WorldWideScience

Sample records for international travel awards

  1. International Humanitarian Award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    The International Humanitarian Award recognizes extraordinary humanitarian services and activism by psychologists, including professional and volunteer work conducted primarily in the field with underserved populations. Award recipients are psychologists who, by their extraordinary service at a difficult time, improve the lives and contribute to the well-being of people in a large or small geographic area anywhere in the world. The 2017 recipient of the APA International Humanitarian Award was selected by the 2016 Committee on International Relations in Psychology (CIRP). The members of the 2016 CIRP were Melissa Morgan Consoli, PhD, and Arpana G. Inman, PhD (Co-chairs); Rehman Abdulrehman, PhD; Gonzalo Bacigalupe, EdD; Frederic Bemak, EdD; Brigitte Khoury, PhD; Susan Nolan, PhD; Nancy Sidun, PsyD; and Danny Wedding, PhD. Dr. Morgan Consoli, Dr. Inman, Dr. Nolan, and Doctor Sidun were members of the subcommittee for the 2017 award. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Dengue fever and international travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnam, Irani; Leder, Karin; Black, Jim; Torresi, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Dengue is a leading public health problem with an expanding global burden. Dengue virus is also a significant cause of illness in international travelers with an increasing number of cases of dengue fever identified in travelers returning from dengue-endemic countries. This review focuses on the clinical illness of dengue infection in international travelers and provides a summary of the risk of infection for travelers, clinical features of infection, and an overview of dengue vaccines and their potential applicability to travelers. Four prospective studies of travelers to dengue-endemic destinations have shown that the dengue infection incidence ranges from 10.2 to 30 per 1,000 person-months. This varies according to travel destination and duration and season of travel. Dengue is also a common cause of fever in returned travelers, accounting for up to 16% of all febrile illnesses in returned travelers. Although the majority of infections are asymptomatic, a small proportion of travelers develop dengue hemorrhagic fever. The diagnosis of dengue in travelers requires a combination of serological testing for IgG and IgM together with either nucleic acid or NS1 antigen testing. Several vaccine candidates have now entered into clinical trials including ChimeriVax Dengue, which is currently in phase 3 trials, live-attenuated chimeric vaccines (DENV-DENV Chimera, Inviragen), live-attenuated viral vaccines, recombinant protein subunit vaccines, and DNA vaccines. Dengue infection in international travelers is not infrequent and may be associated with substantial morbidity. Furthermore, an accurate diagnosis of dengue in travelers requires the use of a combination of diagnostic tests. Although a vaccine is not yet available a number of promising candidates are under clinical evaluation. For now travelers should be provided with accurate advice regarding preventive measures when visiting dengue-endemic areas. © 2013 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  3. Health hazards of international travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossar, J H; Reid, D

    1989-01-01

    The growth of travel and the increasing numbers of those affected by travel-related illnesses, some of a serious nature, will cause this subject to demand the attention of the medical profession, the travel trade, travellers themselves and the health authorities of countries receiving tourists. Provision of appropriate advice for the traveller is a shared responsibility, best channelled mainly through travel agencies; it can moreover be shown to be cost-beneficial. Continued monitoring of illness in travellers and provision of information systems geared to this problem and its prevention are fully justified. They should be based on traditional channels of communication and currently-available modern technology, and be readily accessible to medical and related workers. Increased collaboration between medical workers, health educators and those involved in the travel trade would be a positive and useful contribution towards the reduction of illness and discomfort among travellers and the associated expense incurred by the various national health services concerned. There are clearly economic benefits from the development of international tourism, but these have to be balanced in countries accepting tourists by attention to the prevention of illnesses associated with travel.

  4. Global pest management program wins international award

    OpenAIRE

    Rich, Miriam Sommers

    2009-01-01

    An agricultural research program managed at Virginia Tech has won an international award for its work with pest-management practices that show economic benefits with minimal impact on health and the environment.

  5. Medications and International Travel

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-04-12

    This podcast answers a listener's question about her medications and an international trip she's planning.  Created: 4/12/2011 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/12/2011.

  6. International business travel: impact on families and travellers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espino, C M; Sundstrom, S M; Frick, H L; Jacobs, M; Peters, M

    2002-05-01

    Spouses and staff of the World Bank Group (WBG) were questioned about the impact of international business travel on families and travellers. Dependent variables were self reported stress, concern about the health of the traveller, and negative impact on the family. We hypothesised that several travel factors (independent variables) would be associated with these impacts. These travel factors had to do with the frequency, duration, and predictability of travel and its interference with family activities. Survey forms were developed and distributed to all spouses of travelling staff as well as a small sample of operational staff. Kendall's tau b correlation coefficients of response frequencies were computed with the data from scaled items. Written responses to open ended questions were categorised. Response rates for spouses and staff were 24% and 36%, respectively. Half the spouse sample (n=533) and almost 75% of the staff sample (n=102) reported high or very high stress due to business travel. Self reported spouse stress was associated with six out of eight travel factors. Female spouses, those with children, and younger spouses reported greater stress. Self reported staff stress was significantly associated with four out of nine travel factors. Further insight into how business travel affects families and staff (including children's behavioural changes) and how families cope was gained through responses to written questions. The findings support the notion that lengthy and frequent travel and frequent changes in travel dates which affect family plans, all characteristic of WBG missions, negatively affects many spouses and children (particularly young children) and that the strain on families contributes significantly to the stress staff feel about their travel. Policies or management practices that take into consideration family activities and give staff greater leeway in controlling and refusing travel may help relieve stress.

  7. Rabies vaccination for international travelers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautret, Philippe; Parola, Philippe

    2012-01-05

    Rabies prevention in travelers is a controversial issue. According to experts, the decision to vaccinate results from an individual risk assessment based on the duration of stay, the likelihood of engagement in at-risk activities, the age of the traveler, the rabies endemicity and access to appropriate medical care in the country of destination. However, no detailed information is available regarding the last two determinants in many regions. Twenty-two cases of rabies were reported in tourists, expatriates and migrant travelers over the last decade, including three cases following short-term travel of no more than two weeks. Studies on rabies post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) in travelers show that overall, 0.4% (range 0.01-2.3%) of travelers have experienced an at-risk bite per month of stay in a rabies-endemic country, while 31% of expatriates and 12% of tourists were vaccinated against rabies before traveling. The main reason cited by travelers for not being vaccinated is the cost of the vaccine. The majority of patients who sustained a high risk injury was not vaccinated against rabies before traveling and were not properly treated abroad. From available studies, the following risk factors for injuries sustained from potentially rabid animals may be identified: traveling to South-East Asia, India or North Africa, young age, and traveling for tourism. The duration of travel does not appear to be a risk factor. It should be noted that "at-risk activities" have not been addressed in these studies. Detailed rabies distribution maps and information on the availability of rabies biologics are urgently needed in order to identify those travelers who need pre-travel vaccination. Meanwhile, cost-minimization of rabies pre-exposure vaccination may be achieved in several ways, notably by using the intra-dermal method of vaccination. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. CERN safety expert receives international award

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    On 18 December 2004, the President of the Swiss Electro-technical Committee, Martin Reichle (left), presented the award to Helmut Schönbacher. Helmut Schönbacher, of the Safety Commission at CERN, has received, the "1906 Award" of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) for his standardisation work on the influence of ionizing radiation on insulating materials. From 1986 until 2004, Schönbacher was leader of a working group on radiation composed of internationally recognised experts. It edited standards of the IEC 60544 series on the determination of the effects of ionizing radiation on electrical insulating materials. The working group also edited three IEC Technical Reports on the determination of long-term radiation ageing in polymers. This standardisation work and long-term experience from CERN on the radiation ageing of materials also contributed to research coordination programmes of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). From 1968 until 1988, Schönbacher was a member of the Rad...

  9. International Journal of Molecular Science 2017 Best Paper Award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-02

    The Editors of the International Journal of Molecular Sciences have established the Best Paper Award to recognize the most outstanding articles published in the areas of molecular biology, molecular physics and chemistry that have been published in the International Journal of Molecular Sciences. The prizes have been awarded annually since 2012 [...].

  10. Personal security a guide for international travelers

    CERN Document Server

    Spencer, Tanya

    2013-01-01

    Personal Security: A Guide for International Travelers provides the perfect mix of lessons-learned, tools, and recommendations from experts so that readers can personalize their own approach to managing travel risks. If followed, the information provided will allow readers to get out and experience the local culture while still traveling safely.-Bernie Sullivan, Director Global Security, Hanesbrands Inc....a must-have for any traveler. Having worked in South and Southeast Asia, I know the advice provided in the book holds the key to keeping safe, avoiding dangerous situations, and managing threats when they occur. The book's methodological framework, combined with the author's extensive experience and hands-on knowledge, provide very practical and useful advice.-Kathrine Alexandrowiz, Independent consultant at Kathalyst, former coordinator for the "Regional Risk Management Project for NGOs in Asia Pacific" (ECHO)... a go-to guide for all travelers irrespective of mission or purpose. An excellent piece of work...

  11. International Journal of Molecular Science Best Paper Award 2012

    OpenAIRE

    Kathy Lai

    2012-01-01

    International Journal of Molecular Science is instituting an annual award to recognize the outstanding papers in the area of chemistry, molecular physics and molecular biology published in the International Journal of Molecular Science. [...

  12. Healthy Travel for International Adoptions

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-10-22

    The number of international adoptions, many from developing countries, has doubled in the last 10 years. This podcast discusses ways adoptive families can protect their own health and the health of their new children.  Created: 10/22/2007 by National Center for the Prevention, Detection and Control of Infectious Diseases (NCPDCID).   Date Released: 10/24/2007.

  13. Report on DOE support for GSC13 travel award

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, Jack Anthony [University of Chicago

    2012-04-18

    Consortium. The 3-day conference was held at the Kingkey Palace Hotel, Shenzhen, China, on March 5-7th, 2012, and was hosted by the Beijing Genomics Institute (BGI). The meeting was entitled ‘From Genomes to Interactions to Communities to Models’ and aimed to be a scientific meeting that highlighted the role of data standards associated with genomic, metagenomic and amplicon sequence data, and the contextual information associated with the sample that data was generated from. To this end the meeting focused on genomic projects for animals, plants, fungi and viruses, metagenomic studies in host-microbe interactions, and community dynamics in microbial communities. In addition the meeting hosted a Genomic Observatories Network session, a GSC biodiversity working group session, and a Microbiology of the Built Environment session sponsored by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. The meeting was very well organized by the local hosts at BGI, and all attendees reported that they were very happy with the outcome, service and quality of the science presented. Highlights were keynotes by Rita Colwell, Mitch Sogin and Jim Tiedje. The 5 attendees paid for by the DOE award were Daniel Smith and Jared Wilkening (University of Chicago); Patrick Chain (Los Alamos National Laboratory), Austin Davis-Richardson (University of Florida) and Greg Caporoaso (University of Northern Arizona). Each attendee was able to either present or become involved with the attending scientists, and each reported that they had got something significant out of the meeting. Here are detailed their personal accounts of the GSC13 meeting. We thank DOE for the helping to fund this valuable outreach initiative, and for supporting the attendance of these bright young scientists at this important meeting.

  14. 40 CFR 46.145 - International travel and work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false International travel and work. 46.145... ASSISTANCE FELLOWSHIPS Applying for Fellowships § 46.145 International travel and work. (a) You may use fellowship funds for travel to or work in a foreign country only if the travel or work is approved by the EPA...

  15. Research Award: Policy and Evaluation | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-09-07

    Sep 7, 2016 ... Deadline: September 7, 2016 Please note that all applications must be submitted online. IDRC is one of the world's leaders in generating new knowledge to meet global challenges. We offer a number of research awards providing a unique opportunity to enhance research skills and gain a fresh ...

  16. Research Award: Think Tank Initiative | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-09-07

    Sep 7, 2016 ... These one‐year, paid, in‐house programs of training and mentorship allow award holders to pursue their research goals and work in one of IDRC's dynamic program or division teams. The Think Tank Initiative is a global program that supports independent policy research organizations – or "think tanks" ...

  17. Research award: Think Tank Initiative | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-09-06

    Sep 6, 2017 ... These one‐year, paid, in‐house programs of training and mentorship allow award holders to pursue their research goals and work in one of IDRC's dynamic program or division teams. The Think Tank Initiative is a global program that supports independent policy research organizations, or “think tanks”, ...

  18. Research Award: Employment and Growth | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-09-07

    Sep 7, 2016 ... The successful candidate will allocate 50% of their time to their own research project under the guidance of a Senior Program Officer, and will be expected to present their research plan and provide progress updates during the year. In the remaining 50% of their time, the Research Award Recipient will ...

  19. Research award: Governance and Justice | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-09-06

    Sep 6, 2017 ... In the remaining 50% of the time, the research award recipient will contribute to the management of the program through a variety of tasks, which may include ... in the Latin America and the Caribbean region, and to proposals outlining focused and feasible objectives and clearly defined methodology.

  20. Research Award: Governance and Justice | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-09-07

    Sep 7, 2016 ... These one‐year, paid, in‐house programs of training and mentorship allow award holders to pursue their research goals and work in one of IDRC's dynamic program or division teams. IDRC's Governance and Justice program funds research that addresses development challenges posed by insecurity, ...

  1. International Launch Vehicle Selection for Interplanetary Travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrone, Kristine; Nguyen, Lori T.

    2010-01-01

    In developing a mission strategy for interplanetary travel, the first step is to consider launch capabilities which provide the basis for fundamental parameters of the mission. This investigation focuses on the numerous launch vehicles of various characteristics available and in development internationally with respect to upmass, launch site, payload shroud size, fuel type, cost, and launch frequency. This presentation will describe launch vehicles available and in development worldwide, then carefully detail a selection process for choosing appropriate vehicles for interplanetary missions focusing on international collaboration, risk management, and minimization of cost. The vehicles that fit the established criteria will be discussed in detail with emphasis on the specifications and limitations related to interplanetary travel. The final menu of options will include recommendations for overall mission design and strategy.

  2. Jaime Urrutia Fucugauchi Receives 2013 International Award: Citation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomnitz, Cinna

    2014-01-01

    Jaime Urrutia Fucugauchi was born in Chihuahua, Mexico. His surname Urrutia means "distant" in Basque, and Fucugauchi means roughly "Good luck—come in!" in Japanese. And Jaime, of course, is "James" in Spanish. Thus, Jaime was international from birth. There could hardly have been a better candidate for the AGU International Award.

  3. Award for Distinguished Contributions to the International Advancement of Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    This award is given to individuals who have made sustained and enduring contributions to international cooperation and the advancement of knowledge in psychology. The 2017 recipient of the APA Award for Distinguished Contributions to the International Advancement of Psychology was selected by the 2016 Committee on International Relations in Psychology (CIRP). The members of the 2016 CIRP were Melissa Morgan Consoli, PhD, and Arpana G. Inman, PhD (Co-chairs); Rehman Abdulrehman, PhD; Gonzalo Bacigalupe, EdD; Frederic Bemak, EdD; Brigitte Khoury, PhD; Susan Nolan, PhD; Nancy Sidun, PsyD; and Danny Wedding, PhD. Dr. Morgan Consoli, Dr. Inman, Dr. Nolan, and Doctor Sidun were members of the subcommittee for the 2017 award. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. What proportion of international travellers acquire a travel-related illness? A review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelo, Kristina M; Kozarsky, Phyllis E; Ryan, Edward T; Chen, Lin H; Sotir, Mark J

    2017-09-01

    As international travel increases, travellers may be at increased risk of acquiring infectious diseases not endemic in their home countries. Many journal articles and reference books related to travel medicine cite that between 22-64% of international travellers become ill during or after travel; however, this information is minimal, outdated and limited by poor generalizability. We aim to provide a current and more accurate estimate of the proportion of international travellers who acquire a travel-related illness. We identified studies via PubMed or travel medicine experts, published between January 1, 1976-December 31, 2016 that included the number of international travellers acquiring a travel-related illness. We excluded studies that focused on a single disease or did not determine a rate based on the total number of travellers. We abstracted information on traveller demographics, trip specifics, study enrollment and follow-up and number of ill travellers and their illnesses. Of 743 studies, nine met the inclusion criteria. The data sources were from North America (four studies) and Europe (five studies). Most travellers were tourists, the most frequent destination regions were Asia and Africa, and the median trip duration ranged from 8-21 days. Six studies enrolled participants at the travellers' pre-travel consultation. All studies collected data through either extraction from the medical record, weekly diaries, or pre- and post-travel questionnaires. Data collection timeframes varied by study. Between 6-87% of travellers became ill across all studies. Four studies provided the best estimate: between 43-79% of travellers who frequently visited developing nations (e.g. India, Tanzania, and Kenya) became ill; travellers most frequently reported diarrhoea. This is the most comprehensive assessment available on the proportion of international travellers that develop a travel-related illness. Additional cohort studies would provide needed data to more precisely

  5. Risk factors for psychological stress among international business travellers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striker, J.; Luippold, R. S.; Nagy, L.; Liese, B.; Bigelow, C.; Mundt, K. A.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study investigated sources of self reported psychological stress among international business travellers at the World Bank, following up on a previous study showing that travellers submitted more insurance claims for psychological disorders. Hypotheses were that work, personal, family, and health concerns, as well as time zone travel, contribute to travel stress. METHODS: A travel survey was developed from focus groups and consisted of questions about these potential sources of travel stress. Surveys were sent to a random sample of staff, stratified by number of travel missions, age range, and sex. Canonical correlation analyses estimated the association between key survey items on sources of stress and two measures of travel stress. RESULTS: 498 staff completed the survey. More than a third reported high to very high travel stress. Correlations between predictors and travel stress showed that social and emotional concerns (such as impact of travel on family and sense of isolation) contributed the most to such stress, followed by health concerns, and workload upon return from travel. Surprisingly, time zone travel did not contribute to the self reported stress of these travellers. There were few modifiers of stress, although respondents suggested that a day of rest after travel and reduced workloads would help. CONCLUSIONS: The current study confirms clinical impressions about several correlates of travel stress. Similar research with travellers in other organisations could help to determine whether the findings from this study are valid and what measures can be taken to reduce the psychological health risks to travellers.   PMID:10450241

  6. You, too, can be an international medical traveler: Reading medical travel guidebooks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ormond, M.E.; Sothern, M.

    2012-01-01

    Drawing on literature on self-help and travel guide writing, this paper interrogates five international medical travel guidebooks aimed at encouraging American and British audiences to travel abroad to purchase medical care. These guidebooks articulate a three-step self-help “program” to produce a

  7. Tourism researcher wins Best Paper Award at international conference

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Sookhan

    2010-01-01

    Nancy McGehee, associate professor of hospitality and tourism management research at the Pamplin College of Business at Virginia Tech, received a 2010 Best Paper Award at the recent ATLAS (Association for Tourism and Leisure Education) International Conference on Sustainable Tourism.

  8. Assessing the risk of work-related international travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druckman, Myles; Harber, Philip; Liu, Yihang; Quigley, Robert L

    2014-11-01

    To identify factors affecting the likelihood of requiring medical services during international business trips. Data from more than 800,000 international trips and medical assistance cases provided to 48 multinational corporations in 2009. Travel destination countries were grouped into four a priori risk-related categories. Travel to "low" medical risk countries in aggregate accounted for more hospitalizations and medical evacuations than travel to "high" medical risk countries. Nevertheless, the risk per trip was much higher for travel to higher medical risk countries. Corporations with employees on international travel should allocate sufficient resources to manage and ideally prevent medical issues during business travel. Travel medicine must focus on more than infectious diseases, and programs are necessary for both high- and low-risk regions. Improved understanding of travel-related needs determines resource allocation and risk mitigation efforts.

  9. International travel patterns and travel risks for stem cell transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikati, Tarek; Griffin, Kenneth; Lane, Dakotah; Matasar, Matthew; Shah, Monika K

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell transplantation (SCT) is being increasingly utilized for multiple medical illnesses. However, there is limited knowledge about international travel patterns and travel-related illnesses of stem cell transplant recipients (SCTRs). An observational cross-sectional study was conducted among 979 SCTRs at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center using a previously standardized and validated questionnaire. International travel post SCT, pre-travel health advice, exposure risks, and travel-related illnesses were queried. A total of 516 SCTRs completed the survey (55% response rate); of these, 40% were allogeneic SCTRs. A total of 229 (44.3%) respondents reported international travel outside the United States and Canada post SCT. The international travel incidence was 32% [95% confidence interval CI 28-36] within 2 years after SCT. Using multivariable Cox regression analysis, variables significantly associated with international travel within first 2 years after SCT were history of international travel prior to SCT [hazard ratio (HR) = 5.3, 95% CI 2.3-12.0], autologous SCT (HR = 2.6, 95% CI 1.6-2.8), foreign birth (HR = 2.3, 95% CI 1.5-3.3), and high income (HR = 2.0, 95% CI 1.8-3.7). During their first trip, 64 travelers (28%) had traveled to destinations that may have required vaccination or malaria chemoprophylaxis. Only 56% reported seeking pre-travel health advice. Of those who traveled, 16 travelers (7%) became ill enough to require medical attention during their first trip after SCT. Ill travelers were more likely to have visited high-risk areas (60 vs 26%, p = 0.005), to have had a longer mean trip duration (24 vs 12 days, p = 0.0002), and to have visited friends and relatives (69 vs 21%, p travel was common among SCTRs within 2 years after SCT and was mainly to low-risk destinations. Although the overall incidence of travel-related illnesses was low, certain subgroups of travelers were at a significantly higher risk. Pre-travel

  10. An Update on Travel Vaccines and Issues in Travel and International Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Bonnie; Bunn, William B; Connor, Bradley A

    2016-08-23

    The fields of travel and international medicine are rapidly changing and growing. The role of occupational and travel health nurses is expanding and should be a focus for the future. At the American Association of Occupational Health Nurses Annual meeting on March 24, 2015, in Boston, five presentations were included in the session, An Update on Travel Vaccines and Issues in Travel and International Medicine. This article summarizes three of the presentations and includes a portion of the information generated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) included in the fourth presentation. The first section focuses on the Essential Elements of Travel Medicine Programs including the pre-travel care assessment, trip research and risk identification, medication intervention review, non-pharmaceutical and prevention strategies, and post-travel care. The next section is an overview of key issues for business travelers. The growth in the number of international business travelers and unique aspects of business travel are emphasized in a comprehensive travel health program. This section also includes a discussion of expatriates and their special risks identified in recent literature (e.g., an assessment of the significant costs of health events and productivity losses by both business travelers and expatriates). The final section offers a specific example of a vaccine-preventable disease, namely, Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus, and needed changes in JE vaccine recommendations. © 2016 The Author(s).

  11. Research Award: Risk Management and Internal Audit

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Corey Piccioni

    2013-08-07

    Aug 7, 2013 ... manage research; and. • idenfying competencies, key success factors or performance indicators most crical to research instuons. In addion to their research project, the RMIA Research Awardee will be involved in a range of acvies to contribute to the ongoing program of risk management and internal audit ...

  12. Research Award: Donor Partnership Division | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-09-07

    Sep 7, 2016 ... IDRC's Donor Partnerships division (DPD) initiates, builds, and maintains relationships with donors, international organizations, and research funders ... We are particularly interested in research related to public-private partnerships for development, bilateral investments in research, trends in private ...

  13. International Travel: Tips for Staying Healthy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions Prevention and Wellness Staying Healthy Healthy Living Travel Occupational Health First Aid and Injury Prevention Crisis ... MoreDepression in Children and TeensRead MoreBMI Calculator Air Travel Health TipsTexting and DrivingTravel Needs for SeniorsFood PoisoningAcute ...

  14. International Development Research Centre Corporate Policy Travel

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    André Lavoie

    Transportation. 12.11. Travel Recuperation - Rest Period. 12.12. Emergency Evacuations. 12.13. Exceptions. 13. Travel Undertaken by the President. 14. Travel Undertaken by non-Employees. 14.1 .... perform their official duties such that public confidence and trust in the integrity of the organization are maintained and ...

  15. International Development Research Centre Corporate Policy Travel

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    André Lavoie

    Travel Undertaken by IDRC Employees. 12.1. Accommodation. 12.2. Business Expenses. 12.3. Currency Exchange. 12.4. Dependant Care Allowance. 12.5 .... prior to traveling, consult the Travel Advisory Group's list to determine the ... maintain the list of meal and all-inclusive per diem allowances as well as the rates.

  16. Risk factors and pre-travel healthcare of international travellers attending a Dutch travel clinic: a cross-sectional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieten, Rosanne W; van der Schalie, Maurice; Visser, Benjamin J; Grobusch, Martin P; van Vugt, Michèle

    2014-01-01

    The number of international travellers is currently estimated to exceed one billion annually. To address travel related health risks and facilitate risk reduction strategies, detailed knowledge of travellers' characteristics is important. In this cross-sectional study, data of a 20% sample of travellers visiting the Academic Medical Center (AMC) travel clinic Amsterdam from July 2011 to July 2012 was collected. Itineraries and protection versus exposure rates of preventable infectious diseases were mapped and reported according to STROBE guidelines. 1749 travellers were included. South-Eastern Asia, South-America and West-Africa were most frequently visited. 26.2% of the population had pre-existing medical conditions (often cardiovascular). Young and VFR travellers had a longer median travel time (28 and 30 days) compared to the overall population (21 days). Young adult travellers were relatively often vaccinated against hepatitis B (43.9% vs. 20.5%, p travellers. Pre-travel guidelines were well adhered to. Young adult travellers had high-risk itineraries but were adequately protected. Improvement of hepatitis B and rabies protection would be desirable, specifically for VFRs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Typhoid vaccination for international travelers from Greece visiting developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeti, Paraskevi; Pavli, Androula; Katerelos, Panagiotis; Maltezou, Helena C

    2014-01-01

    Typhoid fever is one of the most common diagnoses in returned international travelers. Our aim was to study the typhoid vaccine prescription practices for travelers from Greece visiting developing countries. A prospective questionnaire-based study was conducted during 2009-2012 in 57 Public Health Departments, which are the only sources of typhoid vaccine in Greece. A total of 3,680 travelers were studied (median age: 38.1 years). Typhoid vaccine was delivered to 1,108 (30.1%) of them. Of those who traveled to sub-Saharan Africa, South America, the Middle East, the Indian subcontinent, Southeast Asia, South Africa, East Asia, North Africa, and Central America, 31.6, 17.1, 35, 44.2, 36.9, 31, 17.7, 31.6, and 36.8% received typhoid vaccine, respectively. Of travelers who stayed travel, typhoid vaccine was administered to 32.7% of those who traveled for leisure, to 28.8% of those who traveled for business, and to 24.1% of those visiting friends and relatives (VFRs). Of travelers who stayed in urban areas, rural areas, and urban and rural areas, 36.3, 30.1, and 26.8% were vaccinated, respectively. The majority of travelers who received the typhoid vaccine stayed in camps (62.9%) or at local residences (41%). Typhoid vaccine administration was statistically significantly associated with destination, duration of travel, purpose of travel, area of stay, and type of accommodation. There is a need to increase awareness of travelers and public health professionals for typhoid vaccination and particularly for high-risk groups of travelers, such as travelers to the Indian subcontinent and VFRs. Strategies for continuing professional education should be developed for travel health professionals. © 2013 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  18. Medical insurance claims associated with international business travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liese, B; Mundt, K A; Dell, L D; Nagy, L; Demure, B

    1997-07-01

    Preliminary investigations of whether 10,884 staff and consultants of the World Bank experience disease due to work related travel. Medical insurance claims filed by 4738 travellers during 1993 were compared with claims of non-travellers. Specific diagnoses obtained from claims were analysed overall (one or more v no missions) and by frequency of international mission (1, 2-3, or > or = 4). Standardised rate of claims ratios (SSRs) for each diagnostic category were obtained by dividing the age adjusted rate of claims for travellers by the age adjusted rate of claims for non-travellers, and were calculated for men and women travellers separately. Overall, rates of insurance claims were 80% higher for men and 18% higher for women travellers than their non-travelling counterparts. Several associations with frequency of travel were found. SRRs for infectious disease were 1.28, 1.54, and 1.97 among men who had completed one, two or three, and four or more missions, and 1.16, 1.28, and 1.61, respectively, among women. The greatest excess related to travel was found for psychological disorders. For men SRRs were 2.11, 3.13, and 3.06 and for women, SRRs were 1.47, 1.96, and 2.59. International business travel may pose health risks beyond exposure to infectious diseases. Because travellers file medical claims at a greater rate than non-travellers, and for many categories of disease, the rate of claims increases with frequency of travel. The reasons for higher rates of claims among travellers are not well understood. Additional research on psychosocial factors, health practices, time zones crossed, and temporal relation between travel and onset of disease is planned.

  19. Health risks, travel preparation, and illness among public health professionals during international travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaban, Victor; Warnock, Eli; Ramana Dhara, V; Jean-Louis, Lee Ann; Sotir, Mark J; Kozarsky, Phyllis

    2014-01-01

    Few data currently exist on health risks faced by public health professionals (PHP) during international travel. We conducted pre- and post-travel health surveys to assess knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP), and illnesses among PHP international travelers. Anonymous surveys were completed by PHP from a large American public health agency who sought a pre-travel medical consult from September 1, 2009, to September 30, 2010. Surveys were completed by 122 participants; travelers went to 163 countries. Of the 122 respondents, 97 (80%) reported at least one planned health risk activity (visiting rural areas, handling animals, contact with blood or body fluids, visiting malarious areas), and 50 (41%) reported exposure to unanticipated health risks. Of the 62 travelers who visited malarious areas, 14 (23%) reported inconsistent or no use of malaria prophylaxis. Illness during travel was reported by 33 (27%) respondents. Most of the PHP travelers in our study reported at least one planned health risk activity, and almost half reported exposure to unanticipated health risks, and one-quarter of travelers to malarious areas reported inconsistent or no use of malaria chemoprophylaxis. Our findings highlight that communication and education outreach for PHP to prevent travel-associated illnesses can be improved. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. International Harmonization of the Patent-awarding Rules

    OpenAIRE

    Kaz Miyagiwa

    2009-01-01

    While the rest of the world issues patents to those who file applications first the U.S. do so to those who can demonstrate to have made inventions first. The U.S. has recently been under pressure to conform to the international rule. In this paper I examine the effect of international harmonization of the patent-awarding rules. In a dynamic two-country model of R&D competition for sequential inventions, I find that harmonization to the first-to-file rule can undermine innovation. This result...

  1. An Approach to Establishing International Quality Standards for Medical Travel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ondřej eKácha

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Traveling abroad to receive a non-elective treatment is expanding each year. Such rising popularity of medical travel and the absence of clear minimum quality requirements in this area urgently calls for setting international standards to ensure good practice and patient safety. The aim of this study is to identify the key domains in medical travel where such quality standards should be established. Drawing from the evidence-based OECD framework and an extensive literature review, this study proposes three critical areas for international quality standards in medical travel: minimum standards of health care facilities and third-party agencies, financial responsibility and patient-centeredness. Several cultural challenges are subsequently introduced that may pose a barrier to the development of the guidelines and should be additionally taken into consideration. Establishing international quality standards in medical travel enhances the benefits to patients and providers, which is urgently needed given the rapid growth in this industry.

  2. International students' image of rural Pennsylvania as a travel destination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Po-Ju Chen; Deborah L. Kerstetter

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the image international students at Penn State have of rural travel destinations in the state of Pennsylvania. In addition, this study investigated whether destination image differed depending upon travel behavior and socio-demographic variables. Four distinct image dimensions, "tourism infrastructure," "...

  3. An approach to establishing international quality standards for medical travel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lácha, O.; Kovács, B.E.; McCarthy, C.; Schuurmans, A.T.; Dobyns, C.; Haller, E.; Hinrichs, S.; Ruggeri, K.

    2016-01-01

    Traveling abroad to receive a non-elective treatment is expanding each year. Such rising popularity of medical travel and the absence of clear minimum quality requirements in this area urgently calls for setting international standards to ensure good practice and patient safety. The aim of this

  4. Interim Procedures Safeguarding Mobile Devices during International Travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    This procedure is for safeguarding EPA information and systems for all employees, contractors, and other users while on international travel or to specifically designated locations within the United States and foreign embassies.

  5. Vaccines for travel and international adoption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Paul J

    2008-04-01

    Vaccines have been one of the most important health advances of the 20th century. As more children emigrate from and travel to underdeveloped countries where they can be exposed to unusual endemic pathogens beyond their previous immunologic experience, it is critical to protect them against these potentially life-threatening infections.

  6. International Development Research Centre Governor Travel Policy

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    André Lavoie

    Version 1.0.0 effective 2015-10-30. 1. Context. 2. ... guidelines and tools to manage and control Governors' IDRC-related travel expenses. 3. .... Governors' control;. • be responsible for costs arising from routings and stopovers undertaken for personal, and not IDRC business-related, purposes or benefits; and. • become ...

  7. Pretravel health advice among international travelers visiting Cuzco, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabada, Miguel M; Maldonado, Fernando; Quispe, Wanda; Serrano, Edson; Mozo, Karen; Gonzales, Elsa; Seas, Carlos; Verdonck, Kristien; Echevarria, Juan I; Gotuzzo, Eduardo

    2005-01-01

    Cuzco, a Peruvian city of historical interest located 3,326 m above sea level, is a frequent destination for tourists. We conducted a descriptive study to assess the extent and sources of pretravel health advice received by international travelers before their arrival to Cuzco. Data were collected as part of a health survey among travelers. Between August and November 2002, travelers between 15 and 65 years old were invited to fill out a questionnaire in the departing area of Cuzco's international airport. A total of 5,988 travelers participated. The mean age was 35.4 years (SD 11.4 yr); 50.6% were female and 50.8% were single. Tourism was the reason for traveling in 90.2% of the participants, and 89.3% of them were traveling with companions. Pretravel health information was received by 93.6%. The median number of information sources was two, with books (41.5%), travel medicine clinics (38.8%), the Internet (23.3%), and general practitioners (22.7%) as the main sources. Most frequently received recommendations were about safe food and water consumption (85%), use of insect repellents (66.0%), sunburn protection (64.4%), and condom use (22%). Only 16.5% took medication to prevent altitude sickness, and 14.2% took medication to prevent traveler's diarrhea. Variables independently associated with receiving pretravel health information from a health care professional were female gender, country of residence other than the United States, length of stay in Cuzco > 7 days, length of stay in other Peruvian cities > 7 days, tourism as the main reason for visiting Cuzco, traveling with companions, and consulting of more than one source of information. Most travelers arriving to Cuzco had received pretravel health information, and the majority obtained it from more than one source. Recommendations addressed for specific health risks, such as altitude sickness prophylaxis, were received by few travelers.

  8. NRAO Scientists on Team Receiving International Astronautics Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-10-01

    The International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) is presenting an award to a pioneering team of scientists and engineers who combined an orbiting radio-astronomy satellite with ground-based radio telescopes around the world to produce a "virtual telescope" nearly three times the size of the Earth. The team, which includes two scientists from the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), will receive the award in a ceremony Sunday, October 16, in Fukuoka, Japan. VSOP Satellite and Ground Telescopes Artist's conception of HALCA satellite and ground observatories together making "virtual telescope" (blue) about three times the size of Earth. CREDIT: ISAS, JAXA (Click on image for larger version) The IAA chose the VLBI Space Observatory Program (VSOP), an international collaboration, to receive its 2005 Laurels for Team Achievement Award, which recognizes "extraordinary performance and achievement by a team of scientists, engineers and managers in the field of Astronautics to foster its peaceful and international use." VSOP team members named in the IAA award include NRAO astronomers Edward Fomalont, of Charlottesville, Virginia, and Jonathan Romney, of Socorro, New Mexico. "This is a well-deserved award for an international team whose hard work produced a scientific milestone that yielded impressive results and provides a foundation for more advances in the future," said Dr. Fred K.Y Lo, NRAO Director. The VSOP program used a Japanese satellite, HALCA (Highly Advanced Laboratory for Communications and Astronomy), that included an 8-meter (26-foot) radio telescope. HALCA was launched in 1997 and made astronomical observations in conjunction with ground-based radio telescopes from 14 countries. Five tracking stations, including one at NRAO's Green Bank, West Virginia, facility, received data from HALCA which later was combined with data from the ground-based telescopes to produce images more detailed than those that could have been made by ground-based systems alone

  9. Travel grant program for the IX International Congresses of Mycology and Bacteriology -- Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granigan, Marion

    2000-05-25

    In 1999, the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) and the National Academy of Sciences' U.S. National Committee for the International Union of Microbiological Sciences (IUMS) jointly organized a competitive travel grant program to support the participation of U.S. scientists in the 9th International Congresses of the Bacteriological and Applied Microbiology, Mycology and Virology Divisions of the IUMS in Sydney, Australia, August 16-20, 1999. Funding was solicited for the program, and the ASM Minority and International Activities department administered the $40,000 raised. Travel grants in the amount of $2,000 were offered to U.S. investigators (citizens, including federal employees, and permanent residents working in the United States) in the early stages of their careers who planned to attend and present their research at the Congress. Teams of established and new investigators who applied jointly were eligible to received a combined $3,000 award. IUMS developed a questionnaire th at each applicant were required to complete and return, which asked each award recipient about their experience at the Congresses. Questionnaire results are included.

  10. International Tourism and Today's Travel Business (Tourism)

    OpenAIRE

    Tagawa, Hiromi

    2010-01-01

     The Japanese tourist industry now faces a turbulent age deriving from a dramatic change of market trend and customer needs. In particular, the recent global economic crisis and diversification of emergency risks have a great influence not only on travel business circles but on the tourist industry as a whole. On the other hand, the tourist industry is regarded as one of the most promising industries in the national strategy, while the realization of the concept of a tourism-oriented nation i...

  11. Self-reported infections during international travel and notifiable infections among returning international travellers, Sweden, 2009-2013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Dahl

    Full Text Available We studied food and water-borne diseases (FWDs, sexually transmitted diseases (STDs, vector-borne diseases (VBDs and diseases vaccinated against in the Swedish childhood vaccination programme among Swedish international travellers, in order to identify countries associated with a high number of infections. We used the national database for notifiable infections to estimate the number of FWDs (campylobacteriosis, salmonellosis, giardiasis, shigellosis, EHEC, Entamoeba histolytica, yersinosis, hepatitis A, paratyphoid fever, typhoid fever, hepatitis E, listeriosis, cholera, STIs (chlamydia, gonorrhoea and acute hepatitis B, VBDs (dengue fever, malaria, West Nile fever, Japanese encephalitis and yellow fever and diseases vaccinated against in the Swedish childhood vaccination programme (pertussis, measles, mumps, rubella, diphtheria acquired abroad 2009-2013. We obtained number and duration of trips to each country from a database that monthly collects travel data from a randomly selected proportion of the Swedish population. We calculated number of infections per country 2009-2013 and incidence/million travel days for the five countries with the highest number of infections. Thailand had the highest number of FWDs (7,697, incidence 191/million travel days, STIs (1,388, incidence 34/million travel days and VBDs (358, incidence 9/million travel days. France had the highest number of cases of diseases vaccinated against in the Swedish childhood vaccination programme (8, 0.4/million travel days. Swedish travellers contracted most infections in Thailand. Special focus should be placed on giving advice to travellers to this destination.

  12. Pre-Travel Health Preparation of Pediatric International Travelers: Analysis From the Global TravEpiNet Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagmann, Stefan; LaRocque, Regina C; Rao, Sowmya R; Jentes, Emily S; Sotir, Mark J; Brunette, Gary; Ryan, Edward T

    2013-12-01

    Children frequently travel internationally. Health-related data on such children are limited. We sought to investigate the demographics, health characteristics, and preventive interventions of outbound US international pediatric travelers. We analyzed data from 32 099 travelers presenting for pre-travel healthcare at the Global TravEpiNet (GTEN), a national consortium of 19 travel clinics, from January 1, 2009 to June 6, 2012. A total of 3332 (10%) of all GTEN travelers were children (traveled mostly for leisure (36%) or to visit friends or relatives (VFR) (36%). Most popular destination regions were Africa (41%), Southeast Asia (16%), Central America (16%), and the Caribbean (16%). Compared with children traveling for leisure, VFR children were more likely to present travel consultation (44% vs 28%), intended to travel for 28 days or longer (70% vs 22%), and to travel to Africa (62% vs 32%). Nearly half of the pediatric travelers (46%) received at least 1 routine vaccine, and most (83%) received at least 1 travel-related vaccine. Parents or guardians of one third of the children (30%) refused at least 1 recommended travel-related vaccine. Most pediatric travelers visiting a malaria-endemic country (72%) received a prescription for malaria chemoprophylaxis. Ten percent of travelers seeking pre-travel healthcare at GTEN sites are children. VFR-travel, pre-travel consultation close to time of departure, and refusal of recommended vaccines may place children at risk for travel-associated illness. Strategies to engage pediatric travelers in timely, pre-travel care and improve acceptance of pre-travel healthcare interventions are needed. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. An Approach to Establishing International Quality Standards for Medical Travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kácha, Ondřej; Kovács, Beáta E; McCarthy, Cormac; Schuurmans, Angela A T; Dobyns, Christopher; Haller, Elisa; Hinrichs, Saba; Ruggeri, Kai

    2016-01-01

    The number of individuals traveling abroad is increasing annually. The rising popularity of medical travel and the absence of clear minimum quality requirements in this area urgently call for the development of international standards to ensure good practice and patient safety. The aim of this study is to identify the key domains in medical travel where quality standards should be established. Drawing from the evidence-based OECD framework and an extensive literature review, this study proposes three critical areas for consideration: minimum standards of health-care facilities and third-party agencies, financial responsibility, and patient centeredness. Several cultural challenges have been introduced that may pose a barrier to development of the guidelines and should be taken into consideration. Establishing international quality standards in medical travel enhances benefits to patients and providers, which is an urgent necessity given the rapid growth in this industry.

  14. Controlling pandemic flu: the value of international air travel restrictions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua M Epstein

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Planning for a possible influenza pandemic is an extremely high priority, as social and economic effects of an unmitigated pandemic would be devastating. Mathematical models can be used to explore different scenarios and provide insight into potential costs, benefits, and effectiveness of prevention and control strategies under consideration.A stochastic, equation-based epidemic model is used to study global transmission of pandemic flu, including the effects of travel restrictions and vaccination. Economic costs of intervention are also considered. The distribution of First Passage Times (FPT to the United States and the numbers of infected persons in metropolitan areas worldwide are studied assuming various times and locations of the initial outbreak. International air travel restrictions alone provide a small delay in FPT to the U.S. When other containment measures are applied at the source in conjunction with travel restrictions, delays could be much longer. If in addition, control measures are instituted worldwide, there is a significant reduction in cases worldwide and specifically in the U.S. However, if travel restrictions are not combined with other measures, local epidemic severity may increase, because restriction-induced delays can push local outbreaks into high epidemic season. The per annum cost to the U.S. economy of international and major domestic air passenger travel restrictions is minimal: on the order of 0.8% of Gross National Product.International air travel restrictions may provide a small but important delay in the spread of a pandemic, especially if other disease control measures are implemented during the afforded time. However, if other measures are not instituted, delays may worsen regional epidemics by pushing the outbreak into high epidemic season. This important interaction between policy and seasonality is only evident with a global-scale model. Since the benefit of travel restrictions can be substantial while

  15. Travel-associated disease among US residents visiting US GeoSentinel clinics after return from international travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagmann, Stefan H F; Han, Pauline V; Stauffer, William M; Miller, Andy O; Connor, Bradley A; Hale, DeVon C; Coyle, Christina M; Cahill, John D; Marano, Cinzia; Esposito, Douglas H; Kozarsky, Phyllis E

    2014-12-01

    US residents make 60 million international trips annually. Family practice providers need to be aware of travel-associated diseases affecting this growing mobile population. To describe demographics, travel characteristics and clinical diagnoses of US residents who present ill after international travel. Descriptive analysis of travel-associated morbidity and mortality among US travellers seeking care at 1 of the 22 US practices and clinics participating in the GeoSentinel Global Surveillance Network from January 2000 to December 2012. Of the 9624 ill US travellers included in the analysis, 3656 (38%) were tourist travellers, 2379 (25%) missionary/volunteer/research/aid workers (MVRA), 1580 (16%) travellers visiting friends and relatives (VFRs), 1394 (15%) business travellers and 593 (6%) student travellers. Median (interquartile range) travel duration was 20 days (10-60 days). Pre-travel advice was sought by 45%. Hospitalization was required by 7%. Compared with other groups of travellers, ill MVRA travellers returned from longer trips (median duration 61 days), while VFR travellers disproportionately required higher rates of inpatient care (24%) and less frequently had received pre-travel medical advice (20%). Illnesses of the gastrointestinal tract were the most common (58%), followed by systemic febrile illnesses (18%) and dermatologic disorders (17%). Three deaths were reported. Diagnoses varied according to the purpose of travel and region of exposure. Returning ill US international travellers present with a broad spectrum of travel-associated diseases. Destination and reason for travel may help primary health care providers to generate an accurate differential diagnosis for the most common disorders and for those that may be life-threatening. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. International Patients' Travel Decision Making Process- A Conceptual Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammad Jamal; Chelliah, Shankar; Haron, Mahmod Sabri

    2016-02-01

    Role of information source, perceived benefits and risks, and destination image has significantly been examined in travel and tourism literature; however, in medical tourism it is yet to be examined thoroughly. The concept discussed in this article is drawn form well established models in tourism literature. The purpose of this research was to identify the source of information, travel benefits and perceived risks related to movement of international patients and develop a conceptual model based on well-established theory. Thorough database search (Science Direct, utmj.org, nih.gov, nchu.edu.tw, palgrave-journals, medretreat, Biomedcentral) was performed to fulfill the objectives of the study. International patients always concern about benefits and risks related to travel. These benefits and risks form images of destination in the minds of international patients. Different sources of information make international patients acquaint about the associated benefits and risks, which later leads to development of intention to visit. This conceptual paper helps in establishing model for decision-making process of international patients in developing visit intention. Ample amount of literature is available detailing different factors involved in travel decision making of international patients; however literature explaining relationship between these factors is scarce.

