WorldWideScience

Sample records for international survey aegis

  1. The All-wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey (AEGIS) Data Sets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, M.; Guhathakurta, P.; Konidaris, N.; Newman, J.A.; Ashby, M.L.N.; Biggs, A.D.; Barmby, P.; Bundy, K.; Chapman, S.; Coil, A.L.; Conselice, C.; Cooper, M.; Croton,; Eisenhardt, P.; Ellis, R.; Faber, S.; Fang, T.; Fazio, G.G.; Georgakakis, A.; Gerke, B.; Goss, W.M.; /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept. /Lick Observ. /LBL, Berkeley

    2006-07-21

    In this the first of a series of ''Letters'', we present a description of the panchromatic data sets that have been acquired in the Extended Groth Strip region of the sky. Our survey, the All-wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey (AEGIS), is intended to study the physical properties and evolutionary processes of galaxies at z {approx} 1. It includes the following deep, wide-field imaging data sets: Chandra/ACIS{sup 30} X-ray (0.5-10 keV), GALEX{sup 31} ultraviolet (1200-2500 A), CFHT/MegaCam Legacy Survey{sup 32} optical (3600-9000 {angstrom}), CFHT/CFH12K optical (4500-9000 {angstrom}), Hubble Space Telescope/ACS{sup 33} optical (4400-8500 {angstrom}), Palomar/WIRC{sup 34} near-infrared (1.2-2.2 {micro}m), Spitzer/IRAC{sup 35} mid-infrared (3.6-8.0 {micro}m), Spitzer/MIPS far-infrared (24-70 {micro}m), and VLA{sup 36} radio continuum (6-20 cm). In addition, this region of the sky has been targeted for extensive spectroscopy using the DEIMOS spectrograph on the Keck II 10 m telescope{sup 37}. Our survey is compared to other large multiwavelength surveys in terms of depth and sky coverage.

  2. The All-Wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey(AEGIS) Data Sets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, M.; Guhathakurta, P.; Konidaris, N.P.; Newman, J.A.; Ashby, M.L.N.; Biggs, A.D.; Barmby, P.; Bundy, K.; Chapman, S.C.; Coil,A.L.; Conselice, C.J.; Cooper, M.C.; Croton, D.J.; Eisenhardt, P.R.M.; Ellis, R.S.; Faber, S.M.; Fang, T.; Fazio, G.G.; Georgakakis, A.; Gerke,B.F.; Goss, W.M.; Gwyn, S.; Harker, J.; Hopkins, A.M.; Huang, J.-S.; Ivison, R.J.; Kassin, S.A.; Kirby, E.N.; Koekemoer, A.M.; Koo, D.C.; Laird, E.S.; Le Floc' h, E.; Lin, L.; Lotz, J.M.; Marshall, P.J.; Martin,D.C.; Metevier, A.J.; Moustakas, L.A.; Nandra, K.; Noeske, K.G.; Papovich, C.; Phillips, A.C.; Rich,R. M.; Rieke, G.H.; Rigopoulou, D.; Salim, S.; Schiminovich, D.; Simard, L.; Smail, I.; Small,T.A.; Weiner,B.J.; Willmer, C.N.A.; Willner, S.P.; Wilson, G.; Wright, E.L.; Yan, R.

    2006-10-13

    In this the first of a series of Letters, we present a description of the panchromatic data sets that have been acquired in the Extended Groth Strip region of the sky. Our survey, the All-wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey (AEGIS), is intended to study the physical properties and evolutionary processes of galaxies at z{approx}1. It includes the following deep, wide-field imaging data sets: Chandra/ACIS X-ray (0.5-10 keV), GALEX ultraviolet (1200-2500 Angstroms), CFHT/MegaCam Legacy Survey optical (3600-9000 Angstroms), CFHT/CFH12K optical (4500-9000 Angstroms), Hubble Space Telescope/ACS optical (4400-8500 Angstroms), Palomar/WIRC near-infrared (1.2-2.2 {micro}m), Spitzer/IRAC mid-infrared (3.6-8.0 {micro}m), Spitzer/MIPS far-infrared (24-70 {micro}m), and VLA radio continuum (6-20 cm). In addition, this region of the sky has been targeted for extensive spectroscopy using the DEIMOS spectrograph on the Keck II 10 m telescope. Our survey is compared to other large multiwavelength surveys in terms of depth and sky coverage.

  3. The DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey: AEGIS observations of a Dual AGNat z = 0.7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerke1, Brian F.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Lotz, Jennifer; Yan, Renbin; Barmby, P.; Coil, Alison L.; Conselice, Christopher J.; Ivison, R.J.; Lin, Lihwai; Koo, David C.; Nandra, Kirpal; Salim, Samir; Small, Todd; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Cooper, Michael C.; Davis, Marc; Faber, S.M.; Guhathakurta, Puragra

    2006-01-01

    We present evidence for a dual Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) within an early-type galaxy at z = 0.709 in the Extended Groth Strip. The galaxy lies on the red sequence, with absolute magnitude M B = -21.0 ( AB, w , with h = 0 0.7) and rest-frame color U - B = 1.38. Its optical spectrum shows strong, double-peaked [O III] emission lines and weak Hβ emission, with Seyfert-like line ratios. The two narrow peaks are separate by 630 km s-1 in velocity and arise from two distinct regions, spatially resolved in the DEIMOS spectrum, with a projected physical separation of 1.2 kpc. HST/ACS imaging shows an early-type (E/S0) galaxy with hints of disturbed structure, consistent with the remnant of a dissipationless merger. Multiwavelength photometric information from the AEGIS consortium confirm the identification of a dust-obscured AGN in an early-type galaxy, with detections in X-ray, optical, infrared and radio wavebands. These data are most readily explained as a single galaxy harboring two AGN--the first such system to be observed in an otherwise typical early-type galaxy

  4. AEGIS geologic simulation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, M.G.

    1982-01-01

    The Geologic Simulation Model (GSM) is used by the AEGIS (Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems) program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory to simulate the dynamic geology and hydrology of a geologic nuclear waste repository site over a million-year period following repository closure. The GSM helps to organize geologic/hydrologic data; to focus attention on active natural processes by requiring their simulation; and, through interactive simulation and calibration, to reduce subjective evaluations of the geologic system. During each computer run, the GSM produces a million-year geologic history that is possible for the region and the repository site. In addition, the GSM records in permanent history files everything that occurred during that time span. Statistical analyses of data in the history files of several hundred simulations are used to classify typical evolutionary paths, to establish the probabilities associated with deviations from the typical paths, and to determine which types of perturbations of the geologic/hydrologic system, if any, are most likely to occur. These simulations will be evaluated by geologists familiar with the repository region to determine validity of the results. Perturbed systems that are determined to be the most realistic, within whatever probability limits are established, will be used for the analyses that involve radionuclide transport and dose models. The GSM is designed to be continuously refined and updated. Simulation models are site specific, and, although the submodels may have limited general applicability, the input data equirements necessitate detailed characterization of each site before application

  5. AEgIS installation completed

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Gravity. Despite first being described over three centuries ago, it remains one of the least understood of the fundamental forces explored by physicists. At CERN’s recently completed AEgIS experiment, a team has set out to examine the effect of gravity on an as-yet-uncharted realm: antimatter.   The complete AEgIS set-up. Located in the AD hall, the AEgIS experiment plans to  make the first direct measurement of Earth’s gravitation effect on antimatter. By sending a beam of antihydrogen atoms through very thin gratings, the experiment will be able to measure how far the antihydrogen atoms fall and in how much time – giving the AEgIS team a measurement of the gravitational coupling. “By the end of 2012, we had finished by putting all the elements of the experiment together,” explains Michael Doser, AEgIS Spokesperson. “Now we have to show that they can all work together and, unfortunately, we will have no antiproton beams fo...

  6. THE DEPENDENCE OF QUENCHING UPON THE INNER STRUCTURE OF GALAXIES AT 0.5 {<=} z < 0.8 IN THE DEEP2/AEGIS SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, Edmond; Faber, S. M.; Koo, David C.; McGrath, Elizabeth J.; Fang, Jerome J.; Barro, G.; Kocevski, Dale D. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 1156 High Street, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Dutton, Aaron A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Elliot Building, 3800 Finnerty Road, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8P 5C2 (Canada); Simard, Luc [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Huang, J.-S. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden State, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Bell, Eric F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Dekel, Avishai [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Salim, Samir [National Optical Astronomical Observatories, 950 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Bundy, K. [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8582 (Japan); Coil, A. L. [Department of Physics, Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, San Diego, CA 92093 (United States); Cooper, Michael C. [Center for Galaxy Evolution, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, 4129 Frederick Reines Hall, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Conselice, C. J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Davis, M. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Dominguez, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Kassin, Susan A., E-mail: ec2250@gmail.com [Astrophysics Science Division, Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 665, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); and others

    2012-12-01

    The shutdown of star formation in galaxies is generally termed 'quenching'. Quenching may occur through a variety of processes, e.g., active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback, stellar feedback, or the shock heating of gas in the dark matter halo. However, which mechanism(s) is, in fact, responsible for quenching is still in question. This paper addresses quenching by searching for traces of possible quenching processes through their effects on galaxy structural parameters such as stellar mass (M {sub *}), M {sub *}/r {sub e}, surface stellar mass density ({approx}M {sub *}/r {sup 2} {sub e}), and Sersic index (n). We analyze the rest-frame U - B color correlations versus these structural parameters using a sample of galaxies in the redshift range 0.5 {<=} z < 0.8 from the DEEP2/AEGIS survey. In addition to global radii, stellar masses, and Sersic parameters, we also use 'bulge' and 'disk' photometric measurements from GIM2D fits to HST/ACS V and I images. We assess the tightness of the color relationships by measuring their 'overlap regions', defined as the area in color-parameter space in which red and blue galaxies overlap; the parameter that minimizes these overlap regions is considered to be the most effective color discriminator. We find that Sersic index (n) has the smallest overlap region among all tested parameters and resembles a step function with a threshold value of n = 2.3. There exists, however, a significant population of outliers with blue colors yet high n values that seem to contradict this behavior; they make up Almost-Equal-To 40% of n > 2.3 galaxies. We hypothesize that their Sersic values may be distorted by bursts of star formation, AGNs, and/or poor fits, leading us to consider central surface stellar mass density, {Sigma}*{sub 1kpc}, as an alternative to Sersic index. Not only does {Sigma}*{sub 1kpc} correct the outliers, but it also forms a tight relationship with color, suggesting that the innermost

  7. 18 June 2012 - DST Global Founder Y. Milner signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss; visiting the AD facility in building 193 with AEGIS Collaboration Spokesperson M. Doser and Adviser for the Russian Federation T. Kurtyka. Managing Director I. Osborne also present with Mrs J. Milner and DST Global A. Lebedkina.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    18 June 2012 - DST Global Founder Y. Milner signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss; visiting the AD facility in building 193 with AEGIS Collaboration Spokesperson M. Doser and Adviser for the Russian Federation T. Kurtyka. Managing Director I. Osborne also present with Mrs J. Milner and DST Global A. Lebedkina.

  8. AEgIS antihydrogen production trap

    CERN Multimedia

    Caraban Gonzalez, Noemi

    2017-01-01

    During technical stop 2017 the AEgIS experiment was open for upgrades and maintenance. We had the opportunity to take some 360 images from inside and see where antiprotons are ¨trapped¨ and anti-Hydrogen produced.

  9. AEGIS: a wildfire prevention and management information system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostas Kalabokidis; Alan Ager; Mark Finney; Nikos Athanasis; Palaiologos Palaiologou; Christos Vasilakos

    2016-01-01

    We describe a Web-GIS wildfire prevention and management platform (AEGIS) developed as an integrated and easy-to-use decision support tool to manage wildland fire hazards in Greece (http://aegis.aegean.gr). The AEGIS platform assists with early fire warning, fire planning, fire control and coordination of firefighting forces by providing online access to...

  10. Preliminary Design of the AEGIS Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Dassa, Luca; Cambiaghi, Danilo

    2010-01-01

    The AEGIS experiment is expected to be installed at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator in a very close future, since the main goal of the AEGIS experiment is the measurement of gravity impact on antihydrogen, which will be produced on the purpose. Antihydrogen production implies very challenging environmental conditions: at the heart of the AEGIS facility 50 mK temperature, 1e-12 mbar pressure and a 1 T magnetic field are required. Interfacing extreme cryogenics with ultra high vacuum will affect very strongly the design of the whole facility, requiring a very careful mechanical design. This paper presents an overview of the actual design of the AEGIS experimental facility, paying special care to mechanical aspects. Each subsystem of the facility – ranging from the positron source to the recombination region and the measurement region – will be shortly described. The ultra cold region, which is the most critical with respect to the antihydrogen formation, will be dealt in detail. The assembly procedures will...

  11. Impact of Year 2000 Issues on the Aegis Weapon System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1999-01-01

    ... are not disrupted by year 2000-related issues. Specifically, we reviewed year 2000 test plans and reports, initialization procedures, system interfaces, system certification, and contingency plan for the Aegis weapon system...

  12. Total Ownership Cost Reduction Case Study: AEGIS Radar Phase Shifters

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bridger, Wray W; Ruiz, Mark D

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this research is to provide a case study that captures the production and design processes and program management solutions used to reduce total ownership costs of AEGIS Radar Phase Shifters...

  13. International concrete crosstie and fastening system survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    The International Concrete Crosstie and : Fastening System Survey assesses the : international railway industrys state of practice : regarding concrete crossties and fastening : system design, performance, and research : needs. The Rail Transporta...

  14. AEGIS: a wildfire prevention and management information system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalabokidis, Kostas; Ager, Alan; Finney, Mark; Athanasis, Nikos; Palaiologou, Palaiologos; Vasilakos, Christos

    2016-03-01

    We describe a Web-GIS wildfire prevention and management platform (AEGIS) developed as an integrated and easy-to-use decision support tool to manage wildland fire hazards in Greece (http://aegis.aegean.gr). The AEGIS platform assists with early fire warning, fire planning, fire control and coordination of firefighting forces by providing online access to information that is essential for wildfire management. The system uses a number of spatial and non-spatial data sources to support key system functionalities. Land use/land cover maps were produced by combining field inventory data with high-resolution multispectral satellite images (RapidEye). These data support wildfire simulation tools that allow the users to examine potential fire behavior and hazard with the Minimum Travel Time fire spread algorithm. End-users provide a minimum number of inputs such as fire duration, ignition point and weather information to conduct a fire simulation. AEGIS offers three types of simulations, i.e., single-fire propagation, point-scale calculation of potential fire behavior, and burn probability analysis, similar to the FlamMap fire behavior modeling software. Artificial neural networks (ANNs) were utilized for wildfire ignition risk assessment based on various parameters, training methods, activation functions, pre-processing methods and network structures. The combination of ANNs and expected burned area maps are used to generate integrated output map of fire hazard prediction. The system also incorporates weather information obtained from remote automatic weather stations and weather forecast maps. The system and associated computation algorithms leverage parallel processing techniques (i.e., High Performance Computing and Cloud Computing) that ensure computational power required for real-time application. All AEGIS functionalities are accessible to authorized end-users through a web-based graphical user interface. An innovative smartphone application, AEGIS App, also

  15. Navy Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) Program: Background and Issues for Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-25

    procuring the missiles.... 97 Rob Taylor, “U.S. and Australia to Cooperate on Asian Missile-Defense...scheduled to grow from 33 at the end of FY2016 to 49 at the end of FY2021. The figure for FY2020 may include up to four BMD-capable Aegis cruisers in...building, or are planning to build Aegis-equipped ships include Japan, South Korea, Australia , Spain, and Norway.2 Aegis BMD System3 Aegis ships

  16. Antihydrogen physics: gravitation and spectroscopy in AEgIS

    CERN Document Server

    Ferragut, R; Stroke, H H; Dassa, L; Rohne, O; Hogan, S D; Cialdi, S; Al-Qaradawi, I Y; Formaro, L; Sandaker, H; Testera, G; Stepanov, S V; Folegati, P; Morhard, C; Warring, U; Prelz, F; Belov, A S; Bonomi, G; Consolati, G; Ferrari, G; Lagomarsino, V; Krasnicky, D; Drobychev, G; Giammarchi, M G; Heyne, R; Zenoni, A; Castelli, F; Mariazzi, S; Cabaret, L; Fischer, A; Boscolo, I; Sillou, D; Villa, F; Perini, D; Djourelov, N; Zavatarelli, S; Oberthaler, M K; Manuzio, G; Carraro, C; Matveev, V A; Jorgensen, L V; Nedelec, P; Prevedelli, M; Comparat, D; Dupasquier, A; Turbabin, A V; Zvezhinskij, D S; Fontana, A; Kellerbauer, A; Canali, C; Dudarev, A; Petracek, V; Riccardi, C; Nebbia, G; Gninenko, S N; Brusa, R S; Rotondi, A; Sacerdoti, M; Calloni, A; Doser, M; Byakov, V M; Quasso, F; Trezzi, D

    2011-01-01

    AEgIS (Antimatter experiment: gravity, interferometry, spectroscopy) is an experiment approved by CERN with the goal of studying antihydrogen physics. In AEgIS, antihydrogen will be produced by charge exchange reactions of cold antiprotons with positronium atoms excited in a Rydberg state (n > 20). In the first phase of the experiment, controlled acceleration by an electric field gradient (Stark effect) and subsequent measurement of free fall in a Moire deflectometer will allow a test of the weak equivalence principle. In a second phase, the antihydrogen will be slowed, confined, and laser-cooled to perform CPT studies and detailed spectroscopy. In the present work, after a general description of the experiment, the present status of advancement will be reviewed, with special attention to the production and excitation of positronium atoms.

  17. The Aegis BMD Global Enterprise: A High End Maritime Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-13

    Australia in the near future—in a high- end Aegis BMD Global Maritime Partnership . A BMD IMPERATIVE The need for effective BMD has increased in the twenty...Maritime Partnership Brad Hicks, George Galdorisi, and Scott C. Truver or more than three decades, beginning soon after the end of World War II, the...thousand-ship navy”—now transformed into a Global Maritime Partnership (GMP), in which nations and navies increasingly work together to ensure

  18. Assessing Aegis Program Transition to an Open-Architecture Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    physical architecture of the combat system in a way that ensures broad applicability of the physical plant and by mod- ernizing the in-service fleet...tatio n C h o ices o n th e Fleet 45 Figure 4.6 Aegis Fleet Composition Under the IWS and Legacy Models (FYs 2010–2060) RAND RR161-4.6 N u m b e r...hardware follows a hockey stick pattern, whereby the cost of purchas- ing the most recent technology is greatest, the cost of purchasing one- generation-old

  19. Adaptation of MCORTEX to the AEGIS Simulation Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-06-01

    real-time functions of the AEGIS weapons system and incorporation of valid simulation procesos for test and evaluation of the total system. The INTFL...ile, 19E-1. 3. 1 i ta 1 Research, ?-L/I Lanizuage Reference Manual , 19;--2. 9. Dieital ;esearch, ProgrAmmer’s Utilities Guide for the --------- Famiy...GuilAe fror &OBO/eOP5; vased Development Systjems 1980 12. INTEL Corperattor. ISIS-II PL/1M-&F C ompil1 r Operator’s Manual , 1979. 13. INTEL Corperation

  20. Report on survey on international hub

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebisawa, Hirobumi; Hoshino, Junko; Hashimoto, Kazuichiro; Okada, Sohei

    2011-06-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is promoting initiative to form an international hub in line with its aim to accept more researchers/engineers from all over the world. Establishment of 'the Committee for JAEA Internationalization Initiative' was planned in 2010 so as to intensify this initiative, and in February, 2010, we visited research institutions in Europe, which include European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), the construction site of ITER in Cadarache, and Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), with the intention to survey and learn their advanced activities and systems in regard to the International Hub, so that the committee will be able to make fruitful discussion. This report describes strategy taken in each institution for an International Hub, and the state of each institution regarding acceptance and management of overseas researchers and engineers, research environment, living environment/health and welfare, and PR activities/coexistence with the local community. (author)

  1. Probing antimatter gravity – The AEGIS experiment at CERN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kellerbauer A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The weak equivalence principle states that the motion of a body in a gravitational field is independent of its structure or composition. This postulate of general relativity has been tested to very high precision with ordinary matter, but no relevant experimental verification with antimatter has ever been carried out. The AEGIS experiment will measure the gravitational acceleration of antihydrogen to ultimately 1% precision. For this purpose, a pulsed horizontal antihydrogen beam with a velocity of several 100 m s−1 will be produced. Its vertical deflection due to gravity will be detected by a setup consisting of material gratings coupled with a position-sensitive detector, operating as a moiré deflectometer or an atom interferometer. The AEGIS experiment is installed at CERN’s Antiproton Decelerator, currently the only facility in the world which produces copious amounts of low-energy antiprotons. The construction of the setup has been going on since 2010 and is nearing completion. A proof-of-principle experiment with antiprotons has demonstrated that the deflection of antiparticles by a few μm due to an external force can be detected. Technological and scientific development pertaining to specific challenges of the experiment, such as antihydrogen formation by positronium charge exchange or the position-sensitive detection of antihydrogen annihilations, is ongoing.

  2. International survey of seat belt use exemptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, H; Sirin, H; Levine, J A; Sauber, E

    2006-08-01

    Substantial evidence of seatbelt efficacy has been shown by several studies, and it is widely recommended that motor vehicle occupants use properly fitted seat belts. However, some (but a heretofore unknown number of) countries with national seat belt laws permit various exemptions which may lower use rates. The aim of this study was to survey the variety of exemptions to national seat belt laws. This investigation relied on identifying respondents from national traffic safety agencies, other governmental and non-governmental organizations, Internet searches, personal contacts, and other sources. Questionnaires were deployed through a web based survey supplemented by email and postal versions. Responses were received from 30 countries of which 28 (93.7%) had a national seat belt law. About two thirds (63.7%) of the 28 national laws applied to both front and back seat passengers. The leading exemption types included vehicles made before a certain year (n = 13), antique vehicles (n = 12), military vehicles (n = 11), buses (n = 9), and emergency vehicles (n = 8). Most responding countries reported one or more specific categories of individuals as exempt including those with medical exemptions (n = 20), taxi drivers (n = 11), police (n = 9), emergency medical personnel (n = 8), physically disabled people (n = 6), and pregnant women (n = 6). Out of 26 responses to the question regarding current level of enforcement, 42.3% felt enforcement was "very good or good" and 57.7% characterized it as "fair or poor". This study represents one of the largest international traffic law surveys reported. Most national seatbelt laws offer perilous exemptions to a broad array of vehicle types and road user groups. These findings, coupled with concern over the level of enforcement in the majority of countries surveyed, suggest that international road safety efforts have a long way to go to improve coverage and enforcement of national seat belt laws.

  3. Survey of international regional anesthesia fellowship directors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lansdown AK

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Andrew K Lansdown,1,2 Paul G McHardy,1 Sanjiv C Patel,1,3 Catherine M Nix,1 Colin JL McCartney1 1Department of Anesthesia, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; 2University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 3University College Hospital, London, UK Background: The scope of regional anesthesia fellowship programs has not been analyzed but may provide insights that could improve fellowship training and standards. Methods: Regional anesthesia fellowship directors across the world were asked to complete a comprehensive survey that detailed the range of educational and practical experience and attitudes as well as assessment procedures offered in their programs. Results: The survey response rate was 66% (45/68. Overall, the range of activities and the time and resources committed to education during fellowships is encouraging. A wide range of nerve block experience is reported with most programs also offering acute pain management, research, and teaching opportunities. Only two-thirds of fellowships provide formal feedback. This feedback is typically a formative assessment. Conclusion: This is the first survey of regional anesthesia fellowship directors, and it illustrates the international scope and continuing expansion of education and training in the field. The results should be of interest to program directors seeking to benchmark and improve their educational programs and to faculty involved in further curriculum development. Keywords: anesthesia, regional, fellowship, education

  4. Measuring g with a beam of antihydrogen (AEgIS)

    CERN Document Server

    Canali, C

    2011-01-01

    The gravitational interaction between matter and antimatter has never been tested experimentally. According to some attempts to unify gravity with the other forces, the possibility that $g(p) 6= g\\bar{(p)}$ cannot be excluded 1 . The AEGIS experiment 2 intends to measure for the first time the gravitational acceleration of antimatter using cold antihydrogen atoms. Antihydrogen atoms will be obtained trough a charge exchange process between Rydberg positronium atoms and antiprotons. Once $\\bar{H}$ are accelerated to form a horizontal beam, they travel through a Moire deflectometer, able to measure the vertical displacement of atoms due to gravity. Knowing the velocity of the antiatoms from the time of flight measurement and the length of the flight path allows to estimate the gravity acceleration g for antihydrogen. With this setup an initial precision on the measure of g of 1% is expected.

  5. International survey of peritoneal dialysis training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardini, Judith; Price, Valerie; Figueiredo, Ana; Riemann, Aase; Leung, Dora

    2006-01-01

    To survey nurses around the world about current practices for peritoneal dialysis (PD) home training programs. Random sampling of nurses to complete a written survey from the International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis Nursing Liaison Committee. United States, Canada, South America (Brazil, Columbia), The Netherlands, Hong Kong. Surveys and responses were sent by fax whenever possible, or by regular mail, or hand carried, or conducted by telephone. Results were stratified by geographic areas as well as by cumulative responses and were expressed as medians with ranges. Kruskal-Wallis was used to evaluate differences in responses. Associations between variables were tested with Pearson correlation. Univariate regression analysis was used to evaluate the impact of variables on peritonitis rates. Variables with p training from a nurse colleague, 11% were guided by a corporate colleague, and 8% were simply self-taught. Clinics responding had a median of 30 PD patients (range 1-400) and reported they trained a median of 8 patients per year (range 0-86). Reported peritonitis rates were a median 0.46 per year or 1 episode every 26 months. Peritonitis rates, however, were not known by 53% of respondents. Total training time per patient had a very wide range of hours, from 6 to 96. There was no correlation between training time and peritonitis rates among the study respondents (p = 0.38), nor with any other variables. There is wide variation in practices for PD patient training programs within countries and around the world. Training time did not appear to be related to peritonitis rates. Randomized trials of training practices are needed to determine which approaches produce the best outcomes for patients.

  6. Particle tracking at 4 K: The Fast Annihilation Cryogenic Tracking (FACT) detector for the AEgIS antimatter gravity experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storey, J., E-mail: james.storey@cern.ch [Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Laboratory for High Energy Physics, University of Bern, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Canali, C. [University of Zurich, Physics Institute, Winterthurerstrasse 190, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Aghion, S. [Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez. di Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Ahlén, O. [European Organisation for Nuclear Research, Physics Department, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Amsler, C.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T. [Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Laboratory for High Energy Physics, University of Bern, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Belov, A.S. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 117312 (Russian Federation); Bonomi, G. [University of Brescia, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Via Branze 38, 25133 Brescia (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez. di Pavia, Via Agostino Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Bräunig, P. [University of Heidelberg, Kirchhoff Institute for Physics, Im Neuenheimer Feld 227, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Bremer, J. [European Organisation for Nuclear Research, Physics Department, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Brusa, R.S. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Trento and INFN, Gruppo Collegato di Trento, Via Sommarive 14, 38050 Povo, Trento (Italy); Burghart, G. [European Organisation for Nuclear Research, Physics Department, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Cabaret, L. [Laboratoire Aimé Cotton, CNRS, Université Paris Sud, ENS Cachan, Bâtiment 505, Campus d' Orsay, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Carante, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez. di Pavia, Via Agostino Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Caravita, R. [University of Milano, Department of Physics, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); and others

    2013-12-21

    The AEgIS experiment is an international collaboration with the main goal of performing the first direct measurement of the Earth's gravitational acceleration on antimatter. Critical to the success of AEgIS is the production of cold antihydrogen (H{sup ¯}) atoms. The FACT detector is used to measure the production and temperature of the H{sup ¯} atoms and for establishing the formation of a H{sup ¯} beam. The operating requirements for this detector are very challenging: it must be able to identify each of the thousand or so annihilations in the 1 ms period of pulsed H{sup ¯} production, operate at 4 K inside a 1 T solenoidal field and not produce more than 10 W of heat. The FACT detector consists of two concentric cylindrical layers of 400 scintillator fibres with a 1 mm diameter and a 0.6 mm pitch. The scintillating fibres are coupled to clear fibres which transport the scintillation light to 800 silicon photomultipliers. Each silicon photomultiplier signal is connected to a linear amplifier and a fast discriminator, the outputs of which are sampled continuously by Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs). In the course of the developments for the FACT detector we have established the performance of scintillating fibres at 4 K by means of a cosmic-ray tracker operating in a liquid helium cryostat. The FACT detector was installed in the AEgIS apparatus in December 2012 and will be used to study the H{sup ¯} formation when the low energy antiproton physics programs resume at CERN in the Summer of 2014. This paper presents the design requirements and construction methods of the FACT detector and provides the first results of the detector commissioning.

  7. Updating systematic reviews: an international survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantelle Garritty

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Systematic reviews (SRs should be up to date to maintain their importance in informing healthcare policy and practice. However, little guidance is available about when and how to update SRs. Moreover, the updating policies and practices of organizations that commission or produce SRs are unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The objective was to describe the updating practices and policies of agencies that sponsor or conduct SRs. An Internet-based survey was administered to a purposive non-random sample of 195 healthcare organizations within the international SR community. Survey results were analyzed using descriptive statistics. The completed response rate was 58% (n = 114 from across 26 countries with 70% (75/107 of participants identified as producers of SRs. Among responders, 79% (84/107 characterized the importance of updating as high or very-high and 57% (60/106 of organizations reported to have a formal policy for updating. However, only 29% (35/106 of organizations made reference to a written policy document. Several groups (62/105; 59% reported updating practices as irregular, and over half (53/103 of organizational respondents estimated that more than 50% of their respective SRs were likely out of date. Authors of the original SR (42/106; 40% were most often deemed responsible for ensuring SRs were current. Barriers to updating included resource constraints, reviewer motivation, lack of academic credit, and limited publishing formats. Most respondents (70/100; 70% indicated that they supported centralization of updating efforts across institutions or agencies. Furthermore, 84% (83/99 of respondents indicated they favoured the development of a central registry of SRs, analogous to efforts within the clinical trials community. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Most organizations that sponsor and/or carry out SRs consider updating important. Despite this recognition, updating practices are not regular, and many organizations lack

  8. An international survey of aquaponics practitioners.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C Love

    Full Text Available Aquaponics, a combination of fish farming and soilless plant farming, is growing in popularity and gaining attention as an important and potentially more sustainable method of food production. The aim of this study was to document and analyze the production methods, experiences, motivations, and demographics of aquaponics practitioners in the United States (US and internationally. The survey was distributed online using a chain sampling method that relied on referrals from initial respondents, with 809 respondents meeting the inclusion criteria. The majority of respondents were from the US (80%, male (78%, and had at least a high school degree (91%. The mean age of respondents was 47±13 years old. Most respondents (52% had three years or less of aquaponics experience. Respondents typically raised tilapia or ornamental fish and a variety of leafy green vegetables, herbs, and fruiting crops. Respondents were most often motivated to become involved in aquaponics to grow their own food, for environmental sustainability reasons, and for personal health reasons. Many respondents employed more than one method to raise crops, and used alternative or environmentally sustainable sources of energy, water, and fish feed. In general, our findings suggest that aquaponics is a dynamic and rapidly growing field with participants who are actively experimenting with and adopting new technologies. Additional research and outreach is needed to evaluate and communicate best practices within the field. This survey is the first large-scale effort to track aquaponics in the US and provides information that can better inform policy, research, and education efforts regarding aquaponics as it matures and possibly evolves into a mainstream form of agriculture.

  9. An International Survey of Aquaponics Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, David C.; Fry, Jillian P.; Genello, Laura; Hill, Elizabeth S.; Frederick, J. Adam; Li, Ximin; Semmens, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Aquaponics, a combination of fish farming and soilless plant farming, is growing in popularity and gaining attention as an important and potentially more sustainable method of food production. The aim of this study was to document and analyze the production methods, experiences, motivations, and demographics of aquaponics practitioners in the United States (US) and internationally. The survey was distributed online using a chain sampling method that relied on referrals from initial respondents, with 809 respondents meeting the inclusion criteria. The majority of respondents were from the US (80%), male (78%), and had at least a high school degree (91%). The mean age of respondents was 47±13 years old. Most respondents (52%) had three years or less of aquaponics experience. Respondents typically raised tilapia or ornamental fish and a variety of leafy green vegetables, herbs, and fruiting crops. Respondents were most often motivated to become involved in aquaponics to grow their own food, for environmental sustainability reasons, and for personal health reasons. Many respondents employed more than one method to raise crops, and used alternative or environmentally sustainable sources of energy, water, and fish feed. In general, our findings suggest that aquaponics is a dynamic and rapidly growing field with participants who are actively experimenting with and adopting new technologies. Additional research and outreach is needed to evaluate and communicate best practices within the field. This survey is the first large-scale effort to track aquaponics in the US and provides information that can better inform policy, research, and education efforts regarding aquaponics as it matures and possibly evolves into a mainstream form of agriculture. PMID:25029125

  10. Different views of AEGIS / AD-6 Experiment (AD facility) AD-6

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    Different views of AEGIS / AD-6 Experiment (AD facility) in July of 2012. The visible parts are the positron accumulator (blue structures on top of of the antiproton extraction line) and the 5T magnet which traps the antiprotons.

  11. Particle tracking at 4K: The Fast Annihilation Cryogenic Tracking (FACT) detector for the AEgIS antimatter gravity experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Storey, J; Ahlén, O; Amsler, C; Ariga, A; Ariga, T; Belov, A.S; Bonomi, G; Bräunig, P; Bremer, J; Brusa, R.S; Burghart, G; Cabaret, L; Canali, C; Carante, M; Caravita, R; Castelli, F; Cerchiari, G; Cialdi, S; Comparat, D; Consolati, G; Dassa, L; Di Domizio, S; Di Noto, L; Doser, M; Dudarev, A; Ereditato, A; Ferragut, R; Fontana, A; Genova, P; Giammarchi, M; Gligorova, A; Gninenko, S.N; Haider, S; Hogan, S.D; Huse, T; Jordan, E; Jørgensen, L.V; Kaltenbacher, T; Kawada, J; Kellerbauer, A; Kimura, M; Knecht, A; Krasnický, D; Lagomarsino, V; Magnani, A; Mariazzi, S; Matveev, V.A; Merkt, F; Moia, F; Nebbia, G; Nédélec, P; Oberthaler, M.K; Pacifico, N; Petrácek, V; Pistillo, C; Prelz, F; Prevedelli, M; Regenfus, C; Riccardi, C; Røhne, O; Rotondi, A; Sandaker, H; Scampoli, P; Spacek, M; Subieta Vasquez, M.A; Testera, G; Trezzi, D; Vaccarone, R; Zavatarelli, S

    2013-01-01

    The AEgIS experiment is an international collaboration with the main goal of performing the fi rst direct measurement of the Earth ' s gravitational acceleration on antimatter. Critical to the success of AEgIS is the production of cold antihydrogen ( H) atoms. The FACT detector is used to measure the production and temperature of the H atoms and for establishing the formation of a H beam. The operating requirements for this detector are very challenging: it must be able to identify each of the thousand or so annihilations in the 1 ms period of pulsed H production, operate at 4 K inside a 1 T solenoidal fi eld and not produce more than 10 W of heat. The FACT detector consists of two concentric cylindrical layers of 400 scintillator fi bres with a 1 mm diameter and a 0.6 mm pitch. The scintillating fi bres are coupled to clear fi bres which transport the scintillation light to 800 silicon photomultipliers. Each silicon photomultiplier signal is connected to a linear ampli fi er and a fast discriminator, the out...

  12. On the way to measuring gbar with AEgIS

    CERN Document Server

    Palchoudhuri, Paroma

    2015-01-01

    The main goal of AEgIS is to measure the fall of antihydrogen in the Earth's gravitational eld, which is a direct test of Einstein's Weak Equivalence Principle. This gravity measurement requires the production of a pulsed and cold antihydrogen beam whose vertical de ection will be observed in a set of moire de ectometer gratings. The antihydrogen detector was previously built in order to measure the produc- tion and temperature of the antihydrogen atoms and for establishing the formation of the antihydrogen beam. This detector consist of scintillating bers that are con- nected to Multi-Pixel-Photon-Counters (MPPCs) which are further connected to readout electrons. For a total of 816 MPPCs, the bias voltage was tested. It was observed that one channel out of the 816 was not functional. Additionally, in the current setup antiprotons, which are used to produce anti- hydrogen, are cooled to 4 K using electrons. A uorescence spectroscopy technique that uses C 2 molecules to more efficiently cool antiprotons i...

  13. International survey on solid state nuclear track detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azimi-Garakani, D.; Wernli, C.

    1992-04-01

    The results of the 1990 international survey on solid state nuclear track detection are presented. The survey was performed in collaboration with the International Nuclear Track Society (INTS). These results include the data on principal investigator(s), collaborator(s), institution, field of application(s), material(s), and method(s) of track observation from 28 countries. (author)

  14. The political economy of international environmental agreements: a survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wangler, L.; Altamirano-Cabrera, J.C.; Weikard, H.P.

    2011-01-01

    This paper surveys the recent literature on the political economy of the formation of international environmental agreements. The survey covers theoretical modelling approaches and empirical studies including experimental work. Central to our survey is the question how the political process impacts

  15. Design of a Superconducting Magnet System for the AEGIS Experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Dudarev, A; ten Kate, H; Perini, D

    2011-01-01

    The new AEGIS (Antimatter Experiment: Gravity, Interferometry, Spectroscopy) Experiment will be installed in the Antiproton Decelerator hall at CERN. The main goal is to measure the Earth's gravitational acceleration of antihydrogen atoms. The experiment consists of two high-homogeneity solenoids placed on the same axis. The 5 T magnet is part of a cylindrical Penning trap to catch and to accumulate antiprotons delivered by the decelerator. The antihydrogen is then produced in the 1 T region where sub-kelvin antiproton temperatures provided by the dilution refrigerator are required to form a slowly-moving beam of antihydrogen. The helium bath cooled superconducting magnets; the different traps and the dilution refrigerator are integrated in a common cryostat with an internal vacuum barrier between the insulating cryogenic vacuum and the very high beam vacuum. In addition, the magnet system has to guarantee a smooth transition between the 5 T and the 1 T magnetic field areas required for a loss-free transfer o...

  16. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems: a short description of the AEGIS approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silviera, D.J.; Harwell, M.A.; Napier, B.A.; Zellmer, J.T.; Benson, G.L.

    1980-09-01

    To meet licensing criteria and protection standards for HLW disposal, research programs are in progress to determine acceptable waste forms, canisters, backfill materials for the repository, and geological formations. Methods must be developed to evaluate the effectiveness of the total system. To meet this need, methods are being developed to assess the long-term effectiveness of isolating nuclear wastes in geologic formations. This work was started in 1976 in the Waste Isolation Safety Assessment Program (WISAP) and continues in the Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Program. The evaluation of this long-term effectiveness involves a number of distinct steps. AEGIS currently has the methods for performing these evaluation steps. These methods are continuously being improved to meet the inreasing level of sophistication which will be required. AEGIS develops a conceptual description of the geologic systems and uses computer models to simulate the existing ground-water pathways. AEGIS also uses a team of consulting experts, with the assistance of a computer model of the geologic processes, to develop and evaluate plausible release scenarios. Then other AEGIS computer models are used to simulate the transport of radionuclides to the surface and the resultant radiation doses to individuals and populations

  17. The CHIP surveys | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2011-07-08

    Jul 8, 2011 ... Many of the young scholars relied on data generated by the China Household Income Project (CHIP), a collaboration between Chinese and international economists that has tracked inequality in China for the past 20 years.

  18. A prospective international Aspergillus terreus survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risslegger, B; Zoran, T; Lackner, M

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: A prospective international multicentre surveillance study was conducted to investigate the prevalence and amphotericin B susceptibility of Aspergillus terreus species complex infections. METHODS: A total of 370 cases from 21 countries were evaluated. RESULTS: The overall prevalence o...

  19. An international survey of tissue banking: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myint, Peter; Wondergem, Jan; Pynda, Yaroslav; Phillips, Glyn O

    2013-06-01

    International Atomic Energy Agency is currently carrying out a survey on the tissue banking activities from the tissue banking organisations worldwide. The purpose of the survey is to establish regional and global overview of the current tissue banking activities and practices in order to assist the International Atomic Energy Agency to provide further guidance about the use of radiation technology to sterilise tissues as well as to promote better collaboration between the regional tissue banking associations. The survey is an on-going exercise and the preliminary data is presented here. This exercise is not completed and the authors urge the remaining tissue banks to participate in the survey.

  20. The International Adult Literacy Survey: What Does It Really Measure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Mary; Barton, David

    2000-01-01

    Evaluates the International Adult Literacy Survey (as reported in OECD 1997) from a New Literacy Studies perspective. Criticism of the survey includes charges that: it provides only a partial picture of literacy; culture is treated as bias; and the test items do not represent the real-life items as claimed. Contains 30 references. (PGS)

  1. Gibbon Aggression During Introductions: An International Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harl, Heather; Stevens, Lisa; Margulis, Susan W; Petersen, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Little is known regarding the prevalence of aggression seen during introductions of captive gibbons (Hylobatidae). In this study, an online survey was developed to quantify and collect contextual details regarding the frequency and types of aggression seen during introductions of captive gibbons (Hylobatidae). Nineteen percent of institutions (17 institutions) reported observing aggression, and 6 of these institutions recorded multiple instances of aggression, though a vast majority of these cases resulted in mild injuries or none at all. The female was the primary aggressor in 23% of cases, the male was the primary aggressor in 58% of cases, and both were the primary aggressor in 1 case. Although these aggressive interactions were often not associated with a known cause, 27% of cases were associated with food displacement. In most cases, management changes, including trying new pairings, greatly reduced situational aggression, suggesting that individual personalities may play a factor in aggression. These data begin to explain the extent of aggression observed in captive gibbons; future studies will address possible correlations with aggression and introduction techniques.

  2. International survey of cochlear implant candidacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, D; De Raeve, L; Graham, J

    2016-04-01

    The goal of this work was to determine international differences in candidacy based on audiometric and speech perception measures, and to evaluate the information in light of the funding structure and access to implants within different countries. An online questionnaire was circulated to professionals in 25 countries. There were 28 respondents, representing the candidacy practice in 17 countries. Results showed differences in the funding model between countries. Unilateral implants for both adults and children and bilateral implants for children were covered by national funding in approximately 60% of countries (30% used medical insurance, and 10% self-funding). Fewer countries provided bilateral implants routinely for adults: national funding was available in only 22% (37% used medical insurance and 41% self-funding). Main evolving candidacy areas are asymmetric losses, auditory neuropathy spectrum disorders and electro-acoustic stimulation. For countries using speech-based adult candidacy assessments, the majority (40%) used word tests, 24% used sentence tests, and 36% used a mixture of both. For countries using audiometry for candidacy (70-80% of countries), the majority used levels of 75-85 dB HL at frequencies above 1 kHz. The United Kingdom and Belgium had the most conservative audiometric criteria, and countries such as Australia, Germany, and Italy were the most lenient. Countries with a purely self-funding model had greater flexibility in candidacy requirements.

  3. Development of an international matrix-solver prediction system on a French-Japanese international grid computing environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Yoshio; Kushida, Noriyuki; Tatekawa, Takayuki; Teshima, Naoya; Caniou, Yves; Guivarch, Ronan; Dayde, Michel; Ramet, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    The 'Research and Development of International Matrix-Solver Prediction System (REDIMPS)' project aimed at improving the TLSE sparse linear algebra expert website by establishing an international grid computing environment between Japan and France. To help users in identifying the best solver or sparse linear algebra tool for their problems, we have developed an interoperable environment between French and Japanese grid infrastructures (respectively managed by DIET and AEGIS). Two main issues were considered. The first issue is how to submit a job from DIET to AEGIS. The second issue is how to bridge the difference of security between DIET and AEGIS. To overcome these issues, we developed APIs to communicate between different grid infrastructures by improving the client API of AEGIS. By developing a server deamon program (SeD) of DIET which behaves like an AEGIS user, DIET can call functions in AEGIS: authentication, file transfer, job submission, and so on. To intensify the security, we also developed functionalities to authenticate DIET sites and DIET users in order to access AEGIS computing resources. By this study, the set of software and computers available within TLSE to find an appropriate solver is enlarged over France (DIET) and Japan (AEGIS). (author)

  4. International Survey of the Status of Waldorf Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogletree, Earl J.

    This international survey study was the first to examine the Waldorf School movement worldwide and focused on the teaching practices, curricula, educational outcomes, and positive program features of Waldorf schools, as well as problems encountered by Waldorf staff. The role of Rudolf Steiner's philosophy, anthroposophy, and its esoteric aspects…

  5. International Survey of Peer Leadership (ISPL): An Emerging ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    International Survey of Peer Leadership (ISPL): An. Emerging Snapshot of the Status of Peer Leadership in. South Africa. Nelia Frade* & Gugu Wendy Tiroyabone**. * Dr Nelia Frade is Senior Coordinator: Tutor Development in the Centre for Academic Staff Development at the University of Johannesburg, South Africa.

  6. TALIS 2013 Technical Report: Teaching and Learning International Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    OECD Publishing, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Effective teaching and teachers are key to producing high-performing students worldwide. So how can countries prepare teachers to face the diverse challenges in today's schools? The Teaching and Learning International Survey (TALIS) helps answer this question. TALIS asks teachers and schools about their working conditions and the learning…

  7. Jagiellonian University Advances in Ps Manipulations and Laser Studies in the AEgIS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Caravita, R; Amsler, C; Bonomi, G; Brusa, R S; Caccia, M; Castelli, F; Cerchiari, G; Comparat, D; Consolati, G; Demetrio, A; Di Noto, L; Doser, M; Evans, C; Ferragut, R; Fesel, J; Fontana, A; Gerber, S; Giammarchi, M; Gligorova, A; Guatieri, F; Haider, S; Hinterberger, A; Holmestad, H; Kellerbauer, A; Khalidova, O; Krasnický, D; Lagomarsino, V; Lansonneur, P; Lebrun, P; Malbrunot, C; Mariazzi, S; Marton, J; Matveev, V; Mazzotta, Z; Müller, S R; Nebbia, G; Nedelec, P; Oberthaler, M; Pacifico, N; Pagano, D; Penasa, L; Petracek, V; Prelz, F; Prevedelli, M; Ravelli, L; Rienäcker, B; Robert, J; Røhne, O M; Rotondi, A; Sandaker, H; Santoro, R; Smestad, L; Sorrentino, F; Testera, G; Tietje, I; Widmann, E; Yzombard, P; Zimmer, C; Zmeskal, J; Zurlo, N

    2017-01-01

    Positronium (Ps), the unstable bound state of electron and positron, is a valuable system for neutral antimatter spectroscopic studies and for antihydrogen production. Forming a pulsed beam cold antihydrogen using charge-exchange with the Rydberg Ps is the goal of the AEgIS Collaboration, which aims to measure gravity on neutral antimatter. Recent results achieved in producing, manipulating and studying Ps are summarized. Ps has been first produced with mesoporous silica targets in a reflection geometry. Spectroscopy of Ps n = 3 state has been conducted, yielding as a byproduct an independent estimate of the produced Ps temperature. Efficient laser excitation to the Rydberg levels was then achieved, validating the proof-of-concept of AEgIS. Subsequently, production of Ps from a new class of transmission targets was also achieved, opening the possibility for future experiments.

  8. Formation of A Cold Antihydrogen Beam in AEGIS For Gravity Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Testera, G; Bonomi, G; Boscolo, I; Brambilla, N; Brusa, R S; Byakov, V M; Cabaret, L; Canali, C; Carraro, C; Castelli, F; Cialdi, S; de Combarieu, M; Comparat, D; Consolati, G; Djourelov, N; Doser, M; Drobychev, G; Dupasquier, A; Fabris, D; Ferragut, R; Ferrari, G; Fischer, A; Fontana, A; Forget, P; Formaro, L; Lunardon, M; Gervasini, A; Giammarchi, M G; Gninenko, S N; Gribakin, G; Heyne, R; Hogan, S D; Kellerbauer, A G; Krasnicky, D; Lagomarsino, V; Manuzio, G; Mariazzi, S; Matveev, V A; Merkt, F; Moretto, S; Morhard, C; Nebbia, G; Nédélec, P; Oberthaler, M K; Pari, P; Petracek, V; Prevedelli, M; Al-Qaradawi, I Y; Quasso, F; Rohne, O; Pesente, S; Rotondi, A; Stapnes, S; Sillou, D; Stepanov, S V; Stroke, Hinko Henry; Tino, G; Vairo, Antonio; Viesti, G; Walters, H; Warring, U; Zavatarelli, S; Zenoni, A; Zvezhinskij, D S

    2008-01-01

    The formation of the antihydrogen beam in the AEGIS experiment through the use of inhomogeneous electric fields is discussed and simulation results including the geometry of the apparatus and realistic hypothesis about the antihydrogen initial conditions are shown. The resulting velocity distribution matches the requirements of the gravity experiment. In particular it is shown that the inhomogeneous electric fields provide radial cooling of the beam during the acceleration.

  9. What skills should new internal medicine interns have in july? A national survey of internal medicine residency program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, Steven; Vu, T Robert; Halvorsen, Andrew J; Aiyer, Meenakshy; McKown, Kevin; Chmielewski, Amy F; McDonald, Furman S

    2014-03-01

    The transition from medical student to intern may cause stress and burnout in new interns and the delivery of suboptimal patient care. Despite a formal set of subinternship curriculum guidelines, program directors have expressed concern regarding the skill set of new interns and the lack of standardization in that skill set among interns from different medical schools. To address these issues, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's Next Accreditation System focuses on the development of a competency-based education continuum spanning undergraduate, graduate, and continuing medical education. In 2010, the Clerkship Directors in Internal Medicine subinternship task force, in collaboration with the Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine survey committee, surveyed internal medicine residency program directors to determine which competencies or skills they expected from new medical school graduates. The authors summarized the results using categories of interest. In both an item rank list and free-text responses, program directors were nearly uniform in ranking the skills they deemed most important for new interns-organization and time management and prioritization skills; effective communication skills; basic clinical skills; and knowing when to ask for assistance. Stakeholders should use the results of this survey as they develop a milestone-based curriculum for the fourth year of medical school and for the internal medicine subinternship. By doing so, they should develop a standardized set of skills that meet program directors' expectations, reduce the stress of transitions across the educational continuum, and improve the quality of patient care.

  10. Research and development of fusion grid infrastructure based on atomic energy grid infrastructure (AEGIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Y.; Nakajima, K.; Kushida, N.; Kino, C.; Aoyagi, T.; Nakajima, N.; Iba, K.; Hayashi, N.; Ozeki, T.; Totsuka, T.; Nakanishi, H.; Nagayama, Y.

    2008-01-01

    In collaboration with the Naka Fusion Institute of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (NFI/JAEA) and the National Institute for Fusion Science of National Institute of Natural Science (NIFS/NINS), Center for Computational Science and E-systems of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (CCSE/JAEA) aims at establishing an integrated framework for experiments and analyses in nuclear fusion research based on the atomic energy grid infrastructure (AEGIS). AEGIS has been being developed by CCSE/JAEA aiming at providing the infrastructure that enables atomic energy researchers in remote locations to carry out R and D efficiently and collaboratively through the Internet. Toward establishing the integrated framework, we have been applying AEGIS to pre-existing three systems: experiment system, remote data acquisition system, and integrated analysis system. For the experiment system, the secure remote experiment system with JT-60 has been successfully accomplished. For the remote data acquisition system, it will be possible to equivalently operate experimental data obtained from LHD data acquisition and management system (LABCOM system) and JT-60 Data System. The integrated analysis system has been extended to the system executable in heterogeneous computers among institutes

  11. Development of Ultra Low-Temperature Electronics for the AEgIS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Kaltenbacher, Thomas; Kellerbauer, Alban; Doser, Michael; Caspers, Friedhelm

    This thesis presents the development of electronics for operation at cryogenic temperatures, with particular emphasis on the cryogenic electronics required for the Antimatter Experiment: Gravity, Interferometry, Spectroscopy (AEgIS) experiment at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN). The research is focused on a highly sensitive charged particle detection system for a Penning trap, on cryogenic low-pass filters and on a low-loss DC-contact RF switch. The detection system consists of a high quality factor tuned circuit including a superconducting coil, and a low-noise amplifier. Since the experimental setup of the AEgIS experiment requires it, the developed electronics must reliably operate at 4.2 K (~269C) and in high constant magnetic field of more than 1 Tesla. Therefore, the performance of the cryogenic electronic designs were carefully evaluated at low-temperature/high magnetic field, the result of which have important implications for the AEgIS experiment. Moreover, a new possibility of ...

  12. Concurrent Validity of the International Family Quality of Life Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Preethy S; Pociask, Fredrick D; DiZazzo-Miller, Rosanne; Carrellas, Ann; LeRoy, Barbara W

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of the social construct of Family Quality of Life (FQOL) is a parsimonious alternative to the current approach of measuring familial outcomes using a battery of tools related to individual-level outcomes. The purpose of this study was to examine the internal consistency and concurrent validity of the International FQOL Survey (FQOLS-2006), using cross-sectional data collected from 65 family caregivers of children with developmental disabilities. It shows a moderate correlation between the total FQOL scores of the FQOLS-2006 and the Beach Center's FQOL scale. The validity of five FQOLS-2006 domains was supported by the correlations between conceptually related domains.

  13. OMINEX: Survey of internal dose monitoring programmes for radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahola, T.; Etherington, G.; Berard, P.; Le Guen, B.; Hurtgen, C.

    2003-01-01

    Monitoring of the workforce in the nuclear industries is carried out primarily in order to demonstrate compliance with European Union (EU) legislation and the Basic Safety Standards for the protection of the health of workers against the dangers arising from ionising radiation recommended by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). There is, however, no common strategy for internal dose monitoring programmes currently in use in the EU countries. Surveys have been carried out in which organisations were asked to provide information on the design of their internal dose monitoring programmes and on the costs of these programmes. Information was requested from both EU countries and Associated States. Databases for storage and reporting of all gained information were constructed, and results from the surveys have been compiled. This work was carried out within the EC 5th Framework Programme project, OMINEX, which aims to provide advice and guidance on designing and implementing internal dose monitoring programmes in the workplace in such a way that best use is made of available resources, while minimising costs. (author)

  14. A survey of health promotion at international schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curless, Melanie; Burns, Sharyn

    2003-04-01

    This study investigated health promotion efforts at international schools serving the education needs of expatriate communities abroad. Factors supporting the implementation of whole-school approaches to health promotion also were examined. Self-completed questionnaires were distributed by a combination of electronic and conventional mail. International school staff in 93 countries (n = 205) completed an adapted version of an instrument used for evaluating the Western Australian School Health Project (WASHP). This survey demonstrated usefulness of the WASHP instrument cross-culturally in a variety of school settings. The level of whole-school approaches to health promotion in the participating international schools varied but tended to be low. Demographic characteristics of schools were not associated with differences in the level of health promotion, with the exception school size. School organizational factors support implementation of health promotion programs.

  15. International Survey on the Management of Wake-Up Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Henrique de Castro-Afonso

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients who wake up having experienced a stroke while asleep represent around 20% of acute stroke admissions. According to international guidelines for the management of acute stroke, patients presenting with wake-up stroke are not currently eligible to receive revascularization treatments. In this study, we aimed to assess the opinions of stroke experts about the management of patients with wake-up stroke by using an international multicenter electronic survey. Method: This study consisted of 8 questions on wake-up stroke treatment. Results: Two hundred invitations to participate in the survey were sent by e-mail. Fifty-nine participants started the survey, 4 dropped out before completing it, and 55 completed the full questionnaire. We had 55 participants from 22 countries. Conclusions: In this study, most stroke experts recommended a recanalization treatment for wake-up stroke. However, there was considerable disagreement among experts regarding the best brain imaging method and the best recanalization treatment. The results of ongoing randomized trials on wake-up stroke are urgently needed.

  16. AEGY-28 Cell Line of Aedes aegypti (Diptera Culicidae is Infection Refractory to Dengue 2 and Yellow Fever Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Y. Castañeda

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Mosquito cell derived cultures are useful tools for arbovirus isolation, identification or characterization. For studying dengue (DENV and yellow fever viruses (YFV Aedes albopictus C6/36 or Aedes pseudoscutellaris AP-61 cell lines, are normally used. The Aedes aegypti AEGY-28 cell line was obtained from embryonic tissues and characterized previously by one of us. In order to evaluate its susceptibility to two Flavivirus, AEGY- 28 cells were inoculated with different multiplicity of infection (MOI with type 2 DENV (COL-789, MOI: 1 and 5 and YFV clinical isolates (V-341, MOI 0,02 then processed at different times post infection (p.i.. Immunostai ning and fluorometric cell-ELISA were carried out to identify and quantify viral antigens. C6/36 and Vero cells were used as positive controls. Unexpectedly, immunoreactivity was not found in inoculated AEGY-28 cells, even in higher MOI or late times p.i., therefore antigen quantification using fluorometric cell-ELISA were not  plausible. Reverse transcriptase PCR with specific primers did not detect viral RNA in AEGY-28 inoculated cells. We can conclude that Aedes aegypti AEGY-28 cell line is not susceptible to dengue and yellow fever Flavivirus, a finding possibly related with the lacking of specific molecules at the plasma membrane or absence of cell machinery necessary for viral replication.

  17. AEgIS at ELENA: outlook for physics with a pulsed cold antihydrogen beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doser, M.; Aghion, S.; Amsler, C.; Bonomi, G.; Brusa, R. S.; Caccia, M.; Caravita, R.; Castelli, F.; Cerchiari, G.; Comparat, D.; Consolati, G.; Demetrio, A.; Di Noto, L.; Evans, C.; Fanì, M.; Ferragut, R.; Fesel, J.; Fontana, A.; Gerber, S.; Giammarchi, M.; Gligorova, A.; Guatieri, F.; Haider, S.; Hinterberger, A.; Holmestad, H.; Kellerbauer, A.; Khalidova, O.; Krasnický, D.; Lagomarsino, V.; Lansonneur, P.; Lebrun, P.; Malbrunot, C.; Mariazzi, S.; Marton, J.; Matveev, V.; Mazzotta, Z.; Müller, S. R.; Nebbia, G.; Nedelec, P.; Oberthaler, M.; Pacifico, N.; Pagano, D.; Penasa, L.; Petracek, V.; Prelz, F.; Prevedelli, M.; Rienaecker, B.; Robert, J.; Røhne, O. M.; Rotondi, A.; Sandaker, H.; Santoro, R.; Smestad, L.; Sorrentino, F.; Testera, G.; Tietje, I. C.; Widmann, E.; Yzombard, P.; Zimmer, C.; Zmeskal, J.; Zurlo, N.

