated by men, reality has been diverging from that perception for a long time. Today at CERN, women play key roles in every aspect of the Organization’s activities.   On Women’s Day, we will be sending a clear message to all young women interested in science and engineering that this is also a field for them. In the CERN Control Centre, half of the Engineers-in-Charge who take responsibility for operating the world’s most powerful particle accelerator are women. In the experiments, in all CERN departments and in the management, women are increasingly represented. That’s because at CERN, and in particl...

  4. Violencia contra las mujeres: el papel del sector salud en la legislación internacional Violence against women: the role of the health sector in international legislation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaby Ortiz-Barreda

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Identificar y describir las responsabilidades que se atribuyen a las administraciones sanitarias en materia de prevención y atención de la violencia contra las mujeres en la legislación internacional sobre este tema. Métodos: Análisis de contenido de las leyes de violencia contra las mujeres recopiladas en The Annual Review of Law of Harvard University, UN Secretary-General's database on Violence against Women, International Digest of Health Legislation y Stop Violence against Women. Se identificaron y seleccionaron las leyes que hacían mención explícita a la participación del sector salud en intervenciones de violencia contra las mujeres. Se clasificaron las intervenciones según los niveles de prevención primaria, secundaria y terciaria definidos por la Organización Mundial de la Salud en su Informe Mundial sobre Violencia y Salud (2002. Resultados: De 115 países analizados, 55 disponen de leyes sobre la violencia contra las mujeres que contemplan la participación del sector salud en sus intervenciones. En la mayoría, esta participación se centra en la denuncia de casos detectados y la atención de casos derivados de servicios policiales. Se identificaron 24 leyes que hacían mención a intervenciones específicamente desarrolladas por el sector salud, sobre todo de prevención terciaria. Las leyes de México, Colombia, Argentina, El Salvador, España y Filipinas integran intervenciones relacionadas con los tres niveles de prevención. Conclusiones: Una cuarta parte de las leyes sobre la violencia contra las mujeres estudiadas incorporan intervenciones específicas del sector salud. Esto sugiere que todavía es incipiente el abordaje integral del problema. Se requiere un mayor aprovechamiento de las potencialidades de este sector en intervenciones previas a las consecuencias de la violencia contra las mujeres.Objectives: To identify and describe the responsibilities attributed to health administrations in preventing

  5. 76 FR 53807 - Women's Equality Day, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-29

    ... change. They let their feet speak when their voices alone were not enough, protesting and marching for... college campuses. On the 91st anniversary of this landmark in civil rights, we continue to uphold the...

  6. 77 FR 52583 - Women's Equality Day, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-29

    ... nearly 50 percent of our workforce, the majority of students in our colleges and graduate schools, and a... Lord two thousand twelve, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and...

  7. Investigating the influence of shame, depression, and distress tolerance on the relationship between internalized homophobia and binge eating in lesbian and bisexual women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Vanessa; Robert-McComb, Jacalyn J; Clopton, James R; Reich, Darcy A

    2017-01-01

    There is limited research evidence about the specific factors influencing disordered eating for lesbian and bisexual women. Therefore, this study investigated relationships among binge eating, internalized homophobia, shame, depression, and distress tolerance in a sample of lesbian (n=72) and bisexual women (n=66). Two hypotheses were tested. First, it was hypothesized that shame and depression would mediate the relationship between internalized homophobia and binge eating. Second, it was hypothesized that distress tolerance would moderate the relationship between shame and binge eating and the relationship between depression and binge eating in the mediation relationships proposed in the first hypothesis. Results indicated that shame was a significant mediator for the relationship between internalized homophobia and binge eating, that depression was not a significant mediator, and that distress tolerance did not moderate the significant mediation relationship between shame and binge eating. The data in this study also indicated that the proportions of lesbian and bisexual participants who reported binge eating and compensatory behavior did not differ significantly, but that bisexual participants reported significantly more depression and shame than lesbian participants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. ITER days in Moscow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golubchikov, L.

    2001-01-01

    In connection with the successful completion of the Engineering Design of the International Thermonuclear Reactor (ITER) and the 50th anniversary of fusion research in the USSR, the Ministry of the Russian Federation for Atomic Energy (Minatom) with the participation of the Russian Academy of Sciences, organized the International Symposium 'ITER days in Moscow' on 7-8 June 2001. About 250 people from more than 20 states took part in the Meeting. The participants welcomed the R and D results of the ITER project and considered it as a necessary step to establish a basis for a fusion energy source. There were also some scientific presentations on the following topics: ITER physics basis; Effect of fusion research on general physics; Fusion power reactors; US interests in burning plasma

  9. Why We Need an International Day?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Jordan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenal pace of technological advancessweeping across the world is in serious need ofsufficient numbers of scientists and engineers,science and technology educators, healthprofessionals, economists, political scientists andpolicy experts, i.e., scientists in all sectors. Thesesectors also include law and library science......

  10. Preferences for prenatal tests for Down syndrome: an international comparison of the views of pregnant women and health professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hill, Melissa; Johnson, Jo-Ann; Langlois, Sylvie; Lee, Hyun; Winsor, Stephanie; Dineley, Brigid; Horniachek, Marisa; Lalatta, Faustina; Ronzoni, Luisa; Barrett, Angela N.; Advani, Henna V.; Choolani, Mahesh; Rabinowitz, Ron; Pajkrt, Eva; van Schendel, Rachèl V.; Henneman, Lidewij; Rommers, Wieke; Bilardo, Caterina M.; Rendeiro, Paula; Ribeiro, Maria João; Rocha, José; Bay Lund, Ida Charlotte; Petersen, Olav B.; Becher, Naja; Vogel, Ida; Stefánsdottir, Vigdis; Ingvarsdottir, Sigrun; Gottfredsdottir, Helga; Morris, Stephen; Chitty, Lyn S.

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive prenatal testing is increasingly available worldwide and stakeholder viewpoints are essential to guide implementation. Here we compare the preferences of women and health professionals from nine different countries towards attributes of non-invasive and invasive prenatal tests for Down

  11. Preferences for prenatal tests for Down syndrome : an international comparison of the views of pregnant women and health professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hill, Melissa; Johnson, Jo-Ann; Langlois, Sylvie; Lee, Hyun; Winsor, Stephanie; Dineley, Brigid; Horniachek, Marisa; Lalatta, Faustina; Ronzoni, Luisa; Barrett, Angela N.; Advani, Henna V.; Choolani, Mahesh; Rabinowitz, Ron; Pajkrt, Eva; van Schendel, Rachel V.; Henneman, Lidewij; Rommers, Wieke; Bilardo, Caterina M.; Rendeiro, Paula; Ribeiro, Maria Joao; Rocha, Jose; Lund, Ida Charlotte Bay; Petersen, Olav B.; Becher, Naja; Vogel, Ida; Stefansdottir, Vigdis; Ingvarsdottir, Sigrun; Gottfredsdottir, Helga; Morris, Stephen; Chitty, Lyn S.

    Non-invasive prenatal testing is increasingly available worldwide and stakeholder viewpoints are essential to guide implementation. Here we compare the preferences of women and health professionals from nine different countries towards attributes of non-invasive and invasive prenatal tests for Down

  12. Films by and/or about Women, 1972: Directory of Filmmakers, Films, and Distributors; Internationally; Past and Present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faxon, Pookie, Comp.; Bolint, Mary, Comp.

    This directory lists a variety of films about women. Reflective of the content, the directory is divided into categories: animated; anthropology, ethnology, sociology, and science; birth and control of birth; careers and job discrimination; children and child care; documentaries; experimental, avant-garde, and classics; male-female relations and…

  13. Optimal Methods to Screen Men and Women for Intimate Partner Violence: Results from an Internal Medicine Residency Continuity Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapur, Nitin A.; Windish, Donna M.

    2011-01-01

    Contradictory data exist regarding optimal methods and instruments for intimate partner violence (IPV) screening in primary care settings. The purpose of this study was to determine the optimal method and screening instrument for IPV among men and women in a primary-care resident clinic. We conducted a cross-sectional study at an urban, academic,…

  14. Internalization of U.S. female beauty standards as a mediator of the relationship between Mexican American women's acculturation and body dissatisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poloskov, Elizabeth; Tracey, Terence J G

    2013-09-01

    The relationships among acculturation, internalization of U.S. sociocultural standards of female beauty, and body dissatisfaction were examined in a sample of 211 Mexican American college women. Structural equation modeling was used to identify the paths among these three factors. Results demonstrated that there are two distinct types of body dissatisfaction: global evaluations and composite site-specific evaluations. The relationships between acculturation toward dominant U.S. culture and both types of body dissatisfaction were found to be fully mediated by internalization of U.S. standards of female beauty. There were no relationships between Mexican orientation and any of the study variables. The results from this study imply that it is important for therapists working with Mexican American female clients to assess the client's level of acculturation, examine the cultural (U.S. and Mexican) messages the client receives, and explore how these messages impact her body image. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Late-career international migration and reproductive work. A comparison between Peruvian and Ukrainian women in the Southern Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Alice Vianello

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Research on the relationship between reproductive work and women´s life trajectories including the experience of labour migration has mainly focused on the case of relatively young mothers who leave behind, or later re-join, their children. While it is true that most women migrate at a younger age, there are a significant number of cases of men and women who move abroad for labour purposes at a more advanced stage, undertaking a late-career migration. This is still an under-estimated and under-researched sub-field that uncovers a varied range of issues, including the global organization of reproductive work and the employment of migrant women as domestic workers late in their lives. By pooling the findings of two qualitative studies, this article focuses on Peruvian and Ukrainian women who seek employment in Spain and Italy when they are well into their forties, or older. A commonality the two groups of women share is that, independently of their level of education and professional experience, more often than not they end up as domestic and care workers. The article initially discusses the reasons for late-career female migration, taking into consideration the structural and personal determinants that have affected Peruvian and Ukrainian women’s careers in their countries of origin and settlement. After this, the focus is set on the characteristics of domestic employment at later life, on the impact on their current lives, including the transnational family organization, and on future labour and retirement prospects. Apart from an evaluation of objective working and living conditions, we discuss women’s personal impressions of being domestic workers in the context of their occupational experiences and family commitments. In this regard, women report varying levels of personal and professional satisfaction, as well as different patterns of continuity-discontinuity in their work and family lives, and of optimism towards the future

  16. 2015 Barcelona Asteroid Day

    CERN Document Server

    Gritsevich, Maria; Palme, Herbert

    2017-01-01

    This volume is a compilation of the research presented at the International Asteroid Day workshop which was celebrated at Barcelona on June 30th, 2015. The proceedings discuss the beginning of a new era in the study and exploration of the solar system’s minor bodies. International Asteroid Day commemorates the Tunguska event of June 30th, 1908. The workshop’s goal was to promote the importance of dealing proactively with impact hazards from space. Multidisciplinary experts contributed to this discussion by describing the nature of comets and asteroids along with their offspring, meteoroids. New missions to return material samples of asteroids back to Earth such as Osiris-REx and Hayabusa 2, as well as projects like AIM and DART which will test impact deflection techniques for Potentially Hazardous Asteroids encounters were also covered. The proceedings include both an outreach level to popularize impact hazards and a scientific character which covers the latest knowledge on these topics, as well as offeri...

  17. [Towards safe motherhood. World Health Day].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plata, M I

    1998-06-01

    The objective of the 'safe motherhood' initiative is to reduce maternal mortality by 50% by the year 2000. A strong policy is needed to permit development of national and international programs. The lifetime risk of death from causes related to complications of pregnancy is estimated at 1/16 in Africa, 1/65 in Asia, 1/130 in Latin America and the Caribbean, 1/1400 in Europe, and 1/3700 in North America. A minimum of 585,000 women die of maternal causes each year, with nearly 90% of the deaths occurring in Asia and Africa. Approximately 50 million women suffer from illnesses related to childbearing. A principal cause of maternal mortality is lack of medical care during labor, delivery, and the postpartum period. Motherhood will become safe if governments, multilateral and bilateral funding agencies, and nongovernmental organizations give it the high priority it requires. Women also die because they lack rights. Their reduced decision-making power and inequitable access to family and social resources prevents them from overcoming barriers to health care. Women die when they begin childbearing at a very young age, yet an estimated 11% of births throughout the world each year are to adolescents. Adolescents have very limited access to family planning, either through legal restrictions or obstacles created by family planning workers. Maternal deaths would be avoided if all births were attended by trained health workers; an estimated 60 million births annually are not. Prevention of unwanted pregnancy and, thus, of the 50 million abortions estimated to take place each year would avoid over 200 maternal deaths each day. Unsafe abortions account for 13% of maternal deaths. The evidence demonstrates that rates of unsafe abortion and abortion mortality are higher where laws are more restrictive.

  18. 'Life under the tent is not safe, especially for young women': understanding intersectional violence among internally displaced youth in Leogane, Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logie, Carmen H; Daniel, CarolAnn; Ahmed, Uzma; Lash, Rebecca

    Haiti's 2010 earthquake devastated social, health, and economic infrastructure and left 2 million persons homeless. Over 6 years later 61,000 people remain displaced, most lacking protection, services, and durable solutions. Structural contexts elevate risks of gender-based violence (GBV) targeting internally displaced (ID) girls and women. We used an intersectionality framework to explore lived experiences and understanding of violence among ID young men and women in Leogane, Haiti. We conducted six focus groups, three with ID young women (n = 30) and three with ID young men (n = 30) aged 18-24 years, and 11 in-depth individual interviews with frontline workers in Leogane. Focus groups and interviews were conducted in Kreyol, transcribed verbatim, translated into English, and analyzed using narrative thematic techniques. Findings revealed violence experienced by ID youth was (re)produced at the intersection of gender, poverty, displacement, and age. Multi-level forms of violence included structural (e.g. poverty), community (e.g. gender norms, and interpersonal (e.g. family expectations) dimensions. Coping strategies spanned intrapersonal (hope), community (social support), and structural (employment/education) dimensions. Interventions to reduce violence should be tailored to address the social inequities that emerge at the intersection of youth, poverty, displacement, and hegemonic gender norms.

  19. Pathophysiological characteristics and effects of obesity in women with early and late manifestation of gestational diabetes diagnosed by the International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkurt, Latife; Göbl, Christian S; Pfligl, Lisa; Leitner, Karoline; Bancher-Todesca, Dagmar; Luger, Anton; Baumgartner-Parzer, Sabina; Pacini, Giovanni; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra

    2015-03-01

    Appropriate risk stratification is essential in gestational diabetes (GDM) diagnosis to optimize therapeutic strategies during pregnancy. However, there are sparse data related to the newly recommended International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups criteria and their use in early pregnancy. This study sought to evaluate clinical and pathophysiological characteristics less up to gestational week (GW) 21 in women with early and late GDM onset. This was a prospective study conducted at the Medical University of Vienna. Pregnant women (n = 211) underwent an oral glucose tolerance test at 16 GW (interquartile range, 14-18 wk) with multiple measurements of glucose, insulin, and C-peptide for evaluation of insulin sensitivity and ß-cell function in addition to detailed obstetrical risk assessment. Clinical followups were performed until end of pregnancy. We performed a metabolic characterization of early-onset GDM. Of 81 women, 49 (23%) showed early (GDMEarly ≤ 21 GW) and 32 (15%) later manifestation (GDMLate ≥ 24 GW) whereas 130 (62%) remained normal-glucose-tolerant (NGT). In contrast with GDMLate, GDMEarly were affected by decreased insulin sensitivity (GDMEarly vs NGT, P obesity. However, ß-cell dysfunction was also detectable in GDMLate, indicating defective compensatory mechanisms emerging already in early pregnancy.

  20. Tropical sex in a European country: Brazilian women's migration to Italy in the frame of international sex tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Piscitelli

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In Fortaleza, which is one of the main cities linked to sex tourism in the Northeast of Brazil, young low income women leave the country with or invited by sex tourists. While some indeed engage themselves in the sex industry in Europe, others leave it when marrying European men. Focusing on the universe of integrants of couples integrated women from the Northeast from Brazil and Italian men, this paper addresses the differentiations that acquire centrality when these relationships, formed in an ambiguous terrain where sexuality, economic interest and romance intermingle, are contextualized in Italy. I analyze the cultural, political and economic implications of that migration. The study discusses the relationship between gender and economic negotiations in those couples, reflecting on the meanings acquired by "tropical sexuality" in the migration to that Northern country.