  17. International Patients’ Travel Decision Making Process- A Conceptual Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    KHAN, Mohammad Jamal; CHELLIAH, Shankar; HARON, Mahmod Sabri

    2016-01-01

    Background: Role of information source, perceived benefits and risks, and destination image has significantly been examined in travel and tourism literature; however, in medical tourism it is yet to be examined thoroughly. The concept discussed in this article is drawn form well established models in tourism literature. Methods: The purpose of this research was to identify the source of information, travel benefits and perceived risks related to movement of international patients and develop a conceptual model based on well-established theory. Thorough database search (Science Direct, utmj.org, nih.gov, nchu.edu.tw, palgrave-journals, medretreat, Biomedcentral) was performed to fulfill the objectives of the study. Results: International patients always concern about benefits and risks related to travel. These benefits and risks form images of destination in the minds of international patients. Different sources of information make international patients acquaint about the associated benefits and risks, which later leads to development of intention to visit. This conceptual paper helps in establishing model for decision-making process of international patients in developing visit intention. Conclusion: Ample amount of literature is available detailing different factors involved in travel decision making of international patients; however literature explaining relationship between these factors is scarce. PMID:27114978

  18. Travel medicine advice to UK based international motor sport teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, A

    2000-01-01

    International motor sport teams travel extensively. Over the years, the design and build of racing cars has improved so that morbidity and mortality in motor sport has been lessened. Those team members supporting the competitors need to be physically and mentally fit to perform complicated tasks, despite having traveled. This group of travelers has not been studied to any extent previously. An anonymous questionnaire asking some basic travel medicine related questions was distributed to the support team members of a Rally team, and Formula One Grand Prix team. Both teams were based in the UK, and competed in all the rounds of their respective world championships. Ten Rally team members and 18 Formula One team members responded to the questionnaire. The results showed moderate coverage of commonly used vaccinations; appropriate use of antimalarials and insect repellents, but by no means by all team members; little or no problems with traveler's diarrhea; some tendencies to problems related to jet lag, but no real attempt to prevent the problem; and finally some attempt at skin protection against solar damage. Support teams are reasonably well prepared for the combination of, the rigors of frequent travel, and a demanding job. There is a deficit in vaccine coverage, especially of both hepatitis A and B, some education is needed in preventing skin problems later in life due to sun exposure, and further study of jet lag and its implications might be appropriate.

  19. 76 FR 58243 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Survey of International Air Travelers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-20

    ...'s Office of Travel & Tourism Industries (OTTI), Phone: (202) 482-0140, and fax: (202) 482- 2887. E... Travel and Tourism Industries (OTTI) of the International Trade Administration provides source data... travel and tourism related acts to collect and publish comprehensive international travel and tourism...

  20. International travel as medical research: architecture and the modern hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Cameron; Willis, Julie

    2010-01-01

    The design and development of the modern hospital in Australia had a profound impact on medical practice and research at a variety of levels. Between the late 1920s and the 1950s hospital architects, administrators, and politicians travelled widely in order to review the latest international developments in the hospital field They were motivated by Australia's geographic isolation and a growing concern with how to govern the population at the level of physical health. While not 'medical research' in the conventional sense of the term, this travel was a powerful generator of medical thinking in Australia and has left a rich archival legacy. This paper draws on that archive to demonstrate the ways in which architectural research and international networks of hospital specialists profoundly shaped the provision of medical infrastructure in Australia.

  1. Preventing dengue and chikungunya fever among international travelers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tither, Pauline Herold

    2014-11-01

    To describe the vulnerability of U.S. travelers in tropical and subtropical regions of the world to dengue and chikungunya fever, to provide practical recommendations to avoid these mosquito-borne diseases, and to offer a communication tool as an aid for pretravel health consultations. Medical, epidemiological, and entomological research articles and reviews, and reports from government agencies. Dengue and chikungunya fever have growing public health impact around the world. International travelers return to the United States infected with these diseases. Mosquito bite avoidance is the only way to prevent dengue and chikungunya fever. Informed travelers have many options for simple and practical measures to lessen the risk of mosquito bites. A message map can be used as a communication tool for pretravel counseling on the prevention of dengue and chikungunya fever within the time frame of an office visit. In a pretravel health consultation, a nurse practitioner can promote travelers' health and prevent dengue, chikungunya fever, and other mosquito-borne diseases by counseling on the risk of these diseases and giving practical recommendations for prevention using a message map. ©2014 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  2. Fairer flying: an international air travel levy for adaptation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambwera, Muyeye; Muller, Benito

    2008-11-15

    For the world's poorest countries and communities, adaptation to climate change is urgently needed, but costly: estimates run into tens of billions of dollars a year. Given the shortfall in current international adaptation funding, how can resources for the developing world be raised? An adaptation levy on international air travel could help fill the gap. A small per-trip payment by passengers could contribute US$8 billion to US$10 billion a year towards adaptation. Similar schemes in France and elsewhere show that this kind of ethical solidarity and 'polluter pays' approach would be simple to implement in practical and institutional terms.

  3. FAQs for IDRC Research Awards 2017 Call | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    In your application, you must also indicate, with appropriate reference(s), whether the country where data collection will take place requires that a local research ethics committee review your project. Finally, note that, as a Research Award Recipient, you will be required to complete the TCPS 2 online training within the first ...

  4. FAQs for IDRC Research Awards 2018 Call | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Candidates can review the research currently being supported by IDRC's programs and become familiar with the objectives of each award. 11) What should I include in the research proposal? All required information is clearly indicated in separate headings in the online application form. 12) How should I address the ...

  5. Fundraising flights: a levy on international air travel for adaptation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birch, Tom; Chambwera, Muyeye

    2011-03-15

    Adapting to climate change will not be cheap: it will cost an estimated tens of billions of dollars each year. But where will the money come from? The UN climate negotiations have set up dedicated funds for the task but domestic politics have resulted in insufficient, variable and unreliable contributions from governments. An innovative adaptation levy on international air travel could help fill the gap. A small charge to individual travellers would raise up to US$10 billion a year. The levy, which follows the 'polluter pays' principle, could be implemented very quickly and at minimal cost and would go a long way to raising sums that could make a significant difference.

  6. Solidarity by demand? Exit and voice in international medical travel - The case of Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ormond, M.E.

    2015-01-01

    Globally, more patients are intentionally travelling abroad as consumers for medical care. However, while scholars have begun to examine international medical travel's (IMT) impacts on the people and places that receive medical travellers, study of its impacts on medical travellers' home contexts

  7. Health and well-being factors associated with international business travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkholder, Justin D; Joines, Ron; Cunningham-Hill, Mark; Xu, Baowei

    2010-01-01

    International travel by US business travelers is continuing to increase with the globalization of the economy. The objective of this study was to determine if the frequency and duration of international business travel is associated with differences in travelers' health and well-being. This study expands our limited knowledge of the impact of long-haul travel on healthy lifestyle choices and traveler's perceptions of their health and well-being. 12,942 unique health risk appraisal (HRA) records of US employees of a multinational corporation were analyzed according to self-reported (objective and subjective) travel history and lifestyle habits. Comparing 2,962 international travelers and 9,980 non-travelers, international business travel was significantly associated with a lower body mass index, lower blood pressure, excess alcohol consumption, sleep deprivation, and diminished confidence to keep up with the pace of work. This study demonstrated both positive and negative associations on the health risks and well-being of a large sample of US-based international business travelers from an US multinational company. This study identifies targeted areas for pretrip screening and counseling to proactively address potential negative effects of travel and may assist in the design of corporate travel health and employee assistance programs. © 2010 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  8. Pre-travel preparation practices among business travellers to tropical and subtropical destinations: results from the Athens International Airport Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavli, Androula; Silvestros, Chrysovalantis; Patrinos, Stavros; Lymperi, Ioanna; Maltezou, Helena C

    2014-01-01

    The number of business travellers from Greece to tropical and subtropical areas has recently increased. The study aimed to assess travel health preparation practices of business travellers departing to Africa, the Middle East and Asia. A questionnaire-based survey was conducted at Athens International Airport, from 1st of November 2011 to 30th of April 2013. A total of 684 business travellers participated in the study; the majority were men (86.1%), of Greek nationality (95.3%), with tertiary education (90.8%) and employed (98%). Their mean age was 40 years; 62% and 26% of them were 35-49 and 19-34 years of age respectively. 84.8% were travelling alone. Most frequent destinations were the Middle East (46.8%) and sub-Saharan Africa (16%). For 23.5% of the travellers it was their first trip to a tropical or subtropical country. Only 58.8% pursued pre-travel health consultation; vaccination and malaria chemoprophylaxis were administered to 24.7% and 25.7% of the travellers, respectively. Hepatitis A and typhoid vaccination rates were lower than expected (70% and 35%, respectively). Nearly half of the travellers who visited malaria endemic areas did not receive any chemoprophylaxis. Having elementary education level, travelling to the Middle East or North Africa, travelling for less than 1 month duration, and staying in a house or a hotel were associated with a higher probability of not pursuing health consultation. Significant gaps were found in pre-travel health practices of business travellers departing to Africa, the Middle East and Asia. Strategies should be developed in order to improve awareness of business travellers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. International travel in the immunocompromised patient: a cross-sectional survey of travel advice in 254 consecutive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialy, C; Horne, K; Dendle, C; Kanellis, J; Littlejohn, G; Ratnam, I; Woolley, I

    2015-06-01

    Our primary aim was to determine the rate of overseas travel in immunocompromised individuals attending appropriate clinics at an Australian tertiary care hospital. We also aimed to characterise health-seeking behaviour prior to travel and investigated sources of pre-travel advice, compared travel patterns and activities between three specific immunosuppressed groups, and examined pre-immunosuppression patient serology. We implemented a cross-sectional survey of patients between February and August 2012. This survey was implemented among three outpatient populations at Monash Medical Centre, an Australian tertiary care hospital. We recruited 254 immunosuppressed adults from three patient populations: human immunodeficiency virus-positive individuals, renal transplant patients and rheumatology patients requiring immunosuppressive therapy. No clinical intervention was performed. In the 10 years preceding the survey, 153 (60.2%) participants reported international travel. Of these, 105 (68.6%) were immunosuppressed at the time of travel. These patients were 47.6% male and 60% Australian born. Forty per cent were visiting friends and relatives as part of their travel. Fifty-four per cent of those immunocompromised at the time of travel were going to high-risk destinations. Pathology files indicated that serological screening was frequently not performed prior to immunosuppression in the renal transplant and rheumatology groups. Immunocompromised patients often travel to high-risk destinations with limited or inadequate pre-travel preparations. Doctors caring for the immunocompromised should be aware of travel risks, suitable vaccination protocols and when to refer to specialist travel clinics. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  10. Sleep, Travel, and Recovery Responses of National Footballers During and After Long-Haul International Air Travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullagar, Hugh H; Duffield, Rob; Skorski, Sabrina; White, David; Bloomfield, Jonathan; Kölling, Sarah; Meyer, Tim

    2016-01-01

    The current study examined the sleep, travel, and recovery responses of elite footballers during and after long-haul international air travel, with a further description of these responses over the ensuing competitive tour (including 2 matches). In an observational design, 15 elite male football players undertook 18 h of predominantly westward international air travel from the United Kingdom to South America (-4-h time-zone shift) for a 10-d tour. Objective sleep parameters, external and internal training loads, subjective player match performance, technical match data, and perceptual jet-lag and recovery measures were collected. Significant differences were evident between outbound travel and recovery night 1 (night of arrival; P sleep duration. Sleep efficiency was also significantly reduced during outbound travel compared with recovery nights 1 (P = .001) and 2 (P = .004). Furthermore, both match nights (5 and 10), showed significantly less sleep than nonmatch nights 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 (all P .05), although large effects were evident for jet-lag on d 2 (2 d after arrival). Sleep duration is truncated during long-haul international travel with a 4-h time-zone delay and after night matches in elite footballers. However, this lost sleep appeared to have a limited effect on perceptual recovery, which may be explained by a westbound flight and a relatively small change in time zones, in addition to the significant increase in sleep duration on the night of arrival after the long-haul flight.

  11. LEGAL ISSUES IN THE ANNULMENT OF INTERNATIONAL ARBITRAL AWARD IN THE HIMPURNA AND KARAHA BODAS IN INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irna Nurhayati

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Law enforcement of international arbitral award in Indonesia is still lacking. Some annulments of the award have occurred in Indonesia. The Himpurna and Karaha Bodas are two notorious cases that show the annulment of the international arbitral awards by a court in Indonesia. However, several legal issues have arisen on this annulment, because the judges in their decision relied on a wrong interpretation to the provision of the United Nation Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards 1958 (the New York Convention, and the parties agreement. This paper will analyse the error of the Indonesian court in annulling the Himpurna and Karaha Bodas awards. This paper will then demonstrate the judges’ misinterpretation to the New York Convention provision concerning refusal and annulment of foreign arbitral award. This paper ultimately will suggest how to create a proper legal environment in Indonesia to apply international arbitration.

  12. Research Award: Risk Management and Internal Audit (RMIA)

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    KKearney

    2011-09-12

    Sep 12, 2011 ... advisory role to various work assignments. Applicants should have a professional interest in internal audit and risk management. Knowledge of project management principles, enterprise risk management practices, and internal audit standards would be an asset. Your past study and research interests will ...

  13. Preparing children for international travel: need for training and pediatric-focused research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagmann, Stefan H F; Leshem, Eyal; Fischer, Philip R; Stauffer, William M; Barnett, Elizabeth D; Christenson, John C

    2014-01-01

    The International Society of Travel Medicine (ISTM) Pediatric Interest Group (PedIG) was created in 2010. We studied the group's professional characteristics and practice patterns to identify clinical areas requiring further training and research related to pediatric international travel. PedIG members were emailed a two-part online questionnaire in September 2011, which comprised questions about professional and practice details, followed by a survey regarding decisions on nine patient scenarios that represent common pediatric pre-travel health challenges. Ninety-three (34%) of 273 members completed the survey. Most were physicians (80%) having a primary specialization in pediatrics (55%) and family medicine (19%). About a third (37%) had acquired the ISTM Certificate in Travel Health (CTH); 14 and 11% chose not to provide malaria chemoprophylaxis for a 2-month-old infant and a 13-year-old child traveling to West Africa, respectively. Azithromycin for empiric treatment of travelers' diarrhea in a 2-year-old traveler to Thailand and Mexico was suggested by 74 and 58%, respectively, while the use of acetazolamide for a 2-month old infant traveling to a high-altitude destination was rarely (13%) chosen. In vaccine-focused scenarios, 71, 69, 21, and 10% would prescribe the meningococcal vaccine for a 6-month-old traveler to Burkina Faso, Japanese encephalitis vaccine to a 10-year-old traveler to Cambodia, hepatitis A vaccine to a 6-month-old traveler to El Salvador, and the typhoid vaccine to a 1-year-old traveler to India, respectively. Members of the PedIG have diverse professional and practice backgrounds. Lack of awareness of established guidelines may place international pediatric travelers at risk for travel-associated morbidity. Strategies are needed to facilitate education and support research in pediatric travel medicine to formulate evidence-based guidelines wherever they are currently missing. © 2014 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  14. Preparing for International Travel and Global Medical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadevan, Swaminatha V; Strehlow, Matthew C

    2017-05-01

    Thorough pretravel preparation and medical consultation can mitigate avoidable health and safety risks. A comprehensive pretravel medical consultation should include an individualized risk assessment, immunization review, and discussion of arthropod protective measures, malaria prophylaxis, traveler's diarrhea, and injury prevention. Travel with children and jet lag reduction require additional planning and prevention strategies; travel and evacuation insurance may prove essential when traveling to less resourced countries. Consideration should also be given to other high-risk travel scenarios, including the provision of health care overseas, adventure and extreme sports, water environments and diving, high altitude, and terrorism/unstable political situations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. International award received recognizing anti-HIV spermicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-10-19

    Until recently, the only topical microbicide being considered for protection against sexually transmitted HIV infection contains nonoxynol-9 (N-9), a detergent ingredient widely used for more than 30 years in the form of gels, foams, aerosols, creams, sponges, suppositories, films, and foaming tablets. While N-9 has both spermicidal and antibacterial/antiviral properties against pathogens responsible for STDs, including HIV, recent clinical studies have found it to be ineffective in protecting against HIV and other STDs. Moreover, N-9 disrupts cell membranes, damages cervicovaginal epithelia, and causes an acute tissue inflammatory response, thus enhancing the likelihood of HIV infection. There is therefore an urgent need for new, effective, safe, and easy-to-use microbicides with anti-HIV activity lacking detergent-type membrane toxicity. Dr. Osmond D'Cruz et al. of the Hughes Institute in St. Paul, Minnesota, have developed an anti-HIV spermicide with the potential of becoming the active ingredient in many beneficial products. Its lead compound is 400 times more potent than N-9 against HIV and at least 10 times more potent than N-9 as a spermicide. These dual-function compounds are non-inflammatory by their nature. Hughes et al.'s discovery is expected to enter human clinical trials within 12 months. A clinical paper describing their achievement won the prestigious Prize Paper Award for the Plenary Session of the Conjoint 16th World Congress on Fertility and Sterility at the 54th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Reproductive Medicine, held in San Francisco, California, during October 4-9, 1998.

  16. Sathasivan ("Saths") Cooper: Award for Distinguished Contributions to the International Advancement of Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    The Award for Distinguished Contributions to the International Advancement of Psychology is given to individuals who have made sustained and enduring contributions to international cooperation and the advancement of knowledge in psychology. The 2014 recipient is Sathasivan ("Saths") Cooper. Cooper is active in global cooperation in psychology for the public and the discipline's benefit so that psychology can truly serve all of humanity. The first psychologist from outside the West to lead the International Union of Psychological Science, he is the driving force behind the Pan-African Psychology Union and continues to ensure that less-developed psychology dispensations play meaningful roles in international psychology." Cooper's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  17. Risk factors for infections in international travelers: an analysis of travel-related notifiable communicable diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, Atar; Libassi, Lisa; Lloyd, Jennifer K; Benoliel, Eileen; Brucker, Rachel; Jones, Megan Q; Kwan-Gett, Tao Sheng; McKeirnan, Shelly; Pecha, Monica; Rietberg, Krista; Serafin, Lauri; Walkinshaw, Lina P; Duchin, Jeffrey S

    2014-01-01

    We sought to describe travel-related illness among our residents and gain insight into targeting pre-travel health advice to prevent travel-related illness. A supplemental travel questionnaire was developed and administered for cases with a legally notifiable communicable disease reported in 2011-2012, who spent at least part of their exposure period outside the United States. Among 451 cases meeting the eligibility criteria, 259 were interviewed. Forty four percent reported receiving pre-travel advice. Two-thirds adhered fully with risk behavior recommendations; 94% followed immunization recommendations partially or fully; and 84% adhered fully with malaria prophylaxis recommendations. The primary reasons for not obtaining pre-travel advice were being unaware of the need (47.5%), or believing they already knew what to do (34.5%). Adults (OR = 2.8, 95% CI = 1.4-5.5), males (OR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.1-3.0), those born outside the United States (OR = 2.0, 95% CI = 1.1-3.7), and those with planning time under two weeks (OR = 4.8, 95% CI = 1.5-15.9) or travel duration less than 7 days (OR = 7.9, 95% CI = 3.0-20.9) were more likely to travel without seeking pre-travel advice. The majority of cases reported not receiving pre-travel advice. Understanding the predictors of failure to receive pre-travel advice may help target public health prevention efforts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The Roles of the Supreme Court of the Republic Indonesia in Enforcement of International Arbitral Awards in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutiara Hikmah

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia has been being a member of the 1958 New York Convention since 1981, namely upon issuance of the Presidential Decree No. 34 of 1981. Prior to taking into force of the Regulation of the Supreme Court of the Republic of Indonesia No. 1 of 1990 on Procedures for Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral awards, there were still constraints for the foreign business players in term of enforcement of arbitral awards in Indonesia. The Supreme Court as the highest judicial institution in Indonesia holds that international arbitral awards can not be enforced in Indonesia. After the Indonesian Supreme Court has issued such a regulation, enforcement of international arbitral awards in Indonesia began to be enforceable, because the procedural law that governs the procedures for execution of arbitral awards has been clear. In order to regulate better the international arbitral award problems in the hierarchy of legislation, on October 12, 1999, the Law on Arbitration and Alternative Dispute Resolution was promulgated. In that Law, there is a special part discussing the International Arbitration. This study examines the development of international arbitral award enforcement in Indonesia before Indonesia becoming member of the 1958 New York Convention, until nowadays, by analyzing the international arbitral awards that were decided by the Supreme Court of the Republic of Indonesia after the coming into effect of the Arbitration Law.

  19. Research Award: Risk Management and Internal Audit (RMIA ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Jean-Claude Dumais

    2012-09-12

    Sep 12, 2012 ... management, internal control, and governance processes. RMIA encourages research proposals from applicants interested in a range of topics that may include: • examining current risk, control or governance issues facing organizations in developing countries;. • studying how financial and administrative ...

  20. Municipal Tender Awards and Internal Appeals by unsuccessful ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Regulations,2 enacted under the Local Government: Municipal Finance Management Act.3 It is argued that at present, internal appeal and dispute resolution processes do not afford unsuccessful bidders adequate protection. Keywords: Appeals; bid committee system; competitive bidding; Constitution; dispute resolution; ...

  1. Alan Guth and Andrei Linde win international cosmology award

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    "Leading theoretical cosmologists Alan Guth, Weisskopf Professor of Physics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Andrei Linde, Professor of Physics at Stanford University, who played prominent roles in developing and refining the theory of cosmic inflation, have been selected by an international panel of experts to receive the 2004 Cosmology Prize of the Peter Gruber Foundation" (1 page).

  2. 7 CFR 1486.501 - What is the rule on notifying field offices of international travel?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... international travel? 1486.501 Section 1486.501 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... EMERGING MARKETS PROGRAM Reporting, Evaluation, and Compliance § 1486.501 What is the rule on notifying field offices of international travel? The Recipient must advise the Agricultural Counselor(s) or...

  3. Patient awareness of need for hepatitis a vaccination (prophylaxis) before international travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Stephen J; Sharapov, Umid; Klevens, Monina

    2015-01-01

    Although hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection is preventable through vaccination, cases associated with international travel continue to occur. The purpose of this study was to examine the frequency of international travel and countries visited among persons infected with HAV and assess reasons why travelers had not received hepatitis A vaccine before traveling. Using data from sentinel surveillance for HAV infection in seven US counties during 1996 to 2006, we examined the role of international travel in hepatitis A incidence and the reasons for patients not being vaccinated. Of 2,002 hepatitis A patients for whom travel history was available, 300 (15%) reported traveling outside of the United States. Compared to non-travelers, travelers were more likely to be female [odds ratio (OR) = 1.74 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.35, 2.24)], aged 0 to 17 years [OR = 3.30 (1.83, 5.94)], Hispanic [OR = 3.69 (2.81, 4.86)], Asian [OR = 2.00 (1.06, 3.77)], and were less likely to be black non-Hispanic [OR = 0.30 (0.11, 0.82)]. The majority, 189 (61.6%), had traveled to Mexico. The most common reason for not getting pre-travel vaccination was "Didn't know I could [or should] get shots" [100/154 (65%)]. Low awareness of HAV vaccination was the predominant reason for not being protected before travel. Different modes of traveler education could improve prevention of hepatitis A. To highlight the risk of infection before traveling to endemic countries including Mexico, travel and consulate websites could list reminders of vaccine recommendations. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  4. The John D. Constable International Traveling Fellowship: A Reciprocal Education in Plastic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberlin, Kyle R; Del Frari, Barbara; Dai, Xinyi; Austen, William G

    2015-06-01

    The John D. Constable International Traveling Fellowship has been an integral part of the American Association of Plastic Surgeons since 2006 and has provided an opportunity for international plastic surgeons to work with leaders in American plastic surgery.

  5. Travelling

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    homes very soon becomes a misplaced sentiment. However well planned a journey may be and how- ever important and tiring the attendances at meet- ings are, at some stage of every day the traveller finds himself in an hotel room and loneliness starts closing in from all four walls. No matter how luxu- rious the hotel may ...

  6. A survey of the health experiences of international business travelers. Part One--Physiological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, H Lynn; Reilly, Sandra M

    2002-10-01

    Occupational health professionals need to know more about the health, worklife, and family life of international business travelers (IBTs). This descriptive correlational study, in two parts, examines the physiological and psychosocial experiences associated with business travel for a sample of 140 employees from western Canada's oil and gas industry. Results for Part One show that 76% of IBTs report travel related health problems, 74% have jet lag, 45% have travelers' diarrhea and gastrointestinal complaints, 12% to 16% have climate adaptation problems, and 2% report accidents and minor injuries. High risk behaviors include not carrying a first aid travel kit (54%); drinking more alcohol than ordinarily (21%); and neglecting food, water, and antimalarial precautions (6% to 14%). Other risk factors include age, length of stay, destination, pre-travel medical examinations, pre-travel advice, and eating and accommodation facilities. Findings show that IBTs are at risk for travel related physiological health problems. Implications for practitioners call for increased occupational health expertise in pre-travel preparation, follow up post-travel and regular health surveillance for employees who travel on international business.

  7. Characterizing International Travel Behavior from Geotagged Photos: A Case Study of Flickr.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yihong Yuan

    Full Text Available Recent advances in multimedia and mobile technologies have facilitated large volumes of travel photos to be created and shared online. Although previous studies have utilized geotagged photos to model travel patterns at individual locations, there is limited research on how these datasets can model international travel behavior and inter-country travel flows-a crucial indicator to quantify the interactions between countries in tourism economics. Realizing the necessity to investigate the potential of geotagged photos in tourism geography, this research investigates international travel patterns from two perspectives: 1 We apply a series of indicators (radius of gyration (ROG, number of countries visited, and entropy to measure the descriptive characteristics of international travel in different countries; 2 By constructing a gravity model of trade, we investigate how distance decay influences the magnitude of international travel flow between geographic entities, and whether (or how much the popularity of a given destination (defined as the percentage of tourist income in national gross domestic product (GDP affects travel choices in different countries. The results provide valuable input to various commercial applications such as individual travel planning and destination suggestions.

  8. Characterizing International Travel Behavior from Geotagged Photos: A Case Study of Flickr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yihong; Medel, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in multimedia and mobile technologies have facilitated large volumes of travel photos to be created and shared online. Although previous studies have utilized geotagged photos to model travel patterns at individual locations, there is limited research on how these datasets can model international travel behavior and inter-country travel flows-a crucial indicator to quantify the interactions between countries in tourism economics. Realizing the necessity to investigate the potential of geotagged photos in tourism geography, this research investigates international travel patterns from two perspectives: 1) We apply a series of indicators (radius of gyration (ROG), number of countries visited, and entropy) to measure the descriptive characteristics of international travel in different countries; 2) By constructing a gravity model of trade, we investigate how distance decay influences the magnitude of international travel flow between geographic entities, and whether (or how much) the popularity of a given destination (defined as the percentage of tourist income in national gross domestic product (GDP)) affects travel choices in different countries. The results provide valuable input to various commercial applications such as individual travel planning and destination suggestions.

  9. Characterizing International Travel Behavior from Geotagged Photos: A Case Study of Flickr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yihong; Medel, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in multimedia and mobile technologies have facilitated large volumes of travel photos to be created and shared online. Although previous studies have utilized geotagged photos to model travel patterns at individual locations, there is limited research on how these datasets can model international travel behavior and inter-country travel flows—a crucial indicator to quantify the interactions between countries in tourism economics. Realizing the necessity to investigate the potential of geotagged photos in tourism geography, this research investigates international travel patterns from two perspectives: 1) We apply a series of indicators (radius of gyration (ROG), number of countries visited, and entropy) to measure the descriptive characteristics of international travel in different countries; 2) By constructing a gravity model of trade, we investigate how distance decay influences the magnitude of international travel flow between geographic entities, and whether (or how much) the popularity of a given destination (defined as the percentage of tourist income in national gross domestic product (GDP)) affects travel choices in different countries. The results provide valuable input to various commercial applications such as individual travel planning and destination suggestions. PMID:27159195

  10. The 'selfie' phenomenon: reducing the risk of harm while using smartphones during international travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, Gerard T; Choi, Joonkoo

    2016-02-01

    Photography is an integral component of the international travel experience. Self-photography is becoming a mainstream behaviour in society and it has implications for the practice of travel medicine. Travellers who take selfies, including with the use of selfie sticks, may be subject to traumatic injuries associated with this activity. This review article is the first in the medical literature to address this emerging phenomenon. Articles indexed on PubMed and Scopus databases through 2015 were retrieved, using the search terms 'travel', combined with 'selfie', 'self-photography', 'smartphone', 'mobile phone' and 'social media'. The reference lists of articles were manually searched for additional publications, and published media reports of travel-related self-photography were examined. The lack of situational awareness and temporary distraction inherent in selfie-taking exposes the traveller to potential hazards. A diverse group of selfie injuries has been reported, including injury and death secondary to selfie-related falls, attacks from wild animals, electrocution, lightning strikes, trauma at sporting events, road traffic and pedestrian accidents. Public health measures adopted by the Russian Federation in response to over 100 reported selfie injuries in 2015 alone are presented. The review also discusses the potential for direct trauma from the use of selfie sticks. Travel-related scenarios where selfies should be avoided include photographs taken from a height, on a bridge, in the vicinity of vehicular traffic, during thunderstorms, at sporting events, and where wild animals are in the background. Recommendations exist which discourage use of mobile phones in drivers and pedestrians. The travel medicine practitioner should routinely counsel travellers about responsible self-photography during international travel and should include this advice in printed material given to the patient. The travel and mobile phone industries should reinforce these health

  11. Globalisation of Cultural Circuits. The Case of International Awards for Fiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bacanu Horea

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the international circuit of fictional texts from the last fifty years (perhaps even one hundred years, in some cases, several independent international organizations, academic and editorial platforms of critique and debate have been established. They have been organizing international contests, fine authorities of critical appreciation, evaluation and awarding of most prolific authors and most successful fictional texts: novels, short stories, stories or utopian and dystopian fictions. The allotment on cultural corridors, the geographical identification of both author and title dynamics which have been nominated at the most prestigious international awards for fiction demonstrates an increased emergence of several zones where wide international circulation texts were seldom, fifty years ago. In this paper, we suggest a reinterpretation and a comprehension of the political context from the contemporary fiction, by regrouping in one category, the three classical genres (historic novel, social novel, political novel and also the universal fiction which implies characters and relations of power. Thus, we create a category which is known as „political fiction”. The increased individualization of this literary macro-genre called „political fiction” is also a creative answer to the high speed of circulation and at the general international amplitude with which contemporary socio-political novels are distributed.

  12. Student Intern Freed Competes at Intel ISEF, Two Others Awarded at Local Science Fair | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Class of 2014–2015 Werner H. Kirsten (WHK) student intern Rebecca “Natasha” Freed earned a fourth-place award in biochemistry at the 2015 Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF), the largest high school science research competition in the world, according to the Society for Science & the Public’s website. Freed described the event as “transformative experience,” where she was able to present her research to “experts, including Nobel laureates, as well as members of the general community and, of course, to [other students].”

  13. Incorporating Emotional Intelligence Competency Building into the Preparation and Delivery of International Travel Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornstein, Suzyn; Nelson, Teresa

    2006-01-01

    As increasing numbers of students participate in international travel courses as part of their collegiate business curriculum, there has been a corresponding rise in academic discussion about how institutions and trip leaders can best prepare for, and manage, the travel experience. While the study of history, politics, and economics of the region…

  14. Educating international students about tuberculosis and infections associated with travel to visit friends and relatives (VFR-travel).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibney, Katherine B; Brass, Amanda; Hume, Sam C; Leder, Karin

    2014-01-01

    International students in Victoria, Australia, originate from over 140 different countries. They are over-represented in disease notifications for tuberculosis and travel-associated infections, including enteric fever, hepatitis A, and malaria. We describe a public health initiative aimed to increase awareness of these illnesses among international students and their support staff. We identified key agencies including student support advisors, medical practitioners, health insurers, and government and professional organisations. We developed health education materials targeting international students regarding tuberculosis and travel-related infections to be disseminated via a number of different media, including electronic and printed materials. We sought informal feedback from personnel in all interested agencies regarding the materials developed, their willingness to deliver these materials to international students, and their preferred media for disseminating these materials. Education institutions with dedicated international student support staff and on-campus health clinics were more easily engaged to provide feedback and disseminate the health education materials than institutions without such dedicated personnel. Response to contacting off-campus medical practices was poor. Delivery of educational materials via electronic and social media was preferred over face-to-face education. It is feasible to provide health education messages targeting international students for dissemination via appropriately-staffed educational institutions. This initiative could be expanded in terms of age-group, geographic range, and health issues to be targeted. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. En route: Transport and embodiment in international medical travel journeys between Indonesia and Malaysia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ormond, M.E.

    2015-01-01

    International medical travel is increasingly big business. Using Indonesian patient-consumers’transport experiences in the pursuit of private medical care in Malaysia, this paper explores howtransport operators and infrastructure are responding and adjusting to the embodied specificities of the

  16. Complicating common ideas about medical tourism: gender, class, and globality in Yemenis' international medical travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangas, Beth

    2011-01-01

    Three cases of international medical travelers from Yemen, a capital‐poor country in the southwest corner of the Arabian Peninsula, help to counter misconceptions within discussions of medical tourism. These misconceptions include the suggestion of leisure in medical tourism, the role of gender and class, and the ease with which we dismiss the health concerns of wealthy individuals. Instead, this article proposes, we should uncover commonalities and differences within international medical travel while avoiding slipping into generalities and stereotypical portrayals.

  17. Knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding travel health among Muscat International Airport travelers in Oman: Identifying the gaps and addressing the challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Abri, Seif S; Abdel-Hady, Doaa M; Al-Abaidani, Idris S

    2016-06-01

    Although the majority of travel-associated communicable diseases can be prevented, the public health burden of these diseases remains significant. Relatively little is known about how travelers know and perceive the health risks associated with travel and how they utilize preventive measures before and while traveling abroad. This study was conducted to determine the level of the knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) of Muscat International Airport travelers about travel health in order to assess the knowledge gap and the need for travel health services in Oman. A cross-sectional study was conducted over a period of 1week using a self-administered questionnaire. The overall level of knowledge about vaccine-preventable diseases, food safety, and preventive measures against insect bites of the participants was inadequate. The practice concerning preventive travel health measures, such as the use of specific immunizations and antimalarial prophylaxis, was very limited, and influenced by some personal and travel-related factors. The inadequate level of travelers' knowledge and poor utilization of travel medicine services highlights the need for the provisions of specialized travel medicine services at the national level and to develop educational materials promoting the importance of pre-travel health advice. Copyright © 2016 Ministry of Health, Saudi Arabia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. International travel and acquisition of multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassing, Robert Jan; Alsma, Jelmer; Arcilla, Maris S; van Genderen, Perry J; Stricker, Bruno H; Verbon, Annelies

    2015-01-01

    International travel is considered to be an important risk factor for acquisition of multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (MRE). The aim of this systematic review was to determine the effect of international travel on the risk of post-travel faecal carriage of MRE. Secondary outcomes were risk factors for acquisition of MRE. A systematic search for relevant literature in seven international databases was conducted according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Articles needed to report on (i) foreign travel, (ii) screening of asymptomatic participants, (iii) antimicrobial susceptibility data and (iv) faecal Enterobacteriaceae carriage. Two researchers independently screened the abstracts, assessed the full article texts for eligibility and selected or rejected them for inclusion in the systematic review. In case of disagreement, a third researcher decided on inclusion. Eleven studies were identified. In all studies, a high prevalence (>20%) of carriage of MRE after international travel was found. The highest prevalence was observed in travellers returning from southern Asia. Foreign travel was associated with an increased risk of carriage of MRE. Further research is needed to assess if this leads to an increase in the number of infections with MRE. Systematic review registration number: PROSPERO CRD42015024973.

  19. International Travel by Speakers of Esperanto. Esperanto Documents, New Series, No. 9A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyblewski, Tyburcjusz

    This volume considers the value of Esperanto in relation to international tourism, and the characteristics of Esperantist tourists. Esperanto is seen as a solution to problems of language in international relations in general, and thus to international travel as well. The following are some of the general characteristics of the majority of…

  20. International recognition for ageing research: John Scott Award-2014 to Leonard Hayflick and Paul Moorhead

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rattan, Suresh

    2014-01-01

    It is with great pleasure and pride that we share the news of the award of the 2014 “City of Philadelphia John Scott Award”, to Dr. Leonard Hayflick and Dr. Paul Moorhead, for their research on ageing. The press release announcing the award states that: “from the first awarded in 1822, the Award...

  1. Knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding travel health among Muscat International Airport travelers in Oman: Identifying the gaps and addressing the challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seif S. Al-Abri

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Although the majority of travel-associated communicable diseases can be prevented, the public health burden of these diseases remains significant. Relatively little is known about how travelers know and perceive the health risks associated with travel and how they utilize preventive measures before and while traveling abroad. This study was conducted to determine the level of the knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP of Muscat International Airport travelers about travel health in order to assess the knowledge gap and the need for travel health services in Oman. A cross-sectional study was conducted over a period of 1 week using a self-administered questionnaire. The overall level of knowledge about vaccine-preventable diseases, food safety, and preventive measures against insect bites of the participants was inadequate. The practice concerning preventive travel health measures, such as the use of specific immunizations and antimalarial prophylaxis, was very limited, and influenced by some personal and travel-related factors. The inadequate level of travelers’ knowledge and poor utilization of travel medicine services highlights the need for the provisions of specialized travel medicine services at the national level and to develop educational materials promoting the importance of pre-travel health advice.

  2. Health problems associated with international business travel. A critical review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, H L; Reilly, S M

    2000-08-01

    1. Few studies examine the travel related health problems of international business travelers (IBTs). Research exists for other travelers, such as tourists, which begins to help clinicians understand the potential health problems faced by IBTs. 2. A review of the literature reveals 36% to 54% of travelers experience physical health problems such as traveler's diarrhea, insomnia, respiratory problems, and skin problems; 6% to 18% report accidents and injuries while abroad. 3. Psychosocial data are equally limited, but support the idea that IBTs may experience stress, anxiety, culture shock, and adjustment problems while overseas. 4. Multiple factors likely contribute to the physical and psychosocial health experiences of IBTs. The historical lack of data for this population of workers combined with the trend towards globalization confirm the need for further study from an occupational health perspective.

  3. An Analysis of the Relationship between Land Use and Weekend Travel: Focusing on the Internal Capture of Trips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Hyoung Tommy Gim

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Weekend travel has not been duly considered in academics and practice regarding its relationship with land use. A lack of consideration is notable in terms of how land use internalizes weekend travel. Thus, by separating the internal and external travel of the traffic analysis zone, this study analyzes the land use effect on weekend travel in comparison with that on weekday travel. Two structural equation models, each of which is specified for weekday and weekend travel, construct the same sample and their results become comparable. At the travel variable level, the models find consistent results: Stronger effects are made on internal travel than on external travel and particularly, on trip frequency than on travel time. This implies that compact land use causes a stronger addition of internal trips and a less strong reduction of external trips, that is, changes in destinations rather than in total travel time. At the factor level, unlike the weekday model in which the sociodemographic factor exerts a stronger effect, the weekend model presents that land use more strongly affects travel patterns. This magnitude difference is explained by the different flexibility of compulsory weekday travel and discretionary weekend travel in relation to the choice of trip destination and frequency.

  4. International travelers and unintentional fatal drowning in Australia--a 10 year review 2002-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peden, Amy E; Franklin, Richard C; Leggat, Peter A

    2016-02-01

    . Drowning deaths of travelers are commonly reported in the media, creating a perception that they are at a higher risk of drowning than residents. This may be true, due in part to unfamiliarity with the risks posed by the hazard, however there is limited information about drowning deaths of travelers in Australia. This study aims to identify the incidence of drowning among international travelers in Australia and examine the risk factors to inform prevention strategies. . Data on unintentional fatal drowning in Australian waterways of victims with a residential postcode from outside Australia were extracted from the Royal Life Saving Society-Australia National Fatal Drowning Database. . Between 1 July 2002 and 30 June 2012 drowning deaths among people known to be international travelers accounted for 4.3% (N = 123) of the 2870 drowning deaths reported in Australian waterways. Key locations for drowning deaths included beaches (39.0%), ocean/harbour (22.0%) and swimming pools (12.2%). Leading activities prior to drowning included swimming (52.0%), diving (17.9%) and watercraft incidents (13.0%). . International travelers pose a unique challenge from a drowning prevention perspective. The ability to exchange information on water safety is complicated due to potential language barriers, possible differences in swimming ability, different attitudes to safety in the traveler's home country and culture, a lack of opportunities to discuss safety, a relaxed attitude to safety which may result in an increase in risk taking behaviour and alcohol consumption. . Prevention is vital both to reduce loss of life in the aquatic environment and promote Australia as a safe and enjoyable holiday destination for international travelers. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Preventing malaria in international travellers: an evaluation of published English-language guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliner, Merav; Poole, Kristina; Sinclair, David; Garner, Paul

    2014-11-03

    People intending to travel may seek information on malaria prevention from a range of sources. To ensure the best protection, this information needs to be reliable, up-to-date, consistent, and useful to their decision making. This study appraises current international and national guidelines written in English for malaria prevention in travellers, and whether any recommendations conflict. We systematically identified national or international English-language guidelines on malaria prevention in travellers to July 2013 using standard and multiple searching methods. We critically appraised guidelines using the AGREE II tool, and report inconsistent recommendations within guidelines. We identified five sets of English-language guidelines on preventing malaria for travellers. Assessment against AGREE II indicate that all of the guidelines fall short of internationally accepted standards in guideline development: none include a transparent description of methods; only one describes sources of funding or potential conflicts of interest; and only one includes formal presentation of the evidence alongside transparent assessment of the quality of that evidence. There were a number of important discrepancies between guidelines, and some omit information about effectiveness, safety and adverse effects of chemoprophylaxis options. The methods used for developing guidelines for malaria prevention in travellers lags behind current internationally recognized standards. Healthcare professionals as well as travellers themselves could be better informed if guidelines were more systematic and transparent summaries of the current knowledge on drug interventions in relation to effects, safety, administration and contra-indications.

  6. Vaccine preventable diseases in returned international travelers: results from the GeoSentinel Surveillance Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggild, Andrea K; Castelli, Francesco; Gautret, Philippe; Torresi, Joseph; von Sonnenburg, Frank; Barnett, Elizabeth D; Greenaway, Christina A; Lim, Poh-Lian; Schwartz, Eli; Wilder-Smith, Annelies; Wilson, Mary E

    2010-10-28

    Vaccine preventable diseases (VPDs) threaten international travelers, but little is known about their epidemiology in this group. We analyzed records of 37,542 ill returned travelers entered into the GeoSentinel Surveillance Network database. Among 580 (1.5%) with VPDs, common diagnoses included enteric fever (n=276), acute viral hepatitis (n=148), and influenza (n=70). Factors associated with S. typhi included VFR travel (pBusiness travel was associated with influenza (p<0.001), and longer travel with hepatitis A virus (p=0.02). 29% of those with VPDs had pre-travel consultations. At least 55% of those with VPDs were managed as inpatients, compared to 9.5% of those with non-VPDs. Three deaths occurred; one each due to pneumococcal meningitis, S. typhi, and rabies. VPDs are significant contributors to morbidity and potential mortality in travelers. High rates of hospitalization make them an attractive target for pre-travel intervention. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Support for U.S. Participants at the 16th International Congress on Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachs, Israel E. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States)

    2017-01-17

    The enclosed report highlights the travel grant awarded to offset the cost of foreign travel of several faculty and students to attend the 16th International Congress on Catalysis (ICC) held in Beijing, China, July 3-8, 2016.

  8. Migration, relationship capital and international travel : theory and evidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCann, Philip; Poot, Jacques; Sanderson, Lynda

    In this article we consider how international migration is related to the frequency and duration of trips to the home country. For many migrants, international migration triggers a series of trips to visit the home country that allow for a replenishment of the depleted relationship capital with

  9. Changing Attitudes Toward Care of Aging Parents: The Influence of Education, International Travel, and Gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compernolle, Ellen

    Population aging is a key public health issue facing many nations, and is particularly pronounced in many Asian countries. At the same time, attitudes toward filial obligation are also rapidly changing, with a decreasing sense that children are responsible for caring for elderly parents. This investigation blends the family versus nonfamily mode of social organization framework with a life course perspective to provide insight into the processes of ideational change regarding filial responsibility, highlighting the influence of education and international travel. Using data from a longitudinal study in Nepal-the Chitwan Valley Family Study-results demonstrate that education and international travel are associated with a decrease in attitudes toward filial obligation. However, findings further reveal that the impact of education and international travel vary both across the life course and by gender.

  10. Providing travel health care--the nurses' role: an international comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Irmgard; Hall, Sheila; Sato, Nahoko

    2013-01-01

    In many countries, the responsibility for travel health lies with medical practitioners who delegate certain tasks to nursing staff. Elsewhere, nurses have taken a leading role and work independently in private or hospital-based clinics, occupational health departments and general practices. The purpose of this study was to examine the roles and challenges faced by nurses providing travel health care in Australia, Japan and the UK, and to compare educational and professional needs. Nurses involved in travel health care were invited to complete an online questionnaire with multiple choice, open-ended, and Likert Scale questions. SurveyMonkey's statistical facilities analysed quantitative data; thematic content analysis was applied to qualitative responses. Differences and similarities between the three countries were conveyed by 474 participants focusing on current positions, work arrangements, and educational and practical concerns. Clinical practice issues, including vaccination and medication regulations, were highlighted with the differences between countries explained by the respective history of travel health care development and the involvement within their nursing profession. The call for more educational opportunities, including more support from employers, and a refinement of the role as travel health nurse appears to be international. Nurses require support networks within the field, and the development of a specialist "travel health nurse" would give a stronger voice to their concerns and needs for specific education and training in travel health care. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Internal travel and risk of dengue transmission in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo E. Chaparro

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Human behavior plays a key role in the dynamics of dengue transmission. However, research on the relationship between human movement and dengue transmission within endemic countries is limited. From January 2008 to December 2011, the authors of this study conducted a retrospective analysis of imported dengue infections in Bogotá, Colombia. Bogotá is a vector-transmission-free city that is also the capital district and most populated municipality in Colombia. The study revealed that 1 Bogotá inhabitants acquired dengue infection in diverse localities throughout the country but the largest proportion of cases (35.6% were contracted at popular tourist destinations in dengue-endemic areas near Bogotá (<200-km radius from city limits, and 2 the number of imported dengue cases increased after major holidays, a transmission pattern not seen in dengue-endemic areas, where disease incidence correlates with rainy periods. It is therefore recommended that physicians consider the effect of travel when diagnosing their patients' illnesses, especially outside dengue-endemic areas where diagnosis of the disease can be challenging due to its nonspecific symptoms. The study also showed that analysis of dengue cases imported to regions free of vector transmission can generate an evidence-based model for characterizing the impact of human movement on the spread of diseases like dengue in countries where they are endemic.