    2018-03-01

    The efficient production of cold antihydrogen atoms in particle traps at CERN's Antiproton Decelerator has opened up the possibility of performing direct measurements of the Earth's gravitational acceleration on purely antimatter bodies. The goal of the AEgIS collaboration is to measure the value of g for antimatter using a pulsed source of cold antihydrogen and a Moiré deflectometer/Talbot-Lau interferometer. The same antihydrogen beam is also very well suited to measuring precisely the ground-state hyperfine splitting of the anti-atom. The antihydrogen formation mechanism chosen by AEgIS is resonant charge exchange between cold antiprotons and Rydberg positronium. A series of technical developments regarding positrons and positronium (Ps formation in a dedicated room-temperature target, spectroscopy of the n=1-3 and n=3-15 transitions in Ps, Ps formation in a target at 10 K inside the 1 T magnetic field of the experiment) as well as antiprotons (high-efficiency trapping of ?, radial compression to sub-millimetre radii of mixed ? plasmas in 1 T field, high-efficiency transfer of ? to the antihydrogen production trap using an in-flight launch and recapture procedure) were successfully implemented. Two further critical steps that are germane mainly to charge exchange formation of antihydrogen-cooling of antiprotons and formation of a beam of antihydrogen-are being addressed in parallel. The coming of ELENA will allow, in the very near future, the number of trappable antiprotons to be increased by more than a factor of 50. For the antihydrogen production scheme chosen by AEgIS, this will be reflected in a corresponding increase of produced antihydrogen atoms, leading to a significant reduction of measurement times and providing a path towards high-precision measurements. This article is part of the Theo Murphy meeting issue `Antiproton physics in the ELENA era'.

  18. Survey of environment related monitoring programmes of international organizations and their contribution to international monitoring programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-12-01

    The report is a summary of environment-related monitoring programmes of international governmental organizations and their contribution to international monitoring programmes. it presents the situation as of November 1986: This survey has been prepared by a consultant for the Secretariat as a background document for the second meeting of the Environment Experts, Economic Summit in Munich, November 1986. It serves information purposes only. No claim for completeness is intended. This report may also prove to be helpful for administrators and the scientific community as regards gaining knowledge on present arrangements, approaches and environmental activities in the framework of international organizations. In this light, the present report could facilitate communication and progress in solving pressing environmental problems on the international level. (orig.)

  19. An AEGIS-CPHD Filter to Maintain Custody of GEO Space Objects with Limited Tracking Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehly, S.; Jones, B.; Axelrad, P.

    2014-09-01

    The problem of space situational awareness (SSA) involves characterizing space objects subject to nonlinear dynamics and sparse measurements. Space objects in GEO are primarily tracked using optical sensors, which have limited fields of view, imperfect ability to detect objects, and are limited to taking measurements at night, all of which result in large gaps between measurements. In addition, the nonlinear dynamics result in state uncertainty representations which are generally non-Gaussian. When estimating the states of a catalog of space objects, these issues must be resolved within the framework of a multitarget filter. To address the issue of non-Gaussian uncertainty, the Adaptive Entropy-based Gaussian-mixture Information Synthesis (AEGIS) filter can be used. AEGIS is an implementation of the Unscented Kalman Filter (UKF) using an adaptive number of Gaussian mixture components to approximate the non-Gaussian state probability density function (pdf). Mixture components are split when nonlinearity is detected during propagation, typically during long data gaps, and can be merged or removed following measurement updates to reduce computational effort. Previous research has examined the use of AEGIS in multitarget filters based in Finite Set Statistics (FISST), including the Probability Hypothesis Density (PHD) filter and Cardinalized PHD (CPHD) filter. This paper uses the CPHD filter because in other applications it has been demonstrated to be more effective at estimating and maintaining the cardinality, or number of objects present, when objects are often leaving the sensor field of view (FOV). An important consideration in implementing the filter is the computation of the probability of detection. Existing formulations use a state-dependent probability of detection to assign a value based on whether the mean estimated state is in the sensor FOV. This paper employs a more realistic development by mapping the full state pdf into measurement space and

  20. The Weak Equivalence Principle With Antimatter: The AEgIS Experiment At CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Pagano, D; Ariga, T; Bonomi, G; Bräunig, P; Brusa, R S; Cabaret, L; Caccia, M; Caravita, R; Castelli, F; Cerchiari, G; Comparat, D; Consolati, G; Demetrio, A; Noto, L Di; Doser, M; Ereditato, A; Evans, C; Ferragut, R; Fesel, J; Fontana, A; Gerber, S; Giammarchi, M; Gligorova, A; Guatieri, F; Haider, S; Holmestad, H; Huse, T; Kellerbauer, A; Krasnicky, D; Lagomarsino, V; Lansonneur, P; Lebrun, P; Malbrunot, C; Mariazzi, S; Matveev, V; Mazzotta, Z; Nebbia, G; Nedelec, P; Oberthaler, M; Pacifico, N; Penasa, L; Petracek, V; Pistillo, C; Prelz, F; Prevedelli, M; Ravelli, L; Rienaecker, B; Røhne, O M; Rotondi, A; Sacerdoti, M; Sandaker, H; Santoro, R; Scampoli, P; Smestad, L; Sorrentino, F; Strojek, I M; Testera, G; Tietje, I C; Vamosi, S; Widmann, E; Yzombard, P; Zmeskal, J; Zurlo, N

    2016-01-01

    he AEgIS experiment at CERN’s Antiproton Decelerator (AD) aims at performing a direct measurement of the gravitational force on antimatter to probe the Weak Equivalence Principle of General Relativity with antimatter. The idea is to measure the vertical displacement of a cold antihydrogen beam, due to the gravitational force, by using a moiré deflectometer. Antihydrogen will be formed through the reaction of charge exchange between cold antiprotons and Rydberg positronium. An overview of the physics goals, experimental setup and preliminary results is presented.

  1. The Pediatric Heart Failure Workforce: An International, Multicenter Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerbach, Scott R; Everitt, Melanie D; Butts, Ryan J; Rosenthal, David N; Law, Yuk M

    2018-02-01

    Our objective was to understand the scope of pediatric heart failure (HF) and the current staffing environment of HF programs. An online survey was distributed to members of the Pediatric Heart Transplant Study and the Pediatric Council of the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. All participants received the primary 23-question survey. Additionally, HF program directors received a 32-question supplemental survey. Of 235 invitations sent, there were 69 (29%) primary surveys and 34 program director surveys completed (24 U.S. programs, 9 outside non-U.S., and one non-specified location). A formal HF program was reported by 88% of directors. There were 150 [IQR 50-200] outpatients/institution and 40% [25-50] of patients had congenital heart disease. Inpatient HF census was 3 [2-4] patients. Most programs (70%) used a consulting service model to provide HF specialty care, while only 10 (30%) utilized an inpatient HF service. Inpatient HF service programs had a higher daily inpatient census versus consult service model programs (4 [3-7] vs. 2 [1-4], respectively; p = 0.022) and had a higher number of full-time equivalents dedicated to HF (5.5 [2-7] vs. 2.5 [1-4], respectively; p = 0.024). Only 47% of programs report a general fellowship rotation devoted to HF. Advanced practice providers (APP) were utilized in 15 programs, nurse coordinators in 2, and both in 3. Most HF programs are formalized, utilize APP, and have inadequate HF staffing to utilize a separate inpatient HF service. Exposure of general pediatric cardiology fellows to HF care is variable between institutions.

  2. Efficiency analysis of energy networks. An international survey of regulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haney, Aoife Brophy [ESRC Electricity Policy Research Group and Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 9DD (United Kingdom); Pollitt, Michael G. [ESRC Electricity Policy Research Group and Judge Business School, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1AG (United Kingdom)

    2009-12-15

    Incentive regulation for networks has been an important part of the reform agenda in a number of countries. As part of this regulatory process, incentives are put in place to improve the cost efficiency of network companies by rewarding good performance relative to a pre-defined benchmark. The techniques used to establish benchmarks are central to the efficiency improvements that are ultimately achieved. Much experience has been gained internationally in the application of benchmarking techniques and we now have a solid understanding of the main indicators of best practice. What we are lacking is a more complete understanding of the factors that influence choice of methods by regulators. In this paper, we present the results of an international survey of energy regulators in 40 countries conducted electronically between June and October 2008. Regulators from European, Australasian and Latin American countries are represented in the survey. Our results show that benchmarking techniques are now widespread in the regulation of gas and electricity networks. Best practice, however, is limited to a small number of regulators. We conclude by summarising existing trends and offering some recommendations on overcoming barriers to best practice efficiency analysis. (author)

  3. Efficiency analysis of energy networks: An international survey of regulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haney, Aoife Brophy, E-mail: ab748@cam.ac.u [ESRC Electricity Policy Research Group and Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 9DD (United Kingdom); Pollitt, Michael G. [ESRC Electricity Policy Research Group and Judge Business School, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1AG (United Kingdom)

    2009-12-15

    Incentive regulation for networks has been an important part of the reform agenda in a number of countries. As part of this regulatory process, incentives are put in place to improve the cost efficiency of network companies by rewarding good performance relative to a pre-defined benchmark. The techniques used to establish benchmarks are central to the efficiency improvements that are ultimately achieved. Much experience has been gained internationally in the application of benchmarking techniques and we now have a solid understanding of the main indicators of best practice. What we are lacking is a more complete understanding of the factors that influence choice of methods by regulators. In this paper, we present the results of an international survey of energy regulators in 40 countries conducted electronically between June and October 2008. Regulators from European, Australasian and Latin American countries are represented in the survey. Our results show that benchmarking techniques are now widespread in the regulation of gas and electricity networks. Best practice, however, is limited to a small number of regulators. We conclude by summarising existing trends and offering some recommendations on overcoming barriers to best practice efficiency analysis.

  4. Efficiency analysis of energy networks: An international survey of regulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haney, Aoife Brophy; Pollitt, Michael G.

    2009-01-01

    Incentive regulation for networks has been an important part of the reform agenda in a number of countries. As part of this regulatory process, incentives are put in place to improve the cost efficiency of network companies by rewarding good performance relative to a pre-defined benchmark. The techniques used to establish benchmarks are central to the efficiency improvements that are ultimately achieved. Much experience has been gained internationally in the application of benchmarking techniques and we now have a solid understanding of the main indicators of best practice. What we are lacking is a more complete understanding of the factors that influence choice of methods by regulators. In this paper, we present the results of an international survey of energy regulators in 40 countries conducted electronically between June and October 2008. Regulators from European, Australasian and Latin American countries are represented in the survey. Our results show that benchmarking techniques are now widespread in the regulation of gas and electricity networks. Best practice, however, is limited to a small number of regulators. We conclude by summarising existing trends and offering some recommendations on overcoming barriers to best practice efficiency analysis.

  5. International survey on dietary fiber: definition, analysis, and reference materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S C; Prosky, L

    1995-01-01

    An international survey was conducted to get the views of 147 professionals in the field on the definition of dietary fiber. The survey also solicited opinions on analytical methods for nutrition labeling, quality control, and nutrition research. The survey finds that dietary fiber is generally defined as polysaccharides and lignin that are not hydrolyzed by human alimentary enzymes. Support is strong for expansion of the definition to include oligosaccharides that are resistant to hydrolysis by human alimentary enzymes. Among techniques for nutrition labeling and quality control, enzymatic-gravimetric methods get the highest support. For nutrition research, more detailed methods such as gas-liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography were considered more appropriate. Respondents support labeling of total, soluble, and insoluble dietary fiber or total dietary fiber alone as sufficient for nutrition labeling of food packages. However, for nutrition research, detailed analytical methods, improvements in accuracy (i.e., closer simulation of in vitro techniques to conditions of human gastrointestinal tract), and improvements in precision and simplicity are suggested. Less than 20% of the participants use reference materials for dietary fiber analysis.

  6. Profiling health-care accreditation organizations: an international survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Charles D; Braithwaite, Jeffrey; Moldovan, Max; Nicklin, Wendy; Grgic, Ileana; Fortune, Triona; Whittaker, Stuart

    2013-07-01

    To describe global patterns among health-care accreditation organizations (AOs) and to identify determinants of sustainability and opportunities for improvement. Web-based questionnaire survey. Organizations offering accreditation services nationally or internationally to health-care provider institutions or networks at primary, secondary or tertiary level in 2010. s) External relationships, scope and activity public information. Forty-four AOs submitted data, compared with 33 in a survey 10 years earlier. Of the 30 AOs that reported survey activity in 2000 and 2010, 16 are still active and stable or growing. New and old programmes are increasingly linked to public funding and regulation. While the number of health-care AOs continues to grow, many fail to thrive. Successful organizations tend to complement mechanisms of regulation, health-care funding or governmental commitment to quality and health-care improvement that offer a supportive environment. Principal challenges include unstable business (e.g. limited market, low uptake) and unstable politics. Many organizations make only limited information available to patients and the public about standards, procedures or results.

  7. AEgIS experiment: Towards antihydrogen beam production for antimatter gravity measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Mariazzi, Sebastiano; Amsler, Claude; Ariga, Akitaka; Ariga, Tomoko; Belov, Alexandre S; Bonomi, Germano; Bräunig, Philippe; Brusa, Roberto S; Bremer, Johan; Cabaret, Louis; Canali, Carlo; Caravita, Ruggero; Castelli, Fabrizio; Cerchiari, Giovanni; Cialdi, Simone; Comparat, Daniel; Consolati, Giovanni; Dassa, Luca; Derking, Jan Hendrik; Di Domizio, Sergio; Di Noto, Lea; Doser, Michael; Dudarev, Alexey; Ereditato, Antonio; Ferragut, Rafael; Fontana, Andrea; Genova, Pablo; Giammarchi, Marco; Gligorova, Angela; Gninenko, Sergei N; Hogan, Stephen D; Haider, Stefan; Jordan, Elena; Jørgensen, Lars V; Kaltenbacher, Thomas; Kawada, Jiro; Kellerbauer, Alban; Kimura, Mitsuhiro; Knecht, Andreas; Krasnický, Daniel; Lagomarsino, Vittorio; Lehner, Sebastian; Malbrunot, Chloe; Matveev, Viktor A; Merkt, Frederic; Moia, Fabio; Nebbia, Giancarlo; Nédélec, Patrick; Oberthaler, Markus K; Pacifico, Nicola; Petráček, Vojtech; Pistillo, Ciro; Prelz, Francesco; Prevedelli, Marco; Regenfus, Christian; Riccardi, Cristina; Røhne, Ole; Rotondi, Alberto; Sandaker, Heidi; Scampoli, Paola; Storey, James; Subieta Vasquez, Martin A.; Spaček, Michal; Czech Technical U. in Prague - FNSPE - B\\oehova 7 - 11519 - Praha 1 - Czech Aff25 Testera, Gemma; Vaccarone, Renzo; Villa, Fabio; Widmann, Eberhard; Zavatarelli, Sandra; Zmeskal, Johann

    2014-01-01

    AEgIS (Antimatter Experiment: Gravity, Interferometry, Spectroscopy) is an experiment that aims to perform the first direct measurement of the gravitational acceleration g of antihydrogen in the Earth’s field. A cold antihydrogen beam will be produced by charge exchange reaction between cold antiprotons and positronium excited in Rydberg states. Rydberg positronium (with quantum number n between 20 and 30) will be produced by a two steps laser excitation. The antihydrogen beam, after being accelerated by Stark effect, will fly through the gratings of a moir ́ e deflectometer. The deflection of the horizontal beam due to its free fall will be measured by a position sensitive detector. It is estimated that the detection of about 10 3 antihydrogen atoms is required to determine the gravitational acceleration with a precision of 1%. In this report an overview of the AEgIS experiment is presented and its current status is described. Details on the production of slow positronium and its excitation with lasers ar...

  8. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems: the AEGIS geologic simulation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, M.G.; Petrie, G.M.

    1981-02-01

    Assessment of the post-closure performance of a nuclear waste repository has two basic components: the identification and analysis of potentially disruptive sequences and the pattern of geologic events and processes causing each sequence, and the identification and analysis of the environmental consequences of radionuclide transport and interactions subsequent to disruption of a repository. The AEGIS Scenario Analysis Task is charged with identifying and analyzing potenially disruptive sequences of geologic events and processes. The Geologic Simulation Model (GSM) was developed to evaluate the geologic/hydrologic system surrounding an underground repository, and describe the phenomena that alone, or in concert, could perturb the system and possibly cause a loss of repository integrity. The AEGIS approach is described in this report. It uses an integrated series of models for repository performance analysis; the GSM for a low-resolution, long-term, comprehensive evaluation of the geologic/hydrologic system, followed by more detailed hydrogeologic, radionuclide transport, and dose models to more accurately assess the consequences of disruptive sequences selected from the GSM analyses. This approach is felt to be more cost-effective than an integrated one because the GSM can be used to estimate the likelihoods of different potentially disruptive future evolutionary developments within the geologic/hydrologic system. The more costly consequence models can then be focused on a few disruptive sequences chosen for their representativeness and effective probabilities

  9. Development of the Cryogenic System of AEgIS at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Derking, J H; Burghart, G; Doser, M; Dudarev, A; Haider, S

    2014-01-01

    The AEgIS (Antimatter Experiment: Gravity, Interferometry, Spectroscopy) experiment is located at the antiproton decelerator complex of CERN. The main goal of the experiment is to perform the first direct measurement of the Earth’s gravitational acceleration on antihydrogen atoms within 1% precision. The antihydrogen is produced in a cylindrical Penning trap by combining antiprotons with positrons. To reach the precision of 1%, the antihydrogen has to be cooled to 100 mK to reduce its random velocity. A dilution refrigerator is selected to deliver the necessary cooling capacity of 100 μW at 50 mK. The AEgIS cryogenic system basically consists of cryostats for a 1-T and for a 5-T superconducting magnet, a central region cryostat, a dilution refrigerator cryostat and a measurement cryostat with a Moiré deflectometer to measure the gravitational acceleration. In autumn 2012, the 1-T cryostat, 5-T cryostat and central region cryostat were assembled and commissioned. The apparatus is cooled down in eight days ...

  10. An international career development survey of critical care practitioners*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mayur B; Laudanski, Krzysztof; Pandharipande, Pratik P

    2014-04-01

    To understand the career development needs of an international multidisciplinary group of critical care practitioners in the 21st century. A web-accessible survey deployed by the In-Training Section of the Society of Critical Care Medicine. University health sciences center. Physicians (doctor of medicine and doctor of osteopathic medicine), advance practice providers (nurse practitioner, physician assistant, nurses, pharmacists, and student members of the Society of Critical Care Medicine. The survey covered domains of demographics, opinions about career development, and opinions about the Society of Critical Care Medicine In-Training Section. One thousand forty-nine of approximately 16,000 Society of Critical Care Medicine members responded to the survey (7% response rate). Continuing education (280, 26.7%), leadership skills (197, 18.8%), and scientific development (192, 18.3%) are among the most important issues for the respondents. Many critical care practitioners would like to assist Society of Critical Care Medicine's efforts in career development (948, 90.4%) and many would consider some aspect of committee involvement (796, 75.9%). The Society of Critical Care Medicine In-Training Section, whose primary mission is career development across the spectrum of providers and expertise levels, needs improved advertisement (981, 93.7%). There is strong support for upcoming Annual Congresses dedicated to career development (834, 79.5%). Of the three main methods of information dissemination for Society of Critical Care Medicine career development initiatives from the In-Training Section, respondents rank e-mail highest (762, 72.6%), followed by webpages (228, 21.7%) and I-rooms (59, 5.6%). Over half of the Society of Critical Care Medicine membership surveyed lack a career development mentor in critical care. This is the largest assessment of the international critical care community regarding the career development needs of 21st century critical care practitioner

  11. Current Trends in Nursing Informatics: Results of an International Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltonen, Laura-Maria; Alhuwail, Dari; Ali, Samira; Badger, Martha K; Eler, Gabrielle Jacklin; Georgsson, Mattias; Islam, Tasneem; Jeon, Eunjoo; Jung, Hyunggu; Kuo, Chiu-Hsiang; Lewis, Adrienne; Pruinelli, Lisiane; Ronquillo, Charlene; Sarmiento, Raymond Francis; Sommer, Janine; Tayaben, Jude L; Topaz, Maxim

    2016-01-01

    Nursing informatics (NI) can help provide effective and safe healthcare. This study aimed to describe current research trends in NI. In the summer 2015, the IMIA-NI Students Working Group created and distributed an online international survey of the current NI trends. A total of 402 responses were submitted from 44 countries. We identified a top five NI research areas: standardized terminologies, mobile health, clinical decision support, patient safety and big data research. NI research funding was considered to be difficult to acquire by the respondents. Overall, current NI research on education, clinical practice, administration and theory is still scarce, with theory being the least common. Further research is needed to explain the impact of these trends and the needs from clinical practice.

  12. Reflections on International Comparative Education Survey Methodology: A Case Study of the European Survey on Language Competences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Karen

    2016-01-01

    This paper reflects on the methodology used in international comparative education surveys by conducting a systematic review of the European Survey on Language Competences (ESLC). The ESLC was administered from February to March 2011, with final results released in June 2012. The survey tested approximately 55,000 students across 14 European…

  13. Respiratory Management of Extremely Preterm Infants: An International Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltempo, Marc; Isayama, Tetsuya; Vento, Máximo; Lui, Kei; Kusuda, Satoshi; Lehtonen, Liisa; Sjörs, Gunnar; Håkansson, Stellan; Adams, Mark; Noguchi, Akihiko; Reichman, Brian; Darlow, Brian A; Morisaki, Naho; Bassler, Dirk; Pratesi, Simone; Lee, Shoo K; Lodha, Abhay; Modi, Neena; Helenius, Kjell; Shah, Prakesh S

    2018-04-13

    There are significant international variations in chronic lung disease rates among very preterm infants yet there is little data on international variations in respiratory strategies. To evaluate practice variations in the respiratory management of extremely preterm infants born at < 29 weeks' gestational age (GA) among 10 neonatal networks participating in the International Network for Evaluating Outcomes (iNeo) of Neonates collaboration. A web-based survey was sent to the representatives of 390 neonatal intensive care units from Australia/New Zealand, Canada, Finland, Illinois (USA), Israel, Japan, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and Tuscany (Italy). Responses were based on practices in 2015. Overall, 321 of the 390 units responded (82%). The majority of units within networks (40-92%) mechanically ventilate infants born at 23-24 weeks' GA on continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) with 30-39% oxygen in respiratory distress within 48 h after birth, but the proportion of units that offer mechanical ventilation for infants born at 25-26 weeks' GA at similar settings varied significantly (20-85% of units within networks). The most common respiratory strategy for infants born at 27-28 weeks' GA on CPAP with 30-39% oxygen with respiratory distress within 48 h after birth used by units also varied significantly among networks: mechanical ventilation (0-60%), CPAP (3-82%), intubation and surfactant administration with immediate extubation (0-75%), and less invasive surfactant administration (0-68%). There are marked variations but also similarities in respiratory management of extremely preterm infants between networks. Further collaboration and exploration is needed to better understand the association of these variations in practice with pulmonary outcomes. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. AEgIS at ELENA: outlook for physics with a pulsed cold antihydrogen beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doser, M; Aghion, S; Amsler, C; Bonomi, G; Brusa, R S; Caccia, M; Caravita, R; Castelli, F; Cerchiari, G; Comparat, D; Consolati, G; Demetrio, A; Di Noto, L; Evans, C; Fanì, M; Ferragut, R; Fesel, J; Fontana, A; Gerber, S; Giammarchi, M; Gligorova, A; Guatieri, F; Haider, S; Hinterberger, A; Holmestad, H; Kellerbauer, A; Khalidova, O; Krasnický, D; Lagomarsino, V; Lansonneur, P; Lebrun, P; Malbrunot, C; Mariazzi, S; Marton, J; Matveev, V; Mazzotta, Z; Müller, S R; Nebbia, G; Nedelec, P; Oberthaler, M; Pacifico, N; Pagano, D; Penasa, L; Petracek, V; Prelz, F; Prevedelli, M; Rienaecker, B; Robert, J; Røhne, O M; Rotondi, A; Sandaker, H; Santoro, R; Smestad, L; Sorrentino, F; Testera, G; Tietje, I C; Widmann, E; Yzombard, P; Zimmer, C; Zmeskal, J; Zurlo, N

    2018-03-28

    The efficient production of cold antihydrogen atoms in particle traps at CERN's Antiproton Decelerator has opened up the possibility of performing direct measurements of the Earth's gravitational acceleration on purely antimatter bodies. The goal of the AEgIS collaboration is to measure the value of g for antimatter using a pulsed source of cold antihydrogen and a Moiré deflectometer/Talbot-Lau interferometer. The same antihydrogen beam is also very well suited to measuring precisely the ground-state hyperfine splitting of the anti-atom. The antihydrogen formation mechanism chosen by AEgIS is resonant charge exchange between cold antiprotons and Rydberg positronium. A series of technical developments regarding positrons and positronium (Ps formation in a dedicated room-temperature target, spectroscopy of the n =1-3 and n =3-15 transitions in Ps, Ps formation in a target at 10 K inside the 1 T magnetic field of the experiment) as well as antiprotons (high-efficiency trapping of [Formula: see text], radial compression to sub-millimetre radii of mixed [Formula: see text] plasmas in 1 T field, high-efficiency transfer of [Formula: see text] to the antihydrogen production trap using an in-flight launch and recapture procedure) were successfully implemented. Two further critical steps that are germane mainly to charge exchange formation of antihydrogen-cooling of antiprotons and formation of a beam of antihydrogen-are being addressed in parallel. The coming of ELENA will allow, in the very near future, the number of trappable antiprotons to be increased by more than a factor of 50. For the antihydrogen production scheme chosen by AEgIS, this will be reflected in a corresponding increase of produced antihydrogen atoms, leading to a significant reduction of measurement times and providing a path towards high-precision measurements.This article is part of the Theo Murphy meeting issue 'Antiproton physics in the ELENA era'. © 2018 The Author(s).

  15. Between Two Science Curricula: The Influence of International Surveys on the Israeli Science Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klieger, Aviva

    2015-01-01

    International surveys have served as agents of change for the introduction of reforms in curricula worldwide. The Israeli Ministry of Education set a goal of raising Israel's ranking in international surveys so that Israel will be among the 10 leading countries in the Program for International Student Assessment and Trends in International…

  16. A Strong-Lens Survey in AEGIS: the influence of large scalestructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moustakas, Leonidas A.; Marshall, Phil; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Coil,Alison L.; Cooper, Michael C.; Davis, Marc; Fassnacht, Christopher D.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Hopkins, Andrew; Koekemoer, Anton; Konidaris,Nicholas P.; Lotz, Jennifer M.; Willmer, Christopher N. A.

    2006-10-13

    We report on the results of a visual search for galaxy-scale strong gravitational lenses over 650 arcmin{sup 2} of HST/ACS (F606W and F814W) imaging in the DEEP2-Extended Groth Strip (EGS). In addition to a previously-known Einstein Cross also found by our search (the 'Cross', HSTJ141735+52264, z{sub lens} = 0.8106, z{sub source} = 3.40), we identify two new strong galaxy-galaxy lenses with multiple extended arcs. The first, HSTJ141820+52361 (the 'Dewdrop'; z{sub lens} = 0.5798), lenses two distinct extended sources into two pairs of arcs (z{sub source} = 0.9818), while the second, HSTJ141833+52435 (the 'Anchor'; z{sub lens} = 0.4625), produces a single pair of arcs (z{sub lens} not yet known). Four less convincing arc/counter-arc and two-image lens candidates are also found and presented for completeness. Lenses are found in a both underdense and overdense local environments, as characterized by a robust measure, 1+{delta}{sub 3}, a normalized density that uses the distance to the third nearest neighbor. All three definite lenses are fit reasonably well by simple singular isothermal ellipsoid models including external shear, giving {chi}{sub {nu}}{sup 2} values close to unity. These shears are much greater than those implied by a simple consideration of the three-dimensional convergence and shear from galaxies along the line of sight, where each galaxy is approximated by a singular isothermal sphere halo truncated at 200 h{sup -1} kpc. This shows how a realistic treatment of galaxies and the large scale structure they are embedded in is necessary, and that simply characterizing the very-local environment may be insufficient.

  17. Results of simplified survey for thyroid internal exposure of children in Fukushima and other surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukushima, Yasumasa

    2012-01-01

    Process, subjects, methods, results and tasks of the title surveys are described, where the others involve the survey of internal and external exposures in Fukushima residents. The simplified survey for thyroid internal exposure of children was based on the request (Mar. 23-25, 2011) of the Nuclear Safety Committee with data of System for Prediction of Environmental Emergency Dose Information (SPEEDI) and was conducted on Mar 24-30 in 1,080 infants/children of age range 0-15 y. Aloka NaI scintillation survey meter was used for measurement of thyroid radioactivity by contacting the detector with the organ portion. The standard limit was 0.2 micro-Sv/h (100 mSv eq./y for 1 year old child). Net dose rates were found to be 0 and <0.04 micro-Sv/h in 55.4% and 99.0% of children, respectively, and were thus lower than the standard in all children. Reliability and error in the measurement should be validated for explanation of the results. The investigations of internal exposures in Fukushima 174 residents were firstly performed on Japanese authority's request by the whole body counting in National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), and then those in 6,434 residents, from Aug. to Oct. (6,608 in total). Exposure at <1 mSv of the committed effective dose equivalent was found in 99.7% of residents and the maximum, 3 mSv, in 2 residents. The dose estimated by various institutions hereafter should be assessed along with the standardized scenario. The external exposure was investigated by inputting the data (1,727 residents, Mar. 11-July 11) of Fukushima Prefectural Health Management into the system to estimate the dose developed by NIRS. Subjects were 138 radiation workers and 1,589 people (F/M 675/914) of 3 regions near the Power Station: when excepting for the workers, 62.8% of subjects were exposed to <1 mSv, 97.4% to <5 mSv, and 99.7% to <10 mSv. Four people were exposed to 10 mSv or more, one of whom, to the maximum of 14.5 mSv. (T.T.)

  18. INTERNATIONAL SURVEY OF PUBLICATIONS IN INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS: RISING THROUGH THE BASE OF WEB SCIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aletéia de Moura Carpes

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Internationalization is an alternative to business growth, allowing its exposure to international standards of products, technologies and management methods, generating significant returns for domestic transactions (STAL, 2010. The evolution of commercial transactions between the countries have brought a lot of issues to be understood, that seek to check the reflection of international activity in the individual, company and nation experiencing this context of globalization. This article was developed from the perspective of a bibliometric research, aiming to increase awareness in the study area related to International Business (International Business and determine which topics studied by the administration on this issue are being investigated further and which are most relevant (hot topics. Analysis of data held on the approaches of qualitative and quantitative research. Qualitatively analyzed the issues addressed in the publications surveyed regarding the content, keywords and relevance of topics. As regards the figures sought to investigate the following variables: total number of publications, authors, subject areas, types of documents, the sources title, year of publications, institutions, funding agencies, languages, countries and analysis of the number of times each publication was cited by the hb index and the index m. According to Hirsch (2005, the total number of articles published measures the productivity of the author, but does not measure the importance and / or impact of their publications. Already the impact of publications is measured by the number of citations that each one receives can be measured by the h-index. The survey of publications housed in the Web of Science citation index with the ISI Citation Indexes from 1997 to 2010 (14 years resulted in 5,355 jobs related to international business, which were entered, especially in the areas of business (business and management (management and the studies analyzed showed a

  19. Polish Acadaemy of Sciences Positronium for Antihydrogen Production in the AEGIS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Consolati, G; Amsler, C; Bonomi, G; Brusa, R S; Caccia, M; Caravita, R; Castelli, F; Cerchiari, G; Comparat, D; Demetrio, A; Di Noto, L; Doser, M; Evans, C; Fanì, M; Ferragut, R; Fesel, J; Fontana, A; Gerber, S; Giammarchi, M; Gligorova, A; Guatieri, F; Haider, S; Hinterberger, A; Holmestad, H; Kellerbauer, A; Khalidova, O; Krasnicky, D; Lagomarsino, V; Lansonneur, P; Lebrun, P; Malbrunot, C; Mariazzi, S; Marton, J; Matveev, V; Mazzotta, Z; Müller, S R; Nebbia, G; Nedelec, P; Oberthaler, M; Pacifico, N; Pagano, D; Penasa, L; Petracek, V; Prelz, F; Prevedelli, M; Ravelli, L; Rienaecker, B; Robert, J; Røhne, O M; Rotondi, A; Sandaker, H; Santoro, R; Smestad, L; Sorrentino, F; Testera, G; Tietje, I C; Widmann, E; Yzombard, P; Zimmer, C; Zmeskal, J; Zurlo, N

    2017-01-01

    The primary goal of the Antihydrogen Experiment: Gravity, Interferometry, Spectroscopy (AEGIS) collaboration is to measure for the first time precisely the gravitational acceleration of antihydrogen, H¯ , a fundamental issue of contemporary physics, using a beam of antiatoms. Indeed, although indirect arguments have been raised against a different acceleration of antimatter with respect to matter, nevertheless some attempts to formulate quantum theories of gravity, or to unify gravity with the other forces, consider the possibility of a non-identical gravitational interaction between matter and antimatter. We plan to generate H¯ through a charge-exchange reaction between excited Ps and antiprotons coming from the Antiproton Decelerator facility at CERN. It offers the advantage to produce sufficiently cold antihydrogen to make feasible a measurement of gravitational acceleration with reasonable uncertainty (of the order of a few percent). Since the cross-section of the above reaction increases with n 4 , n b...

  20. International Student Recruitment Practices. Summary Results of the AACRAO January 2015 60 Second Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (AACRAO), 2015

    2015-01-01

    The January 2015 American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (AACRAO) "60 Second Survey" asked respondents to indicate their institutions' international student recruiting practices. As with other 60 Second Surveys, the survey was distributed through the FluidSurveys platform to all AACRAO members. After…

  1. Development of the cryogenic system of AEgIS at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derking, J. H.; Bremer, J.; Burghart, G.; Doser, M.; Dudarev, A.; Haider, S.

    2014-01-01

    The AEgIS (Antimatter Experiment: Gravity, Interferometry, Spectroscopy) experiment is located at the antiproton decelerator complex of CERN. The main goal of the experiment is to perform the first direct measurement of the Earth's gravitational acceleration on antihydrogen atoms within 1% precision. The antihydrogen is produced in a cylindrical Penning trap by combining antiprotons with positrons. To reach the precision of 1%, the antihydrogen has to be cooled to 100 mK to reduce its random velocity. A dilution refrigerator is selected to deliver the necessary cooling capacity of 100 μW at 50 mK. The AEgIS cryogenic system basically consists of cryostats for a 1-T and for a 5-T superconducting magnet, a central region cryostat, a dilution refrigerator cryostat and a measurement cryostat with a Moiré deflectometer to measure the gravitational acceleration. In autumn 2012, the 1-T cryostat, 5-T cryostat and central region cryostat were assembled and commissioned. The apparatus is cooled down in eight days using 2500 L of liquid helium and liquid nitrogen. During operation, the average consumption of liquid helium is 150 Lṡday-1 and of liquid nitrogen 5 Lṡday-1. The temperature sensors at the Penning traps measured 12 K to 18 K, which is higher than expected. Simulations show that this is caused by a bad thermalization of the trap wiring. The implementation of the sub-kelvin region is foreseen for mid-2015. The antihydrogen will be cooled down to 100 mK in an ultra-cold trap consisting of multiple high-voltage electrodes made of sapphire with gold plated electrode sectors.

  2. An international survey and recommendations for modern hydrokinetic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valyrakis, Manousos; Basnet, Bipin; Dunsmore, Ian

    2017-04-01

    This study presents the results of a survey on some of the advantages of the novel and uniquehydrokinetic energy generation systems over other technologies available today. Recently, a comprehensive assessment study for the application of internationally leading hydrokinetic technologies in water engineering has been conducted. The study was carried with the collaboration of the School of Engineering, University of Glasgow and Scottish Water Horizons Ltd. The assessment involved the information collection, critical analysis of various features and financial viability analysis of various hydrokinetic systems available at this time. The outcomes of the study are summarized below: - The preliminary assessment of the hydrokinetic system and their application were carried out. The technologies were divided into different categories as per their core theory, scope of application as well as positive and negatives effects of their application. - A variety of criteria were used to assess the technical, economical and ecological potential from the application of hydrokinetic systems. - A number of companies representing a wide range of technologies available worldwide were ranked considering the performance of these against the above criteria. - Only a couple of the companies could satisfy the selection condition to be adopted into select sites of low flow and low pressure head. - A more detailed assessment for specific sites and further testing of these technologies is recommended to further assess the advantages and optimal performance of the selected technologies. A preliminary evaluation of the best performing systems demonstrates its effectiveness, particularly over other existing hydrokinetic technologies, when ecology of the open water surface system is considered. Specifically it will be of interest to use the selected technology in combination with a fish passage, as compared with other technologies this system has a minimal amount of fast moving components.

  3. International Short-Term Countermeasures Survey - 2012 Update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingham, Grant

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear emergency planning, preparedness, response, and management, in general, are essential elements of any country's nuclear power programme. Part of nuclear emergency planning and preparedness is the implementation of national emergency plans, including detailed procedures for the implementation of short-term countermeasures, before during, and after the release of radioactive substances. The timely and appropriate implementation of short-term countermeasures, such as sheltering, evacuation, and iodine prophylaxis, can, in case of a nuclear emergency with a release of radioactive material, considerably reduce the doses to the public in the vicinity of the nuclear installation. Although international guidelines exist, national procedures and practices may differ due to different national habits, cultural specificity, and societal needs. Different national procedures and practices may, however, in the case of a radioactive release affecting two neighbouring countries, lead to different decisions in the implementation of countermeasures. In order to better understand existing approaches and to facilitate the comparison of national practices, the NEA decided to launch a questionnaire on current practices regarding short-term countermeasures, updating a similar survey performed in 1994 and 2003, as countries' practices have since evolved and been modified. In 2012, it was decided to reevaluate the country approaches in light of the early lessons learnt from the Fukushima Daiichi NPP accident. The information collected may be used to understand the basis for decisions in various countries, and, if deemed appropriate, as a basis for international harmonisation. This may also assist member countries to explain to the public affected by an emergency why the decisions in neighbouring countries may vary. This report summarises the information given by member countries and includes nine sections to explore the different aspects, covering the following topics: member

  4. AEGIS and Ship Self-Defense System (SSDS) Platforms: Using KVA Analysis, Risk Simulation and Strategic Real Options to Assess Operational Effectiveness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Uchytil, Joseph; Housel, Thomas; Hom, Sandra; Mun, Johnathan; Tarantino, Eric

    2006-01-01

    .... This paper describes research using the KVA+RO framework for estimating return on investment, in an open architecture approach, to upgrading and/or replacing the aging IWS AEGIS and SSDS systems...

  5. Assessing the Operational Value of Situational Awareness for AEGIS and Ship Self Defense System (SSDS) Platforms through the Application of the Knowledge Value Added (KVA) Methodology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Uchytil, Joseph S

    2006-01-01

    .... The objective of this research is to analyze the AEGIS and Ship Self Defense System (SSDS) track management systems to determine potential operational benefits that could be realized through the application of an OA...

  6. Continuing to Confront COPD International Patient Survey: Economic Impact of COPD in 12 Countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foo, Jason; Landis, Sarah H; Maskell, Joe; Oh, Yeon-Mok; van der Molen, Thys; Han, MeiLan K; Mannino, David M; Ichinose, Masakazu; Punekar, Yogesh

    2016-01-01

    Background The Continuing to Confront COPD International Patient Survey estimated the prevalence and burden of COPD across 12 countries. Using data from this survey we evaluated the economic impact of COPD. Methods This cross-sectional, population-based survey questioned 4,343 subjects aged 40 years

  7. Development of nuclear emulsions with 1μm spatial resolution for the AEgIS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, M. [Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Laboratory for High Energy Physics, University of Bern, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Aghion, S. [Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez. di Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Ahlén, O. [European Organisation for Nuclear Research, Physics Department, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Amsler, C., E-mail: claude.amsler@cern.ch [Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Laboratory for High Energy Physics, University of Bern, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Ariga, A.; Ariga, T. [Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Laboratory for High Energy Physics, University of Bern, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Belov, A.S. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 117312 (Russian Federation); Bonomi, G. [University of Brescia, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Via Branze 38, 25133 Brescia (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez. di Pavia, Via Agostino Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Bräunig, P. [University of Heidelberg, Kirchhoff Institute for Physics, Im Neuenheimer Feld 227, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Bremer, J. [European Organisation for Nuclear Research, Physics Department, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Brusa, R.S. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Trento and INFN, Gruppo Collegato di Trento, Via Sommarive 14, 38050 Povo, Trento (Italy); Burghart, G. [European Organisation for Nuclear Research, Physics Department, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Cabaret, L. [Laboratoire Aimé Cotton, CNRS, Université Paris Sud, ENS Cachan, Bâtiment 505, Campus d' Orsay, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Canali, C. [University of Zurich, Physics Institute, Winterthurerstrasse 190, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); and others

    2013-12-21

    The main goal of the AEgIS experiment at CERN is to test the weak equivalence principle for antimatter. We will measure the Earth's gravitational acceleration g{sup ¯} with antihydrogen atoms being launched in a horizontal vacuum tube and traversing a moiré deflectometer. We intend to use a position sensitive device made of nuclear emulsions (combined with a time-of-flight detector such as silicon μ-strips) to measure precisely their annihilation points at the end of the tube. The goal is to determine g{sup ¯} with a 1% relative accuracy. In 2012 we tested emulsion films in vacuum and at room temperature with low energy antiprotons from the CERN antiproton decelerator. First results on the expected performance for AEgIS are presented.

  8. A Global Survey of International Business Education in the 1990s

    OpenAIRE

    Chuck C Y Kwok; Jeffrey Arpan; William R Folks

    1994-01-01

    This article presents the major findings of the fifth global curriculum survey of the Academy of International Business (AIB)—an examination of the status and trends in international business education around the world as of the early 1990s. The survey's findings, based on responses from more than 500 business schools, encompass different goals and methods of internationalization, international linkages and experiential activities, organizational issues, amounts of internationalization progre...

  9. Creating the perfect intern anaesthesia rotation: a survey using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: A questionnaire was sent to Pietermaritzburg (PMB) interns who completed their anaesthesia intern rotation between 2008 and 2010. Two data sets were collected: quantitative data (this will be reported on in another paper) and qualitative data. The qualitative data included five open-ended questions about the ...

  10. Global Sourcing : An international survey among 7 multinationals

    OpenAIRE

    G.J. Verra

    1998-01-01

    In todays marketplace serious changes are taking place. These changes encompass developments such as lowering trade barriers and globalisation of products, and with regard to organisations it encompasses the globalisation of production, R&D and sales. Now, also sourcing is becoming more international. This holds both for smaller companies and for larger companies. The reasons why sourcing becomes more international are diverse.

  11. Creating the perfect intern anaesthesia rotation: a survey using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sedation and regional anaesthesia (4.5%); d. Negative comments (3.9%); e. Confining anaesthesia to .... comfortable with certain procedures, as a previous intern so perfectly summarised: 'I had no muscle memory for these sort of ... safe sedation skills and regional anaesthesia. Structure of the intern anaesthesia rotation.

  12. Photobioreactors with internal illumination - A survey and comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heining, Martin; Buchholz, Rainer

    2015-08-01

    The idea of internally illuminated photobioreactors has existed since the 1990s and various systems were developed since. Recently, the interest in these systems has been on the rise again, due to the increased production of and research on high-value products and recombinant proteins from microalgae and plant cell cultures. While promising results in lab-scale have been achieved, the potential of photoautotrophic or mixotrophic production of these compounds is limited due to the lack of scalable photobioreactors, which could be overcome by internally illuminated systems. In this article, we review different internally illuminated photobioreactors from the last two decades and classify them into two major groups. The photobioreactors are compared based on the ratio of illuminated surface-to-culture volume and the occupied volume by internal light-emitting elements, and possible obstacles, challenges and future trends are discussed. Looking forward, new technologies and smaller light sources have improved the potential of internally illuminated photobioreactors with internal light sources and will enable these technologies to compete with systems with internal light guides, but only a few of these systems have currently achieved a relevant scale. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Auditory interfaces in automated driving: an international survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bazilinskyy, P.; de Winter, J.C.F.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated peoples’ opinion on auditory interfaces in contemporary
    cars and their willingness to be exposed to auditory feedback in automated driving. We used an Internet-based survey to collect 1,205 responses from 91 countries. The respondents stated their attitudes towards two

  14. International survey on neuroradiological interventional and therapeutic devices and materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, René; Mayer, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    A web-based survey was performed among the members of the World Federation of Interventional and Therapeutic Neuroradiology to determine the differences in availability, pricing, and performance of endovascular devices with special focus on coils, intra-arterial stroke devices, detachable balloons,

  15. Ethical concerns of nursing reviewers: an international survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broome, Marion; Dougherty, Molly C; Freda, Margaret C; Kearney, Margaret H; Baggs, Judith G

    2010-11-01

    Editors of scientific literature rely heavily on peer reviewers to evaluate the integrity of research conduct and validity of findings in manuscript submissions. The purpose of this study was to describe the ethical concerns of reviewers of nursing journals. This descriptive cross-sectional study was an anonymous online survey. The findings reported here were part of a larger investigation of experiences of reviewers. Fifty-two editors of nursing journals (six outside the USA) agreed to invite their review panels to participate. A 69-item forced-choice and open-ended survey developed by the authors based on the literature was pilot tested with 18 reviewers before being entered into SurveyMonkey(TM). A total of 1675 reviewers responded with useable surveys. Six questions elicited responses about ethical issues, such as conflict of interest, protection of human research participants, plagiarism, duplicate publication, misrepresentation of data and 'other'. The reviewers indicated whether they had experienced such a concern and notified the editor, and how satisfied they were with the outcome. They provided specific examples. Approximately 20% of the reviewers had experienced various ethical dilemmas. Although the majority reported their concerns to the editor, not all did so, and not all were satisfied with the outcomes. The most commonly reported concern perceived was inadequate protection of human participants. The least common was plagiarism, but this was most often reported to the editor and least often led to a satisfactory outcome. Qualitative responses at the end of the survey indicate this lack of satisfaction was most commonly related to feedback provided on resolution by the editor. The findings from this study suggest several areas that editors should note, including follow up with reviewers when they identify ethical concerns about a manuscript.

  16. An international survey on the current use of electroacupuncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayor, David; Bovey, Mark

    2017-03-01

    Despite many research publications, it is unclear how widely electroacupuncture (EA) and related modalities are used in everyday practice. It is also uncertain who uses them, for what conditions, and with what results. We aimed to survey practitioners about their use of and training in EA. We also sought to determine how much the open-access English-language database at http://www.electroacupunctureknowledge.com (EAK) is used, or might be used in the future, if updated. A survey was developed using several rounds of consultation with a focus group and others. Professional acupuncture membership organisations were contacted to assess their willingness to notify their members. The survey was tested before its launch. Thirty-four professional organisations agreed to participate, together with two research bodies and six UK training institutes. Potentially, around 50 000 professionals practising acupuncture knew about the survey, to which there were 768 responses. Data were analysed for respondent demographics. Around 70% used EA, but <25% used related electrotherapy modalities. Men were more likely than women to use more than one modality. Only around 7% of respondents used non-traditional acupuncture modalities without prior training. However, awareness and usage of the EAK database was low, although around 80% of respondents stated they might use the database in the future, primarily to improve clinical practice. To the best of our knowledge, this is the largest survey on EA and related modalities ever conducted. As such, its results are likely to be of interest to acupuncture and other practitioners (whether or not they use EA), patients, policymakers, and funding agencies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  17. International Human Resource Management Education: A Survey of HR Professionals, Suggestions for Skill Dissemination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, Lizabeth A.; Wagner-Marsh, Fraya; Loewe, G. Michael

    2002-01-01

    Surveyed a human resource professional association about training and interest in international human resources management. Based on results, offers recommendations for expanding coverage of this topic in credit and non-credit courses. (EV)

  18. Educational Psychology in Portugal: Results of the 2013 International School Psychology Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Vitor Alexandre; Marchante, Marta; Raimundo, Raquel; Jimerson, Shane

    2016-01-01

    This study provides valuable information regarding the characteristics, training, roles, activities, preferences, research interests and challenges reported by 803 Portuguese educational psychologists. The study includes responses to the International School Psychology Survey (ISPS) from educational psychologists across various regions of…

  19. International survey on attitudes toward ethics in health technology assessment: An exploratory study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arellano, L.E.; Willett, J.M.; Borry, P.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this exploratory study was to survey international health technology assessment (HTA) professionals to determine attitudes toward ethics in HTA. Methods: An exploratory, quantitative, cross-sectional study design was developed. The sample population (n = 636) was

  20. International Survey of Peer Leadership (ISPL): An Emerging ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The power and importance of peer influence in educational settings has been well documented (Cuseo, 2010; Ender & Kay, 2001; Keup, 2010). In South Africa, research supports international trends that student involvement in peer-led activities contributes to student success and ultimate throughput (Layton & McKenna, ...

  1. Developing an International Survey of Teachers' Assessment Capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Renken, Maggie; Otrel-Cass, Kathrin; Cowie, Bronwen

    teacher education into the first years as teachers across six countries. We target the nature of programmes and changes in understanding assessment purposes, practices, principles and policy. This project builds on the ACT survey of student-teacher understandings of assessment conducted over three years......Professional standards require teachers to be assessment literate - to construct, administer, and score reliable, valid assessments, communicate interpretations and use evidence to adjust teaching to support students. This project investigates student-teachers’ assessment literacy throughout...

  2. Defining Innovation in Neurosurgery: Results from an International Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, Mark M; Cote, David J; Muskens, Ivo S; Smith, Timothy R; Broekman, Marike L

    2018-03-28

    Innovation is a part of the daily practice of neurosurgery. A clear definition of what constitutes innovation is currently lacking, however, and opinions vary from continent to continent, from hospital to hospital, and from surgeon to surgeon. In this study, we distributed an online survey to neurosurgeons from multiple countries to investigate what neurosurgeons consider innovative, by gathering opinions on several hypothetical cases. The anonymous survey consisted of a total of 52 questions and took approximately 10 minutes to complete. A total of 355 neurosurgeons across all continents excluding Antarctica completed the survey. Neurosurgeons achieved consensus (>75%) in considering specific cases to be innovative, including laser resection of meningioma, focused ultrasound for tumor, oncolytic virus, DBS for addiction, and photodynamic therapy for tumor. Although the new dura substitute case was not considered innovative, there was consensus among neurosurgeons indicating that IRB approval was still necessary to maintain ethical standards. Furthermore, although 90% of neurosurgeons considered an oncolytic virus for GBM to be innovative, only 78% believed that IRB approval was necessary prior to treatment. Our results indicate that innovation is a heterogeneous concept among neurosurgeons that necessitates standardization to ensure appropriate patient safety without stifling progress. We discuss the ethical drawbacks of not having a clear definition of innovation, the current challenges in achieving a unified understanding of innovation in neurosurgery, and offer suggestions for uniting the field going forward. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Geologic simulation model for a hypothetical site in the Columbia Plateau. [AEGIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrie, G.M.; Zellmer, J.T.; Lindberg, J.W.; Foley, M.G.

    1981-04-01

    This report describes the structure and operation of the Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Geologic Simulation Model, a computer simulation model of the geology and hydrology of an area of the Columbia Plateau, Washington. The model is used to study the long-term suitability of the Columbia Plateau Basalts for the storage of nuclear waste in a mined repository. It is also a starting point for analyses of such repositories in other geologic settings. The Geologic Simulation Model will aid in formulating design disruptive sequences (i.e. those to be used for more detailed hydrologic, transport, and dose analyses) from the spectrum of hypothetical geological and hydrological developments that could result in transport of radionuclides out of a repository. Quantitative and auditable execution of this task, however, is impossible without computer simulation. The computer simulation model aids the geoscientist by generating the wide spectrum of possible future evolutionary paths of the areal geology and hydrology, identifying those that may affect the repository integrity. This allows the geoscientist to focus on potentially disruptive processes, or series of events. Eleven separate submodels are used in the simulation portion of the model: Climate, Continental Glaciation, Deformation, Geomorphic Events, Hydrology, Magmatic Events, Meteorite Impact, Sea-Level Fluctuations, Shaft-Seal Failure, Sub-Basalt Basement Faulting, and Undetected Features. Because of the modular construction of the model, each submodel can easily be replaced with an updated or modified version as new information or developments in the state of the art become available. The model simulates the geologic and hydrologic systems of a hypothetical repository site and region for a million years following repository decommissioning. The Geologic Simulation Model operates in both single-run and Monte Carlo modes.

  4. Historical panorama of higher teaching in accounting in Brazil - under the aegis of this normative theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Henrique Marroni

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study is characterized for being essentially a part resulting from the the construction of a research developed by the authors on scientific production in the teaching in accounting, where the title originated. It aims to present a historical panorama of higher teaching in accounting in Brazil since colonial Brazil until the implementation of the law last of Guidelines and Bases in 1996 and the Resolution 10/2004 of the CNE which publishes curriculum guidelines national of the undergraduate for courses accounting, under the aegis of this normative theory. The justification for its development is related to the degree of association between the social, cultural and economic development of society and their reflexes on teaching of accounting, and influence of normative theory about this historical panorama. For this, was drawn up a historical panorama of evolutionary steps of the in higher teaching accounting in Brazil, showing the degree of association between the development of society, accounting and education, by means of a bibliographic research. The results achieved allowed identifying that in Brazil the accounting thinking and the teaching in accounting have had a strong influence primarily from Europe and more recently these the U.S.A. Furthermore, normative theory has clearly a predominance in the formation of professionals in this area, dictating the rules for professional formation with enough profile which meets the normative impositions of the National Council of Education who throughout history has not always been a reflection of society's expectations. Therefore be to resolve 10/2004 while being a normative resolution, gives opening to a change process.

  5. THE SLACS SURVEY. VIII. THE RELATION BETWEEN ENVIRONMENT AND INTERNAL STRUCTURE OF EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Treu, Tommaso; Gavazzi, Raphael; Gorecki, Alexia; Marshall, Philip J.; Koopmans, Leon V. E.; Bolton, Adam S.; Moustakas, Leonidas A.; Burles, Scott

    2009-01-01

    We study the relation between the internal structure of early-type galaxies and their environment using 70 strong gravitational lenses from the SLACS Survey. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) database is used to determine two measures of overdensity of galaxies around each lens-the projected

  6. Estimating international interindustry linkages : Non-survey simulations of the Asian-Pacific economy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterhaven, J.; Stelder, T.M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper evaluates a recently published semi-survey international input-output table for nine East-Asian countries and the USA with four non-survey estimation alternatives. A new generalized RAS procedure is used with stepwise increasing information from both import and export statistics as

  7. 76 FR 76029 - International Services Surveys: Amendments to the BE-120, Benchmark Survey of Transactions in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-06

    ... previous benchmark, annual, and quarterly surveys. Survey Background The Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA... and Budget, O.I.R.A., Paperwork Reduction Project, Attention PRA Desk Officer for BEA, via email at... related to industrial processes and products; (2) Rights related to books, CD's, digital music, etc.; (3...

  8. 76 FR 50158 - International Services Surveys: Amendments to the BE-120, Benchmark Survey of Transactions in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-12

    ... Transactions in Selected Services and Intangible Assets With Foreign Persons AGENCY: Bureau of Economic... Services and Intangible Assets with Foreign Persons'' to ``Benchmark Survey of Transactions in Selected...-120, Benchmark Survey of Transactions in Selected Services and Intangible Assets with Foreign Persons...

  9. International survey of contact lens prescribing for extended wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efron, Nathan; Morgan, Philip B; Woods, Craig A

    2012-02-01

    To determine the extent of extended wear (EW) contact lens prescribing worldwide and to characterize the associated demographics and fitting patterns. Up to 1000 survey forms were sent to contact lens fitters in up to 39 countries between January and March every year for five consecutive years (2006-2010). Practitioners were asked to record data relating to the first 10 contact lens fits or refits performed after receiving the survey form. Survey data collected since 1997 was also analyzed to assess EW fitting trends since that time. Details for lens modality were received for 107,094 rigid and soft lens fits of which 88,392 were for soft lens daily wear (DW) and 7470 were for soft lens EW. Overall, EW represents 7.8% of all soft lens fits, ranging from 0.6% in Malaysia to 27% Norway. Compared with DW fittings, EW fittings can be characterized as follows: older age (32.7 ± 13.6 vs. 29.4 ± 12.0 years for DW); males are over-represented; greater proportion of refits; 72% silicone hydrogel; higher proportion of presbyopia and spherical designs; and higher proportion of monthly lens replacement. Of those wearing EW lenses, 80% use multipurpose solutions, whereas 9% do not use any care system. Between 1997 and 1999, the rate of EW prescribing decreased from 5 to 1% of all soft lens fits; it increased to a peak of 12% in 2006, and settled back to 8% by 2010. EW prescribing has failed to break through the "glass ceiling" of 15% and is unlikely to become a mainstream lens wearing modality until the already low risks of ocular complications can be reduced to be equivalent to that for DW.

  10. The limits of levels: Understanding the International Adult Literacy Surveys (IALS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Clair, Ralf

    2012-12-01

    The International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS), an initiative of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), was carried out in the early to mid-1990s across more than 20 countries. It was followed in the early years of the 21st century by the Adult Literacy and Life Skills (ALL) survey and the Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC, currently in data analysis). This article reviews the philosophical basis, theoretical underpinnings and data analysis of the original and subsequent IALS-based surveys. The purpose is to inform users of the survey data of what the surveys can, and cannot, provide. The author argues that the key use of these surveys is providing insights into population-level distribution of one form of literacy, namely a particular kind of text consumption in a developed society. He also points out the challenges regarding the use of the survey series for making international comparisons, for documenting change over time and for representing broad models of literacy. The tendency to use the survey findings for these uses is considered by the author as a misuse of the data, which leaves the potential of the IALS surveys to provide insights into the effectiveness and equity of different educational systems largely untapped.

  11. Survey Forecasts and Money Demand Functions: Some International Evidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stadtmann, Georg; Pierdzioch, Christian; Rülke, Jan

    2011-01-01

    We derive a money demand function from a dynamic macroeconomic general equilibrium model to analyze the correlations between professional economists’ forecasts of the growth rate of money supply, the inflation rate, the growth rate of real output, and the nominal interest rate. Upon estimating...... the money demand function on survey data of professional economists’ forecasts for fourteen Asian-Pacific and Central and South-Eastern European countries, we find that the correlations between professional economists’ forecasts are broadly consistent with the money demand function implied...