  1. Details for Manuscript Number SSM-D-06-00290R2 “Internalized Stigma, Discrimination, and Depression among Men and Women Living with HIV/AIDS in Cape Town, South Africa”

    OpenAIRE

    Simbayi, Leickness C.; Strebel, Anna; Cloete, Allanise; Henda, Nomvo; Mqeketo, Ayanda

    2007-01-01

    AIDS stigmas interfere with HIV prevention, diagnosis and treatment and can become internalized by people living with HIV/AIDS. However, the effects of internalized AIDS stigmas have not been investigated in Africa, home to two-thirds of the more than 40 million people living with AIDS in the world. The current study examined the prevalence of discrimination experiences and internalized stigmas among 420 HIV positive men and 643 HIV positive women recruited from AIDS services in Cape Town, So...

  2. A randomized controlled trial to compare the use of homeopathy and internal Teat Sealers for the prevention of mastitis in organically farmed dairy cows during the dry period and 100 days post-calving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klocke, P; Ivemeyer, S; Butler, G; Maeschli, A; Heil, F

    2010-04-01

    Routine use of antibiotics to prevent mastitis in dairy cows is prohibited by organic farming regulations. Internal Teat Sealers have been proposed as an alternative. We compared two drying-off (DO) supporting measures (Internal Teat Sealer and Homeopathy) to an untreated control group to assess their protective effects against clinical mastitis and intra-mammary infections during dry period of dairy cows. A field trial with 102 dairy cows from 13 Swiss organic dairy farms was conducted. Cows were randomly assigned to one of three groups within a herd. In the Internal Teat Sealer group (ITS; 36 cows) cows were treated with the commercial ORBESEAL (Pfizer) in all four quarters immediately after the last milking. In the Homeopathy group (HDT; 32 cows) the cows were treated per-orally by a herd-specific homeopathic formulation consisting of two remedies in 1:10(6) dilution over 5 days before and after DO. The untreated group received no therapy (U; 34 cows). For ITS, HDT and U the clinical mastitis incidence rates for the first 100 days post-calving were 11%, 9% and 3%, respectively, and the proportion of normally secreting quarters was (quarter somatic cell count (SCC) [QSCC]<100,000/ml) 70%, 68%, and 65%, respectively. Power analysis indicates that a proportion of 75% would support the rejection of null hypothesis in the HDT, and 74% in the ITS group against untreated control. Quarters of cows with SCC<200,000/ml at DO showed significantly higher normal secretion in HDT group (odds ratio [OR] 9.69) compared to untreated control, whereas Teat Sealing lead to an OR of 3.09 (not significant, post hoc power 31.3%). Under the studied conditions herd-specific homeopathic dry cow therapy was effective in increasing the number of animals with normal milk secretion after subsequent parturition, compared to untreated control. It may be an effective alternative to Teat Sealing, particularly in animals with relatively low SCCs. Further research is required to confirm these

  3. Evaluation of internal alpha radiation exposure and subsequent infertility among a cohort of women formerly employed in the radium dial industry.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schieve, L. A.; Davis, F.; Roeske, J.; Handler, A.; Freels, S.; Stinchcomb, T.; Keane, A.; Environmental Research; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago; Univ. of Chicago; DePaul Univ.

    1997-02-01

    This study examined the effect of internal exposure to {alpha}-particle radiation on subsequent fertility among women employed in the radium dial industry prior to 1930, when appreciable amounts of radium were often ingested through the practice of pointing the paint brush with the lips. The analysis was limited to women for whom a radium body burden measurement had been obtained and who were married prior to age 45 (n=603). Internal radiation dose to the ovary was calculated based on initial intakes of radium-226 and radium-228, average ovarian mass, number and energy of {alpha} particles emitted, fraction of energy absorbed with in the ovary, effective retention integrals and estimated photon irradiation. Time between marriage and pregnancy, number of pregnancies and number of live births served as surrogates for fertility. Radiation appeared to have no effect on fertility at estimated cumulative ovarian dose equivalents below 5 Sv; above this dose, however, statistically significant declines in both number of pregnancies and live births were observed. These trends persisted after multivariable adjustment for potential confounding variables and after exclusion of subjects contributing a potential classification or selection bias to the study. Additionally, the high-dose group experienced fewer live births than would have been expected based on population rates. There were no differences in time to first pregnancy between high- and low-dose groups. These results are consistent with earlier studies of {gamma}-ray exposures and suggest that exposure to high doses of radiation from internally deposited radium reduces fertility rather than inducing sterility.

  4. Towards Critical Global Education Worker Subjectivity: An Exploration of Narratives of American Women Engaged in Education-Related International Volunteerism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mule, Lucy

    2017-01-01

    International volunteerism is increasingly associated with shaping global subjectivities of participants. Significant numbers of Global North volunteers--whether working through established volunteer organizations, corporations, nonprofits, academia, or personal networks and connections--engage in education related activities while in the Global…

  5. Haemorrhoids are associated with internal iliac vein reflux in up to one-third of women presenting with varicose veins associated with pelvic vein reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdstock, J M; Dos Santos, S J; Harrison, C C; Price, B A; Whiteley, M S

    2015-03-01

    To determine the prevalence of haemorrhoids in women with pelvic vein reflux, identify which pelvic veins are associated with haemorrhoids and assess if extent of pelvic vein reflux influences the prevalence of haemorrhoids. Females presenting with leg varicose veins undergo duplex ultrasonography to assess all sources of venous reflux. Those with significant reflux arising from the pelvis are offered transvaginal duplex ultrasound (TVS) to evaluate reflux in the ovarian veins and internal Iliac veins and associated pelvic varices in the adnexa, vulvar/labial veins and haemorrhoids. Patterns and severity of reflux were evaluated. Between January 2010 and December 2012, 419 female patients with leg or vulvar varicose vein patterns arising from the pelvis underwent TVS. Haemorrhoids were identified on TVS via direct tributaries from the internal Iliac veins in 152/419 patients (36.3%) and absent in 267/419 (63.7%). The prevalence of the condition increased with the number of pelvic trunks involved. There is a strong association between haemorrhoids and internal Iliac vein reflux. Untreated reflux may be a cause of subsequent symptomatic haemorrhoids. Treatment with methods proven to work in conditions caused by pelvic vein incompetence, such as pelvic vein embolisation and foam sclerotherapy, could be considered. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  6. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Women For Women Homepage FDA Diabetes Information for Patients Page Last Updated: 02/16/2018 Note: If ... FDA Archive Combination Products Advisory Committees Regulatory Information Safety Emergency Preparedness International Programs News & Events Training & Continuing ...

  7. 77 FR 63201 - Leif Erikson Day, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-16

    ...-day Canada. His arrival marked the first known European encounter with North America and began a... only Leif Erikson and Nordic-American culture, but also those men and women who boldly reach for the...

  8. 5th Optimization Day

    CERN Document Server

    Mees, Alistair; Fisher, Mike; Jennings, Les

    2000-01-01

    'Optimization Day' (OD) has been a series of annual mini-conferences in Australia since 1994. The purpose of this series of events is to gather researchers in optimization and its related areas from Australia and their collaborators, in order to exchange new developments of optimization theories, methods and their applications. The first four OD mini-conferences were held in The Uni­ versity of Ballarat (1994), The University of New South Wales (1995), The University of Melbourne (1996) and Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (1997), respectively. They were all on the eastern coast of Australia. The fifth mini-conference Optimization Days was held at the Centre for Ap­ plied Dynamics and Optimization (CADO), Department of Mathematics and Statistics, The University of Western Australia, Perth, from 29 to 30 June 1998. This is the first time the OD mini-conference has been held at the west­ ern coast of Australia. This fifth OD preceded the International Conference on Optimization: Techniques and Applica...

  9. Computational modeling of the mathematical phantoms of the Brazilian woman to internal dosimetry calculations and for comparison of the absorbed fractions with specific reference women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ximenes, Edmir; Guimaraes, Maria Ines C. C.

    2008-01-01

    The theme of this work is the study of the concept of mathematical dummy - also called phantoms - used in internal dosimetry and radiation protection, from the perspective of computer simulations. In this work he developed the mathematical phantom of the Brazilian woman, to be used as the basis of calculations of Specific Absorbed Fractions (AEDs) in the body's organs and skeleton by virtue of goals with regarding the diagnosis or therapy in nuclear medicine. The phantom now developed is similar, in form, to Snyder phantom making it more realistic for the anthropomorphic conditions of Brazilian women. For so we used the Monte Carlo method of formalism, through computer modeling. As a contribution to the objectives of this study, it was developed and implemented the computer system cFAE - consultation Fraction Specific Absorbed, which makes it versatile for the user's query researcher

  10. UN spearheads drive on violence against women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To commemorate International Women's Day, more than 1000 victims of violence against women, activists, and celebrities from five continents participated in a video conference. UN Secretary General Kofi Annan declared that violence against women may be the most shameful human rights violation, and the Executive Director of the UN Development Fund for Women called violence against women "the most unpunished crime." Women from around the world described the culturally-sanctioned abuse they suffer, including female genital mutilation, wife murders, and dowry murders. The conference learned that more than 60 million women are missing in Asia because they were subjected to infanticide or were bartered away by their families to a life of domestic servitude or prostitution. Violence against women can take many forms, including domestic abuse, rape as a war crime, traditional practices, dowry and honor killings, and trafficking. In addition, at least 20% of women worldwide have been physically or sexually assaulted. The morbidity and mortality women suffer from violence is equal to that which they suffer from cancer.

  11. 75 FR 56461 - National Days of Prayer and Remembrance, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-15

    ... men and women in uniform who have lost their lives serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, and elsewhere, while... September to honor the memory of the women, men, and children lost in New York City, in rural Pennsylvania..., 2001, and in the dark days that followed. Innocent men and women were beginning a routine day at work...

  12. Genitourinary syndrome of menopause: new terminology for vulvovaginal atrophy from the International Society for the Study of Women's Sexual Health and the North American Menopause Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portman, David J; Gass, Margery L S

    2014-10-01

    In 2012, the Board of Directors of the International Society for the Study of Women's Sexual Health (ISSWSH) and the Board of Trustees of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) acknowledged the need to review current terminology associated with genitourinary tract symptoms related to menopause. The 2 societies cosponsored a terminology consensus conference, which was held in May 2013. Members of the consensus conference agreed that the term genitourinary syndrome of menopause (GSM) is a medically more accurate, all-encompassing, and publicly acceptable term than vulvovaginal atrophy. GSM is defined as a collection of symptoms and signs associated with a decrease in estrogen and other sex steroids involving changes to the labia majora/minora, clitoris, vestibule/introitus, vagina, urethra and bladder. The syndrome may include but is not limited to genital symptoms of dryness, burning, and irritation; sexual symptoms of lack of lubrication, discomfort or pain, and impaired function; and urinary symptoms of urgency, dysuria and recurrent urinary tract infections. Women may present with some or all of the signs and symptoms, which must be bothersome and should not be better accounted for by another diagnosis. The term was presented and discussed at the annual meeting of each society. The respective Boards of NAMS and ISSWSH formally endorsed the new terminology--genitourinary syndrome of menopause (GSM)--in 2014.

  13. The Impact of Weight Labels on Body Image, Internalized Weight Stigma, Affect, Perceived Health, and Intended Weight Loss Behaviors in Normal-Weight and Overweight College Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essayli, Jamal H; Murakami, Jessica M; Wilson, Rebecca E; Latner, Janet D

    2017-11-01

    To explore the psychological impact of weight labels. A double-blind experiment that randomly informed participants that they were "normal weight" or "overweight." Public university in Honolulu, Hawai'i. Normal-weight and overweight female undergraduates (N = 113). The Body Image States Scale, Stunkard Rating Scale, Weight Bias Internalization Scale, Positive and Negative Affect Schedule, General Health question from the 12-item Short Form Health Survey, modified version of the Weight Loss Methods Scale, and a manipulation check. A 2 × 2 between-subjects analysis of variance explored the main effects of the assigned weight label and actual weight and interactions between assigned weight label and actual weight. Significant main effects of the assigned weight label emerged on measures of body dissatisfaction, F(1, 109) = 12.40, p = .001, [Formula: see text] = 0.10, internalized weight stigma, F(1, 108) = 4.35, p = .039, [Formula: see text] = .04, and negative affect, F(1, 108) = 9.22, p = .003, [Formula: see text] = .08. Significant assigned weight label × actual weight interactions were found on measures of perceived body image, F(1, 109) = 6.29, p = .014, [Formula: see text] = .06, and perceived health, F(1, 109) = 4.18, p = .043, [Formula: see text] = .04. A weight label of "overweight" may have negative psychological consequences, particularly for overweight women.

  14. Inheritance of deleterious mutations at both BRCA1 and BRCA2 in an international sample of 32,295 women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebbeck, Timothy R; Friebel, Tara M; Mitra, Nandita; Wan, Fei; Chen, Stephanie; Andrulis, Irene L; Apostolou, Paraskevi; Arnold, Norbert; Arun, Banu K; Barrowdale, Daniel; Benitez, Javier; Berger, Raanan; Berthet, Pascaline; Borg, Ake; Buys, Saundra S; Caldes, Trinidad; Carter, Jonathan; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Claes, Kathleen B M; Couch, Fergus J; Cybulski, Cezary; Daly, Mary B; de la Hoya, Miguel; Diez, Orland; Domchek, Susan M; Nathanson, Katherine L; Durda, Katarzyna; Ellis, Steve; Evans, D Gareth; Foretova, Lenka; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Ganz, Patricia A; Garber, Judy; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K; Greene, Mark H; Gronwald, Jacek; Hahnen, Eric; Hallberg, Emily; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V O; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Jakubowska, Anna; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; John, Esther M; Karlan, Beth Y; Kaufman, Bella; Investigators, KConFab; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lasset, Christine; Lazaro, Conxi; Lester, Jenny; Loman, Niklas; Lubinski, Jan; Manoukian, Siranoush; Mitchell, Gillian; Montagna, Marco; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Niederacher, Dieter; Nussbaum, Robert L; Offit, Kenneth; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Park, Sue Kyung; Piedmonte, Marion; Radice, Paolo; Rappaport-Fuerhauser, Christine; Rookus, Matti A; Seynaeve, Caroline; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Szabo, Csilla I; Tancredi, Mariella; Teixeira, Manuel R; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary Beth; Thomassen, Mads; Tihomirova, Laima; Tischkowitz, Marc; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Toloczko-Grabarek, Aleksandra; Tung, Nadine; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Villano, Danylo; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Zidan, Jamal; Zorn, Kristin K; McGuffog, Lesley; Easton, Douglas; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Ramus, Susan J

    2016-11-11

    Most BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers have inherited a single (heterozygous) mutation. Transheterozygotes (TH) who have inherited deleterious mutations in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 are rare, and the consequences of transheterozygosity are poorly understood. From 32,295 female BRCA1/2 mutation carriers, we identified 93 TH (0.3 %). "Cases" were defined as TH, and "controls" were single mutations at BRCA1 (SH1) or BRCA2 (SH2). Matched SH1 "controls" carried a BRCA1 mutation found in the TH "case". Matched SH2 "controls" carried a BRCA2 mutation found in the TH "case". After matching the TH carriers with SH1 or SH2, 91 TH were matched to 9316 SH1, and 89 TH were matched to 3370 SH2. The majority of TH (45.2 %) involved the three common Jewish mutations. TH were more likely than SH1 and SH2 women to have been ever diagnosed with breast cancer (BC; p = 0.002). TH were more likely to be diagnosed with ovarian cancer (OC) than SH2 (p = 0.017), but not SH1. Age at BC diagnosis was the same in TH vs. SH1 (p = 0.231), but was on average 4.5 years younger in TH than in SH2 (p BRCA1 or BRCA2 in either BC or OC. Our observations suggest that clinical TH phenotypes resemble SH1. However, TH breast tumor marker characteristics are phenotypically intermediate to SH1 and SH2.

  15. The Internalized Homophobia Scale for Vietnamese Sexual Minority Women (IHVN-W): Conceptualization, factor structure, reliability, and associations with hypothesized correlates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Trang Quynh; Poteat, Tonia; Bandeen-Roche, Karen; German, Danielle; Nguyen, Yen Hai; Vu, Loan Kieu-Chau; Nguyen, Nam Thi-Thu; Knowlton, Amy R.