  12. Travel Characteristics and Pretravel Health Care Among Pregnant or Breastfeeding U.S. Women Preparing for International Travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagmann, Stefan H F; Rao, Sowmya R; LaRocque, Regina C; Erskine, Stefanie; Jentes, Emily S; Walker, Allison T; Barnett, Elizabeth D; Chen, Lin H; Hamer, Davidson H; Ryan, Edward T

    2017-12-01

    To study characteristics and preventive interventions of adult pregnant and breastfeeding travelers seeking pretravel health care in the United States. This cross-sectional study analyzed data (2009-2014) of pregnant and breastfeeding travelers seen at U.S. travel clinics participating in Global TravEpiNet. Nonpregnant, nonbreastfeeding adult female travelers of childbearing age were used for comparison. We evaluated the prescription of malaria chemoprophylaxis and antibiotics for this population as well as the administration of three travel-related vaccines: hepatitis A, typhoid, and yellow fever. We also evaluated use of tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid, and acellular pertussis and influenza vaccines, because these are widely recommended in pregnancy. Of 21,138 female travelers of childbearing age in Global TravEpiNet, 170 (0.8%) were pregnant and 139 (0.7%) were breastfeeding. Many traveled to destinations endemic for mosquito-borne illnesses, including malaria (pregnant: 95%; breastfeeding: 94%), dengue (pregnant: 87%; breastfeeding: 81%), or yellow fever (pregnant: 35%; breastfeeding: 50%). Compared with nonpregnant, nonbreastfeeding adult female travelers, eligible pregnant travelers were less likely to be vaccinated against hepatitis A (28% compared with 51%, Ptravelers did not receive influenza vaccination. Yellow fever vaccine was occasionally provided to pregnant and breastfeeding travelers traveling to countries entirely endemic for yellow fever (6 [20%] of 30 pregnant travelers and 18 [46%] of 39 breastfeeding travelers). Half of pregnant travelers and two thirds of breastfeeding travelers preparing to travel to malaria-holoendemic countries received a prescription for malaria prophylaxis. Most pregnant and breastfeeding travelers seen for pretravel health consultations traveled to destinations with high risk for vector-borne or other travel-related diseases. Destination-specific preventive interventions were frequently underused.

  13. Solidarity by demand? Exit and voice in international medical travel - the case of Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormond, Meghann

    2015-01-01

    Globally, more patients are intentionally travelling abroad as consumers for medical care. However, while scholars have begun to examine international medical travel's (IMT) impacts on the people and places that receive medical travellers, study of its impacts on medical travellers' home contexts has been negligible and largely speculative. While proponents praise IMT's potential to make home health systems more responsive to the needs of market-savvy healthcare consumers, critics identify it as a way to further de-politicise the satisfaction of healthcare needs. This article draws from work on political consumerism, health advocacy and social movements to argue for a reframing of IMT not as a 'one-off' statement about or an event external to struggles over access, rights and recognition within medical travellers' home health systems but rather as one of a range of critical forms of on-going engagement embedded within these struggles. To do this, the limited extant empirical work addressing domestic impacts of IMT is reviewed and a case study of Indonesian medical travel to Malaysia is presented. The case study material draws from 85 interviews undertaken in 2007-08 and 2012 with Indonesian and Malaysian respondents involved in IMT as care recipients, formal and informal care-providers, intermediaries, promoters and policy-makers. Evidence from the review and case study suggests that IMT may effect political and social change within medical travellers' home contexts at micro and macro levels by altering the perspectives, habits, expectations and accountability of, and complicity among, medical travellers, their families, communities, formal and informal intermediaries, and medical providers both within and beyond the container of the nation-state. Impacts are conditioned by the ideological foundations underpinning home political and social systems, the status of a medical traveller's ailment or therapy, and the existence of organised support for recognition and

  14. International recognition for ageing research: John Scott Award-2014 to Leonard Hayflick and Paul Moorhead

    OpenAIRE

    Rattan, Suresh

    2014-01-01

    It is with great pleasure and pride that we share the news of the award of the 2014 “City of Philadelphia John Scott Award”, to Dr. Leonard Hayflick and Dr. Paul Moorhead, for their research on ageing. The press release announcing the award states that: “from the first awarded in 1822, the Award is the oldest scientific award in the United States and, as a legacy to Benjamin Franklin, they are in the historic company of past winners who include Marie Curie, Thomas Edison, Jonas Salk, Irving L...

  15. Travelers' knowledge, attitudes and practices on the prevention of infectious diseases: results from a study at Johannesburg International Airport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toovey, Stephen; Jamieson, Andrew; Holloway, Michele

    2004-01-01

    Although Johannesburg International Airport (JIA) acts as a hub for travel into Africa, little was known of the knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) with respect to infectious disease prevention of departing travelers. The study was conducted among departing passengers at JIA from August to October 2003. Travelers aged at least 18 years, resident in non-malarious developed countries and departing from JIA for risk destinations, were given either a malaria (Q-mal, n=219) or vaccine-preventable disease (Q-vac, n=200) questionnaire. European Travel Health Advisory Board traveler KAP questionnaires were used. African destinations accounted for 99% of the total. Traveler mean age was 42 years, with 30% aged 50 years or above. Leisure (42%) and business (37%) were the commonest travel reasons; 8% of subjects were visiting friends or relatives. Forty-six per cent of travelers prepared for their trip at least 1 month in advance; 86% had sought pre-travel health advice, with travel clinics and the Internet being rated highest by travelers for quality of advice. World Health Organization immunization guidelines were followed poorly: only 37% and 27%, respectively, of travelers had demonstrable proof of protection against hepatitis A and B, with 40% of all Q-vac travelers unable to produce a vaccination certificate. Of travelers to yellow fever- endemic countries, 76% were able to produce a valid vaccination certificate; 22% of travelers to countries not endemic for yellow fever had nevertheless been specifically immunized against yellow fever for their journeys. Forty-nine per cent of Q-mal travelers carried either no or inappropriate antimalarials. Considerable deficiencies in KAP were documented with regard to travel vaccinations and malaria protection in travelers departing JIA. Improved vaccine uptake and antimalarial prescribing are required for travelers to Africa.

  16. 76 FR 55954 - Astralis Ltd., Cavit Sciences, Inc., Crystal International Travel Group, Inc., and Tasker...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Astralis Ltd., Cavit Sciences, Inc., Crystal International Travel Group, Inc., and Tasker Products... securities of Cavit Sciences, Inc. because it has not filed any periodic reports since the period ended...

  17. International Education Travel and Youth of Color: College Is Too Late!

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLellan, Carlton E.

    2011-01-01

    Drawing on literature analyzing impacts of academic and professional early preparation programs for urban students, and particularly those of color, this article argues for the use of similar strategies to encourage and prepare youth from those backgrounds for international education travel. The central argument is that educators must focus more…

  18. Investigating Graduate Business Students' Perceptions of the Educational Value Provided by an International Travel Course Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finley, Jane B.; Taylor, Susan Lee; Warren, D. Lee

    2007-01-01

    Researchers agree that students' critical thinking and decision making skills are enhanced through exposure to new cultures and global markets. Thus, one way of bringing about improvement in these areas is through international travel courses. The purpose of this study is threefold. One, to describe the process involved in the creation of a…

  19. International travel of Korean children and Dengue fever: A single institutional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Soo Han; Kim, Yae Jean; Shin, Ji Hun; Yoo, Keon Hee; Sung, Ki Woong; Koo, Hong Hoe

    2010-06-01

    Dengue fever occurs in many popular tourist destinations and is increasingly imported by returning travelers in Korea. Since Korea is not an endemic country for dengue fever, pediatricians do not usually suspect dengue fever in febrile children even with typical presentation and exposure history. This study was performed to describe the international travel experiences and dengue fever in Korean children. Travel histories were collected based on questionnaires completed by all patients' guardians who visited the pediatric infectious diseases clinic at Samsung Medical Center from January 2008 to December 2008. For patients who were suspected of dengue fever, a serological test was performed. Five hundred and seventeen children visited the pediatric infectious diseases clinic for the first time during this period. About 30% of patients who responded to the questionnaire (101/339) had experienced international travel within the last 2 years. Four patients were diagnosed with dengue fever by serological test. Increasing numbers of Korean children visit dengue endemic areas and they may return home with dengue fever. Dengue fever should be suspected in patients who have a travel history to endemic areas.

  20. Valuation of travel time for international long-distance travel - results from the Fehmarn Belt stated choice experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mabit, Stefan Lindhard; Rich, Jeppe; Burge, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The geographical scope of travel varies from short distances in urban areas to long distances across cities and countries. While urban travel has been widely analysed in the literature, travel over longer distances and particularly across countries, has received much less attention. While this ma...

  1. 7 CFR 3402.6 - Overview of the special international study and/or thesis/dissertation research travel allowance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... thesis/dissertation research travel allowance. 3402.6 Section 3402.6 Agriculture Regulations of the... GRANTS PROGRAM Program Description § 3402.6 Overview of the special international study and/or thesis... special international study or thesis/dissertation research travel allowance, the Project Director must...

  2. Extended spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in international travelers and non-travelers in New York City.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott A Weisenberg

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We performed this study 1 to determine the prevalence of community-associated extended spectrum beta-lactamase producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBLPE colonization and infection in New York City (NYC; 2 to determine the prevalence of newly-acquired ESBLPE during travel; 3 to look for similarities in contemporaneous hospital-associated bloodstream ESBLPE and travel-associated ESBLPE. METHODS: Subjects were recruited from a travel medicine practice and consented to submit pre- and post-travel stools, which were assessed for the presence of ESBLPE. Pre-travel stools and stools submitted for culture were used to estimate the prevalence of community-associated ESBLPE. The prevalence of ESBLPE-associated urinary tract infections was calculated from available retrospective data. Hospital-associated ESBLPE were acquired from saved bloodstream isolates. All ESBLPE underwent multilocus sequence typing (MLST and ESBL characterization. RESULTS: One of 60 (1.7% pre- or non-travel associated stool was colonized with ESBLPE. Among community-associated urine specimens, 1.3% of Escherichia coli and 1.4% of Klebsiella pneumoniae were identified as ESBLPE. Seven of 28 travelers (25.0% acquired a new ESBLPE during travel. No similarities were found between travel-associated ESBLPE and hospital-associated ESBLPE. A range of imported ESBL genes were found, including CTX-M-14 and CTX-15. CONCLUSION: ESBL colonization and infection were relatively low during the study period in NYC. A significant minority of travelers acquired new ESBLPE during travel.

  3. Assessment of the potential for international dissemination of Ebola virus via commercial air travel during the 2014 west African outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogoch, Isaac I; Creatore, Maria I; Cetron, Martin S; Brownstein, John S; Pesik, Nicki; Miniota, Jennifer; Tam, Theresa; Hu, Wei; Nicolucci, Adriano; Ahmed, Saad; Yoon, James W; Berry, Isha; Hay, Simon I; Anema, Aranka; Tatem, Andrew J; MacFadden, Derek; German, Matthew; Khan, Kamran

    2015-01-03

    The WHO declared the 2014 west African Ebola epidemic a public health emergency of international concern in view of its potential for further international spread. Decision makers worldwide are in need of empirical data to inform and implement emergency response measures. Our aim was to assess the potential for Ebola virus to spread across international borders via commercial air travel and assess the relative efficiency of exit versus entry screening of travellers at commercial airports. We analysed International Air Transport Association data for worldwide flight schedules between Sept 1, 2014, and Dec 31, 2014, and historic traveller flight itinerary data from 2013 to describe expected global population movements via commercial air travel out of Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone. Coupled with Ebola virus surveillance data, we modelled the expected number of internationally exported Ebola virus infections, the potential effect of air travel restrictions, and the efficiency of airport-based traveller screening at international ports of entry and exit. We deemed individuals initiating travel from any domestic or international airport within these three countries to have possible exposure to Ebola virus. We deemed all other travellers to have no significant risk of exposure to Ebola virus. Based on epidemic conditions and international flight restrictions to and from Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone as of Sept 1, 2014 (reductions in passenger seats by 51% for Liberia, 66% for Guinea, and 85% for Sierra Leone), our model projects 2.8 travellers infected with Ebola virus departing the above three countries via commercial flights, on average, every month. 91,547 (64%) of all air travellers departing Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone had expected destinations in low-income and lower-middle-income countries. Screening international travellers departing three airports would enable health assessments of all travellers at highest risk of exposure to Ebola virus infection

  4. International travelers with infectious diseases determined by pathology results, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - United States, 1995-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelo, Kristina M; Barbre, Kira; Shieh, Wun-Ju; Kozarsky, Phyllis E; Blau, Dianna M; Sotir, Mark J; Zaki, Sherif R

    2017-09-01

    The failure to consider travel-related diagnoses, the lack of diagnostic capacity for specialized laboratory testing, and the declining number of autopsies may affect the diagnosis and management of travel-related infections. Pre- and post-mortem pathology can help determine causes of illness and death in international travelers. We conducted a retrospective review of biopsy and autopsy specimens sent to the Infectious Diseases Pathology Branch laboratory (IDPBL) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for diagnostic testing from 1995 through 2015. Cases were included if the specimen submitted for diagnosis was from a traveler with prior international travel during the disease incubation period and the cause of illness or death was unknown at the time of specimen submission. Twenty-one travelers, six (29%) with biopsy specimens and 15 (71%) with autopsy specimens, met the inclusion criteria. Among the 15 travelers who underwent autopsies, the most common diagnoses were protozoal infections (7 travelers; 47%), including five malaria cases, followed by viral infections (6 travelers; 40%). Biopsy or autopsy specimens can assist in diagnosing infectious diseases in travelers, especially from pathogens not endemic in the U.S. CDC's IDPBL provides a useful resource for clinicians considering infectious diseases in returned travelers. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Has the economic crisis led to a new risk profile for international travellers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roure, S; Pérez-Quílez, O; Vallès, X; Martínez-Cuevas, O; Sabrià, M; Valerio, L

    2015-11-01

    The economic world crisis has led to the migration of European workers to developing countries with a high incidence of infectious diseases. The objective of this study was to assess whether this context has produced an increase in the risks to international travellers for work reasons (TWR). Observational, retrospective study. The study population included TWR who were attended before travelling at an International Health Unit in the year 2007 (the year before the initiation of the European crisis) and in the year 2012 (when the structural crisis was established). A comparative socioeconomic analysis was performed as well as an analysis of the risk factors present in both groups. In 2007 and 2012 a total of 9,197 travellers were attended. Of these, there were 344 TWR (3.4%); 101 TWR (2.8%) in 2007 and 243 TWR (4.5%) in 2012 (p<0.001). The average age of the travellers was 38.1 years (SD: 10.57). The most common destination was Sub-Saharan Africa, in 164 (47.6%) of the cases. Malaria chemoprophylaxis was prescribed to 152 travellers (44%) and 80 presented comorbidity (23.25%). The TWR from 2012 presented a significantly greater age (p=0.05), more comorbidity (p=0.018) and a greater proportion of stays in rural areas (p=0.0009) for longer time periods (p=0.001). At 5 years from the start of the economic crisis, there was a change in the profile of TWR. Their number has increased significantly, as has the proportion who present risk factors for contracting imported diseases. The International Health Units should adapt to these new circumstances and adopt preventive measures for this population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  6. International travel increase and malaria importation in Romania, 2008-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neghina, Raul; Neghina, Adriana M; Marincu, Iosif; Iacobiciu, Ioan

    2011-09-01

    This report aims to assess the epidemiological characteristics of imported malaria in Romania in the context of international travel increase, and to compare them with the data reported by other European countries. Data on malaria cases were provided by the National Centre for Surveillance and Control of the Communicable Disease, whereas the data regarding international travels to and from Romania were retrieved from the Romanian Statistical Yearbook. The number of Romanian citizens who traveled to Africa in 2007 increased by over 600% as compared to the previous year. During the years 2008-2009, 25 cases of imported malaria were registered in Romania, with no fatalities. All patients were male and most of them (84%) acquired the infection in Africa. Plasmodium falciparum was involved in 68% of cases. The majority of the affected patients (41%) were aged 31 to 40 years. Labor was the main reason for traveling (72%), and 92% of cases took either partial or no chemoprophylaxis. The continuous growth of professional and leisure voyages to malaria-endemic regions may lead to a dramatic increase of imported cases, especially if prophylactic measures are not strictly followed.

  7. International perspective on nanotechnology papers, patents, and NSF awards (2000-2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongyi; Jiang, Shan; Chen, Hsinchun; Roco, Mihail C.

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents the development of nanotechnology between 2000 and 2016 as reflected in the Web of Science papers, United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), World International Property Organization (WIPO) patents, and National Science Foundation (NSF) awards, with a special reference to the United States (US), European Union (EU27), P.R. China, Japan, and South Korea. The field of nanotechnology is branching out into novel scientific and technology platforms, and it is increasingly difficult to separate foundational nanoscale components from divergent application areas. The average global growth rate has been sustained at about 15% for both papers and patents in the selected interval. The growth rates among regions are non-uniform. P.R. China and South Korea have increased faster in both the numbers and quality of their scientific publications, and currently P.R. China has the largest volume of nanotechnology publications and South Korea the most publications per capita in the field of nanotechnology. The US, EU27, and Japan are maintaining leadership in the upstream, better cited, conceptual components of nanotechnology research and development.

  8. Valuation of travel time for international long-distance travel - results from the Fehmarn Belt stated choice experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mabit, Stefan Lindhard; Rich, Jeppe; Burge, Peter

    2013-01-01

    significant interactions among travel cost and time, and journey characteristics, such as distance and duration. This had direct impact on the VTTS, which was shown to decrease with distance and duration. Thirdly, we found that air travel implies a higher average VTTS, which is to be expected but rarely...

  9. Effects of simulated domestic and international air travel on sleep, performance, and recovery for team sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, P; Duffield, R; Vaile, J

    2015-06-01

    The present study examined effects of simulated air travel on physical performance. In a randomized crossover design, 10 physically active males completed a simulated 5-h domestic flight (DOM), 24-h simulated international travel (INT), and a control trial (CON). The mild hypoxia, seating arrangements, and activity levels typically encountered during air travel were simulated in a normobaric, hypoxic altitude room. Physical performance was assessed in the afternoon of the day before (D - 1 PM) and in the morning (D + 1 AM) and afternoon (D + 1 PM) of the day following each trial. Mood states and physiological and perceptual responses to exercise were also examined at these time points, while sleep quantity and quality were monitored throughout each condition. Sleep quantity and quality were significantly reduced during INT compared with CON and DOM (P  0.05). Compared with baseline, physiological and perceptual responses to exercise, and mood states were exacerbated following the INT trial (P sleep disruption during travel and the subsequent exacerbated physiological and perceptual markers of fatigue. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Acute muscular sarcocystosis: an international investigation among ill travelers returning from Tioman Island, Malaysia, 2011-2012

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esposito, Douglas H.; Stich, August; Epelboin, Loïc; Malvy, Denis; Han, Pauline V.; Bottieau, Emmanuel; da Silva, Alexandre; Zanger, Philipp; Slesak, Günther; van Genderen, Perry J. J.; Rosenthal, Benjamin M.; Cramer, Jakob P.; Visser, Leo G.; Muñoz, José; Drew, Clifton P.; Goldsmith, Cynthia S.; Steiner, Florian; Wagner, Noémie; Grobusch, Martin P.; Plier, D. Adam; Tappe, Dennis; Sotir, Mark J.; Brown, Clive; Brunette, Gary W.; Fayer, Ronald; von Sonnenburg, Frank; Neumayr, Andreas; Kozarsky, Phyllis E.; van den Enden, Erwin; van Esbroeck, Marjan; Ghesquiere, Wayne; Nguyen, Duc; Receveur, Marie-Catherine; Peyron, François; Parola, Philippe; Savini, Hélène; Caumes, Eric; Perignon, Alice; Develoux, Michel; Rapp, Christophe; Keller, Christian A.; Haditsch, Martin; Güthoff, Wolfgang; Liebold, Ines; Schäfer, Johannes; Gobbi, Federico; Kortmann, Willemijn; van Twillert, Gitte; Goorhuis, Abraham; van Vugt, Michèle; Stijnis, Kees; Aronica, Eleonora; van Lieshout, Lisette; Roestenberg, Meta; van Wout, Jan; Barkham, Timothy; Lim, Poh Lian; Hatz, Christoph; Brugger, Silvio D.; Furrer, Hansjakob; Chappuis, François; Michel, Yann; Choochumporn, Sanya; Narkwiboonwong, Than; Dryden, Matthew S.; Benedict, Theresa; Handali, Sukwan; Wilkins, Patricia P.; Shieh, Wun-Ju; Zaki, Sherif; Kogelman, Laura; Hatch, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Through 2 international traveler-focused surveillance networks (GeoSentinel and TropNet), we identified and investigated a large outbreak of acute muscular sarcocystosis (AMS), a rarely reported zoonosis caused by a protozoan parasite of the genus Sarcocystis, associated with travel to Tioman

  11. The Scope of the Arbitral Award Binding Effect (Interests of «Third Parties» in International Arbitration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliya Bocharova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern business international transactions are multiparty and complicated. Such contracts are usually composed of several contracts which can contain bilateral dispute resolution arrangements. According to the principle of parties autonomy dispute arising between two persons bound by an arbitration agreement in connection with a multiparty project will be resolved by arbitration exclusively between these two parties. Other parties cannot participate in the resolution of the dispute through arbitration, even if they have played an active role in the actual project. Notwithstanding any legitimate interest, they might have the outcome of the dispute; these parties will remain alien both to the arbitration proceedings and an arbitral award. Their interests are not taken into consideration and left unprotected. Arbitration proceedings, unlike litigation, usually do not bear any intervention or joinder of parties, which is explained by the contractual nature of arbitration.Thus, the binding power of an arbitral award extends only over parties of an arbitration agreement. Meanwhile, an arbitral award can affect interests of third parties. How can these parties defend their interests in arbitration proceedings and during recognition and enforcement proceedings in national courts? There are two ways of resolving such problem in state court litigation. The first one is the compulsory participation of any third party with any legitimate interest in litigation through intervention, joinder of parties, and consolidation of cases. A court ex officio has to gather all parties that can have any legitimate interest in resolving the dispute. If judgment affects any interest of a party that was not involved in the proceedings judgment should be reversed in appellate court. The second way is also the solution against parallel proceedings. This way is to harmonize the outcome of parallel proceedings by the principle of lis pendens and res judicata.The paper examines

  12. Travel medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aw, Brian; Boraston, Suni; Botten, David; Cherniwchan, Darin; Fazal, Hyder; Kelton, Timothy; Libman, Michael; Saldanha, Colin; Scappatura, Philip; Stowe, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To define the practice of travel medicine, provide the basics of a comprehensive pretravel consultation for international travelers, and assist in identifying patients who might require referral to travel medicine professionals. Sources of information Guidelines and recommendations on travel medicine and travel-related illnesses by national and international travel health authorities were reviewed. MEDLINE and EMBASE searches for related literature were also performed. Main message Travel medicine is a highly dynamic specialty that focuses on pretravel preventive care. A comprehensive risk assessment for each individual traveler is essential in order to accurately evaluate traveler-, itinerary-, and destination-specific risks, and to advise on the most appropriate risk management interventions to promote health and prevent adverse health outcomes during travel. Vaccinations might also be required and should be personalized according to the individual traveler’s immunization history, travel itinerary, and the amount of time available before departure. Conclusion A traveler’s health and safety depends on a practitioner’s level of expertise in providing pretravel counseling and vaccinations, if required. Those who advise travelers are encouraged to be aware of the extent of this responsibility and to refer all high-risk travelers to travel medicine professionals whenever possible. PMID:25500599

  13. International dispersal of dengue through air travel: importation risk for Europe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan C Semenza

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The worldwide distribution of dengue is expanding, in part due to globalized traffic and trade. Aedes albopictus is a competent vector for dengue viruses (DENV and is now established in numerous regions of Europe. Viremic travellers arriving in Europe from dengue-affected areas of the world can become catalysts of local outbreaks in Europe. Local dengue transmission in Europe is extremely rare, and the last outbreak occurred in 1927-28 in Greece. However, autochthonous transmission was reported from France in September 2010, and from Croatia between August and October 2010.We compiled data on areas affected by dengue in 2010 from web resources and surveillance reports, and collected national dengue importation data. We developed a hierarchical regression model to quantify the relationship between the number of reported dengue cases imported into Europe and the volume of airline travellers arriving from dengue-affected areas internationally.In 2010, over 5.8 million airline travellers entered Europe from dengue-affected areas worldwide, of which 703,396 arrived at 36 airports situated in areas where Ae. albopictus has been recorded. The adjusted incidence rate ratio for imported dengue into European countries was 1.09 (95% CI: 1.01-1.17 for every increase of 10,000 travellers; in August, September, and October the rate ratios were 1.70 (95%CI: 1.23-2.35, 1.46 (95%CI: 1.02-2.10, and 1.35 (95%CI: 1.01-1.81, respectively. Two Italian cities where the vector is present received over 50% of all travellers from dengue-affected areas, yet with the continuing vector expansion more cities will be implicated in the future. In fact, 38% more travellers arrived in 2013 into those parts of Europe where Ae. albopictus has recently been introduced, compared to 2010.The highest risk of dengue importation in 2010 was restricted to three months and can be ranked according to arriving traveller volume from dengue-affected areas into cities where the vector is

  14. International dispersal of dengue through air travel: importation risk for Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenza, Jan C; Sudre, Bertrand; Miniota, Jennifer; Rossi, Massimiliano; Hu, Wei; Kossowsky, David; Suk, Jonathan E; Van Bortel, Wim; Khan, Kamran

    2014-12-01

    The worldwide distribution of dengue is expanding, in part due to globalized traffic and trade. Aedes albopictus is a competent vector for dengue viruses (DENV) and is now established in numerous regions of Europe. Viremic travellers arriving in Europe from dengue-affected areas of the world can become catalysts of local outbreaks in Europe. Local dengue transmission in Europe is extremely rare, and the last outbreak occurred in 1927-28 in Greece. However, autochthonous transmission was reported from France in September 2010, and from Croatia between August and October 2010. We compiled data on areas affected by dengue in 2010 from web resources and surveillance reports, and collected national dengue importation data. We developed a hierarchical regression model to quantify the relationship between the number of reported dengue cases imported into Europe and the volume of airline travellers arriving from dengue-affected areas internationally. In 2010, over 5.8 million airline travellers entered Europe from dengue-affected areas worldwide, of which 703,396 arrived at 36 airports situated in areas where Ae. albopictus has been recorded. The adjusted incidence rate ratio for imported dengue into European countries was 1.09 (95% CI: 1.01-1.17) for every increase of 10,000 travellers; in August, September, and October the rate ratios were 1.70 (95%CI: 1.23-2.35), 1.46 (95%CI: 1.02-2.10), and 1.35 (95%CI: 1.01-1.81), respectively. Two Italian cities where the vector is present received over 50% of all travellers from dengue-affected areas, yet with the continuing vector expansion more cities will be implicated in the future. In fact, 38% more travellers arrived in 2013 into those parts of Europe where Ae. albopictus has recently been introduced, compared to 2010. The highest risk of dengue importation in 2010 was restricted to three months and can be ranked according to arriving traveller volume from dengue-affected areas into cities where the vector is present. The

  15. Third International Scientific and Practical Conference «Space Travel is Approaching Reality» (Successful Event in Difficult Times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matusevych Tetiana

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the presentations of participants of III International Scientific and Practical Conference «Space Travel – approaching reality», held on 6–7 November 2014 in Kharkiv, Ukraine

  16. Epidemiology and Antimicrobial Resistance of International Travel-Associated Campylobacter Infections in the United States, 2005–2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Amanda; Wymore, Katie; Clogher, Paula; Oosmanally, Nadine; Robinson, Trisha; Lathrop, Sarah; Karr, Jillian; Hatch, Julie; Dunn, John; Ryan, Patricia; Blythe, David

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. The objective of this study was to determine the role international travel plays in US Campylobacter epidemiology and antimicrobial resistance. Methods. In this study, epidemiological and antimicrobial resistance data, encompassing the years 2005 to 2011, from 10 sites participating in the Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network were linked. The 10 sites are represented by 7 states that conducted surveillance on a statewide level, and 3 states which conducted county-level surveillance. Cases of Campylobacter among persons with history of international travel in the week prior to illness were compared with cases among individuals with no international travel. Results. Approximately 18% of Campylobacter infections were estimated to be associated with international travel, and 60% of international travel-associated infections had a quinolone-resistant Campylobacter isolate. Conclusions. We confirm that international travel plays a significant role in campylobacteriosis diagnosed in the United States. Recognizing this is important to both medical management decisions and understanding burden and attribution estimates of US campylobacteriosis and antibiotic-resistant campylobacteriosis. PMID:24832415

  17. Epidemiology and antimicrobial resistance of international travel-associated Campylobacter infections in the United States, 2005-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricotta, Emily E; Palmer, Amanda; Wymore, Katie; Clogher, Paula; Oosmanally, Nadine; Robinson, Trisha; Lathrop, Sarah; Karr, Jillian; Hatch, Julie; Dunn, John; Ryan, Patricia; Blythe, David

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the role international travel plays in US Campylobacter epidemiology and antimicrobial resistance. In this study, epidemiological and antimicrobial resistance data, encompassing the years 2005 to 2011, from 10 sites participating in the Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network were linked. The 10 sites are represented by 7 states that conducted surveillance on a statewide level, and 3 states which conducted county-level surveillance. Cases of Campylobacter among persons with history of international travel in the week prior to illness were compared with cases among individuals with no international travel. Approximately 18% of Campylobacter infections were estimated to be associated with international travel, and 60% of international travel-associated infections had a quinolone-resistant Campylobacter isolate. We confirm that international travel plays a significant role in campylobacteriosis diagnosed in the United States. Recognizing this is important to both medical management decisions and understanding burden and attribution estimates of US campylobacteriosis and antibiotic-resistant campylobacteriosis.

  18. Travel/Travelers and Parasitic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Diseases Laboratory Diagnostic Assistance [DPDx] Parasites Home Travel/Travelers Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir International ... The Parasitic Illnesses That Can Be Acquired During Travel* Contaminated Food and Water More Common giardiasis cryptosporidiosis ...

  19. Stem cell tourism--a web-based analysis of clinical services available to international travellers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Ruairi; O'Brien, Timothy; Flaherty, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell therapies are advertised through online resources which describe a range of treatments with diverse clinical indications. Stem cell tourists may not be aware of the information they should seek when consulting these clinics, or of the potential risks involved. The aim of this study was to characterise the therapies offered by online stem cell clinics. A web based search utilising five search terms was employed. The first twenty pages of each search result were screened against 340 variables. 224 out of 1091 websites advertised stem cell clinics. 68 eligible sites covering 21 countries were evaluated. The top five clinical indications for stem cell therapy were multiple sclerosis, anti-ageing, Parkinson's disease, stroke and spinal cord injury. Adult, autologous stem cells were the most commonly utilised stem cell, and these were frequently sourced from bone marrow and adipose tissue and administered intravenously. Thirty-four per cent of sites mentioned the number of patients treated while one quarter of clinics provided outcome data. Twenty-nine per cent of clinics had an internationally recognised accreditation. Fifteen per cent of clinics stated that their therapies posed no risk. Eighty-eight per cent of clinics claimed treatment effectiveness, with 16% describing their curative potential. Over 40% of sites did not specify the number or duration of treatments. Fifty-three per cent of clinics requested access to patients' medical records, and 12% recommended patients discuss the proposed therapy with their doctor. No clinic recommended that travellers consult a travel medicine specialist or receive vaccinations prior to their intended travel. One quarter of sites discussed contraindications to treatment, with 41% of sites detailing follow up patient care. There is potential for stem cell tourists to receive misleading or deficient information from online stem cell clinics. Both the stem cell tourist and travel medicine practitioner should be educated

  20. Promoting medical tourism to India: messages, images, and the marketing of international patient travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooks, Valorie A; Turner, Leigh; Snyder, Jeremy; Johnston, Rory; Kingsbury, Paul

    2011-03-01

    The practice of medical tourism depends on successfully informing potential patients about procedure options, treatment facilities, tourism opportunities, travel arrangements, and destination countries. The promotion of medical tourism includes a wide range of marketing materials such as flyers, booklets, and websites. Yet, there is a paucity of knowledge about the dissemination, content, and reception of these promotional materials. Drawing on a thematic content analysis of the promotional print material distributed at the first medical tourism trade show in Canada in 2009, the main purpose of this article is to identify and understand the messages and images that companies use to market India as a global destination. While researchers and news media frequently cite low cost procedures as a key determinant for international patient travel, particularly to developing nations, our analysis reveals few low cost-related images or messages in the promotional materials distributed at the trade show. To help explain this surprising disjuncture, we consider four related issues: (1) promotional materials may be designed to be circulated amongst potential patients' concerned family and friends who privilege knowing about things such as the use of advanced technologies; (2) developing nations need to portray safe and advanced treatment facilities in order to dispel potential patients' suspicions that their medical care is inferior; (3) companies may avoid making cost saving claims that cannot be fulfilled for all of their international patients, especially those traveling from developing nations; and (4) messages of low cost may detract from and even undermine messages about quality. We conclude by identifying numerous avenues for future research by social and health scientists, and by considering the implications of our findings for existing knowledge gaps and debates within health geography specifically. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The Role of Attachment, Travel Experiences and English Proficiency in International Students' Acculturative Stress and Depressive Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiljanic, Iskra

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between attachment, travel experiences, and English proficiency and international students' acculturative stress and depressive symptoms. A total of 91 graduate international students completed online surveys. Pearson correlations showed that both attachment anxiety and avoidance were positively correlated with…

  2. Pre-Exposure Rabies Vaccination among US International Travelers: Findings from the Global TravEpiNet Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Samantha B.; Sotir, Mark J.; Han, Pauline; Blanton, Jesse D.; Rao, Sowmya R.; LaRocque, Regina C.; Ryan, Edward T.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: People who travel to areas with high rabies endemicity and have animal contact are at increased risk for rabies exposure. We examined characteristics of international travelers queried regarding rabies vaccination during pretravel consultations at Global TravEpiNet (GTEN) practices during 2009–2010. Material and Methods: We performed bivariate and multivariable analyses of data collected from 18 GTEN clinics. Travel destinations were classified by strength level of rabies vaccination recommendation. Results: Of 13,235 travelers, 226 (2%) reported previous rabies vaccination, and 406 (3%) received rabies vaccine at the consultation. Common travel purposes for these 406 travelers were leisure (26%), research/education (17%), and nonmedical service work (14%). Excluding the 226 who were previously vaccinated, 8070 (62%) of 13,009 travelers intended to visit one or more countries with a strong recommendation for rabies vaccination; 1675 (21%) of these 8070 intended to travel for 1 month or more. Among these 1675 travelers, 145 (9%) were vaccinated, 498 (30%) declined vaccination, 832 (50%) had itineraries that clinicians determined did not indicate vaccination, and 200 (12%) remained unvaccinated for other reasons. In both bivariate and multivariate analyses, travelers with trip durations >6 months versus 1–3 months (adjusted odds ratio [OR]=4.9 [95% confidence interval [CI] 2.1, 11.4]) and those traveling for “research/education” or to “provide medical care” (adjusted OR=5.1 [95% CI 1.9, 13.7] and 9.5 [95% CI 2.2, 40.8], respectively), compared with leisure travelers, were more likely to receive rabies vaccination. Conclusions: Few travelers at GTEN clinics received rabies vaccine, although many planned trips 1 month long or more to a strong-recommendation country. Clinicians often determined that vaccine was not indicated, and travelers often declined vaccine when it was offered. The decision to vaccinate should take into account the

  3. Pre-exposure rabies vaccination among US international travelers: findings from the global TravEpiNet consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Samantha B; Jentes, Emily S; Sotir, Mark J; Han, Pauline; Blanton, Jesse D; Rao, Sowmya R; LaRocque, Regina C; Ryan, Edward T; Abraham, George M; Alvarez, Salvador; Ansdell, Vernon; Yates, Johnnie A; Atkins, Elisha H; Cahill, John; Birich, Holly K; Vitek, Dagmar; Connor, Bradley A; Dismukes, Roberta; Kozarsky, Phyllis; Dosunmu, Rone; Goad, Jeffrey A; Hagmann, Stefan; Hale, DeVon; Hynes, Noreen A; Jacquerioz, Frederique; McLellan, Susan; Knouse, Mark; Lee, Jennifer; LaRocque, Regina C; Ryan, Edward T; Oladele, Alawode; Demeke, Hanna; Pasinski, Roger; Wheeler, Amy E; Rao, Sowmya R; Rosen, Jessica; Schwartz, Brian S; Stauffer, William; Walker, Patricia; Vinetz, Joseph

    2014-02-01

    People who travel to areas with high rabies endemicity and have animal contact are at increased risk for rabies exposure. We examined characteristics of international travelers queried regarding rabies vaccination during pretravel consultations at Global TravEpiNet (GTEN) practices during 2009-2010. We performed bivariate and multivariable analyses of data collected from 18 GTEN clinics. Travel destinations were classified by strength level of rabies vaccination recommendation. Of 13,235 travelers, 226 (2%) reported previous rabies vaccination, and 406 (3%) received rabies vaccine at the consultation. Common travel purposes for these 406 travelers were leisure (26%), research/education (17%), and nonmedical service work (14%). Excluding the 226 who were previously vaccinated, 8070 (62%) of 13,009 travelers intended to visit one or more countries with a strong recommendation for rabies vaccination; 1675 (21%) of these 8070 intended to travel for 1 month or more. Among these 1675 travelers, 145 (9%) were vaccinated, 498 (30%) declined vaccination, 832 (50%) had itineraries that clinicians determined did not indicate vaccination, and 200 (12%) remained unvaccinated for other reasons. In both bivariate and multivariate analyses, travelers with trip durations >6 months versus 1-3 months (adjusted odds ratio [OR]=4.9 [95% confidence interval [CI] 2.1, 11.4]) and those traveling for "research/education" or to "provide medical care" (adjusted OR=5.1 [95% CI 1.9, 13.7] and 9.5 [95% CI 2.2, 40.8], respectively), compared with leisure travelers, were more likely to receive rabies vaccination. Few travelers at GTEN clinics received rabies vaccine, although many planned trips 1 month long or more to a strong-recommendation country. Clinicians often determined that vaccine was not indicated, and travelers often declined vaccine when it was offered. The decision to vaccinate should take into account the strength of the vaccine recommendation at the destination country, duration

  4. Carbon emissions from international cruise ship passengers' travel to and from New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howitt, Oliver J.A.; Revol, Vincent G.N.; Smith, Inga J.; Rodger, Craig J.

    2010-01-01

    Greenhouse gas emissions from international transport contribute to anthropogenic global warming, yet these emissions are not liable under the Kyoto Protocol. International attention is being given to quantifying such emissions. This paper presents the results of research into international cruise ship journeys to and from New Zealand. CO 2 emissions from such journeys were calculated using an activity based, or 'bottom-up', model. Emissions factors for individual journeys by cruise ships to or from New Zealand in 2007 ranged between 250 and 2200 g of CO 2 per passenger-kilometre (g CO 2 per p-km), with a weighted mean of 390 g CO 2 per p-km. The weighted mean energy use per passenger night for the 'hotel' function of these cruise vessels was estimated as 1600 MJ per visitor night, 12 times larger than the value for a land-based hotel. Using a simple price elasticities calculation, international cruise journeys for transport purposes were found to have a greater relative decrease in demand than plane journeys when the impact of carbon pricing was analysed. The potential to decrease the CO 2 emissions per p-km was examined, and if passenger accommodation was compacted and some luxury amenities dispensed with values similar to those of economy-class air travel were obtained.

  5. Carbon emissions from international cruise ship passengers' travel to and from New Zealand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howitt, Oliver J.A.; Revol, Vincent G.N.; Smith, Inga J.; Rodger, Craig J. [Department of Physics, University of Otago, PO Box 56, Dunedin (New Zealand)

    2010-05-15

    Greenhouse gas emissions from international transport contribute to anthropogenic global warming, yet these emissions are not liable under the Kyoto Protocol. International attention is being given to quantifying such emissions. This paper presents the results of research into international cruise ship journeys to and from New Zealand. CO{sub 2} emissions from such journeys were calculated using an activity based, or 'bottom-up', model. Emissions factors for individual journeys by cruise ships to or from New Zealand in 2007 ranged between 250 and 2200 g of CO{sub 2} per passenger-kilometre (g CO{sub 2} per p-km), with a weighted mean of 390 g CO{sub 2} per p-km. The weighted mean energy use per passenger night for the 'hotel' function of these cruise vessels was estimated as 1600 MJ per visitor night, 12 times larger than the value for a land-based hotel. Using a simple price elasticities calculation, international cruise journeys for transport purposes were found to have a greater relative decrease in demand than plane journeys when the impact of carbon pricing was analysed. The potential to decrease the CO{sub 2} emissions per p-km was examined, and if passenger accommodation was compacted and some luxury amenities dispensed with values similar to those of economy-class air travel were obtained. (author)

  6. Carbon emission offsets for aviation-generated emissions due to international travel to and from New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Inga J.; Rodger, Craig J.

    2009-01-01

    International air transport emissions are not subject to liability under the Kyoto Protocol. However, pressure is mounting globally for international aviation to be included in post-Kyoto arrangements. In the absence of international collective action, a number of so-called carbon offsetting schemes have emerged that allow individual travellers and companies to compensate for their international air travel emissions. These schemes offer technological solutions, such as planting sink forests to sequester emissions. To consider the implications of future collective action, this paper presents a case study assessment of the physical feasibility of five schemes for all short duration journeys to and from New Zealand. This is the first comprehensive national-level case study assessment of competing offsetting options for international aviation emissions in the peer-reviewed literature. The CO 2 -e emissions produced by the air travel of international visitors to New Zealand, and for New Zealand residents travelling overseas, is calculated in this paper to be 7893 and 3948 Gg, respectively, in 2005. It is then shown that no single offsetting scheme targeted inside the country appears physically and/or politically realistic. This indicates the sheer size of these emissions, and the challenge that the international community faces for collective action on this matter. (author)

  7. Can business road travel be safe? Experience of an international organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldoni Laestadius, Jasminka; Selod, Anne Gaëlle; Ye, Jian; Dimberg, Lennart; Bliss, Anthony G

    2011-01-01

    Globally, more than 1.2 million people die on the roads every year, and unfortunately so do one or two operational travelers for the World Bank Group (WBG). To investigate potentially preventable factors and improve the institution's road safety policies and practices, an electronic survey was designed in 2008 targeting about 16,000 WBG staff worldwide to inquire about road crashes and near crashes over the 3-year period. Also, questions were asked pertaining to contributing circumstances. Staff was encouraged to provide comments on prevention. A combined index based on the number of reported crashes and near crashes divided by person-days spent on mission in each country was used to rank the countries. A total of 3,760 responses were collected. There were 341 road crashes reported, about 1 in 175 missions. Seventy percent took place in taxis, and 40% of crash victims reported that seatbelts were not used. Contributing factors included driver's decision error, speeding, or road/weather conditions. On the basis of a combined index, a list of 36 high-risk countries is presented. A high correlation between crashes and near crashes (r = 0.89) justifies the method. Improved corporate policies will need to be developed to address preventable risk factors identified in the study. © 2011 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  8. The behaviour and sexual health of young international travellers (backpackers) in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNulty, A M; Egan, C; Wand, H; Donovan, B

    2010-06-01

    To study the demographics, risk behaviours and morbidity of young long-term international travellers (backpackers) attending a sexual health service in Sydney, Australia. Data on new patients were extracted from the Sydney Sexual Health Centre database for the period 1998 to 2006. The sexual risk behaviours and morbidity of the backpackers were compared with other patients of a similar age. The 5698 backpackers who attended the centre reported higher numbers of sexual partners (three or more partners in the past 3 months, 18% vs 12%, pbackpackers (22%) and the comparison population (19%). Backpackers had higher rates of genital chlamydia infection (7% vs 5%, pBackpackers should be a priority population for sexual health promotion and access to services.

  9. Outside the Continental United States International Travel and Contagion Impact Quick Look Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corley, Courtney D.; Lancaster, Mary J.; Brigantic, Robert T.; Kunkel, Brenda M.; Muller, George; McKenzie, Taylor K.

    2012-11-09

    ABSTRACT This paper describes a tool that will allow public health analysts to estimate infectious disease risk at the country level as a function of different international transportation modes. The prototype focuses on a cholera epidemic originating within Latin America or the Caribbean, but it can be expanded to consider other pathogens as well. This effort leverages previous work in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to develop the International Travel to Community Impact (IT-CI) model, which analyzes and assesses potential international disease outbreaks then estimates the associated impacts to U.S. communities and the nation as a whole and orient it for use Outside the Continental United States (OCONUS). For brevity, we refer to this refined model as OIT-CI. First, we developed an operationalized meta-population spatial cholera model for Latin America and the Caribbean at the secondary administrative-level boundary. Secondly, we developed a robust function of human airline critical to approximating mixing patterns in the meta- population model. In the prototype version currently presented here, OIT-CI models a cholera epidemic originating in a Latin American or Caribbean country and spreading via airline transportation routes. Disease spread is modeled at the country level using a patch model with a connectivity function based on demographic, geospatial, and human transportation data. We have also identified data to estimate the water and health-related infrastructure capabilities of each country to include this potential impact on disease transmission.