  12. International Students in Rehabilitation Counseling Education Programs: Results from a National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanan; Degeneffe, Charles Edmund

    2011-01-01

    A national sample of 21 international students in Rehabilitation Counseling Education (RCE) programs was surveyed on their connection to their programs, the stressors they experienced during graduate studies, and their recommendations for RCE programs to better support international students. Participants engaged in limited social activities due…

  13. Exploring propositions about perceptions of energy security: An international survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sovacool, Benjamin K.; Valentine, Scott Victor; Jain Bambawale, Malavika; Brown, Marilyn A.; Fátima Cardoso, Terezinha de; Nurbek, Sayasat; Suleimenova, Gulimzhan; Li Jinke; Xu Yang; Jain, Anil; Alhajji, A.F.; Zubiri, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates how energy users from government, industry, civil society, and academia perceive of energy security challenges. It also analyzes how demographic characteristics influence such perceptions, and how geography, economic structure, modes of domestic energy production, and culture shape energy security priorities. Its primary source of data is a four-part survey distributed in seven languages (English, Mandarin, Portuguese, Russian, Arabic, German, and Japanese) to 2167 respondents in Brazil, China, Germany, India, Kazakhstan, Japan, Papua New Guinea, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, and the United States. These countries were selected because they represent a mix of urban and rural populations, developed and developing economies, import- and export-oriented energy trading flows, communist and capitalist societies, liberalized and state-owned energy markets, and small and large geographic sizes. The survey results are used to test four propositions about energy security related to the education, age, occupation, and gender of respondents, as well five propositions about national energy priorities and the interconnected attributes of security of supply, energy efficiency, energy research and development, energy trade, diversification and decentralization, affordability, environmental quality, climate change, and energy governance.

  14. Technical Evaluation Report 40: The International Learning Object Metadata Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norm Friesen

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available A wide range of projects and organizations is currently making digital learning resources (learning objects available to instructors, students, and designers via systematic, standards-based infrastructures. One standard that is central to many of these efforts and infrastructures is known as Learning Object Metadata (IEEE 1484.12.1-2002, or LOM. This report builds on Report #11 in this series, and discusses the findings of the author's recent study of ways in which the LOM standard is being used internationally.

  15. Barriers to global health development: An international quantitative survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahr Weiss

    Full Text Available Global health's goal of reducing low-and-middle-income country versus high-income country health disparities faces complex challenges. Although there have been discussions of barriers, there has not been a broad-based, quantitative survey of such barriers.432 global health professionals were invited via email to participate in an online survey, with 268 (62% participating. The survey assessed participants' (A demographic and global health background, (B perceptions regarding 66 barriers' seriousness, (C detailed ratings of barriers designated most serious, (D potential solutions.Thirty-four (of 66 barriers were seen as moderately or more serious, highlighting the widespread, significant challenges global health development faces. Perceived barrier seriousness differed significantly across domains: Resource Limitations mean = 2.47 (0-4 Likert scale, Priority Selection mean = 2.20, Corruption, Lack of Competence mean = 1.87, Social and Cultural Barriers mean = 1.68. Some system-level predictors showed significant but relatively limited relations. For instance, for Global Health Domain, HIV and Mental Health had higher levels of perceived Social and Cultural Barriers than other GH Domains. Individual-level global health experience predictors had small but significant effects, with seriousness of (a Corruption, Lack of Competence, and (b Priority Selection barriers positively correlated with respondents' level of LMIC-oriented (e.g., weeks/year spent in LMIC but Academic Global Health Achievement (e.g., number of global health publications negatively correlated with overall barrier seriousness.That comparatively few system-level predictors (e.g., Organization Type were significant suggests these barriers may be relatively fundamental at the system-level. Individual-level and system-level effects do have policy implications; e.g., Priority Selection barriers were among the most serious, yet effects on seriousness of how LMIC-oriented a professional

  16. Barriers to global health development: An international quantitative survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Bahr; Pollack, Amie Alley

    2017-01-01

    Global health's goal of reducing low-and-middle-income country versus high-income country health disparities faces complex challenges. Although there have been discussions of barriers, there has not been a broad-based, quantitative survey of such barriers. 432 global health professionals were invited via email to participate in an online survey, with 268 (62%) participating. The survey assessed participants' (A) demographic and global health background, (B) perceptions regarding 66 barriers' seriousness, (C) detailed ratings of barriers designated most serious, (D) potential solutions. Thirty-four (of 66) barriers were seen as moderately or more serious, highlighting the widespread, significant challenges global health development faces. Perceived barrier seriousness differed significantly across domains: Resource Limitations mean = 2.47 (0-4 Likert scale), Priority Selection mean = 2.20, Corruption, Lack of Competence mean = 1.87, Social and Cultural Barriers mean = 1.68. Some system-level predictors showed significant but relatively limited relations. For instance, for Global Health Domain, HIV and Mental Health had higher levels of perceived Social and Cultural Barriers than other GH Domains. Individual-level global health experience predictors had small but significant effects, with seriousness of (a) Corruption, Lack of Competence, and (b) Priority Selection barriers positively correlated with respondents' level of LMIC-oriented (e.g., weeks/year spent in LMIC) but Academic Global Health Achievement (e.g., number of global health publications) negatively correlated with overall barrier seriousness. That comparatively few system-level predictors (e.g., Organization Type) were significant suggests these barriers may be relatively fundamental at the system-level. Individual-level and system-level effects do have policy implications; e.g., Priority Selection barriers were among the most serious, yet effects on seriousness of how LMIC-oriented a professional was

  17. International survey of self-reported medicine use among adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ebba H; Holstein, Bjørn E; Due, Pernille

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine gender, age, and country variations in adolescents' self-reported medicine use. DESIGN: Cross-sectional school surveys of representative samples of 11- to 15-year-old girls and boys were used. The 1997/1998 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children study was referenced....... A standardized questionnaire was completed during school hours. SETTING: Canada, US, Greenland, Israel, and 24 European countries. PARTICIPANTS: 123 227 participants equally distributed by gender and by 3 age groups (mean 11.7, 13.6, 15.6 y). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Self-reported medicine use for headache.......22), difficulties in getting to sleep 0.96 (0.91 to 1.00), and nervousness 1.04 (0.99 to 1.08). CONCLUSIONS: Substantial proportions of adolescents used medicine for common health problems. The prevalence of use differed between type of symptom for which the medicine was used, between countries, and between gender...

  18. International survey of academic library data curation practices

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This survey looks closely at the data curation practices of a sample of research-oriented universities largely from the USA, the UK, Australia and Scandinavia but also including India, South Africa and other countries. The study looks at how major universities are assisting faculty in developing data curation and management plans for large scale data projects, largely in the sciences and social sciences, often as pre-conditions for major grants. The report looks at which departments of universities are shouldering the data curation burden, the personnel involved in the efforts, the costs involved, types of software used, difficulties in procuring scientific experiment logs and other hard to obtain information, types of training offered to faculty, and other issues in large scale data management.

  19. An international survey of patients living with spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Michael; Kocer, Serdar; Murie Fernandez, Manuel; Balcaitiene, Jovita; Fheodoroff, Klemens

    2017-07-01

    To better understand patient perspectives on the life impact of spasticity. Global Internet survey (April 2014-May 2015) of 281 people living with spasticity. Respondents indicated that spasticity has a broad impact on their daily-life: 72% reported impact on quality of life, 44% reported loss of independence and 44% reported depression. Most respondents (64%) were cared for by family members, of whom half had stopped working or reduced their hours. Overall, 45% reported dissatisfaction with the information provided at diagnosis; main reasons were "not enough information" (67%) and "technical terminology" (36%). Respondents had high treatment expectations; 63% expected to be free of muscle spasm, 41% to take care of themselves and 36% to return to a normal routine. However, 33% of respondents had not discussed these expectations with their physician. The most common treatments were physiotherapy (75%), botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT, 73%) and oral spasmolytics (57%). Of those treated with BoNT, 47% waited >1 year from spasticity onset to treatment. This survey emphasises the broad impact of spasticity and highlights unmet needs in the patient journey. Improvements with regards to communication and the therapeutic relationship would be especially welcomed by patients, and would help manage treatment expectations. Implications of Rehabilitation Spasticity has broad impact on the lives of patients and their families that extends beyond the direct physical disability. Patients with spasticity need to be well informed about their condition and treatments available and should be given the opportunity to discuss their expectations. Physicians need to be aware of the patient's individual needs and expectations in order to better help them achieve their therapeutic goals.

  20. Reactivity Impact of Difference of Nuclear Data Library for PWR Fuel Assembly Calculation by Using AEGIS Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohoka, Yasunori; Tatsumi, Masahiro; Sugimura, Naoki; Tabuchi, Masato

    2011-01-01

    In 2010, the latest version of the Japanese Evaluated Nuclear Data Library (JENDL-4.0) has been released by JAEA. JENDL-4.0 is major update from JENDL- 3.3, and confirmed to give good accuracy by integral test for fission reactor systems such as fast neutron system and thermal neutron system. In this study, we evaluated the reactivity impact due to difference between ENDF/B-VII.0 and JENDL-4.0 for PWR fuel assembly burnup calculation using AEGIS code which has been developed by Nuclear Engineering, Ltd. in cooperation with Nuclear Fuel Industries, Ltd. and Nagoya University

  1. Surveys from inside: An assessment of unit nonresponse bias with internal criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Kohler

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The article uses the so called “internal criteria of representativeness” to assess the unit nonresponse bias in five European comparative survey projects. It then goes on investigating several ideas why unit nonresponse bias might vary between surveys and countries. It is proposed that unit nonresponse bias is either caused by country characteristics or survey methodology. The empirical evidence presented speaks more in favour of the latter than of the former. Among the survey characteristics the features that strengthen the leverage to control interviewers’ behaviour have top priority

  2. Status of simulation in health care education: an international survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qayumi, Karim; Pachev, George; Zheng, Bin; Ziv, Amitai; Koval, Valentyna; Badiei, Sadia; Cheng, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Simulation is rapidly penetrating the terrain of health care education and has gained growing acceptance as an educational method and patient safety tool. Despite this, the state of simulation in health care education has not yet been evaluated on a global scale. In this project, we studied the global status of simulation in health care education by determining the degree of financial support, infrastructure, manpower, information technology capabilities, engagement of groups of learners, and research and scholarly activities, as well as the barriers, strengths, opportunities for growth, and other aspects of simulation in health care education. We utilized a two-stage process, including an online survey and a site visit that included interviews and debriefings. Forty-two simulation centers worldwide participated in this study, the results of which show that despite enormous interest and enthusiasm in the health care community, use of simulation in health care education is limited to specific areas and is not a budgeted item in many institutions. Absence of a sustainable business model, as well as sufficient financial support in terms of budget, infrastructure, manpower, research, and scholarly activities, slows down the movement of simulation. Specific recommendations are made based on current findings to support simulation in the next developmental stages. PMID:25489254

  3. Auditory interfaces in automated driving: an international survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlo Bazilinskyy

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated peoples’ opinion on auditory interfaces in contemporary cars and their willingness to be exposed to auditory feedback in automated driving. We used an Internet-based survey to collect 1,205 responses from 91 countries. The respondents stated their attitudes towards two existing auditory driver assistance systems, a parking assistant (PA and a forward collision warning system (FCWS, as well as towards a futuristic augmented sound system (FS proposed for fully automated driving. The respondents were positive towards the PA and FCWS, and rated the willingness to have automated versions of these systems as 3.87 and 3.77, respectively (on a scale from 1 = disagree strongly to 5 = agree strongly. The respondents tolerated the FS (the mean willingness to use it was 3.00 on the same scale. The results showed that among the available response options, the female voice was the most preferred feedback type for takeover requests in highly automated driving, regardless of whether the respondents’ country was English speaking or not. The present results could be useful for designers of automated vehicles and other stakeholders.

  4. Status of simulation in health care education: an international survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qayumi, Karim; Pachev, George; Zheng, Bin; Ziv, Amitai; Koval, Valentyna; Badiei, Sadia; Cheng, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Simulation is rapidly penetrating the terrain of health care education and has gained growing acceptance as an educational method and patient safety tool. Despite this, the state of simulation in health care education has not yet been evaluated on a global scale. In this project, we studied the global status of simulation in health care education by determining the degree of financial support, infrastructure, manpower, information technology capabilities, engagement of groups of learners, and research and scholarly activities, as well as the barriers, strengths, opportunities for growth, and other aspects of simulation in health care education. We utilized a two-stage process, including an online survey and a site visit that included interviews and debriefings. Forty-two simulation centers worldwide participated in this study, the results of which show that despite enormous interest and enthusiasm in the health care community, use of simulation in health care education is limited to specific areas and is not a budgeted item in many institutions. Absence of a sustainable business model, as well as sufficient financial support in terms of budget, infrastructure, manpower, research, and scholarly activities, slows down the movement of simulation. Specific recommendations are made based on current findings to support simulation in the next developmental stages.

  5. INTERNATIONAL SURVEY OF PUBLICATIONS IN INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS: RISING THROUGH THE BASE OF WEB SCIENCE

    OpenAIRE

    Carpes, Aletéia de Moura; UFSM; Velter, Aline Nadalin; UFSM; Scherer, Flavia Luciane; UFSM; Lütz, Carolina; UFSM

    2011-01-01

    Internationalization is an alternative to business growth, allowing its exposure to international standards of products, technologies and management methods, generating significant returns for domestic transactions (STAL, 2010). The evolution of commercial transactions between the countries have brought a lot of issues to be understood, that seek to check the reflection of international activity in the individual, company and nation experiencing this context of globalization. This article was...

  6. Social Media in Health Science Education: An International Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Elizabeth; Cutts, Emily; Kavikondala, Sushma; Salcedo, Alejandra; D'Souza, Karan; Hernandez-Torre, Martin; Anderson, Claire; Tiwari, Agnes; Ho, Kendall; Last, Jason

    2017-01-04

    Social media is an asset that higher education students can use for an array of purposes. Studies have shown the merits of social media use in educational settings; however, its adoption in health science education has been slow, and the contributing reasons remain unclear. This multidisciplinary study aimed to examine health science students' opinions on the use of social media in health science education and identify factors that may discourage its use. Data were collected from the Universitas 21 "Use of social media in health education" survey, distributed electronically among the health science staff and students from 8 universities in 7 countries. The 1640 student respondents were grouped as users or nonusers based on their reported frequency of social media use in their education. Of the 1640 respondents, 1343 (81.89%) use social media in their education. Only 462 of the 1320 (35.00%) respondents have received specific social media training, and of those who have not, the majority (64.9%, 608/936) would like the opportunity. Users and nonusers reported the same 3 factors as the top barriers to their use of social media: uncertainty on policies, concerns about professionalism, and lack of support from the department. Nonusers reported all the barriers more frequently and almost half of nonusers reported not knowing how to incorporate social media into their learning. Among users, more than one fifth (20.5%, 50/243) of students who use social media "almost always" reported sharing clinical images without explicit permission. Our global, interdisciplinary study demonstrates that a significant number of students across all health science disciplines self-reported sharing clinical images inappropriately, and thus request the need for policies and training specific to social media use in health science education. ©Elizabeth O'Sullivan, Emily Cutts, Sushma Kavikondala, Alejandra Salcedo, Karan D'Souza, Martin Hernandez-Torre, Claire Anderson, Agnes Tiwari, Kendall

  7. Status of simulation in health care education: an international survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qayumi K

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Karim Qayumi,1 George Pachev,2 Bin Zheng,3 Amitai Ziv,4 Valentyna Koval,1 Sadia Badiei,5 Adam Cheng6 1Center of Excellence for Simulation Education and Innovation, Department of Surgery, 2Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 3Surgical Simulation Research Laboratory, Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada; 4Israel Center for Medical Simulation, Chaim Sheba Medical Center and Sackler Medical School, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel; 5Centre of Excellence for Simulation Education and Innovation, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 6KidSIM-ASPIRE Simulation Research Program, Alberta Children’s Hospital, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, CanadaAbstract: Simulation is rapidly penetrating the terrain of health care education and has gained growing acceptance as an educational method and patient safety tool. Despite this, the state of simulation in health care education has not yet been evaluated on a global scale. In this project, we studied the global status of simulation in health care education by determining the degree of financial support, infrastructure, manpower, information technology capabilities, engagement of groups of learners, and research and scholarly activities, as well as the barriers, strengths, opportunities for growth, and other aspects of simulation in health care education. We utilized a two-stage process, including an online survey and a site visit that included interviews and debriefings. Forty-two simulation centers worldwide participated in this study, the results of which show that despite enormous interest and enthusiasm in the health care community, use of simulation in health care education is limited to specific areas and is not a budgeted item in many institutions. Absence of a sustainable business model, as well as sufficient financial support in terms of budget, infrastructure

  8. A microbial survey of the International Space Station (ISS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenna M. Lang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Modern advances in sequencing technology have enabled the census of microbial members of many natural ecosystems. Recently, attention is increasingly being paid to the microbial residents of human-made, built ecosystems, both private (homes and public (subways, office buildings, and hospitals. Here, we report results of the characterization of the microbial ecology of a singular built environment, the International Space Station (ISS. This ISS sampling involved the collection and microbial analysis (via 16S rDNA PCR of 15 surfaces sampled by swabs onboard the ISS. This sampling was a component of Project MERCCURI (Microbial Ecology Research Combining Citizen and University Researchers on ISS. Learning more about the microbial inhabitants of the “buildings” in which we travel through space will take on increasing importance, as plans for human exploration continue, with the possibility of colonization of other planets and moons. Results Sterile swabs were used to sample 15 surfaces onboard the ISS. The sites sampled were designed to be analogous to samples collected for (1 the Wildlife of Our Homes project and (2 a study of cell phones and shoes that were concurrently being collected for another component of Project MERCCURI. Sequencing of the 16S rDNA genes amplified from DNA extracted from each swab was used to produce a census of the microbes present on each surface sampled. We compared the microbes found on the ISS swabs to those from both homes on Earth and data from the Human Microbiome Project. Conclusions While significantly different from homes on Earth and the Human Microbiome Project samples analyzed here, the microbial community composition on the ISS was more similar to home surfaces than to the human microbiome samples. The ISS surfaces are species-rich with 1,036–4,294 operational taxonomic units (OTUs per sample. There was no discernible biogeography of microbes on the 15 ISS surfaces, although this may be a

  9. Survey indicated that core outcome set development is increasingly including patients, being conducted internationally and using Delphi surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggane, Alice M; Brading, Lucy; Ravaud, Philippe; Young, Bridget; Williamson, Paula R

    2018-02-17

    There are numerous challenges in including patients in a core outcome set (COS) study, these can vary depending on the patient group. This study describes current efforts to include patients in the development of COS, with the aim of identifying areas for further improvement and study. Using the COMET database, corresponding authors of COS projects registered or published from 1 January 2013 to 2 February 2017 were invited via a personalised email to participate in a short online survey. The survey and emails were constructed to maximise the response rate by following the academic literature on enhancing survey responses. Personalised reminder emails were sent to non-responders. This survey explored the frequency of patient input in COS studies, who was involved, what methods were used and whether or not the COS development was international. One hundred and ninety-two COS developers were sent the survey. Responses were collected from 21 February 2017 until 7 May 2017. One hundred and forty-six unique developers responded, yielding a 76% response rate and data in relation to 195 unique COSs (as some developers had worked on multiple COSs). Of focus here are their responses regarding 162 COSs at the published, completed or ongoing stages of development. Inclusion of patient participants was indicated in 87% (141/162) of COSs in the published completed or ongoing stages and over 94% (65/69) of ongoing COS projects. Nearly half (65/135) of COSs included patient participants from two or more countries and 22% (30/135) included patient participants from five or more countries. The Delphi survey was reported as being used singularly or in combination with other methods in 85% (119/140) of projects. Almost a quarter (16/65) of ongoing studies reported using a combination of qualitative interviews, Delphi survey and consensus meeting. These findings indicated that the Delphi survey is the most popular method of facilitating patient participation, while the combination of

  10. International Students of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences: A Survey about Their Needs and Difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samouei, Rahele; Zamani, Ahmad Reza; Loghmani, Amir; Nasiri, Hamid; Tavakoli, Mariam

    2013-01-01

    none declared. International students experience difficult situations in a foreign country that may intensify other problems, which are expected in these situations and may have harmful effects on the potential function of students. As the main problems of international students may vary in different situations, the aim of this study was to investigate the main problems of international students in Iran. In this cross sectional survey, all international students in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences who were in Iran during 2006-2007 were evaluated by a questionnaire consisting of six scoops of educational, psychological, supporting-communication, familial, economical and sociocultural. Problems referred to sociocultural scope had greater mean (2.44) followed by communication problems (2.30) and economical problems (2.16). We suggest that consulting centers should employ experts familiar with international students problems capable of communicating well with international students.

  11. The International Social Survey Programme (ISSP): A Tool for Teaching with an International Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, Sean R.; Yodanis, Carrie L.

    2004-01-01

    As American-trained sociologists teaching Swiss students, they had to broaden their U.S.-centered sociological perspective in the classroom. In courses on statistics and research methods, social inequality, economic sociology, sociology of the family, and sociology of work, they needed to find international examples and data that they could use to…

  12. Sampling bias in an international internet survey of diversion programs in the criminal justice system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartford, Kathleen; Carey, Robert; Mendonca, James

    2007-03-01

    Despite advances in the storage and retrieval of information within health care systems, health researchers conducting surveys for evaluations still face technical barriers that may lead to sampling bias. The authors describe their experience in administering a Web-based, international survey to English-speaking countries. Identifying the sample was a multistage effort involving (a) searching for published e-mail addresses, (b) conducting Web searches for publicly funded agencies, and (c) performing literature searches, personal contacts, and extensive Internet searches for individuals. After pretesting, the survey was converted into an electronic format accessible by multiple Web browsers. Sampling bias arose from (a) system incompatibility, which did not allow potential respondents to open the survey, (b) varying institutional gate-keeping policies that "recognized" the unsolicited survey as spam, (c) culturally unique program terminology, which confused some respondents, and (d) incomplete sampling frames. Solutions are offered to the first three problems, and the authors note that sampling bias remains a crucial problem.

  13. Global Connectedness and Global Migration: Insights from the International Changing Academic Profession Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinn, Michelle K.; Ratkovic, Snežana; Wolhunter, Charl C.

    2013-01-01

    The Changing Academic Profession (CAP) international survey was designed in part to consider the effects of globalization on the work context and activities of academics in 19 countries or regions around the world. This paper draws from a subset of these data to explore the extent to which academics are globally connected in their research and…

  14. The OECD and Educational Policy Reform: International Surveys, Governance, and Policy Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volante, Louis; Fazio, Xavier; Ritzen, Jo

    2017-01-01

    Over the past 50 years, the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) has increasingly influenced the nature and scope of education policies in primary, secondary, and tertiary sectors around the world. Policy suggestions in these sectors primarily stem from the results of their various international surveys such as the…

  15. Towards the development of an outcome instrument for spinal trauma : An international survey of spinal surgeons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oner, F. Cumhur; Sadiqi, Said; Lehr, A. Mechteld; Dvorak, Marcel F.; Aarabi, Bizhan; Chapman, Jens R.; Fehlings, Michael G.; Kandziora, Frank; Rajasekaran, S.; Vaccaro, Alexander R.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN.: International web-based survey. OBJECTIVE.: To identify the most relevant aspects of human function and health status from the perspective of health care professionals involved in the treatment of spinal trauma patients. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA.: There is no universally accepted

  16. School Psychology in Egypt: Results of the 2008 International School Psychology Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimerson, Shane R.; Alghorani, Mohammad Adnan; Darweish, Abdel-Hameed; Abdelaziz, Mahmoud

    2010-01-01

    The International School Psychology Survey (ISPS) was used to gather information about the characteristics, training, roles, activities, preferences, research interests and the challenges experienced by school psychology specialists in Egypt. To the degree that the data are representative of the school psychology specialists Egypt, it appears that…

  17. Teaching and Learning International Survey (TALIS) 2013: U.S. Technical Report. NCES 2015-010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strizek, Gregory A.; Tourkin, Steve; Erberber, Ebru

    2014-01-01

    This technical report is designed to provide researchers with an overview of the design and implementation of the Teaching and Learning International Survey (TALIS) 2013. This information is meant to supplement that presented in OECD publications by describing those aspects of TALIS 2013 that are unique to the United States. Chapter 2 provides…

  18. The International School Psychology Survey. Data from Australia, China, Germany, Italy and Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimerson, Shane R.; Graydon, Kelly; Yuen, Mantak; Lam, Shui-Fong; Thurm, Jorg-Michael; Klueva, Nadejda; Coyne, Julia H.; Loprete, Louis; Phillips, Jim

    2006-01-01

    Using the International School Psychology Survey (ISPS) this study aims to advance our knowledge of the characteristics, training, roles and responsibilities, challenges and research interests of school psychologists around the world. Data are presented from five countries; Australia, China (Hong Kong), Germany, Italy and Russia. The ISPS…

  19. Design and Testing of 100 mK High-voltage Electrodes for AEgIS (Proc. 25th ICEC & ICMC2014 conference)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derking, J.H.; Liberadzka, Joanna; Koettig, T.; Bremer, J.

    2015-01-01

    The AEgIS (Antimatter Experiment: Gravity, Interferometry, Spectroscopy) experiment at CERN has as main goal to perform the first direct measurement of the Earth's gravitational acceleration on antihydrogen atoms within 1% precision. To reach this precision, the antihydrogen should be cooled down to

  20. Advancing Nursing Informatics in the Next Decade: Recommendations from an International Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topaz, Maxim; Ronquillo, Charlene; Peltonen, Laura-Maria; Pruinelli, Lisiane; Sarmiento, Raymond Francis; Badger, Martha K; Ali, Samira; Lewis, Adrienne; Georgsson, Mattias; Jeon, Eunjoo; Tayaben, Jude L; Kuo, Chiu-Hsiang; Islam, Tasneem; Sommer, Janine; Jung, Hyunggu; Eler, Gabrielle Jacklin; Alhuwail, Dari

    2016-01-01

    In the summer of 2015, the International Medical Informatics Association Nursing Informatics Special Interest Group (IMIA NISIG) Student Working Group developed and distributed an international survey of current and future trends in nursing informatics. The survey was developed based on current literature on nursing informatics trends and translated into six languages. Respondents were from 31 different countries in Asia, Africa, North and Central America, South America, Europe, and Australia. This paper presents the results of responses to the survey question: "What should be done (at a country or organizational level) to advance nursing informatics in the next 5-10 years?" (n responders = 272). Using thematic qualitative analysis, responses were grouped into five key themes: 1) Education and training; 2) Research; 3) Practice; 4) Visibility; and 5) Collaboration and integration. We also provide actionable recommendations for advancing nursing informatics in the next decade.

  1. Survey of Careers and Achievements on Delegates in JSRT International Delegation Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Masato; Tanaka, Rie; Matsubara, Kosuke; Morioka, Shigeaki; Tsujioka, Katsumi; Arimura, Hidetaka; Ueda, Katsuhiko; Ogura, Akio; Miyati, Tosiaki

    Japanese society of radiological technology (JSRT) categorizes three international delegation projects; short-term studying abroad program (STSAP), international academic society visit program (overseas) (IASVP), and international internship visit program (Stanford University) (IIVP) for driving globalization of JSRT. In this survey, we conducted a questionnaire evaluating effectiveness of the international delegations. The survey covered 50 delegates of STSAP, 180 delegates of IASVP, and 100 delegates of IIVP. This survey includes detailed histories of career, current position, academic articles, and presentations as a first presenter before and on, and after each program. We categorized into six groups (change career, promoted in a position in hospital, kept a current position in hospital, promoted in a position in university, kept a current position in university, and others) in three programs. The response rate is approximately 58% (191/330 delegators). In all programs, almost all the delegates were radiological technologists in the hospital. They had reported a lot of academic articles and made a lot of presentations, and promoted in the hospital and/or university. STSAP, IASVP and IIVP were descending order of the average number of the articles as a first author and presentations as a first presenter. They published more the academic articles in Japanese than in English compared to JJRT and RPT. Therefore, research achievements and human resource conducted by this project provide great technologists and technique, and education. For further JRST globalization, it is desirable that we can continue these international delegations and verify the effectiveness.

  2. Perspectives on the role of the speech and language therapist in palliative care: An international survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Aoife C; Walshe, Margaret

    2015-09-01

    Speech and language therapists can improve the quality of life of people receiving palliative care through the management of communication and swallowing difficulties (dysphagia). However, their role in this domain is poorly defined and little is understood about the current international professional practice in this field. To examine how speech and language therapists perceive their role in the delivery of palliative care to clients, to discover current international speech and language therapist practices and to explore the similarities and differences in speech and language therapists' practice in palliative care internationally. This will inform professional clinical guidelines and practice in this area. Anonymous, non-experimental, cross-sectional survey design. Speech and language therapists working with adult and paediatric palliative care populations in Republic of Ireland, United Kingdom, United States, Canada, Australia and New Zealand where the speech and language therapist profession is well established. Purposive and snowball sampling were used to recruit participants internationally using gatekeepers. An online survey was disseminated using Survey Monkey (http://www.surveymonkey.com). A total of 322 speech and language therapists responded to the survey. Speech and language therapist practices in palliative care were similar across continents. Current speech and language therapist practices along with barriers and facilitators to practice were identified. The need for a speech and language therapist professional position paper on this topic was emphasised by respondents. Internationally, speech and language therapists believe they have a role in palliative care. The speech and language therapist respondents highlighted that this area of practice is under-resourced, under-acknowledged and poorly developed. They highlighted the need for additional research as well as specialist training and education for speech and language therapists and other

  3. INTERNAL REPAIR OF GAS PIPLINES SURVEY OF OPERATOR EXPERIENCE AND INDUSTRY NEEDS REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ian D. Harris

    2003-09-01

    A repair method that can be applied from the inside of a gas transmission pipeline (i.e., a trenchless repair) is an attractive alternative to conventional repair methods since the need to excavate the pipeline is precluded. This is particularly true for pipelines in environmentally sensitive and highly populated areas. The objectives of the project are to evaluate, develop, demonstrate, and validate internal repair methods for pipelines; develop a functional specification for an internal pipeline repair system; and prepare a recommended practice for internal repair of pipelines. The purpose of this survey is to better understand the needs and performance requirements of the natural gas transmission industry regarding internal repair. A total of fifty-six surveys were sent to pipeline operators. A total of twenty completed surveys were returned, representing a 36% response rate, which is considered very good given the fact that tailored surveys are known in the marketing industry to seldom attract more than a 10% response rate. The twenty survey responses produced the following principal conclusions: (1) Use of internal weld repair is most attractive for river crossings, under other bodies of water (e.g., lakes and swamps) in difficult soil conditions, under highways, under congested intersections, and under railway crossings. All these areas tend to be very difficult and very costly if, and where, conventional excavated repairs may be currently used. (2) Internal pipe repair offers a strong potential advantage to the high cost of horizontal direct drilling (HDD) when a new bore must be created to solve a leak or other problem in a water/river crossing. (3) The typical travel distances required can be divided into three distinct groups: up to 305 m (1,000 ft.); between 305 m and 610 m (1,000 ft. and 2,000 ft.); and beyond 914 m (3,000 ft.). In concept, these groups require pig-based systems; despooled umbilical systems could be considered for the first two groups

  4. The International Per Oral Endoscopic Myotomy Survey (IPOEMS): a snapshot of the global POEM experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavropoulos, Stavros N; Modayil, Rani J; Friedel, David; Savides, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    Per oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) represents a Natural Orifice Transluminal Endoscopic Surgery (NOTES) approach to Heller myotomy. Even though we are now entering an exponential phase of growth with a large number of centers interested in POEM, published data to guide them are limited. As part of the July 2012 NOSCAR meeting, a conference was organized to review POEM and develop a consensus document. Authors SNS and TS who chaired the NOSCAR panel recognized the dearth of published data, which also may lag the rapid developments in POEM. Therefore, they undertook a survey of early POEM adopters around the world to rapidly obtain global, extensive, and current data on POEM. The raw survey data were made available to NOSCAR panel participants to assist with their presentations. We summarize the salient findings of the survey. A comprehensive POEM survey was created and tested. The final survey instrument consisted of 197 questions that covered all aspects of POEM, including operator discipline, prior training, patient selection, setting, technique preference, results, adverse events, regulatory requirements, and perspectives on the future. An automated online response collector was used. The International Per Oral Endoscopic Myotomy Survey (IPOEMS) involved 16 expert centers, 7 in North America, 5 in Asia, 4 in Europe, including all high-volume centers (≥30 POEMs per center), as of July 2012. These centers had performed 841 POEMs. There were modest variations among centers in technique and periprocedural management, but all centers uniformly reported excellent efficacy and safety outcomes. The international POEM survey provides a "global snapshot" of the experience of early adopters. The excellent outcomes over a large cumulative volume of procedures are in line with those of published small series and lend further support to the notion that POEM represents a paradigm shift in the treatment of achalasia.

  5. Monitoring Countries in a Changing World: A New Look at DIF in International Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwitser, Robert J; Glaser, S Sjoerd F; Maris, Gunter

    2017-03-01

    This paper discusses the issue of differential item functioning (DIF) in international surveys. DIF is likely to occur in international surveys. What is needed is a statistical approach that takes DIF into account, while at the same time allowing for meaningful comparisons between countries. Some existing approaches are discussed and an alternative is provided. The core of this alternative approach is to define the construct as a large set of items, and to report in terms of summary statistics. Since the data are incomplete, measurement models are used to complete the incomplete data. For that purpose, different models can be used across countries. The method is illustrated with PISA's reading literacy data. The results indicate that this approach fits the data better than the current PISA methodology; however, the league tables are nearly identical. The implications for monitoring changes over time are discussed.

  6. Morbidity and mortality conference: a survey of academic internal medicine departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlander, Jay D; Fincke, B Graeme

    2003-08-01

    This study sought to determine the prevalence and characteristics of morbidity and mortality conferences (M&MCs) in U.S. internal medicine training programs. Two hundred ninety-five of 416 (71%) surveys were returned. Ninety percent of programs have an M&MC. Most meet monthly, have a designated leader, and entail case discussions of 3 or fewer patients. Cases are selected on the basis of unexpected bad outcomes, teaching value, and to a lesser extent, suspected medical error. Two thirds of the sites use M&MCs to meet administrative requirements for quality assurance. M&MC, while prevalent in internal medicine training programs, has a heterogeneity of focus. Hence, the goals and role of the conference, as judged by this survey, do not appear to be well defined and may warrant further clarification.

  7. The best dialysis therapy? Results from an international survey among nephrology professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Ledebo, Ingrid; Ronco, Claudio

    2008-01-01

    Background. There is little evidence for superior outcome of one dialysis therapy versus another. Still, nephrologists have to prescribe dialysis every day. It is therefore of interest to ascertain the opinion among nephrology professionals regarding which therapy they consider to be the best and to compare this to reality. Methods. We designed a survey addressing these questions and distributed it at five international dialysis and nephrology congresses during 2007. Results. Responses were c...

  8. Results of the international survey on: 'Surveillance and diagnostic practices in nuclear power plants'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    An international survey has been conducted by the organizers of the meeting on the use of surveillance systems for the nuclear steam supply systems. The questionnaire prepared consisted of four parts: The surveillance systems that you use; the organisation of the surveillance on your reactor; the experiences gained from surveillance systems; how do you perceive surveillance? Forty-two answers have been received, and the results of responses received to the questionnaire are summarized. (K.A.)

  9. Business partnering as a complement to the accountant’s other roles: International survey evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, P.; Dart, E.

    2013-01-01

    Cases involving change towards a more strongly business-oriented, or business partnering, role for accountants have been documented but evidence of the extent of such change more widely is sparse and indicates limited adoption of the role in practice. Extending the approach of Mouritsen (1996) based on the importance attached to accountants’ activities and using data from an international survey of over 3,000 professionally qualified management accountants, it is found that the importance of ...

  10. Business Partnering as a complement to accountant's other roles: International survey evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, Philip; Dart, Eleanor

    2013-01-01

    Cases involving change towards a more strongly business-oriented, or business partnering, role for accountants have been documented but evidence of the extent of such change more widely is sparse and indicates limited adoption of the role in practice. Extending the approach of Mouritsen (1996) based on the importance attached to accountants’ activities and using data from an international survey of over 3,000 professionally qualified management accountants, it is found that the importance of...

  11. An International Survey of Veterinary Students to Assess Their Use of Online Learning Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gledhill, Laura; Dale, Vicki H M; Powney, Sonya; Gaitskell-Phillips, Gemma H L; Short, Nick R M

    Today's veterinary students have access to a wide range of online resources that support self-directed learning. To develop a benchmark of current global student practice in e-learning, this study measured self-reported access to, and use of, these resources by students internationally. An online survey was designed and promoted via veterinary student mailing lists and international organizations, resulting in 1,070 responses. Analysis of survey data indicated that students now use online resources in a wide range of ways to support their learning. Students reported that access to online veterinary learning resources was now integral to their studies. Almost all students reported using open educational resources (OERs). Ownership of smartphones was widespread, and the majority of respondents agreed that the use of mobile devices, or m-learning, was essential. Social media were highlighted as important for collaborating with peers and sharing knowledge. Constraints to e-learning principally related to poor or absent Internet access and limited institutional provision of computer facilities. There was significant geographical variation, with students from less developed countries disadvantaged by limited access to technology and networks. In conclusion, the survey provides an international benchmark on the range and diversity in terms of access to, and use of, online learning resources by veterinary students globally. It also highlights the inequalities of access among students in different parts of the world.

  12. Establishing a standard definition for child overweight and obesity worldwide: international survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Tim J; Bellizzi, Mary C; Flegal, Katherine M; Dietz, William H

    2000-01-01

    Objective To develop an internationally acceptable definition of child overweight and obesity, specifying the measurement, the reference population, and the age and sex specific cut off points. Design International survey of six large nationally representative cross sectional growth studies. Setting Brazil, Great Britain, Hong Kong, the Netherlands, Singapore, and the United States. Subjects 97 876 males and 94 851 females from birth to 25 years of age. Main outcome measure Body mass index (weight/height2). Results For each of the surveys, centile curves were drawn that at age 18 years passed through the widely used cut off points of 25 and 30 kg/m2 for adult overweight and obesity. The resulting curves were averaged to provide age and sex specific cut off points from 2-18 years. Conclusions The proposed cut off points, which are less arbitrary and more internationally based than current alternatives, should help to provide internationally comparable prevalence rates of overweight and obesity in children. PMID:10797032

  13. A national survey of international electives for medical students in Japan: 2009-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishigori, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Osamu; Sugimoto, Naomi; Kitamura, Kiyoshi; McMahon, Graham T

    2012-01-01

    International electives can provide experiences for medical students to learn about health systems and foster critical self-reflection. So far, little is known about the status of Japanese students' engagement in international electives. We sought to provide information about the internationalization of Japanese medical education by clarifying the current situations of international electives. We undertook a cross-sectional national 17-item questionnaire survey of program officers in all medical schools in Japan in February 2010. Sixty-five (81.3%) of 80 Japanese medical schools responded to the questionnaire. 462 Japanese medical students (3% of all students in their clinical years) travelled to North America (45.5%), Asia (25.0%), or Western Europe (24.4%) to study abroad. The number of students who participated in international electives was significantly increased when academic credit was available (median 6 vs. 1, p < 0.001) and institutional affiliations were present (median 7 vs. 2 students, p < 0.001). Most students were evaluated by means of written assignment on return. About 3% of Japanese medical students participate in international clinical exchanges. Academic credit and institutional affiliations appear to promote greater utilization of international exchange opportunities.

  14. A National Survey of U.S. Dental Students' Experiences with International Service Trips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, R Frederick; Wong, Chloe A; Woodmansey, Karl F; Rowland, Brianna; Horne, Steven O; Seymour, Brittany

    2018-04-01

    Globalization, along with the increasing prevalence of non-communicable diseases, their risk factors, and poor oral health, demands global approaches to oral health care. Trained health care workers' providing volunteer services abroad is one model used for improving access to dental services for some communities. Currently, little is known about U.S. dental student involvement in international clinical service volunteerism. The aim of this exploratory study was to capture national survey data from predoctoral dental students about their interest in and experience with global health service trips. The survey sought to assess students' past experiences and current and future interest in programs providing dental and/or medical services in order to lay the foundation for further research. A 12-question web-based survey was distributed in May 2017 to 22,930 students enrolled in U.S. dental schools. A total of 1,555 students responded, for a response rate of 7%. Respondents were evenly distributed across the four academic years. Approximately 22% (n=342) of the respondents had already participated in a service trip experience, 83% reported interest in a service trip while in school, and 92% were interested after graduation. Reported motivations for international trips included the desire to care for the underserved and to obtain a more global view of health and disease. Concerns were expressed regarding costs and time constraints. This study provided preliminary, exploratory data on dental student engagement with international service trips. Both interest and participation in international service trips among responding students were high, reflecting current trends in both dentistry and medicine. Dental education may have an opportunity to guide student engagement in more sustainable and ethical volunteering in the U.S. and abroad.

  15. State of global pediatric neurosurgery outreach: survey by the International Education Subcommittee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Matthew C; Rocque, Brandon G; Singhal, Ash; Ridder, Thomas; Pattisapu, Jogi V; Johnston, James M

    2017-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Neurosurgical services are increasingly recognized as essential components of surgical care worldwide. The degree of interest among neurosurgeons regarding international work, and the barriers to involvement in global neurosurgical outreach, are largely unexplored. The authors distributed a survey to members of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons/Congress of Neurological Surgeons (AANS/CNS) Joint Section on Pediatric Neurosurgery to assess the state of global outreach among its members and to identify barriers to involvement. METHODS An internet-based questionnaire was developed by the International Education Subcommittee of the AANS/CNS Joint Section on Pediatric Neurosurgery and distributed to pediatric neurosurgeons via the AANS/CNS Joint Section email contact list. Participants were surveyed on their involvement in global neurosurgical outreach, geographic location, nature of the participation, and barriers to further involvement. RESULTS A 35.3% response rate was obtained, with 116 respondents completing the survey. Sixty-one percent have performed or taught neurosurgery in a developing country, and 49% travel at least annually. Africa was the most common region (54%), followed by South America (30%), through 29 separate organizing entities. Hydrocephalus was the most commonly treated condition (88%), followed by spinal dysraphism (74%), and tumor (68%). Most respondents obtained follow-up through communications from local surgeons (77%). Seventy-one percent believed the international experience improved their practice, and 74% were very or extremely interested in working elsewhere. Interference with current practice (61%), cost (44%), and difficulty identifying international partners (43%) were the most commonly cited barriers to participation. CONCLUSIONS Any coordinated effort to expand global neurosurgical capacity begins with appreciation for the current state of outreach efforts. Increasing participation in global outreach will

  16. State of Global Pediatric Neurosurgery Outreach: Survey by the International Education Subcommittee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Matthew C.; Rocque, Brandon G.; Singhal, Ash; Ridder, Tom; Pattisapu, Jogi V.; Johnston, James M.

    2017-01-01

    Object Neurosurgical services are increasingly recognized as essential components of surgical care worldwide. Degree of interest among neurosurgeons regarding international work, and barriers to involvement in global neurosurgical outreach, are largely unexplored. We distributed a survey to members of the AANS/CNS Joint Section on Pediatric Neurosurgery to assess the state of global outreach among its members and identify barriers to involvement. Methods An internet-based questionnaire was developed by the International Education Subcommittee of the AANS/CNS Joint Section on Pediatric Neurosurgery, and distributed to pediatric neurosurgeons via the AANS/CNS Joint Section email contact list. Participants were surveyed on involvement in global neurosurgical outreach, geographic location, nature of participation, and barriers to further involvement. Results A 35.3% response rate was obtained, with 116 respondents completed the survey. 61% performed or taught neurosurgery in a developing country, 49% traveling at least annually. Africa was the most common region (54%), followed by South America (30%), through 29 separate organizing entities. Hydrocephalus was the most commonly treated condition (88%), followed by spinal dysraphism (74%) and tumor (68%). Most respondents obtained follow-up through communication from local surgeons (77%). 71% believed the international experience improved their practice, and 74% were very or extremely interested in working elsewhere. Interference with current practice (61%), cost (44%), and difficulty identifying international partners (43%) were the most commonly cited barriers to participation. Conclusion Any coordinated effort to expand global neurosurgical capacity begins with appreciation for the current state of outreach efforts. Increasing participation in global outreach will require addressing both real and perceived barriers to involvement. Creation and curation of a centralized online database of ongoing projects to facilitate

  17. Why not nephrology? A survey of US internal medicine subspecialty fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhaveri, Kenar D; Sparks, Matthew A; Shah, Hitesh H; Khan, Seyyar; Chawla, Arun; Desai, Tejas; Iglesia, Edward; Ferris, Maria; Parker, Mark G; Kohan, Donald E

    2013-04-01

    There is a decreased interest in nephrology such that the number of trainees likely will not meet the upcoming workforce demands posed by the projected number of patients with kidney disease. We conducted a survey of US internal medicine subspecialty fellows in fields other than nephrology to determine why they did not choose nephrology. A web-based survey with multiple choice, yes/no, and open-ended questions was sent in summer 2011 to trainees reached through internal medicine subspecialty program directors. 714 fellows responded to the survey (11% response rate). All non-nephrology internal medicine subspecialties were represented, and 90% of respondents were from university-based programs. Of the respondents, 31% indicated that nephrology was the most difficult physiology course taught in medical school, and 26% had considered nephrology as a career choice. Nearly one-fourth of the respondents said they would have considered nephrology if the field had higher income or the subject were taught well during medical school and residency training. The top reasons for not choosing nephrology were the belief that patients with end-stage renal disease were too complicated, the lack of a mentor, and that there were insufficient procedures in nephrology. Most non-nephrology internal medicine subspecialty fellows never considered nephrology as a career choice. A significant proportion were dissuaded by factors such as the challenges of the patient population, lack of role models, lack of procedures, and perceived difficulty of the subject matter. Addressing these factors will require the concerted effort of nephrologists throughout the training community. Copyright © 2013 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Sviluppo di un'applicazione Web per la visualizzazione e l'analisi di dati dell'esperimento AEgIS

    CERN Document Server

    Damioli, Andrea Giovanni Battista

    The AEgIS Experiment at the CERN aims to verify the weak interaction principle for antimatter. This thesis presents a web application designed to simplify the analysis of physical data under the AEgIS experiment called "gAnWeb". This analysis can be run via command lines in a Unix Terminal, but a graphical interface can ensure a better user experience, ease the user training and improve the productivity. A web application is a smart way to implement the interface because it allows users to avoid installations, and centralizes all the possible modifications. This document explains the choices made during the development of this application and shows the design process that led to the final product.

  19. Nutrition education tools used in phenylketonuria: clinician, parent and patient perspectives from three international surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, L E; Helm, J R; Rocha, J C; Almeida, M F; Feillet, F; Link, R M; Gizewska, M

    2014-04-01

    Three international surveys were developed aiming to identify the current nutrition educational tools used in the management of phenylketonuria (PKU) and the perceived effectiveness of these tools by clinicians, parents and patients. The first two surveys were distributed through the Metabolic Dietitians ListServe (pno-metabl@listserv.cc.emory.edu), and the third survey was distributed by international clinics and the National PKU Alliance website (www.npkua.org). A total of 888 responses (S1, n = 88; S2, n = 81; S3, n = 719) were collected from all three surveys. The surveys represent participants from 17 countries, in Europe; North America (USA and Canada); Mexico; Argentina; Turkey; Australia; and Africa (Tunisia). A consistent decline in 'parents as role models' as an educational tool was observed starting at age 10 years. Patients responded they feel their families are the most effective form of education, whereas handouts were selected as the least effective educational tool by patients. Parents responded they feel the most effective educational tool is one-on-one counselling. Patients and parents show a desirable trend in wanting to attend group clinic, even in centres where this type of educational tool is not offered. There was a discrepancy between clinicians and patient views regarding the perceived effectiveness of the nutrition education tools. Future research is needed surrounding the impact nutrition education may have on improved dietary compliance in patients with PKU. © 2013 The Authors Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics © 2013 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  20. Contemporary training practices in elite British powerlifters: survey results from an international competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinton, Paul A; Lloyd, Ray; Agouris, Ioannis; Stewart, Arthur

    2009-03-01

    The primary objective of this study was to investigate current powerlifting training methods in light of anecdotal evidence purporting increased similarity with the explosive training practices of weightlifters. The study also assessed the prevalence of contemporary training practices frequently recommended for powerlifters in the popular literature. A 20-item survey was distributed to 32 elite British powerlifters at an International competition. The subject group included multiple national, international, and commonwealth champions and record holders. Based on 2007 competition results, the average Wilks score of the group was 450.26 +/- 34.7. The response rate for the surveys was 88% (28 of 32). The survey was sectioned into 6 areas of inquiry: a) repetition speed, b) explosive training load, c) resistance materials used, d) adjunct power training methods, e) exercise selection, and f) training organization. The results demonstrate that the majority of powerlifters train with the intention to explosively lift maximal and submaximal loads (79 and 82%, respectively). Results revealed that 39% of the lifters regularly used elastic bands and that 57% incorporated chains in their training. Evidence for convergence of training practices between powerlifters and weightlifters was found when 69% of the subjects reported using the Olympic lifts or their derivatives as part of their powerlifting training. Collectively, the results demonstrate that previous notions of how powerlifters train are outdated. Contemporary powerlifters incorporate a variety of training practices that are focused on developing both explosive and maximal strength.

  1. Career interest and perceptions of nephrology: A repeated cross-sectional survey of internal medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Michael N; Maynard, Sharon; Porter, Ivan; Kincaid, Hope; Jain, Deepika; Aslam, Nabeel

    2017-01-01

    Interest in nephrology careers among internal medicine residents in the United States is declining. Our objective was to assess the impact of the presence of a nephrology fellowship training program on perceptions and career interest in nephrology among internal medicine residents. A secondary objective was to identify commonly endorsed negative perceptions of nephrology among internal medicine residents. This was a repeated cross-sectional survey of internal medicine residents before (Group 1) and 3 years after (Group 2) the establishment of nephrology fellowship programs at two institutions. The primary outcome was the percentage of residents indicating nephrology as a career interest in Group 1 vs. Group 2. Secondary outcomes included the frequency that residents agreed with negative statements about nephrology. 131 (80.9%) of 162 residents completed the survey. 19 (14.8%) residents indicated interest in a nephrology career, with 8 (6.3%) indicating nephrology as their first choice. There was no difference in career interest in nephrology between residents who were exposed to nephrology fellows during residency training (Group 2) and residents who were not (Group 1). The most commonly endorsed negative perceptions of nephrology were: nephrology fellows have long hours/burdensome call (36 [28.1%] of residents agreed or strongly agreed), practicing nephrologists must take frequent/difficult call (35 [27.6%] agreed or strongly agreed), and nephrology has few opportunities for procedures (35 [27.3%] agreed or strongly agreed). More residents in Group 2 agreed that nephrology is poorly paid (8.9% in Group 1 vs. 20.8% in Group 2, P = 0.04), whereas more residents in Group 1 agreed that nephrologists must take frequent/difficult call (40.0% in Group 1 vs. 18.1% in Group 2, P = 0.02). The initiation of a nephrology fellowship program was not associated with an increase in internal medicine residents' interest in nephrology careers. Residents endorsed several negative

  2. [Inventory of training of internal medicine in France: Results of a national survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, M; Terrier, B; Mangin, O; Mouthon, L

    2017-05-01

    To make an inventory of training of Internal Medicine in France. This study was conducted between May and September 2015 with coordinators (interviews of 45minutes) of local Internal Medicine training and fellows (online questionnaire). All coordinators (n=28) responded to the interviews. Local training of Internal Medicine exists in 86% of regions (3.1±3.1hours/month) and an interregional training in all interregions (34.7±13.9hours/year). When excluding Île-de-France, no correlation between the number of teachers and the amount of lessons was noted (P=0.61). Of the 550 fellows in Internal Medicine in 2014-2015, 223 (41%) responded to the online questionnaire. Mean level was 5.5±2.7 semesters. The rate of satisfaction (1=very dissatisfied and 5=very satisfied) was 3.0±1.0 and 3.8±0.8 for regional and interregional teaching, respectively (Ponline, 66% wish to have a practical evaluation at the bedside and 70% in simulation centers. Finally, 91% of fellows support the establishment of a national program for the training of Internal Medicine. This survey states for the first time an inventory of training of Internal Medicine dedicated to fellows in France. This report highlights that fellows wish to have a national program, be further evaluated and have access to more interactive approach of teaching. Copyright © 2016 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Harmonizing Measures of Cognitive Performance Across International Surveys of Aging Using Item Response Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kitty S; Gross, Alden L; Pezzin, Liliana E; Brandt, Jason; Kasper, Judith D

    2015-12-01

    To harmonize measures of cognitive performance using item response theory (IRT) across two international aging studies. Data for persons ≥65 years from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS, N = 9,471) and the English Longitudinal Study of Aging (ELSA, N = 5,444). Cognitive performance measures varied (HRS fielded 25, ELSA 13); 9 were in common. Measurement precision was examined for IRT scores based on (a) common items, (b) common items adjusted for differential item functioning (DIF), and (c) DIF-adjusted all items. Three common items (day of date, immediate word recall, and delayed word recall) demonstrated DIF by survey. Adding survey-specific items improved precision but mainly for HRS respondents at lower cognitive levels. IRT offers a feasible strategy for harmonizing cognitive performance measures across other surveys and for other multi-item constructs of interest in studies of aging. Practical implications depend on sample distribution and the difficulty mix of in-common and survey-specific items. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Expertise, needs and challenges of medical educators: Results of an international web survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huwendiek, Sören; Mennin, Stewart; Dern, Peter; Ben-David, Miriam Friedman; Van Der Vleuten, Cees; Tönshoff, Burkhard; Nikendei, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about how medical educators perceive their own expertise, needs and challenges in relation to medical education. To survey an international community of medical educators with a focus on: (1) their expertise, (2) their need for training and (3) perceived challenges. A web-based survey comprising closed and open free-text questions was sent to 2200 persons on the mailing list of the Association for Medical Education in Europe. Of the 2200 medical educators invited to participate, 860 (39%) from 76 different countries took part in the survey. In general, their reported areas of expertise mainly comprised principles of teaching, communication skills training, stimulation of students in self-directed learning and student assessment. Respondents most often indicated a need for training with respect to development in medical-education-research methodology, computer-based training, curriculum evaluation and curriculum development. In the qualitative analysis of 1836 free-text responses concerning the main challenges faced, respondents referred to a lack of academic recognition, funding, faculty development, time for medical education issues and institutional support. The results of this survey indicate that medical educators face several challenges, with a particular need for more academic recognition, funding and academic qualifications in medical education.

  5. METHODS IN THE POST-METHODS ERA. REPORT ON AN INTERNATIONAL SURVEY ON LANGUAGE TEACHING METHODS'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Liu

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Do methods still have a place in 21" century language teaching? To answer this question, an international survey was conducted in the surnmer of 1999. A sample of 800 language teachers world-wide randomly drawn from 17,800 TESOLers were each given a 2-page survey. The return rate was 58.5% with the actual usable data set of448, which was analyzed by using both descriptive and inferential statistics. Among the ten commonly recognized teaching methods surveyed, both the Communicative Language Teaching Approach and an eclectic method seem to have the highest rate in familiarity, preference, and use. But when multiple factors, such as teaching contexts, instructional settings, learners' proficiency levels, class size, teaching experience and educational backgrounds of the teachers, and the status of being a native or nonnative English speaking professional were taken into consideration, various patterns and themes emerged. One interesting finding is that Grammar Translation is still used in EFL contexts, in larger classes, and with learners at low proficiency levels, though the ratio between the actual use of this method and teachers' preference does not match. Based on the results of the survey, a new theoretical framework is proposed to conceptualize language teaching methods in the post-methods era.

  6. Violence Against Women in Hong Kong: Results of the International Violence Against Women Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhours, Brigitte; Broadhurst, Roderic

    2015-11-01

    In Hong Kong, nearly 1,300 women participated by telephone in the International Violence Against Women Survey in 2006. One in five respondents had experienced violence since age 16. Sexual violence (13.4%) was more frequent than physical violence (11.7%). Women were more likely to be abused by men they knew (13.5%) than by strangers (8%). Compared with other surveyed countries, Hong Kong recorded among the lowest rates of violence by both intimate partners and non-partners. These results suggest that cultural influences linked to the interaction of modernization and some protective factors found in the adherence to traditional Chinese values are relevant. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Nutritional survey of an elderly Russian population. CARE International Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, C H; Posner, B M; Peterson, D E

    1994-01-01

    During March and April 1992, CARE International, with epidemiological support from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, conducted household surveys of pensioners 70 years of age or older in two Russian cities. The objectives of these studies were to assess survey feasibility, to report baseline nutritional data, and to determine if demographic identifiers on computerized government listings could be used to target nutritional aid toward the most needy among elderly people. Pensioners in each city were administered questionnaires regarding food consumption and financial and health status. We calculated scores for body mass index (BMI) and Nutritional Screening Initiative (NSI) Checklist (a tool for assessing the nutritional risk status of U.S. elderly). Median pension income was 410 roubles (about $4.00) per month. Forty-five percent of the participants had pensioners will be used for continuing assessment of the impact of economic restructuring in Russia upon elderly citizens.

  8. 5th International Conference on Engineering Surveying Brijuni, September 22-24, 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinaldo Paar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available 5th International Conference on Engineering Surveying was held on the Brijuni Islands from 22 to 24 September 2011. The conference organizers were the Department of Surveying Faculty of Civil Engineering at the Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava and the Institute for Applied Geodesy at the Faculty of Geodesy, University of Zagreb, with the FIG Commission 6. The conference was held under the patronage of the Ministry of Environmental Protection, Physical Planning and Construction of the Republic of Croatia. The conference took place in the Castrum Congress Hall of Hotel Neptun-Istra. The official language of the conference was English. The conference was attended by 70 representatives from Croatia, Slovenia, Serbia, Kosovo, Austria, Germany, Hungary, Greece, Czech Republic and Slovakia, and a total of 40 papers were presented.

  9. Morbidity and Mortality Conference: A Survey of Academic Internal Medicine Departments

    OpenAIRE

    Orlander, Jay D; Fincke, B Graeme

    2003-01-01

    This study sought to determine the prevalence and characteristics of morbidity and mortality conferences (M&MCs) in U.S. internal medicine training programs. Two hundred ninety-five of 416 (71%) surveys were returned. Ninety percent of programs have an M&MC. Most meet monthly, have a designated leader, and entail case discussions of 3 or fewer patients. Cases are selected on the basis of unexpected bad outcomes, teaching value, and to a lesser extent, suspected medical error. Two thirds of th...