    2016-01-01

    We developed the first Vietnamese internalized homophobia (IH) scale, for use with Vietnamese sexual minority women (SMW). Drawing from existing IH scales in the international literature and based on prior qualitative research about SMW in the Viet Nam context, the scale covers two domains: self-stigma (negative attitudes toward oneself as a sexual minority person) and sexual prejudice (negative attitudes toward homosexuality/same-sex relations in general). Scale items, including items borrowed from existing scales and items based on local expressions, were reviewed and confirmed by members of the target population. Quantitative evaluation used data from an anonymous web-based survey of Vietnamese SMW, including those who identified as lesbian (n=1187), or as bisexual (n=641) and those who were unsure about their sexual identity (n=353). The scale was found to consist of two highly correlated factors reflecting self-stigma (not normal/wholesome and self-reproach and wishing away same-sex sexuality) and one factor reflecting sexual prejudice, and to have excellent internal consistency. Construct validity was evidenced by subscales’ associations with a wide range of hypothesized correlates including perceived sexual stigma, outness, social support, connection to other SMW, relationship quality, psychological well-being, anticipation of heterosexual marriage and endorsement of same-sex marriage legalization. Self-stigma was more strongly associated with psychosocial correlates and sexual prejudice was more associated with endorsement of legal same-sex marriage. The variations in these associations across the hypothesized correlates and across sexual identity groups were consistent with the Minority Stress Model and the IH literature, and exhibited context-specific features, which are discussed. PMID:27007469

  16. 1986 Index/Directory of Women's Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Martha Leslie, Ed.

    This is a directory of women's media, i.e., media primarily owned and operated by and for women. The mission of this annual publication is to aid networking among women, women's organizations, and women's media, both nationally and internationally. The directory includes two sections: women's media groups, and individual media women and…

  17. Orthopaedics in day surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    emergency patients for a surgical procedure, returning home the same day (1). Ambulatory orthopaedics happens to have double meaning, so in this communication day surgery will be the preferred term. In Kenya the three models of day.

  18. How Many Days Are Enough? A Study of 365 Days of Pedometer Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Minsoo; Bassett, David R.; Barreira, Tiago V.; Tudor-Locke, Catrine; Ainsworth, Barbara; Reis, Jared P.; Strath, Scott; Swartz, Ann

    2009-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the number of days of pedometer monitoring necessary to achieve reliable and valid estimates of a 1-year average of step counts in adults based on either consecutive days (CD) or random days (RD) of data collection. Twenty-three participants (16 women; M age = 38 years, SD = 9.9) wore a Yamax SW 200 pedometer…

  19. Validez interna y utilidad diagnóstica del Eating Disorders Inventory en mujeres mexicanas Internal validity and diagnostic utility of the Eating Disorder Inventory, in Mexican women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo García-García

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar la utilidad diagnóstica y la validez interna del Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI-2 en mujeres mexicanas. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: De octubre de 2000 a enero de 2001 se invitó a participar a todas las mujeres que a juicio de los psiquiatras de la consulta de anorexia del Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, de la Ciudad de México, padecían anorexia nervosa o bulimia, sin otra patología psiquiátrica. Es un estudio observacional, comparativo, transversal y prolectivo de dos grupos de mujeres: pacientes de la Clínica de Anorexia del Instituto y de una escuela de la Ciudad de México. Se realizó una entrevista clínica estructurada como estándar de oro (SCID/Manual Diagnóstico y Estadístico de los Trastornos Mentales y la aplicación del Eating Disorder Inventory. El análisis estadístico incluyó t de Student para muestras independientes, coeficiente alpha de Cronbach, sensibilidad, especificidad, valor predictivo positivo y negativo. RESULTADOS: No hubo diferencias significativas en peso, talla e índice de masa corporal entre los grupos. La edad de las mujeres sin trastorno alimentario fue menor (16.7±2.8 vs. 19.9±4.3, p=0.004. La calificación total del Eating Disorder Inventory fue claramente diferente (53.8±32.4 mujeres sin trastorno alimentario vs. 146.3±45.6 pacientes, pOBJECTIVE: To assess the diagnostic utility and internal validity of the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI-2 in Mexican women. MATERIAL AND METHODS: An observational, cross-sectional study was conducted between October 2000 and January 2001. The sample population consisted of two groups of women: patients diagnosed with anorexia nervosa or bulimia, but no other psychiatric pathology, seen by psychiatrists at the Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán (National Institute of Medical Sciences and Nutrition Salvador Zubirán, and a randomly selected sample of women from a school in

  20. The Florence Bird Lecture: "From Strength to Strength: The Interrelated Rights of Women and Children over the Life Cycle"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Landon

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the author's Florence Bird lecture, which was delivered at Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada on International Women's Day, March 8, 2012. In the lecture, the author focuses on the interrelated rights of women and children over the life cycle. The author explores this linkage and offers a caveat. The author shares a…

  1. Preference for attractiveness and thinness in a partner: influence of internalization of the thin ideal and shape/weight dissatisfaction in heterosexual women, heterosexual men, lesbians, and gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legenbauer, Tanja; Vocks, Silja; Schäfer, Corinna; Schütt-Strömel, Sabine; Hiller, Wolfgang; Wagner, Christof; Vögele, Claus

    2009-06-01

    This study assesses whether characteristics of one's own body image influences preferences of attractiveness in a partner. The role of gender and sexual orientation is also considered. Heterosexual women (n=67), lesbian women (n=73), heterosexual men (n=61) and gay men (n=82) participated in an internet survey assessing attitudes towards the body and preferences of attractiveness in a partner. Men in particular were found to prefer attractive partners, regardless of sexual orientation. Weight/shape dissatisfaction was found to be a negative predictor for heterosexual men and women. For gay men, preferences were better explained by internalization and weight/shape dissatisfaction. No such associations were found in the lesbian group. Levels of weight/shape dissatisfaction and internalization of socio-cultural slenderness ideals influence expectations of thinness and attractiveness in a partner with this effect being modified by gender and sexual orientation.

  2. Fabiola Gianotti is one of The Guardian's "most inspirational women"

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    Fabiola Gianotti, spokesperson for the ATLAS experiment, was named one of the world’s 100 most inspirational women by The Guardian newspaper. The list was drawn up in celebration of the International Women’s Day on 8 March.    

  3. The 10-day rule: a misnomer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mole, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    The option of restricting medical irradiation of women of reproductive age to the first 10 days of the menstrual cycle is discussed. The current ICRP proposal to abandon the 10-day option in diagnostic radiography is outlined and some reasons for this action by the ICRP are proposed, including the fact that the most sensitive period for radiation damage to the developing foetus brain is at 10-18 weeks after the first day of the last menstrual period. (U.K.)

  4. Transparency International

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulten, van M. (Michel)

    2009-01-01

    Established in 1993, Transparency International (TI) defines itself as “the global civil society organization leading the fight against corruption, that brings people together in a powerful worldwide coalition to end the devastating impact of corruption on men, women and children around the

  5. Heart disease and women

    Science.gov (United States)

    CAD - women; Coronary artery disease - women ... NOT smoke or use tobacco. Get plenty of exercise. Women who need to lose or keep off ... least 60 to 90 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise on most days. To maintain your health, get ...

  6. Tinjauan Hukum Internasional Terhadap Legalitas Women’s International War Crimes Tribunal Sebagai Lembaga Penyelesaian Kejahatan Perang Yang Dilakukan Oleh Tentara Militer Jepang Terhadap Comfort Women.

    OpenAIRE

    Kandou, Alvina Carolyn

    2011-01-01

    Pada tahun 1991, lebih dari 40 tahun usai berakhirnya Perang Dunia II ditandainya kekalahan Jepang, sejumlah mantan Comfort Women mulai menuntut keadilan. Para mantan Comfort Women Korea, disusul dengan para mantan Comfort Women Filipina, Taiwan, Indonesia, dan Belanda tampil menuntut penyidikan, permintaan maaf, ganti rugi, hukuman, hingga pelurusan sejarah kepada Pengadilan Jepang. Dalam laporan yang sama juga dinyatakan bahwa terdapat pula mantan Comfort Women yang masih hidup di Malaysia,...

  7. Talk with Your Doctor about Taking Aspirin Every Day

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... safe to take with aspirin. If you drink alcohol, drink only in moderation . This means no more than ... day for women and no more than 2 drinks a day for men. Alcohol can increase some risks of taking daily aspirin. ...

  8. Day Care Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This database contains locations of day care centers for 50 states and Washington D.C. and Puerto Rico. The dataset only includes center based day care locations...

  9. Is day surgery safe?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majholm, Birgitte; Engbæk, J; Bartholdy, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Day surgery is expanding in several countries, and it is important to collect information about quality. The aim of this study was to assess morbidity and unanticipated hospital visits 0-30 days post-operatively in a large cohort.......Day surgery is expanding in several countries, and it is important to collect information about quality. The aim of this study was to assess morbidity and unanticipated hospital visits 0-30 days post-operatively in a large cohort....

  10.   30‑day mortality after hysterectomy among women with liver cirrhosis, Danish population‑based cohorts study" Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 2002 May 10;102:202-5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lesnikova, Iana; Thulstrup, AM; Nielsen, GL

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Women with liver cirrhosis have a higher incidence of hysterectomy than the general population, generally because of abnormal bleeding. They may also have an increased risk of postoperative mortality and morbidity. METHODS: In the nationwide Danish National Patients Register (NPR) we ...

  11. Growing degree day calculator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degree-day benchmarks indicate discrete biological events in the development of insect pests. For the Sparganothis fruitworm, we have isolated all key development events and linked them to degree-day accumulations. These degree-day accumulations can greatly improve treatment timings for cranberry IP...

  12. Every Day Is Mathematical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barger, Rita H.; Jarrah, Adeeb M.

    2012-01-01

    March 14 is special because it is Pi Day. Mathematics is celebrated on that day because the date, 3-14, replicates the first three digits of pi. Pi-related songs, websites, trivia facts, and more are at the fingertips of interested teachers and students. Less celebrated, but still fairly well known, is National Metric Day, which falls on October…

  13. Women's network in Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Violence and discrimination against women have been part of the Afghan culture for thousands of years, but recently this situation has grown worse. In response, Afghan women have recently formed the Afghan Women's Network. The main objective of this organization is to work for peace and human rights in Afghanistan where the Taliban sect has been especially oppressive of women's rights. In a declaration issued late last year, the Network, which includes women in Pakistan as well as Afghanistan, requested international support for their work to guarantee the right of women to work outside the home, as well as their right to education and personal safety.

  14. Albanian women in physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deda, Antoneta; Alushllari, Mirela; Mico, Silvana

    2015-12-01

    In this report, presented at the 5th IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics, we describe the status of women physicists in Albania and offer some statistical data illustrating the present situation. Undergraduate physics enrollment by girls is high and stable, more women are receiving financial support for doctoral studies, women are well represented in recent academic promotions, and recently women scientists have been appointed to several leadership positions. However, both women and men are challenged by the overall low levels of funding for research and by issues of availability and affordability of child care.

  15. Other Women in Science Groups | Women in Science | Initiatives ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Other Women in Science Groups. Here is the information on various national and international groups/organizations working towards empowering women participation in science. 1. DST Task Force on Women in Science. The Department of Science & Technology has set up a National Task Force on Women in Science to ...

  16. Predictive value of plasma human chorionic gonadotropin measured 14 days after Day-2 single embryo transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løssl, Kristine; Oldenburg, Anna; Toftager, Mette

    2017-01-01

    -2 embryos. The aim of the present study was to investigate the predictive value of p-hCG measured exactly 14 days after the most commonly used Day-2 SET on pregnancy, delivery, and perinatal outcome. Material and methods: A retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data on 466 women who had...

  17. Clinical practice guidelines for the care of girls and women with Turner syndrome: proceedings from the 2016 Cincinnati International Turner Syndrome Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravholt, Claus H; Andersen, Niels H; Conway, Gerard S; Dekkers, Olaf M; Geffner, Mitchell E; Klein, Karen O; Lin, Angela E; Mauras, Nelly; Quigley, Charmian A; Rubin, Karen; Sandberg, David E; Sas, Theo C J; Silberbach, Michael; Söderström-Anttila, Viveca; Stochholm, Kirstine; van Alfen-van derVelden, Janielle A; Woelfle, Joachim; Backeljauw, Philippe F

    2017-09-01

    Turner syndrome affects 25-50 per 100,000 females and can involve multiple organs through all stages of life, necessitating multidisciplinary approach to care. Previous guidelines have highlighted this, but numerous important advances have been noted recently. These advances cover all specialty fields involved in the care of girls and women with TS. This paper is based on an international effort that started with exploratory meetings in 2014 in both Europe and the USA, and culminated with a Consensus Meeting held in Cincinnati, Ohio, USA in July 2016. Prior to this meeting, five groups each addressed important areas in TS care: 1) diagnostic and genetic issues, 2) growth and development during childhood and adolescence, 3) congenital and acquired cardiovascular disease, 4) transition and adult care, and 5) other comorbidities and neurocognitive issues. These groups produced proposals for the present guidelines. Additionally, four pertinent questions were submitted for formal GRADE (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation) evaluation with a separate systematic review of the literature. These four questions related to the efficacy and most optimal treatment of short stature, infertility, hypertension, and hormonal replacement therapy. The guidelines project was initiated by the European Society for Endocrinology and the Pediatric Endocrine Society, in collaboration with The European Society for Pediatric Endocrinology, The Endocrine Society, European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology, The American Heart Association, The Society for Endocrinology, and the European Society of Cardiology. The guideline has been formally endorsed by the European Society for Endocrinology, the Pediatric Endocrine Society, the European Society for Pediatric Endocrinology, the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology and the Endocrine Society. Advocacy groups appointed representatives who participated in pre-meeting discussions and in the

  18. Open Day at SHMI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarosova, M.

    2010-09-01

    During the World Meteorological Day there has been preparing "Open Day" at Slovak Hydrometeorological Institute. This event has more than 10 years traditions. "Open Day" is one of a lot of possibilities to give more information about meteorology, climatology, hydrology too to public. This "Day" is executed in whole Slovakia. People can visit the laboratories, the forecasting room....and meteo and clima measuring points. The most popular is visiting forecasting room. Visitors are interested in e.g. climatologic change in Slovakia territory, preparing weather forecasting, dangerous phenomena.... Every year we have more than 500 visitors.

  19. Another Look at Women Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodson, R.

    1986-01-01

    Women now comprise 30 percent of trade union membership worldwide. The International Labour Organisation's Workers' Education Branch is attempting to improve the status of women workers and increase their participation in union activities and labor education. (SK)

  20. NO TOBACCO DAY

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    The CERN Medical Service is joining in with the world no tobacco day, which takes place on 31 May 2002. We encourage you to take this opportunity to stop smoking for good. Nurses and Doctors will be present on that day to give out information on methods to stop smoking and to assist you in your efforts.

  1. Day care health risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as head lice and scabies are other common health problems that occur in day care centers. You can do a number of ... for the child How to contact your child's health care provider ... sure your child's day care staff knows how to follow that plan.

  2. The Presidents' Day Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, D. Jackson

    2008-01-01

    The history behind the holiday commonly called "Presidents' Day" is a bit confusing. It started as a federal holiday called Washington's Birthday. It was a day set aside to honor George Washington for his accomplishments as a founding father of the country. Later, many northern states began to recognize Abraham Lincoln's Birthday as well for his…

  3. First Day of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Educators Search English Español The First Day of Life KidsHealth / For Parents / The First Day of Life What's in this article? What Your Newborn Looks ... usually begin within the first few hours of life. Your Feelings Having a baby is a life- ...