  10. Comparison of Climate Preferences for Domestic and International Beach Holidays: A Case Study of Canadian Travelers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Rutty

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Coastal tourism is the largest segment of global leisure tourism and it is firmly linked to the destination’s natural resources—with climatic resources chief among them. Through observations and survey responses of beach users, studies have evaluated climatic resources for coastal tourism by quantifying optimal and unacceptable conditions. However, these studies have not taken into consideration that different forms of holidays (e.g., daytrips, short trips, main annual holiday, “once-in-a-lifetime” trip may have varying degrees of resilience to climatic conditions. This is the first study to explore whether ideal and unacceptable climatic conditions vary between domestic and international tourists. Using an in situ survey, Canadian beach users traveling domestically (n = 359 and internationally (n = 120 were examined. Key findings include statistically significant differences (p ≤ 0.05 between the two sample groups for every climate variable, with the international sample more resilient to a broader range of weather conditions, including a greater acceptance for warm temperatures, longer rainfall durations, higher wind speeds, and greater cloud cover. This study adds further insight into the complexities of evaluating climate for tourism, with implications for the demand response of tourists to climate change.

  11. Modeling the costs and benefits of temporary recommendations for poliovirus exporting countries to vaccinate international travelers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duintjer Tebbens, Radboud J; Thompson, Kimberly M

    2017-07-05

    Recognizing that infectious agents readily cross international borders, the International Health Regulations Emergency Committee issues Temporary Recommendations (TRs) that include vaccination of travelers from countries affected by public health emergencies, including serotype 1 wild polioviruses (WPV1s). This analysis estimates the costs and benefits of TRs implemented by countries with reported WPV1 during 2014-2016 while accounting for numerous uncertainties. We estimate the TR costs based on programmatic data and prior economic analyses and TR benefits by simulating potential WPV1 outbreaks in the absence of the TRs using the rate and extent of WPV1 importation outbreaks per reported WPV1 case during 2004-2013 and the number of reported WPV1 cases that occurred in countries with active TRs. The benefits of TRs outweigh the costs in 77% of model iterations, resulting in expected incremental net economic benefits of $210 million. Inclusion of indirect costs increases the costs by 13%, the expected savings from prevented outbreaks by 4%, and the expected incremental net benefits by 3%. Despite the considerable costs of implementing TRs, this study provides health and economic justification for these investments in the context of managing a disease in advanced stages of its global eradication. Copyright © 2017 The Auhors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Development of discrete choice model considering internal reference points and their effects in travel mode choice context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarif; Kurauchi, Shinya; Yoshii, Toshio

    2017-06-01

    In the conventional travel behavior models such as logit and probit, decision makers are assumed to conduct the absolute evaluations on the attributes of the choice alternatives. On the other hand, many researchers in cognitive psychology and marketing science have been suggesting that the perceptions of attributes are characterized by the benchmark called “reference points” and the relative evaluations based on them are often employed in various choice situations. Therefore, this study developed a travel behavior model based on the mental accounting theory in which the internal reference points are explicitly considered. A questionnaire survey about the shopping trip to the CBD in Matsuyama city was conducted, and then the roles of reference points in travel mode choice contexts were investigated. The result showed that the goodness-of-fit of the developed model was higher than that of the conventional model, indicating that the internal reference points might play the major roles in the choice of travel mode. Also shown was that the respondents seem to utilize various reference points: some tend to adopt the lowest fuel price they have experienced, others employ fare price they feel in perceptions of the travel cost.

  13. Proceedings of the 4. annual international greening rooftops for sustainable communities conference, awards and trade show

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    Green roof technologies represent opportunities for significant social, economic and environmental benefits, particularly in urban areas. This conference, awards and trade show provided a forum to discuss the integration of nature with architecture and demonstrated the possibilities of applying advanced green roof technology to residential, institutional, industrial and commercial buildings. Sustainable landscaping principles were reviewed along with methods and techniques of urban ecology. Green roofs have proven to filter polluted air, reduce energy demands, and assist in stormwater management. The additional benefits of green roof technology in urban settings include moderation of the urban heat island effect, creation of green spaces, and preservation of habitat and biodiversity. It was noted that the widespread adoption of green roof technology in North America lags behind Europe due to a lack of effective policy instruments and standards. The conference was divided into the following 3 main sessions: (1) policy and program development, (2) case studies and design, and (3) research on technical performance benefits. The conference featured 40 presentations, of which 36 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs

  14. Infection after transrectal ultrasonography-guided prostate biopsy: increased relative risks after recent international travel or antibiotic use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Uday; Dasgupta, Prokar; Amoroso, Peter; Challacombe, Ben; Pilcher, James; Kirby, Roger

    2012-06-01

    Study Type - Prognosis (case series) Level of Evidence 4 What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Septicaemia is the most frequent cause of hospitalization after transtrectal prostate biopsy; fatalities have been reported and the incidence is on the rise. This study shows that men with a history of recent international travel or antibiotic use have up to four times increased risk of septicaemia and hospitalization. When they do occur, infections are usually due to multi-resistant E coli and additional care, e.g. delay before biopsy, different antibiotic prophylaxis or transperineal biopsy, should be considered in these cases. OBJECTIVE • To study the infection rate after prostate biopsy in those who have travelled overseas or used antibiotics in the 4 weeks before biopsy. PATIENTS AND METHODS • A total of 316 men with a mean (range) age of 61 (45-85) years were studied. All had undergone transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS)-guided prostate biopsy after standard antibiotic prophylaxis. • Before their biopsy the patients were risk stratified and a history of recent international travel or antibiotic use was recorded. • Those who suffered sufficiently severe infection/sepsis so as to require hospitalization were identified at the end of the study period. • The characteristics of these patients and the types of infections were explored and the relative risk (RR) of infection after recent travel or antibiotic use was calculated. RESULTS • Of the 316 men, 16 were hospitalized with infection. • The group with (n= 16) and without (n= 300) infection were equivalent in age, prostate-specific antigen level, disease status and number of biopsy cores taken. • Either recent travel or antibiotic use were independent risk factors for infection [travel: 8/16 vs 76/300; P= 0.04; RR 2.7 and antibiotic use: 4/16 vs 20/300; P= 0.025; RR 4]. There was no significant pattern in the countries visited or the type of antibiotic used. • Culture results were

  15. Canada's stature in international research community enhanced with awarding of nine major projects by CFI

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The Canadian Foundation for Innovation has announced it will fund nine major projects aimed at increasing Canadian research infrastructure and providing access for Canadian researchers to international facilities (1 page).

  16. The absolute risk of venous thrombosis after air travel: a cohort study of 8,755 employees of international organisations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saskia Kuipers

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The risk of venous thrombosis is approximately 2- to 4-fold increased after air travel, but the absolute risk is unknown. The objective of this study was to assess the absolute risk of venous thrombosis after air travel. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted a cohort study among employees of large international companies and organisations, who were followed between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2005. The occurrence of symptomatic venous thrombosis was linked to exposure to air travel, as assessed by travel records provided by the companies and organisations. A long-haul flight was defined as a flight of at least 4 h and participants were considered exposed for a postflight period of 8 wk. A total of 8,755 employees were followed during a total follow-up time of 38,910 person-years (PY. The total time employees were exposed to a long-haul flight was 6,872 PY. In the follow-up period, 53 thromboses occurred, 22 of which within 8 wk of a long-haul flight, yielding an incidence rate of 3.2/1,000 PY, as compared to 1.0/1,000 PY in individuals not exposed to air travel (incidence rate ratio 3.2, 95% confidence interval 1.8-5.6. This rate was equivalent to a risk of one event per 4,656 long-haul flights. The risk increased with exposure to more flights within a short time frame and with increasing duration of flights. The incidence was highest in the first 2 wk after travel and gradually decreased to baseline after 8 wk. The risk was particularly high in employees under age 30 y, women who used oral contraceptives, and individuals who were particularly short, tall, or overweight. CONCLUSIONS: The risk of symptomatic venous thrombosis after air travel is moderately increased on average, and rises with increasing exposure and in high-risk groups.

  17. An international meta-analysis of values of travel time savings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shires, J D; de Jong, G C

    2009-11-01

    Values of travel time savings are often used in cost-benefit analysis of transport projects and policies, and also to compute generalised travel costs. There has been considerable debate as to whether different research methods (e.g. stated versus revealed preference) will lead to different values of travel time savings, and which segmentations (e.g. by income or mode) are most important to capture the heterogeneity in these values. In addition there are many countries where no specific valuation studies have been done. In this paper new equations are estimated on the outcomes of value of travel time savings studies from various countries. In the data set, several countries appear more than once, which is taken into account by estimating random effects panel models. The meta-analysis sheds some new light on the variation of the value of travel time savings by income, country, travel purpose, mode, distance and by survey method. Furthermore, the resulting meta-models are applied to produce new values of travel time savings for business travel, commuting and for other purposes in passenger transport, for 25 European Union Member states. Similar methods could be used to statistically analyse studies carried out on other non-monetary effects, both for transport and non-transport projects, and for inclusion in cost-benefit analysis.

  18. Epidemiology of tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) in international travellers to Western/Central Europe and conclusions on vaccination recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) endemicity is spreading in Europe becoming an increasing health risk also for travellers. Previous reviews on TBE in civilian travellers lacked of numerator data and offered at most rough estimates on denominator data. An evidence-based quantification of the risk so far has been impossible; that resulted in fundamentally differing vaccination recommendations. A standard internet search was conducted with a focus on the data used to formulate vaccination recommendations. As TBE became notifiable at the European Union (EU) level the databases of European Center for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) were analysed for cases imported from abroad 2012. Since these included only 19 EU countries, individual experts were contacted in countries, which had not submitted data and additional surveillance databases were investigated to obtain a comprehensive account on travel-associated TBE in Central and Western Europe. In 2012, the ECDC and other data sources included 38 reported cases of internationally acquired TBE. Basing on estimates of the exposed number of visitors, the attack rate for an undefined period of time could be very roughly extrapolated to be 0.5-1.3 per 100,000 (1 per 77,000-200.000) overall in Western/Central Europe endemic areas for the exposed at-risk population. As advised by the World Health Organization (WHO) travellers exposed outdoors in rural endemic areas to a risk of TBE during the period of transmission should be recommended immunization. In contrast, the advice to recommend TBE vaccination for all visitors of endemic areas is inappropriate. Implementation of the risk strategy is compromised by the fact that many at-risk travellers are unaware of the risk, thus they will not consult competent health professionals. Others may consult late, and in some countries of origin no TBE vaccine is marketed. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2016. All rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press. For

  19. Acute Muscular Sarcocystosis: An International Investigation Among Ill Travelers Returning From Tioman Island, Malaysia, 2011–2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Douglas H.; Stich, August; Epelboin, Loïc; Malvy, Denis; Han, Pauline V.; Bottieau, Emmanuel; da Silva, Alexandre; Zanger, Philipp; Slesak, Günther; van Genderen, Perry J. J.; Rosenthal, Benjamin M.; Cramer, Jakob P.; Visser, Leo G.; Muñoz, José; Drew, Clifton P.; Goldsmith, Cynthia S.; Steiner, Florian; Wagner, Noémie; Grobusch, Martin P.; Plier, D. Adam; Tappe, Dennis; Sotir, Mark J.; Brown, Clive; Brunette, Gary W.; Fayer, Ronald; von Sonnenburg, Frank; Neumayr, Andreas; Kozarsky, Phyllis E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Through 2 international traveler-focused surveillance networks (GeoSentinel and TropNet), we identified and investigated a large outbreak of acute muscular sarcocystosis (AMS), a rarely reported zoonosis caused by a protozoan parasite of the genus Sarcocystis, associated with travel to Tioman Island, Malaysia, during 2011–2012. Methods Clinicians reporting patients with suspected AMS to GeoSentinel submitted demographic, clinical, itinerary, and exposure data. We defined a probable case as travel to Tioman Island after 1 March 2011, eosinophilia (>5%), clinical or laboratory-supported myositis, and negative trichinellosis serology. Case confirmation required histologic observation of sarcocysts or isolation of Sarcocystis species DNA from muscle biopsy. Results Sixty-eight patients met the case definition (62 probable and 6 confirmed). All but 2 resided in Europe; all were tourists and traveled mostly during the summer months. The most frequent symptoms reported were myalgia (100%), fatigue (91%), fever (82%), headache (59%), and arthralgia (29%); onset clustered during 2 distinct periods: “early” during the second and “late” during the sixth week after departure from the island. Blood eosinophilia and elevated serum creatinine phosphokinase (CPK) levels were observed beginning during the fifth week after departure. Sarcocystis nesbitti DNA was recovered from 1 muscle biopsy. Conclusions Clinicians evaluating travelers returning ill from Malaysia with myalgia, with or without fever, should consider AMS, noting the apparent biphasic aspect of the disease, the later onset of elevated CPK and eosinophilia, and the possibility for relapses. The exact source of infection among travelers to Tioman Island remains unclear but needs to be determined to prevent future illnesses. PMID:25091309

  20. Acute muscular sarcocystosis: an international investigation among ill travelers returning from Tioman Island, Malaysia, 2011-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Douglas H; Stich, August; Epelboin, Loïc; Malvy, Denis; Han, Pauline V; Bottieau, Emmanuel; da Silva, Alexandre; Zanger, Philipp; Slesak, Günther; van Genderen, Perry J J; Rosenthal, Benjamin M; Cramer, Jakob P; Visser, Leo G; Muñoz, José; Drew, Clifton P; Goldsmith, Cynthia S; Steiner, Florian; Wagner, Noémie; Grobusch, Martin P; Plier, D Adam; Tappe, Dennis; Sotir, Mark J; Brown, Clive; Brunette, Gary W; Fayer, Ronald; von Sonnenburg, Frank; Neumayr, Andreas; Kozarsky, Phyllis E

    2014-11-15

    Through 2 international traveler-focused surveillance networks (GeoSentinel and TropNet), we identified and investigated a large outbreak of acute muscular sarcocystosis (AMS), a rarely reported zoonosis caused by a protozoan parasite of the genus Sarcocystis, associated with travel to Tioman Island, Malaysia, during 2011-2012. Clinicians reporting patients with suspected AMS to GeoSentinel submitted demographic, clinical, itinerary, and exposure data. We defined a probable case as travel to Tioman Island after 1 March 2011, eosinophilia (>5%), clinical or laboratory-supported myositis, and negative trichinellosis serology. Case confirmation required histologic observation of sarcocysts or isolation of Sarcocystis species DNA from muscle biopsy. Sixty-eight patients met the case definition (62 probable and 6 confirmed). All but 2 resided in Europe; all were tourists and traveled mostly during the summer months. The most frequent symptoms reported were myalgia (100%), fatigue (91%), fever (82%), headache (59%), and arthralgia (29%); onset clustered during 2 distinct periods: "early" during the second and "late" during the sixth week after departure from the island. Blood eosinophilia and elevated serum creatinine phosphokinase (CPK) levels were observed beginning during the fifth week after departure. Sarcocystis nesbitti DNA was recovered from 1 muscle biopsy. Clinicians evaluating travelers returning ill from Malaysia with myalgia, with or without fever, should consider AMS, noting the apparent biphasic aspect of the disease, the later onset of elevated CPK and eosinophilia, and the possibility for relapses. The exact source of infection among travelers to Tioman Island remains unclear but needs to be determined to prevent future illnesses. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2014. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  1. Population attributable risk for chlamydia infection in a cohort of young international travellers (backpackers) and residents in Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Wand, Handan; Guy, Rebecca; Donovan, Basil; McNulty, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Aim To estimate the population attributable risk (PAR) for Chlamydia trachomatis infection in young men and women in Sydney, Australia. Method Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine the association between demographic, sexual behaviour and other potential risk factors and chlamydia positivity in young (?30?years) heterosexual international travellers (backpackers) and Australian residents attending a sexual health clinic. Point and interval estimates of PAR were calculated to qu...

  2. Promising Effect Of Intraarticular Ropivacaine In Femoral Neck Fractures Treated With Internal Fixation (Best Poster Award)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Rune Dueholm

    2008-01-01

     Promising Effect Of Intraarticular Ropivacaine In Femoral Neck Fractures Treated With Internal Fixation Rune Bech*, Jens Lauritsen*+,Tine Dimon*, Ole Ovesen*, Claus Emmeluth, Søren Overgaard*. *:Dept. Ortopaedic Surgery, Odense University Hospital, +:Institute of Public Health-dept. biostatistics...... underwent osteosynthesis with 2 canulated hip screws and were prescribed regular paracetamol and supplementary opioid rescue analgesia as necessary. Pilot group: 11 patients received one peroperative (30 mL=100 mg) and 6 postoperative bolus installations  (10 mL=100 mg) of open label Ropivacaine through...

  3. Proposal for the award of an industrial services contract for civil engineering superstructure and internal construction building work

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    This document concerns the award of an Industrial Services contract for civil engineering superstructure and internal construction building work. Following a market survey carried out among 112 firms in fifteen Member States, a call for tenders (IT-2546/ST/Rev.) was sent on 12 April 2001 to eleven consortia, four consisting of four firms, three consisting of three firms and four consisting of two firms, in seven Member States. By the closing date, CERN had received tenders from eight consortia in six Member States. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a contract with the consortium SPIE CITRA SUD-EST(FR)-ANTIRUST TECHNOLOGY (GR), the lowest bidder, for an initial period of three years from 1 January 2002 for an amount not exceeding 15 375 000 Swiss francs, not subject to revision. The contract will include options for two one-year extensions beyond the initial three-year period. The consortium has indicated the following distribution by country of the contract value covered by this ...

  4. Responses of Lower-Body Power and Match Running Demands Following Long-Haul Travel in International Rugby Sevens Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, John A; Pumpa, Kate L; Pyne, David B

    2017-03-01

    Mitchell, JA, Pumpa, KL, and Pyne, DB. Responses of lowerbody power and match running demands after long-haul travel in international rugby sevens players. J Strength Cond Res 31(3): 686-695, 2017-This study determined the effect of long-haul (>5 hours) travel on lower-body power and match running demands in international rugby sevens players. Lower-body power was assessed in 22 male international rugby sevens players (age 21.7 ± 2.7 years, mass 89.0 ± 6.7 kg, stature 180.5 ± 6.2 cm; mean ± SD) monitored over 17 rugby sevens tournaments. A countermovement jump was used to monitor lower-body power (peak and mean power) over repeated three week travel and competition periods (pretravel, posttravel, and posttournament). Small decreases were evident in peak power after both short and long-haul travel (-4.0%, ±3.2%; mean, ±90% confidence limits) with further reductions in peak and mean power posttournament (-4.5%, ±2.3% and -3.8%, ±1.5%) culminating in a moderate decrease in peak power overall (-7.4%, ±4.0%). A subset of 12 players (completing a minimum of 8 tournaments) had the effects of match running demands assessed with lower-body power. In this subset, long-haul travel elicited a large decrease in lower-body peak (-9.4%, ±3.5%) and mean power (-5.6%, ±2.9%) over the monitoring period, with a small decrease (-4.3%, ±3.0% and -2.2%, ±1.7%) posttravel and moderate decrease (-5.4%, ±2.5% and -3.5%, ±1.9%) posttournament, respectively. Match running demands were monitored through global positioning system. In long-haul tournaments, the 12 players covered ∼13%, ±13% greater total distance (meter) and ∼11%, ±10% higher average game meters >5 m·s when compared with short-haul (rugby sevens tournaments after long-haul travel.

  5. Health problems associated with international travel: a case of cutaneous myiasis in China due to Cordylobia anthropophaga imported from Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Wei; Feng, Yan; Zhang, Lingling; Sun, Jimin; Yao, Linong

    2014-12-01

    More affordable international travel, global trade and commerce, and the exporting of labor have all contributed to international population mobility. Furthermore, population migration leads to the incidence or recurrence of once-controlled diseases. Evidence shows that the popularity of travel can impact health through imported infections and illness. Imported cutaneous myiasis, a type of skin lesion, has attracted the attention of the current authors. This condition often occurs among travelers and it has been reported in several non-endemic countries. However, diagnosis of myiasis and identification of the larvae are difficult. Advances in molecular detection techniques could provide a new way to identify larvae. This study used sequencing of the 28S rRNA gene and morphology to identify the larva infesting the upper arm of a Chinese woman returning from Uganda. The larva was identified as Cordylobia anthropophaga (C. anthropophaga) and the sequences were submitted to GenBank (accession number: KM506761). As foreign interaction increases, imported health problems may become more common in China. Knowledge about various pathogens needs to be increased and molecular methods need to be used to accurately identify those pathogens.

  6. Essential travel medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Zuckerman, Jane N; Leggat, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This 1st edition of Essential Travel Medicine provides an excellent concise introduction to the specialty of Travel Medicine. This core text will enable health care practitioners particularly those new to the clinical practice of Travel Medicine, to gain a fundamental understanding of the diverse and complex issues which can potentially affect the health of the many millions of people who undertake international travel. Jane N Zuckerman is joined by Gary W Brunette from CDC and Peter A Leggat from Australia as Editors. Leading international specialists in their fields have contributed authoritative chapters reflecting current knowledge to facilitate best clinical practice in the different aspects of travel medicine. The aim of Essential Travel Medicine is to provide a comprehensive guide to Travel Medicine as well as a fundamental knowledge base to support international undergraduate and postgraduate specialty training programmes in the discipline of Travel Medicine. The 1st edition of Essential Travel ...

  7. Joseph A. Burton Forum Award Lecture: Managing Nuclear and Biological Risks: Building Resilience through International Cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pregenzer, Arian

    2012-03-01

    International technical cooperation has long been an important nonproliferation strategy, especially since the 1990s when cooperative threat reduction (CTR) to prevent theft or illicit transfer of nuclear weapons, material and expertise in the former Soviet Union became a keystone of U.S. policy. The CTR approach expanded to include engagement with scientists and engineers with expertise relevant to biological and chemical weapons, and continued in the 2000s with efforts in Iraq and Libya, and cooperation with a wide range of countries on export control and nuclear and biological security. In general, the goal of such efforts has been to prevent proliferation or WMD terrorism. In most cases, the United States (or the West) defines the threat, and then funds partner countries to implement solutions. This presentation will argue that the future requires a new approach. Nuclear capabilities are more widely available than ever before, repercussions of the A.Q. Khan network continue to unfurl, and countries such as the DPRK engage in illicit cooperation. In addition, there has been a global boom in biotechnology with many nations, particularly across South and East Asia, investing in the biotech industry as a source of fuels, food, and materials for their rapidly expanding populations. Compared to the 1990s, today's threat is more diffuse, and the line between legitimate and illegitimate technical capability is no longer so clear. In addition, the West has many fewer resources to invest due to the global economic downturn. In this environment, full commitment of all countries that benefit from nuclear and biological advances will be required to assure the safety and security of all. Technical cooperation can continue to play an important role, but with some significant changes: First, challenges should be defined from a local perspective to ensure full commitment and participation. Second, the goal of cooperation should shift from preventing specific threats to building

  8. CMS Industries awarded gold, crystal

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The CMS collaboration honoured 10 of its top suppliers in the seventh annual awards ceremony The representatives of the firms that recieved the CMS Gold and Crystal Awards stand with their awards after the ceremony. The seventh annual CMS Awards ceremony was held on Monday 13 March to recognize the industries that have made substantial contributions to the construction of the collaboration's detector. Nine international firms received Gold Awards, and General Tecnica of Italy received the prestigious Crystal Award. Representatives from the companies attended the ceremony during the plenary session of CMS week. 'The role of CERN, its machines and experiments, beyond particle physics is to push the development of equipment technologies related to high-energy physics,'said CMS Awards Coordinator Domenico Campi. 'All of these industries must go beyond the technologies that are currently available.' Without the involvement of good companies over the years, the construction of the CMS detector wouldn't be possible...

  9. Measuring cross-border travel times for freight : Otay Mesa international border crossing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Cross border movement of people and goods is a vital part of the North American economy. : Accurate real-time data on travel times along the US-Mexico border can help generate a range : of tangible benefits covering improved operations and security, ...

  10. End to End Travel

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — E2 Solutions is a web based end-to-end travel management tool that includes paperless travel authorization and voucher document submissions, document approval...

  11. 41 CFR 301-71.108 - What internal policies and procedures must we establish for travel authorization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... and procedures must we establish for travel authorization? 301-71.108 Section 301-71.108 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 71-AGENCY TRAVEL ACCOUNTABILITY REQUIREMENTS Travel Authorization § 301-71.108...

  12. 41 CFR 301-71.309 - What internal policies and procedures must we establish governing travel advances?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... and procedures must we establish governing travel advances? 301-71.309 Section 301-71.309 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 71-AGENCY TRAVEL ACCOUNTABILITY REQUIREMENTS Accounting for Travel Advances § 301...

  13. International Travel by Congress: Legislation in the 111th Congress, Background, and Potential Policy Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-31

    estimated cost of airline tickets must also be included; • commercial air travel may only be booked in coach /economy class, “consistent with Executive...Singapore 16 Spain 16 Switzerland 16 Thailand 16 Ukraine 16 Vietnam 16 Argentina 15 Austria 15 Bosnia-Herzegovina 15 Colombia 15 Denmark 15...Thailand 16 52 Switzerland 16 51 China 17 50 Canada 17 49 Colombia 15 48 Japan 16 48 Ireland 16 47 Mexico 17 47 Austria 15 45 Jordan 16 44 South

  14. Travelers' Health: Pregnant Travelers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... las picaduras de insectos Business Travel Cold Climates Counterfeit Medicines Cruise Ship Travel Families with Children Fish ... and motion sickness and appear to have a good safety record. VACCINES In the best possible scenario, ...

  15. Travelers' Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stamaril clinics Disease Directory Resources Resources for Travelers Adventure Travel Animal Safety Blood Clots Bug Bites Evite ... Minute Travel Long-Term Travel Mass Gatherings Medical Tourism Mental Health Motion Sickness Natural Disasters Pregnant Travelers ...

  16. CMS Awards

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Ali Mohammad Rafiee receives the CMS Gold Award from Michel Della Negra of CMS. As part of the fifth annual CMS Awards, Iranian contractor HEPCO, located in Arak, an industrial town 200 km west of Tehran, received their Gold Award in a ceremony held on 14 June 2004 (the other award winners were reported in bulletin 13/2004). The Awards are given each year to a small number of the approximately one thousand contractors working on the CMS project. Gold Awards are given for outstanding technical achievement in work carried out for the detector. HEPCO received the Award for the excellent quality of their work in constructing two 25 tonne support tables, two 75 tonne shields (FCS) and eight supporting brackets to lower the HF into the cavern. Welds and machining obtained tolerances that were very difficult in structures of that size. Mr. A. M. Rafiee, the General Manager of the company, acknowledged the benefits of this collaboration, and thanked the efforts and skills of the many staff involved.

  17. 41 CFR 301-71.207 - What internal policies and procedures must we establish for travel reimbursement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 71-AGENCY TRAVEL ACCOUNTABILITY REQUIREMENTS Travel Claims for Reimbursement... should submit a travel claim (including whether to use a standard form or an agency form and whether the... and procedures must we establish for travel reimbursement? 301-71.207 Section 301-71.207 Public...

  18. Closing Remarks and Awards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitaker, M.; Van der Meer, K.; Hamilton, A.

    2015-01-01

    M. Whitaker: On behalf of the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management, we are grateful for the opportunity to support this symposium. The number of symposium events-presentations, posters, technical demonstrations, panel discussions, and receptions - has been completely overwhelming and truly impressive. My compliments to the IAEA organization staff for a spectacular event. I have gained a much better appreciation for why these are only once every four years. This symposium has provided an important opportunity to reengage with friends and colleagues from around the globe to discuss international safeguards topics. The theme this year is very appropriate. So much of our work relies upon people. Together we work to develop the strategies that ensure that international safeguards are effectively implemented to provide the world the assurances that they expect from us. Thank you for this opportunity to share in the organization and execution of this symposium. K. Van der Meer: It is my pleasure to give the last poster awards. We have had two award ceremonies already this week on Wednesday and Thursday to recognize the best posters in those sessions. Today it will be two parts. First we will give the award for the best posters for this morning's sessions, and then we have four special awards: Gold, Silver, Bronze and the New Generation Symposium Award. These are the awards for the best posters for the whole week. The New Generation Symposium Award is for recognition of a younger participant and the prize is also for a younger participant. The full list of award winners is available under the symposium website. The IAEA recognizes the generous donations by INMM and ESARDA of the following prizes given as awards for the best posters: · Best e-poster advertisement per session: free subscription to the ESARDA Bulletin; · Best e-poster per session: free membership in INMM; · Best poster of the week ''Bronze'': free registration for the 8th INMM

  19. Air Travel Health Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions Prevention and Wellness Staying Healthy Healthy Living Travel Occupational Health First Aid and Injury Prevention Crisis ... MoreDepression in Children and TeensRead MoreBMI Calculator International Travel: Tips for Staying HealthyTexting and DrivingTravel Needs for ...

  20. Corporate mobility: Impacts on life domains and implications for work-life balance of international business travelers and expatriates

    OpenAIRE

    Tretyakevich, Natalia; Maggi, Rico

    2016-01-01

    In my dissertation I aim to explore the impacts of work-related mobility on job, family life and personal well-being of the travelling employees. To do so, three studies have been conducted with the purpose to investigate business travel behavioral patterns and impacts of work-related mobility on various life domains of the three segments, namely frequent corporate business travelers, expatriates and travelling academics, for whom the issues of travel stress and work-life balance are of ...

  1. Awards and honours

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS

    2009-01-01

    On the occasion of the international woman day, on 7 March, Fabiola Gianotti, ATLAS spokesperson, was awarded “Commendatore della Repubblica Italiana” by the Italian President for her “scientific knowledge and her excellent management skills demonstrated in guiding the ATLAS project”.

  2. Perceptions of an 'international hospital' in Thailand by medical travel patients: cross-cultural tensions in a transnational space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, Andrea; Chee, Heng Leng

    2015-01-01

    The growing trade in patients seeking health care in other countries, or medical travel, is changing the forms and experiences of health care seeking and producing changes to hospitals in terms of their design, organization and spaces. What is termed in marketing parlance in Thailand as an 'international hospital' oriented to attracting foreign patients, is a hotel-hospital hybrid that is locally produced through the inflexion of local practices to make a therapeutic space for international patients. The paper reports on work undertaken within a Thai hospital in 2012 which included observations and interviews with thirty foreign in-patients and nine informal interviews with hospital staff. Although theorized as a culturally neutral transnational 'space of connectivity', we show how cross-cultural tensions affect the experience of the hospital with implications for the organization of the hospital and notions of 'cultural competence' in care. There is no single universal experience of this space, instead, there are multiple experiences of the 'international hospital', depending on who patients are, where they are from, their expectations and relationships. Such hospitals straddle the expectations of both local patients and international clientele and present highly complex cross-cultural interactions between staff and patients but also between patients and other patients. Spatial organisation within such settings may either highlight cultural difference or help create culturally safe spaces. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. An Analysis of Delay and Travel Times at Sao Paulo International Airport (AISP/GRU): Planning Based on Simulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Erico Soriano Martins; Mueller, Carlos

    2003-01-01

    The occurrence of flight delays in Brazil, mostly verified at the ground (airfield), is responsible for serious disruptions at the airport level but also for the unchaining of problems in all the airport system, affecting also the airspace. The present study develops an analysis of delay and travel times at Sao Paulo International Airport/ Guarulhos (AISP/GRU) airfield based on simulation model. Different airport physical and operational scenarios had been analyzed by means of simulation. SIMMOD Plus 4.0, the computational tool developed to represent aircraft operation in the airspace and airside of airports, was used to perform these analysis. The study was mainly focused on aircraft operations on ground, at the airport runway, taxi-lanes and aprons. The visualization of the operations with increasing demand facilitated the analyses. The results generated in this work certify the viability of the methodology, they also indicated the solutions capable to solve the delay problem by travel time analysis, thus diminishing the costs for users mainly airport authority. It also indicated alternatives for airport operations, assisting the decision-making process and in the appropriate timing of the proposed changes in the existing infrastructure.

  4. DIFFICULTIES IN INTERNATIONAL TRAVELLING FOR RESIDENTS OF AREAS WITH UNDEFINED POLITICAL STATUS. CASE STUDY: CRIMEA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ștefan Constantin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In March 2014 a change took place on Europe's political map. The Crimean Peninsula became part of Russia, switching sovereignty after more than 20 years during which it was part of Ukraine. This took place following a Russian military intervention and a referendum. A majority of the world's countries however, do not recognize the Russian control of Crimea and still consider it a part of Ukraine, rendering the territory an area with undefined political status. Shortly after the sovereignty change, the region and its population started experiencing all kinds of hardships. An often neglected type of hardship Crimeans are experiencing is the difficulty of obtaining visas. Following the referendum, many diplomatic missions in Russia have instituted a policy of not issuing visas to residents of Crimea who apply with Russian-issued documents. This article shall make a summary of EU and Schengen countries' positions regarding this issue, as these are the biggest groups of countries that requires both Russians and Ukrainians to obtain visas before travelling there. This research was made mostly directly, by requesting each country's diplomatic mission in Moscow to give an official position. The research had the purpose of verifying the information that certain countries do issue visas to Crimeans with Russian documents and also to give a more general and complex picture on the matter of visas for residents of Crimea. This theme is important as a policy of not issuing visas has significant repercussions on the region's economy and on the freedom of movement of its citizens.

  5. Preparing for the Unexpected: Managing Low Probability, Disruptive Events in Student International Travel Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Teresa; Ornstein, Suzyn

    2002-01-01

    A canceled study trip to China is used as an example of the application of crisis management planning for international programs. The following elements are discussed: crisis management team, scenario brainstorming, policy definition, moral accountability, alternative scheduling, stakeholder management, future planning, and course redesign.…

  6. Travelers' Health: Cruise Ship Travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Travel Chapter 6 - Death during Travel Cruise Ship Travel Joanna J. Regan, Kara Tardivel, Susan A. Lippold, ... Insurance, & Medical Evacuation Insurance ). Box 6-01. Cruise travel health precautions ADVICE FOR CLINICIANS GIVING PRETRAVEL CRUISE ...

  7. Carriage of colistin-resistant, extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli harboring the mcr-1 resistance gene after short-term international travel to Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakayama T

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Tatsuya Nakayama,1,2 Yuko Kumeda,3 Ryuji Kawahara,4 Takahiro Yamaguchi,4,5 Yoshimasa Yamamoto5 1Center for Global Initiatives, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka, Japan; 2Division of Biomedical Food Research, National Institute of Health Science, Kawasaki, Kanagawa, Japan; 3Center for Microorganism Control, Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai, Osaka, Japan; 4Division of Microbiology, Osaka Institute of Public Health, Osaka, Japan; 5Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka, Japan Background: Due to increasing colistin usage, the dissemination of the colistin-resistant gene mcr-1 has been increasingly investigated. The aim of this study was to determine whether a traveler on a short-term international trip to a developing country could bring mcr-1 back to their home country. Materials and methods: Thirty-four travel events from Japan to Vietnam encompassing 19 travelers were assessed. A fecal specimen was collected from each traveler before and after each travel event and was inoculated on CHROMagar containing cefotaxime (CTX. Three to seven colonies exhibiting the characteristics of Escherichia coli were collected. Susceptibility to antibiotics and extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL production were determined by the disk diffusion method and the double-disk synergy test, respectively. ESBL-encoding genes were genotyped, and phylogenetic groupings were determined by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR. The presence of mcr-1 was also confirmed by PCR and sequencing. Results: A total of 175 ESBL-producing E. coli isolated before and up to 2 weeks after traveling to Vietnam were analyzed. Genotyping of ESBL-producing isolates showed that blaCTX-M-1/blaTEM (27.7% and blaCTX-M-9 (45.9% were the most prevalent genotypes, while the most frequently detected phylogenetic group was D (41.9% followed by B2 (23.0%. In a significant number of travel events, travelers brought ESBL-producing E. coli back to Japan

  8. Hero Award

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-10-07

    This podcast is a lecture given by William H. Foege, MD, MPH when he was honored October 7, 2009 as the 2009 CDC Foundation Hero Award Recipient.  Created: 10/7/2009 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 10/22/2009.

  9. Travelers' Health: Immunocompromised Travelers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Traveler Registration During Trip After Your Trip CDC-TV Videos Resources For Clinicians In-Clinic Quick Links ... Menactra or Menveo 3 years after the primary series. Boosters should be repeated every 5 years thereafter. ...

  10. Connected Traveler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, Alex

    2015-11-01

    The Connected Traveler project is a multi-disciplinary undertaking that seeks to validate potential for transformative transportation system energy savings by incentivizing efficient traveler behavior. This poster outlines various aspects of the Connected Traveler project, including market opportunity, understanding traveler behavior and decision-making, automation and connectivity, and a projected timeline for Connected Traveler's key milestones.

  11. Albatross awarded

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Albatross Award was presented by the American Miscellaneous Society to Sir George Deacon at the Joint Oceanographic Assembly held in Halifax in August 1982. The presentation speech by Warren Wooster and acceptance speech by Sir George Deacon follow.I have been asked by the governing board of the American Miscellaneous Society to present the Albatross Award this evening. But I hasten to point out that the Board is certainly mythical, and there is even some doubt about the existence of the Society. We know that the American Miscellaneous Society, AMSOC, has had several important committees—the committee to greet visitors from outer space and the committee to teach animals their Latin names, for example—but we know little of their success. On the other hand, the triumphs of AMSOC's Project MOHOLE are al ready inscribed in history.

  12. Travel health attitudes among Turkish business travellers to African countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selcuk, Engin Burak; Kayabas, Uner; Binbasioglu, Hulisi; Otlu, Baris; Bayindir, Yasar; Bozdogan, Bulent; Karatas, Mehmet

    The number of international travellers is increasing worldwide. Although health risks related to international travel are important and generally well-understood, the perception of these risks was unclear among Turkish travellers. We aimed to evaluate the attitudes and health risk awareness of Turkish travellers travelling to African countries. A survey was performed of Turkish travellers bound for Africa from Istanbul International Ataturk Airport in July 2013. A total of 124 travellers were enrolled in the study. Among them, 62.9% had information about their destination but only 11.3% had looked for information on health problems related to travel and their destination. Of all travellers, 53.2% had at least one vaccination before travelling. The most commonly administered vaccine was for typhoid. Among the travellers, 69.3% and 80.6% had "no idea" about yellow fever vaccination and malaria prophylaxis, respectively. A positive correlation was found between a higher level of travellers' education and receiving the recommended vaccination for the destination. Our study revealed significant gaps in the vaccination and chemoprophylaxis uptake of Turkish travellers departing to Africa. An awareness and training program should be developed for travellers, as well as public health workers, to address health risks related to travel. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. CMS AWARDS

    CERN Multimedia

    Steven Lowette

    Working under great time pressure towards a common goal in gradual steps can sometimes cause us to forget to take a step back, and celebrate what marvels have been achieved. A general need was felt within CMS to expand the recognition for our young scientists that made outstanding, well recognized and creative contributions to CMS, which served to significantly advance the performance of CMS as a complete and powerful experiment. Therefore, the Collaboration Board endorsed in March 2009 a proposal from the CB Chair and Advisory Group to award each year the newly created "CMS Achievement Award" to fourteen graduate students and postdocs that made exceptional contributions to the Tracker, ECAL, HCAL and Muon subdetectors as well as the TriDAS project, the Commissioning of CMS and the Offline Software and Computing projects. It was also agreed that there was a need to go back in time, and retroactively attribute awards for the years 2007 and 2008 when CMS went from a bare cavern to a detect...

  14. Presence of pathogenic enteric viruses in illegally imported meat and meat products to EU by international air travelers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Lázaro, David; Diez-Valcarce, Marta; Montes-Briones, Rebeca; Gallego, David; Hernández, Marta; Rovira, Jordi

    2015-09-16

    One hundred twenty two meat samples confiscated from passengers on flights from non-European countries at the International Airport of Bilbao (Spain) were tested for the presence of the main foodborne viral pathogens (human noroviruses genogroups I and II, hepatitis A and E viruses) during 2012 and 2013. A sample process control virus, murine norovirus, was used to evaluate the correct performance of the method. Overall, 67 samples were positive for at least one enteric viruses, 65 being positive for hepatitis E virus (53.3%), 3 for human norovirus genogroup I (2.5%) and 1 for human norovirus genogroup II (0.8%), whereas hepatitis A virus was not detected in any sample. The type of positive meat samples was diverse, but mainly was pork meat products (64.2%). The geographical origin of the positive samples was wide and diverse; samples from 15 out 19 countries tested were positive for at least one virus. However, the estimated virus load was low, ranging from 55 to 9.0 × 10(4) PDU per gram of product. The results obtained showed the potential introduction of viral agents in travelers' luggage, which constitute a neglected route of introduction and transmission. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Acute Muscular Sarcocystosis: an international investigation among ill travelers returning from Tioman Island, Malaysia, 2011 and 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two provider-based traveler-focused networks allowed for the detection of a large outbreak of acute muscular sarcocystosis (AMS). Clinicians evaluating travelers returning ill from Malaysia with fever and myalgia noted the biphasic aspect of the disease, the later onset of elevated CPK and eosinophi...

  16. Impact of short- compared to long-haul international travel on the sleep and wellbeing of national wheelchair basketball athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Heidi R; Miller, Joanna; Taylor, Lee; Sargent, Charli; Lastella, Michele; Fowler, Peter M

    2018-07-01

    Currently, very little is known about the impact of short- or long-haul air travel on the sleep and wellbeing of wheelchair basketball athletes. Eleven national wheelchair basketball athletes wore actigraphy monitors prior, during, and after air travel to the United Kingdom. Upon arrival, participants rated their subjective jet-lag, fatigue, and vigor. Individuals traveled to the United Kingdom from different locations in Australia, the United States, and Europe and were categorised according to travel length [LONG (up to 30.2 h) or SHORT (up to 6.5 h)]. Linear mixed models determined effects of travel length on sleep and subjective ratings of jet-lag, fatigue, and vigor. During competition, subjective fatigue and jet-lag were substantially higher (ES = 0.73; ±0.77) and (ES = 0.57; ±0.60), subjective vigor was lower (ES = 1.94; ±0.72), and get-up time was earlier (ES = 0.57; ±0.60) for LONG when compared to SHORT. Travelling greater distances by airplane had a larger effect on subjective ratings of jet-lag, fatigue and vigor, rather than sleep. Irrespective of travel group, sleep and subjective responses were compromised, reflecting the travel requirements, competition-mediated influences, and/or due to a change in environment.

  17. 76 FR 53913 - Award of an Urgent Single-Source Grant to Survivors of Torture International (SOTI) in San Diego...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-30

    ... Torture International (SOTI) in San Diego, CA; Correction AGENCY: Office of Refugee Resettlement, ACF, HHS... urgent single-source grant to Survivors of Torture, International (SOTI), San Diego, CA. The document... the Torture Victims Relief Act (TVRA) of 1998,'' Public Law 105-320 (22 U.S.C. 2152 note...

  18. ACM CCS 2013-2015 Student Travel Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-29

    Student Metrics This section only applies to graduating undergraduates supported by this agreement in this reporting period The number of undergraduates...ACM CCS 2013-2015 Student Travel Support Under the ARO funded effort titled “ACM CCS 2013-2015 Student Travel Support,” from 2013 to 2015, George...Mason University awarded 10 students travel awards every year. These grants enabled the students to offset the cost to attend the ACM Conference on

  19. Awards and honours

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    President of the Italian Republic, Giorgio Napolitano, presenting Fabiola Gianotti with her award on 7 March.On the occasion of International Woman’s Day on 7 March, Fabiola Gianotti, ATLAS spokesperson, was awarded "Commendatore della Repubblica Italiana" by the Italian President for her "scientific knowledge and her excellent management skills demonstrated in guiding the ATLAS project". Gianotti received the honorary title also for "her contribution to the prestige of the Italian scientific community in the field of nuclear physics." Further reading (in Italian only): http://www.quirinale.it/Comunicati/Comunicato.asp?id=38192 An article about the beginning of Gianotti’s term of office as ATLAS spokesperson is available from the latest issue of the CERN Courier: http://cerncourier.com/cws/article/cern/38709

  20. Langley Medal awarded

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Peter M.

    Robert Thomas Jones, senior scientist at the Ames Research Center, Mountain View, Calif., was awarded the distinguished Langley Medal by the Smithsonian Institution for his ‘extensive contributions in theoretical aerodynamics, particularly with regard to development of the swept wing, supersonic area rule and, more recently, the oblique wing.’ Jones is an internationally acclaimed expert on aerodynamics, optics, and biomechanics as well as an applied mathematician, astronomer, inventor, author, and violin maker.The Langley award has been given to just 16 recipients since it was established 73 years ago. Past recipients include Wilbur and Orville Wright, Charles Lindbergh, and Richard Byrd. Named for Samuel Pierpont Langley, aeronautical pioneer and third secretary of the Smithsonian, the medal honors ‘especially meritorious investigations in the field of aerospace science.’

  1. Travelers' Health: International Adoption

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease. Chagas disease is endemic throughout much of Mexico, Central America, and South America (see Chapter 3, ... the developing world receive BCG, oral polio, measles, diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis vaccines per the original immunization ...

  2. Population attributable risk for chlamydia infection in a cohort of young international travellers (backpackers) and residents in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wand, Handan; Guy, Rebecca; Donovan, Basil; McNulty, Anna

    2011-02-23

    To estimate the population attributable risk (PAR) for Chlamydia trachomatis infection in young men and women in Sydney, Australia. Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine the association between demographic, sexual behaviour and other potential risk factors and chlamydia positivity in young (≤ 30 years) heterosexual international travellers (backpackers) and Australian residents attending a sexual health clinic. Point and interval estimates of PAR were calculated to quantify the proportion of chlamydia infections that can theoretically be prevented if a combination of risk factors is eliminated from a target population. In males, the PAR associated with inconsistent condom use in the past 3 months was 65% (95% CI 56% to 71%) in backpackers compared to 50% (95% CI 41% to 56%) in non-backpackers and the PAR associated with reporting three or more female sexual partners in the past 3 months was similar between male backpackers and non-backpackers (33% (95% CI 28% to 40%) and 36% (95% CI 32% to 41%), respectively). In females, the PAR associated with inconsistent condom use in the past 3 months was 51% (95% CI 42% to 59%) in backpackers compared to 41% (95% CI 31% to 51%) in non-backpackers, and the PAR associated with reporting three or more male sexual partners in the past 3 months was 14% (95% CI 11% to 18%) in backpackers compared to 30% (95% CI 25% to 37%) in non-backpackers. These findings suggest that the largest number of chlamydia infections could be avoided by increasing condom use, particularly in backpackers. Reporting multiple partners was also associated with a large proportion of infections and the risk associated with this behaviour should be considered in health promotion strategies.