  10. Continuing to Confront COPD International Surveys : comparison of patient and physician perceptions about COPD risk and management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menezes, Ana M.; Landis, Sarah H.; Han, MeiLan K.; Muellerova, Hana; Aisanov, Zaurbek; van der Molen, Thys; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Ichinose, Masakazu; Mannino, David M.; Davis, Kourtney J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Using data from the Continuing to Confront COPD International Physician and Patient Surveys, this paper describes physicians' attitudes and beliefs regarding chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) prognosis, and compares physician and patient perceptions with respect to COPD. Methods:

  11. Report of a mental health survey among Chinese international students at Yale University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xuesong; Han, Xuemei; Luo, Qianlai; Jacobs, Selby; Jean-Baptiste, Michel

    2013-01-01

    To examine the prevalence of depression and anxiety symptoms in Chinese international students, to identify factors that might be associated with these 2 symptom complexes, and to investigate their perception of mental health issues and counseling services. Chinese students (N = 130) at Yale University. Participants completed an anonymous online survey in fall 2009. Forty-five percent reported symptoms of depression, and 29% reported symptoms of anxiety. A self-evaluation of poor current health, a poor relationship with one's advisor, and a low exercise regimen were associated with a higher prevalence of depression and anxiety symptoms. Twenty-seven percent of responders were not aware of the availability of mental health and counseling services on campus. This study suggests that efforts should be made to improve the relationship between students and their advisors and to enhance the awareness of and the accessibility to mental health and counseling services to improve the mental health of Chinese international students.

  12. The updating of clinical practice guidelines: insights from an international survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Coello, Pablo; Martínez García, Laura; Carrasco, José Miguel; Solà, Ivan; Qureshi, Safia; Burgers, Jako S

    2011-09-13

    Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) have become increasingly popular, and the methodology to develop guidelines has evolved enormously. However, little attention has been given to the updating process, in contrast to the appraisal of the available literature. We conducted an international survey to identify current practices in CPG updating and explored the need to standardize and improve the methods. We developed a questionnaire (28 items) based on a review of the existing literature about guideline updating and expert comments. We carried out the survey between March and July 2009, and it was sent by email to 106 institutions: 69 members of the Guidelines International Network who declared that they developed CPGs; 30 institutions included in the U.S. National Guideline Clearinghouse database that published more than 20 CPGs; and 7 institutions selected by an expert committee. Forty-four institutions answered the questionnaire (42% response rate). In the final analysis, 39 completed questionnaires were included. Thirty-six institutions (92%) reported that they update their guidelines. Thirty-one institutions (86%) have a formal procedure for updating their guidelines, and 19 (53%) have a formal procedure for deciding when a guideline becomes out of date. Institutions describe the process as moderately rigorous (36%) or acknowledge that it could certainly be more rigorous (36%). Twenty-two institutions (61%) alert guideline users on their website when a guideline is older than three to five years or when there is a risk of being outdated. Twenty-five institutions (64%) support the concept of "living guidelines," which are continuously monitored and updated. Eighteen institutions (46%) have plans to design a protocol to improve their guideline-updating process, and 21 (54%) are willing to share resources with other organizations. Our study is the first to describe the process of updating CPGs among prominent guideline institutions across the world, providing a

  13. Linking Errors between Two Populations and Tests: A Case Study in International Surveys in Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Hastedt

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This simulation study was prompted by the current increased interest in linking national studies to international large-scale assessments (ILSAs such as IEA's TIMSS, IEA's PIRLS, and OECD's PISA. Linkage in this scenario is achieved by including items from the international assessments in the national assessments on the premise that the average achievement scores from the latter can be linked to the international metric. In addition to raising issues associated with different testing conditions, administrative procedures, and the like, this approach also poses psychometric challenges. This paper endeavors to shed some light on the effects that can be expected, the linkage errors in particular, by countries using this practice. The ILSA selected for this simulation study was IEA TIMSS 2011, and the three countries used as the national assessment cases were Botswana, Honduras, and Tunisia, all of which participated in TIMSS 2011. The items selected as items common to the simulated national tests and the international test came from the Grade 4 TIMSS 2011 mathematics items that IEA released into the public domain after completion of this assessment. The findings of the current study show that linkage errors seemed to achieve acceptable levels if 30 or more items were used for the linkage, although the errors were still significantly higher compared to the TIMSS' cutoffs. Comparison of the estimated country averages based on the simulated national surveys and the averages based on the international TIMSS assessment revealed only one instance across the three countries of the estimates approaching parity. Also, the percentages of students in these countries who actually reached the defined benchmarks on the TIMSS achievement scale differed significantly from the results based on TIMSS and the results for the simulated national assessments. As a conclusion, we advise against using groups of released items from international assessments in national

  14. INTERNAL EXTINCTION IN THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY LATE-TYPE GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Jungyeon; Park, Changbom

    2009-01-01

    We study internal extinction of late-type galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We find that the degree of internal extinction depends on both the concentration index c and K s -band absolute magnitude M K . We give simple fitting functions for internal extinction. In particular, we present analytic formulae giving the extinction-corrected magnitudes from the observed optical parameters. For example, the extinction-corrected r-band absolute magnitude can be obtained by M r,0 =-20.77 +(-1+√(1+4Δ(M r,obs +20.77+4.93Δ)))/2Δ, where Δ = 0.236{1.35(c - 2.48) 2 - 1.14} log(a/b), c = R 90 /R 50 is the the concentration index, and a/b is the isophotal axis ratio of the 25 mag arcsec -2 isophote in the i band. The 1σ error in M r,0 is 0.21 log(a/b). Late-type galaxies with very different inclinations are found to trace almost the same sequence in the (u - r)-M r diagram when our prescriptions for extinction correction are applied. We also find that (u - r) color can be a third independent parameter that determines the degree of internal extinction.

  15. Reconstructing trends in international migration with three questions in household surveys: Lessons from the MAFE project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Schoumaker

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Data on migration trends are crucially lacking in developing countries. The lack of basic information on migration contrasts sharply with the increasing importance of migration in the policy agenda of both sending and receiving countries. Objective: The general objectives of this paper are: to show how trends in international migration can be reconstructed with three questions in a household survey; to evaluate the precision of the estimates; and to test how sensitive the estimates are to several methodological choices and assumptions. Methods: Migration trends are reconstructed with event history models. The reconstruction uses data collected through migration surveys conducted in cities in three countries (Senegal, Democratic Republic of Congo, and Ghana as part of the MAFE (Migration between Africa and Europe project. Specifically, two types of data are used: simple data on the first migration of children of household heads, collected through household surveys, and full migration histories of children collected in biographic surveys. First, we evaluate the precision of our estimates using data collected in the household questionnaire. Next, the sensitivity of our results to different methodological choices and assumptions is evaluated. Results: Migration trends measured with simple data from household surveys are broadly consistent with results obtained from full migration histories. However, increases in migration trends tend to be underestimated with household data. Migration probabilities are also affected by large confidence intervals. Conclusions: Estimates using household data may be affected by large confidence intervals, and migrations trends are influenced by the simplifying assumptions that are made when using these data. Despite these limitations, estimates based on three simple questions provide useful information on migration levels and trends.

  16. 46 CFR 71.50-3 - Drydock examination, internal structural examination, underwater survey, and alternate hull exam...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., underwater survey, and alternate hull exam intervals. 71.50-3 Section 71.50-3 Shipping COAST GUARD...-3 Drydock examination, internal structural examination, underwater survey, and alternate hull exam... meet the conditions in paragraphs (c) through (f) of this section, it must undergo a drydock and...

  17. International electives in neurology training: a survey of US and Canadian program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Jennifer L; Coleman, Mary E; Engstrom, John W; Mateen, Farrah J

    2014-01-14

    To ascertain the current status of global health training and humanitarian relief opportunities in US and Canadian postgraduate neurology programs. There is a growing interest among North American trainees to pursue medical electives in low- and middle-income countries. Such training opportunities provide many educational and humanitarian benefits but also pose several challenges related to organization, human resources, funding, and trainee and patient safety. The current support and engagement of neurology postgraduate training programs for trainees to pursue international rotations is unknown. A survey was distributed to all program directors in the United States and Canada (December 2012-February 2013) through the American Academy of Neurology to assess the training opportunities, institutional partnerships, and support available for international neurology electives. Approximately half of responding programs (53%) allow residents to pursue global health-related electives, and 11% reported that at least 1 trainee participated in humanitarian relief during training (survey response rate 61%, 143/234 program directors). Canadian programs were more likely to allow residents to pursue international electives than US programs (10/11, 91% vs 65/129, 50%, p = 0.023). The number of trainees participating in international electives was low: 0%-9% of residents (55% of programs) and 10%-19% of residents (21% of programs). Lack of funding was the most commonly cited reason for residents not participating in global health electives. If funding was available, 93% of program directors stated there would be time for residents to participate. Most program directors (75%) were interested in further information on global health electives. In spite of high perceived interest, only half of US neurology training programs include international electives, mostly due to a reported lack of funding. By contrast, the majority of Canadian programs that responded allow international

  18. Feasibility survey on international cooperation for high efficiency energy conversion technology in fiscal 1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-01

    Following cooperative researches on fuel cell jointly conducted by NEDO and EGAT (Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand), the survey on international cooperation relating to high efficiency energy conversion technology was carried out for the ASEAN countries. The paper summed up the results of the survey. The study of the international cooperation is made for the following three items: a program for periodical exchange of information with EGAT, a project for cooperative research on phosphoric acid fuel cell in Indonesia, and a project for cooperative research with EGAT on electric power storage by advanced battery. In Malaysia, which is small in scale of state, part of the Ministry of Energy, Telecommunication and Posts is only in charge of the energy issue. Therefore, the situation is that they cannot answer well to many items of research/development cooperation brought in from Japan. The item of medium- and long-term developmental research in the Philippines is about the problems which are seen subsequently in the Manila metropolitan area where the problem of outage is being settled. Accordingly, it is essential to promote the cooperative research, well confirming policies and systems of the Ministry of Energy and the national electricity corporation.

  19. Burnout and distress among internal medicine program directors: results of a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Colin P; Halvorsen, Andrew J; Swenson, Sara L; McDonald, Furman S

    2013-08-01

    Physician burnout and distress has been described in national studies of practicing physicians, internal medicine (IM) residents, IM clerkship directors, and medical school deans. However, no comparable national data exist for IM residency program directors. To assess burnout and distress among IM residency program directors, and to evaluate relationships of distress with personal and program characteristics and perceptions regarding implementation and consequences of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) regulations. The 2010 Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine (APDIM) Annual Survey, developed by the APDIM Survey Committee, was sent in August 2010 to the 377 program directors with APDIM membership, representing 99.0 % of the 381 United States categorical IM residency programs. The 2010 APDIM Annual Survey included validated items on well-being and distress, including questions addressing quality of life, satisfaction with work-life balance, and burnout. Questions addressing personal and program characteristics and perceptions regarding implementation and consequences of ACGME regulations were also included. Of 377 eligible program directors, 282 (74.8 %) completed surveys. Among respondents, 12.4 % and 28.8 % rated their quality of life and satisfaction with work-life balance negatively, respectively. Also, 27.0 % reported emotional exhaustion, 10.4 % reported depersonalization, and 28.7 % reported overall burnout. These rates were lower than those reported previously in national studies of medical students, IM residents, practicing physicians, IM clerkship directors, and medical school deans. Aspects of distress were more common among younger program directors, women, and those reporting greater weekly work hours. Work-home conflicts were common and associated with all domains of distress, especially if not resolved in a manner effectively balancing work and home responsibilities. Associations with program characteristics

  20. Clinical preventive services in Guatemala: a cross-sectional survey of internal medicine physicians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan E Corral

    Full Text Available Guatemala is currently undergoing an epidemiologic transition. Preventive services are key to reducing the burden of non-communicable diseases, and smoking counseling and cessation are among the most cost-effective and wide-reaching strategies. Internal medicine physicians are fundamental to providing such services, and their knowledge is a cornerstone of non-communicable disease control.A national cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2011 to evaluate knowledge of clinical preventive services for non-communicable diseases. Interns, residents, and attending physicians of the internal medicine departments of all teaching hospitals in Guatemala completed a self-administered questionnaire. Participants' responses were contrasted with the Guatemalan Ministry of Health (MoH prevention guidelines and the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF recommendations. Analysis compared knowledge of recommendations within and between hospitals.In response to simulated patient scenarios, all services were recommended by more than half of physicians regardless of MoH or USPSTF recommendations. Prioritization was adequate according to the MoH guidelines but not including other potentially effective services (e.g. colorectal cancer and lipid disorder screenings. With the exception of colorectal and prostate cancer screening, less frequently recommended by interns, there was no difference in recommendation rates by level.Guatemalan internal medicine physicians' knowledge on preventive services recommendations for non-communicable diseases is limited, and prioritization did not reflect cost-effectiveness. Based on these data we recommend that preventive medicine training be strengthened and development of evidence-based guidelines for low-middle income countries be a priority.

  1. Towards the development of an outcome instrument for spinal trauma: an international survey of spinal surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oner, F Cumhur; Sadiqi, Said; Lehr, A Mechteld; Dvorak, Marcel F; Aarabi, Bizhan; Chapman, Jens R; Fehlings, Michael G; Kandziora, Frank; Rajasekaran, S; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2015-01-15

    International web-based survey. To identify the most relevant aspects of human function and health status from the perspective of health care professionals involved in the treatment of spinal trauma patients. There is no universally accepted outcome instrument available that is specifically designed or validated for spinal trauma patients, contributing to controversies related to the optimal treatment and evaluation of many types of spinal injuries. Therefore, the AOSpine Knowledge Forum Trauma aims to develop such an instrument using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) as its basis. Experts from the 5 AOSpine International world regions were asked to give their opinion on the relevance of a compilation of 143 ICF categories for spinal trauma patients on a 3-point scale: "not relevant," "probably relevant," or "definitely relevant." The responses were analyzed using frequency analysis. Possible differences in responses between the 5 world regions were analyzed with the Fisher exact test and descriptive statistics. Of the 895 invited AOSpine International members, 150 (16.8%) participated in this study. A total of 13 (9.1%) ICF categories were identified as definitely relevant by more than 80% of the participants. Most of these categories were related to the ICF component "activities and participation" (n = 8), followed by "body functions" (n = 4), and "body structures" (n = 1). Only some minor regional differences were observed in the pattern of answers. More than 80% of an international group of health care professionals experienced in the clinical care of adult spinal trauma patients indicated 13 of 143 ICF categories as definitely relevant to measure outcomes after spinal trauma. This study creates an evidence base to define a core set of ICF categories for outcome measurement in adult spinal trauma patients.

  2. National survey on internal quality control for tumour markers in clinical laboratories in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Zhong, Kun; Yuan, Shuai; He, Falin; Du, Yuxuan; Hu, Zhehui; Wang, Zhiguo

    2018-06-15

    This survey was initiated to obtain knowledge on the current situation of internal quality control (IQC) practice for tumour markers (TMs) in China. Additionally, we tried to acquire the most appropriate quality specifications. This survey was a current status survey. The IQC information had been collected via online questionnaires. All of 1821 clinical laboratories which participated in the 2016 TMs external quality assessment (EQA) programme had been enrolled. The imprecision evaluation criteria were the minimal, desirable, and optimal allowable imprecisions based on biological variations, and 1/3 total allowable error (TEa) and 1/4 TEa. A total of 1628 laboratories answered the questionnaires (89%). The coefficients of variation (CVs) of the IQC of participant laboratories varied greatly from 1% (5 th percentile) to 13% (95 th percentile). More than 82% (82 - 91%) of participant laboratories two types of CVs met 1/3 TEa except for CA 19-9. The percentiles of current CVs were smaller than cumulative CVs. A number of 1240 laboratories (76%) reported their principles and systems used. The electrochemiluminescence was the most used principle (45%) and had the smallest CVs. The performance of laboratories for TMs IQC has yet to be improved. On the basis of the obtained results, 1/3 TEa would be realistic and attainable quality specification for TMs IQC for clinical laboratories in China.

  3. Multidisciplinary Views on Applying Explicit and Implicit Motor Learning in Practice: An International Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Kleynen

    Full Text Available A variety of options and techniques for causing implicit and explicit motor learning have been described in the literature. The aim of the current paper was to provide clearer guidance for practitioners on how to apply motor learning in practice by exploring experts' opinions and experiences, using the distinction between implicit and explicit motor learning as a conceptual departure point.A survey was designed to collect and aggregate informed opinions and experiences from 40 international respondents who had demonstrable expertise related to motor learning in practice and/or research. The survey was administered through an online survey tool and addressed potential options and learning strategies for applying implicit and explicit motor learning. Responses were analysed in terms of consensus (≥ 70% and trends (≥ 50%. A summary figure was developed to illustrate a taxonomy of the different learning strategies and options indicated by the experts in the survey.Answers of experts were widely distributed. No consensus was found regarding the application of implicit and explicit motor learning. Some trends were identified: Explicit motor learning can be promoted by using instructions and various types of feedback, but when promoting implicit motor learning, instructions and feedback should be restricted. Further, for implicit motor learning, an external focus of attention should be considered, as well as practicing the entire skill. Experts agreed on three factors that influence motor learning choices: the learner's abilities, the type of task, and the stage of motor learning (94.5%; n = 34/36. Most experts agreed with the summary figure (64.7%; n = 22/34.The results provide an overview of possible ways to cause implicit or explicit motor learning, signposting examples from practice and factors that influence day-to-day motor learning decisions.

  4. Patient-physician interactions during early breast-cancer treatment: results from an international online survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansdown, M; Martin, L; Fallowfield, L

    2008-07-01

    To examine, via an international survey, the impact of positive and negative interactions on the patient-physician relationship. This online survey was conducted in five countries (USA, UK, Germany, Italy and France) in two populations: (1) postmenopausal women diagnosed with early breast cancer (EBC) in the past 5 years, who had undergone surgery; (2) breast-cancer physicians. The survey covered several topics: patient-physician interactions, EBC treatment options and sources of information. In total, 462 physicians and 600 patients responded. Most (85%) physicians considered having a good relationship with their patient the most rewarding part of their job. Although 60% of physicians were satisfied with the consultation time (average 17.9 min), 30% considered it insufficient, whilst 49% of patients would prefer more time. Patients reported that physicians were a primary source of information, with 81% indicating that trust in their physician was a vital component of their care. Many physicians (63%) felt that patients are overwhelmed by the amount of information available, but only 16% of patients felt overwhelmed. Most physicians (78%) consider that telling a patient she has EBC is easier than talking about recurrence; 44% rated talking about recurrence as the most stressful part of their job. Most physicians (91%) considered availability of clinical trial data to be crucial for building trust and 74% believed that treatments that minimise recurrence enable more positive conversations. Good-quality patient care extends beyond effective treatment to include good communication about therapeutic options, side effects, and the development of trust and confidence. The survey revealed some disparities in physicians' and patients' views, but demonstrated that a strong patient-physician relationship is highly valued by both. Patients need access to accurate information and adequate consultation time. Providing effective and well-tolerated treatments that minimise

  5. AEGIS technology demonstration for a nuclear waste repository in basalt. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dove, F.H.; Cole, C.R.; Foley, M.G.

    1982-09-01

    A technology demonstration of current performance assessment techniques as applied to a nuclear waste repository in the Columbia Plateau Basalts was conducted. Hypothetical repository coordinates were selected for an actual geographical setting on the Hanford Reservation in the state of Washington. Published hydrologic and geologic data used in the analyses were gathered in 1979 or earlier. The following report documents the technology demonstration in basalt. Available information has been used to establish the data base and initial hydrologic and geologic interpretations for this site-specific application. A simplified diagram of the AEGIS analyses is shown. Because an understanding of the dynamics of ground-water flow is essential to the development of release scenarios and consequence analyses, a key step in the demonstration is the systems characterization contained in the conceptual model. Regional and local ground-water movement patterns have been defined with the aid of hydrologic computer models. Hypothetical release scenarios have been developed and evaluated by a process involving expert opinion and a Geologic Simulation Model for basalt. (The Geologic Simulation Model can also be used to forecast future boundary conditions for the hydrologic simulation.) Chemical reactivity of the basalt with ground water will influence the leaching and transport of radionuclides; solubility equilibria based on available data are estimated with geochemical models. After the radionuclide concentrations are mathematically introduced into the ground-water movement patterns, waste movement patterns are outlined over elapsed time. Contaminant transport results are summarized for significant radionuclides that are hypothetically released to the accessible environment and to the biosphere.

  6. AEGIS technology demonstration for a nuclear waste repository in basalt. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dove, F.H.; Cole, C.R.; Foley, M.G.

    1982-09-01

    A technology demonstration of current performance assessment techniques as applied to a nuclear waste repository in the Columbia Plateau Basalts was conducted. Hypothetical repository coordinates were selected for an actual geographical setting on the Hanford Reservation in the state of Washington. Published hydrologic and geologic data used in the analyses were gathered in 1979 or earlier. The following report documents the technology demonstration in basalt. Available information has been used to establish the data base and initial hydrologic and geologic interpretations for this site-specific application. A simplified diagram of the AEGIS analyses is shown. Because an understanding of the dynamics of ground-water flow is essential to the development of release scenarios and consequence analyses, a key step in the demonstration is the systems characterization contained in the conceptual model. Regional and local ground-water movement patterns have been defined with the aid of hydrologic computer models. Hypothetical release scenarios have been developed and evaluated by a process involving expert opinion and a Geologic Simulation Model for basalt. (The Geologic Simulation Model can also be used to forecast future boundary conditions for the hydrologic simulation.) Chemical reactivity of the basalt with ground water will influence the leaching and transport of radionuclides; solubility equilibria based on available data are estimated with geochemical models. After the radionuclide concentrations are mathematically introduced into the ground-water movement patterns, waste movement patterns are outlined over elapsed time. Contaminant transport results are summarized for significant radionuclides that are hypothetically released to the accessible environment and to the biosphere

  7. Toward the development of the International Classification of Functioning Core Sets for children with cerebral palsy: a global expert survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiariti, Veronica; Mâsse, Louise C; Cieza, Alarcos; Klassen, Anne F; Sauve, Karen; Armstrong, Robert; O'Donnell, Maureen

    2014-05-01

    The goal of the International Classification of Functioning is to standardize the classification of health and function of children around the world. To facilitate the application of this classification, International Classification of Functioning-based tools like the "Core Sets" are being developed. We conducted an international survey of professional experts to identify the most relevant areas of functioning in children with cerebral palsy. The questionnaire covered each component of the classification. In total, 193 professionals completed the survey (response rate 78%). Overall, 9706 answers were linked to the classification (pediatric version) by 2 professionals. From the experts' perspective, movement-related areas and social participation are the most relevant areas of functioning. Experts suggest a more comprehensive profile of functioning in particular in areas of personal capacity and social participation. The results of this survey will inform the development of the International Classification of Functioning Core Sets for children with cerebral palsy.

  8. AEGIS: THE MORPHOLOGIES OF GREEN GALAXIES AT 0.4 < z < 1.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendez, Alexander J.; Coil, Alison L.; Moustakas, John; Lotz, Jennifer; Salim, Samir; Simard, Luc

    2011-01-01

    We present quantitative morphologies of ∼300 galaxies in the optically defined green valley at 0.4 20 . We find that the green galaxy population is intermediate between the red and blue galaxy populations in terms of concentration, asymmetry, and morphological type and merger fraction estimated using Gini/M 20 . We find that most green galaxies are not classified as mergers; in fact, the merger fraction in the green valley is lower than in the blue cloud. We show that at a given stellar mass, green galaxies have higher concentration values than blue galaxies and lower concentration values than red galaxies. Additionally, we find that 12% of green galaxies have B/T = 0 and 21% have B/T ≤ 0.05. Our results show that green galaxies are generally massive (M * ∼ 10 10.5 M sun ) disk galaxies with high concentrations. We conclude that major mergers are likely not the sole mechanism responsible for quenching star formation in this population and that either other external processes or internal secular processes play an important role both in driving gas toward the center of these galaxies and in quenching star formation.

  9. Interest in international programmes - a survey of Japanese dental hygiene students and educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenouchi, A; Sakurai/Matsukubo, M; Matsukubo, T

    2017-11-01

    Globalization of Japanese dental hygienists is important to match the demands in the present society. The purpose of this study was to gauge opinions on international programmes of Japanese dental hygiene students and educators. Data were collected using a survey that was sent to all eight Japanese universities of oral hygiene in December 2014. Participants were composed of 466 university students majoring in oral hygiene (463 women; three men; mean age: 21 years) and 45 educators teaching dental hygiene education (mean age: 50 years). The response rates were 83.81% and 46.88%, respectively. 48.06% of 464 students would like to study abroad, and 76.04% of 330 students would like to interact with foreign students frequently. 97.54% of 455 students answered that learning English is important for dental hygienists, but 72.39% of 460 students are not comfortable interacting with foreigners in English. Those who knew more dental English terms had higher interest in studying abroad (odds ratio: 1.136). 75% of 44 educators think that dental hygiene students need to or sometimes need to study abroad. 68.89% of 45 educators think that teaching international programmes is costly. We found that Japanese dental hygiene students and educators have positive interest in international programmes. However, they have concerns about their English skills and about the cost of studying it. Therefore, English classes need to be improved, and new approaches are required for lowering the cost of teaching international programmes, while stimulating foreign students' and educators' interest in studying abroad in Japan. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. An epidemiological study of dementia under the aegis of mental health program, Maharashtra, Pune chapter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldanha, D; Mani, Maj Raghunandan; Srivastava, Kalpana; Goyal, Sunil; Bhattacharya, D

    2010-04-01

    There has been an exponential growth in the number of elderly population in India. This study aims to determine the prevalence of dementia in an urban center of Pune and to evaluate the corresponding socio-demographic correlates along with psychiatric morbidity in the study sample. The study population in Pune and Kirkee cantonments was selected based on 2001 census data. The number of people over 65 years numbered 6721 and 2145 of them were randomly selected for a door-to-door survey. They were initially administered household questionnaire and then subjected to a screening tool. Each participant underwent a brief mental state examination and data was collected on the basis of a structured proforma. Patients underwent a detailed cognitive profile using subtests from CSI-D (community screening instrument - dementia), which included a Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease (CERAD) word list, word fluency and delayed recall. Information pertaining to socio-demographic factors in participants and caregivers, caregiver-burden and behavioral and psychological symptoms in participants too were collected from the questionnaire. Radio imaging investigation was also carried out to quantify the deficit. Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software was used to compute the results. Findings revealed that prevalence of dementia in the sample population of elderly aged above 65 years was 4.1%. Socio-demographic factors which conferred a statistically higher risk for dementia were identified to be older age, low socio-economic status, low level of education, presence of family history, whereas, marriage was found to be protective. Burden of care was associated with caring for elderly with dementia with increasing severity of dementia. Patients with dementia performed poorly on cognitive test battery. Social network had a protective effect in respect with severity of dementia. On magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) majority of cases of Alzheimer

  11. Human and organisational factors influencing the reliability of non-destructive testing. An international literary survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kettunen, J.; Norros, L.

    1996-04-01

    The aim of the study is to chart human and organisational factors influencing the reliability of non-destructive testing (NDT). The emphasis will be in ultrasonic testing (UT) and in the planning and execution of in-service inspections during nuclear power plant maintenance outages. Being a literary survey this study is mainly based on the foreign and domestic research available on the topic. In consequence, the results presented in this report reflect the ideas of international research community. In addition to this, Finnish nuclear power plant operators (Imatran Voima Oy and Teollisuuden Voima Oy), independent inspection organisations and the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety have provided us with valuable information on NDT theory and practice. Especially, a kind of 'big picture' of non-destructive testing has been pursued in the study. (6 figs., 2 tabs.)

  12. The value of the physical examination in clinical practice: an international survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, Andrew T; McManus, I Chris; Patrick, Alan; Nair, Kichu; Vaughan, Louella; Dacre, Jane

    2017-12-01

    A structured online survey was used to establish the views of 2,684 practising clinicians of all ages in multiple countries about the value of the physical examination in the contemporary practice of internal medicine. 70% felt that physical examination was 'almost always valuable' in acute general medical referrals. 66% of trainees felt that they were never observed by a consultant when undertaking physical examination and 31% that consultants never demonstrated their use of the physical examination to them. Auscultation for pulmonary wheezes and crackles were the two signs most likely to be rated as frequently used and useful, with the character of the jugular venous waveform most likely to be rated as -infrequently used and not useful. Physicians in contemporary hospital general medical practice continue to value the contribution of the physical examination to assessment of outpatients and inpatients, but, in the opinion of trainees, teaching and demonstration could be improved. © Royal College of Physicians 2017. All rights reserved.

  13. ICF profiling of patients with traumatic brain injury: an international professional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laxe, Sara; Zasler, Nathan; Robles, Verónica; López-Blázquez, Raquel; Tormos, Jose María; Bernabeu, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    A worldwide internet survey was conducted (1) to identify problems of individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI) addressed by health professionals and (2) to summarize these problems using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). A pool of professionals involved in the TBI rehabilitation process that included physicians, nurses, physical therapists, occupational therapists, social workers and psychologists were surveyed to identify problems in functioning and contextual factors of individuals with TBI using open-ended questions. All answers were translated ("linked") to the ICF based on established rules. The frequencies of the linked ICF categories were reported stratified based on context. One-hundred thirty seven professionals from the six World Health Organization regions identified 5656 concepts. 92.66% could be linked to the ICF; 33.03% were related to the domain of body functions, 27.28% to activities and participation, 10.98% to structures and 21.38% to environmental factors. The complexity of TBI was described through the identification of a wide variety of ICF categories. ICF language proved to be a neutral framework allowing the comparison of answers between different professionals in different world regions. People that suffered a traumatic brain injury (TBI) may have a variety of sequelae that impair functioning. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) can help in providing information regarding the identification of patients problems and needs as well as planning, implementing and coordinating the rehabilitation process. The ICF provides a frame of reference process illustrated as the rehabilitation cycle that can help during the rehabilitation process in goal setting bringing together the clinicians' and patient's perspectives in a patient oriented biopsychosocial approach. In the field of TBI rehabilitation, activity limitations and participation restrictions are broadly

  14. Pharmacological, psychological, and patient education interventions for patients with neck pain: results of an international survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlesso, Lisa C; Gross, Anita R; MacDermid, Joy C; Walton, David M; Santaguida, P Lina

    2015-01-01

    Examination of practice patterns compared to existing evidence identifies knowledge to practice gaps. To describe the utilization of pharmacological, patient education, primary psychological interventions and relaxation therapies in patients with neck pain by clinicians. An international cross-sectional survey was conducted to determine the use of these interventions amongst 326 clinicians treating patients with neck pain. Nineteen countries participated. Results were analyzed by usage amongst physical therapists (39%) and chiropractors (35%), as they were the predominant respondents. Patient education (95%) and relaxation therapies (59%) were the most utilized interventions. Tests of subgroup differences determined that physical therapists used patient education significantly more than chiropractors. Use of medications and primary psychological interventions were reported by most to be outside of scope of practice. The high rate of patient education is consistent with supporting evidence. However, usage of relaxation therapies is contrary to evidence suggesting no benefit for improved pain or function for chronic neck pain. This survey indicates that patient education and relaxation therapies are common treatments provided by chiropractors and physical therapists for patients with neck pain. Future research should address gaps associated with variable practice patterns and knowledge translation to reduce usage of interventions shown to be ineffective.

  15. An International Survey of Electric Storage Tank Water Heater Efficiency and Standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Alissa; Lutz, James; McNeil, Michael A.; Covary, Theo

    2013-11-13

    Water heating is a main consumer of energy in households, especially in temperate and cold climates. In South Africa, where hot water is typically provided by electric resistance storage tank water heaters (geysers), water heating energy consumption exceeds cooking, refrigeration, and lighting to be the most consumptive single electric appliance in the home. A recent analysis for the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) performed by the authors estimated that standing losses from electric geysers contributed over 1,000 kWh to the annual electricity bill for South African households that used them. In order to reduce this burden, the South African government is currently pursuing a programme of Energy Efficiency Standards and Labelling (EES&L) for electric appliances, including geysers. In addition, Eskom has a history of promoting heat pump water heaters (HPWH) through incentive programs, which can further reduce energy consumption. This paper provides a survey of international electric storage water heater test procedures and efficiency metrics which can serve as a reference for comparison with proposed geyser standards and ratings in South Africa. Additionally it provides a sample of efficiency technologies employed to improve the efficiency of electric storage water heaters, and outlines programs to promote adoption of improved efficiency. Finally, it surveys current programs used to promote HPWH and considers the potential for this technology to address peak demand more effectively than reduction of standby losses alone

  16. Consultant perception of general internal medicine: a survey of consultant physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Abigail; Newbery, Nina; Goddard, Andrew F

    2015-12-01

    The Future Hospital Commission has highlighted the need for increased general medical skills in the medical workforce in order to meet the increasing demands on the NHS in terms of patients with increasing age, frailty and complex comorbidities. However there continues to be a lack of clarity around the concept of generalism and general internal medicine (GIM), with differing views on the physician's role in GIM. This survey sought to explore further the roles in which current physicians perceive they are practising GIM as well as views on training in GIM. The survey highlights three key points: (i) that consultant perception and practice of GIM continues to vary dependent on physician specialty; (ii) that the practice of GIM is not limited to the front door but includes the management of patients under the care of a specialty team with general medical needs, be that in an inpatient, outpatient or acute care setting; and (iii) that training in GIM needs to reflect this variation in roles and practice. © Royal College of Physicians 2015. All rights reserved.

  17. Definitive Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) for Extracranial Oligometastases: An International Survey of >1000 Radiation Oncologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Stephen L; Porceddu, Sandro; Nakamura, Naoki; Palma, David A; Lo, Simon S; Hoskin, Peter; Moghanaki, Drew; Chmura, Steven J; Salama, Joseph K

    2017-08-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is often used to treat patients with oligometastases (OM). Yet, patterns of SBRT practice for OM are unknown. Therefore, we surveyed radiation oncologists internationally, to understand how and when SBRT is used for OM. A 25-question survey was distributed to radiation oncologists. Respondents using SBRT for OM were asked how long they have been treating OM, number of patients treated, organs treated, primary reason for use, doses used, and future intentions. Respondents not using SBRT for OM were asked reasons why SBRT was not used and intentions for future adoption. Data were analyzed anonymously. We received 1007 surveys from 43 countries. Eighty-three percent began using SBRT after 2005 and greater than one third after 2010. Eighty-four percent cited perceived treatment response/durability as the primary reason for using SBRT in OM patients. Commonly treated organs were lung (90%), liver (75%), and spine (70%). SBRT dose/fractionation schemes varied widely. Most would offer a second course to new OM. Nearly all (99%) planned to continue and 66% planned to increase SBRT for OM. Of those not using SBRT, 59% plan to start soon. The most common reason for not using SBRT was lack of clinical efficacy (48%) or lack of necessary image guidance equipment (34%). Radiation oncologists are increasingly using SBRT for OM. The main reason for not using SBRT for OM is a perceived lack of evidence demonstrating clinical advantages. These data strengthen the need for robust prospective clinical trials (ongoing and in development) to demonstrate clinical efficacy given the widespread adoption of SBRT for OM.

  18. Tax and Fiscal Policies for Promotion of Industrial EnergyEfficiency: A Survey of International Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Lynn; Galitsky, Christina; Sinton, Jonathan; Worrell,Ernst; Graus, Wina

    2005-09-15

    The Energy Foundation's China Sustainable Energy Program (CSEP) has undertaken a major project investigating fiscal and tax policy options for stimulating energy efficiency and renewable energy development in China. This report, which is part of the sectoral sub-project studies on energy efficiency in industry, surveys international experience with tax and fiscal policies directed toward increasing investments in energy efficiency in the industrial sector. The report begins with an overview of tax and fiscal policies, including descriptions and evaluations of programs that use energy or energy-related carbon dioxide (CO2) taxes, pollution levies, public benefit charges, grants or subsidies, subsidized audits, loans, tax relief for specific technologies, and tax relief as part of an energy or greenhouse gas (GHG) emission tax or agreement scheme. Following the discussion of these individual policies, the report reviews experience with integrated programs found in two countries as well as with GHG emissions trading programs. The report concludes with a discussion of the best practices related to international experience with tax and fiscal policies to encourage investment in energy efficiency in industry.

  19. The global pediatric nephrology workforce: a survey of the International Pediatric Nephrology Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Dorey; Ocegueda, Sophie; Nazareth, Meaghan; Zhong, Yi; Weinstein, Adam; Primack, William; Cochat, Pierre; Ferris, Maria

    2016-07-15

    The global pediatric nephrology workforce is poorly characterized. The objectives of our study were to assess pediatric nephrologists' perceptions of the adequacy of the pediatric nephrology workforce, and understand regional challenges to fellow recruitment and job acquisition. Perceptions regarding optimal length of training and research requirements were also queried. A 17-question web-based survey comprised of 14 close-ended and 3 open-ended questions was e-mailed to members of the International Pediatric Nephrology Association. Quantitative and qualitative analyses were performed. We received 341 responses from members of the International Pediatric Nephrology Association from 71 countries. There was a high degree of overall perceived workforce inadequacy with 67 % of all respondents reporting some degree of shortage. Perceived workforce shortage ranged from 20 % in Australia/New Zealand to 100 % in Africa. Respondents from Africa (25 %) and North America (22.4 %) reported the greatest difficulty recruiting fellows. Respondents from Australia/New Zealand (53.3 %) and Latin America (31.3 %) reported the greatest perceived difficulty finding jobs as pediatric nephrologists after training. Low trainee interest, low salary, lack of government or institutional support, and few available jobs in pediatric nephrology were the most frequently reported obstacles to fellow recruitment and job availability. Globally, there is a high level of perceived inadequacy in the pediatric nephrology workforce. Regional variability exists in perceived workforce adequacy, ease of recruitment, and job acquisition. Interventions to improve recruitment targeted to specific regional barriers are suggested.

  20. Survey of international dose monitoring programmes for radiation workers. WP1 in the project OMINEX- (Optimisation of Monitoring for Internal Exposure)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahola, T.; Muikku, M.; Pusa, S.; Etherington, G.; Berard, P.; Guen, B. Le; Hurtgen, C.

    2004-05-01

    Monitoring of the workforce in the nuclear industries is carried out primarily in order to demonstrate compliance with European Union Basic Safety Standards for the protection of the health of workers against the dangers arising from ionizing radiation. There is however no compilation of information on internal dose monitoring programmes currently in use in the EU countries. Surveys were therefore carried out in which organisations were asked to provide information on the design of their internal dose monitoring programmes and on the costs of these programmes. Information was requested from both EU countries and Associated States. Databases for storage and reporting of all information gained were constructed, and results from the surveys compiled. This work was carried out within the EC 5th Framework Programme project OMINEX (Optimisation of Monitoring for Internal Exposure), which aims to provide advice and guidance on designing and implementing internal dose monitoring programmes in the workplace in such a way that best use is made of available resources, while minimising costs. This paper gives the results of the survey of the design of internal dose monitoring programmes. A major conclusion is that, particularly for the actinides, a wide range of approaches to monitoring are in use. There is no consensus on primary monitoring methods. All organisations monitor workers to assess individual doses for entry onto a legal dose record. Cumulative distributions show that most organisations aim to assess doses down to 0.1 - 0.5 mSv. (orig.)

  1. International medical students--a survey of perceived challenges and established support services at medical faculties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huhn, D; Junne, F; Zipfel, S; Duelli, R; Resch, F; Herzog, W; Nikendei, C

    2015-01-01

    Medical students with a non-German background face several challenges during their studies. Besides support given by foreign student offices further specific projects for international students have been developed and are offered by medical faculties. However, so far, neither a systematic survey of the faculties' perceived problems nor of the offered support exists. All study deaneries of medical faculties in Germany were contacted between April and October 2013 and asked for their participation in a telephone interview. Interview partners were asked about 1.) The percentage of non-German students at the medical faculty; 2.) The perceived difficulties and problems of foreign students; 3.) The offers for non-German students; and 4.) The specification of further possibilities of support. Given information was noted, frequencies counted and results interpreted via frequency analysis. Only 39% of the medical faculties could give detailed information about the percentage of non-German students. They reported an average share of 3.9% of students with an EU migration background and 4.9% with a non-EU background. Most frequently cited offers are student conducted tutorials, language courses and tandem-programs. The most frequently reported problem by far is the perceived lack of language skills of foreign students at the beginning of their studies. Suggested solutions are mainly the development of tutorials and the improvement of German medical terminology. Offers of support provided by medical faculties for foreign students vary greatly in type and extent. Support offered is seen to be insufficient in coping with the needs of the international students in many cases. Hence, a better coverage of international students as well as further research efforts to the specific needs and the effectiveness of applied interventions seem to be essential.

  2. International medical students – a survey of perceived challenges and established support services at medical faculties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huhn, D.; Junne, F.; Zipfel, S.; Duelli, R.; Resch, F.; Herzog, W.; Nikendei, C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Medical students with a non-German background face several challenges during their studies. Besides support given by foreign student offices further specific projects for international students have been developed and are offered by medical faculties. However, so far, neither a systematic survey of the faculties’ perceived problems nor of the offered support exists. Method: All study deaneries of medical faculties in Germany were contacted between April and October 2013 and asked for their participation in a telephone interview. Interview partners were asked about 1.) The percentage of non-German students at the medical faculty; 2.) The perceived difficulties and problems of foreign students; 3.) The offers for non-German students; and 4.) The specification of further possibilities of support. Given information was noted, frequencies counted and results interpreted via frequency analysis. Results: Only 39% of the medical faculties could give detailed information about the percentage of non-German students. They reported an average share of 3.9% of students with an EU migration background and 4.9% with a non-EU background. Most frequently cited offers are student conducted tutorials, language courses and tandem-programs. The most frequently reported problem by far is the perceived lack of language skills of foreign students at the beginning of their studies. Suggested solutions are mainly the development of tutorials and the improvement of German medical terminology. Discussion: Offers of support provided by medical faculties for foreign students vary greatly in type and extent. Support offered is seen to be insufficient in coping with the needs of the international students in many cases. Hence, a better coverage of international students as well as further research efforts to the specific needs and the effectiveness of applied interventions seem to be essential. PMID:25699112

  3. International medical students – a survey of perceived challenges and established support services at medical faculties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huhn, D.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Medical students with a non-German background face several challenges during their studies. Besides support given by foreign student offices further specific projects for international students have been developed and are offered by medical faculties. However, so far, neither a systematic survey of the faculties’ perceived problems nor of the offered support exists.Method: All study deaneries of medical faculties in Germany were contacted between April and October 2013 and asked for their participation in a telephone interview. Interview partners were asked about 1. The percentage of non-German students at the medical faculty; 2. The perceived difficulties and problems of foreign students; 3. The offers for non-German students; and 4. The specification of further possibilities of support. Given information was noted, frequencies counted and results interpreted via frequency analysis.Results: Only 39% of the medical faculties could give detailed information about the percentage of non-German students. They reported an average share of 3.9% of students with an EU migration background and 4.9% with a non-EU background. Most frequently cited offers are student conducted tutorials, language courses and tandem-programs. The most frequently reported problem by far is the perceived lack of language skills of foreign students at the beginning of their studies. Suggested solutions are mainly the development of tutorials and the improvement of German medical terminology.Discussion: Offers of support provided by medical faculties for foreign students vary greatly in type and extent. Support offered is seen to be insufficient in coping with the needs of the international students in many cases. Hence, a better coverage of international students as well as further research efforts to the specific needs and the effectiveness of applied interventions seem to be essential.

  4. International multispecialty consensus on how to evaluate ultrasound competence: a Delphi consensus survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin G Tolsgaard

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To achieve international consensus across multiple specialties on a generic ultrasound rating scale using a Delphi technique. METHODS: Ultrasound experts from Obstetrics-Gynaecology, Surgery, Urology, Radiology, Rheumatology, Emergency Medicine, and Gastro-Enterology representing North America, Australia, and Europe were identified. A multi-round survey was conducted to obtain consensus between these experts. Of 60 invited experts, 44 experts agreed to participate in the first Delphi round, 41 remained in the second round, and 37 completed the third Delphi round. Seven key elements of the ultrasound examination were identified from existing literature and recommendations from international ultrasound societies. All experts rated the importance of these seven elements on a five-point Likert scale in the first round and suggested potential new elements for the assessment of ultrasound skills. In the second round, the experts re-rated all elements and a third round was conducted to allow final comments. Agreement on which elements to include in the final rating scale was pre-defined as more than 80% of the experts rating an element four or five, on importance to the ultrasound examination. RESULTS: Two additional elements were suggested by more than 10% of the experts in the first Delphi round. Consensus was obtained to include these two new elements along with five of the original elements in the final assessment instrument: 1 Indication for the examination 2 Applied knowledge of ultrasound equipment 3 Image optimization 4 Systematic examination 5 Interpretation of images 6 Documentation of examination and 7 Medical decision making. CONCLUSION: International multispecialty consensus was achieved on the content of a generic ultrasound rating scale. This is the first step to ensure valid assessment of clinicians in different medical specialties using ultrasound.

  5. Practises and controversies in the management of asymptomatic aneurysms: Results of an international survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshafai, Nabeel; Falenchuk, Olesya; Cusimano, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Asymptomatic aneurysms that are increasingly discovered on cranial diagnostic imaging are a growing management dilemma. Large-scale studies have shown that in most instances, conservative management is appropriate for the majority of patients with aneurysms less than 7 mm in maximum diameter. It is unclear whether international practise mirrors practise in these large trials. To determine how neurosurgeons around the world manage patients with asymptomatic aneurysms. Electronic survey of 283 clinicians managing patients with aneurysms using a 55-item questionnaire detailing characteristics of their experience, their hospitals and their present and future practises and insights regarding the management of patients with intracerebral aneurysms. The 203 neurosurgeons (72%) who responded had a median of 17 years of practise with aneurysms and managed a median of 25 aneurysms annually. The majority of neurosurgeons endorsed treatment of all asymptomatic aneurysms regardless of size. Only four out of 10 neurosurgeons would manage patients with 4 mm anterior communicating artery or middle cerebral artery aneurysms non-surgically, whereas fewer than 2% would conservatively manage asymptomatic patients with 10 or 16 mm aneurysms. Neurosurgeons were split as to the recommended techniques for asymptomatic aneurysms of 10 or 16 mm with about half of them electing clipping and half coiling for ACoA and nearly three quarters favouring clipping for the MCA aneurysm. Although international differences exist between Europe, North America and the rest of the world, most state that their choice of treatment related to decisions around what option would provide the best neurological outcome and prevention of long-term bleeding. Despite large trials supporting the management of small asymptomatic aneurysms, most neurosurgeons internationally chooses to treat them with surgery or endovascular means. Since clinicians use a number of factors beyond the maximum diameter when

  6. Definition, categorization, and terminology of episodic breathlessness: consensus by an international Delphi survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Steffen T; Weingärtner, Vera; Higginson, Irene J; Voltz, Raymond; Bausewein, Claudia

    2014-05-01

    Episodic breathlessness is a common and distressing symptom in patients with advanced disease. Still, it is not yet clearly defined. The aim of this work was to develop an international definition, categorization, and terminology of episodic breathlessness. An online Delphi survey was conducted with international breathlessness experts. We used a structured questionnaire to identify specific aspects and reach agreement on a definition, categorization, and terminology (five-point Likert scale). Consensus was defined in advance as ≥70% agreement. Thirty-one of 68 (45.6%), 29 of 67 (43.3%), and 33 of 67 (49.3%) experts responded in the first, second, and third rounds, respectively. Participants were 20-79 years old, about 60% male, and more than 75% rated their own breathlessness expertise as moderate to high. After three rounds, consensus was reached on a definition, categorization, and terminology (84.4%, 96.3%, and 92.9% agreement). The final definition includes general and qualitative aspects of the symptom, for example, time-limited severe worsening of intensity or unpleasantness of breathlessness in the patient's perception. Categories are predictable or unpredictable, depending on whether any triggers can be identified. There is high agreement on clinical and operational aspects of episodic breathlessness in advanced disease among international experts. The consented definition and categorization may serve as a catalyst for clinical and basic research to improve symptom control and patients' quality of life. Copyright © 2014 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The nurse's role in managing chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: an international survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnasamy, Meinir; Kwok-Wei So, Winnie; Yates, Patsy; de Calvo, Luz Esperanza Ayala; Annab, Rachid; Wisniewski, Tami; Aranda, Sanchia

    2014-01-01

    Nurses play a substantial role in the prevention and management of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). This study set out to describe nurses' roles in the prevention and management of CINV and to identify any gaps that exist across countries. A self-reported survey was completed by 458 registered nurses who administered chemotherapy to cancer patients in Australia, China, Hong Kong, and 9 Latin American countries. More than one-third of participants regarded their own knowledge of CINV as fair to poor. Most participants (>65%) agreed that chemotherapy-induced nausea and chemotherapy-induced vomiting should be considered separately (79%), but only 35% were confident in their ability to manage chemotherapy-induced nausea (53%) or chemotherapy-induced vomiting (59%). Only one-fifth reported frequent use of a standardized CINV assessment tool and only a quarter used international clinical guidelines to manage CINV. Participants perceived their own knowledge of CINV management to be insufficient. They recognized the need to develop and use a standardized CINV assessment tool and the importance of adopting international guidelines to inform the management of CINV. Findings indicate that international guidelines should be made available to nurses in clinically relevant and easily accessible formats, that a review of chemotherapy assessment tools should be undertaken to identify reliable and valid measures amenable to use in a clinical settings, and that a CINV risk screening tool should be developed as a prompt for nurses to enable timely identification of and intervention for patients at high risk of CINV.

  8. Facilitators and Barriers to International Collaboration in Spinal Cord Injury: Results from a Survey of Clinicians and Researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noonan, Vanessa K; Chan, Elaine; Bassett-Spiers, Kent; Berlowitz, David J; Biering-Sørensen, Fin; Charlifue, Susan; Graco, Marnie; Hayes, Keith C; Horsewell, Jane; Joshi, Phalgun; Markelis, Debora; Smith, Verna; Waheed, Zeina; Brown, Douglas J

    2018-02-01

    International collaboration in spinal cord injury (SCI) research is necessary to overcome the challenges often encountered by clinicians and researchers, including participant recruitment, high cost, and the need for specialized expertise. However, international collaboration poses its own obstacles. The objective of this study was to conduct an international online survey to assess barriers and facilitators to international SCI clinical research, potential initiatives to facilitate future collaborations, and the use of SCI-specific data sets and standards. Results were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Of 364 total respondents, 213 completed the survey, with the majority of these participants based in North America (38%), Asia (22%), Europe (18%), and Oceania (16%). Over half had more than 10 years of experience in SCI research or clinical practice (57%) and 60% had previous experience with international collaborations. Funding was identified as a top barrier (82%), a facilitator (93%), and a proposed future initiative (97%). Communication and technology were also identified as strong facilitators and proposed future initiatives. The International Standards for Neurological Classification of SCI were used by 69% of participants, the International Standards to document remaining Autonomic Function after SCI by 13% of participants, and the International SCI Data Sets by 45% of participants. As the need for international collaborations in SCI research increases, it is important to identify how clinicians and researchers can be supported by SCI consumer and professional organizations, funders, and networks. Furthermore, unique solutions to overcome modifiable barriers and creation of new facilitators are also needed.

  9. International Volunteer Programs for Dental Students: Results of 2009 and 2016 Surveys of U.S. Dental Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodmansey, Karl F; Rowland, Briana; Horne, Steve; Serio, Francis G

    2017-02-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence and nature of international volunteer programs for predoctoral students at U.S. dental schools and to document the change over five years. Web-based surveys were conducted in 2009 and 2016. An invitation to participate in the study, along with a hyperlink to the survey, was emailed to the deans of all U.S. dental schools in the two years. In 2009, 47 of 58 dental school deans responded to the survey, for a response rate of 81%. In 2016, 48 of 64 dental school deans responded, for a response rate of 75%. From 2009 to 2016, the number of schools reporting dental student international experiences increased from 25 to 31. In 2016, 65% of responding schools offered dental student international experiences, an 11.5% increase over the results of the 2009 survey. Concomitantly, the number of deans reporting their students' participation in international opportunities not officially sanctioned by the school decreased from 41 to 34. These findings showed an increase in the number of dental schools providing international experiences for their students and established baseline data to assess trends in the future.

  10. Internal migration of Canadian immigrants, 1993–2004: Evidence from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Karen M. King; K. Bruce Newbold

    2011-01-01

    Combining the 1993, 1996, and 1999 six-year panels of the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics Master Files, the purpose of the paper is twofold. First, it examines the migration and distribution patterns of the foreign-born across Census Metropolitan Areas (CMAs). Second, it examines how internal migration modeling results may differ whether pre- and post-migration measures are used. Results suggest that internal migration of the foreign-born generally does not increase their dispersion acr...

  11. Large-scale internal structure in volcanogenic breakout flood deposits: Extensive GPR survey on volcaniclastic deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, K.; Gomez, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    Large-scale outburst floods from volcanic lakes such as caldera lakes or volcanically dammed river-valleys tend to be voluminous with total discharge of > 1-10s km3 and peak discharge of >10000s to 100000s m3 s-1. Such a large flood can travel long distance and leave sediments and bedforms/landforms extensively with large-scale internal structures, which are difficult to assess from single local sites. Moreover, the sediments and bedforms/landforms are sometimes untraceable, and outcrop information obtained by classical geological and geomorphological field surveys is limited to the dissected/terraced parts of fan body, road cuts and/or large quarries. Therefore, GPR (Ground Penetrating Radar), using the properties of electromagnetic waves' propagation through media, seems best adapted for the appraisal of large-scale subsurface structures. Recently, studies on GPR applications to volcanic deposits have successfully captured images of lava flows and volcaniclastic deposits and proved the usefulness of this method even onto the volcanic areas which often encompass complicated stratigraphy and structures with variable material, grainsize, and ferromagnetic content. Using GPR, the present study aims to understand the large-scale internal structures of volcanogenic flood deposits. The survey was carried out over two volcanogenic flood fan (or apron) sediments in northeast Japan, at Numazawa and Towada volcanoes. The 5 ka Numazawa flood deposits in the Tadami river catchment that has been emplaced by a breakout flood from ignimbrite-dammed valley leaving pumiceous gravelly sediments with meter-sized boulders in the flow path. At Towada volcano, a comparable flood event originating from a breach in the caldera rim emplaced the 13-15 ka Sanbongi fan deposits in the Oirase river valley, which is characterized by a bouldery fan deposits. The GPR data was collected following 200 to 500 m long lateral and longitudinal transects, which were captured using a GPR Pulse

  12. Sexual behaviour, drugs and alcohol use of international students at a British university: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivancos, R; Abubakar, I; Hunter, P R

    2009-09-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether international students have greater risk-taking behaviours that could lead to importing novel and resistant strains of sexually transmitted infections (STIs). We conducted a cross-sectional web-based survey of university students' sexual behaviour, alcohol and drug use, and self-reported diagnosis of STIs and compared these between British and international students. In all, 827 students completed the survey, of whom 123 (15%) were international students. International students were less likely to have ever drunk alcohol (95.4% versus 87.8%, P = 0.002) and used drugs (56.4% versus 41.5%, P = 0.002). International students were on average almost two years older at first intercourse (18.7 versus 17 years; P < 0.001). There were no differences in the number of sexual partners between national and international students. On a discriminant analysis model, international students were characterized by being older and from a non-white background, less likely to use cocaine, they drank alcohol less frequently and were more likely to have had unprotected intercourse with two or more partners in the previous year. In conclusion, international students tend to drink more moderately and use fewer recreational drugs than British students. However, they exhibit higher sexual risk behaviours that could lead to importing novel and resistant strains of STIs.