  4. The influence of materialism and ideal body internalization on body-dissatisfaction and body-shaping behaviors of young men and women: support for the Consumer Culture Impact Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guðnadóttir, Unnur; Garðarsdóttir, Ragna B

    2014-04-01

    Exposure to media images of the 'body-perfect' ideal has been partly blamed for the pursuit of thinness among women and muscularity among men. Research has largely overlooked the materialistic messages frequently associated with these images. We present findings from two studies with Icelandic students aged 18-21, one focusing on young women (n = 303) and one on young men (n = 226), which test associations of materialistic and body-perfect ideals with body dissatisfaction and excessive body shaping behaviors. In both studies, the internalization of materialistic values is strongly linked to the internalization of body-perfect ideals: the thin-ideal for young women, and the muscular-ideal for young men. A materialist value orientation also predicted body dissatisfaction in both studies, and was linked to body shaping behaviors, albeit differently for young women and men. Thus, the research identifies materialism as a further correlate of both body dissatisfaction and excessive body-shaping behaviors. The findings support Dittmar's (2008) Consumer Culture Impact Model, which proposes that the body-perfect and 'material good life' ideals jointly impact well-being. © 2014 Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Three Presidents in one day

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, President of Argentina, in the ATLAS cavern with Minister of Science and Technology, Lino Barañao. The President of Mozambique, Armando Guebuza, being shown a crystal from the CMS calorimeter by Jim Virdee, CMS spokesperson, and Felicitas Pauss, CERN Coordinator for External Relations. The President of Poland, Lech Kaczyński, and the First Lady visited the CMS experiment. It was a busy day for many at CERN on 15 June with visits from the Presidents of Argentina, Poland and Mozambique all in one day! The three Presidents were in Geneva for a summit organized by the International Labour Organization (ILO), and couldn’t resist the opportunity to see CERN before heading home. Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, President of Argentina, visited the ATLAS cavern with Minister of Science and Technology, Lino Barañao. While at CERN Kirchner signed an agreement be...

  6. STS-88 Day 06 Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    On this sixth day of the STS-88 mission, the flight crew, Commander Robert D. Cabana, Pilot Frederick W. Sturckow, and Mission Specialists Nancy J. Currie, James H. Newman, Jerry L. Ross, and Sergei Krikalev are awakened by Dwight Yokum's "Streets of Bakersfield," requested by the wife of Pilot Rick Sturckow, a California native. Cabana and Sturckow fire Endeavour's primary reaction control jets to raise the altitude of the International Space Station by about 5-1/2 statute miles. Later on Cabana, Sturckow and Currie are interviewed by the ABC News/Discovery Channel and MSNBC.

  7. STS-72 Flight Day 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    On this seventh day of the STS-72 mission, the flight crew, Cmdr. Brian Duffy, Pilot Brent W. Jett, and Mission Specialists Leroy Chiao, Daniel T. Barry, Winston E. Scott, and Koichi Wakata (NASDA), awakened to music from the Walt Disney movie, 'Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.' Chiao and Scott performed the second spacewalk of the mission where they tested equipment and work platforms that will be used in building the planned International Space Station. This spacewalk was almost seven hours long. Wakata conducted an interview with and answered questions from six graders from a Japanese school in Houston, Texas.

  8. Half of world's women are victims of domestic abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    According to a report by the UN International Children's Emergency Fund (UNICEF), up to half of the world's female population have suffered abuse at the hands of those closest to them, at some point in their lives. This report on Domestic Violence Against Women and Girls is a first effort by the UNICEF to establish the global dimensions of domestic abuse. It is also another step deeper into an aggressive campaign to address the root causes of the problems of millions of the world's women and children. Meanwhile, an outcome of the 5-day UN special meeting is a new blueprint to improve women's lives, noting domestic violence as a primary issue with emphasis on abortion, and punishment for marital rape, domestic abuse, and trafficking. In addition, the conference acknowledged the role of men in the process of improving women's lives. Moreover, the issues of welfare for women caught in armed conflict are also discussed with focus on the war in Mindanao, Philippines.

  9. Effects of low-dose aspirin (50-mg/day), low-dose aspirin plus dipyridamole, and oral anticoagulant agents after internal mammary artery bypass-grafting : Patency and clinical outcome at 1 year

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, J; de la Rivière, Aart Brutel; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Hillege, Hans L.; Pfisterer, M; Kootstra, G. J.; Dunselmann, P. H. J. M.; MULDER, BJM; Lie, Kong I.

    1994-01-01

    Objectives. This study was performed to compare the efficacy and safety of aspirin, aspirin plus dipyridamole, and oral anti coagulant agents in the prevention of internal mammary artery graft occlusion. Background. Antithrombotic drugs increase vein graft patency after coronary artery bypass

  10. Transparency International

    OpenAIRE

    Hulten, van, M. (Michel)

    2009-01-01

    Established in 1993, Transparency International (TI) defines itself as “the global civil society organization leading the fight against corruption, that brings people together in a powerful worldwide coalition to end the devastating impact of corruption on men, women and children around the world”. Its stated goal is “to take action to combat corruption and prevent criminal activities arising from corruption so as to help build a world in which Government, politics, business...

  11. Women helping women in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff-rousselle, M

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Ouk Vong Vathiny is the first director of the Reproductive Health Association of Cambodia (RHAC), the International Planned Parenthood's newest affiliate. Dr. Vathiny's interest in reproductive health began with her first position in a clinic serving women working in Phnom Penh's commercial sex district. Today, she works with RHAC staff to provide a full range of reproductive health services to a wide variety of rural and urban women. Under the direction of Dr. Ping Chutema, the RHAC clinic provides a standard package of safe motherhood services and highlights provision of birth spacing counseling and methods. Although it operates in only three of 22 provinces, the RHAC now distributes between a fourth and a third of all contraceptives dispensed by government services. Dr. Vathiny and Dr. Chutema note that the biggest problem they face is the fact that most women in Cambodia have very little education and that rumors spread faster than real information. Efforts to insure safe motherhood are challenged by high rates of sexually transmitted diseases and by a high prevalence and rate of increase of HIV infection, both of which are exacerbated by the popularity of commercial sex among married men. Domestic violence and women's low nutritional status are also problems. RHAC considers education and counseling essential elements of its safe motherhood package and even trains community-based contraceptive distributors to counsel women on ways to negotiate with their husbands.

  12. AAS 227: Day 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 4 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Helen B. Warner Prize: Origins of Structure in Planetary Systems (by Erika Nesvold)Another excellent prize lecture started off todays sessions. The Helen B. Warner Prize is awarded for achievement in observational or theoretical astrophysics by a young researcher (no more than eight years after their Ph.D.). This years Warner Prize was presented to Ruth Murray-Clay of UC Santa Barbara. For her award lecture, Murray-Clay told us all about planetary system architecture: the number, masses, and orbits of planets in a given system.Ruth Murray-Clay [photo from http://web.physics.ucsb.edu/ ~murray/biocv.html]The underlying question motivating this type of research is: How rare is the Solar System? In other words, how likely is it that a given planetary system will have rocky planets close to their star, gas giants farther out, and ice giants at the outer reaches of the system? Answering this question will help us solve the physics problem of how and where planets form, and will also help us on our search for other planets like Earth.The data on exoplanet population from transit and radial velocity observations and from direct imaging tell us that our Solar System is not common (many systems we observe have much more eccentric gas giants), but that doesnt

  13. News Education: Physics Education Networks meeting has global scale Competition: Competition seeks the next Brian Cox Experiment: New measurement of neutrino time-of-flight consistent with the speed of light Event: A day for all those who teach physics Conference: Students attend first Anglo-Japanese international science conference Celebration: Will 2015 be the 'Year of Light'? Teachers: Challenging our intuition in spectacular fashion: the fascinating world of quantum physics awaits Research: Science sharpens up sport Learning: Kittinger and Baumgartner: on a mission to the edge of space International: London International Youth Science Forum calls for leading young scientists Competition: Physics paralympian challenge needs inquisitive, analytical, artistic and eloquent pupils Forthcoming events

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Education: Physics Education Networks meeting has global scale Competition: Competition seeks the next Brian Cox Experiment: New measurement of neutrino time-of-flight consistent with the speed of light Event: A day for all those who teach physics Conference: Students attend first Anglo-Japanese international science conference Celebration: Will 2015 be the 'Year of Light'? Teachers: Challenging our intuition in spectacular fashion: the fascinating world of quantum physics awaits Research: Science sharpens up sport Learning: Kittinger and Baumgartner: on a mission to the edge of space International: London International Youth Science Forum calls for leading young scientists Competition: Physics paralympian challenge needs inquisitive, analytical, artistic and eloquent pupils Forthcoming events

  14. Comparison of ectopic pregnancy risk among transfers of embryos vitrified on day 3, day 5, and day 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Tong; Chen, Hong; Fu, Rong; Chen, Qiuju; Wang, Yun; Mol, Ben W; Kuang, Yanping; Lyu, Qifeng

    2017-07-01

    To compare ectopic pregnancy risk among transfers of embryos vitrified on day 3, day 5, and day 6. Retrospective cohort study. Academic tertiary-care medical center. A total of 10,736 pregnancies after 23,730 frozen-thawed embryo transfer (FET) cycles of in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection from March 2003 to May 2015. The ectopic pregnancy rate was compared among pregnancies resulting from transfers of embryos vitrified on day 3, day 5, and day 6. Generalized estimation equation regression models were used to calculate unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the association between ectopic pregnancy and selected patient and treatment characteristics. We studied this association in both the group that achieved pregnancy and the group that underwent an FET cycle. Odds of ectopic pregnancy. The overall rate of ectopic pregnancy was 2.8% (304/10,736). Ectopic pregnancy rates after day-3, day-5, and day-6 vitrified embryo transfers were 3.1% (287/9,224), 2.0% (11/562), and 0.6% (6/950), respectively. After adjusting for confounders, the risks of ectopic pregnancy in day-3 and day-5 vitrified embryo transfers were both significantly higher than in day-6 vitrified embryo transfers. The associations were similar when we did calculations per cycle. In women undergoing FET, day-6 vitrified embryo transfer is associated with a significantly lower risk of ectopic pregnancy than both day-3 and day-5 vitrified embryo transfers. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Open Day: General Information

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    http://www.cern.ch/cern50/ With 50 visit points, including theatre performances, debates and visits to installations that have never before been opened to the public, CERN's 50th anniversary Open Day is set to be a day to remember. Seven hundred volunteers have signed up to help for the day. The Open Day team truly appreciates this wonderful show of support! The Open Day would not be possible without their help. Car parking and Access Cars with a CERN sticker can access all CERN sites as normal. However, to avoid congestion on Meyrin site, we ask you to park in areas that will not be open to the public (see below) and to use the shuttle services wherever possible for your transport during the day. Private cars on the French side of the border without a CERN sticker will be diverted to a car park area in the Prévessin site. There is a shuttle service connecting the Meyrin and Prévessin sites via SM18 every 20 minutes. Private cars on the Swiss side of the border without a CERN sticker will be diverte...

  16. Sun-Earth Days

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieman, J.; Ng, C.; Lewis, E.; Cline, T.

    2010-08-01

    Sun-Earth Day is a well-coordinated series of programs, resources and events under a unique yearly theme highlighting the fundamentals of heliophysics research and missions. A menu of activities, conducted throughout the year, inspire and educate participants. Sun-Earth Day itself can vary in date, but usually is identified by a celebration on or near the spring equinox. Through the Sun-Earth Day framework we have been able to offer a series of coordinated events that promote and highlight the Sun, its connection to Earth and the other planets. Sun-Earth Day events are hosted by educators, museums, amateur astronomers and scientists and occur at schools, community groups, parks, planetaria and science centers around the globe. Sun-Earth Day raises the awareness and knowledge of formal and informal education audiences concerning space weather and heliophysics. By building on the success of Sun-Earth Day yearly celebrations, we seek to affect people of all backgrounds and ages with the wonders of heliophysics science, discovery, and exploration in ways that are both tangible and meaningful to their lives.

  17. World Population Day special symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-08-01

    This article describes Japan's celebration of World Population Day, and provides excerpts from speeches at the symposium held on July 8, 1998. The symposium, in Tokyo, was attended by about 300 people. The Chairman of JOICFP gave the opening address. The executive director of UNFPA congratulated Japan for its efforts in the field of population awareness and noted Japan's self-sufficiency despite its importation of 40% of its food and most of its raw materials. A keynote address was delivered by the president of CPE and the former UN Secretary General, who stressed income inequities in the 66% of developing countries within the 185 UN member states. The UN has been promoting sustainable development, but is facing the issue of limited arable land and population growth. The Tutsi and Hutus are fighting due to population based issues. The emphasis should be on women's reproductive rights and protection of women's human rights. 1998 is the 50th year of human rights; progress has been made. The UNFPA Goodwill Ambassador spoke about the disparity between the rich and poor in the Philippines. A small donation reaps incredible progress. Manila has high levels of adolescent childbearing. Men appear to be unaware of the disadvantages of childbearing too early. Rural areas are dominated by strict Roman Catholic beliefs. Manila has commercial sex workers who provide services to Japanese men. The 1998 Kato Award was given to women who raised awareness about coercion in the sex trade and female genital mutilation. The economic situation in Japan creates even greater need to promote family planning and reproductive health.

  18. 2016 SPD: Day 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors note: This week were in Boulder, Colorado at the 47th meeting of the AAS Solar Physics Division (SPD). Follow along to catch some of the latest news from the field of solar physics!The 2016 SPD meeting was launched this morning from the University of Colorado Boulder campus. Two of the hot topics at this years meeting include celebration of the recent move of the National Solar Observatorys headquarters to Boulder, and discussion of the future Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST, formerly the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope, ATST). DKIST, planned for a 2019 completion in Hawaii, is the next big telescope on the horizon for solar physics.Todays press conference had an interesting focus: instruments providing new high-energy observations of the Sun. Representatives from four different instruments were here to talk about some of the latest X-ray solar observations.GRIPSThe GRIPS payload flew at 130,000 ft over Antarctica on a giant balloon in January 2016. [NASA/Albert Shih]First up, Albert Shih (NASA Goddard) described the Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar flares, or GRIPS. GRIPS is a balloon-borne instrument designed to detect X-rays and gamma rays emitted during solar flares. Up to tens of a percent of the energy in solar flares is emitted in the form of accelerated particles, but the physics behind this process is not well understood. GRIPS observes where the highest-energy particles are accelerated, in an effort to learn more about the process.GRIPS was launched on 19 January, 2016 and flew for roughly 12 days gathering ~1 million seconds of data! The logistics of this instruments flight are especially interesting, since it was launched from Antarctica and carried by a balloon at a whopping elevation of 130,000 ft (to get high enough that the atmosphere doesnt absorb all the photons GRIPS is trying to observe). Though the data from the mission has been retrieved, the bulk of the hardware remains where it landed at the end of January. It must

  19. International Endometrial Tumor Analysis (IETA) terminology in women with postmenopausal bleeding and sonographic endometrial thickness ≥ 4.5 mm: agreement and reliability study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sladkevicius, P; Installé, A; Van Den Bosch, T; Timmerman, D; Benacerraf, B; Jokubkiene, L; Di Legge, A; Votino, A; Zannoni, L; De Moor, B; De Cock, B; Van Calster, B; Valentin, L

    2018-02-01

    To estimate intra- and interrater agreement and reliability with regard to describing ultrasound images of the endometrium using the International Endometrial Tumor Analysis (IETA) terminology. Four expert and four non-expert raters assessed videoclips of transvaginal ultrasound examinations of the endometrium obtained from 99 women with postmenopausal bleeding and sonographic endometrial thickness ≥ 4.5 mm but without fluid in the uterine cavity. The following features were rated: endometrial echogenicity, endometrial midline, bright edge, endometrial-myometrial junction, color score, vascular pattern, irregularly branching vessels and color splashes. The color content of the endometrial scan was estimated using a visual analog scale graded from 0 to 100. To estimate intrarater agreement and reliability, the same videoclips were assessed twice with a minimum of 2 months' interval. The raters were blinded to their own results and to those of the other raters. Interrater differences in the described prevalence of most IETA variables were substantial, and some variable categories were observed rarely. Specific agreement was poor for variables with many categories. For binary variables, specific agreement was better for absence than for presence of a category. For variables with more than two outcome categories, specific agreement for expert and non-expert raters was best for not-defined endometrial midline (93% and 96%), regular endometrial-myometrial junction (72% and 70%) and three-layer endometrial pattern (67% and 56%). The grayscale ultrasound variable with the best reliability was uniform vs non-uniform echogenicity (multirater kappa (κ), 0.55 for expert and 0.52 for non-expert raters), and the variables with the lowest reliability were appearance of the endometrial-myometrial junction (κ, 0.25 and 0.16) and the nine-category endometrial echogenicity variable (κ, 0.29 and 0.28). The most reliable color Doppler variable was color score (mean weighted

  20. Day surgery for inguinal hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, A I

    1995-01-01

    Historical developments of groin herniorrhaphy date from Bassini's contributions through many present-day simplified tension-free techniques. Availability of sterile-packaged prosthetic mesh has currently given every surgeon an inexhaustible "tissue bank" for hernia repair surgery. The value of using a local anesthetic is unequaled in verifying the completeness of a repair. Same-day surgery has many advantages including lowered rates of infection, quicker ambulation, and more rapid return to regular activities. The sutureless umbrella plug technique is discussed. It is the simplest technique to permanently repair indirect inguinal hernias. Taking advantage of Nature' window through the internal inguinal ring, the properitoneal space can be reached. By dissecting the peritoneal sac high on its neck and shoulders, the retromuscular properitoneal space can be actualized. It allows a permanent repair to be done by simply protecting the internal ring with a swatch of polypropylene mesh shaped as an umbrella. The body's natural forces that created the hernia work to repair it by transversalis fascia. The procedure is easy to perform, done with local anesthesia, inexpensive, safe, and has minimal recurrence and complication rates.