  3. Travel and migration associated infectious diseases morbidity in Europe, 2008

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Field, Vanessa; Gautret, Philippe; Schlagenhauf, Patricia; Burchard, Gerd-Dieter; Caumes, Eric; Jensenius, Mogens; Castelli, Francesco; Gkrania-Klotsas, Effrossyni; Weld, Leisa; Lopez-Velez, Rogelio; de Vries, Peter; von Sonnenburg, Frank; Loutan, Louis; Parola, Philippe; Simon, Fabrice; Weber, Rainer; Cramer, Jakob; Pérignon, Alice; Odolini, Silvia; Carosi, Giampiero; Chappuis, François

    2010-01-01

    Europeans represent the majority of international travellers and clinicians encountering returned patients have an essential role in recognizing, and communicating travel-associated public health risks. To investigate the morbidity of travel associated infectious diseases in European travellers, we

  4. Travel expenses

    OpenAIRE

    Pištěková, Petra

    2014-01-01

    The thesis "Travel expenses" is dedicated to the travel expenses according to Czech legislation. The aim is to describe the travel reimbursement and to analyze the providing of compensation travel expenses on example of the elementary art school Zruč nad Sázavou. The purpose of this analysis is primarily to find an optimal solution to the problem of determining the place of regular workplace for the travel expenses. The theoretical part focuses on the identification and definition of all prin...

  5. Impact of rabies vaccination history on attainment of an adequate antibody titre among dogs tested for International Travel Certification, Israel - 2010-2014

    OpenAIRE

    Yakobson, B.; Taylor, Nick; Dveres, N.; Rotblat, S.; Spero, Ż.; Lankau, E. W.; Maki, J.

    2017-01-01

    Rabies is endemic in wildlife or domestic carnivore populations globally. Infection of domestic dogs is of particular concern in many areas. In regions where domestic animals are at risk of exposure to rabies virus, dogs should be routinely vaccinated against rabies to protect both pet and human populations. Many countries require demonstration of an adequate level of serum rabies neutralizing antibodies to permit entry of dogs during international travel. We analysed rabies titres of dogs se...

  6. Travel health prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzeniewski, Krzysztof

    All around the world there has been a rapid growth in the number of international travels. According to the World Tourism Organisation the number of international tourist arrivals reached 1,235 billion in 2016 and continues to grow at a high rate. This has been much due to the development of air transport (including low-cost airlines), increasingly common economic migration, a growing number of travellers visiting friends and relatives, and an increase in medical tourism. With tropical destinations becoming increasingly popular among travellers, doctors have seen a rising number of patients who seek medical advice on health risks prevalent in hot countries and health prevention measures to be taken in tropical destinations, especially where sanitation is poor. The risk for developing a medical condition while staying abroad depends on a variety of factors, including the traveller's general health condition, health prevention measures taken before or during travel (vaccinations, antimalarial chemoprophylaxis, health precautions during air, road and sea travel, proper acclimatisation, prevention of heat injuries, protection against local flora and fauna, personal hygiene, water, food and feeding hygiene), as well as the prevalence of health risk factors in a given location. Health prevention is a precondition for safe travel and maintaining good physical health; in the era of a rapid growth in international tourism it has become of key importance for all travellers.

  7. 78 FR 8062 - Awards for Information Relating To Detecting Underpayments of Tax or Violations of the Internal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-05

    ... ``a portion of an IRS civil or criminal'' is corrected to read ``a portion of an Internal Revenue Service (IRS) civil or criminal''. 0 4. On page 74806, column 1, Sec. 301.7623-2(b)(1), line 4, the...)(iv), lines 1 through 18, the language ``A confidentiality agreement. The whistleblower administrative...

  8. Enhancing the International Business Curriculum through Partnership with the United States Department of Commerce: The "E" Award Internship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Jeffrey A.

    2006-01-01

    Management education has been subjected to scrutiny and criticism over its lack of relevance to the "real world" of management practice. In response, many institutions have developed and, in some cases, require students to complete an internship as part of their degree requirements. International business is a field of study where internships can…

  9. Impact of Rabies Vaccination History on Attainment of an Adequate Antibody Titre Among Dogs Tested for International Travel Certification, Israel - 2010-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakobson, B; Taylor, N; Dveres, N; Rotblat, S; Spero, Ż; Lankau, E W; Maki, J

    2017-06-01

    Rabies is endemic in wildlife or domestic carnivore populations globally. Infection of domestic dogs is of particular concern in many areas. In regions where domestic animals are at risk of exposure to rabies virus, dogs should be routinely vaccinated against rabies to protect both pet and human populations. Many countries require demonstration of an adequate level of serum rabies neutralizing antibodies to permit entry of dogs during international travel. We analysed rabies titres of dogs seeking travel certification in Israel to assess demographic and vaccine history factors associated with antibody titres below the acceptable threshold for travel certification. Having received only one previous rabies vaccination and a longer duration since the most recent vaccination was received were primary risk factors for not achieving an adequate rabies virus neutralizing antibody titre for travel certification. These risk factors had stronger effects in younger animals, but were consistent for dogs of all ages. In particular, these findings reiterate the importance of administering at least two rabies vaccinations (the primo vaccination and subsequent booster) to ensure population-level protection against rabies in dogs globally. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  10. 2000 Volvo Award winner in biomechanical studies: Monitoring in vivo implant loads with a telemeterized internal spinal fixation device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohlmann, A; Graichen, F; Weber, U; Bergmann, G

    2000-12-01

    Implant loads were measured in 10 patients using telemeterized internal spinal fixation devices. To determine the postoperative temporal course of implant loads. Little information exists regarding the temporal course of loads on internal spinal fixation devices. The telemeterized internal spinal fixator allows the measurement of three force components and three moments acting in the fixator. Implant loads were determined in up to 20 measuring sessions for different activities, including walking, standing, sitting, lying in the supine position, and lifting an extended leg while in the supine position. Implant loads often increased shortly after anterior interbody fusion was performed. Several patients retained the same high level even after fusion had taken place. This explains the reason why screw breakage sometimes occurs more than half a year after implantation. The time of fusion could not be pinpointed from the loading curves. The results show that fixators may be highly loaded even after fusion has occurred. A flexion bending moment acts on the implant even with the body in a relaxed lying position. This means that already shortly after the anterior procedure, the shape of the spine is not neutral and unloaded, but slightly deformed, which loads the fixators. Pedicle screw breakage more than half a year after insertion does not prove that anterior interbody fusion has not occurred.

  11. Connected Traveler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-06-01

    The Connected Traveler framework seeks to boost the energy efficiency of personal travel and the overall transportation system by maximizing the accuracy of predicted traveler behavior in response to real-time feedback and incentives. It is anticipated that this approach will establish a feedback loop that 'learns' traveler preferences and customizes incentives to meet or exceed energy efficiency targets by empowering individual travelers with information needed to make energy-efficient choices and reducing the complexity required to validate transportation system energy savings. This handout provides an overview of NREL's Connected Traveler project, including graphics, milestones, and contact information.

  12. Travel health advice for backpackers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggat, Peter A; Shaw, Marc M T

    2003-01-01

    There has been an increasing trend for people to travel internationally, further afield, but fewer people are now going on programmed package tours. One of these groups of travelers comprises backpackers, who are distinct from endurance hikers or trekkers and longer-term and more remote expeditioners. Backpackers comprise individuals who travel alone or in a small group on a limited budget, and usually stay in hostels (hostelers), campsites, or similar low-cost accommodation, and carry their belongings in personal load-carrying equipment, most notably backpacks. Individual travel through backpacking, especially hosteling, appears to have become more popular for three probable reasons: travelers are seeking more cost-effective means of traveling and accommodation; they are looking to travel to regions where there is less likelihood of meeting fellow travelers; and they are looking for travel with more risk attached.

  13. Danish long distance travel A study of Danish travel behaviour and the role of infrequent travel activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Mette Aagaard

    2014-01-01

    and increasing income, emphasised a travel type segment with significant impact on the total level of travelling. International travel has increased its market shares considerably, and the strong relation with income changes suggests a travel type segment of significant importance regarding future travel...... behaviour and emissions from transportation in particular. ii The work of this thesis is not limited to a distinct definition of long distance travel, but explores long distance travel in a broader context. The analysis applies data from three different travel surveys: The Danish National Travel Survey (TU...... of respondents is certainly present in a retrospective survey focussing on multiday travel even though travel activities with overnight stays, intuitively iii should be easier to recall than e.g. travelling above a specific distance threshold. The analysis stresses the importance of further targeting the travel...

  14. Long distance travel ‘today’

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Linda

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Dane’s long distance travel. It is a part of the Drivers and Limits project about long distance travel. Long distance travel is in the project defined as infrequent travel with overnight stay. Danes 15-85 years-old travel in average 5.5 long distance travel...... per year og which a third is for international destinations, a third is for domestic second homes and a third are other domestic trips. However, 87% of the kilometres are for international destinations and only 4% are for domestic second homes. Travel activity is very uneven distributed with only half...... of the population having had a journey during the last three month. At the other hand 60% have travelled internationally during the last year and only 2% have never travelled abroad. The paper presents among other things how the travel activity is distributed on travel purpose and mode and how the mode choice...

  15. 10 years of Elsevier/JQSRT awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoop, José; Bernath, Peter F.; Mengüç, M. Pinar; Mishchenko, Michael I.; Rothman, Laurence S.

    2017-10-01

    The Elsevier award program administered by the Editorial Board of the Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer (JQSRT) was conceived in June of 2006 at the 9th Electromagnetic and Light Scattering Conference in St. Petersburg, Russia. Initially the program included three annual Elsevier/JQSRT awards for exceptional early-career scientists working in the main research fields covered by JQSRT: quantitative spectroscopy, radiative transfer, and electromagnetic scattering. In June of 2010 at the 12th Electromagnetic and Light Scattering Conference in Helsinki, Finland, it was decided to expand the award program to include three biennial Elsevier awards intended to celebrate fundamental life-time achievements of internationally recognized leaders in the same research fields. Finally, in 2013 the Elsevier award program was augmented to include a fourth annual early-career award in the category of atmospheric radiation and remote sensing.

  16. [Proceedings of the VII international symposium 'Cultural heritage in geosciences, mining and metallurgy : libraries, archives, museums' : "Museums and their collections" held at the Nationaal Natuurhistorisch Museum Leiden (The Netherlands), 19-23 May, 2003 / Cor F. Winkler Prins and Stephen K. Donovan (editors)]: The 2003 Peter Schmidt award presented to Joanne Lerud

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winkler Prins, C.F.

    2004-01-01

    It was decided 'en petit comite' to present the Peter Schmidt award for 2003 to Joanne Lerud, a dear friend who attended many of the 'Erbe Symposia' and made valuable contributions to them. The award is especially for organising in such an excellent way the Fifth International Symposium 'Cultural

  17. Travelers' Diarrhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... las picaduras de insectos Business Travel Cold Climates Counterfeit Medicines Cruise Ship Travel Families with Children Fish ... alcohol-based hand sanitizer. In general, it’s a good idea to keep your hands away from your ...

  18. The difference in the position of Mexico, Japan and China as recipients of international tourism and their position in Competitiveness Index Travel and Tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irma Magaña Carrillo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Mexico, as a tourist destination that is recipient of tourists, ranks among the top ten in terms of international arrivals. Nevertheless, in terms of competitiveness, according to the index of Travel and Tourism Competitiveness, its ranking is very low. This research project looks to understand and explain the differences in tourist competitiveness between Mexico and other countries within the Asia-Pacific Basin. This article is preoccupied with the question posed by Mexico’s evident contradicting position as that of being on the one hand, leader in terms of international arrivals, and on the other, having a low competitive performance, according to the index of international tourist competitiveness. Comparing Mexico to Japan and China, helps to understand what aspects, among those considered in the index pillars, should be contemplated in order to strengthen Mexico’s levels of competitiveness, as suggested in the Tourist Sectorial Plan 2007-2012.

  19. Two awards for Herwig Schopper

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Former CERN Director-General Herwig Schopper has received two prestigious awards, from UNESCO and from the American Institute of Physics. Herwig Schopper receives the UNESCO Albert Einstein Gold Medal from Koïchiro Matsuura, Director-General of UNESCO. Without any great fanfare, Herwig Schopper has just received two major awards. UNESCO awarded him the Albert Einstein Gold Medal in Paris on 15 April, while on 2 May in Denver the American Institute of Physics (AIP) presented him with the Tate Medal for International Leadership in Physics (together with a USD 10 000 prize). Both awards were in recognition of Herwig Schopper's pivotal role in the construction of international scientific cooperation. Today President of the SESAME Council - the International Centre for Synchrotron Light for Experimental Science and Applications in the Middle East (see Bulletin No. 26/2003) - Herwig Schopper was Director-General of CERN from 1981 to 1988. President of the European Physical Society from 1994 to 1996, he wa...

  20. [Pre-travel advice and patient education of Hungarian travellers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengyel, Ingrid; Felkai, Péter

    2018-03-01

    According to international surveys, over half of the travellers face some kind of health issue when travelling. The overwhelming majority of travel-related illnesses can be prevented with pre-travel medical consultations, but the syllabus and content of the consultation have to match the travel habits and culture of the given society. This publication explores the specificities and travel habits of Hungarian travellers. One hundred participants of a travel exhibition completed a survey about their international travel. As the survey was not representative, the data could only be processed through simple statistical methods. However, since the exhibition was presumably attended by those wishing to travel, the conclusions drawn from the results are worth publishing, since no similar survey in Hungary has been published before. Based on the suitable classification of age groups in travel medicine, 11% of the participants were adolescents / young adults (aged 15-24), 81% adults (25-59) and 8% elderly (60-74). Twenty-eight percent of the participants travel multiple times a year, 40% yearly and 32% of them less frequently; 16% of the adults, 8% of the adolescents and 4% of the elderly age group travel multiple times a year. The travel destinations of Hungarian travellers have remained practically unchanged since a study was conducted 13 years ago: the vast majority (95%) travelled within Europe, 2% to the United States, and 11% of them elsewhere. Since Hungarians do not travel to endemic areas, only 5% consulted their general practitioners (GPs) prior to travelling, and 29% did when they had to be vaccinated. Forty-two percent of those wishing to travel never consult their GPs, even though 29% of them are aware of some chronic illness. Instead, 51% gather their health information from the internet and only 6% from their doctors. By the contradiction between the poor health status of the majority of Hungarian travellers and the negligence of seeking pre-travel advice

  1. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2004 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2004 award winner, Buckman Laboratories International, developed Optimyze technology, which uses an esterase enzyme to remove sticky contaminants from paper products prior to recycling.

  2. Pre-travel advice seeking from GPs by travellers with chronic illness seen at a travel clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagneux-Brunon, Amandine; Andrillat, Carole; Fouilloux, Pascale; Daoud, Fatiha; Defontaine, Christiane; Charles, Rodolphe; Lucht, Frédéric; Botelho-Nevers, Elisabeth

    2016-03-01

    Travellers are ageing and frequently report chronic illness. Pre-travel health advice is crucial, particularly in this subgroup, and general practitioners (GPs) are first in line for treatment adjustment before departure. Our aim is to evaluate pre-travel health advice seeking from GPs by travellers with chronic illness seen at a travel clinic. A cross-sectional observational survey using a questionnaire was conducted between August 2013 and July 2014 in travellers attending the travel medicine clinic of a tertiary university hospital in France. During the study, 2019 travellers were included. Mean age was 39.4 years (±18.8). Three hundred and ninety-one (19.4%) travellers reported a history of a chronic illness. Arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus were the most frequently reported illnesses, affecting, respectively, 168 (8.3%) travellers and 102 (5.1%). Hajj pilgrims were more likely to report a history of chronic illness than other travellers. Only 810 (40.1%) travellers sought pre-travel advice from their GP. Six hundred and fifty-two (40.1%) healthy travellers and 158 (40.5%) travellers reporting chronic illness sought pre-travel advice from their GP (P = 0.96). Travellers with a history of chronic illness do not seek pre-travel health advice from their GP more frequently than healthy travellers. Travel health specialists are generally not the best practitioners to manage the care of underlying medical conditions presenting risks during travel. However, GPs offer continuity and disease management expertise to improve the specificity of pre-travel planning. Thus, ongoing collaboration between the traveller, GP and travel health specialist is likely to yield the best outcomes. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2016. All rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of bacterial enteropathogens isolated from international travelers to Mexico, Guatemala, and India from 2006 to 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang-Latimer, Jeannette; Jafri, Syed; VanTassel, Audrey; Jiang, Zhi-Dong; Gurleen, Kaur; Rodriguez, Savio; Nandy, Ranjan K; Ramamurthy, Thandavaryan; Chatterjee, Santanu; McKenzie, Robin; Steffen, Robert; DuPont, Herbert L

    2011-02-01

    The incidence rates of travelers' diarrhea (TD) have remained high for the last 50 years. More recently, there have been increasing recommendations for self-initiated therapy and use of prophylactic drugs for TD. We last examined the in vitro susceptibilities of commonly used antibiotics against TD pathogens in 1997. We now examine 456 enteropathogens isolated from adult travelers to Mexico, India, and Guatemala with diarrhea acquired between 2006 and 2008 to determine changes in susceptibility against 10 different antimicrobials by the agar dilution method. Traditional antibiotics, such as ampicillin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and doxycycline, continue to show high levels of resistance. Current first-line antibiotic agents, including fluoroquinolones and azithromycin, showed significantly higher MICs than in our earlier study, and MIC(90) levels were above the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute cutoffs for resistance. There were significant geographical differences in resistance patterns when Central America was compared with India. Entertoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) isolates showed increased resistance to ciprofloxacin (P = 0.023) and levofloxacin (P = 0.0078) in India compared with Central America. Enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) isolates from Central America showed increased resistance to nearly all of the antibiotics tested. Compared to MICs of isolates 10 years prior, there were 4- to 10-fold increases in MIC(90) values for ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, and azithromycin for both ETEC and EAEC. There were no significant changes in rifaximin MICs. Rising MICs over time imply the need for continuous surveillance of susceptibility patterns worldwide and geographically specific recommendations in TD therapy.

  4. Are international tourist cruises in Pan-European Corridor 7 through Serbia indeed considered as travels for 'silver hair' people?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragin Aleksandra S.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade the cruise industry has been the tourism niche that has experienced the most rapid growth of all. However, this form of tourism is still in its infancy and has not been relatively well researched. The aim of the paper is to identify average age of cruisers on the Corridor 7. It remains unknown whether similar researches have ever been conducted. The article demonstrates the dominance of 'silver hair' cruisers on the Corridor 7. Furthermore, we found that the age groups 60-84 were the most represented in with the domination of age groups 70-74 and 65-69. The purpose of this study was to at least support a timely adaptation to trends in the cruising industry. The results of the research may initiate further studies on the cause and effect connections between this type of traveling and resources of receptive countries, upon which the travels are based, both aiming at adequate design and launching of the tourist offer, i.e. the optimal development of receptive countries through sustainable tourism.

  5. Danish long distance travel A study of Danish travel behaviour and the role of infrequent travel activities

    OpenAIRE

    Knudsen, Mette Aagaard; Rich, Jeppe; Nielsen, Otto Anker

    2014-01-01

    Historically there has been a lack of knowledge with respect to long distance travel. Due to the considerable contribution of long distance travel to total travelled kilometres and the related energy consumption from the transport sector and derived impacts on greenhouse emissions, this is problematic. The average travel distance has steadily increased during the latest decades together with the increasing motorisation of daily travel and international aviation. Previously most focus has been...

  6. The John Muir Award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Graham

    2002-01-01

    The John Muir Award was established in the United Kingdom to respond to minimal environmental awareness, especially among youth. The Award has three levels of effort; all involve discovering a wild place, exploring its wildness, helping to conserve it, and sharing the experience with a wider audience. There is an effort to establish the award in…

  7. Have eggs. Will travel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kroløkke, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Feminist scholars have critically questioned the practices and ethics of reproductive mobility. While the reproductive mobility of fertility patients has been foregrounded, little is known of egg donor mobility including the experiences of travelling internationally to donate eggs. Based on written...... stories and photographic material provided by forty-two egg donors, this article uses feminist cluster analysis and the concept of eggpreneurship to illustrate how global egg donors negotiate reproductive agency and choice when they travel internationally to donate their eggs. In their stories, global egg...

  8. Travelling or not?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helles, Rasmus; Lai, Signe Sophus

    2017-01-01

    The article presents a quantitative content analysis (Krippendorff, 2013) of the first episode of the 32 Danish drama series produced between 2005 and 2014. A number of these have experienced unprecedented, international success, with series such as Borgen (2010-13) and The Killing (2007......-12) travelling to multiple countries on several continents. The article shows that there are systematic differences in terms of formal characteristics, themes, and characters’ communicative style between the series that travel and the series that do not. Especially, the analysis finds that the presence of strong...... female lead characters is systematically linked to the positive travel patterns of the series, and that this cuts across different genres of series. The analysis also finds that series, which have explicitly low production values and simple narrative structure, systematically travels poorer....

  9. Danish travel activities: do we travel more and longer – and to what extent?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Mette Aagaard

    Two separate Danish National travel surveys are analysed to outline the amount and extent of national and international travelling during the latest 15-20 years; the national travel survey (TU) describes mainly national daily travel activities, whereas the holiday and business travel survey...... describes national and international travel activities including overnight stay(s). When sampling only respondents with trips above 100 kilometres, they only accounts for around 2% of all daily travel activities, however, this share appears to increase and suggest in general that we do travel longer....... But due to this limited share of trips, the overall impacts of longer distance travelling vanish when considering all daily travel activities. Especially as about 95% of all daily travel destinations range less than 50 kilometres away and in total induce an average trip length of 20 kilometres. If focus...

  10. Travel Recommendations for the Nursing Mother

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... International Lactation Consultant Association Related Topics Diabetes Nutrition Travel Recommendations for the Nursing Mother Recommend on Facebook ... child from some environmental hazards When a Mother Travels Apart from Her Nursing Infant or Child Prior ...

  11. Individual traveller health priorities and the pre-travel health consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, Gerard T; Chen, Bingling; Avalos, Gloria

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the principal travel health priorities of travellers. The most frequently selected travel health concerns were accessing medical care abroad, dying abroad, insect bites, malaria, personal safety and travel security threats. The travel health risks of least concern were culture shock, fear of flying, jet lag and sexually transmitted infections. This study is the first to develop a hierarchy of self-declared travel health risk priorities among travellers. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Characteristics and pre-travel preparation of travelers at a Canadian pediatric tertiary care travel clinic: A retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiao Wei; Pell, Lisa G; Akseer, Nadia; Khan, Sarah; Lam, Ray E; Louch, Debra; Science, Michelle; Morris, Shaun K

    2016-01-01

    International travelers are susceptible to a wide spectrum of travel related morbidities. Despite rising number of international travelers in Canada, the demographics, risk profiles, and preventative strategies of high-risk traveler groups, including pediatric travelers visiting friends and relatives (VFRs) are not well described. A descriptive analysis was conducted on pre-travel consultations completed between January 2013 and August 2014 at a large pediatric tertiary care center in Toronto, Canada. Data on demographics, travel characteristics, and pre-travel interventions were extracted from 370 pre-travel consultations. Results were compared between all VFR and non-VFR travelers, as well as between children traveling to visit friends and relatives, for vacation, and for education and/or volunteer purposes. Forty-eight percent of consultations were for children travel to visit friends and/or relatives than for other purposes (29% vs 9%, p travel for >28 days than children traveling for vacation (43% vs 1%, p traveling for education/volunteer purposes (43% vs 21%, p = 0.03). Around half of cVFRs traveled to destinations in Asia (51%). The majority stayed with locals, friends and/or relatives (85%), and nearly all traveled to urban destinations (98%). The most prescribed interventions for children were azithromycin (84%), Dukoral (66%), and the hepatitis A vaccine (60%). Atovaquone/proguanil was the most commonly prescribed antimalarial for children. Children that travel to visit friends and relatives represent a unique travel group and may require specific considerations during pre-travel preparations. Our findings can help develop targeted pre-travel strategies for children VFRs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Travel and migration associated infectious diseases morbidity in Europe, 2008

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Field, V.; Gautret, P.; Schlagenhauf, P.; Burchard, G.D.; Caumes, E.; Jensenius, M.; Castelli, F.; Gkrania-Klotsas, E.; Weld, L.; Lopez-Velez, R.; de Vries, P.; von Sonnenburg, F.; Loutan, L.; Parola, P.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Europeans represent the majority of international travellers and clinicians encountering returned patients have an essential role in recognizing, and communicating travel-associated public health risks. Methods: To investigate the morbidity of travel associated infectious diseases in

  14. HOW TO FACILITATE THE MOVEMENT OF PASSENGERS BY INTRODUCING BAGGAGE COLLECTION SYSTEMS FOR TRAVEL FROM NORTH SHIELDS TO NEWCASTLE INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Connor REECE

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews current systems that either transport baggage or have the potential to transport baggage, as well as proposed systems, before modelling some of them in a modal choice model to examine how effective they would be if implemented. It was hoped that the introduction of a baggage collection system would increase the number of passengers using public transport which would be good for the environment. The specific location of the study was Tyne and Wear and a journey from North Shields to Newcastle International Airport was chosen for the analysis. The system proposed is compared to an existing systems known as InPost and Virgin Bag Magic. It was found that for the average passenger in North Shields, a system based on the way InPost operates would offer the greatest utility. However, with the introduction of a new utility equation that could analyse mixed-mode travel, a baggage collection hub based in Newcastle upon Tyne city centre offered a more significant number of users provided that the cost of the system was either covered in the travel ticket or provided by the airport or airline free of charge. This dedicated baggage collection system would be much more expensive to introduce compared to the InPost system as the infrastructure to run the InPost system is already in place, however, the ridership of the newly proposed system would be much larger therefore it could potentially recoup the development costs.

  15. Prestigious award for SOHO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-09-01

    SOHO spacecraft artist's impression hi-res Size hi-res: 451 Kb Credits: ESA SOHO spacecraft SOHO is a project of international cooperation between ESA and NASA. SOHO's science ranges from the Sun's hot interior, through its visible surface and stormy atmosphere, and out to distant regions where the wind from the Sun battles with a breeze of atoms coming from among the stars. The award recognises both the outstanding achievements in designing, building and operating the mission, as well as the science it has performed. It is a tribute to a team that has contributed to one of the most successful space missions in history. The International Academy of Astronautics presents this award in recognition of extraordinary performance and achievement by teams of scientists, engineers and managers in the field of astronautics. This honour has been awarded only twice before - to the Russian Mir Space Station Team and the US Space Shuttle Team. Now the SOHO team joins this select group. The citation of the award for the SOHO team reads: "To the team of scientists, engineers and managers for the development and operation of a world-class mission leading to substantial advancements in understanding the Sun and the solar-terrestrial relationship." SOHO has an impressive and unique list of achievements. For instance, it produced the first ever images of the turbulent outer shell of the Sun and of the structure below sunspots. It gave the most precise measurements of the solar temperature structure, the interior rotation and the gas flows inside the Sun. It measured the acceleration of the fast and slow solar winds and discovered new solar phenomena, such as solar tornadoes. It revolutionised our ability to forecast space weather, and helped our understanding of the impact of solar variability on Earth's climate. During eight years of operation, the team has had to face several heart-stopping moments, but with extraordinary team spirit, skill and competence, they turned these

  16. Traveling Solo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Joan A.

    1986-01-01

    Four after-school workshops for hearing impaired high school students focused on the independent transportation skills of riding a bus alone, using a transfer, figuring out routes and schedules, and securing additional travel information. (CL)

  17. Travelling Concepts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Karen-Margrethe

    2013-01-01

    Review of "Travelling Concepts, Metaphors, and Narratives: Literary and Cultural Studies in an Age of Interdisciplinary Research" ed. by Sibylle Baumgarten, Beatrice Michaelis and Ansagar Nünning, Trier; Wissenschaftlicher Verlag Trier, 2012......Review of "Travelling Concepts, Metaphors, and Narratives: Literary and Cultural Studies in an Age of Interdisciplinary Research" ed. by Sibylle Baumgarten, Beatrice Michaelis and Ansagar Nünning, Trier; Wissenschaftlicher Verlag Trier, 2012...

  18. STDs and the overseas traveller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowbottom, J

    1993-02-01

    Although most HIV and STD patients acquire their infections in Australia there is an increase in the numbers diagnosed with these infections after international travel. Risks to the sexual health of the travellers and their subsequent partners are discussed and suggestions made for minimising risks.

  19. Travel motivations of package tour travelers

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Jui Chi

    2007-01-01

    Managers in the travel industry are keen to know what influences customer decision-making and how customers make their decisions. Travel motivation reflects one’s needs and wants and can be viewed as a critical variable in relation to their purchase decisions. Travel motives for joining group travel may be different from those of free independent travelers. This study examined travel motives as well as travel decision-making of Taiwanese travellers with a group package tour abroad. The qualit...

  20. The impact of the EU-US Open Skies Agreement on international travel and carbon dioxide emissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mayor, K.; Tol, R.S.J.

    2008-01-01

    We use a model of domestic and international tourist numbers and flows to estimate the impact of the EU-US Open Skies agreement that is to take effect in March 2008. The Open Aviation Area will result in increased competition between transatlantic carriers and consequently falls in the cost of

  1. Travel during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Travel During Pregnancy Home For Patients Search FAQs Travel ... Travel During Pregnancy FAQ055, April 2017 PDF Format Travel During Pregnancy Pregnancy Is travel safe during pregnancy? ...

  2. Travelers' Health: Rubella

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stamaril clinics Disease Directory Resources Resources for Travelers Adventure Travel Animal Safety Blood Clots Bug Bites Evite ... Minute Travel Long-Term Travel Mass Gatherings Medical Tourism Mental Health Motion Sickness Natural Disasters Pregnant Travelers ...

  3. Tables Summarizing Awards Supported by IDRC

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Carole Labrie

    2013-04-04

    Apr 4, 2013 ... international development and the alleviation of global poverty. Once a year: APRIL. Up to CAD20,000. 1 or 2 per year. II. Canadian Window on · International Development · Awards. Doctoral. Masters'. X. X. Must be enrolled in a Canadian. University. Explore a problem common to First Nations or Inuit.

  4. 2004 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2004 award winner, Jeneil Biosurfactant Company, makes biobased, rhamnolipid surfactants by fermentation that are less toxic and more biodegradable than conventional surfactants.

  5. DCHA Travel & Mission Support System

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — DTRAMS is a travel data collection system for DCHA that collects information on both the basic details of an employee's trips (destination, length, purpose, etc.)...

  6. PPL Travel & Mission Support System

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — PTRAMS is a travel data collection system for PPL that collects information on both the basic details of an employee's trips (destination, length, purpose, etc.) and...

  7. GH Travel & Mission Support System

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — HTRAMS is a travel data collection system for GH that collects information on both the basic details of an employee's trips (destination, length, purpose, etc.) and...

  8. Clean Cities National Partner Awards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2002-05-01

    U. S. DOE Clean Cities Program has awarded its National Partner awards for 2002, and the awards will be presented at the Clean Cities Conference in May 2002. This fact sheets describe the winners and their contributions.

  9. Environmental Impact of Long Distance Travel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Linda

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the CO2 emission resulting from long distance travel by Danes. The emissions are analysed as the Danes’ footprint the whole way from Denmark to the final destination. International travel represents 31% of the Danes’ CO2 emission from passenger travel...... and the climate burden from long overseas distances is especially high even though only few travel overseas. The travel activity is furthermore increasing much more for long distances than for European destinations. Domestic travel activity with overnight stay is nearly stagnating. The study furthermore shows...

  10. Environmental Impact of Long Distance Travel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Linda

    This paper presents an analysis of the CO2 emission resulting from long distance travel by Danes. The emissions are analysed as the Danes’ footprint the whole way from Denmark to the final destination. International travel represents 31% of the Danes’ CO2 emission from passenger travel...... and the climate burden from long overseas distances is especially high even though only few travel overseas. The travel activity is furthermore increasing much more for long distances than for European destinations. Domestic travel activity with overnight stay is nearly stagnating. The study furthermore shows...

  11. Creativity Awards: Great Expectations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgour, Mark; Sasser, Sheila; Koslow, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Given the creativity inherent in advertising, one useful measure of creativity may be the advertising creativity award. Although creativity awards have been used by academics, agencies, and clients as indicators of exemplary creative work, there is surprisingly little research as to what creative elements they actually represent. Senior agency…

  12. IDRC Doctoral Research Awards

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    test

    Example of the letter required by IDRC: Reference: IDRC Awards competition: John Smith (Please indicate the title of the award.) a) As research supervisor of Mr. John Smith, I confirm that I approve and support the research proposal submitted by the candidate. b) Mr. Smith has successfully completed the following course(s):.

  13. Travelling light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Suzanne

    2004-07-01

    WHEN BOSTON nurse Phil Jones graduated from nursing school four years ago, he took a job at a large city hospital. He quickly tired of the excessive workloads and felt he wasn't being paid enough. After only a year, he wanted out. He found a way to escape by becoming what is called a travel nurse.

  14. Awards aplenty in Krakow

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    CERN will be well represented this year at the award ceremony organized by the European Physical Society (EPS) in Krakow. The Gargamelle Collaboration is being awarded the High Energy and Particle Physics prize, while Maurizio Pierini shares the Young Physicist Prize. Both Mick Storr and Andrzej Siemko will be awarded the Medal of the Polish Commission of National Education.This year’s EPS-High Energy and Particle Physics Prize is being awarded to the Gargamelle Collaboration for the discovery of the weak neutral current. Gargamelle’s large bubble chamber is now displayed in the Microcosm garden at CERN in commemoration of the discovery that led to the acceptance of the electroweak theory and the award of the Noble prize to Glashow, Salam and Weinberg in 1979. On 3 September 1973 the collaboration published two papers in the same issue of Physics Letters, one on neutral currents involving electrons, the other on neutral current interactions with hadrons (protons and neut...

  15. Pension Fund award

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2013-01-01

    The CERN Pension Fund won the Investments & Pensions Europe (IPE) 2013 Gold Award in the Medium Real-Estate Investor category. IPE is the leading European publication on the subject of pensions. The awards were judged by a panel of 22 members, which included leading European investment consultants and pension fund executives.     Théodore Economou (left), the CERN Pension Fund’s Chief Executive Officer, receives the IPE 2013 Gold Award.   The award recognised the “fresh thinking” behind the CERN Pension Fund’s updated real-estate strategy, which has brought it “focus” on “high-quality assets and diversification.” The jury also noted the Fund’s “streamlined and cost-efficient” management, and noted that CERN is “running a tight ship”. While the awards are given by a European institution, they have a worldwide scope, and winners in ot...

  16. Traveling questions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoeyer, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, I argue that uncertainty and nonknowledge, and not just research results, can be important vehicles of translation through which genetic research participation comes to affect the lives of research participants. Based on interviews with participants in a genetic research project, I....... Research questions, and not just results, may serve as a generative form of knowledge that can travel as fast as any answer....

  17. High Efficiency Traveling-Wave Tube Power Amplifier for Ka-Band Software Defined Radio on International Space Station-A Platform for Communications Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Force, Dale A.; Kacpura, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    The design, fabrication and RF performance of the output traveling-wave tube amplifier (TWTA) for a space based Ka-band software defined radio (SDR) is presented. The TWTA, the SDR and the supporting avionics are integrated to forms a testbed, which is currently located on an exterior truss of the International Space Station (ISS). The SDR in the testbed communicates at Ka-band frequencies through a high-gain antenna directed to NASA s Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS), which communicates to the ground station located at White Sands Complex. The application of the testbed is for demonstrating new waveforms and software designed to enhance data delivery from scientific spacecraft and, the waveforms and software can be upgraded and reconfigured from the ground. The construction and the salient features of the Ka-band SDR are discussed. The testbed is currently undergoing on-orbit checkout and commissioning and is expected to operate for 3 to 5 years in space.

  18. Aetiology and epidemiology of fever in children presenting to the emergency department of a French paediatric tertiary care centre after international travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naudin, Jérôme; Blondé, Renaud; Alberti, Corinne; Angoulvant, François; De Lauzanne, Agathe; Armoogum, Priscilla; Pull, Lauren; Lorrot, Mathie; Imbert, Patrick; Dauger, Stéphane; Mercier, Jean-Christophe; Faye, Albert

    2012-02-01

    As few data are available on the causes of fever in children returning from international travel, the authors studied children presenting to a French tertiary care centre with fever. Children presenting to the emergency department of the Robert Debré Paediatric Hospital, Paris, France between July and December 2007 with fever that occurred within 3 months of a stay abroad were included in this retrospective study. The children (n=538) had most commonly visited North Africa (NA) (n=214), sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) (n=185) and Europe (n=67). Their median age was 2.8 years (IQR 1.4-5.8). The median time between their return to France and the onset of fever was 5 days (IQR 0-18). Cosmopolitan infections represented 85% of the established diagnoses (97.8% and 63.9% in the children returning from NA and SSA, respectively). Fever of unknown origin accounted for 19.3% of cases. Malaria was the leading tropical infection. Excluding malaria, diarrhoeal diseases were more frequent in the children returning from NA (38.5%) than in those returning from SSA (24.5%). Malaria was associated with stays in endemic countries that exceeded 30 days (OR 3.13, 95% CI 1.02 to 9.59). Cosmopolitan infections are the leading cause of fever in French children returning from tropical and subtropical areas. However, all febrile children who have returned from an endemic area should be tested for malaria.

  19. Nuclear Fusion Award 2009 speech Nuclear Fusion Award 2009 speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbagh, Steven Anthony

    2011-01-01

    This is an exceptional moment in my career, and so I want to thank all of my teachers, colleagues and mentors who have made this possible. From my co-authors and myself, many thanks to the International Atomic Energy Agency, IOP Publishing, the Nuclear Fusion journal team, and the selection committee for the great honor of receiving this award. Also gratitude to Kikuchi-sensei, not only for the inventive and visionary creation of this award, but also for being a key mentor dating back to his efforts in producing high neutron output in JT-60U. It was also a great honor to receive the award directly from IAEA Deputy Director General Burkart during the 23rd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference in Daejeon. Receiving the award at this venue is particularly exciting as Daejeon is home to the new, next-generation KSTAR tokamak device that will lead key magnetic fusion research areas going forward. I would also like to thank the mayor of Daejeon, Dr Yum Hong-Chul, and all of the meeting organizers for giving us all a truly spectacular and singular welcoming event during which the award was presented. The research leading to the award would not have been possible without the support of the US Department of Energy, and I thank the Department for the continued funding of this research. Special mention must be made to a valuable co-author who is no longer with us, Professor A. Bondeson, who was a significant pioneer in resistive wall mode (RWM) research. I would like to thank my wife, Mary, for her infinite patience and encouragement. Finally, I would like to personally thank all of you that have approached and congratulated me directly. There are no units to measure how important your words have been in this regard. When notified that our paper had been shortlisted for the 2009 Nuclear Fusion Award, my co-authors responded echoing how I felt—honored to be included in such a fine collection of research by colleagues. It was unfathomable—would this paper follow the brilliant work

  20. Constraints to leisure travel and visitation to natural areas: An international comparison of four cities.In: Chavez, Deborah J.; Winter, Patricia L.; Absher, James D., eds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick T. Tierney; Deborah J. Chavez; James D. Absher

    2008-01-01

    Leisure travel and visitation to natural areas and constraints to undertaking these activities are important concerns for recreation resource managers and tourism businesses. Surveys were administered to Los Angeles, Barcelona, Glasgow, and Morelia, Mexico, residents to ascertain leisure travel and undeveloped natural area visitation levels and constraints. A...

  1. Effects of northbound long-haul international air travel on sleep quantity and subjective jet lag and wellness in professional Australian soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Peter; Duffield, Rob; Howle, Kieran; Waterson, Adam; Vaile, Joanna

    2015-07-01

    The current study examined the effects of 10-h northbound air travel across 1 time zone on sleep quantity, together with subjective jet lag and wellness ratings, in 16 male professional Australian football (soccer) players. Player wellness was measured throughout the week before (home training week) and the week of (away travel week) travel from Australia to Japan for a preseason tour. Sleep quantity and subjective jet lag were measured 2 d before (Pre 1 and 2), the day of, and for 5 d after travel (Post 1-5). Sleep duration was significantly reduced during the night before travel (Pre 1; 4.9 [4.2-5.6] h) and night of competition (Post 2; 4.2 [3.7-4.7] h) compared with every other night (P0.90). Moreover, compared with the day before travel, subjective jet lag was significantly greater for the 5 d after travel (P0.90), and player wellness was significantly lower 1 d post-match (Post 3) than at all other time points (P0.90). Results from the current study suggest that sleep disruption, as a result of an early travel departure time (8 PM) and evening match (7:30 PM), and fatigue induced by competition had a greater effect on wellness ratings than long-haul air travel with a minimal time-zone change. Furthermore, subjective jet lag may have been misinterpreted as fatigue from sleep disruption and competition, especially by the less experienced players. Therefore, northbound air travel across 1 time zone from Australia to Asia appears to have negligible effects on player preparedness for subsequent training and competition.

  2. Great Indoors Awards 2007

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    Hollandis Maastrichtis jagati 17. XI esimest korda rahvusvahelist auhinda The Great Indoors Award. Aasta sisekujundusfirmaks valiti Masamichi Katayama asutatud Wonderwall. Auhinna said veel Zaha Hadid, Heatherwick Studio, Ryui Nakamura Architects ja Item Idem

  3. CPD Allocations and Awards

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — The CPD Allocation and Award database provides filterable on-screen and exportable reports on select programs, such as the Community Development Block Grant Program,...

  4. FY11 Coc Awards

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — This report displays the renewal homeless assistance projects being awarded by HUD under the 2011 Continuum of Care (CoC) competitive grants process. Approximately...

  5. 2015 Gulf Guardian Awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Gulf of Mexico Program Partnership developed the Gulf Guardian awards as a way to recognize and honor the businesses, community groups, individuals, and agencies that are taking positive steps to keep the Gulf healthy, beautiful and productive.

  6. Tectonics wins AAP Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    AGU's newest journal, Tectonics, won the 1983 award for excellence in journal design and production given by the Association of American Publishers, Inc. (AAP), in the eighth annual professional and scholarly publishing awards competition. Edited by John F. Dewey, the bimonthly journal is a joint publication of AGU and the European Geophysical Society. Paul E. Tapponnier is the European editor and B.C. Burchfiel is the North American editor. The journal is now in its third year of publication.

  7. Awarding a Prize

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moeran, Brian

    2013-01-01

    This article describes and analyses the selection and prize awarding processes for a biennial ceramics exhibition in Japan. Based on long-term fieldwork in the “art world” (Becker 1982) of contemporary Japanese ceramics, as well as on participant observation of the processes concerned, the article...... addresses and draws upon two sets of sociological writings: one concerned with prizes and awards; the other with evaluative practices....

  8. The stress of travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterhouse, J; Reilly, T; Edwards, B

    2004-10-01

    International travel is an essential part of the life of elite athletes, both for competition and training. It is also becoming increasingly common among recreational sportspersons. Long-distance travel is associated with a group of transient negative effects, collectively referred to as 'travel fatigue', which result from anxiety about the journey, the change to an individual's daily routine, and dehydration due to time spent in the dry air of the aircraft cabin. Travel fatigue lasts for only a day or so, but for those who fly across several time zones, there are also the longer-lasting difficulties associated with 'jet lag'. The problems of jet lag can last for over a week if the flight crosses 10 time zones or more, and they can reduce performance and the motivation to train effectively. Knowledge of the properties of the body clock enables the cause of the difficulties to be understood (an unadjusted body clock), and forms the basis of using light in the new time zone to promote adjustment of the body clock. Sleep loss and its effects are important components of jet lag, and attempts to promote sleep by the use of melatonin and other hypnotics are also relevant. Sleep loss is also found in those who undertake challenges that involve long periods where the normal consolidated sleep of 8 h length is not possible. Advice on sleep regimens in such circumstances is given.

  9. Kokes Award for the 24th North American Catalysis Society Meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rioux, Robert M. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2016-05-02

    The objective of the Richard. J. Kokes Travel Award program is to encourage the participation of students in the biennial North American Catalysis Society (NACS) Meetings. The Kokes Award covers a significant portion of the transportation, lodging, and conference registration costs. Eligible students must be enrolled at a North American university and need to present a paper at the meeting. The Kokes awardee will be required to contribute some time to the organizing committee to assist in meeting operations and to be present at the meeting during the entire time. Similar to the 23rd Kokes Award program, undergraduate students are also eligible for the 24th Kokes Award program.