  13. An investigation of routes to cancer diagnosis in 10 international jurisdictions, as part of the International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership: survey development and implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, David; Vedsted, Peter; Anandan, Chantelle; Zalounina, Alina; Fourkala, Evangelia Ourania; Desai, Rakshit; Liston, William; Jensen, Henry; Barisic, Andriana; Gavin, Anna; Grunfeld, Eva; Lambe, Mats; Law, Rebecca-Jane; Malmberg, Martin; Neal, Richard D; Kalsi, Jatinderpal; Turner, Donna; White, Victoria; Bomb, Martine; Menon, Usha

    2016-07-25

    This paper describes the methods used in the International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership Module 4 Survey (ICBPM4) which examines time intervals and routes to cancer diagnosis in 10 jurisdictions. We present the study design with defining and measuring time intervals, identifying patients with cancer, questionnaire development, data management and analyses. Recruitment of participants to the ICBPM4 survey is based on cancer registries in each jurisdiction. Questionnaires draw on previous instruments and have been through a process of cognitive testing and piloting in three jurisdictions followed by standardised translation and adaptation. Data analysis focuses on comparing differences in time intervals and routes to diagnosis in the jurisdictions. Our target is 200 patients with symptomatic breast, lung, colorectal and ovarian cancer in each jurisdiction. Patients are approached directly or via their primary care physician (PCP). Patients' PCPs and cancer treatment specialists (CTSs) are surveyed, and 'data rules' are applied to combine and reconcile conflicting information. Where CTS information is unavailable, audit information is sought from treatment records and databases. Reliability testing of the patient questionnaire showed that agreement was complete (κ=1) in four items and substantial (κ=0.8, 95% CI 0.333 to 1) in one item. The identification of eligible patients is sufficient to meet the targets for breast, lung and colorectal cancer. Initial patient and PCP survey response rates from the UK and Sweden are comparable with similar published surveys. Data collection was completed in early 2016 for all cancer types. An international questionnaire-based survey of patients with cancer, PCPs and CTSs has been developed and launched in 10 jurisdictions. ICBPM4 will help to further understand international differences in cancer survival by comparing time intervals and routes to cancer diagnosis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to

  14. An investigation of routes to cancer diagnosis in 10 international jurisdictions, as part of the International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership: survey development and implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, David; Vedsted, Peter; Anandan, Chantelle; Zalounina, Alina; Fourkala, Evangelia Ourania; Desai, Rakshit; Liston, William; Jensen, Henry; Barisic, Andriana; Gavin, Anna; Grunfeld, Eva; Lambe, Mats; Law, Rebecca-Jane; Malmberg, Martin; Neal, Richard D; Kalsi, Jatinderpal; Turner, Donna; White, Victoria; Bomb, Martine

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This paper describes the methods used in the International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership Module 4 Survey (ICBPM4) which examines time intervals and routes to cancer diagnosis in 10 jurisdictions. We present the study design with defining and measuring time intervals, identifying patients with cancer, questionnaire development, data management and analyses. Design and setting Recruitment of participants to the ICBPM4 survey is based on cancer registries in each jurisdiction. Questionnaires draw on previous instruments and have been through a process of cognitive testing and piloting in three jurisdictions followed by standardised translation and adaptation. Data analysis focuses on comparing differences in time intervals and routes to diagnosis in the jurisdictions. Participants Our target is 200 patients with symptomatic breast, lung, colorectal and ovarian cancer in each jurisdiction. Patients are approached directly or via their primary care physician (PCP). Patients’ PCPs and cancer treatment specialists (CTSs) are surveyed, and ‘data rules’ are applied to combine and reconcile conflicting information. Where CTS information is unavailable, audit information is sought from treatment records and databases. Main outcomes Reliability testing of the patient questionnaire showed that agreement was complete (κ=1) in four items and substantial (κ=0.8, 95% CI 0.333 to 1) in one item. The identification of eligible patients is sufficient to meet the targets for breast, lung and colorectal cancer. Initial patient and PCP survey response rates from the UK and Sweden are comparable with similar published surveys. Data collection was completed in early 2016 for all cancer types. Conclusion An international questionnaire-based survey of patients with cancer, PCPs and CTSs has been developed and launched in 10 jurisdictions. ICBPM4 will help to further understand international differences in cancer survival by comparing time intervals and routes to cancer

  15. Music Therapy Practice Status and Trends Worldwide: An International Survey Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Petra; Tague, Daniel B

    2017-11-01

    The field of music therapy is growing worldwide. While there is a wealth of country-specific information available, only a few have databased workforce censuses. Currently, little to no descriptive data exists about the global development of the profession. The purpose of this study was to obtain descriptive data about current demographics, practice status, and clinical trends to inform worldwide advocacy efforts, training needs, and the sustainable development of the field. Music therapists (N = 2,495) who were professional members of organizations affiliated with the World Federation of Music Therapy (WFMT) served as a sample for this international cross-sectional survey study. A 30-item online questionnaire was designed, pilot tested by key partners, and translated into seven languages. Researchers and key partners distributed the online survey through e-mail invitations and social media announcements. Professional music therapists worldwide are well-educated, mature professionals with adequate work experience, who are confident in providing high-quality services primarily in mental health, school, and geriatric settings. Due to ongoing challenges related to recognition and government regulation of the field as an evidence-based and well-funded healthcare profession, most individuals work part-time music therapy jobs and feel underpaid. Yet, many music therapists have a positive outlook on the field's future. Continued research and advocacy efforts, as well as collaborations with lobbyists, business consultants, and credentialing/licensure experts to develop progressive strategies, will be crucial for global development and sustainability of the field. © the American Music Therapy Association 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  16. International variation in adherence to referral guidelines for suspected cancer: a secondary analysis of survey data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Brian D; Mant, David; Neal, Richard D; Hart, Nigel; Hamilton, Willie; Shinkins, Bethany; Rubin, Greg; Rose, Peter W

    2016-01-01

    Background Variation in cancer survival persists between comparable nations and appears to be due, in part, to primary care practitioners (PCPs) having different thresholds for acting definitively in response to cancer-related symptoms. Aim To explore whether cancer guidelines, and adherence to them, differ between jurisdictions and impacts on PCPs’ propensity to take definitive action on cancer-related symptoms. Design and setting A secondary analysis of survey data from six countries (10 jurisdictions) participating in the International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership. Method PCPs’ responses to five clinical vignettes presenting symptoms and signs of lung (n = 2), colorectal (n = 2), and ovarian cancer (n = 1) were compared with investigation and referral recommendations in cancer guidelines. Results Nine jurisdictions had guidelines covering the two colorectal vignettes. For the lung vignettes, although eight jurisdictions had guidelines for the first, the second was covered by a Swedish guideline alone. Only the UK and Denmark had an ovarian cancer guideline. Survey responses of 2795 PCPs (crude response rate: 12%) were analysed. Guideline adherence ranged from 20–82%. UK adherence was lower than other jurisdictions for the lung vignette covered by the guidance (47% versus 58%; P <0.01) but similar (45% versus 46%) or higher (67% versus 38%; P <0.01) for the two colorectal vignettes. PCPs took definitive action least often when a guideline recommended a non-definitive action or made no recommendation. UK PCPs adhered to recommendations for definitive action less than their counterparts (P <0.01). There wasno association between jurisdictional guideline adherence and 1-year survival. Conclusion Cancer guideline content is variable between similarly developed nations and poor guideline adherence does not explain differential survival. Guidelines that fail to cover high-risk presentations or that recommend non-definitive action may reduce definitive

  17. Definition, Management, and Outcomes of Acute Kidney Injury: An International Survey of Nephrologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Umar; Tober, Aaron; Chinchilli, Vernon; Reeves, W Brian; Ghahramani, Nasrollah

    2017-12-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a complex disease burdened by uncertainties of definition, management strategies, and prognosis. This study explores the relationship between demographic characteristics of nephrologists and their perceptions about the definition, management, and follow-up of AKI. We developed a Web-based survey, the International Survey on Acute Kidney Injury (ISAKI), consisting of 29 items in 4 categories: (1) demographic and practice characteristics, (2) definition of AKI, (3) management of renal replacement therapy (RRT) in AKI, and (4) sequelae of AKI. A multivariable stepwise logistic regression model was used to examine relationships between the dependent variables and the demographic characteristics of the respondents. Responses from 743 nephrologists from 90 countries were analyzed. The majority (60%) of respondents reported using RIFLE and/or AKIN criteria regularly to define AKI, although US nephrologists were less likely to do so (OR: 0.58; 95% CI: 0.42-0.85). The most common initial RRT modality was intermittent hemodialysis (63.5%), followed by continuous RRT (23.8%). Faculty affiliation was associated with a higher likelihood of using a dialysis schedule of ≥4 times a week (OR: 1.75; 95% CI: 1.20-2.55). The respondents believed that a single episode of AKI increases the likelihood of development of chronic kidney disease (CKD) (55%), subsequent AKI (36%), and rapid progression of preexisting CKD (87%). US nephrologists were less likely to recommend follow-up after resolution of AKI (OR: 0.15; 95% CI: 0.07-0.33). Our findings highlight the need for a widely accepted consensus definition of AKI, a uniform approach to management, and improved follow-up after resolution of AKI episodes.

  18. Practice Patterns Analysis of Ocular Proton Therapy Centers: The International OPTIC Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrbacek, Jan, E-mail: Jan.hrbacek@psi.ch [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Mishra, Kavita K. [Ocular Tumor Proton Therapy Program, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Kacperek, Andrzej [National Proton Therapy Centre, Clatterbridge Cancer Centre, Bebington (United Kingdom); Dendale, Remi; Nauraye, Catherine; Auger, Michel [Centre de Protonthérapie d' Orsay, Institut Curie, Orsay (France); Herault, Joel [Centre Lacassagne, Nice (France); Daftari, Inder K. [Ocular Tumor Proton Therapy Program, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Trofimov, Alexei V.; Shih, Helen A.; Chen, Yen-Lin E. [F. H. Burr Proton Therapy Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Denker, Andrea [Protons for Therapy, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Heufelder, Jens [BerlinProtonen am HZB, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Horwacik, Tomasz; Swakoń, Jan [Institute of Nuclear Physic, Polish Academy of Sciences, Krakow (Poland); Hoehr, Cornelia; Duzenli, Cheryl [BC Cancer Agency – TRIUMF, Vancouver (Canada); Pica, Alessia [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Goudjil, Farid; Mazal, Alejandro [Centre de Protonthérapie d' Orsay, Institut Curie, Orsay (France); and others

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: To assess the planning, treatment, and follow-up strategies worldwide in dedicated proton therapy ocular programs. Methods and Materials: Ten centers from 7 countries completed a questionnaire survey with 109 queries on the eye treatment planning system (TPS), hardware/software equipment, image acquisition/registration, patient positioning, eye surveillance, beam delivery, quality assurance (QA), clinical management, and workflow. Results: Worldwide, 28,891 eye patients were treated with protons at the 10 centers as of the end of 2014. Most centers treated a vast number of ocular patients (1729 to 6369). Three centers treated fewer than 200 ocular patients. Most commonly, the centers treated uveal melanoma (UM) and other primary ocular malignancies, benign ocular tumors, conjunctival lesions, choroidal metastases, and retinoblastomas. The UM dose fractionation was generally within a standard range, whereas dosing for other ocular conditions was not standardized. The majority (80%) of centers used in common a specific ocular TPS. Variability existed in imaging registration, with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) rarely being used in routine planning (20%). Increased patient to full-time equivalent ratios were observed by higher accruing centers (P=.0161). Generally, ophthalmologists followed up the post–radiation therapy patients, though in 40% of centers radiation oncologists also followed up the patients. Seven centers had a prospective outcomes database. All centers used a cyclotron to accelerate protons with dedicated horizontal beam lines only. QA checks (range, modulation) varied substantially across centers. Conclusions: The first worldwide multi-institutional ophthalmic proton therapy survey of the clinical and technical approach shows areas of substantial overlap and areas of progress needed to achieve sustainable and systematic management. Future international efforts include research and development for imaging and planning software upgrades

  19. An International Survey of Approaches to Chair Restraint of Nonhuman Primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Jennifer L; Bloomsmith, Mollie A; Prescott, Mark J

    2017-10-01

    Specifically designed restraint chairs are the preferred method of restraint for research studies that require NHP to sit in place for sustained periods of time. In light of increasing emphasis on refinement of restraint to improve animal wellbeing, it is important to have a better understanding of this potentially stressful procedure. Although chair restraint is used internationally, very little published information is available on this subject. We developed a survey to obtain an overview of equipment, procedures, and plans for improvement regarding chair restraint. We received 101 responses from people working in academic, government, contract research, and pharmaceutical laboratories within the Americas, Europe and Asia. Findings indicate that the majority of laboratories using restraint chairs work with macaque species. Restraint chairs are used for a wide range of procedures, including cognitive testing, recording neuronal activity, functional MRI, intravenous infusion, and blood sampling. Approximately 2/3 of laboratories use an enclosed 'box chair,' which the animal is trained to enter and then to extend its head through an opening on the top of the chair; the remaining one third of laboratories use an 'open chair' design, in which manual handling or the pole-and-collar system is used to transfer and secure the animal into the chair. Respondents reported that when selecting the type of chair to use, they considered comfort for the animal, ease of use, and the ability to adjust fit between animals of different sizes. Various training methods and timeframes are used to prepare macaques for restraint chair procedures. Several laboratories are incorporating greater use of positive reinforcement training. The community that uses these restraint procedures needs to work together to define best practice; our survey results can help in that effort.

  20. Critical Infrastructure Interdependency Modeling: A Survey of U.S. and International Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2006-08-01

    The Nation’s health, wealth, and security rely on the production and distribution of certain goods and services. The array of physical assets, processes, and organizations across which these goods and services move are called "critical infrastructures".1 This statement is as true in the U.S. as in any country in the world. Recent world events such as the 9-11 terrorist attacks, London bombings, and gulf coast hurricanes have highlighted the importance of stable electric, gas and oil, water, transportation, banking and finance, and control and communication infrastructure systems. Be it through direct connectivity, policies and procedures, or geospatial proximity, most critical infrastructure systems interact. These interactions often create complex relationships, dependencies, and interdependencies that cross infrastructure boundaries. The modeling and analysis of interdependencies between critical infrastructure elements is a relatively new and very important field of study. The U.S. Technical Support Working Group (TSWG) has sponsored this survey to identify and describe this current area of research including the current activities in this field being conducted both in the U.S. and internationally. The main objective of this study is to develop a single source reference of critical infrastructure interdependency modeling tools (CIIMT) that could be applied to allow users to objectively assess the capabilities of CIIMT. This information will provide guidance for directing research and development to address the gaps in development. The results will inform researchers of the TSWG Infrastructure Protection Subgroup of research and development efforts and allow a more focused approach to addressing the needs of CIIMT end-user needs. This report first presents the field of infrastructure interdependency analysis, describes the survey methodology, and presents the leading research efforts in both a cumulative table and through individual datasheets. Data was

  1. Worklife and Wellness in Academic General Internal Medicine: Results from a National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linzer, Mark; Poplau, Sara; Babbott, Stewart; Collins, Tracie; Guzman-Corrales, Laura; Menk, Jeremiah; Murphy, Mary Lou; Ovington, Kay

    2016-09-01

    General internal medicine (GIM) careers are increasingly viewed as challenging and unsustainable. We aimed to assess academic GIM worklife and determine remediable predictors of stress and burnout. We conducted an email survey. Physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants in 15 GIM divisions participated. A ten-item survey queried stress, burnout, and work conditions such as electronic medical record (EMR) challenges. An open-ended question assessed stressors and solutions. Results were categorized into burnout, high stress, high control, chaos, good teamwork, high values alignment, documentation time pressure, and excessive home EMR use. Frequencies were determined for national data, Veterans Affairs (VA) versus civilian populations, and hospitalist versus ambulatory roles. A General Linear Mixed Model (GLMM) evaluated associations with burnout. A formal content analysis was performed for open-ended question responses. Of 1235 clinicians sampled, 579 responded (47 %). High stress was present in 67 %, with 38 % burned out (burnout range 10-56 % by division). Half of respondents had low work control, 60 % reported high documentation time pressure, half described too much home EMR time, and most reported very busy or chaotic workplaces. Two-thirds felt aligned with departmental leaders' values, and three-quarters were satisfied with teamwork. Burnout was associated with high stress, low work control, and low values alignment with leaders (all p teamwork than ambulatory clinicians and fewer hospitalists noted documentation time pressure (both p < 0.001). Key themes from the qualitative analysis were short visits, insufficient support staff, a Relative Value Unit mentality, documentation time pressure, and undervaluing education. While GIM divisions overall demonstrate high stress and burnout, division rates vary widely. Sustainability efforts within GIM could focus on visit length, staff support, schedule control, clinic chaos, and EMR stress.

  2. International Evidence-Based Medicine Survey of the Veterinary Profession: Information Sources Used by Veterinarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntley, Selene J.; Dean, Rachel S.; Massey, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Veterinarians are encouraged to use evidence to inform their practice, but it is unknown what resources (e.g. journals, electronic sources) are accessed by them globally. Understanding the key places veterinarians seek information can inform where new clinically relevant evidence should most effectively be placed. An international survey was conducted to gain understanding of how veterinary information is accessed by veterinarians worldwide. There were 2137 useable responses to the questionnaire from veterinarians in 78 countries. The majority of respondents (n = 1835/2137, 85.9%) undertook clinical work and worked in a high income country (n = 1576/1762, 89.4%). Respondents heard about the survey via national veterinary organisations or regulatory bodies (31.5%), online veterinary forums and websites (22.7%), regional, discipline-based or international veterinary organisations (22.7%) or by direct invitation from the researchers or via friends, colleagues or social media (7.6%). Clinicians and non-clinicians reportedly used journals most commonly (65.8%, n = 1207/1835; 75.6%, n = 216/286) followed by electronic resources (58.7%, n = 1077/1835; 55.9%, n = 160/286), respectively. Respondents listed a total of 518 journals and 567 electronic sources that they read. Differences in veterinarian preference for resources in developed, and developing countries, were found. The nominated journals most read were the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association (12.7% of nominations) for clinicians and the Veterinary Record (5.7%) for non-clinicians. The most accessed electronic resource reported was the Veterinary Information Network (25.6%) for clinicians and PubMed (7.4%) for non-clinicians. In conclusion, a wide array of journals and electronic resources appear to be accessed by veterinarians worldwide. Veterinary organisations appear to play an important role in global communication and outreach to veterinarians and consideration should be given to how these

  3. International Evidence-Based Medicine Survey of the Veterinary Profession: Information Sources Used by Veterinarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntley, Selene J; Dean, Rachel S; Massey, Andrew; Brennan, Marnie L

    2016-01-01

    Veterinarians are encouraged to use evidence to inform their practice, but it is unknown what resources (e.g. journals, electronic sources) are accessed by them globally. Understanding the key places veterinarians seek information can inform where new clinically relevant evidence should most effectively be placed. An international survey was conducted to gain understanding of how veterinary information is accessed by veterinarians worldwide. There were 2137 useable responses to the questionnaire from veterinarians in 78 countries. The majority of respondents (n = 1835/2137, 85.9%) undertook clinical work and worked in a high income country (n = 1576/1762, 89.4%). Respondents heard about the survey via national veterinary organisations or regulatory bodies (31.5%), online veterinary forums and websites (22.7%), regional, discipline-based or international veterinary organisations (22.7%) or by direct invitation from the researchers or via friends, colleagues or social media (7.6%). Clinicians and non-clinicians reportedly used journals most commonly (65.8%, n = 1207/1835; 75.6%, n = 216/286) followed by electronic resources (58.7%, n = 1077/1835; 55.9%, n = 160/286), respectively. Respondents listed a total of 518 journals and 567 electronic sources that they read. Differences in veterinarian preference for resources in developed, and developing countries, were found. The nominated journals most read were the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association (12.7% of nominations) for clinicians and the Veterinary Record (5.7%) for non-clinicians. The most accessed electronic resource reported was the Veterinary Information Network (25.6%) for clinicians and PubMed (7.4%) for non-clinicians. In conclusion, a wide array of journals and electronic resources appear to be accessed by veterinarians worldwide. Veterinary organisations appear to play an important role in global communication and outreach to veterinarians and consideration should be given to how these

  4. International Evidence-Based Medicine Survey of the Veterinary Profession: Information Sources Used by Veterinarians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selene J Huntley

    Full Text Available Veterinarians are encouraged to use evidence to inform their practice, but it is unknown what resources (e.g. journals, electronic sources are accessed by them globally. Understanding the key places veterinarians seek information can inform where new clinically relevant evidence should most effectively be placed. An international survey was conducted to gain understanding of how veterinary information is accessed by veterinarians worldwide. There were 2137 useable responses to the questionnaire from veterinarians in 78 countries. The majority of respondents (n = 1835/2137, 85.9% undertook clinical work and worked in a high income country (n = 1576/1762, 89.4%. Respondents heard about the survey via national veterinary organisations or regulatory bodies (31.5%, online veterinary forums and websites (22.7%, regional, discipline-based or international veterinary organisations (22.7% or by direct invitation from the researchers or via friends, colleagues or social media (7.6%. Clinicians and non-clinicians reportedly used journals most commonly (65.8%, n = 1207/1835; 75.6%, n = 216/286 followed by electronic resources (58.7%, n = 1077/1835; 55.9%, n = 160/286, respectively. Respondents listed a total of 518 journals and 567 electronic sources that they read. Differences in veterinarian preference for resources in developed, and developing countries, were found. The nominated journals most read were the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association (12.7% of nominations for clinicians and the Veterinary Record (5.7% for non-clinicians. The most accessed electronic resource reported was the Veterinary Information Network (25.6% for clinicians and PubMed (7.4% for non-clinicians. In conclusion, a wide array of journals and electronic resources appear to be accessed by veterinarians worldwide. Veterinary organisations appear to play an important role in global communication and outreach to veterinarians and consideration should be given to how

  5. AEGIS: Agent Oriented Organisations

    OpenAIRE

    Unland, R.; Kirn, S.; Wanka, U.; O'Hare, G. M. P. (Greg M. P.); Abbas, S.

    1995-01-01

    Today's enterprises are faced with highly dynamic, sometimes even hostile environments. This paper dicovers that the two most prominent organizational strategies addressing these challenges, namely that of widespread decentralization and of business process orientation, are inherently conflicting. We argue that cooperative knowledge processing technology can contribute to dissolve this conflict. For this purpose, we introduce the reader into the field of Distributed Artificial Intelligence. O...

  6. Towards a definition of refractory neuropathic pain for epidemiological research. An international Delphi survey of experts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Blair H

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Best current estimates of neuropathic pain (NeuP prevalence come from studies using various screening detecting pain with probable neuropathic features; the proportion experiencing significant, long-term NeuP, and the proportion not responding to standard treatment are unknown. These “refractory” cases are the most clinically important to detect, being the most severe, requiring specialist treatment. Methods We report an international Delphi survey of experts in NeuP, aiming for consensus on the features required to define, for epidemiological research: (1 neuropathic pain; and (2 when NeuP is “refractory”. A web-based questionnaire was developed and data collected from three rounds of questionnaires from nineteen experts. Results There was good consensus on essential inclusion of six items to identify NeuP (“prickling, tingling, pins & needles”, “pain evoked by light touch”, “electric shocks or shooting pain”, “hot or burning” pain, “brush allodynia on self-examination”, and “relevant history” and on some items that were non-essential. Consensus was also reached on components of a “refractory NeuP” definition: minimum duration (one year; number of trials of drugs of known effectiveness (four; adequate duration of these trials (three months / maximum tolerated; outcomes of treatment (pain severity, quality of life. Further work needs to validate these proposed criteria in general population research. Conclusions This paper presents an international consensus on measuring the epidemiology of refractory neuropathic pain. This will be valuable in reaching an agreed estimate of the prevalence of neuropathic pain, and the first estimate of refractory neuropathic pain prevalence.

  7. Central venous access devices site care practices: an international survey of 34 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadhurst, Daphne; Moureau, Nancy; Ullman, Amanda J

    2016-01-01

    Effective postinsertion management of central venous access devices (CVADs) is important to prevent CVAD-associated complications, including catheter-associated bloodstream infections. Although there is a wealth of evidence-based guidelines available to guide the care of CVADs, applying their recommendations to the clinical setting across variable patient groups, CVAD types and international healthcare settings is challenging. This may result in patients receiving suboptimal care. A cross-sectional descriptive study using an online survey was performed with an aim to determine current CVAD site care practices internationally. The CVAD site care domains included skin antisepsis, dressing selection, frequency of dressing change and device securement practices across impaired and unimpaired CVAD sites. Clinicians (n = 1044) residing in 34 countries reported diversity in their practice, with the majority of respondents practicing as nurses (89%) from North America (81%) as vascular access specialists (52%). The respondents' reported practice was variant, with differing inconsistency to guidelines throughout each of the domains. There was wide variance in the management of CVAD sites with impaired skin integrity, such as rash, skin stripping/adhesive-related injuries and drainage. Vascular access clinicians reported high levels of confidence in managing CVAD sites, including those with impaired skin. These inconsistencies are reflective of the complex and heterogeneous populations requiring CVADs, the evidence available to support practice in this area, the skills and knowledge of the clinicians caring for them and the resources of the healthcare setting. Further research and education is necessary to ensure that CVAD site care is undertaken effectively to minimise preventable complications.

  8. EVALUATION OF PATIENT AND PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT INITIATIVES IN HEALTH TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT: A SURVEY OF INTERNATIONAL AGENCIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Laura; Polisena, Julie; Scott, Anna Mae; Holtorf, Anke-Peggy; Staniszewska, Sophie; Facey, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Although there is increased awareness of patient and public involvement (PPI) among health technology assessment (HTA) organizations, evaluations of PPI initiatives are relatively scarce. Our objective as members of Health Technology Assessment International's (HTAi's) Patient and Citizen Involvement Group (PCIG) was to advance understanding of the range of evaluation strategies adopted by HTA organizations and their potential usefulness. In March 2016, a survey was sent to fifty-four HTA organizations through the International Network of Agencies for Health Technology Assessment (INAHTA) and contacts of members of HTAi's PCIG. Respondents were asked about their organizational structure; how patients and members of the public are involved; whether and how PPI initiatives have been evaluated, and, if so, which facilitators and challenges to evaluation were found and how results were used and disseminated. Fifteen (n = 15) programs from twelve countries responded (response rate 27.8 percent) that involved patients (14/15) and members of the public (10/15) in HTA activities. Seven programs evaluated their PPI activities, including participant satisfaction (5/7), process (5/7) and impact evaluations (4/7). Evaluation results were used to improve PPI activities, identify education and training needs, and direct strategic priorities. Facilitators and challenges revolved around the need for stakeholder buy-in, sufficient resources, senior leadership, and including patients in evaluations. A small but diverse set of HTA organizations evaluate their PPI activities using a range of strategies that reflect the range of rationales and approaches to PPI in HTA. It will be important for HTA organizations to draw on evaluation theories and methods.

  9. Criteria for selecting implementation science theories and frameworks: results from an international survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A. Birken

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Theories provide a synthesizing architecture for implementation science. The underuse, superficial use, and misuse of theories pose a substantial scientific challenge for implementation science and may relate to challenges in selecting from the many theories in the field. Implementation scientists may benefit from guidance for selecting a theory for a specific study or project. Understanding how implementation scientists select theories will help inform efforts to develop such guidance. Our objective was to identify which theories implementation scientists use, how they use theories, and the criteria used to select theories. Methods We identified initial lists of uses and criteria for selecting implementation theories based on seminal articles and an iterative consensus process. We incorporated these lists into a self-administered survey for completion by self-identified implementation scientists. We recruited potential respondents at the 8th Annual Conference on the Science of Dissemination and Implementation in Health and via several international email lists. We used frequencies and percentages to report results. Results Two hundred twenty-three implementation scientists from 12 countries responded to the survey. They reported using more than 100 different theories spanning several disciplines. Respondents reported using theories primarily to identify implementation determinants, inform data collection, enhance conceptual clarity, and guide implementation planning. Of the 19 criteria presented in the survey, the criteria used by the most respondents to select theory included analytic level (58%, logical consistency/plausibility (56%, empirical support (53%, and description of a change process (54%. The criteria used by the fewest respondents included fecundity (10%, uniqueness (12%, and falsifiability (15%. Conclusions Implementation scientists use a large number of criteria to select theories, but there is little

  10. Challenges in the research ethics review of cluster randomized trials: international survey of investigators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Shazia H; Brehaut, Jamie C; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Weijer, Charles; Boruch, Robert; Donner, Allan; Eccles, Martin P; McRae, Andrew D; Saginur, Raphael; Skea, Zoë C; Zwarenstein, Merrick; Taljaard, Monica

    2013-04-01

    Cluster randomized trials (CRTs) complicate the interpretation of standard research ethics guidelines for several reasons. For one, the units of allocation, intervention, and observation often may differ within a single trial. In the absence of tailored and internationally accepted ethics guidelines for CRTs, researchers and research ethics committees have no common standard by which to judge ethically appropriate practices in CRTs. Moreover, lack of familiarity with and consideration of the unique features of the CRT design by research ethics committees may cause difficulties in the research ethics review process, and amplify problems such as variability in the requirements and decisions reached by different research ethics committees. We aimed to characterize research ethics review of CRTs, examine investigator experiences with the ethics review process, and assess the need for ethics guidelines for CRTs. An electronic search strategy implemented in MEDLINE was used to identify and randomly sample 300 CRTs published in English language journals from 2000 to 2008. A web-based survey with closed- and open-ended questions was administered to corresponding authors in a series of six contacts. The survey response rate was 64%. Among 182 of 285 eligible respondents, 91% indicated that they had sought research ethics approval for the identified CRT, although only 70% respondents reported research ethics approval in the published article. Nearly one-third (31%) indicated that they have had to meet with ethics committees to explain aspects of their trials, nearly half (46%) experienced variability in the ethics review process in multijurisdictional trials, and 38% experienced negative impacts of the ethics review process on their trials, including delays in trial initiation (28%), increased costs (10%), compromised ability to recruit participants (16%), and compromised methodological quality (9%). Most respondents (74%; 95% confidence interval (CI): 67%-80%) agreed or

  11. Criteria for selecting implementation science theories and frameworks: results from an international survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birken, Sarah A; Powell, Byron J; Shea, Christopher M; Haines, Emily R; Alexis Kirk, M; Leeman, Jennifer; Rohweder, Catherine; Damschroder, Laura; Presseau, Justin

    2017-10-30

    Theories provide a synthesizing architecture for implementation science. The underuse, superficial use, and misuse of theories pose a substantial scientific challenge for implementation science and may relate to challenges in selecting from the many theories in the field. Implementation scientists may benefit from guidance for selecting a theory for a specific study or project. Understanding how implementation scientists select theories will help inform efforts to develop such guidance. Our objective was to identify which theories implementation scientists use, how they use theories, and the criteria used to select theories. We identified initial lists of uses and criteria for selecting implementation theories based on seminal articles and an iterative consensus process. We incorporated these lists into a self-administered survey for completion by self-identified implementation scientists. We recruited potential respondents at the 8th Annual Conference on the Science of Dissemination and Implementation in Health and via several international email lists. We used frequencies and percentages to report results. Two hundred twenty-three implementation scientists from 12 countries responded to the survey. They reported using more than 100 different theories spanning several disciplines. Respondents reported using theories primarily to identify implementation determinants, inform data collection, enhance conceptual clarity, and guide implementation planning. Of the 19 criteria presented in the survey, the criteria used by the most respondents to select theory included analytic level (58%), logical consistency/plausibility (56%), empirical support (53%), and description of a change process (54%). The criteria used by the fewest respondents included fecundity (10%), uniqueness (12%), and falsifiability (15%). Implementation scientists use a large number of criteria to select theories, but there is little consensus on which are most important. Our results suggest that the

  12. Development of a survey instrument to investigate the primary care factors related to differences in cancer diagnosis between international jurisdictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Peter W; Hamilton, Willie; Aldersey, Kate; Barisic, Andriana; Dawes, Martin; Foot, Catherine; Grunfeld, Eva; Hart, Nigel; Neal, Richard D; Pirotta, Marie; Sisler, Jeffrey; Thulesius, Hans; Vedsted, Peter; Young, Jane; Rubin, Greg

    2014-06-17

    Survival rates following a diagnosis of cancer vary between countries. The International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership (ICBP), a collaboration between six countries with primary care led health services, was set up in 2009 to investigate the causes of these differences. Module 3 of this collaboration hypothesised that an association exists between the readiness of primary care physicians (PCP) to investigate for cancer - the 'threshold' risk level at which they investigate or refer to a specialist for consideration of possible cancer - and survival for that cancer (lung, colorectal and ovarian). We describe the development of an international survey instrument to test this hypothesis. The work was led by an academic steering group in England. They agreed that an online survey was the most pragmatic way of identifying differences between the jurisdictions. Research questions were identified through clinical experience and expert knowledge of the relevant literature.A survey comprising a set of direct questions and five clinical scenarios was developed to investigate the hypothesis. The survey content was discussed and refined concurrently and repeatedly with international partners. The survey was validated using an iterative process in England. Following validation the survey was adapted to be relevant to the health systems operating in other jurisdictions and translated into Danish, Norwegian and Swedish, and into Canadian and Australian English. This work has produced a survey with face, content and cross cultural validity that will be circulated in all six countries. It could also form a benchmark for similar surveys in countries with similar health care systems. The vignettes could also be used as educational resources. This study is likely to impact on healthcare policy and practice in participating countries.

  13. International survey of veterinarians to assess the importance of competencies in professional practice and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bok, Harold G J; Teunissen, Pim W; Boerboom, Tobias B B; Rhind, Susan M; Baillie, Sarah; Tegzes, John; Annandale, Henry; Matthew, Susan; Torgersen, Anne; Hecker, Kent G; Härdi-Landerer, Christina M; Gomez-Lucia, Esperanza; Ahmad, Bashir; Muijtjens, Arno M M; Jaarsma, Debbie A D C; van der Vleuten, Cees P M; van Beukelen, Peter

    2014-10-15

    To determine the perceived importance of specific competencies in professional veterinary practice and education among veterinarians in several countries. Survey-based prospective study. 1,137 veterinarians in 10 countries. Veterinarians were invited via email to participate in the study. A framework of 18 competencies grouped into 7 domains (veterinary expertise, communication, collaboration, entrepreneurship, health and welfare, scholarship, and personal development) was used. Respondents rated the importance of each competency for veterinary professional practice and for veterinary education by use of a 9-point Likert scale in an online questionnaire. Quantitative statistical analyses were performed to assess the data. All described competencies were perceived as having importance (with overall mean ratings [all countries] ≥ 6.45/9) for professional practice and education. Competencies related to veterinary expertise had the highest ratings (overall mean, 8.33/9 for both professional practice and education). For the veterinary expertise, entrepreneurship, and scholarship domains, substantial differences (determined on the basis of statistical significance and effect size) were found in importance ratings among veterinarians in different countries. Results indicated a general consensus regarding the importance of specific types of competencies in veterinary professional practice and education. Further research into the definition of competencies essential for veterinary professionals is needed to help inform an international dialogue on the subject.

  14. Domiciliary Non-invasive Ventilation in COPD: An International Survey of Indications and Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crimi, Claudia; Noto, Alberto; Princi, Pietro; Cuvelier, Antoine; Masa, Juan F; Simonds, Anita; Elliott, Mark W; Wijkstra, Peter; Windisch, Wolfram; Nava, Stefano

    2016-08-01

    Despite the fact that metanalyses and clinical guidelines do not recommend the routine use of domiciliary non-invasive ventilation (NIV) for patients diagnosed with severe stable Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and with chronic respiratory failure, it is common practice in some countries. We conducted an international web-survey of physicians involved in provision of long-term NIV to examine patterns of domiciliary NIV use in patients diagnosed with COPD. The response rate was 41.6%. A reduction of hospital admissions, improvements in quality of life and dyspnea relief were considered as the main expected benefits for patients. Nocturnal oxygen saturation assessment was the principal procedure performed before NIV prescription. Recurrent exacerbations (>3) requiring NIV and failed weaning from in hospital NIV were the most important reasons for starting domiciliary NIV. Pressure support ventilation (PSV) was the most common mode, with "low" intensity settings (PSV-low) the most popular (44.4 ± 30.1%) compared with "high" intensity (PSV-high) strategies (26.9 ± 25.9%), with different geographical preferences. COPD is confirmed to be a common indication for domiciliary NIV. Recurrent exacerbations and failed weaning from in-hospital NIV were the main reasons for its prescription.

  15. Low levels of breast cancer risk awareness in young women: an international survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacey, Victoria; Steptoe, Andrew; Davídsdóttir, Sigurlína; Baban, Adriana; Wardle, Jane

    2006-10-01

    At least a fifth of breast cancer cases in Western countries are likely to be due to modifiable lifestyle factors. Previous work has found that while women in Western countries are aware that breast cancer can be hereditary, their knowledge of the influence of lifestyle is poor. This survey investigated on the awareness of breast cancer risk factors in university students from 23 countries between 1999 and 2001. Data were collected on awareness of links with heredity, alcohol use, exercise, obesity, stress, smoking and diet. Almost a third of women were not aware that any of these factors influenced breast cancer. Just 57% were aware of the genetic link and fewer than 1 in 20 women correctly identified alcohol, exercise or obesity as factors influencing breast cancer. Stress and smoking were the most commonly chosen lifestyle risk factors although current data suggest that they have little actual impact on breast cancer risk. There was considerable international variation, with highest levels of awareness in students in the United States of America (USA). Knowledge of risk in this sample was poorer than previously observed in older women. Health messages concerning cancer in general may be more relevant for this age group, because of the lower salience of breast cancer for younger women.

  16. Research Priorities for NCD Prevention and Climate Change: An International Delphi Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Colagiuri

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Climate change and non-communicable diseases (NCDs are arguably the greatest global challenges of the 21st Century. However, the confluence between them remains under-examined and there is little evidence of a comprehensive, systematic approach to identifying research priorities to mitigate their joint impact. Consequently, we: (i convened a workshop of academics (n = 25 from the Worldwide Universities Network to identify priority areas at the interface between NCDs and climate change; (ii conducted a Delphi survey of international opinion leaders in public health and relevant other disciplines; and (iii convened an expert panel to review and advise on final priorities. Three research areas (water security; transport; conceptualising NCD harms to support policy formation were listed among the top 10 priorities by >90% of Delphi respondents, and ranked among the top 12 priorities by >60% of respondents who ranked the order of priority. A fourth area (reducing the carbon footprint of cities was ranked highest by the same >60% of respondents. Our results are consistent with existing frameworks on health and climate change, and extends them by focusing specifically on NCDs. Researching these priorities could progress understanding of climate change and NCDs, and inform global and national policy decisions for mitigating associated harms.

  17. International Differences in Multiple Sclerosis Health Outcomes and Associated Factors in a Cross-sectional Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace D. Reilly

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a major cause of disability and poor quality of life (QOL. Previous studies have shown differences in MS health outcomes between countries. This study aimed to examine the associations between international regions and health outcomes in people with MS. Self-reported data were taken from the Health Outcomes and Lifestyle In a Sample of people with Multiple Sclerosis online survey collected in 2012. The 2,401 participants from 37 countries were categorized into three regions: Australasia, Europe, and North America. Differences were observed between regions in disability, physical and mental health QOL, fatigue, and depression, but most of these disappeared after adjusting for sociodemographic, disease, and lifestyle factors in multivariable regression models. However, adjusted odds for disability were higher in Europe [odds ratio (OR: 2.17, 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.28 to 3.67] and North America (OR: 1.79, 95% CI: 1.28 to 2.51 compared to Australasia. There may be other unmeasured factors that vary between regions, including differences in access and quality of healthcare services, determining disability in MS. When assessing differences in MS health outcomes, lifestyle factors and medication use should be taken into consideration.

  18. Research Priorities for NCD Prevention and Climate Change: An International Delphi Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colagiuri, Ruth; Boylan, Sinead; Morrice, Emily

    2015-10-16

    Climate change and non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are arguably the greatest global challenges of the 21st Century. However, the confluence between them remains under-examined and there is little evidence of a comprehensive, systematic approach to identifying research priorities to mitigate their joint impact. Consequently, we: (i) convened a workshop of academics (n = 25) from the Worldwide Universities Network to identify priority areas at the interface between NCDs and climate change; (ii) conducted a Delphi survey of international opinion leaders in public health and relevant other disciplines; and (iii) convened an expert panel to review and advise on final priorities. Three research areas (water security; transport; conceptualising NCD harms to support policy formation) were listed among the top 10 priorities by >90% of Delphi respondents, and ranked among the top 12 priorities by >60% of respondents who ranked the order of priority. A fourth area (reducing the carbon footprint of cities) was ranked highest by the same >60% of respondents. Our results are consistent with existing frameworks on health and climate change, and extends them by focusing specifically on NCDs. Researching these priorities could progress understanding of climate change and NCDs, and inform global and national policy decisions for mitigating associated harms.

  19. Internet use by patients with bipolar disorder: Results from an international multisite survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Rita; Conell, Jörn; Glenn, Tasha; Alda, Martin; Ardau, Raffaella; Baune, Bernhard T; Berk, Michael; Bersudsky, Yuly; Bilderbeck, Amy; Bocchetta, Alberto; Bossini, Letizia; Castro, Angela M Paredes; Cheung, Eric Yw; Chillotti, Caterina; Choppin, Sabine; Del Zompo, Maria; Dias, Rodrigo; Dodd, Seetal; Duffy, Anne; Etain, Bruno; Fagiolini, Andrea; Hernandez, Miryam Fernández; Garnham, Julie; Geddes, John; Gildebro, Jonas; Gonzalez-Pinto, Ana; Goodwin, Guy M; Grof, Paul; Harima, Hirohiko; Hassel, Stefanie; Henry, Chantal; Hidalgo-Mazzei, Diego; Kapur, Vaisnvy; Kunigiri, Girish; Lafer, Beny; Larsen, Erik R; Lewitzka, Ute; Licht, Rasmus W; Lund, Anne Hvenegaard; Misiak, Blazej; Monteith, Scott; Munoz, Rodrigo; Nakanotani, Takako; Nielsen, René E; O'Donovan, Claire; Okamura, Yasushi; Osher, Yamima; Piotrowski, Patryk; Reif, Andreas; Ritter, Philipp; Rybakowski, Janusz K; Sagduyu, Kemal; Sawchuk, Brett; Schwartz, Elon; Scippa, Ângela M; Slaney, Claire; Sulaiman, Ahmad H; Suominen, Kirsi; Suwalska, Aleksandra; Tam, Peter; Tatebayashi, Yoshitaka; Tondo, Leonardo; Vieta, Eduard; Vinberg, Maj; Viswanath, Biju; Volkert, Julia; Zetin, Mark; Whybrow, Peter C; Bauer, Michael

    2016-08-30

    There is considerable international interest in online education of patients with bipolar disorder, yet little understanding of how patients use the Internet and other sources to seek information. 1171 patients with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder in 17 countries completed a paper-based, anonymous survey. 81% of the patients used the Internet, a percentage similar to the general public. Older age, less education, and challenges in country telecommunications infrastructure and demographics decreased the odds of using the Internet. About 78% of the Internet users looked online for information on bipolar disorder or 63% of the total sample. More years of education in relation to the country mean, and feeling very confident about managing life decreased the odds of seeking information on bipolar disorder online, while having attended support groups increased the odds. Patients who looked online for information on bipolar disorder consulted medical professionals plus a mean of 2.3 other information sources such as books, physician handouts, and others with bipolar disorder. Patients not using the Internet consulted medical professionals plus a mean of 1.6 other information sources. The percentage of patients with bipolar disorder who use the Internet is about the same as the general public. Other information sources remain important. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Research Priorities for NCD Prevention and Climate Change: An International Delphi Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colagiuri, Ruth; Boylan, Sinead; Morrice, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Climate change and non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are arguably the greatest global challenges of the 21st Century. However, the confluence between them remains under-examined and there is little evidence of a comprehensive, systematic approach to identifying research priorities to mitigate their joint impact. Consequently, we: (i) convened a workshop of academics (n = 25) from the Worldwide Universities Network to identify priority areas at the interface between NCDs and climate change; (ii) conducted a Delphi survey of international opinion leaders in public health and relevant other disciplines; and (iii) convened an expert panel to review and advise on final priorities. Three research areas (water security; transport; conceptualising NCD harms to support policy formation) were listed among the top 10 priorities by >90% of Delphi respondents, and ranked among the top 12 priorities by >60% of respondents who ranked the order of priority. A fourth area (reducing the carbon footprint of cities) was ranked highest by the same >60% of respondents. Our results are consistent with existing frameworks on health and climate change, and extends them by focusing specifically on NCDs. Researching these priorities could progress understanding of climate change and NCDs, and inform global and national policy decisions for mitigating associated harms. PMID:26501301

  1. Adult Education and Indigenous Peoples in Brazil. International Survey on Adult Education for Indigenous Peoples. Country Study: Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes da Silva, Aracy

    Adult education for indigenous peoples in Brazil was examined. First, information on government institutions, indigenous organizations, international agencies, and nongovernmental organizations engaged in adult education for Brazil's indigenous peoples was compiled. Next, questionnaires and survey techniques were used to research the policy and…

  2. Most Essential Wheeled Mobility Skills for Daily Life : An International Survey Among Paralympic Wheelchair Athletes With Spinal Cord Injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fliess-Douer, Osnat; Vanlandewijck, Yves C.; Van der Woude, Lucas H. V.

    Fliess-Douer O, Vanlandewijck YC, Van Der Woude LHV. Most essential wheeled mobility skills for daily life: an international survey among paralympic wheelchair athletes with spinal cord injury. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2012;93:629-35. Objectives: To create a hierarchical list of the most essential

  3. Intensive Survey Data from Antikythera, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Bevan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The Antikythera Survey Project was an interdisciplinary programme of fieldwork, artefact study and laboratory analysis that considered the long-term history and human ecology of the small Greek island of Antikythera. It was co-directed by Andrew Bevan (UCL and James Conolly (Trent, in collaboration with Aris Tsaravopoulos (Greek Archaeological Service, and under the aegis of the Canadian Institute in Greece and the Hellenic Ministry of Culture. Its various primary datasets are unusual, both in the Mediterranean and beyond, for providing intensive survey coverage of an entire island’s surface archaeology.

  4. Current practice in the intramedullary nailing of tibial shaft fractures: an international survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Mohit; Guyatt, Gordon H; Tornetta, Paul; Swiontkowski, Marc F; Hanson, Beate; Sprague, Sheila; Syed, Amena; Schemitsch, Emil H

    2002-10-01

    Tibial fractures are the most common of all long bone fractures. Although many tibial fractures may be managed conservatively, a certain subset, including unstable fractures and open fractures, require operative stabilization. Intramedullary nails have become the popular choice of implant in the treatment of tibial shaft fractures. The variability in outcomes with tibial shaft fractures may reflect technical aspects of the surgical procedure and perioperative care regimens among surgeons. Identifying the distribution of surgeons' preferences in nailing technique, and the rationale for their choices, will aid in focusing educational activities for the orthopedic community and planning future clinical trials. Our objectives were to clarify surgeons' opinions regarding technical aspects of surgery and perioperative care after intramedullary nailing of closed and open tibial shaft fractures, and to identify predictors of surgeons' preferences in technique and perioperative care. This study was a cross-sectional survey using focus groups, key informants, and sampling to redundancy strategies to develop a survey to examine surgeons' preferences in the treatment of tibial shaft fractures. The survey was pilot tested for clarity and content validity. We mailed this survey in July 2000 to 577 orthopedic surgeons who have an interest in trauma care. These were members of the Orthopaedic Trauma Association, American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, or European AO International affiliated trauma centers. We used several strategies to improve response rates including personalized cover letters, stamped return envelopes, follow-up telephone calls, and repeat mailing of questionnaires. Main outcome measures included technical issues such as reduction, exposure, intramedullary reaming, and interlocking screws; and factors associated with surgeons' preferences such as age, fellowship, academic practice, and geographic location. Four hundred forty-four surgeons (77%) responded

  5. International conference on research methodology for roadside surveys of drinking-driving : alcohol countermeasures workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-09-01

    The basic purpose [of the conference] was to encourage more roadside surveys by furthering the research methodology and recommendations for conducting roadside surveys developed by a special group of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Deve...

  6. Restrictions on antimicrobial use in food animal production: an international regulatory and economic survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maron, Dina Fine; Smith, Tyler J S; Nachman, Keeve E

    2013-10-16

    The administration of antimicrobial drugs to food animals at low doses for extended durations for growth promotion and disease prevention has been linked to the global health crisis of antimicrobial resistance. Internationally, multiple jurisdictions have responded by restricting antimicrobial use for these purposes, and by requiring a veterinary prescription to use these drugs in food animals. Opponents of these policies have argued that restrictions have been detrimental to food animal production where they have been adopted. We surveyed the antimicrobial use policies of 17 political jurisdictions outside of the United States with respect to growth promotion, disease prevention, and veterinary oversight, and reviewed the available evidence regarding their production impacts, including measures of animal health. Jurisdictions were included if they were a top-five importer of a major U.S. food animal product in 2011, as differences between the policies of the U.S. and other jurisdictions may lead to trade barriers to U.S. food animal product exports. Jurisdictions were also included if information on their policies was publicly available in English. We searched the peer-reviewed and grey literatures and corresponded with jurisdictions' U.S. embassies, regulators, and local experts. Jurisdictions were categorized by whether they prohibit use of antimicrobials for growth promotion and/or use of antimicrobials without a veterinary prescription. Of the 17 jurisdictions surveyed, six jurisdictions have prohibited both types of use, five jurisdictions have prohibited one use but not the other use, and five jurisdictions have not prohibited either use, while information was not available for one jurisdiction. Data on the production impacts of these prohibitions were limited, although available data, especially from Denmark and Sweden, suggest that restrictions on growth promotion use can be implemented with minimal production consequences. A majority of leading U.S. trade

  7. Archiving Legacy Images from International Tsunami Science Team (ITST) Surveys, 1946 - 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synolakis, C.; Kong, L. S. L.; Elwany, H.; Arcos, N. P.; Dunbar, P. K.

    2016-12-01

    The ITIC, USC, Coastal Environments, and NOAA/NCEI have collaborated to gather legacy videos and photos from ITST surveys conducted since 1992, plus from 1946 and 1956, by the USC-TR. The images will become part of the NCEI online and searchable historical tsunami image database. The legacy videos and photos document the local conditions in the tsunami aftermath and are important resources for visualizing the tsunami and identifying patterns of impacts. The data provide invaluable insights into tsunami events, and this information will empower future generations to make informed decisions regarding the future management of ocean resources, local development, and safety protocols. Eyewitnesses are important sources for further understanding even well studied events, especially before 2000. Videos provide context - what residents were doing, what they felt, what they saw, what reactions helped them survive. Photographs document inundation extent. Together, they help to visualize the location and document human behavior and response of the built environment. For example, a flow mark inside a house that survived, versus a partially destroyed house, differentiates construction styles. While the scientific rationale behind tsunami surveys is obvious, ITST protocols strike the delicate balance between the prompt need to act to recover ephemeral scientific field evidence, and urgent priorities for search-and-rescue immediately after tsunami disasters. The data set includes over 50 videos of varying formats and over 3,000 internationally-sourced photos from 24 major tsunami events from 1946-2013: 01 April 1946 Unimak Island, Aleutians; 09 July 1956 Amorgos Island, Greece; 01 September 1992, Nicaragua; 12 December 1992, Flores; 02 June 1994, East Java; 04 October 1994, Shikotan; 14 November 1994, Mindoro, Philippines; 17 January 1994 Northridge; 09 October 1995, Manzanillo, Mexico; 17 February 1997, Biak, Indonesia; 21 February 1996 Chimbote, Peru; 17 August 1998 Aitape, PNG

  8. The experience of international doctoral education in nursing: an exploratory survey of staff and international nursing students in a British university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Catrin

    2007-07-01

    As part of the internationalization of higher education, increasing numbers of international doctoral students are coming to study in British nursing schools. This paper reports on a small-scale exploratory survey that sought to investigate the educational experiences of these students and their supervisors in one British School of Nursing. Both staff and students saw great value in international education. However both groups identified the need for greater support to facilitate adjustment in a number of areas, including: understanding the PhD process, studying in a second language, working within a different academic culture, managing the supervision relationship, and finding a sense of community. This was a small study, but the findings confirm key issues identified in the limited available literature. Recommendations include staff training and the development of additional in-puts for students. Future research should include qualitative, longitudinal and multi-site studies to more thoroughly assess the process and outcomes of international doctoral education in nursing.

  9. The Survey of criterion of gravity threshold for prosecution of crimes in international criminal court: comparative view on other international courts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Saber

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Survey of criterion of gravity threshold for prosecution of crimes in international criminal court One of the issues that have gained a good place in considerations of the office of the prosecution and Icc, is the gravity threshold set out in paragraph 1(d of article 17 of statute. This concept has some challenges: challenges such as lack of definition, lack of criterion for satisfaction of this concept. Given to the fact that gravity threshold is one part of admissibility mechanism, these ambiguities can disturb the legitimacy and function of international criminal court as the first permanent international criminal court. Hence, the purpose in present paper is to clarify this significant concept. Moreover, the gravity threshold criterions and the role of this concept in situation and cases also have been analyzed. Finally, it is concluded that due to political considerations, the clarification of gravity threshold is seriously needed.

  10. SURF - SUrvey of Risk Factor management: first report of an international audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooney, Mt; Reiner, Z; Sheu, W; Ryden, L; Sutter, J de; De Bacquer, D; DeBacker, G; Mithal, A; Chung, N; Lim, Yt; Dudina, A; Reynolds, A; Dunney, K; Graham, I

    2014-07-01

    Despite the fact that subjects with established coronary heart disease (CHD) are at high risk of further events and deserve meticulous secondary prevention, current audits such as EUROASPIRE show poor control of major risk factors. Ongoing monitoring is required. We present a new risk factor audit system, SURF (Survey of Risk Factor management), that can be conducted much more quickly and easily than existing audit systems and has the potential to allow hospitals of all sizes to participate in a unified international audit system that will complement EUROASPIRE. Initial experience indicates that SURF is truly simple to undertake in an international setting, and this is illustrated with the results of a substantive pilot project conducted in Europe and Asia. The data collection system was designed to allow rapid and easy data collection as part of routine clinic work. Consecutive patients (aged 18 and over) with established CHD attending outpatient cardiology clinics were included. Information on demographics, previous coronary medical history, smoking history, history of hypertension, dyslipidaemia or diabetes, physical activity, attendance at cardiac rehabilitation, cardiac medications, lipid and glucose levels (and HbA1c in diabetics) if available within the last year, blood pressure, heart rate, body mass index, and waist circumference were collected using a one-page data collection sheet. Years spent in full time education was added as an additional question during the pilot phase. Three European countries - Ireland (n = 251), Belgium (n = 122), and Croatia (n = 124) - and four Asian countries - Singapore (n = 142), Taiwan (n = 334), India (n = 97), and Korea (n = 45) - were included in the pilot study. The results of initial field testing were confirmed in that it proved possible to collect data within 60-90 seconds per subject. There was poor control of several risk factors including high levels of physical inactivity (41

  11. Current practice in the management of wound odour: an international survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gethin, Georgina; Grocott, Patricia; Probst, Sebastian; Clarke, Eric

    2014-06-01

    To determine from a multi-disciplinary and international perspective current practice in the management of wound odour. Malodour is cited by patients and carers as one of the most distressing and socially isolating aspects of their wounds. The absence of a standardised approach to assessment and management underscores the need to collect baseline data to support guideline development. On-line survey. A study specific questionnaire in English, Spanish, Italian and German was emailed to wound care organisations worldwide, palliative and oncology nursing organisations, and known contacts with a special interest in wound management, for distribution to members between December 2011 and February 2012. 1444 people from 36 countries responded. 12% assess odour with descriptive words being the most frequent form of assessment. Charcoal and silver based dressings were the most frequently used odour management agents, yet, only 48.4% and 23% respectively reported these as being very effective. Antimicrobial agents were cited as most effective but were not the most frequently used. 8% use aromatherapy oils direct to the wound, and 74% combine a range of dressings to try and manage odour. Odour, pain and exudate management were the greatest wound management challenges facing patients and clinicians. 46.7% of respondents encounter patients with MFW on a monthly basis and 89% agreed there is a need to develop guidelines in this area. A 'trial and error' approach to odour management exists with low overall satisfaction with current practice. There is a need for research and education on means to assess odour and odour management options. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. What is mental health? Evidence towards a new definition from a mixed methods multidisciplinary international survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manwell, Laurie A; Barbic, Skye P; Roberts, Karen; Durisko, Zachary; Lee, Cheolsoon; Ware, Emma; McKenzie, Kwame

    2015-01-01

    Objective Lack of consensus on the definition of mental health has implications for research, policy and practice. This study aims to start an international, interdisciplinary and inclusive dialogue to answer the question: What are the core concepts of mental health? Design and participants 50 people with expertise in the field of mental health from 8 countries completed an online survey. They identified the extent to which 4 current definitions were adequate and what the core concepts of mental health were. A qualitative thematic analysis was conducted of their responses. The results were validated at a consensus meeting of 58 clinicians, researchers and people with lived experience. Results 46% of respondents rated the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC, 2006) definition as the most preferred, 30% stated that none of the 4 definitions were satisfactory and only 20% said the WHO (2001) definition was their preferred choice. The least preferred definition of mental health was the general definition of health adapted from Huber et al (2011). The core concepts of mental health were highly varied and reflected different processes people used to answer the question. These processes included the overarching perspective or point of reference of respondents (positionality), the frameworks used to describe the core concepts (paradigms, theories and models), and the way social and environmental factors were considered to act. The core concepts of mental health identified were mainly individual and functional, in that they related to the ability or capacity of a person to effectively deal with or change his/her environment. A preliminary model for the processes used to conceptualise mental health is presented. Conclusions Answers to the question, ‘What are the core concepts of mental health?’ are highly dependent on the empirical frame used. Understanding these empirical frames is key to developing a useful consensus definition for diverse populations. PMID:26038353

  13. International survey on D-dimer test reporting: a call for standardization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Tripodi, Armando; Simundic, Ana-Maria; Favaloro, Emmanuel J

    2015-04-01

    D-dimer is the biochemical gold standard for diagnosing a variety of thrombotic disorders, but result reporting is heterogeneous in clinical laboratories. A specific five-item questionnaire was developed to gain a clear picture of the current standardization of D-dimer test results. The questionnaire was opened online (December 24, 2014-February 10, 2015) on the platform "Google Drive (Google Inc., Mountain View; CA)," and widely disseminated worldwide by newsletters and alerts. A total of 409 responses were obtained during the period of data capture, the largest of which were from Italy (136; 33%), Australia (55; 22%), Croatia (29; 7%), Serbia (26; 6%), and the United States (21; 5%). Most respondents belonged to laboratories in general hospitals (208; 51%), followed by laboratories in university hospitals (104; 26%), and the private sector (94; 23%). The majority of respondents (i.e., 246; 60%) indicated the use of fibrinogen equivalent unit for expressing D-dimer results, with significant heterogeneities across countries and health care settings. The highest prevalence of laboratories indicated they were using "ng/mL" (139; 34%), followed by "mg/L" (136; 33%), and "µg/L" (73; 18%), with significant heterogeneity across countries but not among different health care settings. Expectedly, the vast majority of laboratories (379; 93%) declared to be using a fixed cutoff rather than an age-adjusted threshold, with no significant heterogeneity across countries and health care settings. The results of this survey attest that at least 28 different combinations of measurement units are currently used to report D-dimer results worldwide, and this evidence underscores the urgent need for more effective international joined efforts aimed to promote a worldwide standardization of D-dimer results reporting. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  14. Wide variation in organisation and clinical practice of paediatric intestinal failure teams: an international survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelis, Esther; de Koning, Barbara; van Winckel, Myriam; Tabbers, Merit; Hill, Susan; Hulst, Jessie

    2017-11-22

    We aimed to assess the current organisation and clinical practice of teams treating children with intestinal failure (IF) across Europe and compare the results with the current guideline. A two-part online survey was sent to all the major European specialist IF services. The first part concerned general information about the team and patients monitored. The second part concerned important care topics such as vascular access and monitoring of complications. No patient identifiers were collected. Seventy-three respondents completed the first part, representing 61 teams in 20 countries. The median number of children on parenteral nutrition (PN) at home per team was 15 (range 1-125). Teams consisted of the following members: paediatric gastroenterologist (present in 100% of the teams), dietitian (95%), specialist nurse (92%), paediatric surgeon (89%), pharmacist (82%), psychologist (66%), social worker (62%), speech therapist (48%), physiotherapist (38%), general paediatrician (33%). The second part was completed by 67/73 respondents (59/61 teams). Vascular access care was comparable with the guideline. Somatostatin analogues were prescribed by 14% of the IF teams and probiotics by 44% of the teams. Prophylactic anticoagulation was used by 46% of the teams. In 81% of the teams a multicomponent lipid emulsion containing fish oil was routinely used. Bone densitometry was regularly performed in 75% of teams, but never performed in 19%. In conclusion, there is a wide diversity of composition of IF teams and their number of patients treated. Overall, there is good compliance to the current guideline. Clinical practice that varied most was the standard use of medication such as probiotics and somatostatin analogues, and standard monitoring of long-term complications. Experience regarding specific treatment options should be shared. Moreover, international agreement on standards of care with focus on implementation of the guideline is needed to optimise care and improve

  15. Imaging the internal structure of fluid upflow zones with detailed digital Parasound echosounder surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiess, V.; Zuehlsdorff, L.; von Lom-Keil, H.; Schwenk, T.