  1. La celebración del año internacional de la mujer en Argentina (1975: acciones y conflitos The celebration of the international women's year in Argentina (1975: actions and conflicts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Giordano

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo estudia las repercusiones del Año Internacional de la Mujer (1975 en Argentina, cuya actividad central fue la Conferencia reunida en México DF entre el 19 de junio y el 2 de julio. En ese momento, Argentina atravesaba una coyuntura de fuerte conflictividad política situada entre dos férreas dictaduras (1966-1973 y 1976-1983. La convocatoria de la ONU dio a las mujeres mayor visibilidad como sujetos sociales con demandas propias. Es un tema poco visibilizado en la historiografía, que aquí se aborda considerando la invocación de los derechos de las mujeres como consigna política en disputa. El análisis permite evidenciar los límites y la reticencia del Estado y de algunas mujeres y grupos de mujeres para abarcar esas demandas.This article studies the impact of the International Women's Year (1975 in Argentina. Its main activity was an International Conference which took place in Mexico City between June, 19 and July, 2. At that moment, Argentina was going though a time of strong political conflict, a time embedded between two fierce dictatorships (1966-1973 y 1976-1983. It is a topic which has not been so much visible in historiographical studies and that this article considers together with the invocation of women's rights as a disputable political cause. The invitation addressed by the UN made women more visible as individuals with their own demands. The analysis of this topic helps evidence the limits and unwillingness of the State and of some women and women's groups to embrace those demands.

  2. Review of the importance of nutrition during the first 1000 days: maternal nutritional status and its associations with fetal growth and birth, neonatal and infant outcomes among African women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrottesley, S V; Lamper, C; Pisa, P T

    2016-04-01

    Maternal nutritional status (MNS) is a strong predictor of growth and development in the first 1000 days of life and may influence susceptibility to non-communicable diseases in adulthood. However, the role of nutrition during this window of developmental plasticity in Africa is unclear. This paper reviews published data to address whether maternal nutrition during the first 1000 days is important for Africa, with a focus on MNS and its associations with fetal growth and birth, neonatal and infant outcomes. A systematic approach was used to search the following databases: Medline, EMBASE, Web of Science, Google Scholar, ScienceDirect, SciSearch and Cochrane Library. In all, 26 studies met the inclusion criteria for the specific objectives. MNS in Africa showed features typical of the epidemiological transition: higher prevalences of maternal overweight and obesity and lower underweight, poor diet quality 1 and high anaemia prevalence. Maternal body mass index and greater gestational weight gain (GWG) were positively associated with birth weight; however, maternal overweight and obesity were associated with increased risk of macrosomia and intrauterine growth restriction. Maternal anaemia was associated with lower birth weight. Macro- and micronutrient supplementation during pregnancy were associated with improvements in GWG, birth weight and mortality risk. Data suggest poor MNS in Africa and confirms the importance of the first 1000 days as a critical period for nutritional intervention to improve growth, birth outcomes and potential future health risk. However, there is a lack of data beyond birth and a need for longitudinal data through infancy to 2 years of age.

  3. 4th Optimization Day

    CERN Document Server

    Eberhard, Andrew; Ralph, Daniel; Glover, Barney M

    1999-01-01

    Although the monograph Progress in Optimization I: Contributions from Aus­ tralasia grew from the idea of publishing a proceedings of the Fourth Optimiza­ tion Day, held in July 1997 at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, the focus soon changed to a refereed volume in optimization. The intention is to publish a similar book annually, following each Optimization Day. The idea of having an annual Optimization Day was conceived by Barney Glover; the first of these Optimization Days was held in 1994 at the University of Ballarat. Barney hoped that such a yearly event would bring together the many, but widely dispersed, researchers in Australia who were publishing in optimization and related areas such as control. The first Optimization Day event was followed by similar conferences at The University of New South Wales (1995), The University of Melbourne (1996), the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (1997), and The University of Western Australia (1998). The 1999 conference will return to Ballarat ...

  4. Security for women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    International Rescue Committee

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available An assessment by the International Rescue Committee in 1996 in Kibondo District, Tanzania, indicated that 27 per cent of women between the ages of 12 and 49 had experienced sexual violence since becoming refugees.

  5. Advancing Women's Health and Women's Leadership With Endowed Chairs in Women's Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnes, Molly; Johnson, Paula; Klein, Wendy; Jenkins, Marjorie; Bairey Merz, C Noel

    2017-02-01

    Gender-based bias and conflation of gender and status are root causes of disparities in women's health care and the slow advancement of women to leadership in academic medicine. More than a quarter of women physicians train in internal medicine and its subspecialties, and women physicians almost exclusively constitute the women's health focus within internal medicine. Thus, internal medicine has considerable opportunity to develop women leaders in academic medicine and promote women's health equity.To probe whether holding an endowed chair-which confers status-in women's health may be an effective way to advance women leaders in academic medicine and women's health, the authors explored the current status of endowed chairs in women's health in internal medicine. They found that the number of these endowed chairs in North America increased from 7 in 2013 to 19 in 2015, and all were held by women. The perceptions of incumbents and other women's health leaders supported the premise that an endowed chair in women's health would increase women's leadership, the institutional stature of women's health, and activities in women's health research, education, and clinical care.Going forward, it will be important to explore why not all recipients perceived that the endowed chair enhanced their own academic leadership, whether providing women's health leaders with fundraising expertise fosters future success in increasing the number of women's health endowed chairs, and how the conflation of gender and status play out (e.g., salary differences between endowed chairs) as the number of endowed chairs in women's health increases.

  6. National hearing day

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The 12th of June 2003 Is the French National Hearing Day. The Medical Service invites everyone working at CERN to come and have an ear test at the infirmary. Bld. 57, ground floor, between 9h00 and 16h00 Tel. 73802

  7. NATIONAL HEARING DAY

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The 12th of June 2003 Is the French National Hearing Day. The Medical Service invites everyone working at CERN to come and have an ear test at the infirmary. Bld. 57, ground floor, between 9h00 and 16h00 Tel. 73802

  8. CERN openlab Open Day

    CERN Multimedia

    Purcell, Andrew Robert

    2015-01-01

    The CERN openlab Open Day took place on 10 June, 2015. This was the first in a series of annual events at which research and industrial teams from CERN openlab can present their projects, share achievements, and collect feedback from their user communities.

  9. World Heart Day

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-09-01

    For World Heart Day, learn more about what heart-healthy steps you can take in the workplace.  Created: 9/1/2009 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 9/9/2009.

  10. Radiochemistry days; Journees radiochimie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    This document provides the 44 papers (transparencies used during the presentations and posters) presented at the Radiochemistry Days, held September 3-4, 1998 in Nantes, France. The main studied topics were problematic questions concerning the nuclear fuel cycle and in particular the management, storage of radioactive wastes and the environmental impact. (O.M.)

  11. My Day of Silence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Scott C.

    1999-01-01

    A heterosexual doctoral student discusses his experiences when he tries to take part in a day of silence to help combat homophobia and heterosexism. His vow of silence teaches him that he will never fully understand the experience of a person who has been historically, socially, and legally silent. (Author/MKA)

  12. Fabulous Weather Day

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Candice; Mogil, H. Michael

    2007-01-01

    Each year, first graders at Kensington Parkwood Elementary School in Kensington, Maryland, look forward to Fabulous Weather Day. Students learn how meteorologists collect data about the weather, how they study wind, temperature, precipitation, basic types/characteristics of clouds, and how they forecast. The project helps the students grow in…

  13. Adult Day Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... institutional care while still providing consistent medical monitoring Average Annual Cost Per Person 6 $75,000 $50,000 Homemaker Home Health Aide Semi Private Private $25,000 Adult Day Servi Acesssisted Living Home Care Nursing Homes $0 1. General information based on ...

  14. Computer Security Day

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

      Viruses, phishing, malware and cyber-criminals can all threaten your computer and your data, even at CERN! Experts will share their experience with you and offer solutions to keep your computer secure. Thursday, 10 June 2010, 9.30, Council Chamber Make a note in your diary! Presentations in French and English: How do hackers break into your computer? Quels sont les enjeux et conséquences des attaques informatiques contre le CERN ? How so criminals steal your money on the Internet? Comment utiliser votre ordinateur de manière sécurisée ? and a quiz: test your knowledge and win one of the many prizes that will be on offer! For more information and to follow the day's events via a live webcast go to: http://cern.ch/SecDay.  

  15. CERN Heart Days

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    14 & 15 OCTOBER 2003 The Medical Service and the Fire Brigade invite everyone working at CERN to participate in the above event. INFIRMARY 9 am to 16.30 pm Building 57, ground floor no need to book HEALTHY HEART? • Evaluation of personal cardiac risks through the monitoring of: Blood pressure Cholesterol and sugar levels Body Mass Index ... and more • Leaflets, information and advice concerning cardiac issues FIRE BRIGADE 9 to 12 am - Building 65 Please book (limited to 15 people/day) FIRST AID COURSES • What to do in a Cardiac Emergency (3 h. duration) Places are limited and on reservation only (15 people/day). To book, e-mail the Medical Services on: service.medical@cern.ch

  16. CERN Heart Days

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    14 & 15 OCTOBER 2003 The Medical Service and the Fire Brigade invite everyone working at CERN to participate in the above event. INFIRMARY 9 am to 16.30 pm Building 57, ground floor No need to book HEALTHY HEART? Evaluation of personal cardiac risks through the monitoring of: Blood pressure Cholesterol and sugar levels Body Mass Index ... and more Leaflets, information and advice concerning cardiac issues FIRE BRIGADE 9 to 12am - Building 65 Please book (limited to 15 people/day) FIRST AID COURSES What to do in a Cardiac Emergency (3 h. duration) Places are limited and on reservation only (15 people/day). To book, e-mail the Medical Services on: service.medical@cern.ch

  17. One Day on Earth

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    In collaboration with the CineGlobe Film Festival, the One Day on Earth global film project invites you to share your story of scientific inspiration, scientific endeavors and technological advancement on 11 November 2011 (11.11.11).   Technology in the 21st century continuously inspires us to re-imagine the world. From outer-space to cyberspace, new ideas that we hope will improve the lives of future generations keep us in a state of change. However, these new technologies may alter the nature of our shared existence in ways not yet known. On 11.11.11, we invite you to record the exciting ways that science is a part of your life, together with people around the world who will be documenting their lives on this day of global creation. See www.onedayonearth.org for details on how to participate.

  18. LHC days 2003

    CERN Document Server

    LHC days 2003

    2003-01-01

    The LHC days 2003, held in Les Diablerets from 2nd to 4th June 2003 and attended by more than 130 participants from 6 divisions of CERN, bear witness of the broad involvement of CERN in the LHC, and of the development of the project in its construction and installation phases. The core responsibilities of the Accelerator Technology division, such as superconducting magnets, cryogenics and vacuum, took a large share of the program, but the related topics of machine installation, commissioning, testing and operation, as well as the interface with the experimental areas and their physics detectors provided the occasion of dynamic exchanges and intense discussions, as they constitute the forthcoming phases of our work on the project. This report summarizes the presentations and discussions which took place during these three days.

  19. Open Days in 2008

    CERN Multimedia

    Corinne Pralavorio

    CERN will be organising two Open Days in 2008, one for CERN employees and their families on Saturday, 5 April, and another for the general public on Sunday, 6 April. This is the one last chance to see the LHC and its experiments. In addition to the surface facilities, visitors will be able to go underground to see the accelerator and will have acces to the experiment caverns. Exceptionally, most of the points along the ring will be open. We need a large number of volunteers to ensure the success of these two very special days. Full details of the events will be published in the first January edition of the Bulletin. Volunteers will be able to register by completing an electronic form and an information session will be organised.

  20. National HIV Testing Day

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-06-09

    Dr. Kevin A. Fenton, Director of CDC's National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, discusses National HIV Testing Day, an annual observance which raises awareness of the importance of knowing one's HIV status and encourages at-risk individuals to get an HIV test.  Created: 6/9/2011 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 6/9/2011.

  1. World water day

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The symposium on world water day for the year 2005 was held on 22nd March by the Pakistan Engineering congress in collaboration with Water and Power Development Authority (WAPDA). Six technical papers by engineers/experts presented on the diverse fields from large dams to drinking water and public hygiene. Paper published in this volume are open for written discussion. (orig./A.B.)

  2. 'EU divertor celebration day'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merola, M.

    2002-01-01

    The meeting 'EU divertor celebration day' organized on 16 January 2002 at Plansee AG, Reutte, Austria was held on the occasion of the completion of manufacturing activities of a complete set of near full-scale prototypes of divertor components including the vertical target, the dome liner and the cassette body. About 30 participants attended the meeting including Dr. Robert Aymar, ITER Director, representatives from EFDA, CEA, ENEA, IPP and others

  3. Day surgery in Bristol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrington, S

    1993-02-01

    As in the rest of the United Kingdom, day surgery in Bristol is on the increase. In the Bristol Royal Infirmary day surgery unit (DSU) we treat approximately 3,500 patients a year. We have recently opened a second operating theatre. This has shifted the proportion of cases from our general theatres. This has also improved our case mix, less minor surgery under local anaesthetics, to more of the recommended 'basket type' surgery ie hernia repair, varicose vein surgery, excision of breast lumps etc. We have recently introduced an appointment booking system that is progressing. Such changes have to be introduced with good preparation, communication and a lot of diplomacy. I would like to outline the management aspects that help to expand and improve on the service we give, including patient selection and the appointment booking system we have introduced. I will describe how we drew up a policy involving the organisation of operation lists and staff involvement in day surgery management and accountability for patient care from admission through to discharge including our latest care plan. Finally I will outline the methods we have developed for evaluating the care we give.

  4. Women and the environment: the role of gender in effective natural resource management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This article discusses women's role in effective management of natural resources in developing countries. USAID and other international donors are responding to environmental degradation by recognizing the importance of daily life in developing countries and the individual potential to conserve natural resources. USAID requires that environmental projects take into account a host of factors associated with women, especially women's poverty. More than 50% of the 1.3 billion living in poverty (expenditures of under $1/day) are women. Rural women are especially disadvantaged. The number of people living in poverty has increased for women by 47% and for men by 30%. Natural resource management (NRM) planners must take into account women's limited access to renewable energy sources, lack of property rights, and lack of education. Planners in the past failed to take into account gender constraints and women's environment-related roles. The result is that men and women benefit unequally from project activities, knowledge on NRM was lost, and sustainable development and environmental protection were less effective. Women use natural resources in the collection of water for cooking and cleaning, farming, fishing, and collecting food and firewood. Women affect the environment in their management of sanitation. Programs that succeed in addressing long term needs of communities and households must recognize women's knowledge of the community economy and NRM. Poverty is a constraint to sustainable use of natural resources.

  5. The effects of Vibroacoustic treatment on girls and women with Rett Syndrome: Paper to the 2nd International Scientific Research Workshop: Infant Behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigram, Anthony Lewis

    2003-01-01

    Vibroacoustic therapy is a treatment using the relaxing effects of sedative music combined with pulsed, sinusoidal low frequency tones between 35Hz-70Hz, transmitted through bass speakers built into a bed or chair. This treatment has shown effects in reducing arousal level in girls and women with...

  6. CERN hearing day

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    1 in 10 people suffer from hearing loss - do you? The Medical Service invites everyone working on CERN premises to participate in the National Hearing Day on: Thursday 10th March From 9am to 4pm The Infirmary, Blg. 57, Gr.Fl. We will be offering hearing tests (audiogram); information, advice on hearing loss, tinnitus and more. Deafness does not just affect the elderly: in Europe, 50% the hearing-impaired are under the age of 55. Exposure to excessive noise is one of the main reasons for hearing loss. But prevention is possible and effective: for example, Hearing protection devices could reduce tinnitus cases by 80%.