  10. A profile of travelers--an analysis from a large swiss travel clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bühler, Silja; Rüegg, Rolanda; Steffen, Robert; Hatz, Christoph; Jaeger, Veronika K

    2014-01-01

    Globally, the Swiss have one of the highest proportions of the population traveling to tropical and subtropical countries. Large travel clinics serve an increasing number of customers with specific pre-travel needs including uncommon destinations and preexisting medical conditions. This study aims to identify health characteristics and travel patterns of travelers seeking advice in the largest Swiss travel clinic so that tailored advice can be delivered. A descriptive analysis was performed on pre-travel visits between July 2010 and August 2012 at the Travel Clinic of the Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Zurich, Switzerland. A total of 22,584 travelers sought pre-travel advice. Tourism was the main reason for travel (17,875, 81.5%), followed by visiting friends and relatives (VFRs; 1,715, 7.8%), traveling for business (1,223, 5.6%), and "other reasons" (ie, volunteer work, pilgrimage, study abroad, and emigration; 1,112, 5.1%). The main travel destination was Thailand. In the VFR group, the highest proportions of traveling children (258, 15.1%) and of pregnant or breastfeeding women (23, 3.9%) were observed. Mental disorders were more prominent in VFRs (93, 5.4%) and in travel for "other reasons" (63, 5.7%). The latter stayed for the longest periods abroad; 272 (24.9%) stayed longer than 6 months. VFR travelers received the highest percentage of yellow fever vaccinations (523, 30.5%); in contrast, rabies (269, 24.2%) and typhoid vaccinations (279, 25.1%) were given more often to the "other travel reasons" group. New insights into the characteristics of a selected and large population of Swiss international travelers results in improved understanding of the special needs of an increasingly diverse population and, thus, in targeted preventive advice and interventions. © 2014 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  11. Educational Travel to Israel in the Era of Globalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezrachi, Elan

    2015-01-01

    Travel to Israel has been a central feature of Jewish and Zionist education yet it is time for this educational travel to be examined in the context of current cultural trends of travel and transnational experiences. The Jewish educational community has not yet internalized the impact of global trends on the field of travel to Israel from a…

  12. Request for Travel Funds for Systems Radiation Biology Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen [NYU School of Medicine

    2014-03-22

    The 3rd International Systems Radiation Biology Workshop brought together the major European, US and Japanese research programs on radiation risk as well as selected experts representing systems biological approaches to discuss how the new methodologies could be best exploited for low dose research. A significant part of the workshop was devoted to discussions organised as breakout group sessions. To facilitate discussions number of participants was limited to 60 persons. To achieve the goals of this symposium in this international conference, support from DOE is vital. Hence, this proposal requested support in the amount of $15,000 to cover the travel expenses of international experts and radiation biology scientists from the United States. This supporting mechanism was clearly identified to the selected US participants as a conference support award from the DOE (See attached PDF). The workshop was an outstanding opportunity to strengthen interactions between leading experts in the emerging areas of radiation sciences, and will also provide opportunities for younger scientists to meet with experts and discuss their results. This workshop was designed to endorse active engagement in international collaboration. A major objective of this conference was to effectively communicate research results, in order to ensure that current thinking reflects sound science of radiation biology. Further, this international event addressed the use and success of scientific initiatives in radiation biology for policymakers, standard-setters, and the general public.

  13. A rich harvest of awards for the CERN Pension Fund

    CERN Document Server

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2012-01-01

    The CERN Pension Fund recently received two prestigious international awards. The governing bodies and the whole Pension Fund team are celebrating this success, and looking forward to a busy and bright new year.   On 29 November, Théodore Economou (left) accepted the Best Risk Management Solutions Prize at the 2012 Investments & Pensions Europe Awards. “The awards go to the entire CERN Pension Fund team, the Pension Fund Governing Board, and the Investment Committee,” says Théodore Economou, the Fund’s Chief Executive Officer. On 29 November, at a ceremony held in Copenhagen, Théodore accepted the first award received by the Fund for the Best Risk Management Solutions at the 2012 Investments & Pensions Europe (IPE) Awards. A few days later, he was informed that the Fund had also won the “2012 Industry Innovation Award” of the Asset International - Chief Investment Officer (aiCIO) magazine, in the &l...

  14. Travel personae of American pleasure travelers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, S.; Tussyadiah, Iis; Mazanec, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Travel style has been shown to be a useful concept for understanding travelers. In this study it is argued that the portfolio of trips (specifically, the portfolio of various trip styles) one takes can be used to describe his/her overall travel persona. Network analysis was used to examine...... the structural relationships between types of trips based upon the assumption that each travel style may be considered as a "node," and its association with other travel styles may be represented by the links within the network. Analyses indicate that American travelers take on a wide range of different travel...

  15. Tuberculosis Information for International Travelers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Studies Consortium Research Projects Publications TB Trials Consortium Study Descriptions Background Behavioral & Social Science Research Infection Control TB in Specific Populations African-American Community Stop TB in the African-American ...

  16. Travel itinerary uncertainty and the pre-travel consultation--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, Gerard; Md Nor, Muhammad Najmi

    2016-01-01

    Risk assessment relies on the accuracy of the information provided by the traveller. A questionnaire was administered to 83 consecutive travellers attending a travel medicine clinic. The majority of travellers was uncertain about destinations within countries, transportation or type of accommodation. Most travellers were uncertain if they would be visiting malaria regions. The degree of uncertainty about itinerary potentially impacts on the ability of the travel medicine specialist to perform an adequate risk assessment, select appropriate vaccinations and prescribe malaria prophylaxis. This study reveals high levels of traveller uncertainty about their itinerary which may potentially reduce the effectiveness of their pre-travel consultation. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of International society of travel medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. The impact of injection anxiety on education of travelers about common travel risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Lorraine M; Farquharson, Lorna; O'Dwyer, Niamh A; Behrens, Ron H

    2014-01-01

    relationship was found between recall and anxiety, this may have been due to the sample and setting. © 2013 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  18. Profile of Travelers With Preexisting Medical Conditions Attending a Specialist Travel Medicine Clinic in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Calvin Teo Jia; Flaherty, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Patients with complex medical comorbidities travel for protracted periods to remote destinations, often with limited access to medical care. Few descriptions are available of their preexisting health burden. This study aimed to characterize preexisting medical conditions and medications of travelers seeking pre-travel health advice at a specialized travel medicine clinic. Records of travelers attending the Galway Tropical Medical Bureau clinic between 2008 and 2014 were examined and information relating to past medical history was entered into a database. Data were recorded only where the traveler had a documented medical history and/or was taking medications. Of the 4,817 records available, 56% had a documented medical history and 24% listed medications. The majority of travelers with preexisting conditions were female. The mean age of the cohort was 31.68 years. The mean period remaining before the planned trip was 40 days. Southeast Asia was the most popular single destination, and 17% of travelers with medical conditions were traveling alone. The most frequently reported conditions were allergies (20%), insect bite sensitivity (15%), asthma (11%), psychiatric conditions (4%), and hypertension (3%). Of the 30 diabetic travelers, 14 required insulin; 4.5% of travelers were taking immunosuppressant drugs, including corticosteroids. Half of the female travelers were taking the oral contraceptive pill while 11 travelers were pregnant at the time of their pre-travel consultation. This study provides an insight into the medical profile of travelers attending a travel health clinic. The diverse range of diseases reported highlights the importance of educating physicians and nurses about the specific travel health risks associated with particular conditions. Knowledge of the effects of travel on underlying medical conditions will inform the pre-travel health consultation. © 2015 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  19. THE PERCEIVED RISK OF TRAVELLING, WITH EMPHASIS ON TERRORISM

    OpenAIRE

    Stefanou, Areti

    2009-01-01

    Risk is an important factor when considering international tourism (Lepp and Gibson, 2003; Sonmez and Graefe, 1998b; 1998a; Sonmez, 1998), especially nowadays as a result of the increased magnitude and frequency of terrorism attacks when travelling. Such events have negatively affected individuals’ perceived risk in international travel, making terrorism risk a key element of the international travel scene. Perceived risk can influence a positive image, intention to travel to a particular des...

  20. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2012 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2012 award winner, Buckman International, developed Maximyze enzymes that modify the cellulose in wood fibers to increase binding between fibers in paper and improve paper strength.

  1. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2003 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2003 award winner, DuPont, developed a genetically engineered microorganism jointly with Genencor International to manufacture 1,3-propanediol, a building block for Sorona polyester.

  2. 2013 Awards Gala Event | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dr. Roger I. Glass , M.D., Ph.D. (right), was Jack Andraka , 16 (middle), who recently won the 2012 Gordon E. Moore Award, grand prize of the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair. Andraka developed a quick and ...

  3. The Concept of Travel Medicine and the Actual Situation of Travel-Related Illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunalı, Varol; Turgay, Nevin

    2017-06-01

    Travel medicine defines all diseases and medical situations that are related to travel. Travel medicine comprises infectious diseases, traumas, altitude sickness, sun burns, embolisms, jet lag, and many more travel-related situations. With the increasing possibility and ease of travel, the number of people who have travelled internationally has exceeded 1.13 billion in 2014, and the revenues of international travel have exceeded 1.25 trillion dollars. With every passing day, international travels are shifting toward the developing countries and to more exotic regions of the world, and travelers tend to be more adventurous and daring, thereby increasing risky behaviors during travels. Traveling plays an important role in transmitting infections such as Zika virus infection, Ebola, avian flu, severe acute respiratory syndrome, Chikungunya, and dengue fever and is the principal reason for the epidemics of these types of infections on a global scale. With this background, we suggest that travel medicine is an important but "neglected" medical discipline as the discipline of Parasitology itself like most parasitic diseases.

  4. 48 CFR 752.7002 - Travel and transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    .... 752.7002 Section 752.7002 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT... limitations on particular items of cost. (b) International travel. For travel to and from post of assignment... dependents. When travel is by economy class accommodations, the Contractor will be reimbursed for the cost of...

  5. 48 CFR 731.205-46 - Travel costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Travel costs. 731.205-46 Section 731.205-46 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT GENERAL....205-46 Travel costs. It is USAID policy to require prior written approval of international travel by...

  6. Business travelers: vaccination considerations for this population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin H; Leder, Karin; Wilson, Mary E

    2013-04-01

    Illness in business travelers is associated with reduced productivity on the part of the employee as well as the employer. Immunizations offer a reliable method of preventing infectious diseases for international business travelers. The authors review the travel patterns of business travelers, available data on illnesses they encounter, their potential travel-associated risks for vaccine-preventable diseases and recommendations on immunizations for this population. Routine vaccines (e.g., measles, tetanus and influenza) should be reviewed to assure that they provide current coverage. The combined hepatitis A and hepatitis B vaccine with a rapid schedule offers options for those with time constraints. Other vaccine recommendations for business travelers need to focus on their destinations and activities and underlying health, taking into account the concept of cumulative risk for those with frequent travel, multiple trips or long stays.

  7. Bon voyage: an update on safe travel in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Claire Ann; Chan, Crystal

    2014-12-01

    Travel in pregnancy is common, particularly as international travel for work and leisure has become more commonplace. Few women are fully aware of the potential risks of travelling while pregnant, particularly the risk of delivering abroad. We describe here the medical risks and the many social, financial, and logistical considerations for travelling during pregnancy. Pertinent considerations include the risks of developing medical complications abroad, immunization considerations, access to obstetrical care in developing countries, travel medical insurance, and airline regulations.

  8. 78 FR 3398 - United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board: Meeting of the United States Travel and Tourism...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board: Meeting of the United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board AGENCY: International Trade... the schedule and agenda for an open meeting of the United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board...

  9. 78 FR 70274 - United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board: Meeting of the United States Travel and Tourism...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board: Meeting of the United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board AGENCY: International Trade... the schedule and agenda for an open meeting of the United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board...

  10. Awarding a Prize

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moeran, Brian

    2013-01-01

    This article describes and analyses the selection and prize awarding processes for a biennial ceramics exhibition in Japan. Based on long-term fieldwork in the “art world” (Becker 1982) of contemporary Japanese ceramics, as well as on participant observation of the processes concerned, the article...

  11. Award Winning Science Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showalter, Victor M.; Slesnick, Irwin L.

    This is a collection of reports of student award winning science projects that have appeared in "The Science Teacher." Grade levels 7-12 are represented with projects categorized as follows: biology, chemistry and physics, earth-space science, and miscellaneous. In each section the abstracts are arranged in order of increasing complexity…

  12. Research Award: Networked Economies

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Office 2004 Test Drive User

    2015-08-06

    Aug 6, 2015 ... have completed a master's or doctoral degree at a recognized university. These awards may be part of an academic requirement. • Your proposed research must focus on a developing country. The research awardee should have the following qualifications: • Master's degree in social sciences, media ...

  13. ATLAS Thesis Awards 2015

    CERN Multimedia

    Biondi, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Winners of the ATLAS Thesis Award were presented with certificates and glass cubes during a ceremony on Thursday 25 February. The winners also presented their work in front of members of the ATLAS Collaboration. Winners: Javier Montejo Berlingen, Barcelona (Spain), Ruth Pöttgen, Mainz (Germany), Nils Ruthmann, Freiburg (Germany), and Steven Schramm, Toronto (Canada).

  14. FAQs for Research Awards

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Jean-Claude Dumais

    Visit the Grants page for details on the positions offered by IDRC's programs. 9) How do you select Research Awardees? You can find out more about the Research Awards evaluation process in the Call for Application and Checklist documents under the Grants Web page. 10) Can someone at IDRC review my research ...

  15. Global Cancer Humanitarian Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pat Garcia-Gonzalez of the Max Foundation accepted the first annual NCI Global Cancer Medicine Humanitarian Award for her work in chronic myeloid leukemia at the NCI, Center for Global Health Symposium for Global Cancer Research, held in Boston on March 25, 2015.

  16. ATLAS Thesis Award 2017

    CERN Multimedia

    Anthony, Katarina

    2018-01-01

    Winners of the ATLAS Thesis Award were presented with certificates and glass cubes during a ceremony on 22 February, 2018. They are pictured here with Karl Jakobs (ATLAS Spokesperson), Max Klein (ATLAS Collaboration Board Chair) and Katsuo Tokushuku (ATLAS Collaboration Board Deputy Chair).

  17. Recipients of major scientific awards: A descriptive and predictive analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbee, Andrew Calvin

    Recent trends demonstrate an increase of women in leadership roles, STEM fields, and participating in higher education including graduate and doctoral programs, which is a result of Title IX. This quantitative study considered major scientific awards awarded to females and examines demographic characteristics of awardees from the Nobel, National Academy of Sciences (NAS), and National Science Foundation (NSF). More specifically, the following awards were examined the Nobel Prize in Chemistry, the NAS Public Welfare Medal, and the NSF National Medal of Science within the discipline of Physical Science. Also, this study focused on equality to determine if a fair playing field and equal opportunity for women in academics has improved since Title IX. A limited amount of research has explored female award recipients. Specifically, existing research, has not examined the pinnacle of academic performance in the form of national and international awards. In the present study, I posed research questions relating to demographic characteristics of award recipients from the Nobel, NAS, and NSF between 1975 and 2015. Additionally, I examined if sex and age of the awardees could predict early career award obtainment. Through the frame of Social cognitive theory (Bandura, 1986, 1997, and 2005) I considered how perceptions of gender roles are a product of influence by society and the possible connection to performance. Results indicated a limited number of females have received these scientific awards and the awardees age could predict receiving an award early in their career. Additionally, the study provided insight into the progression of Title IX within the context of athletics and academics. It addressed the incremental and systematic increase in academics for women at high school, college, career, and scientific awards. Perhaps most importantly, it identified an observed pattern for female science award recipients reaching a critical mass and a tipping point.

  18. Overview of selected infectious disease risks for the corporate traveler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, T Warner; Fortuna, Joseph

    2008-08-01

    International business travel to under-developed and developing countries has increased considerably over the past two decades. Most of these destinations are endemic to a variety of infectious diseases, many of which are associated with considerable morbidity, mortality, or both and the nonimmune, unprepared corporate traveler is at risk. Comprehensive pretravel consultation is essential to prevent travel-related illness. This review addresses some of the infectious diseases that can be acquired during international travel, including regions of endemicity, assessment of risk, and available means of prevention. In addition, we discuss data concerning current practices and attitudes of travelers, along with some of the issues surrounding the counseling of corporate travelers.

  19. The Connected Traveler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Stanley

    2017-04-24

    The Connected Traveler project is a multi-disciplinary undertaking that seeks to validate potential for transformative transportation system energy savings by incentivizing energy efficient travel behavior.

  20. 77 FR 38583 - Meeting of the United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-28

    ... Board has four subcommittees: Travel Facilitation; Infrastructure and Sustainability; Business Climate... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Meeting of the United States Travel and... the United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board (Board). The agenda may change to accommodate...

  1. An Examination of U.S. AACSB International Accounting-Accredited Schools to Determine Global Travel Experience Requirements in Accounting Masters Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Susan Lee; Finley, Jane B.

    2010-01-01

    The authors report on the extent to which U.S. graduate accounting programs accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business have included some type of global travel experience in their graduate accounting curriculum. The authors contacted 137 member schools offering accounting masters degrees. Only one school required an…

  2. Travellers' profile, travel patterns and vaccine practices--a 10-year prospective study in a Swiss Travel Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boubaker, Rim; Meige, Pierrette; Mialet, Catherine; Buffat, Chantal Ngarambe; Uwanyiligira, Mediatrice; Widmer, Francine; Rochat, Jacynthe; Fossati, Annie Hérard; Souvannaraj-Blanchant, Manisinh; Payot, Sylvie; Rochat, Laurence; de Vallière, Serge; Genton, Blaise; D'Acremont, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    vaccinations or because of real travel health concern or both. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2016. All rights reserved.For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Travel time and travel cost in European air travel

    OpenAIRE

    Dusek, Tamas

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study is to examine two issues of consumer air travel accessibility in Europe, namely flight time and ticket costs. The first part of the paper discusses the various methodological problems of creating time matrix and cost matrix of air travel. Because of problems of conceptualizing of the air travel network and the modifiable areal unit problem the analysis is conducted on several spatial levels. The smallest network consists of 15 busiest airports and the largest network has ...

  4. Infectious Risks of Traveling Abroad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin H; Blair, Barbra M

    2015-08-01

    A popular leisure activity, international travel can be associated with some infections. The most common travel-related illnesses appear to be gastrointestinal, dermatologic, respiratory, and systemic febrile syndromes. The pretravel medical consultation includes immunizations, malaria chemoprophylaxis, self-treatment for traveler's diarrhea, and advice on the prevention of a myriad of other infectious causes including dengue, chikungunya, rickettsiosis, leptospirosis, schistosomiasis, and strongyloidiasis. Travel to locations experiencing outbreaks such as Ebola virus disease, Middle East respiratory syndrome, avian influenza, and chikungunya call for specific alerts on preventive strategies. After travel, evaluation of an ill traveler must explore details of exposure, including destinations visited; activities; ingestion of contaminated food or drinks; contact with vectors, animals, fresh water, or blood and body fluids; and other potential exposures. Knowledge of the geographic distribution of infectious diseases is important in generating the differential diagnoses and testing accordingly. Empiric treatment is sometimes necessary when suspicion of a certain diagnosis is strong and confirmatory tests are delayed or lacking, particularly for infections that are rapidly progressive (for example, malaria) or for which timing of testing is prolonged (such as leptospirosis).

  5. A-Level Revision Guide: Travel and Tourism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirlaway, Joanne; Duckett, Ian

    2007-01-01

    A-levels in Travel and Tourism are unitised qualifications that should take a minimum of two years to achieve. Successful completion of year one results in the candidate achieving a qualification in its own right: an AS level. This AS level will be deemed a single or a double award depending on how many units have been assessed. A single award…

  6. 2017-2018 Travel Expense Reports for Jean Lebel, President

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Chantal Taylor

    Purpose: Attend the 2017 Canada Gairdner Awards Gala. Date(s):. 2017-10-26 to 2017-10-27. Destination(s):. Toronto. Airfare: $433.81. Other. Transportation: $20.00. Accommodation: $422.26. Meals and. Incidentals: $25.92. Other: $0.00. Total: $901.99. Comments: 2017-2018 Travel Expense Reports for. Jean Lebel ...

  7. Standardized training in nurse model travel clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofarelli, Theresa A; Ricks, Jane H; Anand, Rahul; Hale, Devon C

    2011-01-01

    International travel plays a significant role in the emergence and redistribution of major human diseases. The importance of travel medicine clinics for preventing morbidity and mortality has been increasingly appreciated, although few studies have thus far examined the management and staff training strategies that result in successful travel-clinic operations. Here, we describe an example of travel-clinic operation and management coordinated through the University of Utah School of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases. This program, which involves eight separate clinics distributed statewide, functions both to provide patient consult and care services, as well as medical provider training and continuing medical education (CME). Initial training, the use of standardized forms and protocols, routine chart reviews and monthly continuing education meetings are the distinguishing attributes of this program. An Infectious Disease team consisting of one medical doctor (MD) and a physician assistant (PA) act as consultants to travel nurses who comprise the majority of clinic staff. Eight clinics distributed throughout the state of Utah serve approximately 6,000 travelers a year. Pre-travel medical services are provided by 11 nurses, including 10 registered nurses (RNs) and 1 licensed practical nurse (LPN). This trained nursing staff receives continuing travel medical education and participate in the training of new providers. All nurses have completed a full training program and 7 of the 11 (64%) of clinic nursing staff serve more than 10 patients a week. Quality assurance measures show that approximately 0.5% of charts reviewed contain a vaccine or prescription error which require patient notification for correction. Using an initial training program, standardized patient intake forms, vaccine and prescription protocols, preprinted prescriptions, and regular CME, highly trained nurses at travel clinics are able to provide standardized pre-travel care to

  8. GeoSentinel surveillance of illness in returned travelers, 2007-2011

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leder, Karin; Torresi, Joseph; Libman, Michael D.; Cramer, Jakob P.; Castelli, Francesco; Schlagenhauf, Patricia; Wilder-Smith, Annelies; Wilson, Mary E.; Keystone, Jay S.; Schwartz, Eli; Barnett, Elizabeth D.; von Sonnenburg, Frank; Brownstein, John S.; Cheng, Allen C.; Sotir, Mark J.; Esposito, Douglas H.; Freedman, David O.; Burchard, Gerd-Dieter; Ward, Brian J.; Maclean, J. Dick; Kain, Kevin C.; Boggild, Andrea K.; Caumes, Eric; Pérignon, Alice; Parola, Philippe; Simon, Fabrice; Delmont, Jean; Loutan, Louis; Chappuis, François; Jensenius, Mogens; Grobusch, Martin P.; de Vries, Peter J.; Gadroen, Kartini; McCarthy, Anne E.; Brown, Graham V.; Field, Vanessa; Kanagawa, Shuzo; Kato, Yasuyuki; Mizunno, Yasutaka; Stauffer, William M.; Walker, Patricia F.; Ursing, Johan; Fröberg, Gabrielle; Askling, Helena Hervius; Weber, Rainer; Tachikawa, Natsuo; Kurai, Hanako; Sagara, Hiroko; Lim, Poh Lian; Haulman, N. Jean; Roesel, David J.; Jong, Elaine C.; Connor, Bradley A.; Carosi, Giampiero; Hale, Devon C.; Anand, Rahul; Gelman, Stephanie S.; Gkrania-Klotsas, Effrossyni; López-Vélez, Rogelio; Pérez-Molina, Jose A.; Kozarsky, Phyllis E.; Wu, Henry M.; Fairley, Jessica K.; Franco-Paredes, Carlos; Rapp, Christophe; Aoun, Olivier; Borwein, Sarah; Cahill, John D.; McKinley, George; Hagmann, Stefan; Henry, Michael; Miller, Andy O.; Mendelson, Marc; Vincent, Peter; Coyle, Christina M.; Doyle, Patrick W.; Ghesquiere, Wayne G.; Chen, Lin H.; Vincelette, Jean; Piyaphanee, Watcharapong; Silachamroon, Udomsak; Hynes, Noreen A.; Sack, R. Bradley; McKenzie, Robin; Perret, Cecilia; Shaw, Marc T.; Hern, Annemarie; Phu, Phi Truong Hoang; Anderson, Nicole M.; Batchelor, Trish; Meisch, Dominique; Lalloo, David G.; Beeching, Nicholas J.; Wang, Andy; Eason, Jane; MacDonald, Susan; Licitra, Carmelo; Crespo, Antonio; Anderson, Susan; Yates, Johnnie A.; Ansdell, Vernon E.; Pandey, Prativa; Pradhan, Rashila; Murphy, Holly; Nutman, Thomas B.; Klion, Amy D.; Smith, Catherine C.; MacConnachie, Alisdair A.; Jenks, Nancy P.; Kerr, Christine A.; Valdez, Luis M.; Siu, Hugo; Flores-Figueroa, Jose; Okhuysen, Pablo C.

    2013-01-01

    International travel continues to increase, particularly to Asia and Africa. Clinicians are increasingly likely to be consulted for advice before travel or by ill returned travelers. To describe typical diseases in returned travelers according to region, travel reason, and patient demographic

  9. Kokes Awards for the 23rd North American Catalysis Society Meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, Gary [University of Kentucky Research Foundation, Lexington, KY (United States)

    2014-01-31

    The Tri-State Catalysis Society awarded 107 Kokes Travel Awards. The program was very successful and to date this was the most Kokes Travel Awards ever awarded at a North American Catalysis Society Meeting. It provided students who merited an award the opportunity to attend the meeting, present a paper in the form of either an oral presentation or a poster presentation, and to serve the North American Catalysis Society by participating in the organization of the meeting. Students worked very hard during the week of the meeting to make it a success. Financial support for the Kokes awards was provided by DOE, NSF, NACS, as well as the Tri-State Catalysis Society, the latter through fund raising activities, and other donations. AT the meeting, each student received over $1050 in kind to offset the costs of registration fees ($260), hotel accommodations ($295.7), transportation ($400 travel allowance), as well as T-shirts ($20), and banquet tickets ($95 provided by donations from society members). In addition, for the first time, students received certificates that were signed by the President of NACS, Professor Enrique Iglesia, and by the Kokes Awards Chair, Gary Jacobs (see last page). A list of meeting co-chairs (i.e., Uschi M. Graham, Umit S. Ozkan, and Madan Bhassin) and the honorary chair (Burtron H. Davis) was also included on the certificate, along with the name of the recipient. The awardees were chosen on a merit-based guideline which also included the requirements of having a presentation accepted at the meeting and being a student at a North American University. The Richard J. Kokes Student Travel Award Committee (Gary Jacobs, Rodney Andrews, and Peter Smirniotis) with help from the Organizing Committee were able to secure money from four sources as detailed in Table 1. As detailed by our Treasurer, Dr. Helge Toufar of Clariant, the total amount spent was $105,000.

  10. Design Concepts for Zero-G Whole Body Cleansing on ISS Alpha. Part 2; Individual Design Project; Degree awarded by International Space Univ., 1997

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Susmita

    2001-01-01

    This document was originally published in 1997 as a International Space University Master of Space Studies student's project. While the specifics may be a little dated, the results gleaned are still relevant and valid. Johnson Space Center is now abuzz with preparations for the International Space Station. The work on the various systems for the U.S. Habitation Module will begin in 1998. As a prelude, the Flight Crew Support Division perceived the need to take a closer, more critical took at planning the Whole Body Cleansing function for ISS. This report is an endeavour to retrieve all data available on whole body cleansing mechanisms used, past and present, by the Russians and the Americans, analyze it and create design concepts for products/product systems for zero-g whole body cleansing on ISS Alpha, for typical duration of about 90 days. This report takes a close look at the Skylab collapsible shower, the Mir shower/sauna, the full body cleansing methods currently in use onboard the Space Shuttle and Mir and at the Whole Body Shower designed and tested for Space Station Freedom. It attempts to "listen" carefully to what the Mir astronauts (Norm Thagard, Shannon Lucid and John Blaha) have to say about their personal hygiene experiences during their recent stays on Mir. The findings in the report call for a change in paradigm. What is good for Earth conditions is not necessarily good for Zero-g! It concludes that a shower is not a good idea for the ISS. The final concept that is proposed reflects very strongly what the Mir astronauts would like to have and to use onboard a station like the ISS, The report concludes with directions of how to take the "idea" further and realize it in the form of a product system for Whole Body Cleansing onboard the ISS.

  11. Travellers and influenza: risks and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goeijenbier, M; van Genderen, P; Ward, B J; Wilder-Smith, A; Steffen, R; Osterhaus, A D M E

    2017-01-01

    Influenza viruses are among the major causes of serious human respiratory tract infection worldwide. In line with the high disease burden attributable to influenza, these viruses play an important, but often neglected, role in travel medicine. Guidelines and recommendations regarding prevention and management of influenza in travellers are scarce. Of special interest for travel medicine are risk populations and also circumstances that facilitate influenza virus transmission and spread, like travel by airplane or cruise ship and mass gatherings. We conducted a PUBMED/MEDLINE search for a combination of the MeSH terms Influenza virus, travel, mass gathering, large scale events and cruise ship. In addition we gathered guidelines and recommendations from selected countries and regarding influenza prevention and management in travellers. By reviewing these search results in the light of published knowledge in the fields of influenza prevention and management, we present best practice advice for the prevention and management of influenza in travel medicine. Seasonal influenza is among the most prevalent infectious diseases in travellers. Known host-associated risk factors include extremes of age and being immune-compromised, while the most relevant environmental factors are associated with holiday cruises and mass gatherings. Pre-travel advice should address influenza and its prevention for travellers, whenever appropriate on the basis of the epidemiological situation concerned. Preventative measures should be strongly recommended for travellers at high-risk for developing complications. In addition, seasonal influenza vaccination should be considered for any traveller wishing to reduce the risk of incapacitation, particularly cruise ship crew and passengers, as well as those participating in mass gatherings. Besides advice concerning preventive measures and vaccination, advice on the use of antivirals may be considered for some travellers. © International Society of

  12. AMSOC's Albatross Award to Joe Reid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Robert E.

    Joseph L. Reid, premier physical oceanographer at Scripps Institiution of Oceanography, La Jolla, Calif., received the highly prized Albatross Award at the recent Joint Oceanographic Assembly in Acapulco. The presentation was by Robert E. Stevenson, Secretary General, International Association for the Physical Sciences of the Ocean, San Diego, Calif. Reid was honored “for his outrageous insistence that ocean circulation models should bear some resemblance to reality.”

  13. Travel-related illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Carol C

    2013-06-01

    Travel abroad for business and pleasure should be safe and meaningful for the traveler. To assure that safe experience, certain processes should be considered before travel. A thorough pretravel health assessment will offer patients and health care providers valuable information for anticipatory guidance before travel. The destination-based risk assessment will help determine the risks involved in travel to specific locations and guide in the development of contingency plans for all travelers, especially those with chronic conditions. Diseases are more prevalent overseas, and immunizations and vaccinations are all important considerations for persons traveling abroad. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. CMS Thesis Award

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The 2003 CMS thesis award was presented to Riccardo Ranieri on 15 March for his Ph.D. thesis "Trigger Selection of WH → μ ν b bbar with CMS" where 'WH → μ ν b bbar' represents the associated production of the W boson and the Higgs boson and their subsequent decays. Riccardo received his Ph.D. from the University of Florence and was supervised by Carlo Civinini. In total nine thesis were nominated for the award, which was judged on originality, impact within the field of high energy physics, impact within CMS and clarity of writing. Gregory Snow, secretary of the awarding committee, explains why Riccardo's thesis was chosen, ‘‘The search for the Higgs boson is one of the main physics goals of CMS. Riccardo's thesis helps the experiment to formulate the strategy which will be used in that search.'' Lorenzo Foà, Chairperson of the CMS Collaboration Board, presented Riccardo with an commemorative engraved plaque. He will also receive the opportunity to...

  15. Results of the Rhine-Ruhr international materials conference and award 2005. Materials for energy technology in the 21st century - Documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This paper contains the origin wording of 16 lectures (speech) and discussions, which were held on the first Rhine-Ruhr International Materials Conference in Essen, Germany, on October 23 and 24, 2005. The focus of the gathering was on materials research, development and production in the field of energy engineering. The following topics are dealt with: Energy Concepts for Closing the Gap between Demand and Environmental Protection (Klaus Toepfer); Materials Science: The Competitive Factor in the Global Energy Technology Development (Roland Schenkel); The Necessity for Innovation in the EU as Seen by a New Member State (K.J. Kurzydlowski); New Pathways for Cooperation between Materials Science and Industry (Paul M. Siffert); Energy Demand and Environmental Protection - how to get both in line (Mark Radka); Chinese Energy Efficiency Policy leading to cleaner Production in China (Ming Yang); The Global Significance of Solar Energy Supply (Adolf Goetzberger); The Vision of Sustainable Development of Nuclear Energy (Patrick Ledermann); Improving the Efficiency of Energy Technology with Novel Materials (Johannes Teyssen); New Material Concepts for High Efficiency and Low Risk Exploitation of Energy (Koichi Yagi); Materials Systems for Tomorrow's Gas Turbines (Wilfried Kurz); Science and Technological Advances in Fusion Energy Research, ITER and beyond (Bernard Saoutic); Materials, Systems and Milestones for Economically and Environmentally Attractive Fusion Power Plants (Ian Cook); Fuel Cells - The State of the Art: Applications, Feasibility, Technology and Outlook for the Next Decade (Roland Diethelm); Wind Energy - Significance and Challenges for Tomorrow (Christian Nath); Solar Energy - Time Scale for the Full Application (Volker Wittwer)

  16. Lessons learned from the science of caring: Extending the reach of psychosocial oncology: The International Psycho-Oncology Society 2016 Sutherland Award Lecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bultz, Barry D

    2017-06-01

    In medicine, referral to a medical oncology specialty is based on recent history, physical examination, pathology, surgery reports, imaging, blood work, and the patient's vital signs. By contrast, referral to a psychosocial specialist has typically been based on the patients expressed request for psychosocial support or the health care team's observation of the patient's limited adjustment or poor coping with the diagnosis, treatment, or end-of-life distress. These observations are usually based on clinical acumen not on metrics. In psychosocial oncology, by committing to the science of caring and relying on the use of standardized tools to screen for distress, the multidisciplinary cancer care team assess, communicate, and intervene on what is measured. That is, health care providers can begin to address the patients' identified concerns. Branding distress as the 6th vital sign and incorporating screening for distress into standard cancer practice can be an effective strategy to challenging the resistance in implementation of psychosocial oncology in cancer care institutions. Accreditation agencies are endorsing the need to assess patient distress and better manage symptoms of distress as part of routine and standardized patient care. While many international organizations and societies support the importance of screening, implementing screening for distress still has a long way to go to be operationalized in many cancer care programs. Screening for distress when implemented does, however, create an opportunity for psychosocial oncology to extend its reach into cancer care programs and institutions. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Prevalence of Stx-producing Shigella species isolated from French Travelers Returning from the Caribbean: An Emerging Pathogen with International Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Miranda D.; Lacher, David W.; Leonard, Susan R.; Abbott, Jason; Zhao, Shaohua; Lampel, Keith A.; Prothery, Estelle; Gouali, Malika; Weill, François-Xavier; Maurelli, Anthony T.

    2015-01-01

    Shiga toxins are potent cytotoxins that inhibit host cell protein synthesis, leading to cell death. Classically, these toxins are associated with intestinal infections due to Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli or Shigella dysenteriae serotype 1 and infections with these strains can lead to hemolytic uremic syndrome. Over the past decade there is increasing recognition that Shiga toxin is produced by additional Shigella species. We recently reported the presence and expression of stx genes in Shigella flexneri 2a clinical isolates. The toxin genes were carried by a new stx-encoding bacteriophage and infection with these strains correlated with recent travel to Haiti or the Dominican Republic. In this study we further explored the epidemiological link to this region by utilizing the French National Reference Center for Escherichia coli, Shigella and Salmonella collection to survey the frequency of Stx-producing Shigella species isolated from French travelers returning from the Caribbean. About 21% of the isolates tested were found to encode and produce Stx. These isolates included strains of S. flexneri 2a, S. flexneri Y, and S. dysenteriae 4. All of the travelers whom were infected with Stx-producing Shigella had recently traveled to Haiti, the Dominican Republic, or French Guiana. Furthermore, whole genome sequencing found that the toxin genes were encoded by a prophage that was highly identical to the phage we identified in our previous study. These findings demonstrate that this new stx-encoding prophage is circulating within that geographical area, has spread to other continents, and is capable of spreading to multiple Shigella serogroups. PMID:25980352

  18. Atovaquone-proguanil versus chloroquine-proguanil for malaria prophylaxis in non-immune travellers: a randomised, double-blind study. Malarone International Study Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høgh, B; Clarke, P D; Camus, D; Nothdurft, H D; Overbosch, D; Günther, M; Joubert, I; Kain, K C; Shaw, D; Roskell, N S; Chulay, J D

    2000-12-02

    Chloroquine plus proguanil is widely used for malaria chemoprophylaxis despite low effectiveness in areas where multidrug-resistant malaria occurs. Studies have shown that atovaquone and proguanil hydrochloride is safe and effective for prevention of falciparum malaria in lifelong residents of malaria-endemic countries, but little is known about non-immune travellers. In a double-blind equivalence trial, 1083 participants travelling to a malaria-endemic area were randomly assigned to two treatment groups: atovaquone-proguanil plus placebos for chloroquine and proguanil, or chloroquine, proguanil, and placebo for atovaquone-proguanil. Follow-up was by telephone 7 and 60 days after travel and at a clinic at 28 days. Serum samples were tested for antibodies to a malaria circumsporozoite protein. Blood and serum samples of participants with a potential malaria diagnosis were tested in a reference laboratory. 7 days after travel, at least one adverse event was reported by 311 (61%) of 511 participants who received atovaquone-proguanil and 329 (64%) of 511 who received chloroquine-proguanil. People receiving atovaquone-proguanil had a lower frequency of treatment-related gastrointestinal adverse events (59 [12%] vs 100 [20%], p=0.001), and of treatment-related adverse events of moderate or severe intensity (37 [7%] vs 56 [11%], p=0.05). There were fewer treatment-related adverse events that caused prophylaxis to be discontinued in the atovaquone-proguanil group than in the chloroquine-proguanil group (one [0.2%] vs ten [2%], p=0.015). Overall the two preparations were similarly tolerated. However, significantly fewer adverse gastrointestinal events were observed in the atovaquone-proguanil group in than in the chloroquine-proguanil group.

  19. Travel medicine: Part 1-The basics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamata, Kazuhiro; Birrer, Richard B; Tokuda, Yasuharu

    2017-04-01

    International travels for tourism and business purposes continue to increase annually, while the global terrorism and the risk of lethal viral infections are currently real concerns. It is important that primary care physicians assess travel risk and adequately prepare the prospective traveler for trips. Appropriate vaccines should be administered and an emergency self-kit recommended. Patient should be educated about safe travel habits and a posttravel follow-up process established. Further, traveling healthcare professionals may be called upon to assist an ill patient at any time during their journey. In these 2-part special articles, we provide a practical brief summary of up-to-date travel medicine basics for primary care physicians.

  20. Japanese English in Travel Brochures

    OpenAIRE

    Premvadee Na Nakornpanom

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the role and impact of English loan words on Japanese language in travel brochures. The issues arising from a potential switch to English as a tool to absorb the West’s advanced knowledge and technology in the modernization of Japan to a means of linking Japan with the rest of the world and enhancing the country’s international presence. Sociolinguistic contexts was used to analyze data collected from the Nippon Travel agency "HIS"’s brochures in Thailand, revealing th...

  1. E3 Travel & Mission Support System

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — ETRAMS is a travel data collection system developed by the CKM team in E3 that collects information on both the basic details of an employee's trips (destination,...

  2. AN ANNULLED AWARD CANNOT BE ENFORCED UNDER THE NEW YORK CONVENTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faizal Kurniawan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Arbitral award is final and binding. A concept of “binding” is fundamental in International arbitral award. Nevertheless, the focus commonly concerns about the annulment and/or deferment of International arbitral award so that it could not be implemented. However, the New York Convention does not govern this issue.  In addition, international arbitral awards must meet the following requirements: the award is made in the territory other than conflicting countries, and/ or it is not considered a domestic awards in the State where recognition and enforcement is sought. This is important because the enforcement proceedings between foreign and domestic awards are different. This article elaborates the principles of the recognition and enforcement of a foreign award and the grounds or criteria for refusing to enforce an award are limited to the specific defenses i.e. public policy. The party opposing enforcement bears the burden of proofin the existence of the enumerated defenses. Keywords: binding, annullment, deferment, acknowledgement and enforcement of arbitral award.

  3. Travel risk behaviours and uptake of pre-travel health preventions by university students in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Forward planning and preventative measures before travelling can significantly reduce the risk of many vaccine preventable travel-related infectious diseases. Higher education students may be at an increased risk of importing infectious disease as many undertake multiple visits to regions with higher infectious disease endemicity. Little is known about the health behaviours of domestic or international university students, particularly students from low resource countries who travel to high-resource countries for education. This study aimed to assess travel-associated health risks and preventative behaviours in a sample of both domestic and international university students in Australia. Methods In 2010, a 28 item self-administered online survey was distributed to students enrolled at the University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia. Multiple methods of distributing links to the online survey were utilised. The survey examined the international travel history, travel intentions, infection control behaviours and self-reported vaccination history. Results A total of 1663 respondents completed the online survey, 22.1% were international students and 83.9% were enrolled at an undergraduate level. Half had travelled internationally in the previous 12 months, with 69% of those travelling only once during that time with no difference in travel from Australia between domestic and international students (p = 0.8). Uptake of pre-travel health advice was low overall with 68% of respondents reporting they had not sought any advice from a health professional prior to their last international trip. Domestic students were more likely to report uptake of a range of preventative travel health measures compared to international students, including diarrhoeal medication, insect repellent, food avoidance and condoms (P students reported low risk perception of travel threats and a low corresponding concern for these threats. Conclusions Our study highlights the need to

  4. Pediatric travel consultation in an integrated clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson , J C; Fischer , P R; Hale , D C; Derrick , D

    2001-01-01

    In May 1997, a pediatric travel service was created within a larger integrated University-County Health Department international travel clinic. The purpose of the service was to further enhance the travel advice and care provided to children and their parents or guardians. The current study was designed to describe the care of children in this setting and to compare the care of children seen in the Pediatric Travel Service with that of children seen by other providers. All pediatric patients (defined as individuals Mexico, South America, and Southeast Asia. When compared to travelers seen in the Regular Clinic, individuals in the Pediatric Travel Service group were more likely to travel for humanitarian work, and for parental work relocation. Persons in the Regular Clinic were more likely to travel to Mexico and Central America. They were also more likely to travel on vacation and for missionary work or study. Hepatitis B and tetanus-diphtheria booster vaccinations were given more frequently to travelers seen in the Regular Clinic. Also, ciprofloxacin and antimotility agents were more commonly prescribed in this group. No differences were noted in the duration of travel or in the time interval between clinic visit and departure. While general travel advice was considered to be similar in both clinic groups, some differences were observed in the frequency of administration of certain vaccines and prescriptions of medications. These differences were likely due to a difference in age in the two study groups. The high volume and success of the clinic suggest that integrated pediatric and adult travel services in a coordinated setting can be effective.

  5. 78 FR 77103 - United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration United States Travel and Tourism... extended deadline for application for membership on the United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board... Travel and Tourism Advisory Board (Board). The November 25, 2013 notice provided that all applications...

  6. 78 FR 70275 - United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration United States Travel and Tourism... an opportunity to apply for membership on the United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board... Travel and Tourism Advisory Board (Board). The purpose of the Board is to advise the Secretary of...

  7. Time travel a history

    CERN Document Server

    Gleick, James

    2016-01-01

    From the acclaimed author of The Information and Chaos, here is a mind-bending exploration of time travel: its subversive origins, its evolution in literature and science, and its influence on our understanding of time itself. The story begins at the turn of the previous century, with the young H. G. Wells writing and rewriting the fantastic tale that became his first book and an international sensation: The Time Machine. It was an era when a host of forces was converging to transmute the human understanding of time, some philosophical and some technological: the electric telegraph, the steam railroad, the discovery of buried civilizations, and the perfection of clocks. James Gleick tracks the evolution of time travel as an idea that becomes part of contemporary culture—from Marcel Proust to Doctor Who, from Jorge Luis Borges to Woody Allen. He investigates the inevitable looping paradoxes and examines the porous boundary between pulp fiction and modern physics. Finally, he delves into a temporal shift that...

  8. Promoting health and safety for traveling and commuting employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pochat-Debroux, Sophia

    2008-09-01

    In a society that relies on a growing market economy and free enterprise, Americans spend inordinate time commuting and traveling for work. Aircraft and private vehicles are the two primary modes of work-related travel, with each having its own inherit risks and hazards. Although much has been written about international travel health, little has been published about protecting the health and safety of workers during domestic business travel. The intent of this article is to highlight the statistics associated with domestic business travel and present sound rationale for an inclusive and comprehensive domestic travel health and safety program for employees.

  9. AID awards 3-year Guatemala contract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    The US Agency for International Development (USAID) has awarded a 3-year US$593,036 grant to the Los Angeles firm of Juarez and Associates, Inc. to help implement a contraceptive social marketing project in Guatemala. The firm will provide marketing assistance to the for-profit organization. Importadora de Productos Farmaceuticos (PROFA), an offshoot of the nonprofit International Planned Parenthood Federation affiliate, Asociacion Pro-Bienestar de la Familia de Guatemala (APROFAM), created specifically to conduct the social marketing project. Juarez and Associates has previous market research experience in family planning in Guatemala. Contraceptive social marketing sales are projected to begin in early 1985.

  10. CERNois wins prestigious accelerator award

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2011-01-01

    During the 2nd International Particle Accelerator Conference, CERN’s Rogelio Tomás García became the first Spaniard to receive the Frank Sacherer Prize for his work in particle beam optics.   Rogelio Tomás García at the 2nd International Particle Accelerator Conference. The Frank Sacherer Prize is awarded to physicists who have made a “significant, original contribution to the accelerator field" early on in their career. This year the prize was given to Rogelio Tomás García who, at only 35 years of age, has made important contributions to the optics design, optics measurement, and correction techniques applied at both the LHC and Brookhaven’s RHIC. “Tomás has had a vital impact on CERN’s beam optics studies and has made very impressive achievements in the field of beam optics,” says Oliver Brüning, Head of the Accelerators and Beam Physics...

  11. 1993 architectural design awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-01

    The 10th annual architectural design awards sponsored by Contemporary Long Term Care salute nursing homes and retirement communities that combine a flair for innovative living environments with a sensitivity to the needs of aging residents. These facilities represent the very best in elderly housing that prolongs independence while enhancing efficient operation. The 1993 winners are: King Health Center, U.S. Soldiers' and Airmen's Home, Washington, DC; The Terrace of Los Gatos, Los Gatos, CA; Walker Elder Suites, Edina, MN; The Jefferson, Ballston, VA; The Forum at Rancho San Antonio, Cupertino, CA.