    2001-12-01

    Sites of venting fluids both with continuous and episodic supply often reveal complex surface and internal structures, which are difficult to image and cause problems to transfer results from local sampling towards a structural reconstruction and a quantification of (average) flux rates. Detailed acoustic and seismic surveys would be required to retrieve this information, but also an appropriate environment, where fluid migration can be properly imaged from contrasts to unaffected areas. Hemipelagic sediments are most suitable, since typically reflectors are coherent and of low lateral amplitude variation and structures are continuous over distances much longer than the scale of fluid migration features. During RV Meteor Cruise M473 and RV Sonne Cruise SO 149 detailed studies were carried out in the vicinity of potential fluid upflow zones in the Lower Congo Basin at 5oS in 3000 m water depth and at the Northern Cascadia Margin in 1000 m water depth. Unexpected sampling of massive gas hydrates from the sea floor as well as of carbonate concretions, shell fragments and different liveforms indicated active fluid venting in a typically hemipelagic realm. The acoustic signature of such zones includes columnar blanking, pockmark depressions at the sea floor, association with small offset faults (ParaDigMA System for further processing and display, to image the spatial structure of the upflow zones. Due to the high data density amplitudes and other acoustic properties could be investigated in a 3D volume and time slices as well as reflector surfaces were analyzed. Pronounced lateral variations of reflection amplitudes within a complex pattern indicate potential pathways for fluid/gas migration and occurrences of near-surface gas hydrate deposits, which may be used to trace detailed surface evidence from side scan sonar imaging down to depth and support dedicated sampling.

  16. Contemporary Management of Achalasia by Pediatric Surgeons: A Survey of the International Pediatric Endosurgical Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Joanna L; Rentea, Rebecca M; St Peter, Shawn D

    2016-07-01

    Achalasia is a rare neurodegenerative disorder of the esophagus. Surgical repair consists of esophagomyotomy, often in conjunction with an antireflux procedure. We sought to determine practice patterns in surgical treatment of pediatric achalasia. Data regarding preferences were collected as part of a comprehensive online-based survey sent to members of the International Pediatric Endosurgery Group (IPEG) completed by 191 surgeons of which 141 performed esophagomyotomies for achalasia. Procedures performed per surgeon were 1-2 (n = 21, 15%); 3-5 (n = 49, 34%); 6-10 (n = 39, 28%); 11-20 (n = 21, 15%); >20 (n = 11, 8%). Most approached the operation laparoscopically (n = 127, 90%). Workup before esophageal myotomy consisted of a diagnostic esophagram (n = 133, 94%) or manometry (n = 102, 73%). Only 60% of surgeons (n = 84) required an EGD. No preference observed in division location of the phrenoesophageal ligament for mobilization of the esophagus. There was a predominant preference for hook cautery (n = 82, 58%) over harmonic shears (n = 30, 21%), heated sealing device LigaSure™ (n = 18, 13%), and other devices (n = 11, 8%) for muscle division. Intraoperatively, 57% (n = 80) had endoscopy and 50% (n = 71) had postoperative esophagram before initiation of enteral feeding. For antireflux procedure, Thal/Dor approach was performed most frequently (n = 111, 79%) followed by the Toupet (n = 18, 13%) and Nissen (n = 4, 3%) and none (n = 7, 5%). Diet restrictions were provided in 76% (n = 107) of postoperative patients. Given the infrequency of achalasia in children, there are a range of treatment plans among pediatric surgeons. We have identified current practices as a first step in developing more standard treatment pathways.

  17. An international survey to identify the intrinsic and extrinsic factors of research studies most likely to change orthopaedic practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornley, P; de Sa, D; Evaniew, N; Farrokhyar, F; Bhandari, M; Ghert, M

    2016-04-01

    Evidence -based medicine (EBM) is designed to inform clinical decision-making within all medical specialties, including orthopaedic surgery. We recently published a pilot survey of the Canadian Orthopaedic Association (COA) membership and demonstrated that the adoption of EBM principles is variable among Canadian orthopaedic surgeons. The objective of this study was to conduct a broader international survey of orthopaedic surgeons to identify characteristics of research studies perceived as being most influential in informing clinical decision-making. A 29-question electronic survey was distributed to the readership of an established orthopaedic journal with international readership. The survey aimed to analyse the influence of both extrinsic (journal quality, investigator profiles, etc.) and intrinsic characteristics (study design, sample size, etc.) of research studies in relation to their influence on practice patterns. A total of 353 surgeons completed the survey. Surgeons achieved consensus on the 'importance' of three key designs on their practices: randomised controlled trials (94%), meta-analyses (75%) and systematic reviews (66%). The vast majority of respondents support the use of current evidence over historical clinical training; however subjective factors such as journal reputation (72%) and investigator profile (68%) continue to influence clinical decision-making strongly. Although intrinsic factors such as study design and sample size have some influence on clinical decision-making, surgeon respondents are equally influenced by extrinsic factors such as investigator reputation and perceived journal quality.Cite this article: Dr M. Ghert. An international survey to identify the intrinsic and extrinsic factors of research studies most likely to change orthopaedic practice. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:130-136. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.54.2000578. © 2016 Ghert et al.

  18. Predictors, Quality Markers, and Economics of Volunteering Internationally: Results from a Comprehensive Survey of American Society of Plastic Surgeons Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Joyce K; Schoenbrunner, Anna R; Kelley, Kristen D; Gosman, Amanda A

    2017-09-01

    Plastic surgeons have a long history of international volunteer work. To date, there have been no outcome-based studies among surgeons who volunteer internationally. The purpose of this study was to describe predictors of volunteering, clinical quality markers, and economics of international volunteering among American plastic surgeons. A cross-sectional validated e-mail survey tool was sent to all board-certified plastic surgeons by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. The survey response rate was 15 percent (745 total individuals), of which 283 respondents traveled within the past 5 years. Analysis was performed in R. Stepwise multivariate logistic regression was performed to determine the predictors of death/complication. Respondents reported high use of medical records, follow-up care, and host affiliation. Fewer than half of all respondents reported use of international safety surgery guidelines, and the majority of respondents reported volunteering abroad outside of their scope of practice. The majority of children younger than 5 years were not cared for by a pediatric anesthesiologist. The majority of participants reported personally spending more than $1000 on their last trip and performing surgery estimated to be worth on average $28,000 each. International surgical volunteer trips attempt to ease the global burden of surgical disease. The authors' study reports variation in quality of care provided on these trips. Most significantly, the majority of children younger than 5 years were not cared for by a pediatric anesthesiologist, and many plastic surgeons operated outside of their scope of practice.

  19. Internal Migration of Canadian Immigrants, 1993-2004: Evidence from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Bruce Newbold

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Combining the 1993, 1996, and 1999 six-year panels of the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics Master Files, the purpose of the paper is twofold. First, it examines the migration and distribution patterns of the foreign-born across Census Metropolitan Areas (CMAs. Second, it examines how internal migration modeling results may differ whether pre- and post-migration measures are used. Results suggest that internal migration of the foreign-born generally does not increase their dispersion across Canada, with the foreign-born primarily choosing one of the three immigrant gateway cities of Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver, or moving to other relatively large CMAs.

  20. Positronium in the AEgIS experiment: study on its emission from nanochanneled samples and design of a new apparatus for Rydberg excitations

    CERN Document Server

    Di Noto, Lea

    This experimental thesis has been done in the framework of AEgIS (Antimatter Experiment: Gravity, Interferometry, Spectroscopy), an experiment installed at CERN, whose primary goal is the measurement of the Earth's gravitational acceleration on anti-hydrogen. The antiatoms will be produced by the charge exchange reaction, where a cloud of Ps in Rydberg states interacts with cooled trapped antiprotons. Since the charge exchange cross section depends on Ps velocity and quantum number, the velocity distribution of Ps emitted by a positron-positronium converter as well as its excitation in Rydberg states have to be studied and optimized. In this thesis Ps cooling and emission into vacuum from nanochannelled silicon targets was studied by performing Time of Flight measurements with a dedicated apparatus conceived to receive the slow positron beam as produced at the Trento laboratory or at the NEPOMUC facility at Munich. Measurements were done by varying the positron implantation energy, the sample temperature and ...

  1. Cross-section analyses of attitudes towards science and nature from the International Social Survey Programme 1993, 2000, and 2010 surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Joseph Anthony L

    2015-04-01

    This paper explores public attitudes towards science and nature in twelve countries using data from the International Social Survey Programme environment modules of 1993, 2000, and 2010. Analysis of attitude items indicates technocentric and pessimistic dimensions broadly related to the Dominant Social Paradigm and New Environmental Paradigm. A bi-axial dimension scale is utilized to classify respondents among four environmental knowledge orientations. Discernible and significant patterns are found among countries and their populations. Relationships with other substantial variables in the surveys are discussed and findings show that the majority of industrialized countries are clustered in the rational ecologist categorization with respondents possessing stronger ecological consciousness and optimism towards the role of modern institutions, science, and technology in solving environmental problems. © The Author(s) 2013.

  2. Equity of access to primary healthcare for vulnerable populations: the IMPACT international online survey of innovations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Lauralie; Furler, John; Densley, Konstancja; Haggerty, Jeannie; Russell, Grant; Levesque, Jean-Frederic; Gunn, Jane

    2016-04-12

    Improving access to primary healthcare (PHC) for vulnerable populations is important for achieving health equity, yet this remains challenging. Evidence of effective interventions is rather limited and fragmented. We need to identify innovative ways to improve access to PHC for vulnerable populations, and to clarify which elements of health systems, organisations or services (supply-side dimensions of access) and abilities of patients or populations (demand-side dimensions of access) need to be strengthened to achieve transformative change. The work reported here was conducted as part of IMPACT (Innovative Models Promoting Access-to-Care Transformation), a 5-year Canadian-Australian research program aiming to identify, implement and trial best practice interventions to improve access to PHC for vulnerable populations. We undertook an environmental scan as a broad screening approach to identify the breadth of current innovations from the field. We distributed a brief online survey to an international audience of PHC researchers, practitioners, policy makers and stakeholders using a combined email and social media approach. Respondents were invited to describe a program, service, approach or model of care that they considered innovative in helping vulnerable populations to get access to PHC. We used descriptive statistics to characterise the innovations and conducted a qualitative framework analysis to further examine the text describing each innovation. Seven hundred forty-four responses were recorded over a 6-week period. 240 unique examples of innovations originating from 14 countries were described, the majority from Canada and Australia. Most interventions targeted a diversity of population groups, were government funded and delivered in a community health, General Practice or outreach clinic setting. Interventions were mainly focused on the health sector and directed at organisational and/or system level determinants of access (supply-side). Few innovations

  3. Trauma-informed care for children in the ambulance: international survey among pre-hospital providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alisic, Eva; Tyler, Mark P; Giummarra, Melita J; Kassam-Adams, Rahim; Gouweloos, Juul; Landolt, Markus A; Kassam-Adams, Nancy

    2017-01-01

    Background: Pre-hospital providers, such as paramedics and emergency medical technicians, are in a position to provide key emotional support to injured children and their families. Objective: Our goal was to examine (a) pre-hospital providers' knowledge of traumatic stress in children, attitudes towards psychosocial aspects of care, and confidence in providing psychosocial care, (b) variations in knowledge, attitudes, and confidence according to demographic and professional characteristics, and (c) training preferences of pre-hospital providers regarding psychosocial care to support paediatric patients and their families. Method: We conducted a cross-sectional, online survey among an international sample of 812 pre-hospital providers from high-income countries. The questionnaire was adapted from a measure for a similar study among Emergency Department staff, and involved 62 items in 7 main categories (e.g. personal and work characteristics, knowledge of paediatric traumatic stress, and confidence regarding 18 elements of psychosocial care). The main analyses comprised descriptive statistics and multiple regression analyses. Results: On average, respondents answered 2.7 ( SD  = 1.59) out of seven knowledge questions correctly. Respondents with higher knowledge scores were more often female, parent of a child under 17, and reported that at least 10% of their patients were children. A majority of participants (83.5%) saw all 18 aspects of psychosocial care as part of their job. Providers felt moderately confident ( M  = 3.2, SD  = 0.45) regarding their skills in psychosocial care, which was predicted by gender (female), having more experience, having a larger proportion of child patients, and having received training in psychosocial care in the past five years. Most respondents (89.7%) wanted to gain more knowledge and skills regarding psychosocial care for injured children. In terms of training format, they preferred an interactive website or a one-off group

  4. Gaps in Radiation Therapy Awareness: Results From an Educational Multi-institutional Survey of US Internal Medicine Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaverdian, Narek; Yoo, Sun Mi; Cook, Ryan; Chang, Eric M; Jiang, Naomi; Yuan, Ye; Sandler, Kiri; Steinberg, Michael; Lee, Percy

    2017-08-01

    Internists and primary care providers play a growing role in cancer care. We therefore evaluated the awareness of radiation therapy in general and specifically the clinical utility of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) among current US internal medicine residents. A web-based institutional review board-approved multi-institutional survey was distributed to US internal medicine residency programs. The survey evaluated trainee demographic characteristics, baseline radiation oncology awareness, knowledge of the role of SBRT for early-stage NSCLC, and whether the survey successfully improved awareness. Thirty US internal medicine programs participated, with an overall participant response rate of 46% (1177 of 2551). Of the trainees, 93% (n=1076) reported no radiation oncology education in their residency, 39% (n=452) reported confidence in knowing when to consult radiation oncology in an oncologic emergency, and 26% (n=293) reported confidence in knowing when to consult radiation oncology in the setting of a newly diagnosed cancer. Of the participants, 76% (n=850) correctly identified that surgical resection is the standard treatment in operable early-stage NSCLC, but only 50% (n=559) of participants would recommend SBRT to a medically inoperable patient, followed by 31% of participants (n=347) who were unsure of the most appropriate treatment, and 10% (n=117) who recommended waiting to offer palliative therapy. Ninety percent of participants (n=1029) agreed that they would benefit from further training on when to consult radiation oncology. Overall, 96% (n=1072) indicated that the survey increased their knowledge and awareness of the role of SBRT. The majority of participating trainees received no education in radiation oncology in their residency, reported a lack of confidence regarding when to consult radiation oncology, and overwhelmingly agreed that they would benefit from further training. These findings

  5. [Accepted Manuscript] Mental health care utilisation among internally displaced persons in Ukraine: results from a nation-wide survey.

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, B.; Makhashvili, N.; Javakhishvili, J.; Karachevskyy, A.; Kharchenko, N.; Shpiker, M.; Richardson, E.

    2017-01-01

    Aims There are an estimated 1.5 million internally displaced persons (IDPs) in Ukraine because of the armed conflict in the east of the country. The aim of this paper is to examine utilisation patterns of mental health and psychosocial support (MHPSS) care among IDPs in Ukraine. A cross-sectional survey design was used. Data were collected from 2203 adult IDPs throughout Ukraine between March and May 2016. Data on mental health care utilisation were collected, along with outcomes including po...

  6. A Global Oral Health Survey of professional opinion using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougall, Alison; Molina, Gustavo F; Eschevins, Caroline; Faulks, Denise

    2015-06-01

    The concept of oral health is frequently reduced to the absence of disease, despite existing conceptual models exploring the wider determinants of oral health and quality of life. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) (WHO) is designed to qualify functional, social and environmental aspects of health. This survey aimed to reach a consensual description of adult oral health, derived from the ICF using international professional opinion. The Global Oral Health Survey involved a two-round, online survey concerning factors related to oral health including functioning, participation and social environment. Four hundred eighty-six oral health professionals from 74 countries registered online. Professionals were pooled into 18 groups of six WHO world regions and three professional groups. In a randomised stratification process, eight professionals from each pool (n=144) completed the survey. The first round consisted of eight open-ended questions. Open expression replies were analysed for meaningful concepts and linked using established rules to the ICF. In Round 2, items were rated for their relevance to oral health (88% response rate). Eighty-nine ICF items and 30 other factors were considered relevant by at least 80% of participants. International professionals reached consensus on a holistic description of oral health, which could be qualified and quantified using the ICF. These results represent the first step towards developing an ICF Core Set in Oral Health, which would provide a practical tool for reporting outcome measures in clinical practice, for research and epidemiology, and for the improvement of interdisciplinary communication regarding oral health. Professional consensus reached in this survey is the foundation stone for developing an ICF Core Set in Oral Health, allowing the holistic aspects of oral health to be qualified and quantified. This tool is necessary to widen our approach to clinical decision making

  7. When Old Habits Train a New Generation: Findings From a National Survey of Internal Medicine Program Directors on Procedural Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricotta, Daniel N; Smith, C Christopher; McSparron, Jakob I; Chaudhry, Saima I; McDonald, Furman S; Huang, Grace C

    2017-11-01

    Resident physicians routinely perform bedside procedures that pose substantial risk to patients. However, no standard programmatic approach to supervision and procedural competency assessment among residents currently exists. The authors performed a national survey of internal medicine (IM) program directors to examine procedural assessment and supervision practices of IM residency programs. Procedures chosen were those commonly performed by medicine residents at the bedside. Of the 368 IM programs, 226 (61%) completed the survey. Programs reported the predominant method of training as 171 (74%) apprenticeship and 106 (46%) as module based. The majority of programs used direct observation to attest to competence, with 55% to 62% relying on credentialed residents. Most programs also relied on a minimum number of procedures to determine competence (64%-88%), 72% of which reported 5 procedures (a lapsed historical standard). This national survey demonstrates that procedural assessment practices for IM residents are insufficiently robust and may put patients at undue risk.

  8. Essential literature for the chiropractic profession: Results and implementation challenges from a survey of international chiropractic faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansholt, Barbara A.; Salsbury, Stacie A.; Corber, Lance G.; Stites, John S.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Scientific literature applicable to chiropractic practice proliferates in quantity, quality, and source. Chiropractic is a worldwide profession and varies in scope between states or provinces and from country to country. It is logical to consider that the focus and emphasis of chiropractic education varies between programs as well. This original research study endeavored to determine “essential literature” recommended by chiropractic faculty. The purpose of this article is (1) to share our results and (2) to promote discussion and explore means for future collaboration of chiropractic faculty through a worldwide platform. Methods: A 2-phase recruitment occurred initially at the institutional level and subsequently at the faculty level. A Web-based survey used qualitative data collection methods to gather bibliographic citations. Descriptive statistics were calculated for demographics, and citation responses were ranked per number of recommendations, grouped into categories, and tabulated per journal source and publication date. Results: Forty-one chiropractic programs were contacted, resulting in 30 participating chiropractic programs (16 US and 14 international). Forty-five faculty members completed the entire survey, submitting 126 peer-reviewed publications and 25 additional citations. Readings emphasized clinical management of spine pain, the science of spinal manipulation, effectiveness of manual therapies, teaching of chiropractic techniques, outcomes assessments, and professional issues. Conclusion: A systematic approach to surveying educators in international chiropractic institutions was accomplished. The results of the survey provide a list of essential literature for the chiropractic profession. We recommend establishing a chiropractic faculty registry for improved communication and collaboration. PMID:28768114

  9. National survey of international electives for global health in undergraduate medical education in Japan, 2011-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tomio; Nishigori, Hiroshi

    2018-02-01

    Interest in global health in medical education is increasing in Western countries, whereas data from non-Western countries is scarce. Here, we conducted a nationwide study of international clinical electives at Japanese medical schools from 2011 to 2013. We constructed a 28-item cross-sectional survey in Japanese to investigate the rate and characteristics of both Japanese students going abroad and international students coming on exchange to Japan. The surveys were sent to the administrative offices of all 80 Japanese medical schools in each of the three years, through the Japan Medical Education Foundation. All 80 medical schools responded to the questionnaire (response rate, 100%). An average of 70 of the 80 medical universities provided exchange programs across the three years to allow students to travel abroad as part of the school curriculum and obtain academic credit. The schools provided support in the form of in- and outside-class preparatory programs, tuition fee exemptions and housing. The most popular destinations for Japanese students going abroad were Europe and North America, which may reflect the desire of Japanese students to acquire medical knowledge or experience through exposure to the English language. In contrast, the most common countries of origin of international exchange students coming to Japan were Asian countries such as South Korea, Thailand and Taiwan, with pediatrics being the most popular elective. Foreign exchange programs are becoming increasingly incorporated into the Japanese medical education curriculum and can help to strengthen international partnerships and collaborations.

  10. National survey of international electives for global health in undergraduate medical education in Japan, 2011–2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tomio; Nishigori, Hiroshi

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Interest in global health in medical education is increasing in Western countries, whereas data from non-Western countries is scarce. Here, we conducted a nationwide study of international clinical electives at Japanese medical schools from 2011 to 2013. We constructed a 28-item cross-sectional survey in Japanese to investigate the rate and characteristics of both Japanese students going abroad and international students coming on exchange to Japan. The surveys were sent to the administrative offices of all 80 Japanese medical schools in each of the three years, through the Japan Medical Education Foundation. All 80 medical schools responded to the questionnaire (response rate, 100%). An average of 70 of the 80 medical universities provided exchange programs across the three years to allow students to travel abroad as part of the school curriculum and obtain academic credit. The schools provided support in the form of in- and outside-class preparatory programs, tuition fee exemptions and housing. The most popular destinations for Japanese students going abroad were Europe and North America, which may reflect the desire of Japanese students to acquire medical knowledge or experience through exposure to the English language. In contrast, the most common countries of origin of international exchange students coming to Japan were Asian countries such as South Korea, Thailand and Taiwan, with pediatrics being the most popular elective. Foreign exchange programs are becoming increasingly incorporated into the Japanese medical education curriculum and can help to strengthen international partnerships and collaborations. PMID:29581617

  11. SURVEY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    SURVEY er en udbredt metode og benyttes inden for bl.a. samfundsvidenskab, humaniora, psykologi og sundhedsforskning. Også uden for forskningsverdenen er der mange organisationer som f.eks. konsulentfirmaer og offentlige institutioner samt marketingsafdelinger i private virksomheder, der arbejder...... med surveys. Denne bog gennemgår alle surveyarbejdets faser og giver en praktisk indføring i: • design af undersøgelsen og udvælgelse af stikprøver, • formulering af spørgeskemaer samt indsamling og kodning af data, • metoder til at analysere resultaterne...

  12. Public Health Services Utilization and Its Determinants among Internal Migrants in China: Evidence from a Nationally Representative Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingya; Lin, Senlin; Liang, Di; Qian, Yi; Zhang, Donglan; Hou, Zhiyuan

    2017-09-01

    There have been obstacles for internal migrants in China in accessing local public health services for some time. This study aimed to estimate the utilization of local public health services and its determinants among internal migrants. Data were from the 2014 and 2015 nationally representative cross-sectional survey of internal migrants in China. Multivariate logistic regressions were used to estimate the relationship between socioeconomic, migration, and demographic characteristics and public health services utilization. Our results showed that internal migrants in more developed eastern regions used less public health services. Those with higher socioeconomic status were more likely to use public health services. The years of living in the city of residence were positively associated with the utilization of public health services. Compared to migration within the city, migration across provinces significantly reduced the probability of using health records (OR = 0.88, 95% CI: 0.86-0.90), health education (OR = 0.97, 95% CI: 0.94-1.00), and health education on non-communicable diseases (OR = 0.92, 95% CI: 0.89-0.95) or through the Internet (OR = 0.96, 95% CI: 0.94-0.99). This study concludes that public health services coverage for internal migrants has seen great improvement due to government subsidies. Internal migrants with lower socioeconomic status and across provinces need to be targeted. More attention should be given to the local government in the developed eastern regions in order to narrow the regional gaps.

  13. International survey of methods used in health technology assessment (HTA: does practice meet the principles proposed for good research?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephens JM

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Jennifer M Stephens,1 Bonnie Handke,2 Jalpa A Doshi3 On behalf of the HTA Principles Working Group, part of the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR HTA Special Interest Group (SIG1Pharmerit International, Bethesda, MD, USA; 2Medtronic Neuromodulation, Minneapolis, MN, USA; 3Center for Evidence-Based Practice and Center for Health Incentives and Behavioral Economics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USAObjective: To describe research methods used internationally in health technology assessment (HTA and health-care reimbursement policies; compare the survey findings on research methods and processes to published HTA principles; and discuss important issues/trends reported by HTA bodies related to current research methods and applications of the HTA process.Methods: Representatives from HTA bodies worldwide were recruited to complete an online survey consisting of 47 items within four topics: (1 organizational information and process, (2 primary HTA methodologies and importance of attributes, (3 HTA application and dissemination, and (4 quality of HTA, including key issues. Results were presented as a comparison of current HTA practices and research methods to published HTA principles.Results: The survey was completed by 30 respondents representing 16 countries in five major regions, Australia (n = 3, Canada (n = 2, Europe (n = 17, Latin America (n = 2, and the United States (n = 6. The most common methodologies used were systematic review, meta-analysis, and economic modeling. The most common attributes evaluated were effectiveness (more commonly than efficacy, cost-effectiveness, safety, and quality of life. The attributes assessed, relative importance of the attributes, and conformance with HTA principles varied by region/country. Key issues and trends facing HTA bodies included standardizing methods for economic evaluations and grading of evidence, lack of evidence

  14. Linking Errors between Two Populations and Tests: A Case Study in International Surveys in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastedt, Dirk; Desa, Deana

    2015-01-01

    This simulation study was prompted by the current increased interest in linking national studies to international large-scale assessments (ILSAs) such as IEA's TIMSS, IEA's PIRLS, and OECD's PISA. Linkage in this scenario is achieved by including items from the international assessments in the national assessments on the premise that the average…

  15. 76 FR 58243 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Survey of International Air Travelers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-20

    ...'s Office of Travel & Tourism Industries (OTTI), Phone: (202) 482-0140, and fax: (202) 482- 2887. E... Travel and Tourism Industries (OTTI) of the International Trade Administration provides source data... travel and tourism related acts to collect and publish comprehensive international travel and tourism...

  16. Some gender issues in educational computer use: results of an international comparative survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen Reinen, I.A.M.; Plomp, T.

    1993-01-01

    In the framework of the Computers in Education international study of the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA), data have been collected concerning the use of computers in 21 countries. This article examines some results regarding the involvement of women in

  17. A Survey of Clinical Skills Evaluation Practices in Internal Medicine Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Linda L.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    The evaluation processes of 75 internal medicine residencies visited by the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) in 1978-82 are reviewed. The methods of evaluation used by the residencies are described and compared with the findings from an earlier cycle of visits in 1972-75. (Author/MLW)

  18. Delphi survey of international pharmacology experts: an attempt to derive international recommendations for use of medicine in breastfeeding women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Lisa H; Ryan, Kath; Barnett, Clare

    2015-04-01

    There are currently no common guidelines used by health professionals to aid decision-making around the use of medicines during breastfeeding. Several specialized books, Web sites, and drug information services exist; however, all use slightly different criteria to derive their "safety hierarchy." The aim of this study was to build consensus among international experts in pharmacology and breastfeeding to develop an agreed-upon classification system for safety of medicine use in breastfeeding women. A three-round Web-based Delphi qualitative research design was used. Seventeen experts in pharmacy/pharmacology and breastfeeding identified 15 key parameters that are used to inform decisions about medicines and breastfeeding. The most important parameters about the infant were the age and health of the child, and those of the medicine were the safety profile and experience of use in infants. The experts had a clear understanding of the complexity of decision-making when prescribing for breastfeeding women. Although the current number or letter classification systems do not incorporate important considerations such as infant age, a longer "descriptive text" incorporating all considerations may be impractical in busy clinical practice. Although clinicians and lay people would appreciate a simple classification scheme, in practice, decision-making about the safety of medicines for breastfeeding women is complex.

  19. International survey of veterinarians to assess the importance of competencies in professional practice and education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bok, H.G.; Teunissen, P.W.; Boerboom, T.B.; Rhind, S.M.; Baillie, S.; Tegzes, J.; Annandale, H.; Matthew, S.; Torgersen, A.; Hecker, K.G.; Hardi-Landerer, C.M.; Gomez-Lucia, E.; Ahmad, B.; Muijtjens, A.M.; Jaarsma, D.A.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der; Beukelen, P. van

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the perceived importance of specific competencies in professional veterinary practice and education among veterinarians in several countries. DESIGN: Survey-based prospective study. SAMPLE: 1,137 veterinarians in 10 countries. PROCEDURES: Veterinarians were invited via email

  20. An international literature survey on energy-economic growth nexus: Evidence from country-specific studies

    OpenAIRE

    Omri, Anis

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, an extensive review of the rapidly growing in the literature on the nexus between economic growth and four types of energy consumption : total energy consumption, electricity consumption, nuclear consumption, and renewable consumption. The various hypotheses associated with the causal interaction between these variables along with a survey of the empirical literature are also discussed. The survey focuses on country coverage, periods, modeling techniques, and empirical conclusi...

  1. Editorial policy in reporting ethical processes: A survey of 'instructions for authors' in International Indexed Dental Journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navaneetha, Cugati

    2011-04-01

    The International Committee of Medical Journal Editors expects authors to report if their studies were carried out in accordance with the International Ethical Guidelines and Declaration of Helsinki; and inform readers regarding the same. To determine the proportion of International Indexed Dental Journals reporting on ethical clearance for human and animal research, obtaining of informed consent and / or assent, and the conduction of research in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki and International Medical Research, 2006. A cross-sectional survey of 'instructions for authors,' for analysis of editorial policy on ethical processes, was done. One hundred and twenty-six dental journals (which included 50 general and 76 specialties) were reviewed for reporting, with regard to the Ethical Committee Approval for human and animal researches, obtaining of informed consent / assent from the research participants, and research in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki as well as International Medical Research 2006 were analyzed. Descriptive statistics was used and results were expressed in percentages. Of the 126 dental journals, 57 (45.23%) reported having obtained approval from the Ethics Committee, 33 (26.19%) were instructed about the Animal Ethics Committee approval, and 38 (30.15%) insisted on obtaining and reporting informed consent / assent. 41 (32.53%) journals expected authors to mention the research being conducted according to Declaration of Helsinki and and 3 (2.38%) journals required researches to be conducted in accordance with International Medical Research, 2006. A significant proportion of international indexed dental journals did not provide instructions to authors to report on the ethical approval, informed consent and / assent, and research conduction according to the Declaration of Helsinki as well as the International Medical Research, 2006.

  2. Editorial policy in reporting ethical processes: A survey of ′instructions for authors′ in International Indexed Dental Journals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cugati Navaneetha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The International Committee of Medical Journal Editors expects authors to report if their studies were carried out in accordance with the International Ethical Guidelines and Declaration of Helsinki; and inform readers regarding the same. Aims: To determine the proportion of International Indexed Dental Journals reporting on ethical clearance for human and animal research, obtaining of informed consent and / or assent, and the conduction of research in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki and International Medical Research, 2006. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional survey of ′instructions for authors,′ for analysis of editorial policy on ethical processes, was done. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty-six dental journals (which included 50 general and 76 specialties were reviewed for reporting, with regard to the Ethical Committee Approval for human and animal researches, obtaining of informed consent / assent from the research participants, and research in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki as well as International Medical Research 2006 were analyzed. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive statistics was used and results were expressed in percentages. Results: Of the 126 dental journals, 57 (45.23% reported having obtained approval from the Ethics Committee, 33 (26.19% were instructed about the Animal Ethics Committee approval, and 38 (30.15% insisted on obtaining and reporting informed consent / assent. 41 (32.53% journals expected authors to mention the research being conducted according to Declaration of Helsinki and and 3 (2.38% journals required researches to be conducted in accordance with International Medical Research, 2006. Conclusions: A significant proportion of international indexed dental journals did not provide instructions to authors to report on the ethical approval, informed consent and / assent, and research conduction according to the Declaration of Helsinki as well as the

  3. The increasing globalization of health librarianship: a brief survey of international trends and activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madge, Bruce; Plutchak, T Scott

    2005-09-01

    Throughout his career, Leslie Morton was interested in international developments in health librarianship. In memory of the work he did in this field, the authors examine current developments in international health librarianship and describe some current themes. The authors draw from their combined experience in international activities and the published information available from selected library associations and related organizations. Although many of the major health library associations around the world are tackling agendas specific to their own country, issues of international concern are emerging in common. These are grouped around globalization, partnerships and co-operation, electronic access, especially open access, and working with the developing world in a number of different ways. Of course, the basis of all of these initiatives is to improve the health of the population by providing the best possible access to materials. Professional associations can provide a useful institutional infrastructure for addressing issues of international interest. Librarians should encourage their associations to develop these international initiatives and to seek out new and innovative ways to work together across international boundaries.

  4. Social Media in the Academic Life of International Students in Turkey: A Survey Study

    OpenAIRE

    MUYINGO, Rajab Idd; KIRIK, Ali Murat

    2017-01-01

    As social media becomes the idealspace of sharing information in a simple and convenient way, it continues toattract numerous scholarly studies. This paper investigates the peculiarity ofsocial media in the academic life of international students in Turkey, with anaim of ascertaining the social media tools used by international students.Secondly is to scrutinize the academic purposes of social media usage among internationalstudents in Turkey. The third objective is to determine the academic ...

  5. The medicinal use of cannabis and cannabinoids--an international cross-sectional survey on administration forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazekamp, Arno; Ware, Mark A; Muller-Vahl, Kirsten R; Abrams, Donald; Grotenhermen, Franjo

    2013-01-01

    Cannabinoids, including tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol, are the most important active constituents of the cannabis plant. Over recent years, cannabinoid-based medicines (CBMs) have become increasingly available to patients in many countries, both as pharmaceutical products and as herbal cannabis (marijuana). While there seems to be a demand for multiple cannabinoid-based therapeutic products, specifically for symptomatic amelioration in chronic diseases, therapeutic effects of different CBMs have only been directly compared in a few clinical studies. The survey presented here was performed by the International Association for Cannabinoid Medicines (IACM), and is meant to contribute to the understanding of cannabinoid-based medicine by asking patients who used cannabis or cannabinoids detailed questions about their experiences with different methods of intake. The survey was completed by 953 participants from 31 countries, making this the largest international survey on a wide variety of users of cannabinoid-based medicine performed so far. In general, herbal non-pharmaceutical CBMs received higher appreciation scores by participants than pharmaceutical products containing cannabinoids. However, the number of patients who reported experience with pharmaceutical products was low, limiting conclusions on preferences. Nevertheless, the reported data may be useful for further development of safe and effective medications based on cannabis and single cannabinoids.

  6. Data for the Oxford Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Study international survey of vascular surgery professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regent Lee

    2017-10-01

    This Data-in-Brief article contains a detailed method for the conduct of this survey and additional original data. In this survey, we also provided vascular surgery colleagues with contemporary epidemiologic and surgical outcome data. This was followed by a hypothetical scenario whereby a patient had just been diagnosed with a small (40 mm AAA and a novel biomarker predicted it to be fast growing in the coming years. We assessed the vascular professionals' perception of the patient's preference for management in this scenario, and their willingness to refer patients for a surgical trial that investigates the outcome of early versus late surgery in this setting. The survey then asked the vascular professionals to assume the role of the patient, and provided their own preferences in such a scenario.

  7. International multi-site survey on the use of online support groups in bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer, Rita; Conell, Jörn; Glenn, Tasha

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Peer support is an established component of recovery from bipolar disorder, and online support groups may offer opportunities to expand the use of peer support at the patient's convenience. Prior research in bipolar disorder has reported value from online support groups. AIMS......: To understand the use of online support groups by patients with bipolar disorder as part of a larger project about information seeking. METHODS: The results are based on a one-time, paper-based anonymous survey about information seeking by patients with bipolar disorder, which was translated into 12 languages....... The survey was completed between March 2014 and January 2016 and included questions on the use of online support groups. All patients were diagnosed by a psychiatrist. Analysis included descriptive statistics and general estimating equations to account for correlated data. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: The survey...

  8. Twitter Strategies for Web-Based Surveying: Descriptive Analysis From the International Concussion Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Sharief; Düking, Peter; Mellalieu, Stephen D

    2016-09-01

    Social media provides researchers with an efficient means to reach and engage with a large and diverse audience. Twitter allows for the virtual social interaction among a network of users that enables researchers to recruit and administer surveys using snowball sampling. Although using Twitter to administer surveys for research is not new, strategies to improve response rates are yet to be reported. To compare the potential and actual reach of 2 Twitter accounts that administered a Web-based concussion survey to rugby players and trainers using 2 distinct Twitter-targeting strategies. Furthermore, the study sought to determine the likelihood of receiving a retweet based on the time of the day and day of the week of posting. A survey based on previous concussion research was exported to a Web-based survey website Survey Monkey. The survey comprised 2 questionnaires, one for players, and one for those involved in the game (eg, coaches and athletic trainers). The Web-based survey was administered using 2 existing Twitter accounts, with each account executing a distinct targeting strategy. A list of potential Twitter accounts to target was drawn up, together with a list of predesigned tweets. The list of accounts to target was divided into 'High-Profile' and 'Low-Profile', based on each accounts' position to attract publicity with a high social interaction potential. The potential reach (number of followers of the targeted account), and actual reach (number of retweets received by each post) between the 2 strategies were compared. The number of retweets received by each account was further analyzed to understand when the most likely time of day, and day of the week, a retweet would be received. The number of retweets received by a Twitter account decreased by 72% when using the 'high-profile strategy' compared with the 'low-profile strategy' (incidence rate ratio (IRR); 0.28, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.21-0.37, P.001) and 6 PM to 11:59 PM (IRR 1.48, 95% CI 1

  9. A quantitative survey of intern's knowledge of communication skills: an Iranian exploration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyne Owen D

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is a high priority that health care providers have effective communication skills. It has been well documented that the doctor-patient relationship is central to the delivery of high quality medical care, and it has been shown to affect patient satisfaction, to decrease the use of pain killers, to shorten hospital stays, to improve recovery from surgery and a variety of other biological, psychological and social outcomes. This study sought to quantify the current knowledge of interns in Iran about communication skills. Methods A cross-sectional study using a self-report questionnaire was conducted among interns. Data analysis was based on 223 questionnaires. The internal consistency of the items was 0.8979. Results Overall, knowledge levels were unsatisfactory. Results indicated that interns had a limited knowledge of communication skills, including identification of communication skills. In addition, there was a significant difference between the mean scores of interns on breaking bad news and sex education. The confidence of males about their communication skills was significantly higher than for females. Analysis of the total scores by age and sex showed that there was a statistically significant main effect for sex and the interaction with age was statistically significant. Free response comments of the interns are also discussed. Conclusions It is argued that there is a real need for integrating a communication skills course, which is linked to the various different ethnic and religious backgrounds of interns, into Iranian medical curricula. Some recommendations are made and the limitations of the study are discussed.

  10. Wide variation in organisation and clinical practice of paediatric intestinal failure teams: an international survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neelis, Esther; de Koning, Barbara; van Winckel, Myriam; Tabbers, Merit; Hill, Susan; Hulst, Jessie

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to assess the current organisation and clinical practice of teams treating children with intestinal failure (IF) across Europe and compare the results with the current guideline. A two-part online survey was sent to all the major European specialist IF services. The first part concerned

  11. International survey of veterinarians to assess the importance of competencies in professional practice and education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bok, Harold G. J.; Teunissen, Pim W.; Boerboom, Tobias B. B.; Rhind, Susan M.; Baillie, Sarah; Tegzes, John; Annandale, Henry; Matthew, Susan; Torgersen, Anne; Hecker, Kent G.; Härdi-Landerer, Christina M.; Gomez-Lucia, Esperanza; Ahmad, Bashir; Muijtjens, Arno M. M.; Jaarsma, Debbie A. D. C.; van der Vleuten, Cees P. M.; van Beukelen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    To determine the perceived importance of specific competencies in professional veterinary practice and education among veterinarians in several countries. Survey-based prospective study. 1,137 veterinarians in 10 countries. Veterinarians were invited via email to participate in the study. A

  12. [Recent trends in international migration to Venezuela: results of a national migration survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrealba, R

    1988-12-01

    The author discusses the results of a national migration and household survey conducted in Venezuela in 1987. Incoming migration is described and the sociodemographic characteristics of resident aliens are analyzed, including place of origin, occupational status, and sex. (SUMMARY IN ENG)

  13. The Continued Salience of Methodological Issues for Measuring Psychiatric Disorders in International Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tausig, Mark; Subedi, Janardan; Broughton, Christopher; Pokimica, Jelena; Huang, Yinmei; Santangelo, Susan L.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the extent to which methodological concerns explicitly addressed by the designers of the World Mental Health Surveys persist in the results that were obtained using the WMH-CIDI instrument. We compared rates of endorsement of mental illness symptoms in the United States (very high) and Nepal (very low) as they were affected by…

  14. The International scale interval study: improving the comparability of responses to survey questions about happiness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenhoven, R.

    2009-01-01

    This study is about survey questions on happiness using verbal response options, such as ‘very happy’ and ‘fairly happy’. The aim is to estimate what degrees of happiness are denoted by such terms in different questions and Languages. These degrees are expressed in numerical values on a 0 to 10

  15. The international scale interval study : Improving the comparability of responses to survey questions about happiness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Veenhoven (Ruut)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThis study is about survey questions on happiness using verbal response options, such as 'very happy' and 'fairly happy'. The aim is to estimate what degrees of happiness are denoted by such terms in different questions and languages. These degrees are expressed in numerical values on a

  16. Barriers to adopting a fistula-first policy in Europe: an international survey among national experts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veer, Sabine N.; Ravani, Pietro; Coentrão, Luis; Fluck, Richard; Kleophas, Werner; Labriola, Laura; Hoischen, Susanne H.; Noordzij, Marlies; Jager, Kitty J.; van Biesen, Wim

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore how vascular access care was reimbursed, promoted, and organised at the national level in European and neighbouring countries. An electronic survey among national experts to collect country-level data. Forty-seven experts (response rate, 76%) from 37 countries

  17. Continuities and Discontinuities in Accounting Systems: 1998 Survey of ASBO International Membership in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henstock, Thomas F.

    1999-01-01

    Based on a survey of Association of School Business Officials members, this article focuses on 10 accounting system modules and how respondents felt about their system's operation and integration. Results showed solid continuity among general ledger, accounts payable, and payroll modules and discontinuities among fixed-asset and student accounting…

  18. The role of hospital payments in the adoption of new medical technologies: an international survey of current practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorenson, Corinna; Drummond, Michael; Torbica, Aleksandra; Callea, Giuditta; Mateus, Ceu

    2015-04-01

    This study examined the role of prospective payment systems in the adoption of new medical technologies across different countries. A literature review was conducted to provide background for the study and guide development of a survey instrument. The survey was disseminated to hospital payment systems experts in 15 jurisdictions. Fifty-one surveys were disseminated, with 34 returned. The surveys returned covered 14 of the 15 jurisdictions invited to participate. The majority (71%) of countries update the patient classification system and/or payment tariffs on an annual basis to try to account for new technologies. Use of short-term separate or supplementary payments for new technologies occurs in 79% of countries to ensure adequate funding and facilitate adoption. A minority (43%) of countries use evidence of therapeutic benefit and/or costs to determine or update payment tariffs, although it is somewhat more common in establishing short-term payments. The main barrier to using evidence is uncertain or unavailable clinical evidence. Almost three-fourths of respondents believed diagnosis-related group systems incentivize or deter technology adoption, depending on the particular circumstances. Improvements are needed, such as enhanced strategies for evidence generation and linking evidence of value to payments, national and international collaboration and training to improve existing practice, and flexible timelines for short-term payments. Importantly, additional research is needed to understand how different payment policies impact technology uptake as well as quality of care and costs.

  19. Female medical physicists: The results of a survey carried out by the International Organization for Medical Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsapaki, Virginia; Rehani, Madan M

    2015-06-01

    The gender composition of the existing medical physicist (MP) workforce around the world is basically unknown. The International Organization for Medical Physics (IOMP) performed a survey in order to investigate the number of MPs in countries around the world and the percentage of women MPs compared to total number of MPs. A simple online questionnaire prepared as a Google Forms survey asking the country, the total number of MPs, the number of female MPs and finally the gender of the person providing the data was sent in mid-March 2013 to six regional member organizations of IOMP, as well as contact points in many member countries. Sixty-six countries responded to the survey by mid-July 2013. Fifty two percent of those who filled the form were females, the rest males. The total number of MPs was 17,024, of which 28% were female (4807). The median values of percentages of females were 21% in the USA, 47% in Europe, 35% in Asia, 33% in Africa and 24% in Latin America. This is the first international survey that investigates the number and percentage of female MPs around the world. There are European countries that are far away from the target set by European Commission (40%) whereas in countries in the Middle East and Asia, female MPs actually outnumber males. This study is the first step in a more in-depth study that needs to be taken in near future. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Use of alumni and employer surveys for internal quality assurance of the DVM program at the University of Montreal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucet, Michèle Y; Vrins, André

    2010-01-01

    Annual alumni and employer surveys, initially designed as outcomes assessment tools, were integrated into a new internal quality assurance strategy to improve the doctor of veterinary medicine program at the University of Montreal's Faculté de Médecine Vétérinaire. Data collected annually from the classes of 2004-2007 indicated that alumni and their employers were generally satisfied with their level of preparation after one year of professional activity. Specific weaknesses were found in non-technical skills such as communication and resource management. These data were used in support of other forms of feedback to guide curricular reform.

  1. Surgeon Reported Outcome Measure for Spine Trauma an International Expert Survey Identifying Parameters Relevant for The Outcome of Subaxial Cervical Spine Injuries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sadiqi, Said; Verlaan, Jorrit Jan; Lehr, A. M.; Dvorak, Marcel F.; Kandziora, Frank; Rajasekaran, S.; Schnake, Klaus J.; Vaccaro, Alexander R.; Oner, F. C.

    2016-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN.: International web-based survey OBJECTIVE.: To identify clinical and radiological parameters that spine surgeons consider most relevant when evaluating clinical and functional outcomes of subaxial cervical spine trauma patients. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA.: While an outcome instrument

  2. Negative and positive participant responses to the composite international diagnostic interview - Results of the Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaf, R. de; Have, M.L. ten; Dorsselaer, S.A.F.M. van; Schoemaker, C.G.; Vollebergh, W.A.M.

    2004-01-01

    Little is known about the emotional responses of participants in community surveys to standardised psychiatric interviews like the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI). This study investigates the proportion of subjects responding negatively or positively to the CIDI, and identifies

  3. A Report on Health Resource Use in Internal Radiation Therapy with Radium Chloride (223Ra) (2nd Survey).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinuya, Seigo; Kato, Katsuhiko; Kamioka, Takeshi; Shimmura, Toshiyuki; Matoba, Yoshinori; Ito, Kengo

    2017-01-01

    Internal radiation therapy using radium ( 223 Ra) chloride injection ( 223 Ra injection) is already being applied in actual clinical practice, however the NHI medical technical fee for the use of 223 Ra injection has not yet been set. The Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine surveyed health resource use for internal radiation therapy using 223 Ra via questionnaires sent to medical institutions that have used 223 Ra injection. Results showed that the necessary cost per patient is 1,005,567 JPY, based on the Draft Proposal for Medical Examination Value (Ver. 7.1) of the Japanese Health Insurance Federation for Surgery. 223 Ra injection is supposed to be administered 6 times to each patient at 4-week intervals, and the fee per treatment was calculated to be 167,595 JPY. The appropriate NHI medical technical fee is thus considered to be 16,759 points per patient per treatment, which can be claimed 6 times per patient.

  4. Report of a Mental Health Survey among Chinese International Students at Yale University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xuesong; Han, Xuemei; Luo, Qianlai; Jacobs, Selby; Jean-Baptiste, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To examine the prevalence of depression and anxiety symptoms in Chinese international students, to identify factors that might be associated with these 2 symptom complexes, and to investigate their perception of mental health issues and counseling services. Participants: Chinese students ("N" = 130) at Yale University.…

  5. The urologist view of BPH progression: results of an international survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Djavan, B.; Nickel, J. C.; de la Rosette, J.; Abrams, P.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the opinion amongst the international urological community on whether benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a progressive disease.METHODS: A 15-item questionnaire was distributed to the mailing list of the publication European Urology Today as well as being accessed through the

  6. Testing Practices and Attitudes Toward Tests and Testing: An International Survey

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Evers, A.; McCormick, C. M.; Hawley, L. R.; Muñiz, J.; Balboni, G.; Bartram, D.; Boben, D.; Egeland, J.; El-Hassan, K.; Fernández-Hermida, J.R.; Fine, S.; Frans, Ö.; Gintiliéne, G.; Hagemeister, C.; Halama, P.; Iliescu, D.; Jaworowska, A.; Jiménez, P.; Manthouili, M.; Matesic, K.; Michaelsen, L.; Mogaji, A.; Morley-Kirk, J.; Rózsa, S.; Rowlands, L.; Schittekatte, M.; Sümer, H.C.; Suwartono, T.; Urbánek, Tomáš; Wechsler, S.; Zelenevska, T.; Zanev, S.; Zhang, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 2 (2017), s. 158-190 ISSN 1530-5058 Institutional support: RVO:68081740 Keywords : psychological test ing * test ing practices * test use * International Test Commission * European Federation of Psychologists' Associations Subject RIV: AN - Psychology OBOR OECD: Psychology (including human - machine relations)

  7. Testing Practices and Attitudes Toward Tests and Testing: An International Survey

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Evers, A.; McCormick, C. M.; Hawley, L. R.; Muñiz, J.; Balboni, G.; Bartram, D.; Boben, D.; Egeland, J.; El-Hassan, K.; Fernández-Hermida, J.R.; Fine, S.; Frans, Ö.; Gintiliéne, G.; Hagemeister, C.; Halama, P.; Iliescu, D.; Jaworowska, A.; Jiménez, P.; Manthouili, M.; Matesic, K.; Michaelsen, L.; Mogaji, A.; Morley-Kirk, J.; Rózsa, S.; Rowlands, L.; Schittekatte, M.; Sümer, H.C.; Suwartono, T.; Urbánek, Tomáš; Wechsler, S.; Zelenevska, T.; Zanev, S.; Zhang, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 2 (2017), s. 158-190 ISSN 1530-5058 Institutional support: RVO:68081740 Keywords : psychological testing * testing practices * test use * International Test Commission * European Federation of Psychologists' Associations Subject RIV: AN - Psychology OBOR OECD: Psychology (including human - machine relations)

  8. A survey on occurrence of internal and external fish parasites and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The internal parasites recovered were Clinostomum, Acanthocephalues and Capillaria accounting for 15.2%, 11.2%, and 7.2% of the total infection respectively, while 4% had ... These findings demand a future focus and stretch of intervention programs for alleviation of the problems facing the Lake before its exhaustion.

  9. Postanalytical external quality assessment of urine albumin in primary health care: An international survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aakre, K.M.; Thue, G.; Subramaniam-Haavik, S.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Microalbuminuria (MA) is recognized as an important risk factor for cardiovascular and renal complications in diabetes. We sought to evaluate how screening for MA is conducted and how urine albumin (UA) results are interpreted in primary care internationally. METHODS: General practiti...

  10. Howard Community College 1986 Staff Services Evaluation: Internal Marketing Survey, Spring 1986. Research Report Number 45.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radcliffe, Susan; Novak, Virginia E.

    As part of an internal marketing effort, a study was conducted at Howard Community College (HCC) to determine employees' evaluation of key educational services provided by the college. All full-time faculty, administrators, and support staff were asked to evaluate 13 areas of service on a scale of 1 (poor) to 5 (excellent) and to identify HCC's…

  11. Mental Health Functioning in the Human Rights Field: Findings from an International Internet-Based Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joscelyne, Amy; Knuckey, Sarah; Satterthwaite, Margaret L; Bryant, Richard A; Li, Meng; Qian, Meng; Brown, Adam D

    2015-01-01

    Human rights advocates play a critical role in promoting respect for human rights world-wide, and engage in a broad range of strategies, including documentation of rights violations, monitoring, press work and report-writing, advocacy, and litigation. However, little is known about the impact of human rights work on the mental health of human rights advocates. This study examined the mental health profile of human rights advocates and risk factors associated with their psychological functioning. 346 individuals currently or previously working in the field of human rights completed an internet-based survey regarding trauma exposure, depression, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), resilience and occupational burnout. PTSD was measured with the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist-Civilian Version (PCL-C) and depression was measured with the Patient History Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9). These findings revealed that among human rights advocates that completed the survey, 19.4% met criteria for PTSD, 18.8% met criteria for subthreshold PTSD, and 14.7% met criteria for depression. Multiple linear regressions revealed that after controlling for symptoms of depression, PTSD symptom severity was predicted by human rights-related trauma exposure, perfectionism and negative self-appraisals about human rights work. In addition, after controlling for symptoms of PTSD, depressive symptoms were predicted by perfectionism and lower levels of self-efficacy. Survey responses also suggested high levels of resilience: 43% of responders reported minimal symptoms of PTSD. Although survey responses suggest that many human rights workers are resilient, they also suggest that human rights work is associated with elevated rates of PTSD and depression. The field of human rights would benefit from further empirical research, as well as additional education and training programs in the workplace about enhancing resilience in the context of human rights work.

  12. Mental Health Functioning in the Human Rights Field: Findings from an International Internet-Based Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joscelyne, Amy; Knuckey, Sarah; Satterthwaite, Margaret L.; Bryant, Richard A.; Li, Meng; Qian, Meng; Brown, Adam D.

    2015-01-01

    Human rights advocates play a critical role in promoting respect for human rights world-wide, and engage in a broad range of strategies, including documentation of rights violations, monitoring, press work and report-writing, advocacy, and litigation. However, little is known about the impact of human rights work on the mental health of human rights advocates. This study examined the mental health profile of human rights advocates and risk factors associated with their psychological functioning. 346 individuals currently or previously working in the field of human rights completed an internet-based survey regarding trauma exposure, depression, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), resilience and occupational burnout. PTSD was measured with the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist-Civilian Version (PCL-C) and depression was measured with the Patient History Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9). These findings revealed that among human rights advocates that completed the survey, 19.4% met criteria for PTSD, 18.8% met criteria for subthreshold PTSD, and 14.7% met criteria for depression. Multiple linear regressions revealed that after controlling for symptoms of depression, PTSD symptom severity was predicted by human rights-related trauma exposure, perfectionism and negative self-appraisals about human rights work. In addition, after controlling for symptoms of PTSD, depressive symptoms were predicted by perfectionism and lower levels of self-efficacy. Survey responses also suggested high levels of resilience: 43% of responders reported minimal symptoms of PTSD. Although survey responses suggest that many human rights workers are resilient, they also suggest that human rights work is associated with elevated rates of PTSD and depression. The field of human rights would benefit from further empirical research, as well as additional education and training programs in the workplace about enhancing resilience in the context of human rights work. PMID:26700305

  13. Mental Health Functioning in the Human Rights Field: Findings from an International Internet-Based Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Joscelyne

    Full Text Available Human rights advocates play a critical role in promoting respect for human rights world-wide, and engage in a broad range of strategies, including documentation of rights violations, monitoring, press work and report-writing, advocacy, and litigation. However, little is known about the impact of human rights work on the mental health of human rights advocates. This study examined the mental health profile of human rights advocates and risk factors associated with their psychological functioning. 346 individuals currently or previously working in the field of human rights completed an internet-based survey regarding trauma exposure, depression, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD, resilience and occupational burnout. PTSD was measured with the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist-Civilian Version (PCL-C and depression was measured with the Patient History Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9. These findings revealed that among human rights advocates that completed the survey, 19.4% met criteria for PTSD, 18.8% met criteria for subthreshold PTSD, and 14.7% met criteria for depression. Multiple linear regressions revealed that after controlling for symptoms of depression, PTSD symptom severity was predicted by human rights-related trauma exposure, perfectionism and negative self-appraisals about human rights work. In addition, after controlling for symptoms of PTSD, depressive symptoms were predicted by perfectionism and lower levels of self-efficacy. Survey responses also suggested high levels of resilience: 43% of responders reported minimal symptoms of PTSD. Although survey responses suggest that many human rights workers are resilient, they also suggest that human rights work is associated with elevated rates of PTSD and depression. The field of human rights would benefit from further empirical research, as well as additional education and training programs in the workplace about enhancing resilience in the context of human rights work.

  14. Science and technology related global problems: An international survey of science educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bybee, Rodger W.; Mau, Teri

    This survey evaluated one aspect of the Science-Technology-Society theme, namely, the teaching of global problems related to science and technology. The survey was conducted during spring 1984. Two hundred sixty-two science educators representing 41 countries completed the survey. Response was 80%. Findings included a ranking of twelve global problems (the top six were: World Hunger and Food Resources, Population Growth, Air Quality and Atmosphere, Water Resources, War Technology, and Human Health and Disease). Science educators generally indicated the following: the science and technology related global problems would be worse by the year 2000; they were slightly or moderately knowledgeable about the problems; print, audio-visual media, and personal experiences were their primary sources of information; it is important to study global problems in schools; emphasis on global problems should increase with age/grade level; an integrated approach should be used to teach about global problems; courses including global problems should be required of all students; most countries are in the early stages of developing programs including global problems; there is a clear trend toward S-T-S; there is public support for including global problems; and, the most significant limitations to implementation of the S-T-S theme (in order of significance) are political, personnel, social, psychological, economic, pedagogical, and physical. Implications for research and development in science education are discussed.

  15. International multi-site survey on the use of online support groups in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Rita; Conell, Jörn; Glenn, Tasha; Alda, Martin; Ardau, Raffaella; Baune, Bernhard T; Berk, Michael; Bersudsky, Yuly; Bilderbeck, Amy; Bocchetta, Alberto; Bossini, Letizia; Castro, Angela M Paredes; Cheung, Eric Y W; Chillotti, Caterina; Choppin, Sabine; Zompo, Maria Del; Dias, Rodrigo; Dodd, Seetal; Duffy, Anne; Etain, Bruno; Fagiolini, Andrea; Hernandez, Miryam Fernández; Garnham, Julie; Geddes, John; Gildebro, Jonas; Gonzalez-Pinto, Ana; Goodwin, Guy M; Grof, Paul; Harima, Hirohiko; Hassel, Stefanie; Henry, Chantal; Hidalgo-Mazzei, Diego; Kapur, Vaisnvy; Kunigiri, Girish; Lafer, Beny; Larsen, Erik R; Lewitzka, Ute; Licht, Rasmus W; Hvenegaard Lund, Anne; Misiak, Blazej; Piotrowski, Patryk; Monteith, Scott; Munoz, Rodrigo; Nakanotani, Takako; Nielsen, René E; O'donovan, Claire; Okamura, Yasushi; Osher, Yamima; Reif, Andreas; Ritter, Philipp; Rybakowski, Janusz K; Sagduyu, Kemal; Sawchuk, Brett; Schwartz, Elon; Scippa, Ângela M; Slaney, Claire; Sulaiman, Ahmad H; Suominen, Kirsi; Suwalska, Aleksandra; Tam, Peter; Tatebayashi, Yoshitaka; Tondo, Leonardo; Vieta, Eduard; Vinberg, Maj; Viswanath, Biju; Volkert, Julia; Zetin, Mark; Whybrow, Peter C; Bauer, Michael

    2017-08-01

    Peer support is an established component of recovery from bipolar disorder, and online support groups may offer opportunities to expand the use of peer support at the patient's convenience. Prior research in bipolar disorder has reported value from online support groups. To understand the use of online support groups by patients with bipolar disorder as part of a larger project about information seeking. The results are based on a one-time, paper-based anonymous survey about information seeking by patients with bipolar disorder, which was translated into 12 languages. The survey was completed between March 2014 and January 2016 and included questions on the use of online support groups. All patients were diagnosed by a psychiatrist. Analysis included descriptive statistics and general estimating equations to account for correlated data. The survey was completed by 1222 patients in 17 countries. The patients used the Internet at a percentage similar to the general public. Of the Internet users who looked online for information about bipolar disorder, only 21.0% read or participated in support groups, chats, or forums for bipolar disorder (12.8% of the total sample). Given the benefits reported in prior research, clarification of the role of online support groups in bipolar disorder is needed. With only a minority of patients using online support groups, there are analytical challenges for future studies.