  7. CERN hearing day

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    1 in 10 people suffer from hearing loss ? do you? The Medical Service invites everyone working on the CERN site to participate in the NATIONAL HEARING DAY on: Thursday 10th March 2005 From 9am to 4pm The Infirmary, Blg. 57, Ground Floor We will be offering hearing tests (audiograms), as well as information and advice on hearing loss, tinnitus, etc. Deafness does not just affect the elderly: in Europe, 50% of the hearing-impaired are under the age of 55. Exposure to excessive noise is one of the main reasons for hearing problems but prevention is possible. For example, hearing protection devices can prevent 80% of tinnitus cases.

  8. CERN hearing day

    CERN Document Server

    2005-01-01

    1 in 10 people suffer from hearing loss - do you? The Medical Service invites everyone working on CERN premises to participate in the National Hearing Day on: Thursday 10th March From 9am to 4pm The Infirmary, Blg. 57, Gr.Fl. We will be offering hearing tests (audiogram); information, advice on hearing loss, tinnitus and more. Deafness does not just affect the elderly: in Europe, 50% the hearing-impaired are under the age of 55. Exposure to excessive noise is one of the main reasons for hearing loss. But PREVENTION IS POSSIBLE AND EFFECTIVE: for example, Hearing protection devices could reduce tinnitus cases by 80%.

  9. CERN hearing day

    CERN Document Server

    2005-01-01

    1 in 10 people suffer from hearing loss - do you? The Medical Service invites everyone working on the CERN site to participate in the NATIONAL HEARING DAY on: Thursday 10th March 2005 From 9am to 4pm The Infirmary, Blg. 57, Ground Floor We will be offering hearing tests (audiograms), as well as information and advice on hearing loss, tinnitus, etc. Deafness does not just affect the elderly: in Europe, 50% of the hearing-impaired are under the age of 55. Exposure to excessive noise is one of the main reasons for hearing problems but PREVENTION IS POSSIBLE. For example, hearing protection devices can prevent 80% of tinnitus cases.

  10. Gis Day 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esri Italia Esri Italia

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Si è svolto nelle Marche, ad Urbino, città simbolo del legame tra scienza e Rinascimento, il GIS DAY 2005; l’evento ha avuto il patrocinio di DAMAC – INTERREG SECUR SEA ed il supporto di: Regione Marche - Giunta Regionale, Contea di Zara (Croazia, Centro di Geobiologia - Università di Urbino, Forum delle Città dell’Adriatico e dello Ionio e Adriatic Action Plan 2020 ed ha sviluppato il tema dedicato ad “Un GIS interoperabile e internazionale”.

  11. DARPA 7-Day Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-17

    and LF 59,60 . These complexes are then taken up by a clatherin dependent mechanism where changes in pH cause pore formation and entry of EF and LF...in Ac-DEX nano/ mico -particles (particles). Mice were inoculated at 20 µg lysate /mouse. Mice were challenged day 21, 26 and 33 i.p with 232-402...due to the complex immune response that is necessary to protect against highly virulent strains94. Furthermore, in the development of a rapid response

  12. Hard-hat day

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    CERN will be organizing a special information day on Friday, 27th June, designed to promote the wearing of hard hats and ensure that they are worn correctly. A new prevention campaign will also be launched.The event will take place in the hall of the Main Building from 11.30 a.m. to 2.00 p.m., when you will be able to come and try on various models of hard hat, including some of the very latest innovative designs, ask questions and pass on any comments and suggestions.

  13. The Future Days

    OpenAIRE

    Cerezo Rodríguez, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    In this memorandum it will be read all the documentation related to the Final Project Degree of Carlos Cerezo Rodríguez, The Future Days. The objective of this project has been to realise a mini-game (in form of interactive animation in Flash). So that, it will rest prepared for his posterior upload to websites that offer these services. As it will be appreciated in the writing, the process of construction of the project has been made through a phase of planning and preproduction, a phase of ...

  14. IAEA Supports World Cancer Day

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Cancer can strike anyone at anytime, young or old, rich or poor. It knows no borders. World Cancer Day, on 4 February, was initiated to raise global awareness of cancer issues and stimulate new strategies and thinking to combat the killer disease. Nowhere is the need greater than in the developing world, where millions of people are suffering and dying due to lack of cancer prevention and treatment. According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), 84 million people will die of cancer in the next 10 years, more than 70% of them in low-income countries, unless action is taken now. The IAEA's Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy (PACT) was created to help poorer countries confront the growing cancer crisis by integrating radiotherapy into comprehensive cancer control programmes. As it celebrates its third birthday on World Cancer Day, PACT can claim significant progress in building effective relationships with a broad array of stakeholders, initiating six pilot projects and gaining increasing support from Member States. The IAEA commends all organizations, agencies and individuals engaged in the battle to defeat this dreadful disease. We look forward to continued collaboration with international partners to help bring hope to cancer patients, to relieve their suffering and to save lives. (IAEA)

  15. A 7-day recall period for a clinical application of the oral health impact profile questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Niels; John, Mike T; Feuerstahler, Leah; Baba, Kazuyoshi; Larsson, Pernilla; Peršić, Sanja; Kende, Dóra; Reißmann, Daniel R; Rener-Sitar, Ksenija

    2016-01-01

    Aims were to investigate and compare the validity and reliability of Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP) scores referencing 7-day and 1-month recall periods in international prosthodontic patients. A sample of 267 patients (mean age = 54.0 years, SD = 17.2 years, 58 % women) with stable oral health-related quality of life was recruited from prosthodontic treatment centers in Croatia, Germany, Hungary, Japan, Slovenia, and Sweden. These patients completed the OHIP on two occasions using a new 7-day recall period and the traditional 1-month recall period. OHIP score validity and reliability were investigated with structural equation models (SEMs) that included OHIP(past 7 days) and OHIP(1 month) latent factors and single indicator measures of global oral health status. The SEMs assessed measurement invariance and the relative validities of the two OHIP latent factors (representing the two recall periods). The SEMs provided cogent evidence for recall period measurement invariance for the two OHIP forms and equal validities (r = .48) with external measures of global oral health status. When assessed in international prosthodontic patients, OHIP scores using the new 7-day recall period were as reliable and valid as the scores using the 1-month recall period. Conceptual advantages make a 7-day recall period a preferred frame of reference in clinical applications of the OHIP questionnaire.

  16. Women's Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Women have unique health issues. And some of the health issues that affect both men and women can affect women differently. Unique issues ... and men also have many of the same health problems. But these problems can affect women differently. ...

  17. Higgs Boson Pizza Day

    CERN Multimedia

    Stefania Pandolfi

    2016-01-01

    CERN celebrated the fourth anniversary of the historical Higgs boson announcement with special pizzas.    400 pizzas were served on Higgs pizza day in Restaurant 1 at CERN to celebrate the fourth anniversary of the announcement of the discovery of the Higgs Boson (Image: Maximilien Brice/ CERN) What do the Higgs boson and a pizza have in common? Pierluigi Paolucci, INFN and CMS collaboration member, together with INFN president Fernando Ferroni found out the answer one day in Naples: the pizza in front of them looked exactly like a Higgs boson event display. A special recipe was then created in collaboration with the chef of the historic “Ettore” pizzeria in the St. Lucia area of Naples, and two pizzas were designed to resemble two Higgs boson decay channel event displays. The “Higgs Boson Pizza Day” was held on Monday, 4 July 2016, on the fourth anniversary of the announcement of the discovery of the Higgs boso...

  18. Women Empowering Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anyikwa, Victoria A.; Chiarelli-Helminiak, Christina M.; Hodge, Diane M.; Wells-Wilbon, Rhonda

    2015-01-01

    As women in this female-centered profession of social work, we have not effectively advocated for ourselves in terms of leadership in our educational systems. We reexamine the 2008 special section of the "Journal of Social Work Education" on women in the academy and build on information that suggests social work has lost its momentum to…

  19. Analyzing Culture as an Obstacle to Gender Equality in a Non-Western Context: Key Areas of Conflict between International Women's Rights and Cultural Rights in South Sudan

    OpenAIRE

    C. Leiber

    2017-01-01

    International human rights treaties ensure basic rights to all people, regardless of nationality. These treaties have developed in a predominantly Western environment, and their implementation into non-western contexts often raises questions of the transfer-ability of value systems and governance structures. International human rights treaties also postulate the right to the full enjoyment and expression of one’s own culture, known as cultural rights. Many cultural practices and traditions in...

  20. 75 FR 62453 - German-American Day, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-12

    ... shores in search of freedom, opportunity, and the chance at a better life. The German men and women who... ancestry who have been an integral part of our national life. On German-American Day, we pay tribute to the... lives on in the men, women, and families of German descent who enhance civic engagement, steer our...

  1. Women at CERN: the Laboratory's Equal Opportunities Policy in numbers

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    On 16 March, eight days after International Women's Day, CERN is organizing a discussion on its Equal Opportunities Policy. This is a new chance for all at CERN to find out about the programme, and to get up to date with the position of women at CERN. This year CERN will mark International Women's Day with a special event on Friday 16 March: a chance for all at CERN to meet members of the Equal Opportunities Advisory Panel. You have probably already heard about the Panel, but you may have wondered what the Equal Opportunities Programme actually does to ensure fair treatment in the recruitment and career development of men and women, and to allow all to work in an atmosphere of safety, dignity, and mutual respect. Daniella Moraes of the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro at work on electronics for the LHCb experiment. By attending this meeting CERN people will have the chance to learn about the work of the Panel, its recommendations to Management, and the subsequent actions taken by the Organization. The m...

  2. CERN Heart Days

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    14 & 15 OCTOBER 2003 The Medical Service and the Fire Brigade invite everyone working at CERN to participate in the above event. INFIRMARY 9 am to 16.30 pm Building 57, ground floor HEALTHY HEART? ♥ Evaluation of personal cardiac risks through the monitoring of: • Blood pressure • Cholesterol and sugar levels • Body Mass Index ... and more ♥ Leaflets, information and advice concerning cardiac issues FIRE BRIGADE 9 to 12am Building 65 FIRST AID COURSES ♥ What to do in a Cardiac Emergency (3 h duration) Places are limited and on reservation only (15 people / day) To book, E-mail the Medical Services on: service.medical@cern.ch

  3. Injector MD Days 2017

    CERN Document Server

    Rumolo, G

    2017-01-01

    The Injector Machine Development (MD) days 2017 were held on 23-24 March, 2017, at CERN with thefollowing main goals:Give a chance to the MD users to present their results and show the relevant progress made in 2016 onseveral fronts.Provide the MD users and the Operation (OP) crews with a general overview on the outcome and theimpact of all ongoing MD activities.Identify the open questions and consequently define - with priorities - a list of machine studies in theinjectors for 2017 (covering the operational beams, LHC Injectors Upgrade, High Luminosity LHC,Physics Beyond Colliders, other projects).Create the opportunity to collect and document the highlights of the 2016 MDs and define the perspectivesfor 2017.Discuss how to make best use of the MD time, in particular let the main MD user express their wishesand see whether/how OP teams can contribute to their fulfilment.

  4. "A Day Without Immigrants"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiskanen, Benita

    2009-01-01

    , policy makers, and participants. Although much of these debates ostensibly centered around illegal Latino/a immigration to the United States, underneath the discussion ran a curious ideological thread, one that invoked groups' right to be in the United States in the first place. The article argues...... that the rhetoric used in these discourses pitted various class-based ethnoracial groups against each other not so much to tackle the proposed immigration bill but, rather, to comment on the ramifications of an increasingly multiracial United States. Udgivelsesdato: 01 December 2009......Abstract This article considers the debates surrounding the "Day Without Immigrants" protests organized in major U.S. cities on 1 May 2006, prompted by H.R. 4437, the Border Protection, Anti-Terrorism, and Illegal Immigration Control Act of 2005, from the multiple perspectives of scholars, pundits...

  5. Rationale and design of MUSIC OS-EU: an international observational study of the treatment of postmenopausal women for osteoporosis in Europe and Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Ankita; Sen, Shuvayu; Adachi, Jonathan D; Adami, Silvano; Cortet, Bernard; Cooper, Alun L; Geusens, Piet; Mellström, Dan; Weaver, Jessica P; van den Bergh, Joop P; Nguyen, Allison M; Keown, Paul A; Leung, Albert T; Sajjan, Shiva

    2015-01-01

    The Medication Use Patterns, Treatment Satisfaction, and Inadequate Control of Osteoporosis Study (MUSIC OS-EU) was designed to better understand the rate and burden of gastrointestinal (GI) events on clinical and health care outcomes among postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. MUSIC OS-EU is a prospective, multinational, observational cohort study of postmenopausal women ≥50 years of age diagnosed with osteoporosis and enrolled in physician clinics in six countries: France, Italy, the Netherlands, Sweden, the United Kingdom, and Canada. The MUSIC OS-EU study has three components: (i) a physician survey to describe their management of osteoporotic patients with GI events; (ii) a retrospective chart survey to describe the receipt and type of osteoporosis medication prescribed; and (iii) a prospective cohort study including untreated and treated patients diagnosed with osteoporosis to investigate the rate of GI events and association with osteoporosis medication use patterns, health-related quality of life, treatment satisfaction and resource utilisation among postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. Physicians at 97 sites completed the physician questionnaire and data for 716 patients were abstracted for the retrospective chart review. Enrolment and the baseline data collection for the prospective cohort study were conducted between March 2012 and June 2013 for 292 untreated and 2,959 treated patients, of whom 684 were new users and 2,275 were experienced users of oral osteoporosis medications. The results of MUSIC OS-EU will illuminate the association of GI events with the management of osteoporosis and with patient-reported outcomes among postmenopausal women with osteoporosis in Europe and Canada.

  6. Third generation oral contraceptives and risk of venous thromboembolic disorders: an international case-control study. Transnational Research Group on Oral Contraceptives and the Health of Young Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, W. O.; Lewis, M. A.; Heinemann, L. A.; Thorogood, M.; MacRae, K. D.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To test whether use of combined oral contraceptives containing third generation progestogens is associated with altered risk of venous thromboembolism. DESIGN--Matched case-control study. SETTING--10 centres in Germany and United Kingdom. SUBJECTS--Cases were 471 women aged 16-44 who had a venous thromboembolism. Controls were 1772 women (at least 3 controls per case) unaffected by venous thromboembolism who were matched with corresponding case for age and for hospital or community setting. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Odds ratios derived with stratified analyses and unconditional logistic regression to adjust for potential confounding variables. RESULTS--Odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) for venous thromboembolism were: for any oral contraceptives versus no use, 4.0 (3.1 to 5.3); for second generation products (low dose ethinyl-oestradiol, no gestodene or desogestrel) versus no use, 3.2 (2.3 to 4.3); for third generation products (low dose ethinyloestradiol, gestodene or desogestrel) versus no use, 4.8 (3.4 to 6.7); for third generation products versus second generation products, 1.5 (1.1 to 2.1); for products containing gestodene versus second generation products, 1.5 (1.0 to 2.2); and for products containing desogestrel versus second generation products, 1.5 (1.1 to 2.2). Probability of death due to venous thromboembolism for women using third generation products is about 20 per million users per year, for women using second generation products it is about 14 per million users per year, and for non-users it is five per million per year. CONCLUSIONS--Risk of venous thromboembolism was slightly increased in users of third generation oral contraceptives compared with users of second generation products. PMID:8555935

  7. ROTARY DAY AT THE UNITED NATIONS OFFICE IN GENEVA

    CERN Document Server

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    We have been informed about the Rotary day at the United Nations office in Geneva. Join us on November 10th & 11th, 2017 at the United Nations office Avenue de la Paix 8-14 1211 Geneva, Switzerland   PEACE: MAKING A DIFFERENCE! Conflict and violence displace millions of people each year. Half of those killed in conflict are children, and 90 percent are civilians. We, Rotarians, refuse conflict as a way of life. But how can we contribute to Peace? And what about you? Are you keen on meeting exceptional individuals and exchanging ideas to move forward? Would you like to network and collaborate with Rotarians, Government Representatives, International Civil Servants, Representatives of Nongovernmental Organizations and Liberal Professions, Businessmen/women, and Students to make a difference in Peace? In November 2017, come to Geneva, get involved, and formulate recommendations to the international community. Together, we’ll celebrate Rotary&a...