  12. Award for Steve Myers

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Last Thursday Steve Myers, Leader of the Accelerator and Beams Division, received one of the UK Institute of Physics awards. He is the recipient of the 2003 Duddel Medal and Prize for his contributions to the development of major charged-particle accelerator projects at CERN. As head of the commissioning group for the Large Electron Positron (LEP) collider, says the citation, his contributions have had «a direct impact on the results from LEP, which have reached a precision and extent far beyond expectation and are key in defining the Standard Model of particle physics».

  13. Table Summarizing Awards Supported by Fellowships and Awards

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Liliane Castets-Poupart

    developing country university. Support is for doctoral research awards, full study degrees, post-doc fellowships, internships and sabbaticals in sub-Saharan. Africa, Asia and Latin. America and the Caribbean. Variable. Managed by various developing country institutions. Variable. Fellowships · http://www.idrc.ca/awards.

  14. Travel risk behaviours and uptake of pre-travel health preventions by university students in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heywood Anita E

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Forward planning and preventative measures before travelling can significantly reduce the risk of many vaccine preventable travel-related infectious diseases. Higher education students may be at an increased risk of importing infectious disease as many undertake multiple visits to regions with higher infectious disease endemicity. Little is known about the health behaviours of domestic or international university students, particularly students from low resource countries who travel to high-resource countries for education. This study aimed to assess travel-associated health risks and preventative behaviours in a sample of both domestic and international university students in Australia. Methods In 2010, a 28 item self-administered online survey was distributed to students enrolled at the University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia. Multiple methods of distributing links to the online survey were utilised. The survey examined the international travel history, travel intentions, infection control behaviours and self-reported vaccination history. Results A total of 1663 respondents completed the online survey, 22.1% were international students and 83.9% were enrolled at an undergraduate level. Half had travelled internationally in the previous 12 months, with 69% of those travelling only once during that time with no difference in travel from Australia between domestic and international students (p = 0.8. Uptake of pre-travel health advice was low overall with 68% of respondents reporting they had not sought any advice from a health professional prior to their last international trip. Domestic students were more likely to report uptake of a range of preventative travel health measures compared to international students, including diarrhoeal medication, insect repellent, food avoidance and condoms (P Conclusions Our study highlights the need to educate students about the risk associated with travel and improve preventative

  15. In Vitro Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Bacterial Enteropathogens Isolated from International Travelers to Mexico, Guatemala, and India from 2006 to 2008▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang-Latimer, Jeannette; Jafri, Syed; VanTassel, Audrey; Jiang, Zhi-Dong; Gurleen, Kaur; Rodriguez, Savio; Nandy, Ranjan K.; Ramamurthy, Thandavaryan; Chatterjee, Santanu; McKenzie, Robin; Steffen, Robert; DuPont, Herbert L.

    2011-01-01

    The incidence rates of travelers' diarrhea (TD) have remained high for the last 50 years. More recently, there have been increasing recommendations for self-initiated therapy and use of prophylactic drugs for TD. We last examined the in vitro susceptibilities of commonly used antibiotics against TD pathogens in 1997. We now examine 456 enteropathogens isolated from adult travelers to Mexico, India, and Guatemala with diarrhea acquired between 2006 and 2008 to determine changes in susceptibility against 10 different antimicrobials by the agar dilution method. Traditional antibiotics, such as ampicillin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and doxycycline, continue to show high levels of resistance. Current first-line antibiotic agents, including fluoroquinolones and azithromycin, showed significantly higher MICs than in our earlier study, and MIC90 levels were above the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute cutoffs for resistance. There were significant geographical differences in resistance patterns when Central America was compared with India. Entertoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) isolates showed increased resistance to ciprofloxacin (P = 0.023) and levofloxacin (P = 0.0078) in India compared with Central America. Enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) isolates from Central America showed increased resistance to nearly all of the antibiotics tested. Compared to MICs of isolates 10 years prior, there were 4- to 10-fold increases in MIC90 values for ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, and azithromycin for both ETEC and EAEC. There were no significant changes in rifaximin MICs. Rising MICs over time imply the need for continuous surveillance of susceptibility patterns worldwide and geographically specific recommendations in TD therapy. PMID:21115800

  16. Luciano Maiani and Jean Iliopoulos awarded the Dirac Medal

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Luciano Maiani, when he was Director-General of CERN. Jean Iliopoulos in 1999. (©CNRS Photothèque - Julien Quideau)On 8 August, the 2007 Dirac Medal, one of the most prestigious prizes in the fields of theoretical physics and mathematics, was awarded to Luciano Maiani, professor at Rome’s La Sapienza University and former Director-General of CERN, and to Jean Iliopoulos, emeritus Director of Research at the CNRS Laboratory of Theoretical Physics. The medal was awarded to both physicists for their joint "work on the physics of the charm quark, a major contribution to the birth of the Standard Model, the modern theory of Elementary Particles." Founded by the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) in 1985, the Dirac Medal is awarded annually on 8 August, the birthday of the famous physicist Paul Dirac, winner of the 1933 Nobel Prize for Physics. It is awarded to ...

  17. Travelling with HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulla S; Jensen-Fangel, Søren; Pedersen, Gitte

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We aimed to describe travel patterns, extent of professional pre-travel advice and health problems encountered during travel among HIV-infected individuals. METHODS: During a six-month period a questionnaire was handed out to 2821 adult HIV-infected individuals attending any...... of the eight Danish medical HIV care centers. RESULTS: A total of 763 individuals responded. During the previous two years 49% had travelled outside Europe; 18% had travelled less and 30% were more cautious when choosing travel destination than before the HIV diagnosis. Pre-travel advice was sought by only 38......%, and travel insurance was taken out by 86%. However, 29%/74% did not inform the advisor/the insurance company about their HIV status. Nearly all patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) were adherent, but 58% worried about carrying HIV-medicine and 19% tried to hide it. Only 19% experienced...

  18. Travelers' Health: Cryptosporidiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... las picaduras de insectos Business Travel Cold Climates Counterfeit Medicines Cruise Ship Travel Families with Children Fish ... minute to allow for a margin of safety). Alcohol-based hand sanitizers are not effective against the ...

  19. Travelers' Health: Scabies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Clots Bug Bites Evite las picaduras de insectos Business Travel Cold Climates Counterfeit Medicines Cruise Ship Travel Families ... a patient with itching and by observing the characteristic rash. Diagnosis can be confirmed by microscopically identifying ...

  20. Travelers' Health: Leishmaniasis, Visceral

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... such as the United States reflects travel and immigration patterns. VL is uncommon in US travelers and ... changing pattern at the hospital for tropical diseases, London. PLoS One. 2015;10(4):e0121418. Murray HW. ...

  1. Traveling wave laser system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregg, D.W.; Kidder, R.E.; Biehl, A.T.

    1975-01-01

    A method is described for generating a traveling wave laser pulse of almost unlimited energy content wherein a gain medium is pumped into a traveling wave mode, the traveling wave moving at essentially the velocity of light to generate an amplifying region or zone which moves through the medium at the velocity of light in the presence of directed stimulating radiation, thereby generating a traveling coherent, directed radiation pulse moving with the amplification zone through the gain medium. (U.S.)

  2. IDRC Doctoral Research Awards 2018 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    There will be no need to indicate interest; the top candidates in this area will automatically be considered for this fellowship, which is of the same value and has the ... Gender dimensions of the research;; Ethical considerations of the research;; Benefit to the communities where the research is taking place;; Suitability of the ...

  3. Research Award: Foundations for Innovation | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-09-07

    Sep 7, 2016 ... Knowledge of science, technology and innovation;; Knowledge of research for development;; Field experience in a developing country;; Demonstrated ability to work independently; and; Strong verbal and written communications skills. It is highly desirable that the candidate is enrolled in (or has recently ...

  4. IDRC Research Awards 2018 Checklist | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Please note: Only online applications are accepted How to apply Use this link https://ra-br-competition.fluidreview.com/ to access the online application system and submit a complete application by 4:00 pm EDT the day of the deadline. Incomplete and late applications will NOT be considered. After the deadline, members of ...

  5. IDRC Research Awards 2017 Checklist | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-12-31

    Documents to be submitted (if shortlisted). Proof of citizenship or permanent residency,and, if required, a copy of a work permit valid in Canada until December 31, 2017; Official transcripts from your most recent completed degree AND of your current program (if applicable); Confirmation of registration in a master's or ...

  6. Research Award: Climate Change | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-09-07

    Sep 7, 2016 ... Environmental studies/sciences; Development studies; Urban planning; Climate finance; Environmental economics; Civil engineering; Water resource management; Geography. Priority will be given to proposals outlining focused and feasible objectives, and clearly defined methodology. Further, the ...

  7. Research award: Climate Change | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-09-06

    , agriculture, industry, and domestic use. Particular areas of interest include: geographic information systems (GIS) applications for climate change impacts and adaptation analysis;; innovative research to improve planning ...

  8. 2018 IDRC Research Award recipients | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Choice and capabilities: Examining economic and social factors that influence labour market transitions amongst Tanzanian women completing secondary schooling. Employment and Growth. HEAGLE, Adele, Approaching, analyzing, acting: The ethical implications of adolescent sexual and reproductive health research in ...

  9. Research award: Employment and Growth | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-09-06

    Sep 6, 2017 ... The successful candidate will allocate 50% of his/her time for a research project under the guidance of a senior program officer, and will be expected ... Priority will be given to proposals that fit the GrOW program's objectives and that outline focused and feasible objectives and clearly defined methodology.

  10. Research award: Networked Economies | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-09-06

    Sep 6, 2017 ... Deadline: September 6, 2017 Please note that all applications must be submitted online. IDRC is one of the ... For example, big data analytics can offer solutions to a number of health and social problems, but they also pose privacy and security concerns for governments in the developing world. Networked ...

  11. Research Award: Networked Economies | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-09-07

    Sep 7, 2016 ... Deadline: September 7, 2016 Please note that all applications must be submitted online. IDRC is one of the world's ... For example, open data has great potential for driving innovation. Similarly, big data analytics can offer solutions to a number of health and social problems. Networked Economies also ...

  12. Research award: Policy and Evaluation | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2018-01-14

    Jan 14, 2018 ... What are the opportunities to integrate big data and artificial intelligence into strategy and evaluation for research for development? ... Applications must be submitted via email directly to the Policy and Evaluation Division at poev@idrc.ca and may consist only of a resume and cover letter, including an ...

  13. IDRC Research Awards 2018 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Agriculture and Food Security, Climate Change, Collaborative Adaptation Research Initiative in Africa and Asia, Employment and Growth, Food, Environment, and Health, Foundations for Innovation, Governance and Justice, Livestock Vaccine Innovation Fund, Maternal and Child Health, Networked Economies, Think Tank ...

  14. IDRC Doctoral Research Awards 2017 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This call is open to Canadians, permanent residents of Canada, and citizens of developing countries pursuing doctoral studies at a Canadian university. Who can apply. To be eligible, you must meet the following requirements: You must be a citizen or permanent resident of Canada, or a citizen of a developing country.

  15. Research award: Foundations for Innovation | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-09-06

    Sep 6, 2017 ... In addition to leading-edge collaborative research, the program supports individual and organizational capacity-building initiatives, particularly in areas related to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). We are particularly interested in the roles of research councils or innovation ...

  16. Award Recipient Final Report Form

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC Doctoral Research Awards. Name: Research Topic: Institution(s) of Affiliation: Supervisor: Program of Study in: Duration of Award: From: ... Please give the title of the thesis or dissertation you are preparing. 4. If any paper or book resulting from your work during tenure is to be published, please indicate by whom and ...

  17. Campus Technology Innovators Awards 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Meg; Raths, David

    2010-01-01

    Each year in judging the Campus Technology Innovators awards, the authors have the privilege of reading through hundreds of fascinating examples of technology innovation on campus. Nominated projects cover the gamut of technology areas, from assessment and advising to wireless and web 2.0. This article presents 11 innovator award winners of this…

  18. Step 4: Award Negotiation & Issuance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Before a grant can be awarded and accepted, several pre-award activities must happen to formalize the partnership. Ensuring compliance with federal laws, a review of costs and a negotiation of the appropriate funding level must all happen in order to rece

  19. Molecules Best Paper Award 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhee, Derek J

    2013-02-05

    Molecules has started to institute a "Best Paper" award to recognize the most outstanding papers in the area of natural products, medicinal chemistry and molecular diversity published in Molecules. We are pleased to announce the second "Molecules Best Paper Award" for 2013.

  20. Travel, infection and immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soonawala, Darius

    2016-01-01

    Preface: The content of this thesis is based on research that was conducted at the travel and vaccination clinic at Leiden University Medical Centre (LUMC). This clinic provides pre-travel care to the general population, and to special groups of travellers, such as patients who use

  1. Modelling urban travel times

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zheng, F.

    2011-01-01

    Urban travel times are intrinsically uncertain due to a lot of stochastic characteristics of traffic, especially at signalized intersections. A single travel time does not have much meaning and is not informative to drivers or traffic managers. The range of travel times is large such that certain

  2. Travel Agent Course Outline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    British Columbia Dept. of Education, Victoria.

    Written for college entry-level travel agent training courses, this course outline can also be used for inservice training programs offered by travel agencies. The outline provides information on the work of a travel agent and gives clear statements on what learners must be able to do by the end of their training. Material is divided into eight…

  3. International adaptation: psychosocial and parenting experiences of caregivers who travel to the United States to obtain acute medical care for their seriously ill child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Rachel; Ludi, Erica; Pao, Maryland; Wiener, Lori

    2013-01-01

    Despite the increasing trend of travel for medical purposes, little is known about the experience of parents and other caregivers who come to the United States specifically to obtain medical treatment for their seriously ill child. In this exploratory, descriptive qualitative study, we used a semi-structured narrative guide to conduct in-depth interviews with 22 Spanish- or English-speaking caregivers about the challenges encountered and adaptation required when entering a new medical and cultural environment. Caregivers identified the language barrier and transnational parenting as challenges while reporting hospital staff and their own families as major sources of support. Using the results of the study as a guide, clinical and program implications are provided and recommendations for social work practice discussed.

  4. Travel epidemiology: the Saudi perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memish, Ziad A; Venkatesh, S; Ahmed, Qanta A

    2003-02-01

    The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia occupies four-fifths of the Arabian Peninsula, with a land area of 2 million square kilometres. Saudi Arabia holds a unique position in the Islamic world, as the custodian of the two holiest places of Islam, in Mecca and Medina. Annually, some 2 million Muslims from over 140 countries embark on Hajj. This extraordinary en masse migration is a unique forum for the study of travel epidemiology since the Hajj carries various health risks, both communicable and non-communicable, often on a colossal scale. Non-communicable hazards of the Hajj include stampede and motor vehicle trauma, fire-related burn injuries and accidental hand injury during animal slaughter. Communicable hazards in the form of outbreaks of multiple infectious diseases have been reported repeatedly, during and following the Hajj. Meningococcal meningitis, gastroenteritis, hepatitis A, B and C, and various zoonotic diseases comprise some of the possible infectious hazards at the Hajj. Many of these infectious and non-infectious hazards can be avoided or averted by adopting appropriate prophylactic measures. Physicians and health personnel must be aware of these risks to appropriately educate, immunize and prepare these travellers facing the unique epidemiological challenges of Hajj in an effort to minimize untoward effects. Travel epidemiology related to the Hajj is a new and exciting area, which offers valuable insights to the travel specialist. The sheer scale of numbers affords a rare view of migration medicine in action. As data is continually gathered and both national and international policy making is tailored to vital insights gained through travel epidemiology, the Hajj will be continually safeguarded. Practitioners will gain from findings of travel related epidemiological changes in evolution at the Hajj: the impact of vaccinating policies, infection control policies and public health are afforded a real-world laboratory setting at each annual Hajj, allowing us to

  5. Traveling wave laser system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregg, D.W.; Kidder, R.E.; Biehl, A.T.

    1975-01-01

    The invention broadly involves a method and means for generating a traveling wave laser pulse and is basically analogous to a single pass light amplifier system. However, the invention provides a traveling wave laser pulse of almost unlimited energy content, wherein a gain medium is pumped in a traveling wave mode, the traveling wave moving at essentially the velocity of light to generate an amplifying region or zone which moves through the medium at the velocity of light in the presence of directed stimulating radiation, thereby generating a traveling coherent, directed radiation pulse moving with the amplification zone through the gain medium. (U.S.)

  6. COLLIDE Pro Helvetia Award

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    The COLLIDE Pro Helvetia Award is run in partnership with Pro Helvetia, giving the opportunity to Swiss artists to do research at CERN for three months.   From left to right: Laura Perrenoud, Marc Dubois and Simon de Diesbach. The photo shows their VR Project, +2199. Fragment.In are the winning artists of COLLIDE Pro Helvetia. They came to CERN for two months in 2015, and will now continue their last month in the laboratory. Fragment.In is a Swiss based interaction design studio. They create innovative projects, interactive installations, video and game design. Read more about COLLIDE here.

  7. Award for Lise Meitner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1967-01-01

    It is a matter of history that the work in the 1930's of Lise Meitner, Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassmann played a great part in pointing the way to exploiting the possibilities of fission. One of the most interesting occasions the Agency has known came in 1963 when Lise Meitner paid a visit to talk about her life as a scientist, thus returning to the city where she had started her university career in 1901. Her account of a career which had brought her into contact with scientists such as Einstein, Planck, Rutherford, Bohr and many others took her listeners back to the birth of the atomic age. A photograph is shown taken at Dr. Meitner's home in Cambridge, UK, when she received the Enrico Fermi award for 1966, shared with Hahn and Strassmann

  8. Awards and Honours

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Graphene collects the Nobel prize   Nobel Prize winners Andre Geim (left) and Konstantin Novoselov (right). © Sergeom, Wikimedia Commons, and University of Manchester, UK. The Nobel Prize in Physics for 2010 has been awarded to Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov, both from the University of Manchester, for their “groundbreaking experiments regarding the two-dimensional material graphene”. Graphene has exceptional properties that have made it a micro-laboratory for quantum physics. Not only is graphene the thinnest material ever made, it is also the strongest, as well as being an excellent conductor and almost completely transparent. At a time when many researchers believed that it was impossible for such thin materials to be stable, Geim and Novoselov extracted graphene from a piece of graphite using only normal adhesive tape. Novoselov, 36, first worked with Andre Geim, 51, as a PhD student in the Netherlands. He subsequentl...

  9. Topic Map for Authentic Travel

    OpenAIRE

    Wandsvik, Atle; Zare, Mehdi

    2007-01-01

    E-business is a new trend in Internet use. Authentic travel is an approach to travel and travel business which helps the traveler experience what is authentic in the travel destination. But how can the traveler find those small authentic spots and organize them together to compose a vacation? E-business techniques, combined withTopic Maps, can help.

  10. Travel characteristics and health practices among travellers at the travellers' health and vaccination clinic in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Vernon J; Wilder-Smith, Annelies

    2006-10-01

    Singapore has a fast-growing travel industry, but few studies have been done on travel characteristics and travel health practices. This study describes the profile and healthseeking behaviour of travellers attending a travel health clinic in Singapore. A cross-sectional survey was conducted on travellers attending the Traveller's Health and Vaccination Centre (THVC) between September and November 2002 using a standardised questionnaire. Information obtained included individual demographic and medical information, travel patterns, vaccination status and travel health practices. Four hundred and ninetyfive (74%) eligible travellers seen at THVC responded to the questionnaire. Their mean age was 36 years; 77% were professionals, managers, executives, and businessmen, students, and white collar workers. Asia was the main travel destination, and most travelled for leisure and resided in hotels or hostels. The median duration of travel was 16 days. Although >90% had previously travelled overseas, only 20% had previously sought pre-travel advice. Malays were significantly underrepresented (P travel advice compared with Chinese, Indians and Malays. Factors associated with seeking pre-travel advice included travel outside of Asia, especially Africa and South America. Singaporean travellers travel more often to cities rather than rural areas, compared with non-Asian travellers. Asia is the preferred destination, and travel outside of Asia is perceived as more risky and is associated with seeking pre-travel advice and vaccinations. Travel patterns and behaviours need to be taken into account when developing evidence-based travel medicine in Asia.

  11. Acceptability of hypothetical dengue vaccines among travelers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Christine M; MacLeod, William B; Hamer, Davidson H; Sanchez-Vegas, Carolina; Chen, Lin H; Wilson, Mary E; Karchmer, Adolf W; Yanni, Emad; Hochberg, Natasha S; Ooi, Winnie W; Kogelman, Laura; Barnett, Elizabeth D

    2013-01-01

    Dengue viruses have spread widely in recent decades and cause tens of millions of infections mostly in tropical and subtropical areas. Vaccine candidates are being studied aggressively and may be ready for licensure soon. We surveyed patients with past or upcoming travel to dengue-endemic countries to assess rates and determinants of acceptance for four hypothetical dengue vaccines with variable efficacy and adverse event (AE) profiles. Acceptance ratios were calculated for vaccines with varied efficacy and AE risk. Acceptance of the four hypothetical vaccines ranged from 54% for the vaccine with lower efficacy and serious AE risk to 95% for the vaccine with higher efficacy and minor AE risk. Given equal efficacy, vaccines with lower AE risk were better accepted than those with higher AE risk; given equivalent AE risk, vaccines with higher efficacy were better accepted than those with lower efficacy. History of Japanese encephalitis vaccination was associated with lower vaccine acceptance for one of the hypothetical vaccines. US-born travelers were more likely than non-US born travelers to accept a vaccine with 75% efficacy and a risk of minor AEs (p = 0.003). Compared with North American-born travelers, Asian- and African-born travelers were less likely to accept both vaccines with 75% efficacy. Most travelers would accept a safe and efficacious dengue vaccine if one were available. Travelers valued fewer potential AEs over increased vaccine efficacy. © 2013 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  12. Globalization of leptospirosis through travel and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandara, Medhani; Ananda, Mahesha; Wickramage, Kolitha; Berger, Elisabeth; Agampodi, Suneth

    2014-08-12

    Leptospirosis remains the most widespread zoonotic disease in the world, commonly found in tropical or temperate climates. While previous studies have offered insight into intra-national and intra-regional transmission, few have analyzed transmission across international borders. Our review aimed at examining the impact of human travel and migration on the re-emergence of Leptospirosis. Results suggest that alongside regional environmental and occupational exposure, international travel now constitute a major independent risk factor for disease acquisition. Contribution of travel associated leptospirosis to total caseload is as high as 41.7% in some countries. In countries where longitudinal data is available, a clear increase of proportion of travel-associated leptospirosis over the time is noted. Reporting patterns is clearly showing a gross underestimation of this disease due to lack of diagnostic facilities. The rise in global travel and eco-tourism has led to dramatic changes in the epidemiology of Leptospirosis. We explore the obstacles to prevention, screening and diagnosis of Leptopirosis in health systems of endemic countries and of the returning migrant or traveler. We highlight the need for developing guidelines and preventive strategies of Leptospirosis related to travel and migration, including enhancing awareness of the disease among health professionals in high-income countries.

  13. Twitter for travel medicine providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Deborah J; Kohl, Sarah E

    2016-03-01

    Travel medicine practitioners, perhaps more so than medical practitioners working in other areas of medicine, require a constant flow of information to stay up-to-date, and provide best practice information and care to their patients. Many travel medicine providers are unaware of the popularity and potential of the Twitter platform. Twitter use among our travellers, as well as by physicians and health providers, is growing exponentially. There is a rapidly expanding body of published literature on this information tool. This review provides a brief overview of the ways Twitter is being used by health practitioners, the advantages that are peculiar to Twitter as a platform of social media, and how the interested practitioner can get started. Some key points about the dark side of Twitter are highlighted, as well as the potential benefits of using Twitter as a way to disseminate accurate medical information to the public. This article will help readers develop an increased understanding of Twitter as a tool for extracting useful facts and insights from the ever increasing volume of health information. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2016. All rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Economics of malaria prevention in US travelers to West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Kenji; Coleman, Margaret S; Khan, Nomana; Jentes, Emily S; Arguin, Paul; Rao, Sowmya R; LaRocque, Regina C; Sotir, Mark J; Brunette, Gary; Ryan, Edward T; Meltzer, Martin I

    2014-01-01

    Pretravel health consultations help international travelers manage travel-related illness risks through education, vaccination, and medication. This study evaluated costs and benefits of that portion of the health consultation associated with malaria prevention provided to US travelers bound for West Africa. The estimated change in disease risk and associated costs and benefits resulting from traveler adherence to malaria chemoprophylaxis were calculated from 2 perspectives: the healthcare payer's and the traveler's. We used data from the Global TravEpiNet network of US travel clinics that collect de-identified pretravel data for international travelers. Disease risk and chemoprophylaxis effectiveness were estimated from published medical reports. Direct medical costs were obtained from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample and published literature. We analyzed 1029 records from January 2009 to January 2011. Assuming full adherence to chemoprophylaxis regimens, consultations saved healthcare payers a per-traveler average of $14 (9-day trip) to $372 (30-day trip). For travelers, consultations resulted in a range of net cost of $20 (9-day trip) to a net savings of $32 (30-day trip). Differences were mostly driven by risk of malaria in the destination country. Our model suggests that healthcare payers save money for short- and longer-term trips, and that travelers save money for longer trips when travelers adhere to malaria recommendations and prophylactic regimens in West Africa. This is a potential incentive to healthcare payers to offer consistent pretravel preventive care to travelers. This financial benefit complements the medical benefit of reducing the risk of malaria.

  15. 76 FR 53666 - U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board: Meeting of the U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board: Meeting of the U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board AGENCY: International Trade Administration, U.S... agenda for an open meeting of the U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board (Board). The agenda may change...

  16. 75 FR 14135 - U.S. Travel And Tourism Advisory Board: Meeting of the U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration U.S. Travel And Tourism Advisory Board: Meeting of the U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board AGENCY: International Trade Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of an open meeting. SUMMARY: The U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory...

  17. 75 FR 63811 - The U.S. Travel & Tourism Advisory Board: Information-Gathering Session of the U.S. Travel and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration The U.S. Travel & Tourism Advisory Board: Information-Gathering Session of the U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board AGENCY: International Trade...: The U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board (``Board'') will convene a public information-gathering...

  18. 75 FR 39496 - U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board: Meeting of the U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board: Meeting of the U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board AGENCY: International Trade Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of an open meeting. SUMMARY: The U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory...

  19. 75 FR 16438 - U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board: Meeting of the U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board: Meeting of the U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board AGENCY: International Trade Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of the rescheduling of an Open Meeting. SUMMARY: The U.S. Travel and...

  20. 75 FR 80039 - U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board: Meeting of the U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board: Meeting of the U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board AGENCY: International Trade Administration, U.S... agenda for an open meeting of the U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board (Board). The agenda may change...

  1. 76 FR 21703 - U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board: Meeting of the U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board: Meeting of the U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board AGENCY: International Trade Administration, U.S... agenda for an open meeting of the U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board (Board). The agenda may change...

  2. 77 FR 38039 - Corporation for Travel Promotion (dba Brand USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Corporation for Travel Promotion (dba Brand USA) AGENCY: International Trade Administration, Commerce. ACTION: Notice of an opportunity for... Corporation for Travel Promotion (Board) (dba Brand USA). The purpose of the Board is to guide the Corporation...

  3. 78 FR 44531 - Corporation for Travel Promotion (dba Brand USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Corporation for Travel Promotion (dba Brand USA) AGENCY: International Trade Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of an... the Corporation for Travel Promotion (dba Brand USA). The purpose of the Board is to guide the...

  4. 78 FR 53728 - Corporation for Travel Promotion (dba Brand USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-30

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Corporation for Travel Promotion (dba Brand USA) AGENCY: International Trade Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of an... the Corporation for Travel Promotion (dba Brand USA). The purpose of the Board is to guide the...

  5. Faking or Convincing: Why Do Some Advertising Campaigns Win Creativity Awards?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raoul V. Kübler

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Since the Sarbanes-Oxley Act was passed in 2002, it has become commonplace in the advertising industry to use creativity-award-show prizes instead of gross income figures to attract new customers. Therefore, achieving a top creativity ranking and winning creativity awards have become high priorities in the advertising industry. Agencies and marketers have always wondered what elements in the advertising creation process would lead to the winning of creativity awards. Although this debate has been dominated by pure speculation about the success of different routines, approaches and strategies in winning creativity awards, for the first time our study delivers an empirical insight into the key drivers of creativity award success. We investigate what strategies and which elements of an advertising campaign are truly likely to lead to winning the maximum number of creativity awards. Using a sample of 108 campaigns, we identify factors that influence campaign success at international advertising award shows. We identify innovativeness and the integration of multiple channels as the key drivers of creativity award success. In contrast to industry beliefs, meaningful or personally connecting approaches do not seem to generate a significant benefit in terms of winning creativity awards. Finally, our data suggest that the use of so-called “fake campaigns” to win more creativity awards does not prove to be effective.

  6. Effectiveness of pre-travel consultation in the prevention of travel-related diseases: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafuri, Silvio; Guerra, Rocco; Gallone, Maria Serena; Cappelli, Maria Giovanna; Lanotte, Serafina; Quarto, Michele; Germinario, Cinzia

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of pre-travel counselling carried out in Travel Clinics. This is a retrospective cohort. Three hundred international travellers were enrolled; 150 people were from users of Bari Travel Clinic, 150 were users of a travel agency. Enrolled subjects were interviewed using a questionnaire. The average age of the enrolled subjects was 37.5 ± 13.9, without statistically significant differences between the two groups. 86% of cases and 19.3% of the controls reported the use of anti-malaria prophylaxis (p Travel Clinic users, 6% reported diarrhoea and these figures were 27% in the control group (p travel counselling; in the future, new studies must investigate the cost-effectiveness of pre-travel prevention measures.

  7. Business travel in Asia: blood tests required?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karel, S

    1988-03-01

    Travellers to Asian countries face growing hostility as potential carriers of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Visitors who plan to stay in China, India, the Philippines, or South Korea for more than 1 year must prove that they are AIDS-free. In addition, all foreign students who enter China and India must carry documents indicating that they tested negative for the AIDS virus. The upcoming Olympics poses a special health problem for South Korea, which has not so far required AIDS testing for short-term visitors. A World Health Organization consultation on AIDS infection and international travel has raised questions about the feasibility of an AIDS screening program. The estimated direct cost per traveller for AIDS testing would be US$10-20. Even if all foreign travellers were to be screened, 2 problems could still allow AIDS to enter these countries: black marketing of false health certificates and failing to test foreign nationals who have been abroad. Moreover, a restrictive screening policy for international travellers could result in a decline in tourism and international commerce. Business people who intend to travel to Asia for extended periods of time are advised to check with embassies before their departure to find out what AIDS-related clearances may be required.

  8. 20 CFR 439.605 - Award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 439.605 Award. Award means an award of financial assistance by the SSA or other... administrative requirements. (b) The term award does not include: (1) Technical assistance that provides services...

  9. 32 CFR 22.610 - Award instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Award instruments. 22.610 Section 22.610 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE DoD GRANT AND AGREEMENT REGULATIONS DoD GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS-AWARD AND ADMINISTRATION Award § 22.610 Award instruments. (a) Each...

  10. Call for Applications IDRC Research Awards 2016

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Carole Labrie

    2015-08-06

    Call for Applications. IDRC Research Awards 2016. Deadline: August 6, 2015. The award. IDRC offers these awards to graduate-level Canadians, permanent residents of Canada, and citizens of developing countries. Research award recipients will undertake a one-year paid program of research on the topic they have ...

  11. TRAVEL AND HOME LEAVE

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2002-01-01

    Administrative procedures for : Travel to the home station and home leave (hl) Additional travel to the home station (at) Travel to the home station and home leave for family reasons (hlf) As part of the process of simplifying administrative procedures, HR and AS Divisions have devised a new, virtually automatic procedure for payment of travel expenses to the home station. The changes are aimed at rationalising administrative procedures and not at reducing benefits. The conditions of eligibility are unchanged. The new procedure, which will be operational with effect from 1st June 2002, will greatly simplify the administrative processing of claims for travel expenses and the recording of home leaves. Currently, requests for payment are introduced manually into the Advances and Claims system (AVCL) by divisional secretariats. All travel to the home station starting prior to 1st June 2002 will be processed according to the existing system whereas that starting on 1st June and after will be processed accordi...

  12. 2002 Institute of Physics awards

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The IOP Rutherford Medal and prize was awarded to P Dornan, W Venus and D Plane for their major contributions to the detectors and leadership of the LEP, ALEPH, OPAL and DELPHI experiments (4 paragraphs).

  13. Institute of Physics Awards 2002

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The IOP Physics Awards for 2002 include: Prof. M Lockwood, Univ. Southhampton and Rutherford Laboratory, Charles Chree Medal and Prize; Dr. S Myers, CERN, Duddell Medal and Prize; Dr S Langridge, Rutherford Laboratory, Charles Vernon Boys Medal and Prize.

  14. Climate Leadership Awards and Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    The seventh annual Climate Leadership Awards Dinner will be held during the 2018 Climate Leadership Conference; the event publicly recognize individuals and organizations for their outstanding leadership in reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

  15. Climate Leadership Awards Frequent Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provides answers to frequently asked questions regarding the Climate Leadership Awards, sponsored by EPA's Center for Corporate Climate Leadership with co-sponsorship from the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions and The Climate Registry.

  16. Materials Best Paper Award 2015

    OpenAIRE

    Maryam Tabrizian

    2015-01-01

    Materials has established an annual award for the best article and for the best review published in Materials in order to acknowledge the outstanding contributions of our authors in the area of materials science and engineering.[...

  17. Plascore receives awards from CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Plascore recently was awarded two honors from CERN, European High Energy Physics Lab, for its involvement in the manufacture of Thermoplastic Honeycomb panels for their large superconducting super collider (1/2 page).

  18. 2015 Gulf Guardian Award Winners

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Gulf of Mexico Program Partnership developed the Gulf Guardian awards as a way to recognize and honor the businesses, community groups, individuals, and agencies that are taking positive steps to keep the Gulf healthy, beautiful and productive.

  19. 2017 Gulf Guardian Award Winners

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Gulf of Mexico Program Partnership developed the Gulf Guardian awards as a way to recognize and honor the businesses, community groups, individuals, and agencies that are taking positive steps to keep the Gulf healthy, beautiful and productive.

  20. Travels in Architectural History

    OpenAIRE

    Deriu, Davide; Piccoli, Edoardo; Turan Özkaya, Belgin

    2016-01-01

    Travel is a powerful force in shaping the perception of the modern world and plays an ever-growing role within architectural and urban cultures. Inextricably linked to political and ideological issues, travel redefines places and landscapes through new transport infrastructures and buildings. Architecture, in turn, is reconstructed through visual and textual narratives produced by scores of modern travellers — including writers and artists along with architects themselves. In the age of the c...

  1. Outstanding student paper awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Hydrology Section presented five outstanding student paper awards at the 1999 Spring Meeting in Boston, Massachusetts, last June.Maneesha Joshi presented a poster titled “Estimation of the Extent and Duration of Melt on the Greenland Ice Sheet using an Edge Detection Technique on Passive Microwave Data.” She received her B.Tech. in civil engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay in 1991, and a M.S. in environmental engineering from State University of New York, Buffalo in 1994. Maneesha expects to complete her Ph.D. in civil engineering (remote sensing) in September 1999, under the supervision of Carolyn Merry (Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering & Geodetic Science), Ken Jezek, and John Bolzan (Byrd Polar Research Center) at the Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. Her thesis focuses on estimating the extent of melt, melt season, and duration, and absorbed radiation on the Greenland ice sheet from passive microwave and SAR data. Maneesha's other interests include image processing, issues related to global climate change, and photogrammetry.

  2. CERN apprentice receives award

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Another CERN apprentice has received an award for the quality of his work. Stéphane Küng (centre), at the UIG ceremony last November, presided over by Geneva State Councillor Pierre-François Unger, Head of the Department of Economics and Health. Electronics technician Stéphane Küng was honoured in November by the Social Foundation of the Union Industrielle Genevoise (UIG) as one of Geneva’s eight best apprentices in the field of mechatronics. The 20-year-old Genevan obtained his Federal apprentice’s certificate (Certificat fédéral de capacité - CFC) in June 2007, achieving excellent marks in his written tests at the Centre d’Enseignement Professionnel Technique et Artisanal (CEPTA). Like more than 200 youngsters before him, Stéphane Küng spent part of his four-year sandwich course working at CERN, where he followed many practical training courses and gained valuable hands-on experience in various technical groups and labs. "It’ always very gr...

  3. Pre-Travel Medical Preparation of Business and Occupational Travelers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nomana M.; Jentes, Emily S.; Brown, Clive; Han, Pauline; Rao, Sowmya R.; Kozarsky, Phyllis; Hagmann, Stefan H.F.; LaRocque, Regina C.; Ryan, Edward T.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to understand more about pre-travel preparations and itineraries of business and occupational travelers. Methods: De-identified data from 18 Global TravEpiNet clinics from January 2009 to December 2012 were analyzed. Results: Of 23,534 travelers, 61% were non-occupational and 39% occupational. Business travelers were more likely to be men, had short times to departure and shorter trip durations, and commonly refused influenza, meningococcal, and hepatitis B vaccines. Most business travelers indicated that employers suggested the pre-travel health consultation, whereas non-occupational travelers sought consultations because of travel health concerns. Conclusions: Sub-groups of occupational travelers have characteristic profiles, with business travelers being particularly distinct. Employers play a role in encouraging business travelers to seek pre-travel consultations. Such consultations, even if scheduled immediately before travel, can identify vaccination gaps and increase coverage. PMID:26479857

  4. Call for Applications IDRC Doctoral Research Awards (IDRA)

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Liliane Castets-Poupart

    2015-05-20

    May 20, 2015 ... Since 1982, IDRC has helped graduate students undertake thesis research in the field of international development. IDRC Doctoral Research Awards are intended to promote the growth of. Canadian and developing-country capacity in research to improve the lives of people in the developing world.

  5. Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards in Civil and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ethiopia is not yet party to the New York Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards. It can also be said that Ethiopian arbitration laws fail to cope with the emerging modern laws and practices in international commercial arbitration. However, as of 1965, with the introduction of the Civil ...

  6. Interior design students win two IDEC Student Design Competition awards

    OpenAIRE

    Watson-Bloch, Cathy

    2005-01-01

    Interior Design students in the School of Architecture + Design at Virginia Tech won two of the four awards presented in the 2004-2005 Interior Design Educators Council (IDEC) Student Design Competition. Winners were selected at the International IDEC Conference in Savannah, Ga. with Virginia Tech Interior Design students winning second place and honorable mention.

  7. 28 CFR 94.24 - Determination of award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....24 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) CRIME VICTIM SERVICES International Terrorism Victim Expense Reimbursement Program Coverage § 94.24 Determination of award. After review of each application, the Director shall determine the eligibility of the victim or representative and the amount, if...

  8. IDRC welcomes its 2018 Research Award recipients | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-12-07

    Dec 7, 2017 ... ... and the creation, dissemination, and use of knowledge from an international perspective. Read more about the 2018 awardees and their research topics. Learn more about the awards on IDRC's Funding page. Subscribe to funding alerts or follow IDRC on Twitter and Facebook for the latest news on calls ...

  9. Prescribed Travel Schedules for Fatigue Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmire, Alexandra; Johnston, Smith; Lockley, Steven

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Fatigue Management Team is developing recommendations for managing fatigue during travel and for shift work operations, as Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Management of Circadian Desynchrony in ISS Operations. The Guidelines provide the International Space Station (ISS ) flight surgeons and other operational clinicians with evidence-based recommendations for mitigating fatigue and other factors related to sleep loss and circadian desynchronization. As much international travel is involved both before and after flight, the guidelines provide recommendations for: pre-flight training, in-flight operations, and post-flight rehabilitation. The objective of is to standardize the process by which care is provided to crewmembers, ground controllers, and other support personnel such as trainers, when overseas travel or schedule shifting is required. Proper scheduling of countermeasures - light, darkness, melatonin, diet, exercise, and medications - is the cornerstone for facilitating circadian adaptation, improving sleep, enhancing alertness, and optimizing performance. The Guidelines provide, among other things, prescribed travel schedules that outline the specific implementation of these mitigation strategies. Each travel schedule offers evidence based protocols for properly using the NASA identified countermeasures for fatigue. This presentation will describe the travel implementation schedules and how these can be used to alleviate the effects of jet lag and/or schedule shifts.

  10. Travel and transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bill, Jan; Roesdahl, Else

    2007-01-01

    On the interrelationship between travel, transport and society; on land transport, sea and river transport, and on winter transport;  on the related technologies and their developments......On the interrelationship between travel, transport and society; on land transport, sea and river transport, and on winter transport;  on the related technologies and their developments...

  11. Carlson Wagonlit Travel informs

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    From 7 to 9 September come and visit our "Andalusia" stand at the entrance to Restaurant No. 1 – Novae. Take part in our competition where you could win over 1000 Swiss francs worth of travel vouchers from our partner VT Vacances! Carlson Wagonlit Travel http://www.carlsonwagonlit.com

  12. Handbook of Sustainable Travel

    OpenAIRE

    GARLING, Tommy; ETTENA, Dick; FRIMAN, Margareta

    2014-01-01

    This volume gathers distinguished researchers on travel behavior from a variety of disciplines, to offer state-of-the-art research and analysis encompassing environmental, traffic and transport psychology; transport planning and engineering; transport geography; transport economics; consumer services research; environmental sociology and well-being research. The underlying dilemma is that neither contemporary transportation technology nor contemporary travel behaviors are sustainable. The pat...

  13. CARLSON WAGONLIT TRAVEL

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    CARLSON WAGONLIT TRAVEL informs you that our agency will be closed from 22 December 2006 at 16:30 until 8 January 2007 at 8:30. For all URGENT MATTERS you can contact our CARLSON WAGONLIT TRAVEL branch at W.H.O. (Mr Pierre Plumettaz), phone: 022 791 55 95. We wish you already a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

  14. CARLSON WAGONLIT TRAVEL

    CERN Document Server

    CARLSON WAGONLIT TRAVEL

    2004-01-01

    CARLSON WAGONLIT TRAVEL informs you that our agency will be closed from 17 December 2004 at 16:30 until 3 January 2005 at 8:30. For all URGENT MATTERS you can contact our CARLSON WAGONLIT TRAVEL branch at WHO (Mr Pierre Plumettaz), phone: 022 788 10 65 We wish you already a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

  15. Pregnancy course and outcome in women traveling to developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammour, Rami N; Bahous, Rabia; Grupper, Moti; Ohel, Gonen; Steinlauf, Shmuel; Schwartz, Eli; Potasman, Israel

    2012-01-01

    The issue of travel to developing countries during pregnancy has not been sufficiently studied. The aim of this study is to investigate the rate, course, and outcome of pregnancies in women who traveled to developing countries while pregnant, or became pregnant during such travel. Women visiting two major travel clinics in Israel for consultation within the years 2004 to 2009, who were pregnant or declared an intention of becoming pregnant during travel were contacted. This was followed by a telephone interview by an obstetrician with those women who were actually pregnant. Background characteristics, morbidity during travel, and pregnancy course and outcome were collected. Overall 52,430 travelers' records had been screened. Of these, we identified 49 women who were pregnant during their trip, but 3 declined participation. Of the remaining 46 women, 33 were pregnant at departure, and 13 conceived during travel. The incidence of pregnancy during travel was thus 0.93/1000 travelers. Thirty-three women traveled to East Asia, 8 to South and Central America, 5 to Africa. More than two thirds of women received pretravel vaccinations. Adherence to the World Health Organization recommendations regarding food and drink was high (87%) and travelers' diarrhea occurred in only 11% of women. Five of 22 women traveling to malarious areas had taken antimalarial prophylaxis. Six women required medical therapy during travel. Pregnancy outcome was not different from the normal population except for an unusually low rate of preterm delivery. In this cohort, travel to developing countries was not associated with adverse pregnancy outcome. Larger studies are needed to support these findings. © 2012 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  16. A little helps a lot The overall winners of this year's Nursing Standard Nurse of the Year awards have enhanced the lives of hundreds of African children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Alison

    2003-11-05

    This year's overall Nurse 2003 award is unusual in that there are two winners, Clare McKenzie and Pauline Stratton. Sadly Ms Stratton receives the award posthumously as she died earlier this year in an accident while visiting the award-winning project in Malawi. The nurses, from the North Cumbria Acute Hospitals NHS Trust, won the Robert Tiffany International award and overall prize for their collaboration with Malawian nurses.

  17. NADIM-Travel: A Multiagent Platform for Travel Services Aggregation

    OpenAIRE

    Ben Ameur, Houssein; Bédard, François; Vaucher, Stéphane; Kropf, Peter; Chaib-draaa, Brahim; Gérin-Lajoie, Robert

    2010-01-01

    With the Internet as a growing channel for travel services distribution, sophisticated travel services aggregators are increasingly in demand. A travel services aggregation platform should be able to manage the heterogeneous characteristics of the many existing travel services. It should also be as scalable, robust, and flexible as possible. Using multiagent technology, we designed and implemented a multiagent platform for travel services aggregation called NADIM-Travel. In this platform, a p...

  18. Travel time data collection handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-03-01

    This Travel Time Data Collection Handbook provides guidance to transportation : professionals and practitioners for the collection, reduction, and presentation : of travel time data. The handbook should be a useful reference for designing : travel ti...