  16. Dietary trends and management of hyperphosphatemia among patients with chronic kidney disease: an international survey of renal care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouque, Denis; Cruz Casal, Maria; Lindley, Elizabeth; Rogers, Susan; Pancířová, Jitka; Kernc, Jennifer; Copley, J Brian

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this study was to review the opinions and experiences of renal care professionals to examine dietary trends among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and problems associated with the clinical management of hyperphosphatemia. This was an online survey comprising open and closed questions requesting information on patient dietary trends and the clinical management of hyperphosphatemia. The study was conducted in 4 European countries (the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom). Participants were 84 renal care professionals. This was an online survey. Responder-reported experiences and perceptions of patient dietary trends and hyperphosphatemia management were assessed. Most survey responders (56%) observed an increase in the consumption of processed convenience food, 48% noticed an increase in the consumption of foods rich in phosphorus-containing additives, and 60% believed that there has been a trend of increasing patient awareness of the phosphorus content of food. Patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD) were most likely to experience difficulties in following advice on dietary phosphorus restriction (38% of responders estimated that 25-50% of their patients experienced difficulties, and 29% estimated that 51-75% experienced difficulties). Maintaining protein intake and restricting dietary phosphorus were perceived as being equally important by at least half of responders for predialysis patients (56%) and for those undergoing peritoneal dialysis and HD (54% and 50%, respectively). There were international variations in dietary trends and hyperphosphatemia management. Although most responders have observed a trend of increasing awareness of the phosphorus content of food among patients with CKD, the survey results indicate that many patients continue to experience difficulties when attempting to restrict dietary phosphorus. The survey responses reflect the global trend of increasing consumption of processed convenience foods and

  17. International survey for good practices in forecasting uncertainty assessment and communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthet, Lionel; Piotte, Olivier

    2014-05-01

    Achieving technically sound flood forecasts is a crucial objective for forecasters but remains of poor use if the users do not understand properly their significance and do not use it properly in decision making. One usual way to precise the forecasts limitations is to communicate some information about their uncertainty. Uncertainty assessment and communication to stakeholders are thus important issues for operational flood forecasting services (FFS) but remain open fields for research. French FFS wants to publish graphical streamflow and level forecasts along with uncertainty assessment in near future on its website (available to the greater public). In order to choose the technical options best adapted to its operational context, it carried out a survey among more than 15 fellow institutions. Most of these are providing forecasts and warnings to civil protection officers while some were mostly working for hydroelectricity suppliers. A questionnaire has been prepared in order to standardize the analysis of the practices of the surveyed institutions. The survey was conducted by gathering information from technical reports or from the scientific literature, as well as 'interviews' driven by phone, email discussions or meetings. The questionnaire helped in the exploration of practices in uncertainty assessment, evaluation and communication. Attention was paid to the particular context within which every insitution works, in the analysis drawn from raw results. Results show that most services interviewed assess their forecasts uncertainty. However, practices can differ significantly from a country to another. Popular techniques are ensemble approaches. They allow to take into account several uncertainty sources. Statistical past forecasts analysis (such as the quantile regressions) are also commonly used. Contrary to what was expected, only few services emphasize the role of the forecaster (subjective assessment). Similar contrasts can be observed in uncertainty

  18. Age and Educational Inequalities in Smoking Cessation Due to Three Population-Level Tobacco Control Interventions: Findings from the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Netherlands Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagelhout, Gera E.; Crone, Matty R.; van den Putte, Bas; Willemsen, Marc C.; Fong, Geoffrey T.; de Vries, Hein

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to examine age and educational inequalities in smoking cessation due to the implementation of a tobacco tax increase, smoke-free legislation and a cessation campaign. Longitudinal data from 962 smokers aged 15 years and older were used from three survey waves of the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Netherlands Survey. The 2008…

  19. 75 FR 33885 - Office of International Affairs; Survey of Foreign Ownership of U.S. Securities as of June 30, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-15

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Office of International Affairs; Survey of Foreign Ownership of U.S... it is conducting a mandatory survey of foreign ownership of U.S. securities as of June 30, 2010. This... equities, short-term debt securities (including selected money market instruments), and long-term debt...

  20. OligArch: A software tool to allow artificially expanded genetic information systems (AEGIS to guide the autonomous self-assembly of long DNA constructs from multiple DNA single strands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin M. Bradley

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic biologists wishing to self-assemble large DNA (L-DNA constructs from small DNA fragments made by automated synthesis need fragments that hybridize predictably. Such predictability is difficult to obtain with nucleotides built from just the four standard nucleotides. Natural DNA's peculiar combination of strong and weak G:C and A:T pairs, the context-dependence of the strengths of those pairs, unimolecular strand folding that competes with desired interstrand hybridization, and non-Watson–Crick interactions available to standard DNA, all contribute to this unpredictability. In principle, adding extra nucleotides to the genetic alphabet can improve the predictability and reliability of autonomous DNA self-assembly, simply by increasing the information density of oligonucleotide sequences. These extra nucleotides are now available as parts of artificially expanded genetic information systems (AEGIS, and tools are now available to generate entirely standard DNA from AEGIS DNA during PCR amplification. Here, we describe the OligArch (for "oligonucleotide architecting" software, an application that permits synthetic biologists to engineer optimally self-assembling DNA constructs from both six- and eight-letter AEGIS alphabets. This software has been used to design oligonucleotides that self-assemble to form complete genes from 20 or more single-stranded synthetic oligonucleotides. OligArch is therefore a key element of a scalable and integrated infrastructure for the rapid and designed engineering of biology.

  1. The assessment of depression awareness and help-seeking behaviour: experiences with the International Depression Literacy Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickie A M, Ian B; Davenport, Tracey A; Luscombe, Georgina M; Rong, Ye; Hickie, Megan L; Bell, Morag I

    2007-09-13

    Depression causes substantial disease burden in both developed and developing countries. To reduce this burden, we need to promote understanding of depression as a major health condition. The International Depression Literacy Survey (IDLS) has been developed to assess understanding of depression in different cultural and health care settings. Four groups of Australian university students completed the survey: medical students in second (n = 103) and fourth (n = 82) years of a graduate course, ethnic Chinese students (n = 184) and general undergraduate students (n = 38). Differences between the student groups were evident, with fourth year medical students demonstrating greater general health and depression literacy than second year medical students. Australian undergraduate students demonstrated better depression literacy than those from ethnic Chinese backgrounds. Ethnicity also influenced help seeking and treatment preferences (with more Chinese students being inclined to seek help from pharmacists), beliefs about discrimination and perceptions regarding stigma. The IDLS does detect significant differences in understanding of depression among groups from different ethnic backgrounds and between those who differ in terms of prior health training. These preliminary results suggest that it may be well suited for use in a wider international context. Further investigation of the utility of the IDLS is required before these results could be extrapolated to other populations.

  2. The assessment of depression awareness and help-seeking behaviour: experiences with the International Depression Literacy Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Ye

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depression causes substantial disease burden in both developed and developing countries. To reduce this burden, we need to promote understanding of depression as a major health condition. The International Depression Literacy Survey (IDLS has been developed to assess understanding of depression in different cultural and health care settings. Methods Four groups of Australian university students completed the survey: medical students in second (n = 103 and fourth (n = 82 years of a graduate course, ethnic Chinese students (n = 184 and general undergraduate students (n = 38. Results Differences between the student groups were evident, with fourth year medical students demonstrating greater general health and depression literacy than second year medical students. Australian undergraduate students demonstrated better depression literacy than those from ethnic Chinese backgrounds. Ethnicity also influenced help seeking and treatment preferences (with more Chinese students being inclined to seek help from pharmacists, beliefs about discrimination and perceptions regarding stigma. Conclusion The IDLS does detect significant differences in understanding of depression among groups from different ethnic backgrounds and between those who differ in terms of prior health training. These preliminary results suggest that it may be well suited for use in a wider international context. Further investigation of the utility of the IDLS is required before these results could be extrapolated to other populations.

  3. An international based survey on perioperative use of tranexamic acid in neurotrauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moscote-Salazar Luis Rafael

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tranexamic acid is used to reduce bleeding, easy to use, affordable and relatively safe. There are few studies on the use of tranexamic acid in trauma and especially in neurosurgery. There is no published study on the trend the use of tranexamic acid in neurotrauma surgery among international doctors. The aim of this study was to evaluate the current practice for use of tranexamic acid during neurotrauma surgery.

  4. Small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) in international business: A survey of recent literature

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Klaus-Dieter

    1996-01-01

    It is often argued that the process of globalization has mainly favoured large-scale multinational companies which are able to organize their business efficiently within internal hierarchies. However, globalization has not only pushed cross-border intra-finn transactions but also other arrangements among firms such as licensing or subcontracting that fall short of ownership involvements. This opens up new opportunities for small and medium sized enterprises, too. The paper provides a general ...

  5. Survey of special nuclear material vehicle monitors for domestic and international safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fehlau, P.E.; Atwater, H.F.; Caldwell, J.T.; Shunk, E.R.

    1979-01-01

    Special nuclear materials vehicle monitors, including gateside vehicle monitors, hand-held personnel-vehicle monitors, and a new tunnel monitor concept for very large vehicles, are discussed. The results of a comparison of effectiveness of monitors for domestic application are presented. The results of calculations and small scale prototype measurements are given for a tunnel-like neutron monitor for monitoring at the perimeter of an enrichment plant subjected to International Safeguards

  6. Survey of international regulatory bioequivalence recommendations for approval of generic topical dermatological drug products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braddy, April C; Davit, Barbara M; Stier, Ethan M; Conner, Dale P

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this article is to discuss the similarities and differences in accepted bioequivalence (BE) approaches for generic topical dermatological drug products between international regulatory authorities and organizations. These drug products are locally applied and not intended for systemic absorption. Therefore, the BE approaches which serve as surrogates to establish safety and efficacy for topical dosage forms tend to differ from the traditional solid oral dosage forms. We focused on 15 different international jurisdictions and organizations that currently participate in the International Generic Drug Regulators Pilot Project. These are Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Chinese Taipei, the European Medicines Association (EMA), Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, Singapore (a member of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations), South Africa, South Korea, Switzerland, the USA and the World Health Organization (WHO). Upon evaluation, we observed that currently only Canada, the EMA, Japan, and the USA have specific guidance documents for topical drug products. Across all jurisdictions and organizations, the three approaches consistently required are (1) BE studies with clinical endpoints for most topical drug products; (2) in vivo pharmacodynamic studies, in particular the vasoconstrictor assay for topical corticosteroids; and (3) waivers from BE study requirements for topical solutions. Japan, South Africa, the USA, and the WHO are also making strides to accept other BE approaches such as in vivo pharmacokinetic studies for BE assessment, in vivo dermatopharmacokinetic studies and/or BE studies with in vitro endpoints.

  7. Men with Sexual Problems and Their Partners: Findings from the International Survey of Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Raymond C; Heiman, Julia R; Long, J Scott; Fisher, William A; Sand, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies of sexual function problems in men have focused on the individual male and related sociodemographic characteristics, individual risk factors and lifestyle concomitants, or medical comorbidities. Insufficient attention has been given to the role of sexual and relationship satisfaction and, more particularly, to the perspective of the couple as causes or correlates of sexual problems in men or women. Previously, we reported results of the first large, multi-national study of sexual satisfaction and relationship happiness in 1,009 midlife and older couples in five countries (Brazil, Germany, Japan, Spain, U.S.). For the present study, we examined, within each problem, the association of four major sexual problems in men (loss of sexual desire, erectile problems, premature ejaculation, delayed/absent orgasm) and multiple problems, with male and female partners' assessments of physical intimacy, sexual satisfaction, and relationship happiness, as well as associations with well-known health and psychosocial correlates of sexual problems in men. Sexual problem rates of men in our survey were generally similar to rates observed in past surveys in the general population, and similar risk factors (age, relationship duration, overall health) were associated with lack of desire, anorgasmia, or erection difficulties in our sample. As in previous surveys, there were few correlates of premature ejaculation. As predicted, men with one or more sexual problems reported decreased relationship happiness as well as decreased sexual satisfaction compared to men without sexual problems. Moreover, female partners of men with sexual problems had reduced relationship happiness and sexual satisfaction, although these latter outcomes were less affected in the women than the men. The association of men's sexual problems with men's and women's satisfaction and relationship happiness were modest, as these couples in long-term, committed relationships were notable for their

  8. Treatment of AKI in developing and developed countries: An international survey of pediatric dialysis modalities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupesh Raina

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is a common cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, with a pediatric incidence ranging from 19.3% to 24.1%. Treatment of pediatric AKI is a source of debate in varying geographical regions. Currently CRRT is the treatment for pediatric AKI, but limitations due to cost and accessibility force use of adult equipment and other therapeutic options such as peritoneal dialysis (PD and hemodialysis (HD. It was hypothesized that more cost-effective measures would likely be used in developing countries due to lesser resource availability.A 26-question internet-based survey was distributed to 650 pediatric Nephrologists. There was a response rate of 34.3% (223 responses. The survey was distributed via pedneph and pcrrt email servers, inquiring about demographics, technology, resources, pediatric-specific supplies, and preference in renal replacement therapy (RRT in pediatric AKI. The main method of analysis was to compare responses about treatments between nephrologists in developed countries and nephrologists in developing countries using difference-of-proportions tests.PD was available in all centers surveyed, while HD was available in 85.1% and 54.1% (p = 0.00, CRRT was available in 60% and 33.3% (p = 0.001, and SLED was available in 20% and 25% (p = 0.45 centers of developed and developing world respectively. In developing countries, 68.5% (p = 0.000 of physicians preferred PD to costlier therapies, while in developed countries it was found that physicians favored HD (72%, p = 0.00 or CRRT (24%, p = 0.041 in infants.Lack of availability of resources, trained physicians and funds often preclude standards of care in developing countries, and there is much development needed in terms of meeting higher global standards for treating pediatric AKI patients. PD remains the main modality of choice for treatment of AKI in infants in developing world.

  9. Management of optic neuritis and impact of clinical trials: an international survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biousse, Valérie; Calvetti, Olivier; Drews-Botsch, Carolyn D

    2009-01-01

    countries, steroids were often prescribed to improve visual outcome or to decrease the long-term risk of multiple sclerosis. INTERPRETATION: Although recent clinical trials have changed the management of acute ON around the world, many neurologists and ophthalmologists do not evaluate and treat acute......OBJECTIVE: 1) To evaluate the management of acute isolated optic neuritis (ON) by ophthalmologists and neurologists; 2) to evaluate the impact of clinical trials; 3) to compare these practices among 7 countries. METHODS: A survey on diagnosis and treatment of acute isolated ON was sent to 5...

  10. Television Traffic: A One-Way Street? A Survey and Analysis of the International Flow of Television Programme Material. Reports and Papers on Mass Communication No. 70.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordenstreng, Kaarle; Varis, Tapio

    An international inventory was made to determine the composition of television programs, particularly from the point of view of program material exported to a country outside. A survey was also made of the international networks for sales and exchanges of program material for broadcast. A report of these studies includes the scope and methods of…

  11. An International Survey of Health Care Providers Involved in the Management of Cancer Patients Exposed to Cardiotoxic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Sulpher

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiotoxicity is the second leading cause of morbidity and mortality in cancer survivors. The objective of this international cardiac oncology survey was to gain a better understanding of current knowledge and practice patterns among HCPs involved in the management of cancer patients exposed to potentially cardiotoxic drugs. Between 2012 and 2013, we conducted an email-based survey of HCPs involved in the management of cardiac disease in cancer patients. 393 survey responses were received, of which 77 were from Canadian respondents. The majority of respondents were cardiologists (47%, followed closely by medical oncologists. The majority of respondents agreed that cardiac issues are important to cancer patients (97%. However, only 36% of total respondents agreed with an accepted definition of cardiotoxicity. While 78% of respondents felt that cardiac medications are protective during active cancer treatment, only 51% would consider prescribing these medications up-front in cancer patients. Although results confirm a high level of concern for cardiac safety, there continues to be a lack of consensus on the definition of cardiotoxicity and a discrepancy in clinical practice between cardiologists and oncologists. These differences in opinion require resolution through more effective research collaboration and formulation of evidence-based guidelines.

  12. An International Survey of Health Care Providers Involved in the Management of Cancer Patients Exposed to Cardiotoxic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulpher, Jeffrey; Mathur, Shrey; Lenihan, Daniel; Johnson, Christopher; Turek, Michele; Law, Angeline; Stadnick, Ellamae; Dattilo, Franco; Graham, Nadine; Dent, Susan F

    2015-01-01

    Cardiotoxicity is the second leading cause of morbidity and mortality in cancer survivors. The objective of this international cardiac oncology survey was to gain a better understanding of current knowledge and practice patterns among HCPs involved in the management of cancer patients exposed to potentially cardiotoxic drugs. Between 2012 and 2013, we conducted an email-based survey of HCPs involved in the management of cardiac disease in cancer patients. 393 survey responses were received, of which 77 were from Canadian respondents. The majority of respondents were cardiologists (47%), followed closely by medical oncologists. The majority of respondents agreed that cardiac issues are important to cancer patients (97%). However, only 36% of total respondents agreed with an accepted definition of cardiotoxicity. While 78% of respondents felt that cardiac medications are protective during active cancer treatment, only 51% would consider prescribing these medications up-front in cancer patients. Although results confirm a high level of concern for cardiac safety, there continues to be a lack of consensus on the definition of cardiotoxicity and a discrepancy in clinical practice between cardiologists and oncologists. These differences in opinion require resolution through more effective research collaboration and formulation of evidence-based guidelines.

  13. Regret and rationalization among smokers in Thailand and Malaysia: findings from the International Tobacco Control Southeast Asia Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wonkyong B; Fong, Geoffrey T; Zanna, Mark P; Omar, Maizurah; Sirirassamee, Buppha; Borland, Ron

    2009-07-01

    To test whether differences of history and strength in tobacco control policies will influence social norms, which, in turn, will influence quit intentions, by influencing smokers' regret and rationalization. The data were from the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Policy Evaluation Southeast Asia Survey, a cohort survey of representative samples of adult smokers in Thailand (N = 2,000) and Malaysia (N = 2,006). The survey used a stratified multistage sampling design. Measures included regret, rationalization, social norms, and quit intention. Thai smokers were more likely to have quit intentions than Malaysian smokers. This difference in quit intentions was, in part, explained by the country differences in social norms, regret, and rationalization. Reflecting Thailand's history of stronger tobacco control policies, Thai smokers, compared with Malaysian smokers, perceived more negative social norms toward smoking, were more likely to regret, and less likely to rationalize smoking. Mediational analyses revealed that these differences in social norms, accounted, in part, for the country-quit intention relation and that regret and rationalization accounted, in part, for the social norm-quit intention relation. The results suggest that social norms toward smoking, which are shaped by tobacco control policies, and smokers' regret and rationalization influence quit intentions.

  14. Hospital antibiotic management in Hungary--results of the ABS maturity survey of the ABS International group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternak, Gabor; Almasi, Istvan; Rakoczi, Eva

    2008-01-01

    The prudent use of antibiotics is considered a very important issue in hospitals throughout Europe. The project ABS International developed a questionnaire to survey antibiotic-related structures and services in the hospitals of participating countries. This article describes the situation in Hungary. Questionnaires were sent to all the hospitals in Hungary, which numbered 182 at the time of the survey. A total of 68 hospitals, accounting for 37.4% of all hospitals, returned the answered questionnaires. These 68 hospitals accounted for 52.4% of the hospital beds available in Hungary at the time of the survey. The answers were stratified according to the function and position of the hospitals and analyzed by calculating means, medians and standard deviations of various parameters. The cumulative maturity figure for Hungary was 3.42+/-0.55. The lowest cumulative figures were found in chronic-care hospitals and the highest in the university hospitals. Significant differences were found in the availability of diagnostic services. The level of control of antibiotic consumption was similar between hospitals. The availability of bedside microbiological tests, such as legionella antigen detection, was rated as poor. Resources dedicated for antibiotic officers were very minor. Antibiotic stewardship cannot be conducted without appropriate resources (time, financing) provided by hospital management or the authorities. The technical background (microbiology, organizations, etc.) on which to build is already available in Hungarian hospitals.

  15. What Makes a Great Resident Teacher? A Multicenter Survey of Medical Students Attending an Internal Medicine Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melvin, Lindsay; Kassam, Zain; Burke, Andrew; Wasi, Parveen; Neary, John

    2014-12-01

    Residents have a critical role in the education of medical students and have a unique teaching relationship because of their close proximity in professional development and opportunities for direct supervision. Although there is emerging literature on ways to prepare residents to be effective teachers, there is a paucity of data on what medical students believe are the attributes of successful resident teachers. We sought to define the qualities and teaching techniques that learners interested in internal medicine value in resident teachers. We created and administered a resident-as-teacher traits survey to senior medical students from 6 medical schools attending a resident-facilitated clinical conference at McMaster University. The survey collected data on student preferences of techniques employed by resident teachers and qualities of a successful resident teacher. Of 90 student participants, 80 (89%) responded. Respondents found the use of clinical examples (78%, 62 of 80) and repetition of core concepts (71%, 58 of 80) highly useful. In contrast, most respondents did not perceive giving feedback to residents, or receiving feedback from residents, was useful to their learning. With respect to resident qualities, respondents felt that a strong knowledge base (80%, 64 of 80) and tailoring teaching to the learner's level (83%, 66 of 80) was highly important. In contrast, high expectations on the part of resident supervisors were not valued. This multicenter survey provides insight into the perceptions of medical students interested in internal medicine on the techniques and qualities that characterize successful resident teachers. The findings may be useful in the future development of resident-as-teacher curricula.

  16. International variation in policies and practices related to informed consent in acute cardiovascular research: Results from a 44 country survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Belle, Gerald; Mentzelopoulos, Spyros D; Aufderheide, Tom; May, Susanne; Nichol, Graham

    2015-06-01

    Research in an emergency setting such as that with an acute cardiovascular event is challenging because the window of opportunity to treat may be short and may preclude time to obtain informed consent from the patient or their representative. Some perceive that requiring informed consent in emergency situations has limited improvements in care. Vulnerable populations including minorities or residents of low-income countries are at greatest risk of need for resuscitation. Lack of enrollment of such patients would increase uncertainties in treatment benefit or harm in those at greater risk of need for resuscitation. We sought to assess international variation in policies and procedures related to exception from informed consent (EFIC) or deferred consent for emergency research. A brief survey instrument was developed and modified by consensus among the investigators. Included were multiple choice and open-ended responses. The survey included an illustrative example of a hypothetical randomized study. Elicited information included the possibility of conducting such a study in the respondent's country, as well as approvals required to conduct the study. The population of interest was emergency physicians or other practitioners of acute cardiovascular event research. Usable responses were obtained from 44 countries (76% of surveyed). Community opposition to EFIC was noted in 6 (14%) countries. Emergency Medical Services (EMS) providers in 8 (20%) countries were judged unable or unwilling to participate. A majority of countries (36, 82%) required approval by a Research Ethics Committee or similar. Government approval was required in 25 (57%) countries. There is international variation in practices and policies related to consent for emergency research. There is an ongoing need to converge regulations based on the usefulness of multinational emergency research to benefit both affluent and disadvantaged populations. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  17. Surgical skills curricula in American College of Surgeons Accredited Education Institutes: An international survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaderi, Iman; Fitzgibbons, Shimae; Watanabe, Yusuke; Lachapelle, Alexander; Paige, John

    2017-04-01

    A clear understanding of simulation-based curricula in use at American College of Surgeons Accredited Education Institutes (ACS-AEIs) is lacking. A 25-question online survey was sent to ACS-AEIs. The response rate approached 60%. The most frequent specialties to use the ACS-AEIs are general surgery and obstetrics/gynecology (94%). Residents are the main target population for programming/training (96%). Elements of the ACS/Association of Program Directors in Surgery Surgical Skills Curriculum are used by 77% of responding ACS-AEIs. Only 49% of ACS-AEIs implement the entire curriculum and 96% have independently developed their own surgical skills curricula. "Home-grown" simulators have been designed at 71% of ACS-AEIs. Feasibility (80%), evidence of effectiveness (67%), and cost (60%) were reasons for curriculum adoption. All programs use operative assessment tools for resident performance, and 53% use Messick's unitary framework of validity. Most programs (88%) have financial support from their academic institute. Majority of ACS-AEIs had trainees evaluate their faculty instructors (90%), and the main form of such faculty evaluation was postcourse surveys (97%). This study provides specific information regarding simulation-based curricula at ACS-AEIs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Nutrition education in European medical schools: results of an international survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, M; van Buul, V J; Wilms, E; Nellessen, N; Brouns, F J P H

    2014-07-01

    Consumers and patients are unsure of whom to trust for nutritional advice. Although medical doctors are seen as experts in nutrition and their advice is regularly followed, data are lacking on the amount of nutrition education in European medical school curricula. In line with US research, we distributed a survey on required and/or optional nutrition contact hours to medical education directors of all accredited medical schools (N=217) in Western European Union countries (N=14). In total, respondents from 32 medical schools (14.7%) from 10 countries indicated that nutrition education, in some form, was required in 68.8% of schools where, on average, 23.68 h of required nutrition education was provided. The results from this small-scale survey are comparable to a 2010 US study; conversely, European educators were satisfied with the amount of nutrition education. We substantiate the increasing concern over the inadequate amounts of nutrition education provided to medical students in Europe.

  19. Current models of care for disorders of sex development – results from an International survey of specialist centres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Kyriakou

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To explore the current models of practice in centres delivering specialist care for children with disorders of sex development (DSD, an international survey of 124 clinicians, identified through DSDnet and the I-DSD Registry, was performed in the last quarter of 2014. Results A total of 78 (63 % clinicians, in 75 centres, from 38 countries responded to the survey. A formal national network for managing DSD was reported to exist in 12 (32 % countries. The paediatric specialists routinely involved in the initial evaluation of a newborn included: endocrinologist (99 %, surgeon/urologist (95 %, radiologist (93 %, neonatologist (91 %, clinical geneticist (81 % and clinical psychologist (69 %. A team consisting of paediatric specialists in endocrinology, surgery/urology, clinical psychology, and nursing was only possible in 31 (41 % centres. Of the 75 centres, 26 (35 % kept only a local DSD registry and 40 (53 % shared their data in a multicentre DSD registry. Attendance in local, national and international DSD-related educational programs was reported by 69, 78 and 84 % clinicians, respectively. Participation in audits/quality improvement exercises in DSD care was reported by 14 (19 % centres. In addition to complex biochemistry and molecular genetic investigations, 40 clinicians (51 % also had access to next generation sequencing. A genetic test was reported to be more preferable than biochemical tests for diagnosing 5-alpha reductase deficiency and 17-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3 deficiency by 50 and 55 % clinicians, respectively. Conclusion DSD centres report a high level of interaction at an international level, have access to specialist staff and are increasingly relying on molecular genetics for routine diagnostics. The quality of care provided by these centres locally requires further exploration.

  20. Importance of and satisfaction with work and professional interpersonal issues: a survey of physicians practicing general internal medicine in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, D J; Griffith, L E; Sackett, D L

    1995-09-15

    To explore the importance of and satisfaction with clinical responsibilities, teaching, research and interpersonal issues among general internists; to understand the barriers to satisfaction in these domains and the usefulness of potential solutions to these problems. Cross-sectional survey conducted from November 1992 to June 1994. Ontario. General internists who were fellows of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada and members of the Ontario Medical Association. Of 1192 physicians, 1007 (84.5%) returned a completed questionnaire; only the 199 who devoted at least 50% of their time to the practice of general internal medicine were included in this analysis. The respondents were satisfied with their primary role as clinicians dealing with complex, undifferentiated problems caring for the total patient and providing consultation. Guidelines for the referral of patients to general internists, computerization of test results, recruitment of general internal medicine fellows and more confidence in the future of general internal medicine were some of the solutions considered likely to increase professional satisfaction. The respondents involved in teaching suggested additional solutions, such as an opportunity to improve their teaching and evidence-based medicine skills and a greater recognition for their teaching efforts. Few of the general internists conducted research, barriers included lack of personal and project funding, and pressure to generate clinical earnings. In the domain of professional interpersonal issues, women were significantly more likely than men to rate having a mentor, peer support groups, ongoing career counselling, promotion and tenure guidelines for parental leave, availability of on-site day care, addressing gender discrimination and adoption of gender-neutral language as likely to improve the work environment. The primary role of general internists is that of patient-centred clinician. Our findings suggest that general

  1. Clinical Reasoning Education at US Medical Schools: Results from a National Survey of Internal Medicine Clerkship Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rencic, Joseph; Trowbridge, Robert L; Fagan, Mark; Szauter, Karen; Durning, Steven

    2017-11-01

    Recent reports, including the Institute of Medicine's Improving Diagnosis in Health Care, highlight the pervasiveness and underappreciated harm of diagnostic error, and recommend enhancing health care professional education in diagnostic reasoning. However, little is known about clinical reasoning curricula at US medical schools. To describe clinical reasoning curricula at US medical schools and to determine the attitudes of internal medicine clerkship directors toward teaching of clinical reasoning. Cross-sectional multicenter study. US institutional members of the Clerkship Directors in Internal Medicine (CDIM). Examined responses to a survey that was emailed in May 2015 to CDIM institutional representatives, who reported on their medical school's clinical reasoning curriculum. The response rate was 74% (91/123). Most respondents reported that a structured curriculum in clinical reasoning should be taught in all phases of medical education, including the preclinical years (64/85; 75%), clinical clerkships (76/87; 87%), and the fourth year (75/88; 85%), and that more curricular time should be devoted to the topic. Respondents indicated that most students enter the clerkship with only poor (25/85; 29%) to fair (47/85; 55%) knowledge of key clinical reasoning concepts. Most institutions (52/91; 57%) surveyed lacked sessions dedicated to these topics. Lack of curricular time (59/67, 88%) and faculty expertise in teaching these concepts (53/76, 69%) were identified as barriers. Internal medicine clerkship directors believe that clinical reasoning should be taught throughout the 4 years of medical school, with the greatest emphasis in the clinical years. However, only a minority reported having teaching sessions devoted to clinical reasoning, citing a lack of curricular time and faculty expertise as the largest barriers. Our findings suggest that additional institutional and national resources should be dedicated to developing clinical reasoning curricula to improve

  2. Internal Control of Derivatives Usage by Spanish Savings Banks: An Empirical Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Fernández-Laviada

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Global derivatives activity continues to expand although they have provided some of the most devastating financial disasters. The debate on their regulation has always been present and is still unresolved. However, without undervaluing the importance of regulation and the usefulness of an adequate external control, a sound internal control system is essential to prevent new financial scandals. First of all, this paper, through the review of existing recommendations, rules, regulation and academic literature, studies and analyses the need and importance of internal control in derivative usage for risk management. And secondly, through a questionnaire about established policies, procedures and internal controls, it provides evidence related to its usage and control by Spanish savings banks.El uso de los derivados sigue en expansión a pesar de haber ocasionado alguno de los mayoresescándalos financieros.El debate sobre su regulación, todavía sin resolver, ha estado siempre presente. No obstante,y sin menospreciar la importancia de la regulación y la utilidad de un adecuado controlexterno, un buen sistema de control interno es esencial para prevenir nuevos desastres.Este trabajo, en primer lugar, a través de la revisión de las recomendaciones, normas,regulación y literatura académica existente, estudia y analiza la necesidad e importancia delcontrol interno en el uso de los derivados para la gestión del riesgo. Y en segundo lugar, através de un cuestionario sobre las políticas, procedimientos y controles internos establecidos,aporta evidencia sobre el uso y control de los mismos por las cajas de ahorros españolas.

  3. Vibration survey of internal combustion engines for use on unmanned air vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duanis, B.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the method, the procedure and data results of engine vibration test which is carried out on engines for use on unmanned air vehicles. The paper focuses on the testing of rotating propulsion systems powered by an internal combustion engine which is composed of main rotating components such as the alternator, gearbox, propeller , dampers and couplings. Three measurement methods for measuring torsional and lateral vibrations are presented: a. Gear tooth pulse signal. b. Shaft Strain Gage. c. Laser Displacement Sensors The paper also presents data from tests which were performed using each method and discusses the applications, the advantages and disadvantages of each method

  4. Survey of Study on Internal Waves Detection in Synthetic Aperture Radar Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Jin-song

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, Internal Waves (IWs detection in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR image has received considerable attentions in the area of marine remote sensing and has already become one of the most important marine applications of SAR. Typical research results at home and abroad are reviewed. Three areas of researches are introduced and summarized, including parameter inversion method of IWs, the effect of different SAR parameter and wind field conditions on IWs imaging, the 2-dimentional SAR imaging simulation of IWs.

  5. Harmonizing national growth references for multi-centre surveys, drug monitoring and international postmarketing surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermanussen, M; Assmann, C; Wöhling, H; Zabransky, M

    2012-01-01

    National European growth references differ. We aimed to convert (harmonize) currently used charts into a single unified interchangeable LMS format for each European nation. Nine currently used national European growth references from Belgium (2009), France (1979), Poland (2001), Sweden (2002), Switzerland (1989), the UK (1990), Italy (2006) and Germany (1979 and 1997) were harmonized and compared with the international WHO child growth standards and WHO growth reference data for 5-19 years. European growth charts can be harmonized. The approach appears useful as height, and body mass index (BMI) is inappropriately represented by WHO references. European height references exhibit warping when plotted against the WHO reference. The French appears too short, the other Europeans too tall. Also, the BMI is not appropriately represented by the WHO references. Harmonizing references is a novel, convenient and cost-effective approach for converting historic and/or incomplete local or national growth reference charts into a unified interchangeable LMS format. Harmonizing facilitates producing growth references 'on demand', for limited regional purposes, for ethnically, socio-economically or politically defined minorities, but also for matching geographically different groups of children and adolescents for international growth and registry studies. © 2011 The Author(s)/Acta Paediatrica © 2011 Foundation Acta Paediatrica.

  6. A survey of the health experiences of international business travelers. Part One--Physiological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, H Lynn; Reilly, Sandra M

    2002-10-01

    Occupational health professionals need to know more about the health, worklife, and family life of international business travelers (IBTs). This descriptive correlational study, in two parts, examines the physiological and psychosocial experiences associated with business travel for a sample of 140 employees from western Canada's oil and gas industry. Results for Part One show that 76% of IBTs report travel related health problems, 74% have jet lag, 45% have travelers' diarrhea and gastrointestinal complaints, 12% to 16% have climate adaptation problems, and 2% report accidents and minor injuries. High risk behaviors include not carrying a first aid travel kit (54%); drinking more alcohol than ordinarily (21%); and neglecting food, water, and antimalarial precautions (6% to 14%). Other risk factors include age, length of stay, destination, pre-travel medical examinations, pre-travel advice, and eating and accommodation facilities. Findings show that IBTs are at risk for travel related physiological health problems. Implications for practitioners call for increased occupational health expertise in pre-travel preparation, follow up post-travel and regular health surveillance for employees who travel on international business.

  7. Innovation indicators: a survey of innovative activities in the international food processed industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinicius Cardoso de Barros Fornari

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper seeks to combine traditional methods of measuring intensity with other alternative indicators to examine the dispersion of innovation activities in different industries and countries. The hypothesis that underlies the study lies in the fact that in the Food Processed Industry (IAP the traditional methods are insufficient to detect the core of the innovation process. As method, we analyzed patent data extracted from the twenty-five largest food processed companies in the world and suggested different indicators developed from the Pesquisa de Inovação Tecnológica (PINTEC, 2010 – for Brazilian companies – and the Community Innovation Survey (CIS, 2009 – for European Union companies. The results allowed us to establish relationships in three dimensions: (i the complexity of the innovative effort of the IAP; (ii the efforts to innovation in different countries are distinct and; (iii there is heterogeneity in country performance.

  8. EFSUMB COMPASS for Rheumatologists dissemination and implementation--an international survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janta, Iustina; Terslev, Lene; Ammitzbøll-Danielsen, Mads

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB) competency assessment (COMPASS) for rheumatologists performing musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSUS) was developed and published 2 years ago. It consists of a 3 level competency system. The objective of this study...... was to evaluate how the EFSUMB COMPASS has been disseminated and implemented and to assess the potential obstacles encountered. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A questionnaire was developed and distributed by e-mail to all rheumatologists certified as EFSUMB level 3. RESULTS: Seventeen (85%) rheumatologists considered......%). A total of 83 rheumatologists had been trained and assessed for competency in the three EFSUMB levels. CONCLUSION: This survey highlights the current status of EFSUMB COMPASS implementation in European countries with an expected increased number of rheumatologists being able to train and assess new...

  9. Management of optic neuritis and impact of clinical trials: an international survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biousse, Valérie; Calvetti, Olivier; Drews-Botsch, Carolyn D

    2009-01-01

    more frequently presented to ophthalmologists, and were subsequently referred to neurologists or subspecialists. Evaluation and management of ON varied among countries, mostly because of variations in healthcare systems, imaging access, and local guidelines. A brain MRI was obtained for 70......OBJECTIVE: 1) To evaluate the management of acute isolated optic neuritis (ON) by ophthalmologists and neurologists; 2) to evaluate the impact of clinical trials; 3) to compare these practices among 7 countries. METHODS: A survey on diagnosis and treatment of acute isolated ON was sent to 5...... countries, steroids were often prescribed to improve visual outcome or to decrease the long-term risk of multiple sclerosis. INTERPRETATION: Although recent clinical trials have changed the management of acute ON around the world, many neurologists and ophthalmologists do not evaluate and treat acute...

  10. What style of leadership do women in STEMM fields perform? Findings from an international survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Meredith; Davies, Amanda; Moore, Robyn

    2017-01-01

    It is widely acknowledged that women in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and medicine (STEMM) fields are underrepresented in leadership globally. However, little is known about how leadership styles of women in STEMM relate to this underrepresentation. This article discusses findings from a survey examining how 61 women in STEMM define leadership and describe their own leadership styles. Using content analysis and drawing on Full Range Leadership Model factors, findings suggest that women define leadership and describe their own leadership styles using transformational factors. However, there was no consistency in how participants defined ideal leadership or how they defined their own leadership styles. This finding unsettles ideas of distinctly gendered leadership styles. We argue that expectations that leadership will be performed in distinctly gendered styles may be contributing to the underrepresentation of women in leadership roles in STEMM.

  11. Up: The rise of nitrous oxide abuse. An international survey of contemporary nitrous oxide use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaar, Stephen J; Ferris, Jason; Waldron, Jon; Devaney, Madonna; Ramsey, John; Winstock, Adam R

    2016-04-01

    In recent years the recreational use of inhaled nitrous oxide gas (N2O) is becoming increasingly popular, yet little is known about the characteristics of its users or the effects they experience. This paper presents original research from the 2014 Global Drug Survey (GDS) (n=74,864). GDS runs the largest survey of recreational drug use in the world. The findings confirm N2O as a very common drug of use, in particular in the UK and US (38.6% and 29.4% lifetime prevalence). In the UK N2O was reported to be the eighth most commonly used substance. N2O was generally consumed via gas-filled balloons, at festivals and clubs where use of other substances was common. The vast majority of users use infrequently, and their use is not associated with significant harm. However, there appears to be a subpopulation of heavy users who may be using in a dependent pattern. Analysis of last year N2O users (n=4883), confirms that N2O is associated with hallucinations and confusion (which may be the desired effects) and persistent numbness and accidental injury (27.8%, 23.9%, 4.3% and 1.2% of last year users, respectively). Accidental injury is associated with the highest number of 'hits' per session, suggesting a dose-response relationship. The presence of significant harm is discussed in the light of public education on the risks of N2O use and harm-reduction strategies appropriate to N2O use. Further work needs to be completed to confirm the presence of persistent neurological symptoms in recreational users. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. A comparative survey of the impacts of extreme rainfall in two international case studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spekkers, Matthieu; Rözer, Viktor; Thieken, Annegret; ten Veldhuis, Marie-Claire; Kreibich, Heidi

    2017-08-01

    Flooding is assessed as the most important natural hazard in Europe, causing thousands of deaths, affecting millions of people and accounting for large economic losses in the past decade. Little is known about the damage processes associated with extreme rainfall in cities, due to a lack of accurate, comparable and consistent damage data. The objective of this study is to investigate the impacts of extreme rainfall on residential buildings and how affected households coped with these impacts in terms of precautionary and emergency actions. Analyses are based on a unique dataset of damage characteristics and a wide range of potential damage explaining variables at the household level, collected through computer-aided telephone interviews (CATI) and an online survey. Exploratory data analyses based on a total of 859 completed questionnaires in the cities of Münster (Germany) and Amsterdam (the Netherlands) revealed that the uptake of emergency measures is related to characteristics of the hazardous event. In case of high water levels, more efforts are made to reduce damage, while emergency response that aims to prevent damage is less likely to be effective. The difference in magnitude of the events in Münster and Amsterdam, in terms of rainfall intensity and water depth, is probably also the most important cause for the differences between the cities in terms of the suffered financial losses. Factors that significantly contributed to damage in at least one of the case studies are water contamination, the presence of a basement in the building and people's awareness of the upcoming event. Moreover, this study confirms conclusions by previous studies that people's experience with damaging events positively correlates with precautionary behaviour. For improving future damage data acquisition, we recommend the inclusion of cell phones in a CATI survey to avoid biased sampling towards certain age groups.

  13. An international survey of classification and treatment choices for group D retinoblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmine H Francis

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To determine which IIRC scheme was used by retinoblastoma centers worldwide and the percentage of D eyes treated primarily with enucleation versus globe salvaging therapies as well as to correlate trends in treatment choice to IIRC version used and geographic region. METHODS: An anonymized electronic survey was offered to 115 physicians at 39 retinoblastoma centers worldwide asking about IIRC classification schemes and treatment patterns used between 2008 and 2012. Participants were asked to record which version of the IIRC was used for classification, how many group D eyes were diagnosed, and how many eyes were treated with enucleation versus globe salvaging therapies. Averages of eyes per treatment modality were calculated and stratified by both IIRC version and geographic region. Statistical significance was determined by Chi-square, ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis tests using Prism. RESULTS: The survey was completed by 29% of physicians invited to participate. Totally 1807 D eyes were diagnosed. Regarding IIRC system, 27% of centers used the Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles (CHLA version, 33% used the Children’s Oncology Group (COG version, 23% used the Philadelphia version, and 17% were unsure. The rate for primary enucleation varied between 0 and 100% and the mean was 29%. By IIRC version, primary enucleation rates were: Philadelphia, 8%; COG, 34%; and CHLA, 37%. By geographic region, primary enucleation rates were: Latin America, 57%; Asia, 40%; Europe, 36%; Africa, 10%, US, 8%; and Middle East, 8%. However, systemic chemoreduction was used more often than enucleation in all regions except Latin America with a mean of 57% per center (P<0.0001. CONCLUSION: Worldwide there is no consensus on which IIRC version is used, systemic chemoreduction was the most frequently used initial treatment during the study period followed by enucleation and primary treatment modality, especially enucleation, varied greatly with regards to IIRC version

  14. Smokeless tobacco product prices and taxation in Bangladesh: findings from the International Tobacco Control Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nargis, N; Hussain, A K M G; Fong, G T

    2014-12-01

    Smokeless tobacco use occupies a significant portion of overall tobacco consumption in Bangladesh. Yet very little is known about the effectiveness of tax and price policy in controlling the use of smokeless tobacco use in the country. The paper examines the price distribution of various smoked (cigarette, bidi) and smokeless tobacco products (zarda, gul) using the univariate Epanechnikov kernel density function. It estimates the own and cross price elasticity of demand for the most widely used smokeless tobacco product zarda using two-step regression analysis. The analysis is based on data from the ITC Bangladesh Wave 3 Survey which is a nationally representative cohort survey of tobacco users and nonusers conducted in in Bangladesh during 2011-12. The price elasticity of lower price brands of zarda is estimated at -0.64 and of higher priced brands at -0.39, and the cross price elasticity of zarda with respect to cigarette price at 0.35. The tax increase on smokeless tobacco needs to be greater than the tax increase on smoked tobacco to bridge the wide price differential between the two types of products that currently encourages downward substitution from smoked to smokeless tobacco and discourages quitting behavior. This paper argues that increasing tax on smokeless tobacco simultaneously with the tax increase on smoked tobacco can have significant negative impact on the prevalence of smokeless tobacco use in Bangladesh. Finally, a specific excise system replacing the existing ad valorem excise tax can substantially contribute to the revenue collection performance from smokeless tobacco products.

  15. Variability of ethics education in laboratory medicine training programs: results of an international survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruns, David E; Burtis, Carl A; Gronowski, Ann M; McQueen, Matthew J; Newman, Anthony; Jonsson, Jon J

    2015-03-10

    Ethical considerations are increasingly important in medicine. We aimed to determine the mode and extent of teaching of ethics in training programs in clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine. We developed an on-line survey of teaching in areas of ethics relevant to laboratory medicine. Reponses were invited from directors of training programs who were recruited via email to leaders of national organizations. The survey was completed by 80 directors from 24 countries who directed 113 programs. The largest numbers of respondents directed postdoctoral training of scientists (42%) or physicians (33%), post-masters degree programs (33%), and PhD programs (29%). Most programs (82%) were 2years or longer in duration. Formal training was offered in research ethics by 39%, medical ethics by 31%, professional ethics by 24% and business ethics by 9%. The number of reported hours of formal training varied widely, e.g., from 0 to >15h/year for research ethics and from 0 to >15h for medical ethics. Ethics training was required and/or tested in 75% of programs that offered training. A majority (54%) of respondents reported plans to add or enhance training in ethics; many indicated a desire for online resources related to ethics, especially resources with self-assessment tools. Formal teaching of ethics is absent from many training programs in clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine, with heterogeneity in the extent and methods of ethics training among the programs that provide the training. A perceived need exists for online training tools, especially tools with self-assessment components. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Anatomists' views on human body dissection and donation: an international survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arráez-Aybar, Luis-Alfonso; Bueno-López, José Luis; Moxham, Bernard John

    2014-12-01

    A survey was conducted to test three hypotheses: anatomists believe that dissection by students conveys not just anatomical knowledge but also essential skills and attitudes, including professionalism; anatomists approve of the donation of their own bodies or body parts/organs for medical/health-care training and research; attitudes towards body dissection and donation are not dependent upon gender or upon the extent of teaching experience, but are related to transcendental convictions relating to beliefs in the afterlife. Eighty-one anatomists, from 29 countries responded to the survey; 80% indicated that they required medical/health-care students to dissect human cadavers (60% females-86% males, p=0.02). Most teachers recorded that dissection was an instrument for training undergraduate students, an instrument for the development of professional skills, and an instrument to help to control emotions in the future doctor rather than being only a means of teaching/learning anatomy facts. Males were more receptive to the concept that dissection helps to control emotions in the future doctor (p=0.02). Most teachers (75%) said they were willing to donate their bodies, 41% saying they would donate body organs only, 9% would donate their entire bodies only, 25% would separately donate organs and also the entire body. The willingness to donate increased significantly with the years of teaching experience (p=0.04). Teachers who were not believers in the afterlife were more likely to donate their organs/bodies than were believers (p=0.03). Our findings showed that anatomists' attitudes towards body dissection and donation are dependent upon gender, upon the extent of teaching experience, and upon transcendental convictions.

  17. Survey of HNPCC Management Analysis of Responses from 18 International Cancer Centres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chow Elizabeth

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Eighteen international cancer centres responded to a questionnaire designed to determine clinic practices regarding the management of Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC. Areas covered include definition, clinical intakes, pre-genetic testing for microsatellite instability (MSI or expression of mismatch repair (MMR genes by immunohistochemistry (IHC, mutational analysis, consent practices, counselling, surveillance planning, and surgical decision making. In the absence of a firm evidence base, some management practices were variable, with local access to funding and other resources being influential. More consistent responses were evident for management practices with a stronger evidence base from previous clinical research. This document provides important information to guide the management of HNPCC patients, allow comparisons to be made between the approaches of various clinics to HNPCC families, and define management issues that need to be addressed in clinical research.

  18. Should International Classification of Diseases codes be used to survey hospital-acquired pneumonia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfensberger, A; Meier, A H; Kuster, S P; Mehra, T; Meier, M-T; Sax, H

    2018-05-01

    As surveillance of hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) is very resource intensive, alternatives for HAP surveillance are needed urgently. This study compared HAP rates according to routine discharge diagnostic codes of the International Classification of Diseases, 10 th Revision (ICD-10; ICD-HAP) with HAP rates according to the validated surveillance definitions of the Hospitals in Europe Link for Infection Control through Surveillance (HELICS/IPSE; HELICS-HAP) by manual retrospective re-evaluation of patient records. The positive predictive value of ICD-HAP for HELICS-HAP was 0.35, and sensitivity was 0.59. Therefore, the currently available ICD-10-based routine discharge data do not allow reliable identification of patients with HAP. Copyright © 2018 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Postanalytical external quality assessment of urine albumin in primary health care: An international survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aakre, K.M.; Thue, G.; Subramaniam-Haavik, S.

    2008-01-01

    practitioners (GPs) received a case history-based questionnaire depicting a male type 2 diabetes patient in whom UA testing had not been performed. Questions were related to type of urine sample used for UA testing, need for a repeat test, whether UA testing was performed in the office laboratory, and what......BACKGROUND: Microalbuminuria (MA) is recognized as an important risk factor for cardiovascular and renal complications in diabetes. We sought to evaluate how screening for MA is conducted and how urine albumin (UA) results are interpreted in primary care internationally. METHODS: General...... MA are followed only partially, and should be made more practicable, addressing issues such as type of samples, measurement units, and repeat tests. (c) 2008 American Association for Clinical Chemistry Udgivelsesdato: 2008/10...

  20. International Atomic Energy Agency fellows: Where are they now? The Department of Technical Cooperation's report on the fellowship survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    In order to assess the impact and the quality of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) fellowship programme, the Department of Technical Cooperation conducted a survey among former fellows from the years 2001 and 2002. These fellows have all completed the fellowship training, and have had time to judge in what way their training is useful to their work in their home country. As a result of this survey, further surveys could be conducted to serve as a continuous systematic assessment of the fellowship and other programmes. Former fellows from the years 2001 and 2002 were asked to fill out a questionnaire containing questions regarding the following: Where are the former fellows now and what are they doing? How did the fellows rate the quality of the fellowship programme? How did the fellows rate the impact of the training they received through the fellowship programme, the impact on their home institution, and the impact on the TC project and their home country? The survey period was 11 February - 4 March 2005. Reaching a sufficient number of former fellows from the years 2001 and 2002 posed some difficulties. The National Liaison Officers contributed greatly in finding the former fellows' current contact information. Out of the 2067 fellows who were in the field in the years 2001 and 2002, 613 participated in the survey (meaning, 30% of all fellows from those years and 50% of those reached by email or fax). The results of the survey given below represent only the survey participants' opinions, not those of all former fellows from the years 2001 and 2002. To ensure that the results are representative of all fellows, a follow-up study of seven countries is currently being done. The IAEA fellowship programme contributes successfully to knowledge and technology transfer to fellows' home institutions, their home countries and the TC projects they are involved in, as evidenced by the following survey results: 94% of the fellows who participated in the survey

  1. An International Survey of Assessment Practices for Short-Term and Working Memory Deficits in Aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salis, Christos; Murray, Laura; Bakas, Katrina

    2018-02-20

    Recent research has highlighted the clinical relevance of understanding the nature of short-term memory (STM) and working memory (WM) deficits in persons with aphasia and the way these deficits affect linguistic processing and functional communication in activities of daily living. The psychometric properties of tests commonly used to identify STM/WM problems in individuals with aphasia, however, have been questioned. No previous study has sought to investigate assessment practices and attitudes by speech-language pathologists involved in aphasia management. Accordingly, the aims of this study were (a) to investigate both attitudes toward STM/WM assessment in individuals with aphasia, as well as the types and frequency of STM/WM tests used with individuals with aphasia, and (b) to explore factors (e.g., educational background) that may influence STM/WM assessment practices. Respondents recruited via professional and aphasia support organizations completed an online survey. The survey elicited information about the respondents' demographic and clinical backgrounds and STM/WM assessment clinical practices and views, including frequency and preferred use of specific STM/WM tests. The majority of respondents reported regular use of STM/WM tests as part of aphasia management. Positive attitudes toward STM/WM assessments were also reported. The most popular rankings of tests were the Cognitive Linguistic Quick Test (Helm-Estabrooks, 2001), the Comprehensive Aphasia Test (Swinburn, Porter, & Howard, 2005), and the Token Test (McNeil & Prescott, 1978). Results suggested limited knowledge about measures that assess self-perceptions of functional memory abilities. Regression analyses showed that the frequency of reported STM/WM test use was similar between clinicians and dual-role researchers/clinicians, but their attitudes toward the value of STM/WM differed. U.S. and UK respondents reported similar assessment practices. It is reassuring that STM/WM is taken into

  2. A Child’s Concept of Pain: An International Survey of Pediatric Pain Experts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hush, Julia M.; Hancock, Mark J.; Moseley, G. Lorimer; Butler, David S.; Pacey, Verity

    2018-01-01

    A child’s ‘concept of pain’ refers to how they understand what pain actually is, what function pain serves, and what biological processes are thought to underpin it. We aimed to determine pediatric pain experts’ opinions of: (1) the importance and usefulness of assessing a child’s concept of pain in clinical and/or research settings; (2) the usefulness of the content of items within currently published adult-targeted resources for assessing a child’s concept of pain; and (3) important domains of a child’s concept of pain to assess. Forty-nine pediatric pain experts (response rate = 75.4%) completed an online survey. Descriptive statistics and frequency of responses were analyzed. Experts from all included disciplines reported that assessing a child’s concept of pain is important and useful both clinically and in a research setting (>80% reported very or extremely useful for each item). Experts considered that the content of 13 items from currently published adult-targeted resources was useful, but the wording was too complex for children aged 8–12 years. Experts considered that all seven of the proposed domains of a child’s concept of pain was important to assess. The findings can be used to inform the development of an assessment tool for a child’s concept of pain. PMID:29342976

  3. Science journal editors' views on publication ethics: results of an international survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wager, E; Fiack, S; Graf, C; Robinson, A; Rowlands, I

    2009-06-01

    Breaches of publication ethics such as plagiarism, data fabrication and redundant publication are recognised as forms of research misconduct that can undermine the scientific literature. We surveyed journal editors to determine their views about a range of publication ethics issues. Questionnaire sent to 524 editors-in-chief of Wiley-Blackwell science journals asking about the severity and frequency of 16 ethical issues at their journals, their confidence in handling such issues, and their awareness and use of guidelines. Responses were obtained from 231 editors (44%), of whom 48% edited healthcare journals. The general level of concern about the 16 issues was low, with mean severity scores of 20% of the editors stated that 12 of the 16 items never occurred at their journal. However, 13%-47% did not know the frequency of the problems. Awareness and use of guidelines was generally low. Most editors were unaware of all except other journals' instructions. Most editors of science journals seem not very concerned about publication ethics and believe that misconduct occurs only rarely in their journals. Many editors are unfamiliar with available guidelines but would welcome more guidance or training.

  4. Management of optic neuritis and impact of clinical trials: an international survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biousse, Valérie; Calvetti, Olivier; Drews-Botsch, Carolyn D

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: 1) To evaluate the management of acute isolated optic neuritis (ON) by ophthalmologists and neurologists; 2) to evaluate the impact of clinical trials; 3) to compare these practices among 7 countries. METHODS: A survey on diagnosis and treatment of acute isolated ON was sent to 5,443 n...... ON patients according to the best evidence from clinical research. This confirms that evaluation of the impact of major clinical trials ("translational T2 clinical research") is essential when assessing the effects of interventions designed to improve quality of care.......-80% of ON patients; lumbar punctures were obtained mostly in Europe and Thailand. Although most patients received acute treatment with intravenous steroids, between 14% and 65% of neurologists and ophthalmologists still recommended oral prednisone (1 mg/kg/day) for the treatment of acute isolated ON. In all...... countries, steroids were often prescribed to improve visual outcome or to decrease the long-term risk of multiple sclerosis. INTERPRETATION: Although recent clinical trials have changed the management of acute ON around the world, many neurologists and ophthalmologists do not evaluate and treat acute...

  5. Use of lead shielding on pregnant patients undergoing CT scans: Results of an international survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iball, Gareth R., E-mail: gri@medphysics.leeds.ac.u [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Old Medical School, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds, W. Yorkshire LS1 3EX (United Kingdom); Brettle, David S. [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Old Medical School, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds, W. Yorkshire LS1 3EX (United Kingdom)

    2011-05-15

    Aim: An online survey has been used to assess the use of abdominal lead shielding on pregnant patients undergoing CT scans. The aim of the study was to identify potential geographical variations in the use of such shielding as well as the opinions of the users in terms of the weight, manoeuvrability and ergonomics of the lead shields. Materials and methods: The online questionnaire was distributed to CT Radiographers in the UK, Europe, North America and Australia and responses were gathered electronically over a six month period. All completed responses were downloaded and subsequently analysed for each geographical region. Results: In total, 390 completed questionnaires were received with over 100 from each of the UK, North America and Australia. The use of lead shielding was found to vary significantly across the globe with the highest usage in North America (94.5%) and the lowest usage in Europe (46.3%). Approximately 20% of all respondents said that they experienced occupationally related back pain and 25% of all respondents said that patients complained about the weight of the shielding. Conclusion: Significant geographical variations in both the use of lead shielding for foetal radiation protection and the users' opinions of the shielding devices that are used have been identified and it has become clear that existing shielding solutions are not optimised for this task.

  6. Peripheral nerve injuries: an international survey of current treatments and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Thomas; Krichevsky, Alisa; Sumarto, Andrew; Jaffurs, Daniel; Wirth, Garrett A; Paydar, Keyianoosh; Evans, Gregory R D

    2009-07-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries are a serious health concern and leave many patients with lifelong disabilities. There is little information about incidences, current practice, outcomes, and type of research that may help delineate new strategies. A questionnaire was designed to determine characteristics of peripheral nerve injuries and the need for alternative strategies and sent to 889 plastic, hand, trauma, and orthopedic surgeons in 49 countries; 324 completed surveys were collected and analyzed (total response rate of 36.45%). The majority of institutions treat more than 3000 patients annually. Trauma was the leading cause of injury with the majority located on the upper extremity. In most cases, a primary repair was achieved, but 2.52% were unrepairable. The overall outcome was linked to their Sunderland classification (SCL). A grade 1 nerve injury (SCL-1) reached a maximum outcome after 7.15 months. SCL-2, -3, -4, and -5 needed 10.69, 14.08, 17.66, and 19.03 months, respectively. Tissue engineering was considered the most important research field, resulting in a visual analogue scale of 8.6. Despite marked advances in the treatment of peripheral nerve injuries, clinical outcomes still appear unsatisfactory. The importance of research in the field of tissue engineering should be emphasized as a pathway toward improving these outcomes.