  8. Vitamin D supplementation for women during pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    De-Regil, Luz Maria; Palacios, Cristina; Ansary, Ali; Kulier, Regina; Peña-Rosas, Juan Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Background Vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency is thought to be common among pregnant women. Vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy has been suggested as an intervention to protect against adverse gestational outcomes. Objectives To examine whether supplements with vitamin D alone or in combination with calcium or other vitamins and minerals given to women during pregnancy can safely improve maternal and neonatal outcomes. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (31 October 2011), the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (31 October 2011), the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations (28 October 2011) and also contacted relevant organisations (8 April 2011). Selection criteria Randomised and quasi-randomised trials with randomisation at either individual or cluster level, evaluating the effect of supplementation with vitamin D alone or in combination with other micronutrients for women during pregnancy. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently i) assessed the eligibility of studies against the inclusion criteria ii) extracted data from included studies, and iii) assessed the risk of bias of the included studies. Data were checked for accuracy. Main results The search strategy identified 34 potentially eligible references. We included six trials assessing a total of 1023 women, excluded eight studies, and 10 studies are still ongoing. Five trials involving 623 women compared the effects of vitamin D alone versus no supplementation/placebo and one trial with 400 women compared the effects of vitamin D and calcium versus no supplementation. Only one trial with 400 women reported on pre-eclampsia: women who received 1200 IU vitamin D along with 375 mg of elemental calcium per day were as likely to develop pre-eclampsia as women who received no supplementation (average risk ratio (RR) 0.67; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.33 to 1.35). Data from four trials

  9. Seven remarkable days

    CERN Multimedia

    This has been a truly remarkable seven days for CERN. Things have moved so fast that it has sometimes been hard to separate fact from fiction – all the more so since facts have often seemed too good to be true. It’s been a week of many firsts. Monday was the first time we’ve had two captured beams in the LHC. It’s the first time the LHC has functioned as a particle accelerator, boosting particles to the highest beam energy so far achieved at CERN. And it’s been a week in which we’ve seen the highest energy proton-proton collisions ever produced at CERN: our last hadron collider, the SPS was a proton-antiproton collider, a technically simpler machine than the LHC. This week’s successes are all the more remarkable precisely because of the complexity of the LHC. Unlike the SPS collider, it is two accelerators not one, making the job of commissioning nearly twice as difficult. I’d like to express my heartfelt thanks and congra...

  10. CERN Diabetes Awareness Days

    CERN Document Server

    2005-01-01

    Do you have diabetes without knowing it? Following last year's successful campaign, the CERN Infirmary has organised two further diabetes prevention and screening days on 10th & 11th October 2005 from 9am to 4pm (INFIRMARY, Bldg 57, ground floor) open to everyone working on the CERN site who was unable to participate in 2004. Testing of blood pressure, cholesterol and sugar levels, Body Mass Index, etc. Information - documentation - personal and individual advice. Presence of a dietician from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. In cooperation with the NOVAE, DSR & AVENANCE restaurants Diabetes is reaching epidemic proportions in many countries and, if not diagnosed sufficiently early, can be a major cause of blindness and of heart and kidney disease, etc. Prevention is possible through screening and life-style changes such as improved dietary habits and regular physical exercise. Diabetes is not a serious condition in itself if it is diagnosed and treated early enough but it can have very serious consequences...

  11. CERN diabetes awareness days

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Do you have diabetes without knowing it? Following last year's successful campaign, the CERN Infirmary has organised two further diabetes prevention and screening days on 10th & 11th October 2005 from 9am to 4pm (INFIRMARY, Bldg 57, ground floor) open to everyone working on the CERN site who was unable to participate in 2004. Testing of blood pressure, cholesterol and sugar levels, Body Mass Index, etc. Information - documentation - personal and individual advice. Presence of a dietician from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. In cooperation with the NOVAE, DSR & AVENANCE restaurants. Diabetes is reaching epidemic proportions in many countries and, if not diagnosed sufficiently early, can be a major cause of blindness, heart and kidney disease, etc. Prevention is possible through screening and life-style changes such as improved dietary habits and regular physical exercise. Diabetes is not a serious condition in itself if diagnosed and treated early enough but it can have very serious consequences if und...

  12. Printshop open days

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2013-01-01

    With new machines, new services and new opening hours, the CERN Printshop has turned over many new leaves at the start of 2013. Come and find out more from 25 to 27 March at the Printshop open days!   The CERN Printshop’s new 8-metre long black and white printer. The CERN Printshop’s new 8-metre long black-and-white printer is a technical marvel. It can produce 160 pages per minute (it prints on both sides in one pass) and can also staple, punch holes, do thermal binding and make A4 or A5 brochures. The new colour printer is more discreet but no less efficient: it churns out 70 A4 or A3 pages per minute. Once they are printed, colour documents can be inserted into the black and white machine to be hole-punched, made into brochures or bound. They can even be mixed in with black-and-white pages and, as if by magic, come out in the right order! Having recently acquired a state-of-the-art large-format printer, the CERN Printshop can now print posters in A2, A1 or A0 format. ...

  13. Two days of films

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    The Chinese community at CERN and the CERN CineClub, on the occasion of the Chinese New Year, invite everyone to two days of films Thursday 3 February 2011 at 20:30 - CERN Council Chamber Eat drink man woman Directed by Ang LEE (Taiwan, 1994) 122 min. With Sihung Lung, Yu-Wen Wang, Chien-Lien Wu, Kuei-Mei Yang Senior Master Chef Chu lives in a large house in Taipei with his three unmarried daughters, Jia-Jen, a chemistry teacher converted to Christianity, Jia-Chien, an airline executive, and Jia-Ning, a student who also works in a fast food restaurant. Life in the house revolves around the ritual of an elaborate dinner each Sunday, and the love lives of all the family members. Original version Mandarin with English subtitles Friday 4 February 2011 at 19:30 - CERN Council Chamber Adieu, ma concubine Directed by Chen KAIGE (China / Hong Kong, 1993) 171 min. With Leslie Cheung, Fengyi Zhang, Li Gong "Farewell, My Concubine" is a movie with two parallel, intertwined stories. It is the story of two performers in t...

  14. Crafts and Craft Education as Expressions of Cultural Heritage: Individual Experiences and Collective Values among an International Group of Women University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokko, Sirpa; Dillon, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores relationships between crafts, craft education and cultural heritage as reflected in the individual experiences and collective values of fifteen female university students of different nationalities. The students (all trainee teachers) were following a course in crafts and craft education as part of an International Study…

  15. Oncological management and obstetric and neonatal outcomes for women diagnosed with cancer during pregnancy: a 20-year international cohort study of 1170 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, Jorine; Verheecke, Magali; van Calsteren, Kristel; van Calster, Ben; Shmakov, Roman G.; Mhallem Gziri, Mina; Halaska, Michael J.; Fruscio, Robert; Lok, Christianne A. R.; Boere, Ingrid A.; Zola, Paolo; Ottevanger, Petronella B.; de Groot, Christianne J. M.; Peccatori, Fedro A.; Dahl Steffensen, Karina; Cardonick, Elyce H.; Polushkina, Evgeniya; Rob, Lukas; Ceppi, Lorenzo; Sukhikh, Gennady T.; Han, Sileny N.; Amant, Frédéric

    2018-01-01

    Awareness is growing that cancer can be treated during pregnancy, but the effect of this change on maternal and neonatal outcomes is unknown. The International Network on Cancer, Infertility and Pregnancy (INCIP) registers the incidence and maternal, obstetric, oncological, and neonatal outcomes of

  16. An international comparative public health analysis of sex trafficking of women and girls in eight cities: achieving a more effective health sector response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias Konstantopoulos, Wendy; Ahn, Roy; Alpert, Elaine J; Cafferty, Elizabeth; McGahan, Anita; Williams, Timothy P; Castor, Judith Palmer; Wolferstan, Nadya; Purcell, Genevieve; Burke, Thomas F

    2013-12-01

    Sex trafficking, trafficking for the purpose of forced sexual exploitation, is a widespread form of human trafficking that occurs in all regions of the world, affects mostly women and girls, and has far-reaching health implications. Studies suggest that up to 50 % of sex trafficking victims in the USA seek medical attention while in their trafficking situation, yet it is unclear how the healthcare system responds to the needs of victims of sex trafficking. To understand the intersection of sex trafficking and public health, we performed in-depth qualitative interviews among 277 antitrafficking stakeholders across eight metropolitan areas in five countries to examine the local context of sex trafficking. We sought to gain a new perspective on this form of gender-based violence from those who have a unique vantage point and intimate knowledge of push-and-pull factors, victim health needs, current available resources and practices in the health system, and barriers to care. Through comparative analysis across these contexts, we found that multiple sociocultural and economic factors facilitate sex trafficking, including child sexual abuse, the objectification of women and girls, and lack of income. Although there are numerous physical and psychological health problems associated with sex trafficking, health services for victims are patchy and poorly coordinated, particularly in the realm of mental health. Various factors function as barriers to a greater health response, including low awareness of sex trafficking and attitudinal biases among health workers. A more comprehensive and coordinated health system response to sex trafficking may help alleviate its devastating effects on vulnerable women and girls. There are numerous opportunities for local health systems to engage in antitrafficking efforts while partnering across sectors with relevant stakeholders.

  17. AAS 227: Day 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 3 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Henry Norris Russell Lecture: Viewing the Universe with Infrared Eyes: The Spitzer Space Telescope (by Erika Nesvold)The Henry Norris Russell Award is the highest honor given by the AAS, for a lifetime of eminence in astronomy research. This years award went to Giovanni Fazio of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Fazio became a leader in gamma ray astronomy before switching mid-career to the study of infrared astronomy, and he gave his award lecture on the latter subject, specifically on the Spitzer Space Telescope, one of the most successful infrared telescopes of all time.Artists rendering of the Spitzer space telescope. [NASA/JPL-Caltech]Spitzer has been operating for more than twelve years, and has resulted in over six thousand papers in refereed journals in that time. The telescope sits in an Earth-trailing orbit around the Sun, and is now farther from the Earth (1.4 AU) than the Earth is from the Sun. Fazio gave the audience a fascinating overview of the science done by Spitzer over more than a decade. One of the most productive areas of research for Spitzer is the study of exoplanets, which hadnt even been discovered when the Spitzer Telescope was first conceived. Spitzers high sensitivity and ability to observe exoplanets over

  18. Tritium conference days

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnier-Laplace, J.; Lebaron-Jacobs, L.; Sene, M.; Devin, P.; Chretien, V.; Le Guen, B.; Guetat, Ph.; Baglan, N.; Ansoborlo, E.; Boyer, C.; Masson, M.; Bailly-Du-Bois, P.; Jenkinson, St.; Wakeford, R.; Saintigny, Y.; Romeo, P.H.; Thompson, P.; Leterq, D.; Chastagner, F.; Cortes, P.; Philippe, M.; Paquet, F.; Fournier, M.

    2009-01-01

    This document gathers the slides of the available presentations given during this conference day. Twenty presentations out of 21 are assembled in the document and deal with: 1 - tritium in the environment (J. Garnier-Laplace); 2 - status of knowledge about tritium impact on health (L. Lebaron-Jacobs); 3 - tritium, discrete but present everywhere (M. Sene); 4 - management of tritium effluents from Areva NC La Hague site - related impact and monitoring (P. Devin); 5 - tritium effluents and impact in the vicinity of EDF's power plants (V. Chretien and B. Le Guen); 6 - contribution of CEA-Valduc centre monitoring to the knowledge of atmospheric tritiated water transfers to the different compartments of the environment (P. Guetat); 7 - tritium analysis in environment samples: constraints and means (N. Baglan); 8 - organically-linked tritium: the analyst view (E. Ansoborlo); 9 - study of tritium transfers to plants via OBT/HTO air and OBT/HTO free (C. Boyer); 10 - tritium in the British Channel (M. Masson and P. Bailly-Du-Bois); 11 - tritium in British coastal waters (S. Jenkinson); 12 - recent results from epidemiology (R. Wakeford); 13 - effects of tritiated thymidine on hematopoietic stem cells (P.H. Romeo); 14 - tritium management issue in Canada: the point of view from authorities (P. Thompson); 15 - experience feedback of the detritiation process of Valduc centre (D. Leterq); 16 - difficulties linked with tritiated wastes confinement (F. Chastagner); 17 - optimisation of tritium management in the ITER project (P. Cortes); 18 - elements of thought about the management of tritium generated by nuclear facilities (M. Philippe); 19 - CIPR's position about the calculation of doses and risks linked with tritium exposure (F. Paquet); 20 - tritium think tanks (M. Fournier). (J.S.)

  19. Astrophysics days and MHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falgarone, Edith; Rieutord, Michel; Richard, Denis; Zahn, Jean-Paul; Dauchot, Olivier; Daviaud, Francois; Dubrulle, Berengere; Laval, Jean-Philippe; Noullez, Alain; Bourgoin, Mickael; Odier, Philippe; Pinton, Jean-Francois; Leveque, Emmanuel; Chainais, Pierre; Abry, Patrice; Mordant, Nicolas; Michel, Olivier; Marie, Louis; Chiffaudel, Arnaud; Daviaud, Francois; Petrelis, Francois; Fauve, Stephan; Nore, C.; Brachet, M.-E.; Politano, H.; Pouquet, A.; Leorat, Jacques; Grapin, Roland; Brun, Sacha; Delour, Jean; Arneodo, Alain; Muzy, Jean-Francois; Magnaudet, Jacques; Braza, Marianna; Boree, Jacques; Maurel, S.; Ben, L.; Moreau, J.; Bazile, R.; Charnay, G.; Lewandowski, Roger; Laveder, Dimitri; Bouchet, Freddy; Sommeria, Joel; Le Gal, P.; Eloy, C.; Le Dizes, S.; Schneider, Kai; Farge, Marie; Bottausci, Frederic; Petitjeans, Philippe; Maurel, Agnes; Carlier, Johan; Anselmet, Fabien

    2001-05-01

    This publication gathers extended summaries of presentations proposed during two days on astrophysics and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). The first session addressed astrophysics and MHD: The cold interstellar medium, a low ionized turbulent plasma; Turbulent convection in stars; Turbulence in differential rotation; Protoplanetary disks and washing machines; gravitational instability and large structures; MHD turbulence in the sodium von Karman flow; Numerical study of the dynamo effect in the Taylor-Green eddy geometry; Solar turbulent convection under the influence of rotation and of the magnetic field. The second session addressed the description of turbulence: Should we give up cascade models to describe the spatial complexity of the velocity field in a developed turbulence?; What do we learn with RDT about the turbulence at the vicinity of a plane surface?; Qualitative explanation of intermittency; Reduced model of Navier-Stokes equations: quickly extinguished energy cascade; Some mathematical properties of turbulent closure models. The third session addressed turbulence and coherent structures: Alfven wave filamentation and formation of coherent structures in dispersive MHD; Statistical mechanics for quasi-geo-strophic turbulence: applications to Jupiter's coherent structures; Elliptic instabilities; Physics and modelling of turbulent detached unsteady flows in aerodynamics and fluid-structure interaction; Intermittency and coherent structures in a washing machine: a wavelet analysis of joint pressure/velocity measurements; CVS filtering of 3D turbulent mixing layer using orthogonal wavelets. The last session addressed experimental methods: Lagrangian velocity measurements; Energy dissipation and instabilities within a locally stretched vortex; Study by laser imagery of the generation and breakage of a compressed eddy flow; Study of coherent structures of turbulent boundary layer at high Reynolds number

  20. AAS 228: Day 3 afternoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Along with a team ofauthors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting twiceeach day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Wikipedia Year of Science Editathon (by Meredith Rawls)Whats your first go-to source for an unfamiliar topic on the internet? If you said Wikipedia, youre not alone. For many people, Wikipedia is the primary source of information about astronomy and science. However, many Wikipedia articles about science topics are incomplete or missing, and women are underrepresented among scientists with biographies.To address this, the AAS Astronomy Education Board teamed up with the Wiki Education Foundation to host an edit-a-thon as part of the Wikipedia Year of Science. More than forty attendees spent the better part of three hours working through tutorials, creating new articles, and editing existing ones. The session was generously sponsored by the Simons Foundation.The Year of Science initiative seeks to bring Wikipedia editing skills to the classroom and help new editors find sustainable ways to contribute to Wikipedia in the long term. Anybody can create a free account and start editing!As a first-time Wikipedia contributor, I took the time to go through nearly all the tutorial exercises and familiarize myself with the process of editing a page. I decided to flesh out one section in an existing page about asteroseismology. Others created biography pages from scratch or selected various astronomical topics to write about. To me, the editing process felt like a cross between writing a blog post and a journal article, in a hack day type environment. Working through the tutorial and some examples renewed my empathy for learners who are tackling a new skill set for the first time. A full summary of our

  1. Vietnamese women in struggle for national independence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    The 30-year struggle for independence in Viet Nam took a huge toll on women, but even in the hardest times, Vietnamese women received support from the world-wide women's movement. As the world prepares to enter the new millennium, it is important to determine what policies can be created to prevent war and guarantee peace. These policies must grow out of international agreement on basic principles such as respect for independence and sovereignty and must not resort to the embargoes and sanctions that have placed a disproportionate burden on women and children. Another challenge of the new millennium is to encourage implementation of national programs, policies, and measures to help women realize their rights while preserving traditional family values. Despite the heightened visibility of the international women's movement, women still suffer from widespread inequalities. In accordance with the goals of the Communist Party of Viet Nam, the 8th Congress of Vietnamese Women in 1997 created a national plan for women that is a blueprint for the women's movement for the years 1997-2000. Among the goals are creating jobs for women, upgrading their standard of living, eliminating hunger, decreasing poverty, and ensuring that women have educational opportunities. Vietnamese women also seek to strengthen their relationship with other women in the international community, and the Vietnamese Women's Union has actively forwarded the objectives of the Federation of International Democratic Women.