  19. Pre-travel advice at a crossroad: Medical preparedness of travellers to South and Southeast-Asia - The Hamburg Airport Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolling, Thierry; Mühlenpfordt, Melina; Addo, Marylyn M; Cramer, Jakob P; Vinnemeier, Christof D

    Specific travel-related recommendations exist for the prevention or self-treatment of infectious diseases contracted by travellers to the tropics. In the current study, we assessed the medical preparedness per these recommendations, focusing on whether travellers carried antidiarrheal and antimalarial medication with them stratified by type of pre-travel advice. We surveyed travellers departing from Hamburg International Airport to South or Southeast Asia, using a questionnaire on demographic, medical and travel characteristics. 975 travellers were analysed - the majority (817, 83%) being tourists. A large proportion packed any antidiarrheal medication (612, 63%) - most frequently loperamide (440, 72%). Only 176 of 928 (19%) travellers to destinations with low-to medium risk for malaria packed a recommended antimalarial medication. The majority (162, 17%) of them carried antimalarials as stand-by emergency treatment (SBET). 468 (48%) travellers had a pre-travel medical consultation. This lead to higher odds of carrying SBET- with the highest odds associated with a consultation at a travel medicine specialist (OR 7.83 compared to no consultation). Attending a travel medicine specialist was associated with better adherence to current recommendations concerning the carriage of stand-by emergency treatment of malaria. However, the proportion of travellers seeking pre-travel health advice was overall low in our population. Promoting pre-travel consultations may, therefore, lead to higher adherence to the current recommendations in travel medicine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. LeishMan recommendations for treatment of cutaneous and mucosal leishmaniasis in travelers, 2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blum, Johannes; Buffet, Pierre; Visser, Leo; Harms, Gundel; Bailey, Mark S; Caumes, Eric; Clerinx, Jan; van Thiel, Pieter P A M; Morizot, Gloria; Hatz, Christoph; Dorlo, Thomas P C; Lockwood, Diana N J

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) and mucosal leishmaniasis (ML) in travelers is still controversial. Over the last decade, national and international consortia have published recommendations for treating CL in travelers. These guidelines harmonize many issues, but there are some

  1. ATLAS Award for Difficult Task

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Two Russian companies were honoured with an ATLAS Award, for supply of the ATLAS Inner Detector barrel support structure elements, last week. On 23 March the Russian company ORPE Technologiya and its subcontractor, RSP Khrunitchev, were jointly presented with an ATLAS Supplier Award. Since 1998, ORPE Technologiya has been actively involved in the development of the carbon-fibre reinforced plastic elements of the ATLAS Inner Detector barrel support structure. After three years of joint research and development, CERN and ORPE Technologiya launched the manufacturing contract. It had a tight delivery schedule and very demanding specifications in terms of mechanical tolerance and stability. The contract was successfully completed with the arrival of the last element of the structure at CERN on 8 January 2004. The delivery of this key component of the Inner Detector deserves an ATLAS Award given the difficulty of manufacturing the end-frames, which very few companies in the world would have been able to do at an ...

  2. Travel Photography: Destination Workshop

    OpenAIRE

    Pradhan, Mukul

    2016-01-01

    Travel photography is a growing and highly popular form of tourism in most parts of the world but despite huge potentials, certain places in the world have yet to capitalize on this opportunity. Among these destinations, Nepal, a country filled with breath-taking landscape and ever-vibrant and growing urban cities has done little to provide this experience of trav-el photography to travelers. Hence, the goal of this Bachelor’s thesis was to develop an at-tractive, affordable and unforgettable...

  3. Horton Grantee gets AAG Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey McDonnell, an assistant professor of forest hydrology at Utah State University, Logan, received the J. Warren Nystrom Award from the Association of American Geographers for his doctoral dissertation, “The Age, Origin and Pathway of Subsurface Stormflow in a Steep Humid Headwater Catchment.” In 1987, McDonnell was awarded AGU's Horton Research Grant for his thesis proposal.McDonnell received his Ph.D. in 1989 from the University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand. His dissertation was supervised by I. F. Owens, Department of Geography, University of Canterbury and A. J. Pearce, New Zealand Forest Research Institute.

  4. Travel-associated salmonella and campylobacter gastroenteritis in England: estimation of under-ascertainment through national laboratory surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenner, Dominik; Gillespie, Iain

    2011-01-01

    Increased international travel raises the importance of accurate surveillance of travel-associated gastroenteric pathogens to improve treatment and the investigation of cross-border outbreaks. This study found that 45% of Salmonella and 17% of Campylobacter infections in England were travel-associated, but only 29 and 3% of travel histories were accurately identified by national laboratory surveillance. More structured data collection forms and staff training may be needed to address this. © 2011 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  5. Characteristics of Travelers to Asia Requiring Multidose Vaccine Schedules: Japanese Encephalitis and Rabies Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Xaviour J; Barnett, Elizabeth D; Wilson, Mary E; Macleod, William B; Jentes, Emily S; Karchmer, Adolf W; Hamer, Davidson H; Chen, Lin H

    2015-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) and rabies are serious vaccine preventable diseases which are an important consideration for travelers to Asia. Five Boston-area travel clinics collected demographic data, trip information, and interventions for travelers to Asia seen at pre-travel consultations from March 1, 2008, through July 31, 2010. We evaluated travelers for proportion vaccinated for JE and rabies, those traveling for >1 month, and whether travelers had adequate time to complete the JE series (clinic visit ≥28 days before departure) and rabies pre-exposure prophylaxis (clinic visit ≥21 days before departure). Among 15,440 travelers from five Boston Area Travel Medicine Network travel clinics, Asia was the most common destination region, visited by 5,582 (36%) of travelers. Among these travelers, 4,810 (86%) planned to travel to only one Asian subregion. Median trip duration was 17 days, with more than 20% traveling for >1 month. The most common destinations were South (41%), Southeast (26%), and East (23%) Asia. Of those traveling to South, Southeast, or East Asia, over one-third with trips >1 month had insufficient time to complete a series for either JE or rabies vaccine. Overall, only 10% of travelers were vaccinated (past and pre-travel visit) for either JE or rabies, with lowest percentages among travelers visiting friends and relatives. Most travelers received advice on vector precautions (96%) and rabies prevention, which included avoiding animal contact, washing wounds, and obtaining appropriate post-exposure prophylaxis (88%). Given the insufficient time for completion and relatively low vaccination rates, greater awareness of earlier pre-travel consultations, at least 4-6 weeks before travel, and accurate risk assessment for travelers are important. Effective counseling about vector avoidance, rabies, and animal bite prevention and management remains critical. © 2015 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  6. Travel case scenarios as a demonstration of risk assessment of VFR travelers: introduction to criteria and evidence-based definition and framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Ron H; Stauffer, William M; Barnett, Elizabeth D; Loutan, Louis; Hatz, Christoph F; Matteelli, Alberto; Macpherson, Douglas W

    2010-01-01

    Travel-associated health risks need to be balanced against the positive opportunities associated with interregional travel. As the perceived and real spectrum of health risks related to international travel increase both quantitatively and qualitatively, the need for more discriminating tools in clinical assessment for the purpose of mitigation, public health management, and research are needed. One group of international travelers identified as having increased risk of poor travel-related health outcomes are those who travel with the specific intent of visiting friends or relatives (VFR travelers). Due to variations in defining VFR travel in the health context there are issues in applying this designation uniformly from multiple perspectives. This article supports the standardization of VFR traveler definitions based on objective criteria and provides illustrations of the application of this definition through an illustrated approach to risk assessment based on these criteria and the differentials in the determinants of health between source and destination regions. A working group was established by the Migration Health Sub-committee, International Society for Travel Medicine to assess the literature on VFR travel and health, review an evidence-based approach to managing health risk related to travel, and to propose criteria-based definition for VFR travel. The new definition of a VFR is a traveler whose primary purpose of travel is to visit friends or relatives where there is a gradient of epidemiological risk between home and destination. A case scenario discussion of VFR travel defined by criteria and risk assessment based on differential determinants of health is presented in this article. The goal of this article is to encourage discussion on travel health evaluation for the most "at risk" populations and to standardize the application of clinical, public health, and research approaches to defining VFR travelers in a risk management context.

  7. Traveling with breathing problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000066.htm Traveling with breathing problems To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. If you have breathing problems and you: Are short of breath most ...

  8. Tips for Travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avoid bringing bed bugs home by taking precautions when traveling such as inspecting bedding and luggage racks in hotel rooms, and upon returning home unpacking directly into a washing machine and dry at high temperatures.

  9. Illinois travel statistics, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The 2008 Illinois Travel Statistics publication is assembled to provide detailed traffic : information to the different users of traffic data. While most users of traffic data at this level : of detail are within the Illinois Department of Transporta...

  10. Illinois travel statistics, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The 2010 Illinois Travel Statistics publication is assembled to provide detailed traffic : information to the different users of traffic data. While most users of traffic data at this level : of detail are within the Illinois Department of Transporta...

  11. Illinois travel statistics, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The 2009 Illinois Travel Statistics publication is assembled to provide detailed traffic : information to the different users of traffic data. While most users of traffic data at this level : of detail are within the Illinois Department of Transporta...

  12. Caregiving and travel patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    This study explored the impact of caregiving for older adults on mobility and travel : patterns. Specifically, the focus was on how caregivers managed trips on behalf of : another who receives care. Caregiving is becoming increasingly common as the :...

  13. Travelers' Health: Hepatitis B

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Traveler Registration During Trip After Your Trip CDC-TV Videos Resources For Clinicians In-Clinic Quick Links ... if concentration is ≥10 mIU/mL after vaccine series completion; passive transfer after hepatitis B immune globulin ...

  14. The Image of travelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grand, Karina Lykke

    2017-01-01

    . The new travel image had its focus on concurrency, everyday life and the secular world, resulting in images that anticipated the photographic travel image, the snapshot and the travel postcard. The advent of this new strategy proved to have a very long after-life, as tourists and travellers of today still...... lean a great deal on the image codes that Rørbye and his fellow artists of the 1830s invented. The aim of the article is to elaborate on Rørbye’s first European sojourn in 1834-37, and it is my intention to frame the conditions involved in doing such a trip with attention to what Rørbye saw...

  15. Carlson Wagonlit Travel

    CERN Multimedia

    Carlson Wagonlit Travel

    2005-01-01

    Dear customers, On 3 January we informed you that the airlines had decided to cease paying commission to travel agencies in Switzerland. This measure has since been progressively introduced, with rare exceptions. Consequently, in agreement with CERN, we are obliged to apply new transaction fees for private travel, with immediate effect. Carlson Wagonlit Travel (CWT) offers: A personalized, professional and competent consultancy service To seek the most economical and best solution adapted to your needs Neutrality in comparing prices and benefits Additional information concerning e.g. visa regulations, insurance, vaccinations, etc. Support in the event of problems We draw your attention to the fact that, in spite of the increase, these prices remain very competitive on today's market. Thank you for your trust and understanding. Yours truly, Carlson Wagonlit Travel CERN agency

  16. Travelers' Health: Meningococcal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Zika Travel Information World Map of Zika Country Classification Technical Guidance Risk of Zika Virus at Your ... Meningococcal meningitis is characterized by sudden onset of headache, fever, and stiffness of the neck, sometimes accompanied ...

  17. Travelers' Health: Motion Sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Zika Travel Information World Map of Zika Country Classification Technical Guidance Risk of Zika Virus at Your ... Hyperventilation Increased sensitivity to odors Loss of appetite Headache Drowsiness Warm sensation General discomfort PREVENTION Nonpharmacologic interventions ...

  18. Travelers' Health: Hepatitis A

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Zika Travel Information World Map of Zika Country Classification Technical Guidance Risk of Zika Virus at Your ... pain at the injection site (56%–67%) and headache (14%–16%). Among children (11–25 months of ...

  19. MedlinePlus: Awards and Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... winner of the 2005 World Summit on the Information Society Awards for e-health. Winner of the Thomas Reuters/Frank Bradway Rogers Information Advancement Award in 2014 for MedlinePlus Connect and ...

  20. Research Award: Innovation for Inclusive Development program

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC CRDI

    2011-09-12

    Research Award: Innovation for Inclusive Development program. Deadline: September 12, 2011. Note that all applications must be sent electronically. IDRC offers Research Awards annually to Canadians, permanent residents of. Canada, and citizens of developing countries pursuing master's or doctoral studies.

  1. CoC Awards by Program Component

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — CoC Awards by Program Component reports provide snapshots of award data broken down by eligible program component types for the year selected. The reports, which can...

  2. Gordon F. Kirkbright bursary award, 2018

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    The Gordon F. Kirkbright bursary award is a prestigious annual award that enables a promising student/non-tenured young scientist of any nation to attend a recognised scientific meeting or visit a place of learning.

  3. Business travel and sustainability

    OpenAIRE

    AGUILERA, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Although it contributes significantly to the demand for transport, in particular air transport, business travel has been relatively neglected in thinking about the strategies needed to promote more sustainable mobility practices. This paper provides a two-stage approach to this subject. We begin by showing how the sustainability of business travel is relevant not only in environmental terms, but also from an economic and social perspective. In the second stage, we consider the strategies that...

  4. Travel Market Switzerland 2007

    OpenAIRE

    Laesser, Christian; Bieger, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Technical Report and Results - In 2007, for the seventeenth time since 1972, a survey on the travel behaviour of the Swiss population was conducted. The database resulting from this project (Travel Market Switzerland 2007) is still the most extensive on private trips by the Swiss resident population. Private trips are defined/ delimited as all journeys by private persons with at least one overnight stay outside their home and their normal life and work environment. They include all types of l...

  5. Comparison Of Travel Behaviour In 11 European Countries By Use Of Post- Harmonized European National Travel Surveys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Linda; Hubert, Jean-Paul; Järvi, Tuuli

    2014-01-01

    Travel behaviour comparison among countries has become interesting to understand structural differences in travel behaviour between countries which are important to help developing more sustainable transport policies. To that end, National Travel Surveys (NTS’s) are the most suitable tool. The ai...... differences in urban structure, density, income, shopping centre structure, and business structure on travel behaviour. The mileage at the international travel is a special challenge which should be investigated further.......Travel behaviour comparison among countries has become interesting to understand structural differences in travel behaviour between countries which are important to help developing more sustainable transport policies. To that end, National Travel Surveys (NTS’s) are the most suitable tool. The aim...... of this paper is to compare travel behaviour among 11 European counties using NTS’s. A post-harmonization process is developed to overcome methodological differences between the surveys and to isolate the differences in travel behaviour. Travel behaviour is measured as mileage, time use, and trips per trip...

  6. The New England travel market: changes in generational travel patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodney B. Warnick

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine and explore the New England domestic travel market trends, from 1979 through 1991 within the context of generations. The existing travel markets, who travel to New England, are changing by age cohorts and specifically within different generations. The New England changes in generational travel patterns do not reflect national...

  7. Freedom of Movement (Common Travel Area) (Travel Documentation) Bill 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butler, Graham; Hunt, Brian; Flanagan, Terence

    2014-01-01

    Private Members' Bill (legislation) introduced in Dáil Éireann (House of Deputies), Houses of the Oireachtas (Irish Parliament). An Act to reinforce the Common Travel Area by providing for passport-free travel for persons who are entitled to travel within the Common Travel Area without a passport...

  8. Travels in Architectural History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Deriu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Travel is a powerful force in shaping the perception of the modern world and plays an ever-growing role within architectural and urban cultures. Inextricably linked to political and ideological issues, travel redefines places and landscapes through new transport infrastructures and buildings. Architecture, in turn, is reconstructed through visual and textual narratives produced by scores of modern travellers — including writers and artists along with architects themselves. In the age of the camera, travel is bound up with new kinds of imaginaries; private records and recollections often mingle with official, stereotyped views, as the value of architectural heritage increasingly rests on the mechanical reproduction of its images. Whilst students often learn about architectural history through image collections, the place of the journey in the formation of the architect itself shifts. No longer a lone and passionate antiquarian or an itinerant designer, the modern architect eagerly hops on buses, trains, and planes in pursuit of personal as well as professional interests. Increasingly built on a presumption of mobility, architectural culture integrates travel into cultural debates and design experiments. By addressing such issues from a variety of perspectives, this collection, a special 'Architectural Histories' issue on travel, prompts us to rethink the mobile conditions in which architecture has historically been produced and received.

  9. An Integrated Model to Explain Inter-Relationships in Travel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study focuses on the decision making process of international tourists traveling to Tanzania. An integrated approach is proposed to understand the interrelationships among tourist motivations, expectations, place identity and place dependence. Specifically, travel motivations directly affect tourist's expectations and ...

  10. Homeland Security Master's Degrees Awarded

    OpenAIRE

    Center for Homeland Defense and Security

    2011-01-01

    Center for Homeland Defense and Security, PRESS RELEASES MONTEREY, Calif. – Twenty-nine professionals who work in the homeland security field were awarded master’s degrees March 25 at the Naval Postgraduate School Center for Homeland Defense and Security. The...

  11. Research Award: Information and Networks

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC CRDI

    mentorship allow award holders to pursue their research goals and work in one of IDRC's dynamic program or ... governance, education, entrepreneurship, as well as collaborative models for participation and organization. ... What role do collaborative technologies (e.g., social media) play in social innovation and change?

  12. Frances Allen Wins Turing Award

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 8. Frances Allen Wins Turing Award. Priti Shankar. Article-in-a-Box Volume 12 Issue 8 August 2007 pp 5-5. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/012/08/0005-0005. Author Affiliations.

  13. Materials Best Paper Award 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Ophelia Han; Maryam Tabrizian

    2013-01-01

    Materials is instituting an annual award to recognize the outstanding papers in the area of materials science and engineering published in Materials. We are pleased to announce the first “Materials Best Paper Award” for 2013. Nominations were selected by the Section Editor-in-Chiefs and Editorial Board members of Materials from all papers published in 2009.

  14. Frances Allen Wins Turing Award

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 8. Frances Allen Wins Turing Award. Priti Shankar. Article-in-a-Box Volume 12 Issue 8 August 2007 pp ... Author Affiliations. Priti Shankar1. Department of Computer Science and Automation, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India ...

  15. Research Award: IDRC Challenge Fund

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Corey Piccioni

    2013-08-07

    Aug 7, 2013 ... IDRC is one of the world's leaders in generang new knowledge to meet global challenges. We offer a number of research awards providing a unique opportunity to enhance research skills and gain a fresh perspecve on crucial development issues. These one‐year, paid, in‐house programs of training and ...

  16. Impact on Learning Award, 1998.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Planning and Management, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Presents the 1998 winners of Impact on Learning Awards, recognition given to K-12 public schools that have solved real-world problems with design, engineering, and technology solutions. Categories represented include auditoriums, cafeterias, classrooms, commons areas, early-childhood learning centers, libraries, lobbies, and science and computer…

  17. Award Recipient Final Report Form

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    7. a) Were you in contact with other IDRC staff (aside from Centre Awards staff) during the. course of your research? Please indicate who you were in contact with and if this contact assisted you in any way. b) Please indicate the names and contact information of individuals from other organizations (departments, institutes, ...

  18. Leishmaniasis, an emerging infection in travelers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavli, Androula; Maltezou, Helena C

    2010-12-01

    Leishmaniasis is a vector-borne protozoan infection with a wide clinical spectrum, which ranges from asymptomatic infection to fatal visceral leishmaniasis. A review of the recent literature indicates a sharp increase in imported leishmaniasis cases in developed, non-endemic countries over the last decade, in association with increasing international tourism, military operations, and the influx of immigrants from endemic countries. South America is the main area for the acquisition of cutaneous leishmaniasis, and adventure travelers on long-term trips in highly-endemic forested areas are at particular risk. Popular Mediterranean destinations are emerging as the main areas of acquisition of visceral leishmaniasis for European travelers. Leishmaniasis should be considered in patients presenting with a compatible clinical syndrome and a history of travel to an endemic area, even if this occurred several months or years ago. Appropriate counseling should be provided to adventure travelers, military personnel, researchers, and other groups of travelers likely to be exposed to sandflies in endemic areas. Copyright © 2010 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. 76 FR 16630 - Announcement of an Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-24

    ... Development announces the award of a cooperative agreement with the Congressional Hunger Center (CHC) in Washington, DC, to work with ACF programs on hunger and obesity issues for young children. An award in the... Children and Families (ACF) announces the award of a cooperative agreement to the Congressional Hunger...

  20. 46 CFR 502.409 - Arbitration awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Arbitration awards. 502.409 Section 502.409 Shipping... Alternative Dispute Resolution § 502.409 Arbitration awards. (a)(1) The award in an arbitration proceeding... arbitration proceeding may not serve as an estoppel in any other proceeding for any issue that was resolved in...

  1. International Curriculums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Larry L.

    This workshop presentation on international curriculums in the field of parks, recreation, leisure, cultural services, and travel/tourism comments that the literature is replete with articles addressing what the field is about, but not about curriculum issues, models, and structure. It reports an international survey of 12 college educators…

  2. Travel risk assessment, advice and vaccinations in immunocompromised travellers (HIV, solid organ transplant and haematopoeitic stem cell transplant recipients): A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aung, A K; Trubiano, J A; Spelman, D W

    2015-01-01

    International travellers with immunocompromising conditions such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, solid organ transplantation (SOT) and haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) are at a significant risk of travel-related illnesses from both communicable and non-communicable diseases, depending on the intensity of underlying immune dysfunction, travel destinations and activities. In addition, the choice of travel vaccinations, timing and protective antibody responses are also highly dependent on the underlying conditions and thus pose significant challenges to the health-care providers who are involved in pre-travel risk assessment. This review article provides a framework of understanding and approach to aforementioned groups of immunocompromised travellers regarding pre-travel risk assessment and management; in particular travel vaccinations, infectious and non-infectious disease risks and provision of condition-specific advice; to reduce travel-related mortality and morbidity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Hepatitis B vaccination in travelers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonder, Gerard J. B.

    2008-01-01

    An increasing number of travelers travel to hepatitis B-endemic countries. In travel medicine, vaccinations should be advised according to risks. The actual incidence of hepatitis B infection in short-term tourists is very low and probably not higher than it is for people who do not travel. There is

  4. Media awards for responsible reporting of suicide: Experiences from Australia, Belgium and Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dare, Andrew J; Andriessen, Karl Am; Nordentoft, Merete; Meier, Michella; Huisman, Annemiek; Pirkis, Jane E

    2011-06-03

    Media awards to encourage responsible reporting of suicide have been introduced in several countries, including Australia, Belgium and Denmark. This study aimed to examine the experiences of Australian, Belgian and Danish award recipients in preparing stories on suicide, and consider the impacts of the awards for these recipients and for media professionals more broadly. We conducted semi-structured telephone interviews with the majority (14 out of 15) of past recipients of the awards in the three countries of interest. Media awards appear to show promise as a method of reinforcing national and international media guidelines on reporting suicide. The recipients of awards were proud to have had their achievements recognized in this way, and had developed a heightened awareness of the issues inherent in reporting suicide. Although relatively few had prepared subsequent stories on suicide, a number had been given opportunities to provide advice to other media professionals about how best to approach this sensitive topic. Recipients viewed the awards as an important means by which good quality reporting can be rewarded, and a springboard for raising community awareness about suicide. The experience from Australia, Belgium and Denmark suggests that media awards which recognize responsible reporting of suicide are extremely worthwhile.

  5. Impact of traveling to visit friends and relatives on chronic disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurgle, Holly E; Roesel, David J; Erickson, Tiffany N; Devine, Emily Beth

    2013-01-01

    Travelers visiting friends and relatives (VFR) are known to be at high risk of acquiring infectious diseases during travel. However, little is known about the impact of VFR travel on chronic diseases. This was a nonrandomized, retrospective observational study. Patients were adult VFR travelers who received care from an internal medical clinic serving immigrants and refugees. The primary objective was to determine the impact of VFR travel on markers of chronic disease management including: blood pressure, glycosylated hemoglobin, body mass index, serum creatinine, and anticoagulation. Of the 110 VFR travelers in our study, N = 48 traveled to Africa and N = 62 traveled to Asia for a mean duration of 59 (range 21-303) days. Of the 433 counseling points discussed at pre-travel visits, 71% were infectious disease prevention, 16% chronic disease related, and 13% travel safety. A total of 63 patients (57%) reported one or more health problems while traveling. Of these, 35 patients (32%) experienced a problem related to a chronic condition. In comparison, 24 (22%) patients experienced an acute infection. Sixty percent of patients were nonadherent to medications during travel. An average increase in diastolic blood pressure of 3.6 mmHg among patients with hypertension was the only statistically significant change in a chronic disease marker when values before and after travel were compared. Subgroup analysis revealed that travel to Africa and nonadherence to medications were also associated with worsening blood pressure control, and patients traveling to Africa experienced a decrease in body mass index. This study identified a high proportion of problems related to chronic conditions experienced during VFR travel, while pre-travel appointments tended to focus on infectious disease prevention. A greater emphasis on medication adherence and chronic disease management during VFR travel is also needed during pre-travel preparations. © 2013 International Society of

  6. Airport surveys at travel destinations--underutilized opportunities in travel medicine research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Irmgard L

    2015-01-01

    Research in destination airports, especially in resource-poor areas, allows unique immediate access to travelers at the conclusion of their trip. Response rates are high and the recall gap small. Trip-related health matters can be elicited relatively easily. An insight into travelers' decision-making processes on location would fill large gaps in our knowledge regarding travel health advice provision; yet, this approach is still much underutilized. Using PubMed, ScienceDirect, Google Scholar, and ProQuest, a review of the literature on airport surveys was conducted to determine where they were used, their response rates and purpose, and location-relevant methodological information. The lack of methodological guidelines in the reviewed literature resulted in recommendations for planning and conducting an airport survey at a destination airport. Millions of travelers in airports around the world represent an underutilized sample of potential study participants for topics that cannot be studied adequately in other settings. Benefiting from close cooperation between travel health professionals and airport authorities, researchers can expect not only large-scale convenience samples for surveys, but also opportunities to explore exciting and creative research topics to broaden our understanding of travel medicine and health. © 2014 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  7. Travelers' Health: Trypanosomiasis, American (Chagas Disease)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stamaril clinics Disease Directory Resources Resources for Travelers Adventure Travel Animal Safety Blood Clots Bug Bites Evite ... Minute Travel Long-Term Travel Mass Gatherings Medical Tourism Mental Health Motion Sickness Natural Disasters Pregnant Travelers ...

  8. Award for the best CMS thesis

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The 2002 CMS PhD Thesis Award for has been presented to Giacomo Luca Bruno for his thesis defended at the University of Pavia in Italy and entitled "The RPC detectors and the muon system for the CMS experiment at the LHC". His work was supervised by Sergio P. Ratti from the University of Pavia. Since April 2002, Giacomo has been employed as a research fellow by CERN's EP Division. He continues to work on CMS in the areas of data acquisition and physics reconstruction and selection. Last Monday he received a commemorative engraved plaque from Lorenzo Foà, chairman of the CMS Collaboration Board. He will also receive expenses paid to an international physics conference to present his thesis results. Giacomo Luca Bruno with Lorenzo Foà

  9. Remarks delivered at the awards ceremony

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brumberger, H.; Hendricks, R.W. (eds.)

    1978-06-01

    For almost four decades, the distinguished trio of professors, W. W. Beeman, A. Guinier, and O. Kratky, have provided leadership of the field of small-angle scattering through both their teaching and their personal research. Collectively, they have authored or coauthored over 400 scientific articles and reviews, several books, and have been associated with over 140 graduate and postdoctoral students. It was thus appropriate that each should be honored for his outstanding contributions to the field at the Fourth International Conference on Small-Angle Scattering which was held in Gatlinburg, Tennessee, in October 1977. The Board of Directors of the Special Interest Group on Small-Angle Scattering of the American Crystallographic Association in conjunction with the Conference Organizing Committee, arranged a special awards ceremony during which each honoree presented his personal reminiscences of the development of small-angle scattering in his own laboratory. This report is a record of this event.

  10. Common Health Risks, Required Precautions of Travelers and their Customs Towards the Use of Travel Medicine Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roupa, Zoe; Zikos, Dimitrios; Vasilopoulos, Aristides; Diomidous, Marianna

    2012-01-01

    There is an increasing number of people who travel around the world. Every traveler is exposed to nearly all infectious risks which may occur during his travel time. Some of the main risk factors can be water quality, temperature and high humidity and the exposure to multi-resistant microorganisms. To tackle the upcoming problem there is an imperative need to develop a new branch of medicine with the name of travel medicine. A consultation prior to departure for an upcoming trip is required, focusing to a personalized healthcare plan, based on international scientific protocols and epidemiological studies.Travelers must acquire essential information about the prevailing hygiene conditions and climatic differentiations that occur in the region. Additionally there are several health risks upon the arrival at destination. A scheduled visit to a health professional is necessary, especially in the case of travelers suffering from chronic diseases or those taking medication, while vaccination is considered essential for specific destination countries. Healthcare professionals should be able to inform travelers and evaluate their needs. According to research studies on notion and attitudes travelers' specific risks, only few of them are well-informed during a trip. While most studies indicate that travelers have some kind of pre travel medical consultation, not all of them proceed to the required vaccinations and medications. Travelling for business or leisure around the world may be unhealthy. The importance of proper preparation prior to the travel requires to be adequately informed by specialized healthcare professionals, and to receive appropriate vaccinations and medications, when required. The results of the review of notions and attitudes of travelers during the trip indicate not only the need for further development of the branch of travel medicine but especially the need for the expansion and the availability of health services.

  11. Extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae colonisation in long-term overseas business travellers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Yasutaka; Miura, Yuri; Yamaguchi, Tetsuo; Matsumoto, Tetsuya

    International travel is considered a risk for colonisation with extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-PE). To our knowledge, no studies to date have focused on ESBL-PE colonisation among long-term business travellers. Therefore this study aimed to clarify the characteristics associated with ESBL-PE colonisation in Japanese long-term business travellers. Japanese business travellers planning to stay abroad for ≥6 months were enrolled. Of the 192 travellers, 135 provided only post-travel stool samples and 57 provided both pre- and post-travel stool samples. Additionally, microbiological analyses of ESBL-PE strains, including susceptibility tests and polymerase chain reaction amplification of CTX-M genes and their sequencing were performed. A post-travel survey showed that of the 55 travellers (40.7%) who tested positive for ESBL-PE after travel, the highest proportion was travellers returning from East and Central Asia. CTX-M gene analyses showed that CTX-M-15 was the most frequently observed (55.0%). A pre- and post-travel survey showed that of the 22 travellers (44.9%) acquired ESBL-PE during their travel, with acquisition most frequently observed in travellers returning from South Asia. Risk-based evaluations of ESBL-PE colonisation should be performed not only for regular tourists but also for long-term business travellers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of the Coca-Cola company travel health kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Lynne A; Bettinger, Julie; Dismukes, Roberta; Kozarsky, Phyllis E

    2002-01-01

    The Coca-Cola travel health kit has been used for about one decade for international travelers and required evaluation to see if the items contained were appropriate for the employees. Two hundred thirty-four travelers were sampled and filled out a voluntary survey including questions about demographic information, travel history, and usage and value of the contents of the travel health kit. One hundred eighty-one surveys were returned; 65% of the respondents were male, and the majority of travelers were between the ages of 36 and 45 years. The most useful items were analgesics and medications used for gastrointestinal problems. In general, the items identified as being the least useful were those requiring specialized use by a medical practitioner, such as needles and syringes. Suggestions of items to be added to the kit included vitamins, cough drops, sleep aids, and eye drops. A surprising result that Coca-Cola employees expressed the desire for brand name rather than generic items. Evaluation of the Coca-Cola Company travel health kit revealed it to be very useful to most corporate travelers. Suggestions that were made will be taken into consideration in designing a new kit, and consideration is being given to whether a basic travel health kit should be provided to which travelers can add other items depending on their personal needs.

  13. Bureau for Food Security Travel and Mission Support System

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — FTRAMS is a travel data collection system for BFS that collects information on both the basic details of an employee's trips (destination, length, purpose, etc.) and...

  14. Travel-related health problems in Japanese travelers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Yasutaka; Kudo, Koichiro

    2009-09-01

    Although the number of Japanese individuals traveling abroad has increased steadily, reaching approximately 17.3 million in 2007, the incidence of various travel-related health problems in Japan remains unknown. The travel-related health problems of Japanese travelers returning to Japan from abroad are analyzed by assessing the records. Data were collected retrospectively on returning travelers who visited the authors' travel clinic during the period from January 2005 through to December 2006 with any health problem acquired overseas. A total of 345 patients were included in this study (200 male, 145 female; average age, 34+/-12.3 years). Reasons for travel included leisure (45.8%); business (39.1%); visiting friends and relatives or accompanying other travelers (8.7%); volunteering (3.8%); and long stays in order to study or live (2.6%). The most visited destination was Asia (n=260), followed by Africa (n=105). The most commonly reported health problems were gastro-intestinal infections (39.1%), followed by respiratory tract infections (16.2%), animal bites (8.1%), and skin problems (5.8%). Together, malaria and dengue accounted for 10% of diagnoses in 125 febrile patients (36.2%). Although the profile of travel-related health problems in Japanese travelers is similar to that of Western travelers, the characteristics of travel were quite different. Therefore Japanese travel advice should be tailored to suit the Japanese traveler.

  15. Travel and Hospitality | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Results 1 - 60 of 60 ... Expense reports must have supporting documentation, and must be approved by the appropriate manager before processing and payment. All senior management and Board of Governors' expense claims are reviewed for compliance by the Finance and Administration Division before payment.

  16. Travel Health and Wellness Officer | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... wellness initiatives using the mechanism established and include results in an activity report at the end of November and May;; Ensure the production of effective communication tools and high-quality motivational and advertising materials, i.e. posters, invitations, etc;; Provide quality client service to all Centre employees.

  17. New awards for CERN science

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Earlier this week, the European Physical Society (EPS) announced its High Energy and Particle Physics prizes for 2013, and I’m pleased to say that the LHC featured highly. With all that has been happening in the last few years, that’s perhaps not too surprising, but these awards nevertheless constitute a great honour for our community.   The High Energy and Particle Physics Prize went to the ATLAS and CMS collaborations “for the discovery of a Higgs boson, as predicted by the Brout-Englert-Higgs mechanism”, and to Michel Della Negra, Peter Jenni and Tejinder Virdee “for their pioneering and outstanding leadership roles in the making of the ATLAS and CMS experiments”. Among the other awards, the Young Experimental Physicist Prize went to Diego Martinez Santos “for his outstanding contributions to the trigger and commissioning of the LHCb experiment, and the analyses leading to first evidence for the rare decay B0s→ ...

  18. John Cherry wins Horton Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillham, Robert W.; Cherry, John

    The recipient of the 1985 Robert T. Horton Award is John Cherry. As John's colleague and friend for the past 12 years, it is a great privilege and honor for me to have been asked to prepare the citation for this award.John received his bachelor's degree in geological engineering from the University of Saskatchewan and his M.S., also in geological engineering, from the University of California at Berkeley. After earning his Ph.D. in geology at the University of Illinois, John spent 1 year in postdoctoral study at the University of Bordeaux, France, before returning to Canada in 1967 as an assistant professor of geology at the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg. John joined the Department of Earth Sciences at the University of Waterloo as an associate professor in 1971. At Waterloo he is currently a full professor and Director of the Institute for Groundwater Research.

  19. LHCb Early Career Scientist Awards

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrick Koppenburg for the LHCb Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    On 15 September 2016, the LHCb collaboration awarded the first set of prizes for outstanding contributions of early career scientists.   From left to right: Guy Wilkinson (LHCb spokesperson), Sascha Stahl, Kevin Dungs, Tim Head, Roel Aaij, Conor Fitzpatrick, Claire Prouvé, Patrick Koppenburg (chair of committee) and Sean Benson. Twenty-five nominations were submitted and considered by the committee, and 5 prizes were awarded to teams or individuals for works that had a significant impact within the last year. The awardees are: Roel Aaij, Sean Benson, Conor Fitzpatrick, Rosen Matev and Sascha Stahl for having implemented and commissioned the revolutionary changes to the LHC Run-2 high-level-trigger, including the first widespread deployment of real-time analysis techniques in High Energy Physics;   Kevin Dungs and Tim Head for having launched the Starterkit initiative, a new style of software tutorials based on modern programming methods. “Starterkit is a group of ph...

  20. Carlson Wagonlit Travel

    CERN Document Server

    2008-01-01

    We would like to inform you that our agency will be closed from 21st December 2008 at 16:30 until 5th January 2009 at 8:30. For all URGENT MATTERS you can contact our CARLSON WAGONLIT TRAVEL at Rue du Nant in Geneva (Team 3), phone: 058 322 26 20. The agency will be open on 22nd, 23rd, 29th and 30th December. We wish you a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year! CARLSON WAGONLIT TRAVEL CERN Agency

  1. Business travel-associated illness: a GeoSentinel analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin H; Leder, Karin; Barbre, Kira A; Schlagenhauf, Patricia; Libman, Michael; Keystone, Jay; Mendelson, Marc; Gautret, Philippe; Schwartz, Eli; Shaw, Marc; MacDonald, Sue; McCarthy, Anne; Connor, Bradley A; Esposito, Douglas H; Hamer, Davidson; Wilson, Mary E

    2018-01-01

    Analysis of a large cohort of business travelers will help clinicians focus on frequent and serious illnesses. We aimed to describe travel-related health problems in business travelers. GeoSentinel Surveillance Network consists of 64 travel and tropical medicine clinics in 29 countries; descriptive analysis was performed on ill business travelers, defined as persons traveling for work, evaluated after international travel 1 January 1997 through 31 December 2014. Among 12 203 business travelers seen 1997-2014 (14 045 eligible diagnoses), the majority (97%) were adults aged 20-64 years; most (74%) reported from Western Europe or North America; two-thirds were male. Most (86%) were outpatients. Fewer than half (45%) reported a pre-travel healthcare encounter. Frequent regions of exposure were sub-Saharan Africa (37%), Southeast Asia (15%) and South Central Asia (14%). The most frequent diagnoses were malaria (9%), acute unspecified diarrhea (8%), viral syndrome (6%), acute bacterial diarrhea (5%) and chronic diarrhea (4%). Species was reported for 973 (90%) of 1079 patients with malaria, predominantly Plasmodium falciparum acquired in sub-Saharan Africa. Of 584 (54%) with malaria chemoprophylaxis information, 92% took none or incomplete courses. Thirteen deaths were reported, over half of which were due to malaria; others succumbed to pneumonia, typhoid fever, rabies, melioidosis and pyogenic abscess. Diarrheal illness was a major cause of morbidity. Malaria contributed substantial morbidity and mortality, particularly among business travelers to sub-Saharan Africa. Underuse or non-use of chemoprophylaxis contributed to malaria cases. Deaths in business travelers could be reduced by improving adherence to malaria chemoprophylaxis and targeted vaccination for vaccine-preventable diseases. Pre-travel advice is indicated for business travelers and is currently under-utilized and needs improvement.

  2. The severe acute respiratory syndrome: impact on travel and tourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder-Smith, Annelies

    2006-03-01

    SARS and travel are intricately interlinked. Travelers belonged to those primarily affected in the early stages of the outbreak, travelers became vectors of the disease, and finally, travel and tourism themselves became the victims. The outbreak of SARS created international anxiety because of its novelty, its ease of transmission in certain settings, and the speed of its spread through jet travel, combined with extensive media coverage. The psychological impacts of SARS, coupled with travel restrictions imposed by various national and international authorities, have diminished international travel in 2003, far beyond the limitations to truly SARS hit areas. Governments and press, especially in non SARS affected areas, have been slow to strike the right balance between timely and frequent risk communication and placing risk in the proper context. Screening at airport entry points is costly, has a low yield and is not sufficient in itself. The low yield in detecting SARS is most likely due to a combination of factors, such as travel advisories which resulted in reduced travel to and from SARS affected areas, implementation of effective pre-departure screening at airports in SARS-hit countries, and a rapid decline in new cases at the time when screening was finally introduced. Rather than investing in airport screening measures to detect rare infectious diseases, investments should be used to strengthen screening and infection control capacities at points of entry into the healthcare system. If SARS reoccurs, the subsequent outbreak will be smaller and more easily contained if the lessons learnt from the recent epidemic are applied. Lessons learnt during the outbreak in relation to international travel will be discussed.

  3. Cluster of Imported Vivax Malaria in Travelers Returning From Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitzel, Thomas; Labarca, Jaime; Cortes, Claudia P; Rosas, Reinaldo; Balcells, M Elvira; Perret, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    We report a cluster of imported vivax malaria in three of five Chilean travelers returning from Peru in March 2015. The cluster highlights the high risk of malaria in the Loreto region in northern Peru, which includes popular destinations for international nature and adventure tourism. According to local surveillance data, Plasmodium vivax is predominating, but Plasmodium falciparum is also present, and the incidence of both species has increased during recent years. Travelers visiting this region should be counseled about the prevention of malaria and the options for chemoprophylaxis. © 2015 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  4. 1986 James B. Macelwane Awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyllie, Peter J.; Stolper, Edward M.

    I can think of few things more pleasurable than introducing a young scientist whose research has enhanced his visibility to such an extent that his or her image is clearly distinguishable from among the large number of young scientists publishing excellent research these days.Normally, the recipient of a young scientist award is in a state approaching shock, with mixed feelings of pride and humility and appreciation for all those who guided him or her on the way. For Ed Stolper, however, the situation is different, and he is sitting here quite calmly. Although he is only 33 years old, his image shines brightly enough that it has received attention previously—He was awarded the Clarke Medal of the Geochemical Society in 1985, and he shared the Newcomb Cleveland Prize in 1985 with Sally Rigden and Tom Ahrens for the best 1984 paper in Science. Today it is the Macelwane Award of the American Geophysical Union, and there are still several tomorrows before his age disqualifies him as a young scientist, making it necessary for him to start getting down to serious, mature research.

  5. DSM Science & Technology Awards (south) event 2011: the role of micronutrients in human nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    On 21 June 2011, the DSM Science & Technology Awards recognized and rewarded outstanding innovative young scientists active in fundamental and applied research. As in previous years, an international judging committee honored creative and groundbreaking PhD research. Twelve finalists, the top candidates from Switzerland, Austria, France and southern Germany, were invited for the final competition followed by the award ceremony attended by numerous representatives of universities, non-governmental organizations, institutes of technology and industry. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. 75 FR 59227 - U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board... To Apply for Membership on the U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board. SUMMARY: The Department of Commerce is currently seeking applications to fill three vacant positions on the U.S. Travel and Tourism...

  7. 76 FR 50179 - U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-12

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board... to apply for membership on the U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board. SUMMARY: The Department of Commerce is currently seeking applications for membership on the U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board...

  8. 77 FR 75148 - Request for Applications for United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-19

    ... States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board AGENCY: International Trade Administration, Commerce. ACTION: Notice of an opportunity to apply for membership on the United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board... States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board (Board). The purpose of the Board is to advise the Secretary of...

  9. 78 FR 53426 - United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board Charter Renewal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration United States Travel and Tourism... for the United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board on August 19, 2013. DATES: The Charter for the United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board was renewed on August 19, 2013. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION...

  10. 77 FR 8809 - United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board; Teleconference Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-15

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration United States Travel and Tourism... Commerce. ACTION: Notice of an open teleconference meeting. SUMMARY: The United States Travel and Tourism... National Travel and Tourism Strategy (Strategy). The Executive Order was issued by President Barack Obama...

  11. 78 FR 42041 - Travel and Tourism Trade Mission to Taiwan, Japan, and Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-15

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Travel and Tourism Trade Mission to... Foreign Commercial Service is amending notice for the Travel and Tourism Trade Mission to Taiwan, Japan... executive lead the Travel and Tourism Trade Mission to Taiwan, Japan and Korea, March 10-14, 2014, published...

  12. 26 CFR 49.4262(b)-1 - Exclusion of certain travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Exclusion of certain travel. 49.4262(b)-1... Exclusion of certain travel. (a) In general. Under section 4262(b) taxable transportation does not include... computing tax on travel not excluded. (1) Where a payment is made for transportation which includes...

  13. 77 FR 8216 - Request for Stakeholder Comments on “National Travel and Tourism Strategy”

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-14

    ... ``National Travel and Tourism Strategy'' AGENCY: International Trade Administration, Department of Commerce... comments on key stakeholder priorities to be considered in the development of a national strategy, entitled ``National Travel and Tourism Strategy'' (``Strategy''), to be produced by the Task Force on Travel and...

  14. 75 FR 36414 - Federal Travel Regulation (FTR); Directions for Reporting Other Than Coach-Class Accommodations...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-25

    ... GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION [Docket 2010-009; Sequence 3] Federal Travel Regulation (FTR); Directions for Reporting Other Than Coach-Class Accommodations for Employees on Official Travel AGENCY... Accountability Office (GAO) report, Premium Class Travel: Internal Control Weaknesses Governmentwide Led to...

  15. 77 FR 56811 - United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-14

    ... Executive Order 13597 on travel and tourism. The agenda may change to accommodate Board business. The final..., the Board will hear updates from its four subcommittees on travel facilitation, business climate... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration United States Travel and Tourism...

  16. Travel medicine physician adherence to guidelines for the emergency self treatment of malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, Gerard T; Walden, Lucas M; Townend, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Few studies have examined emergency self treatment (EST) antimalarial prescribing patterns. 110 physician-members of the Travel Medicine Society of Ireland and British Global and Travel Health Association participated in this study. There was a trend towards the prescription of EST for travel to remote low-risk malaria areas; for long-term residents living in low-risk areas; and for frequent travellers to low-risk areas. This study provides insights into the use of EST in travellers' malaria. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2016. All rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Business travel and behavioral and mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rundle, Andrew G; Revenson, Tracey A; Friedman, Michael

    2017-12-21

    Assess associations between business travel and behavioral and mental health. Cross-sectional analyses of de-identified electronic medical record data from EHE International, Inc. a provider of corporate wellness programs. Higher levels of business travel were associated with poorer outcomes. Compared to traveling 1-6 nights/month for work, those who traveled 21 + nights were more likely to: smoke (prevalence ratio = 3.74, 95% CI 2.56, 5.46), report trouble sleeping (PR = 1.37, 95% CI 1.09, 1.71), be sedentary (PR = 1.95, 95%CI 1.56, 2.43) and score above clinical thresholds for alcohol dependence (CAGE score>1: PR = 2.04, 95% CI 1.26, 3.29), and mild or worse anxiety (GAD-7 Score>4: PR = 1.69, 95% CI 1.29, 2.21) and depression symptoms (PHQ-9 Score>4: PR = 2.27, 95%CI 1.70, 3.03). Employers should provide programs to help employees manage stress and maintain health while traveling for work.

  18. Risk for Travelers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Form Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (vCJD) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... for Travelers Surveillance Treatment Related Links Prion Diseases Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE), or Mad Cow ...

  19. Flu and Holiday Travel

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-12-13

    This podcast explains the ways people can stay healthy and avoid the flu when traveling this winter.  Created: 12/13/2010 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 12/13/2010.

  20. Zika Travel Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... was previously found in the locations on this list, but scientists have determined the virus is no longer present. This means all travelers, including pregnant women, can visit these ... a country or territory on this list, CDC will remove it from the list and ...