  2. 76 FR 21221 - National Equal Pay Day, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-15

    ... average than working men. Each year, National Equal Pay Day reflects how far into the current year women must work to match what men earned in the previous year. On National Equal Pay Day, we rededicate..., education, industry, and hours, this wage gap persists. Over the course of her lifetime, this gap will cost...

  3. AAS 227: Day 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 2 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Plenary Session: Black Hole Physics with the Event Horizon Telescope (by Susanna Kohler)If anyone needed motivation to wake up early this morning, they got it in the form of Feryal Ozel (University of Arizona) enthralling us all with exciting pictures, videos, and words about black holes and the Event Horizon Telescope. Ozel spoke to a packed room (at 8:30am!) about where the project currently stands, and where its heading in the future.The EHT has pretty much the coolest goal ever: actually image the event horizons of black holes in our universe. The problem is that the largest black hole we can look at (Sgr A*, in the center of our galaxy) has an event horizon size of 50 as. For this kind of resolution roughly equivalent to trying to image a DVD on the Moon! wed need an Earth-sized telescope. EHT has solved this problem by linking telescopes around the world, creating one giant, mm-wavelength effective telescope with a baseline the size of Earth.Besides producing awesome images, the EHT will be able to test properties of black-hole spacetime, the no-hair theorem, and general relativity (GR) in new regimes.Ozel walked us through some of the theory prep work we need to do now in order to get the most science out of the EHT, including devising new

  4. 2016 SPD: Day 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    last the longest 2 minutes and 40 seconds is the small town of Hopkinsville, KY. WKU is located a little over an hour away, and both locations are prepared for a large influx of people on eclipse day!Partial solar eclipse as viewed by the space-based Solar Dynamics Observatory. [NASA/SDO]WKU is located just off the centerline of eclipse path, which has some advantages: this provides better viewing of some of the chromospheric features of the Sun during the eclipse, like priminences and solar loops. WKU is setting up a variety of educational and public outreach activities at their football stadium and the WKU farm, and they encourage you to come visit for the eclipse!In addition, they are participating in a nationwide experiment called Citizen CATE, short for the Continental American Telescopic Eclipse. This project will use 60 telescopes spanning the 2500 mile path of totality to record continuous data of the eclipse as it travels across the US. The result will be data of a remarkable 90 minutes of totality, revealing the activity of the solar corona and providing an extended view of the eclipse as has never been seen before.Science During the EclipseNext up was Shadia Habbal (University of Hawaii), who is a co-leader of the AAS 2017 Eclipse Task Force. In addition to her education and outreach efforts associated with the eclipse, however, Habbal is a solar eclipse researcher. She and her collaborators are known as the Solar Wind Sherpas, due to the fact that they hand-carry their science equipment around the world for solar eclipses!Solar corona during a 2008 eclipse, with color overlay indicating emission from highly ionized iron lines. [Habbal et al. 2010]The primary science done during solar eclipses is the study of the solar corona, the region that extends from the solar surface out to several solar radii. This region is too faint to observe normally, but when the light from the Suns disk is blocked out, we can examine it.Unfortunately, the space telescopes that

  5. AAS 228: Day 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note: Lastweek we were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Here is a final post aboutselectedevents on the last day of the meeting, written by authors fromastrobites.com, a grad-student collaborative project with which we recently announced a new partnership! Starting in July,keep an eye out for astrobites postsat AAS Nova in between Highlights(i.e., on Tuesdays and Thursdays).Were excited to be working together to bring you more recent astronomy research from AAS journals!Extrasolar Planets: Detection (by Leonardo dos Santos)Thursdays first session on exoplanets was about detecting these distant worlds, and the opening talk was given by Robert Siverd (Las Cumbres Observatory). He describes the NRES, a network of spectrographs that will look for exoplanets using the radial velocity method. One of the coolest aspects of this instrument is that it will feature an on the fly scheduling system that will perform observations as efficiently as possible. The spectrograph is still being tested, but a unit will be deployed at CTIO later this year.@lcogt contracted by @NASA_TESS for follow up of their candidates. #aas228 Jessie Christiansen (@aussiastronomer) June 16, 2016Measuring the depths of transits and eclipses in Spitzer has been problematic in the past, since the Spitzer instrument IRAC (InfraRed Array Camera) has a non-uniform response in its detectors pixels. But, as reported by James Ingalls (Spitzer Science Center, Caltech), observers are circumventing this issue by using what they call the staring mode (avoiding large pointing jumps) and an algorithm to pick sweet spot pixels. Moreover, the results from the IRAC Data Challenge are helping to better understand its behavior. Giuseppe Morello (University College London), on the other hand, explained how his research group gets rid of instrumental effects from IRAC using machine learning. This method removes systematics from exoplanet transit data no matter if the noise source is from an instrument or

  6. Women Swell Ranks of Working Poor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    World of Work, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Women continue to work longer hours for less pay and in worse jobs than men in every country in the world. An International Labour Organization report highlights serious discrimination in job opportunities and working conditions for women. (Author)

  7. The Role of Women in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, K. D.

    1975-01-01

    A broad discussion of women in India, especially those living in rural villages, examines their literacy, employment opportunities, political influence, modernization, historical and present sex roles, and the influence of the International Women's Year, and proposes future action. (LH)

  8. A novel diagnostic index combining HE4, CA125 and age may improve triage of women with suspected ovarian cancer - An international multicenter study in women with an ovarian mass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Mona Aarenstrup; Høgdall, Estrid V S; Christensen, Ib J

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To develop and validate a biomarker-based index to optimize referral and diagnosis of patients with suspected ovarian cancer. Furthermore, to compare this new index with the Risk of Malignancy Index (RMI) and Risk of Ovarian Malignancy Algorithm (ROMA). PATIENTS AND METHODS: A training study......, consisting of patients with benign ovarian disease (n=809) and ovarian cancer (n=246), was used to develop the Copenhagen Index (CPH-I) utilizing the variables serum HE4, serum CA125 and patient age. Eight international studies provided the validation population; comprising 1060 patients with benign ovarian...

  9. Debate: The Challenges and Perils of Reframing Trafficking as ‘Modern-Day Slavery’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janie Chuang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the last five years, we have seen a rebranding of global anti-trafficking efforts as ‘modern-day slavery’ abolitionism. The United States of America (US Department of State and powerful philanthropists are key proponents of the slavery makeover, prompting other governments, international organisations, and non-governmental organisations alike to adopt the ‘modern-day slavery’ frame. The slavery frame has helped ignite outrage and galvanise political support for modern anti-slavery campaigns. It has also helped expand the anti-trafficking spotlight beyond the sex sector to expose the extreme exploitation that men, women, and children suffer in the non-sexual labour sectors of our global economy. These benefits come at a cost, however, both with respect to legal doctrine and practice, and, perhaps more significantly, to how we understand and respond to the problem of extreme exploitation for profit.

  10. Art History and the Case for the Women of Surrealism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orenstein, Gloria Feman

    1975-01-01

    While the International Women's Year, designated by the United Nations, focused on the infinite and varied resources of women in all fields, the author devoted his attention to the accomplishments of some women in the fine arts. (Author/RK)

  11. 77 FR 72909 - International Day of Persons With Disabilities, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-06

    ... they travel, conduct business, study, or reside overseas. Ratifying the Convention in the Senate would reaffirm America's position as the global leader on disability rights and better position us to encourage... disabilities is guaranteed. Today, let us renew our commitment to meeting that challenge here in the United...

  12. 76 FR 76601 - International Day of Persons With Disabilities, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-08

    ... American dream and comprehensive opportunities in education, health care, and employment within reach for... of people with disabilities. From the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 to the Twenty-First... disability community--affirm our commitment to an equitable and just society where every American can play a...

  13. 75 FR 76251 - International Day of Persons With Disabilities, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-08

    ... promote human rights, fair opportunity, and equal access for people with disabilities. Last year, the... Disabilities, the first new human rights treaty of the 21st century. Like our laws in the United States, this..., and they have paved the way for countless Americans with disabilities to share their talents and...

  14. Methodology of Day-To-Day Ship Costs Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milojka Počuča

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a methodology of assessing the day-to-day fixed costs of maritime cargo ships. The authoress refersthe reader to factors that affect the amount affixed daily costsand the day-to-day voyage costs of ships. In the last chapter thepaper presents an estimation of the average daily fixed costsand day-to-day voyage costs of ships per type and size for theyear 2003. Besides particular explanations, the reader is refe"ed to data bases that authentically impart data on the structureof maritime fleets and their technical characteristics, aswell as databases on prices and costs in maritime transport.

  15. AAS 227: Day 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or at astrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the @astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Things kicked off last night at our undergraduate reception booth. Thanks to all of you who stopped by we were delightedto have so many people tell us that they already know about and useastrobites, and we were excited to introduce a new cohort of students at AAS to astrobites for the first time.Tuesday morning was the official start of the meeting. Here are just a few of the talks and workshops astrobiters attended today.Opening Address (by Becky Smethurst)The President of the AAS, aka our fearless leader Meg Urry kicked off the meeting this morning at the purely coffee powered hour of 8am this morning. She spoke about the importance of young astronomers at the meeting (heres looking at you reader!) and also the importance of the new Working Group for Accessibility and Disabilities (aka WGAD pronounced like wicked) at the AAS. The Society has made extra effort this year to make the conference accessible to all,a message which was very well received by everyone in attendance.Kavli Lecture: New Horizons Alan Stern (by Becky Smethurst)We were definitely spoilt with the first Plenary lecture at this years conference Alan Stern gave us a a review of the New Horizons mission of the Pluto Fly By (astrobites covered the mission back in July with this post). We were treated to beautiful images, wonderful results and a foray into geology.Before (Hubble) and after #NewHorizons. #thatisall #science #astro alanstern #aas227 pic.twitter.com/kkMt6RsSIR Science News (@topsciencething) January 5, 2016Some awesome facts from the lecture that blew my mind:New Horizons is now 2AU (!) beyond Pluto

  16. Design, conduct, and analyses of Breast International Group (BIG) 1-98: a randomized, double-blind, phase-III study comparing letrozole and tamoxifen as adjuvant endocrine therapy for postmenopausal women with receptor-positive, early breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giobbie-Hurder, Anita; Price, Karen N; Gelber, Richard D

    2009-06-01

    Aromatase inhibitors provide superior disease control when compared with tamoxifen as adjuvant therapy for postmenopausal women with endocrine-responsive early breast cancer. To present the design, history, and analytic challenges of the Breast International Group (BIG) 1-98 trial: an international, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, phase-III study comparing the aromatase inhibitor letrozole with tamoxifen in this clinical setting. From 1998-2003, BIG 1-98 enrolled 8028 women to receive monotherapy with either tamoxifen or letrozole for 5 years, or sequential therapy of 2 years of one agent followed by 3 years of the other. Randomization to one of four treatment groups permitted two complementary analyses to be conducted several years apart. The first, reported in 2005, provided a head-to-head comparison of letrozole versus tamoxifen. Statistical power was increased by an enriched design, which included patients who were assigned sequential treatments until the time of the treatment switch. The second, reported in late 2008, used a conditional landmark approach to test the hypothesis that switching endocrine agents at approximately 2 years from randomization for patients who are disease-free is superior to continuing with the original agent. The 2005 analysis showed the superiority of letrozole compared with tamoxifen. The patients who were assigned tamoxifen alone were unblinded and offered the opportunity to switch to letrozole. Results from other trials increased the clinical relevance about whether or not to start treatment with letrozole or tamoxifen, and analysis plans were expanded to evaluate sequential versus single-agent strategies from randomization. Due to the unblinding of patients assigned tamoxifen alone, analysis of updated data will require ascertainment of the influence of selective crossover from tamoxifen to letrozole. BIG 1-98 is an example of an enriched design, involving complementary analyses addressing different questions several years

  17. News Paper | Women in Science | Initiatives | Indian Academy of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    News Paper. News and Articles from Newspapers/Magazines. Level-playing field for women scientists - The Hindu. News item on Women's Day Conference by the National Task Force (DST) for Women in Science. More ...

  18. 100 days in the jungle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohler, S.; Hall, V.

    2000-07-01

    This book describes the ordeals of 8 oilfield workers, 7 Canadian and 1 American, who were kidnapped in the jungles of Ecuador on September 11, 1999 while on a job to repair a rusted, leaking pipeline. AEC, the largest Canadian player in the country and the owner of the pipeline, contracted United Pipeline Systems to bring its stake of the pipeline up to Canadian standards. The pipeline ran along a gravel highway in the middle of Ecuador's Oriente region between the oil towns of Lago Agrio and Tarapoa where it met a main pipeline that runs all the way to the Pacific seaport of Esmerelda. Before the petroleum industry moved into Ecuador, the region was untouched rain forest. AEC was drawn to Ecuador by its rich crude reserves and the government's desire to lure international investment. Tarapoa is only 40 km from the Columbian border, a violent area controlled by the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Columbia (FARC), a Marxist guerrilla group responsible for most of Columbia's kidnappings. In 1999, there were almost 200 kidnappings in Ecuador alone and thousand others in 1990s were taken hostage in Columbia. The kidnappers ideologically opposed the disparities of wealth created by the oil boom and spent their ransoms on weapons to fight against the government. This book presents a detailed account of the kidnapping from the hostages perspective and describes the efforts made by United Pipeline Systems and the Department of Foreign Affairs to bring the workers safely home after 100 days in captivity. The theory is that the kidnappers, still unidentified at the time that this book was published, either belonged to FARC (or an Ecuadorian offshoot FARE) or they were common, well organized bandits with no political affiliation.

  19. Changes in steroid hormones during an international powerlifting competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Panse, Bénédicte; Labsy, Zakaria; Baillot, Aurélie; Vibarel-Rebot, Nancy; Parage, Gaston; Albrings, Detlev; Lasne, Françoise; Collomp, Katia

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess changes in the steroid hormone levels of elite athletes during an international powerlifting competition. Baseline cortisol, DHEA and testosterone were determined in saliva samples in 19 (8 men, 11 women) junior and sub-junior athletes on the day before competition, and then on the competition day during the official weighing and in the hour after competition. Performance was determined by total output and the Wilks formula. No change in saliva steroid concentrations was observed between samples collected on the day before competition and the weighing samples. There was no gender effect on cortisol concentrations but saliva testosterone levels were always significantly higher in men than in women (ppowerlifting competition produce a significant increase in adrenal steroid hormones in both genders, with an increase in male gonadal steroid hormone. Further studies are necessary to examine the changes in oestradiol and progesterone in women and their potential impact on performance during international powerlifting competition. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Understanding Women\\'s Economic And Social Human Rights ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article considers the evolution of women\\'s rights in international human rights law. It then moves on to consider the gender dimension of economic, social and cultural rights before examining constraints to their enjoyment and enforcement. East African Journal of Peace and Human Rights Vol. 12 (2) 2006: pp. 232-253 ...