  7. International survey of occupational health nurses' roles in multidisciplinary teamwork in occupational health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Bonnie; Kono, Keiko; Marziale, Maria Helena Palucci; Peurala, Marjatta; Radford, Jennifer; Staun, Julie

    2014-07-01

    Access to occupational health services for primary prevention and control of work-related injuries and illnesses by the global workforce is limited (World Health Organization [WHO], 2013). From the WHO survey of 121 (61%) participating countries, only one-third of the responding countries provided occupational health services to more than 30% of their workers (2013). How services are provided in these countries is dependent on legal requirements and regulations, population, workforce characteristics, and culture, as well as an understanding of the impact of workplace hazards and worker health needs. Around the world, many occupational health services are provided by occupational health nurses independently or in collaboration with other disciplines' professionals. These services may be health protection, health promotion, or both, and are designed to reduce health risks, support productivity, improve workers' quality of life, and be cost-effective. Rantanen (2004) stated that basic occupational health services must increase rather than decline, especially as work becomes more complex; workforces become more dynamic and mobile, creating new models of work-places; and jobs become more precarious and temporary. To better understand occupational health services provided by occupational health nurses globally and how decisions are made to provide these services, this study examined the scope of services provided by a sample of participating occupational health nurses from various countries. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Internal Stellar Kinematics of M32 from the SPLASH Survey: Dark Halo Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howley, K. M.; Guhathakurta, P.; van der Marel, R.; Geha, M.; Kalirai, J.; Yniguez, B.; Kirby, E.; Cuillandre, J.-C.; Gilbert, K.

    2013-03-01

    As part of the SPLASH survey of the Andromeda (M31) system, we have obtained Keck/DEIMOS spectra of the compact elliptical (cE) satellite M32. This is the first resolved-star kinematical study of any cE galaxy. In contrast to most previous kinematical studies that extended out to r information to account statistically for M31 contamination. The rotation curve and velocity dispersion profile extend well beyond the radius (r ~ 150'') where the isophotes are distorted. Unlike NGC 205, another close dwarf companion of M31, M32's kinematics appear regular and symmetric and do not show obvious sharp gradients across the region of isophotal elongation and twists. We interpret M31's kinematics using three-integral axisymmetric dynamical equilibrium models constructed using Schwarzschild's orbit superposition technique. Models with a constant mass-to-light ratio can fit the data remarkably well. However, since such a model requires an increasing tangential anisotropy with radius, invoking the presence of an extended dark halo may be more plausible. Such an extended dark halo is definitely required to bind a half-dozen fast-moving stars observed at the largest radii, but these stars may not be an equilibrium component of M32. Data herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and NASA. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  9. Survey of RFID and Its Application to International Ocean/Air Container Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Minoru; Nakada, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Hitoshi; Shimizu, Masashi

    “Internet of Things” (IoT) requires information to be collected from “anything”, “anytime”, and “anywhere”. In order to achieve this, wireless devices are required that have (1) automatic data acquisition capability, (2) small size, (3) long life, and (4) long range communication capability. One way to meet these requirements is to adopt active Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) systems. Active RFID is more advantageous than passive RFID and enables higher data reading performance over longer distances. This paper surveys active RFID systems, the services they currently promise to provide, technical problems common to these services, and the direction in which research should head in the future. It also reports the results of EPCglobal (EPC: Electronic Product Code) pilot tests conducted on global logistics for tracking ocean/air container transportation using active RFID systems for which we developed several new types of active RFID tags. The test results confirm that our active RFID tags have sufficient capability and low power consumption to well support ocean/air transportation and logistics service.

  10. A retrospective survey of the use of laboratory tests to simulate internal combustion engine materials tribology problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blau, P.J.

    1992-12-31

    Progress in the Field of tribology strongly parallels, and has always been strongly driven by, developments and needs in transportation and related industries. Testing of candidate materials for internal combustion engine applications has historically taken several routes: (1) replacement of parts in actual engines subjected to daily use, (2) testing in special, instrumented test engines, (3) and simulative testing in laboratory tribometers using relatively simple specimens. The advantages and disadvantages of each approach are reviewed using historical examples. A four-decade, retrospective survey of the tribomaterials literature focused on the effectiveness of laboratory simulations for engine materials screening. Guidelines for designing and ducting successful tribology laboratory simulations will be discussed. These concepts were used to design a valve wear simulator at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  11. The International Network of Obstetric Survey Systems (INOSS): benefits of multi-country studies of severe and uncommon maternal morbidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Marian

    2014-02-01

    The International Network of Obstetric Survey Systems (INOSS) is a multi-country collaboration formed to facilitate studies of uncommon and severe complications of pregnancy and childbirth. Collaborations such as INOSS offer many benefits in the study of rare complications. The use of uniform case definitions, common datasets, specifically collected detailed data and prospectively agreed comparative and combined analyses all add to the validity of studies and their utility to guide policy and clinical practice and hence improve the quality of care. Such multi-national collaborations allow for the conduct of robust studies less subject to many of the biases attributed to typical observational studies. For very rare conditions such collaborations may provide the only route to providing high quality evidence to guide practice. Clinicians and researchers conducting studies into rare and severe complications should consider working through a network such as INOSS to maximize the value of their research. © 2013 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  12. An international survey of in-service inspection experience with prestressed concrete pressure vessels and containments for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-04-01

    An international survey is presented of experience obtained from the in-service surveillance of prestressed concrete pressure vessels and containments for nuclear reactors. Some information on other prestressed concrete structures is also given. Experience has been gained during the working life of such structures in Western Europe and the USA over the years since 1967. For each country a summary is given of the nuclear programme, national standards and Codes of Practice, and the detailed in-service inspection programme. Reports are then given of the actual experience obtained from the inspection programme and the methods of measurement, examination and reporting employed in each country. A comprehensive bibliography of over 100 references is included. The appendices contain information on nuclear power stations which are operating, under construction or planned worldwide and which employ either prestressed concrete pressure vessels or containments. (U.K.)

  13. Targeting improved patient outcomes using innovative product listing agreements: a survey of Canadian and international key opinion leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Melissa; Henshall, Chris; Garrison, Louis P; Griffin, Adrian D; Coyle, Doug; Long, Stephen; Khayat, Zayna A; Anger, Dana L; Yu, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    To address the uncertainty associated with procuring pharmaceutical products, product listing agreements (PLAs) are increasingly being used to support responsible funding decisions in Canada and elsewhere. These agreements typically involve financial-based rebating initiatives or, less frequently, outcome-based contracts. A qualitative survey was conducted to improve the understanding of outcome-based and more innovative PLAs (IPLAs) based on input from Canadian and international key opinion leaders in the areas of drug manufacturing and reimbursement. Results from a structured literature review were used to inform survey development. Potential participants were invited via email to partake in the survey, which was conducted over phone or in person. Responses were compiled anonymously for review and reporting. Twenty-one individuals participated in the survey, including health technology assessment (HTA) key opinion leaders (38%), pharmaceutical industry chief executive officers/vice presidents (29%), ex-payers (19%), and current payers/drug plan managers/HTA (14%). The participants suggested that ~80%-95% of Canadian PLAs are financial-based rather than outcomes-based. They indicated that IPLAs offer important benefits to patients, payers, and manufacturers; however, several challenges limit their use (eg, administrative burden, lack of agreed-upon endpoint). They noted that IPLAs are useful in rapidly evolving therapeutic areas and those associated with high unmet need, a quantifiable endpoint, and/or robust data systems. The Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health, the pan-Canadian Pharmaceutical Alliance, and other arms-length organizations could play important roles in identifying uncertainty and endpoints and brokering pan-Canadian PLAs. Industry should work collaboratively with payers to identify uncertainty and develop innovative mechanisms to address it. The survey results indicated that while challenging, use of IPLAs may be associated with

  14. Assessing the internal validity of a household survey-based food security measure adapted for use in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadeghizadeh Atefeh

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of food insecurity is an indicator of material well-being in an area of basic need. The U.S. Food Security Module has been adapted for use in a wide variety of cultural and linguistic settings around the world. We assessed the internal validity of the adapted U.S. Household Food Security Survey Module to measure adult and child food insecurity in Isfahan, Iran, using statistical methods based on the Rasch measurement model. Methods The U.S. Household Food Security Survey Module was translated into Farsi and after adaptation, administered to a representative sample. Data were provided by 2,004 randomly selected households from all sectors of the population of Isfahan, Iran, during 2005. Results 53.1 percent reported that their food had run out at some time during the previous 12 months and they did not have money to buy more, while 26.7 percent reported that an adult had cut the size of a meal or skipped a meal because there was not enough money for food, and 7.2 percent reported that an adult did not eat for a whole day because there was not enough money for food. The severity of the items in the adult scale, estimated under Rasch-model assumptions, covered a range of 6.65 logistic units, and those in the child scale 11.68 logistic units. Most Item-infit statistics were near unity, and none exceeded 1.20. Conclusion The range of severity of items provides measurement coverage across a wide range of severity of food insecurity for both adults and children. Both scales demonstrated acceptable levels of internal validity, although several items should be improved. The similarity of the response patterns in the Isfahan and the U.S. suggests that food insecurity is experienced, managed, and described similarly in the two countries.

  15. An international perspective on electric transportation. Survey on electric road transport 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weeda, M; Kroon, P. [ECN Policy Studies, Petten (Netherlands); Appels, D. [Agentschap NL, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2012-09-15

    To compare the Dutch governmental efforts and developments in the field of electric road transport, the Ministry of Economic Affairs, Agriculture and Innovation has asked ECN Policy Studies and NL Agency to conduct an international assessment on electric mobility. The countries that have been considered are: Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, UK, China, USA and South Korea. The Netherlands has a high ambition level with regard to the number of electric vehicles and is one of the leaders as for the envisaged number of charging points. In the field of R and D, Germany, South Korea and China take the lead, followed by France, the UK, the USA and Austria. However, the assessment has only looked at specific funds for electric mobility, and has not looked at general R and D and innovation funds. The Netherlands has several electro-mobility field tests, but is not leading in number. Norway and Austria are leading countries when it comes to implementation of public charging infrastructure.

  16. Patterns of decline in upper limb function of boys and men with DMD: an international survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Mariska M H P; Bergsma, Arjen; Geurts, Alexander C H; de Groot, Imelda J M

    2014-07-01

    With increasing life expectancy, upper extremity (UE) function becomes more and more important in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Knowledge of UE function in these children is, however, limited. The aim of this study was to gain insight into the changing patterns of UE function during the course of DMD. A Web-based questionnaire on UE function, covering all domains of the International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health, was distributed worldwide. Primary domains of the questionnaire were: participant characteristics, UE pain and stiffness, UE activities, and social participation. Data were described per disease stage and analyzed using descriptive analysis. A total of 213 boys/men with DMD (1-35 years) were included in this study. UE pain, stiffness, and activity limitations increased with disease stage. UE activity limitations already occurred in the early ambulatory stage. Compared to the healthy population, social participation was restricted in DMD patients and about 70% of the respondents experienced UE limitations when performing social activities. Despite the existence of UE impairments, only 9% of the respondents used supportive aids. Functional capacities and activities of the UE are limited already in the early ambulatory stage of patients with DMD affecting their social participation. Therefore, clinicians should pay attention to UE limitations before DMD patients lose their capacity to walk. Effective and adequate aids as well as attention for pain and stiffness in the therapeutic management could help to reduce UE activity limitations and related restrictions in social participation.

  17. The Peruvian Tsunami of 23 June 2001: Preliminary Report by the International Tsunami Survey Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    OKAL, E.; ARAYA, S.; BORRERO, J.; DENGLER, L.; GOMER, B.; KOSHIMURA, S.; LAOS, G.; OLCESE, D.; ORTIZ, M. F.; SWENSSON, M.; TITOV, V.; VEGAS, F.

    2001-12-01

    The South Peru event of 23 June 2001 resulted in a regionally destructive tsunami (23 dead; 62 missing). A 12-member ITST was deployed in the field area during 05-15 July, principally to survey the inundation, and interview survivors. Our principal results are: 1. The area affected extends from Atico in the NW to Ilo in the SE over 300 km of coastline. Maximum run-up was concentrated at Camana, where it averaged 5 m, with peaks at 7 m. Inundation distances were substantial, typically 200 to 700 m, and reaching over 1 km at one location. 2. The tsunami featured a strong leading depression, (vertical amplitude -5 to -6 m), followed by a series of positive waves. Most reliable witnesses describe 4 waves, the 3rd being largest. The downdraw was seen even in areas where no positive run-up was detected. The period of the waves was large, the downdraw lasting 15 mn. 3. Destruction is concentrated over 15 km on either side of Camana. Agricultural fields were covered with up to 40 cm of sand. Most of the destruction took place at La Punta, 10 km SE of Camana. Adobe and infilled wall structures fared most poorly. 4. Had the tsunami occurred at high tide on a Summer evening, when the beach at La Punta was bristling with vacationers, the death toll might have been 1000; a different mechanism with no leading depression would have been even more disastrous. 5. Despite the 23 casualties, a majority of people told us of their run for the hills, mostly upon seeing the downdraw. This is a positive attitude, proof of a good level of consciousness on the part of the population.

  18. Long-term activity restrictions after shoulder arthroplasty: an international survey of experienced shoulder surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnussen, Robert A; Mallon, William J; Willems, W Jaap; Moorman, Claude T

    2011-03-01

    Shoulder arthroplasty is being performed with increasing frequency, and patients' athletic participation after shoulder arthroplasty is on the rise. However, little data exist regarding appropriate long-term activity restrictions. We hypothesize that European and North American surgeons both recommend increasing long-term activity restrictions, moving from hemiarthroplasty to total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) to reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA), and that both groups impose similar restrictions on their patients. An online survey was sent to members of the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) and the European Society for Surgery of the Shoulder and Elbow (SECEC). Participants received a list of 37 activities and classified their postoperative recommendations for each activity as allowed, allowed with experience, not allowed, or undecided. The participation rate was 18%, including 47 North American surgeons and 52 European surgeons. All patients were allowed to participate in nonimpact activities, including jogging/running, walking, stationary bicycling, and ballroom dancing. Sports requiring light upper extremity involvement, including low-impact aerobics, golf, swimming, and table tennis, were allowed after hemiarthroplasty and TSA, and were allowed with experience after RTSA. Sports with fall potential, including downhill skiing, tennis, basketball, and soccer, were allowed with experience after hemiarthroplasty and TSA, and undecided or not allowed after RTSA. Higher-impact sports, such as weightlifting, waterskiing, and volleyball, were undecided after hemiarthroplasty and TSA and were not allowed after RTSA. European surgeons were more conservative than American surgeons in their recommendations after hemiarthroplasty and TSA, but good agreement between the 2 groups was noted regarding restrictions after RTSA. Restrictions should be based on the type of arthroplasty performed and patients' preoperative experience. Copyright © 2011 Journal of

  19. Worldwide enucleation techniques and materials for treatment of retinoblastoma: an international survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daphne L Mourits

    Full Text Available To investigate the current practice of enucleation with or without orbital implant for retinoblastoma in countries across the world.A digital survey identifying operation techniques and material used for orbital implants after enucleation in patients with retinoblastoma.We received a response of 58 surgeons in 32 different countries. A primary artificial implant is routinely inserted by 42 (72.4% surgeons. Ten (17.2% surgeons leave the socket empty, three (5.2% decide per case. Other surgeons insert a dermis fat graft as a standard primary implant (n=1, or fill the socket in a standard secondary procedure (n=2; one uses dermis fat grafts and one artificial implants. The choice for porous implants was more frequent than for non-porous implants: 27 (58.7% and 15 (32.6%, respectively. Both porous and non-porous implant types are used by 4 (8.7% surgeons. Twenty-five surgeons (54.3% insert bare implants, 11 (23.9% use separate wrappings, eight (17.4% use implants with prefab wrapping and two insert implants with and without wrapping depending on type of implant. Attachment of the muscles to the wrapping or implant (at various locations is done by 31 (53.4% surgeons. Eleven (19.0% use a myoconjunctival technique, nine (15.5% suture the muscles to each other and seven (12.1% do not reattach the muscles. Measures to improve volume are implant exchange at an older age (n=4, the use of Restylane SQ (n=1 and osmotic expanders (n=1. Pegging is done by two surgeons.No (worldwide consensus exists about the use of material and techniques for enucleation for the treatment of retinoblastoma. Considerations for the use of different techniques are discussed.

  20. Report on the International Society for Laboratory Hematology Survey on guidelines to support clinical hematology laboratory practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, C P M; Moffat, K A; George, T I; Proytcheva, M; Iorio, A

    2016-05-01

    Given the importance of evidence-based guidelines in health care, we surveyed the laboratory hematology community to determine their opinions on guideline development and their experience and interest in developing clinical hematology laboratory practice guidelines. The study was conducted using an online survey, distributed to members of the International Society for Laboratory Hematology (ISLH) in 2015, with analysis of collected, anonymized responses. A total of 245 individuals participated. Most worked in clinical and/or research laboratories (83%) or industry (11%). 42% felt there were gaps in current guidelines. The majority (58%) recommended that ISLH engages its membership in guideline development. Participants differed in their familiarity with, and use of, different organizations' guidelines. Participants felt it was important to follow best practice recommendations on guideline development, including engagement of experts, statement about conflict of interests and how they were managed, systematic review and grading evidence for recommendations, identifying recommendations lacking evidence or consensus, and public input and peer review of the guideline. Moreover, it was considered important to provide guidelines free of charge. Industry involvement in guidelines was considered less important. The clinical laboratory hematology community has high expectations of laboratory practice guidelines that are consistent with recent recommendations on evidence-based guideline development. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. The impact of country and culture on end-of-life care for injured patients: results from an international survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Chad G; Navsaria, Pradeep; Kirkpatrick, Andrew W; Vercler, Christian; Dixon, Elijah; Zink, John; Laupland, Kevin B; Lowe, Michael; Salomone, Jeffrey P; Dente, Christopher J; Wyrzykowski, Amy D; Hameed, S Morad; Widder, Sandy; Inaba, Kenji; Ball, Jill E; Rozycki, Grace S; Montgomery, Sean P; Hayward, Thomas; Feliciano, David V

    2010-12-01

    Up to 20% of all trauma patients admitted to an intensive care unit die from their injuries. End-of-life decision making is a variable process that involves prognosis, predicted functional outcomes, personal beliefs, institutional resources, societal norms, and clinician experience. The goal of this study was to better understand end-of-life processes after major injury by comparing clinician viewpoints from various countries and cultures. A clinician-based, 38-question international survey was used to characterize the impacts of medical, religious, social, and system factors on end-of-life care after trauma. A total of 419 clinicians from the United States (49%), Canada (19%), South Africa (11%), Europe (9%), Asia (8%), and Australasia (4%) completed the survey. In America, the admitting surgeon guided most end-of-life decisions (51%), when compared with all other countries (0-27%). The practice structure of American respondents also varied from other regions. Formal medical futility laws are rarely available (14-38%). Ethical consultation services are often accessible (29-98%), but rarely used (0-29%), and typically unhelpful (maker viewpoint, and institutional resources resulted in significant variation in end-of-life care after injury. These disparities reflect competing concepts (patient autonomy, distributive justice, and religion).

  2. Recommendations for radioembolisation after liver surgery using yttrium-90 resin microspheres based on a survey of an international expert panel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samim, Morsal [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Surgery, Utrecht (Netherlands); University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Utrecht (Netherlands); Veenendaal, Linde M. van; Braat, Manon N.G.J.A.; Hoven, Andor F. van den; Bosch, Maurice A.A.J. van den; Lam, Marnix G.E.H. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Utrecht (Netherlands); Hillegersberg, Richard van [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Surgery, Utrecht (Netherlands); Sangro, Bruno [Clinica Universidad de Navarra-IDISNA and CIBEREHD, Liver Unit, Pamplona (Spain); Kao, Yung Hsiang [Cabrini Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Melbourne (Australia); Liu, Dave [Vancouver General Hospital, University of British Columbia, Department of Radiology, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Louie, John D.; Sze, Daniel Y. [Stanford University Medical Center, Division of Interventional Radiology, Stanford (United States); Rose, Steven C. [University of California, Department of Radiology, San Diego (United States); Brown, Daniel B. [Vanderbilt University, Medical Center North, Department of Radiology, Nashville (United States); Ahmadzadehfar, Hojjat [University Hospital Bonn, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bonn (Germany); Kim, Edward [Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, New York (United States)

    2017-12-15

    Guidelines on how to adjust activity in patients with a history of liver surgery who are undergoing yttrium-90 radioembolisation ({sup 90}Y-RE) are lacking. The aim was to study the variability in activity prescription in these patients, between centres with extensive experience using resin microspheres {sup 90}Y-RE, and to draw recommendations on activity prescription based on an expert consensus. The variability in activity prescription between centres was investigated by a survey of international experts in the field of {sup 90}Y-RE. Six representative post-surgical patients (i.e. comparable activity prescription, different outcome) were selected. Information on patients' disease characteristics and data needed for activity calculation was presented to the expert panel. Reported was the used method for activity prescription and whether, how and why activity reduction was found indicated. Ten experts took part in the survey. Recommendations on activity reduction were highly variable between the expert panel. The median intra-patient range was 44 Gy (range 18-55 Gy). Reductions in prescribed activity were recommended in 68% of the cases. In consensus, a maximum D{sub Target} of 50 Gy was recommended. With a current lack of guidelines, large variability in activity prescription in post-surgical patients undergoing {sup 90}Y-RE exists. In consensus, D{sub Target} ≤50 Gy is recommended. (orig.)

  3. Cessation assistance reported by smokers in 15 countries participating in the International Tobacco Control (ITC) policy evaluation surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borland, Ron; Li, Lin; Driezen, Pete; Wilson, Nick; Hammond, David; Thompson, Mary E; Fong, Geoffrey T; Mons, Ute; Willemsen, Marc C; McNeill, Ann; Thrasher, James F; Cummings, K Michael

    2012-01-01

    To describe some of the variability across the world in levels of quit smoking attempts and use of various forms of cessation support. Use of the International Tobacco Control Policy Evaluation Project surveys of smokers, using the 2007 survey wave (or later, where necessary). Australia, Canada, China, France, Germany, Ireland, Malaysia, Mexico, the Netherlands, New Zealand, South Korea, Thailand, United Kingdom, Uruguay and United States. Samples of smokers from 15 countries. Self-report on use of cessation aids and on visits to health professionals and provision of cessation advice during the visits. Prevalence of quit attempts in the last year varied from less than 20% to more than 50% across countries. Similarly, smokers varied greatly in reporting visiting health professionals in the last year (<20% to over 70%), and among those who did, provision of advice to quit also varied greatly. There was also marked variability in the levels and types of help reported. Use of medication was generally more common than use of behavioural support, except where medications are not readily available. There is wide variation across countries in rates of attempts to stop smoking and use of assistance with higher overall use of medication than behavioural support. There is also wide variation in the provision of brief advice to stop by health professionals. © 2011 The Authors, Addiction © 2011 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  4. A survey of evidence in the Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine oncology manuscripts from 1999 to 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahora, A; Khanna, C

    2010-01-01

    To survey and monitor trends in evidence for oncology manuscripts published in the Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine (JVIM) between 1999 and 2007 based on an evidence-based medicine (EBM) standard. All veterinary oncology-related articles published in JVIM and 7 other high-impact journals from 1999 to 2007 were collected by database searches. Relevant manuscripts then were characterized including investigator affiliation, subject matter investigated, retrospective or prospective study design, manuscript type, and classifications of manuscripts using an EBM standard. A total of 172 relevant veterinary oncology manuscripts were identified in JVIM between 1999 and 2007. The proportion of oncology manuscripts published each year rose with the total number of manuscripts published in JVIM (mean, 13%; range, 8-15%). The author affiliations and subject matter were similar during this evaluation period. Case series represented the most common manuscript type (40%). With the exception of a progressive increase in prospective manuscripts and a reduction in case reports, no significant changes in the classification of manuscripts using EBM standards were seen. During this same period, veterinary oncology manuscripts published in 7 high-impact journals were associated with higher standards of evidence including prospective studies and randomized trials. The standards of evidence for veterinary oncology manuscripts published in JVIM have remained static between 1999 and 2007. This survey provides an informative benchmark for the state of evidence in previous JVIM oncology manuscripts and may be useful in identifying specific opportunities that may raise the standards of evidence in future publications in JVIM.

  5. Impact of point-of-sale tobacco display bans: findings from the International Tobacco Control Four Country Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin; Borland, Ron; Fong, Geoffrey T; Thrasher, James F; Hammond, David; Cummings, Kenneth M

    2013-10-01

    This study examined the impact of point-of-sale (POS) tobacco marketing restrictions in Australia and Canada, in relation to the United Kingdom and the United States where there were no such restrictions during the study period (2006-10). The data came from the International Tobacco Control Four Country Survey, a prospective multi-country cohort survey of adult smokers. In jurisdictions where POS display bans were implemented, smokers' reported exposure to tobacco marketing declined markedly. From 2006 to 2010, in Canada, the percentages noticing POS tobacco displays declined from 74.1 to 6.1% [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 0.26, P marketing in the United States and United Kingdom remained high during this period. In parallel, there were declines in reported exposures to other forms of advertising/promotion in Canada and Australia, but again, not in the United States or United Kingdom. Impulse purchasing of cigarettes was lower in places that enacted POS display bans. These findings indicate that implementing POS tobacco display bans does result in lower exposure to tobacco marketing and less frequent impulse purchasing of cigarettes.

  6. Predictors of smoking in cars with nonsmokers: findings from the 2007 Wave of the International Tobacco Control Four Country Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitchman, Sara C; Fong, Geoffrey T; Borland, Ron; Hyland, Andrew

    2010-04-01

    This study examines the proportion and characteristics of smokers who smoke in cars with nonsmokers across four countries and the potentially modifiable correlates of this behavior. Respondents included a total of 6,786 current adult smokers from Wave 6 (September 2007-February 2008) of the International Tobacco Control Four Country Survey, a random digit-dial telephone survey of nationally representative samples of adult smokers in Australia, the United Kingdom, Canada, and the United States. Reports of smoking in cars with nonsmokers ranged from a low of 29% in Australia and the United Kingdom, to 34% in Canada, and to a high of 44% in the United States. Daily smokers who were from the United States, male, and younger were the most likely to smoke in cars with nonsmokers. Several potentially modifiable factors were also found to be related to this behavior, including smoke-free homes and beliefs about the dangers of cigarette smoke exposure to nonsmokers. A considerable proportion of smokers continue to smoke in cars with nonsmokers across the four countries, particularly in the United States. Public health campaigns should educate smokers about the hazards of cigarette smoke exposure and promote the need for smoke-free cars. These findings provide a foundation of evidence relevant for jurisdictions that are considering banning smoking in cars.

  7. International travel in the immunocompromised patient: a cross-sectional survey of travel advice in 254 consecutive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialy, C; Horne, K; Dendle, C; Kanellis, J; Littlejohn, G; Ratnam, I; Woolley, I

    2015-06-01

    Our primary aim was to determine the rate of overseas travel in immunocompromised individuals attending appropriate clinics at an Australian tertiary care hospital. We also aimed to characterise health-seeking behaviour prior to travel and investigated sources of pre-travel advice, compared travel patterns and activities between three specific immunosuppressed groups, and examined pre-immunosuppression patient serology. We implemented a cross-sectional survey of patients between February and August 2012. This survey was implemented among three outpatient populations at Monash Medical Centre, an Australian tertiary care hospital. We recruited 254 immunosuppressed adults from three patient populations: human immunodeficiency virus-positive individuals, renal transplant patients and rheumatology patients requiring immunosuppressive therapy. No clinical intervention was performed. In the 10 years preceding the survey, 153 (60.2%) participants reported international travel. Of these, 105 (68.6%) were immunosuppressed at the time of travel. These patients were 47.6% male and 60% Australian born. Forty per cent were visiting friends and relatives as part of their travel. Fifty-four per cent of those immunocompromised at the time of travel were going to high-risk destinations. Pathology files indicated that serological screening was frequently not performed prior to immunosuppression in the renal transplant and rheumatology groups. Immunocompromised patients often travel to high-risk destinations with limited or inadequate pre-travel preparations. Doctors caring for the immunocompromised should be aware of travel risks, suitable vaccination protocols and when to refer to specialist travel clinics. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  8. An international survey of cancer pain characteristics and syndromes. IASP Task Force on Cancer Pain. International Association for the Study of Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caraceni, A; Portenoy, R K

    1999-09-01

    The optimal assessment of cancer pain includes a detailed description of pain characteristics and classification by both syndrome and likely mechanisms. In the clinical setting, the interpretation of this information is aided by knowledge of the available clinical experiences on these aspects of the pain. Unfortunately, existing data are limited. There have been few large surveys of cancer pain characteristics and syndromes, and comparative data from patients in different parts of the world are entirely lacking. To better define the characteristics of cancer pain syndromes the Task Force on Cancer Pain of the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) conducted a prospective, cross-sectional, international, multicenter survey of pain specialists and their patients. From a total of 100 clinicians who described themselves as cancer pain practitioners in the IASP membership directory, 51 agreed to participate in the survey and a total of 58 provided data. These clinicians resided in 24 countries and evaluated a total of 1095 patients with severe cancer pain mostly requiring opioid medication, using a combination of patient-rated and observer-rated measures. The patient-rated scales comprised a pain intensity measure chosen from the brief pain inventory. The observer-rated information included demographic and tumor-related data, and responses on checklists of pain syndromes and pathophysiologies. Patients were heterogeneous in terms of demographics and tumor-related information. More than 76% had a Kamofsky performance status score or = 7 on a 10-point numeric scale. The factors that were univariately associated with higher pain intensity included the presence of breakthrough pain, somatic pain or neuropathic pain, age younger than 60 years, and lower performance status score. A multivariate model suggested that the presence of breakthrough pain, somatic pain, and lower performance status were the most important predictors of intense pain. Pains that were

  9. International Survey of Peer Leadership (ISPL: An Emerging Snapshot of the Status of Peer Leadership in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frade Nelia

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The power and importance of peer influence in educational settings has been well documented (Cuseo, 2010; Ender & Kay, 2001; Keup, 2010. In South Africa, research supports international trends that student involvement in peer-led activities contributes to student success and ultimate throughput (Layton & McKenna, 2015; Loots, 2009; Underhill & McDonald, 2010. A plethora of research exists attesting to the benefits for students who are the recipients of peer-led activities. In South Africa, however, knowledge gaps exist pertaining to a national perspective on the experiences and, to some extent, on the benefits of peer leadership activities for peer leaders themselves. The purpose of this study is to provide an initial national snapshot of the development and experiences of peer leaders at six South African institutions of higher education, using the International Survey of Peer Leaders (ISPL. The research design adopted was a non-probability purposive sampling technique, with a sample size of N=466. Data were analysed using descriptive analyses. Findings validate previous findings and provide a more comprehensive picture of the types of peer leadership positions held, the training and support peer leaders receive, levels of engagement, and the benefits of being involved in peer-led activities.

  10. International guidelines for bioequivalence of systemically available orally administered generic drug products: a survey of similarities and differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davit, Barbara; Braddy, April C; Conner, Dale P; Yu, Lawrence X

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this article is to discuss the similarities and differences among bioequivalence approaches used by international regulatory authorities when reviewing applications for marketing new generic drug products which are systemically active and intended for oral administration. We focused on the 13 jurisdictions and organizations participating in the International Generic Drug Regulators Pilot. These are Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Chinese Taipei, the European Medicines Association, Japan, Mexico, Singapore, South Korea, Switzerland, the USA, and the World Health Organization. We began with a comparison of how the various jurisdictions and organizations define a generic product and its corresponding reference product. We then compared the following bioequivalence approaches: recommended bioequivalence study designs, method of pharmacokinetic calculations and bioequivalence acceptance limits, recommendations for modifying bioequivalence study designs and limits for highly variable drugs and narrow therapeutic index drugs, provisions for waiving bioequivalence study requirements (granting biowaivers), and implementation of the Biopharmaceutics Classification System. We observed that, overall, there are more similarities than differences in bioequivalence approaches among the regulatory authorities surveyed.

  11. A global survey on occupational health services in selected international commission on occupational health (ICOH) member countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantanen, Jorma; Lehtinen, Suvi; Valenti, Antonio; Iavicoli, Sergio

    2017-10-05

    The United Nations General Assembly (UNGA), the International Labour Organization (ILO), the World Health Organization (WHO), the International Commission on Occupational Health (ICOH), and the European Union (EU) have encouraged countries to organize occupational health services (OHS) for all working people irrespective of the sector of economy, size of enterprise or mode of employment of the worker. The objective of this study was to survey the status of OHS in a sample of countries from all continents. A questionnaire focusing on the main aspects of OHS was developed on the basis of ILO Convention No. 161 and several other questionnaire surveys used in various target groups of OHS. The questionnaire was sent to 58 key informants: ICOH National Secretaries. A total of 49 National Secretaries responded (response rate 84.5%), from countries that employ 70% of the total world labour force. The majority of the respondent countries, 67%, had drawn up an OHS policy and implement it with the help of national occupational safety and health (OSH) authorities, institutes of occupational health or respective bodies, universities, and professional associations. Multidisciplinary expert OHS resources were available in the majority (82%) of countries, but varied widely in quantitative terms. The average OHS coverage of workers was 24.8%, with wide variation between countries. In over two thirds (69%) of the countries, the content of services was mixed, consisting of preventive and curative services, and in 29% preventive only. OHS financing was organized according to a mixed model among 63% and by employers only among 33% of the respondents. The majority of countries have drawn up policies, strategies and programmes for OHS. The infrastructures and institutional and human resources for the implementation of strategies, however, remain insufficient in the majority of countries (implementation gap). Qualitatively, the content and multidisciplinary nature of OHS corresponds to

  12. International

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    This rubric reports on 10 short notes about international economical facts about nuclear power: Electricite de France (EdF) and its assistance and management contracts with Eastern Europe countries (Poland, Hungary, Bulgaria); Transnuclear Inc. company (a 100% Cogema daughter company) acquired the US Vectra Technologies company; the construction of the Khumo nuclear power plant in Northern Korea plays in favour of the reconciliation between Northern and Southern Korea; the delivery of two VVER 1000 Russian reactors to China; the enforcement of the cooperation agreement between Euratom and Argentina; Japan requested for the financing of a Russian fast breeder reactor; Russia has planned to sell a floating barge-type nuclear power plant to Indonesia; the control of the Swedish reactor vessels of Sydkraft AB company committed to Tractebel (Belgium); the renewal of the nuclear cooperation agreement between Swiss and USA; the call for bids from the Turkish TEAS electric power company for the building of the Akkuyu nuclear power plant answered by three candidates: Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), Westinghouse (US) and the French-German NPI company. (J.S.)

  13. Targeting improved patient outcomes using innovative product listing agreements: a survey of Canadian and international key opinion leaders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson M

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Melissa Thompson,1 Chris Henshall,2 Louis P Garrison,3 Adrian D Griffin,4 Doug Coyle,2,5 Stephen Long,6 Zayna A Khayat,7 Dana L Anger,1 Rebecca Yu8 1Cornerstone Research Group Inc., Burlington, ON, Canada; 2Health Economics Research Group, Brunel University London, London UK; 3Pharmaceutical Outcomes Research and Policy Program, School of Pharmacy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; 4Government Affairs & Policy, Johnson & Johnson, High Wycombe, UK; 5School of Epidemiology, Public Health and Preventive Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada; 6Health and Life Sciences, Global Public Affairs, Calgary, AB, 7Health Systems Innovation at MaRS Discovery District, Toronto, ON, Canada; 8Strategic Health Technology Assessment, Government Affairs & Market Access, Janssen Inc., Toronto, ON, Canada Objectives: To address the uncertainty associated with procuring pharmaceutical products, product listing agreements (PLAs are increasingly being used to support responsible funding decisions in Canada and elsewhere. These agreements typically involve financial-based rebating initiatives or, less frequently, outcome-based contracts. A qualitative survey was conducted to improve the understanding of outcome-based and more innovative PLAs (IPLAs based on input from Canadian and international key opinion leaders in the areas of drug manufacturing and reimbursement. Methods: Results from a structured literature review were used to inform survey development. Potential participants were invited via email to partake in the survey, which was conducted over phone or in person. Responses were compiled anonymously for review and reporting. Results: Twenty-one individuals participated in the survey, including health technology ­assessment (HTA key opinion leaders (38%, pharmaceutical industry chief executive officers/vice presidents (29%, ex-payers (19%, and current payers/drug plan managers/HTA (14%. The participants suggested that ~80%–95% of

  14. Support for and aspects of use of educational games in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs in the US: a survey

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson Mark C; Mustafa Reem; Gunukula Sameer; Akl Elie A; Symons Andrew; Moheet Amir; Schünemann Holger J

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The evidence supporting the effectiveness of educational games in graduate medical education is limited. Anecdotal reports suggest their popularity in that setting. The objective of this study was to explore the support for and the different aspects of use of educational games in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs in the United States. Methods We conducted a survey of family medicine and internal medicine residency program directors in the United Stat...

  15. Current Management of Patients With Diverticulosis and Diverticular Disease: A Survey From the 2nd International Symposium on Diverticular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tursi, Antonio; Picchio, Marcello; Elisei, Walter; Di Mario, Francesco; Scarpignato, Carmelo; Brandimarte, Giovanni

    2016-10-01

    Management of diverticular disease (DD) remains a point of debate. To investigate the current opinion of participants of the 2nd International Symposium on Diverticular Disease, on real-life management of patients with DD of the colon. Twelve questions were aimed at the diagnosis, treatment, and management options for diverticulosis and symptomatic DD. In total, 115 surveys from 8 European Countries were filled out. High fiber diet was widely prescribed in diverticulosis (59.1%). Probiotics (25%) were the most frequent prescribed drug, whereas 29.8% of participants did not prescribe any treatment in diverticulosis. Colonoscopy was frequently prescribed in symptomatic patients (69.3%), whereas 72.9% of participants did not prescribe any instrumental tool in their follow-up. Rifaximin, probiotics, and mesalazine were the most frequent prescribed drugs both in symptomatic patients (28.1, 14.9%, and 11.4%, respectively) and to prevent recurrence of the disease (42.5%, 12.4%, and 28.2%, respectively). With respect to laboratory exams, 57.9% of participants prescribed them during follow-up. The majority of participants (64.9%) managed suspected acute diverticulitis at home. Rifaximin, probiotics, and mesalazine were the most frequent prescribed drugs to prevent recurrence of the disease (32.2%, 13.2%, and 11.4%, respectively), whereas 25.4% of participants did not prescribe any drugs. Finally, no differences were found among gastroenterologists, surgeons, and general practitioners in managing this disease. This surveys shows that current management of DD is similar between different medical specialities, generally in line with current literature.

  16. Prevalence and predictors of smoking in "smoke-free" bars. Findings from the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Europe Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagelhout, Gera E; Mons, Ute; Allwright, Shane; Guignard, Romain; Beck, François; Fong, Geoffrey T; de Vries, Hein; Willemsen, Marc C

    2011-05-01

    National level smoke-free legislation is implemented to protect the public from exposure to second-hand tobacco smoke (SHS). The first aim of this study was to investigate how successful the smoke-free hospitality industry legislation in Ireland (March 2004), France (January 2008), the Netherlands (July 2008), and Germany (between August 2007 and July 2008) was in reducing smoking in bars. The second aim was to assess individual smokers' predictors of smoking in bars post-ban. The third aim was to examine country differences in predictors and the fourth aim was to examine differences between educational levels (as an indicator of socioeconomic status). This study used nationally representative samples of 3147 adult smokers from the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Europe Surveys who were surveyed pre- and post-ban. The results reveal that while the partial smoke-free legislation in the Netherlands and Germany was effective in reducing smoking in bars (from 88% to 34% and from 87% to 44%, respectively), the effectiveness was much lower than the comprehensive legislation in Ireland and France which almost completely eliminated smoking in bars (from 97% to 3% and from 84% to 3% respectively). Smokers who were more supportive of the ban, were more aware of the harm of SHS, and who had negative opinions of smoking were less likely to smoke in bars post-ban. Support for the ban was a stronger predictor in Germany. SHS harm awareness was a stronger predictor among less educated smokers in the Netherlands and Germany. The results indicate the need for strong comprehensive smoke-free legislation without exceptions. This should be accompanied by educational campaigns in which the public health rationale for the legislation is clearly explained. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The Management of Patients with Chronic Subdural Hematoma Treated with Low-Dose Acetylsalicylic Acid: An International Survey of Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleman, Jehuda; Kamenova, Maria; Guzman, Raphael; Mariani, Luigi

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this international survey was to investigate the current management of patients undergoing surgery for chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH) treated with low-dose acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). We administered a survey via e-mail to neurosurgeons with questions relating to the surgical treatment of cSDH, emphasizing their practices with patients treated with low-dose ASA. We received 157 responses, with a response rate of 22.4%. Almost 80% of the responders discontinue ASA treatment at least 5 days before surgery and 80.7% resume treatment after 5 days or more, and 27.6% discontinue treatment for at least 30 days. The main factor influencing ASA resumption time is the indication for ASA (54.5%), and postoperative imaging is concluded in 71.7%, Postoperative thrombosis prophylaxis is administered by 60% of the responders, and 50% apply it 24 hours after surgery. Almost 95% of the responders believe that better evidence is needed for the management of patients with cSDH treated with ASA. Guidelines for these patients exist in only 24.3% of the institutes. Most neurosurgeons discontinue ASA treatment for at least 7 days in the perioperative period of surgical evacuation of cSDH, even though recent studies show that early ASA resumption might be safe. Thrombosis prophylaxis is administered by only 60%, even though patients with cSDH are at high risk of developing thromboembolic complications. Better evidence and guidelines are warranted because the incidence of patients with cSDH under the treatment of ASA is increasing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Influence of internal migration on reproductive health in Myanmar: results from a recent cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    May Sudhinaraset

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maternal and reproductive health remains a significant public health issue in Myanmar. Little data exists on women’s health issues, including social and demographic influences. While past studies have demonstrated rural/urban health disparities, an increasingly important population resulting from urban growth in Myanmar is the internal migrant population, individuals moving within the country for better job or educational opportunities. Past studies suggest that women make up more than half of internal migrants, yet there is a dearth of information on this new wave of migration, particularly on women’s reproductive health issues. The objective of this study is to assess the influence of women’s migration in Myanmar on reproductive health outcomes, including delivering in a facility, using a skilled birth attendant, and using a modern method of family planning. Methods Data from a cross-sectional household survey using multistage cluster sampling design conducted between September to October 2014 was used to assess the accessibility and the use of maternal and child health products and services. A total of 1800 currently married women of reproductive age, including 348 from urban and 1452 from rural areas, were recruited to complete surveys. A set of multivariable regressions was performed to assess reproductive health outcomes and predictors. Results Across health indicators, female migrants had better health outcomes compared to non-migrants. Controlling for demographic characteristics, migrants were 1.60 times more likely to use a modern form of family planning compared to non-migrants (p < 0.01 and use antenatal care during pregnancy (p < 0.05. While not statistically significant, migrants were 1.29 times more likely to deliver with a skilled attendant and 1.08 times more likely to deliver in a facility. Conclusions This study found that female migrants in Myanmar reported better health outcomes compared to

  19. Feeding strategies in pediatric cancer patients with gastrointestinal mucositis: a multicenter prospective observational study and international survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuiken, Nicoline S S; Rings, Edmond H H M; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M; van de Wetering, Marianne D; Tissing, Wim J E

    2017-10-01

    Currently, there is no adequate prevention or treatment for both oral and gastrointestinal mucositis induced by chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Supportive care of symptoms plays a primary role during mucositis in the pediatric clinical setting. We aimed to get insight in the currently used feeding strategies in clinical practice in pediatric cancer patients with chemotherapy-induced mucositis. A prospective observational study was performed to identify feeding strategies after chemotherapy courses causing mucositis in almost all patients at the University Medical Center Groningen (UMCG), the Academic Medical Center Amsterdam (AMC), and the Princess Maxima Center Utrecht (PMC). Consecutive patients, aged 0-18 years, either diagnosed with B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL) or scheduled for autologous stem cell transplantation (SCT) between April 2015 and September 2016 were included in this study. In addition to the observational study in the Netherlands, an international online questionnaire was conducted for pediatric oncology centers. A total of 13 patients were included, after 21 chemotherapy courses. No nutritional support was administered after 23.8% courses, tube feeding after 19.0% of the courses, TPN in 19.0% of courses, and 38.1% received a combination of tube feeding and TPN. The international survey revealed that 63.2% of the centers administered tube feeding as first choice, 31.6% administered only TPN as first choice, and one center administered a combination as first choice. There is a variability in feeding strategies in the clinical practice both in the Netherlands as well as worldwide. This study is a basis for future studies in this important clinical field to develop clinical trials comparing tube feeding and TPN both in adult and pediatric patients.

  20. Validation of the Comprehensive ICF Core Set for Vocational Rehabilitation From the Perspective of Physical Therapists: International Delphi Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaech Moll, Veronika M; Escorpizo, Reuben; Portmann Bergamaschi, Ruth; Finger, Monika E

    2016-08-01

    The Comprehensive ICF Core Set for vocational rehabilitation (VR) is a list of essential categories on functioning based on the World Health Organization (WHO) International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), which describes a standard for interdisciplinary assessment, documentation, and communication in VR. The aim of this study was to examine the content validity of the Comprehensive ICF Core Set for VR from the perspective of physical therapists. A 3-round email survey was performed using the Delphi method. A convenience sample of international physical therapists working in VR with work experience of ≥2 years were asked to identify aspects they consider as relevant when evaluating or treating clients in VR. Responses were linked to the ICF categories and compared with the Comprehensive ICF Core Set for VR. Sixty-two physical therapists from all 6 WHO world regions responded with 3,917 statements that were subsequently linked to 338 ICF categories. Fifteen (17%) of the 90 categories in the Comprehensive ICF Core Set for VR were confirmed by the physical therapists in the sample. Twenty-two additional ICF categories were identified that were not included in the Comprehensive ICF Core Set for VR. Vocational rehabilitation in physical therapy is not well defined in every country and might have resulted in the small sample size. Therefore, the results cannot be generalized to all physical therapists practicing in VR. The content validity of the ICF Core Set for VR is insufficient from solely a physical therapist perspective. The results of this study could be used to define a physical therapy-specific set of ICF categories to develop and guide physical therapist clinical practice in VR. © 2016 American Physical Therapy Association.

  1. Use of less expensive cigarettes in six cities in China: findings from the International Tobacco Control (ITC) China Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiang; Hyland, Andrew; Fong, Geoffrey T; Jiang, Yuan; Elton-Marshall, Tara

    2010-10-01

    The existence of less expensive cigarettes in China may undermine public health. The aim of the current study is to examine the use of less expensive cigarettes in six cities in China. Data was from the baseline wave of the International Tobacco Control (ITC) China Survey of 4815 adult urban smokers in 6 cities, conducted between April and August 2006. The percentage of smokers who reported buying less expensive cigarettes (the lowest pricing tertile within each city) at last purchase was computed. Complex sample multivariate logistic regression models were used to identify factors associated with use of less expensive cigarettes. The association between the use of less expensive cigarettes and intention to quit smoking was also examined. Smokers who reported buying less expensive cigarettes at last purchase tended to be older, heavier smokers, to have lower education and income, and to think more about the money spent on smoking in the last month. Smokers who bought less expensive cigarettes at the last purchase and who were less knowledgeable about the health harm of smoking were less likely to intend to quit smoking. Measures need to be taken to minimise the price differential among cigarette brands and to increase smokers' health knowledge, which may in turn increase their intentions to quit.

  2. MO-A-BRB-01: Review of TG-262 Internal Survey of Practices in EMR for External Beam Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechalakos, J.

    2015-01-01

    The process of converting to an electronic chart for radiation therapy can be daunting. It requires a dedicated committee to first research and choose appropriate software, to review the entire documentation policy and flow of the clinic, to convert this system to electronic form or if necessary, redesign the system to more easily conform to the electronic process. Those making the conversion and those who already use electronic charting would benefit from the shared experience of those who have been through the process in the past. Therefore TG262 was convened to provide guidance on electronic charting for external beam radiation therapy and brachytherapy. This course will present the results of an internal survey of task group members on EMR practices in External Beam Radiation Therapy as well as discuss important issues in EMR development and structure for both EBRT and brachytherapy. Learning Objectives: Be familiarized with common practices and pitfalls in development and maintenance of an electronic chart in Radiation Oncology Be familiarized with important issues related to electronic charting in External Beam Radiation Therapy Be familiarized with important issues related to electronic charting in Brachytherapy

  3. Internal Migration Patterns of Foreign-Born Immigrants in Spain. A study based on the National Immigrant Survey (ENI-2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvestre, Javier

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This article extends the existing literature on the internal migration patterns of the foreign-born in Spain. We analyze the spatial distribution of immigrants and their patterns of mobility at different levels. Socio-demographic characteristics of immigrants and characteristics of places of origin and destination are considered. We also examine repeat migration, duration of residence in each destination, as well as return migration within Spain. To this end, we make use of a new micro database corresponding to the National Immigrant Survey (Encuesta Nacional de Inmigrantes, ENI-2007.

    Este artículo contribuye a la literatura sobre la migración interna de los inmigrantes nacidos fuera de España. En él se analiza la distribución espacial y las pautas de movilidad de los inmigrantes, considerando aspectos como las características sociodemográficas de los individuos y las características de los orígenes y destinos dentro de España. También se analiza la emigración repetida, la duración de la residencia en cada destino y la emigración de retorno (dentro de España. Para todo ello, se utiliza la nueva base de datos micro derivada de la Encuesta Nacional de Inmigrantes, ENI-2007.

  4. Content Validity of the Comprehensive ICF Core Set for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseases: An International Delphi Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobst, Andrea; Kirchberger, Inge; Cieza, Alarcos; Stucki, Gerold; Stucki, Armin

    2013-01-01

    The "Comprehensive ICF Core Set for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseases (COPD)" is an application of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) and represents the typical spectrum of problems in functioning of patients with COPD. The objective of this study was to validate this ICF Core Set from the perspective of physicians. Physicians experienced in COPD treatment were asked about the patients' problems treated by physicians in patients with COPD in a three-round electronic mail survey using the Delphi technique. Responses were linked to the ICF. Seventy-six physicians in 44 countries gave a total of 1330 responses that were linked to 148 different ICF categories. Nine ICF categories were not represented in the Comprehensive ICF Core Set for COPD although at least 75% of the participants have rated them as important. Nineteen concepts were linked to the not yet developed ICF component personal factors and seventeen concepts were not covered by the ICF. The high percentage of ICF categories represented in the ICF Core Set for COPD indicates satisfactory content validity from the perspective of the physicians. However, some issues were raised that were not covered and need to be investigated further.

  5. Cigarette prices, cigarette expenditure and smoking-induced deprivation: findings from the International Tobacco Control Mexico survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siahpush, Mohammad; Thrasher, James F; Yong, Hua H; Cummings, K Michael; Fong, Geoffrey T; de Miera, Belén Saenz; Borland, Ron

    2013-07-01

    Mexico implemented annual tax increases between 2009 and 2011. We examined among current smokers the association of price paid per cigarette and daily cigarette expenditure with smoking-induced deprivation (SID) and whether the association of price or expenditure with SID varies by income. We used data (n=2410) from three waves of the International Tobacco Control Mexico survey (ie, 2008, 2010, 2011) and employed logistic regression to estimate the association of price paid per cigarette and daily cigarette expenditure with the probability of SID ('In the last 6 months, have you spent money on cigarettes that you knew would be better spent on household essentials like food?'). Price paid per cigarette increased from Mex$1.24 in 2008, to Mex$1.36 in 2010, to Mex$1.64 in 2011. Daily cigarette expenditure increased from Mex$6.9, to Mex$7.6 and to Mex$8.4 in the 3 years. There was no evidence of an association between price and SID. However, higher expenditure was associated with a higher probability of SID. There was no evidence that the association of price or expenditure with SID varied by income. Tax increases in Mexico have resulted in smokers paying more and spending more for their cigarettes. Those with higher cigarette expenditure experience more SID, with no evidence that poorer smokers are more affected.

  6. One hundred prime references on hydrogeochemical and stream sediment surveying for uranium as internationally practiced, including 60 annotated references

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, R.R. Jr.; Bolivar, S.L.

    1981-04-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE), formerly the US ERDA, has initiated a nationwide Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR). This program is part of the US National Uranium Resource Evaluation, designed to provide an improved estimate for the availability and economics of nuclear fuel resources and make available to industry information for use in exploration and development of uranium resources. The Los Alamos National Laboratory is responsible for completing the HSSR in Rocky Mountain states of New Mexico, Colorado, Wyoming, and Montana and in the state of Alaska. This report contains a compilation of 100 prime references on uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance as internationally practiced prior to 1977. The major emphasis in selection of these references was directed toward constructing a HSSR program with the purpose of identifying uranium in the Los Alamos National Laboratory area of responsibility. The context of the annotated abstracts are the authors' concept of what the respective article contains relative to uranium geochemistry and hydrogeochemical and stream sediment surveying. Consequently, in many cases, significant portions of the original articles are not discussed. The text consists of two parts. Part I contains 100 prime references, alphabetically arranged. Part II contains 60 select annotated abstracts, listed in chronological order

  7. The Profile of Patients and Current Practice of Treatment of Upper Limb Muscle Spasticity with Botulinum Toxin Type A: An International Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakheit, Abdel Magid

    2010-01-01

    To document the current practice in relation with the treatment of patients with upper limb spasticity with botulinum toxin type A to inform future research in this area. We designed an international, cross-sectional, noninterventional survey of current practice. Nine hundred and seventy-four patients from 122 investigational centres in 31…

  8. Oral contraception and menstrual bleeding during treatment of venous thromboembolism: Expert opinion versus current practice: Combined results of a systematic review, expert panel opinion and an international survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klok, F. A.; Schreiber, K.; Stach, K.; Ageno, W.; Middeldorp, S.; Eichinger, S.; Delluc, A.; Blondon, M.; Ay, C.

    2017-01-01

    The optimal management of oral contraception and menstrual bleeding during treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is largely unknown. We aimed to elicit expert opinion and compare that to current practice as assessed by a world-wide international web-based survey among physicians. 10

  9. Educational Differences in Associations of Noticing Anti-Tobacco Information with Smoking-Related Attitudes and Quit Intentions: Findings from the International Tobacco Control Europe Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springvloet, L.; Willemsen, M. C.; Mons, U.; van den Putte, B.; Kunst, A. E.; Guignard, R.; Hummel, K.; Allwright, S.; Siahpush, M.; de Vries, H.; Nagelhout, G. E.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined educational differences in associations of noticing anti-tobacco information with smoking-related attitudes and quit intentions among adult smokers. Longitudinal data (N = 7571) from two waves of six countries of the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Europe Surveys were included. Generalized estimating equation analyses and…

  10. International Residency Program Evaluation: Assessing the Reliability and Initial Validity of the ACGME-I Resident Survey in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Halah; Lindeman, Brenessa; Matarelli, Steven A; Nair, Satish Chandrasekhar

    2014-09-01

    Educators agree on the importance of assessing the quality of graduate medical education. In the United States, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) resident survey is an important part of the accreditation process, yet some studies have questioned its validity. We assessed the reliability and acceptance of the ACGME-International (ACGME-I) resident survey in the culturally distinct, nonnative English-speaking resident population of Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates. A total of 158 residents in ACGME-I accredited institutions in Abu Dhabi received an online link to the ACGME-I survey. Reliability analysis was conducted using the Cronbach α. A focus group was then held with a convenience sample of 25 residents from different institutions and specialties to understand potential challenges encountered by survey participants. Completed surveys were received from 116 residents (73.4%). The 39 items in the survey demonstrated high reliability, with a Cronbach α of 0.918. Of the 5 subscales, 4 demonstrated acceptable to very good reliability, ranging from 0.72 to 0.888. The subscale "resources" had lower reliability at 0.584. Removal of a single item increased the Cronbach α to a near-acceptable score of 0.670. Focus group results indicated that the survey met standards for readability, length, and time for completion. The ACGME-I resident survey demonstrates acceptable reliability and validity for measuring the perceptions of residents in an international residency program. The data derived from the survey can offer an important set of metrics for educational quality improvement in the United Arab Emirates.

  11. A survey of the beliefs regarding international emergency medicine among fourth-year medical students planning on matching in emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schechter-Perkins, Elissa M; Forget, Nicolas P; Mallon, William K

    2013-06-20

    With the recent growth of fellowships in international emergency medicine, the authors sought to evaluate medical students' attitudes toward international emergency medicine and to determine the effects these attitudes have on their residency selection. Cross-sectional survey. An anonymous, eight-question online survey was distributed to all members of the American Academy of Emergency Medicine Resident and Student section. This survey was also distributed to fourth-year medical students rotating through the Emergency Department at Los Angeles County and the University of Southern California. Ninety-eight surveys were collected, 61 from rotating students and 37 from the AAEM mailing. There were no statistically significant differences in responses between the two groups. Of the respondents, 49.4% of have been exposed to IEM, and 46.9% have participated in international health projects. Ninety-four percent agree that IEM is an exciting career option. Seventy-nine percent said programs with IEM opportunities are more appealing than those without, and 45% said the presence of IEM opportunities would be an important factor in rank list; 53% believe that IEM requires formal public health training, and 63% believe it requires tropical medicine training; 68.3%of respondents speak a language in addition to English. This subset was more likely to have participated in IEM projects previously (p = 0.026) but not more likely to make match choices based on IEM. Half of medical students surveyed had prior experience in international health, and most agree that international emergency medicine is an exciting career option. Over two thirds believe that the presence of IEM opportunities will be a factor in their match list decision.

  12. Socio-Economic Variation in Price Minimizing Behaviors: Findings from the International Tobacco Control (ITC Four Country Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigar Nargis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines how socio-economic status (SES modifies how smokers adjust to changes in the price of tobacco products through utilization of multiple price minimizing techniques. Data come from the International Tobacco Control Policy Evaluation (ITC Four Country Survey, nationally representative samples of adult smokers and includes respondents from Canada, the United States, the United Kingdom and Australia. Cross-sectional analyses were completed among 8,243 respondents (7,038 current smokers from the survey wave conducted between October 2006 and February 2007. Analyses examined predictors of purchasing from low/untaxed sources, using discount cigarettes or roll-your-own (RYO tobacco, purchasing cigarettes in cartons, and engaging in high levels of price and tax avoidance at last purchase. All analyses tested for interactions with SES and were weighted to account for changing and under-represented demographics. Relatively high levels of price and tax avoidance behaviors were present; 8% reported buying from low or untaxed source; 36% used discount or generic brands, 13.5% used RYO tobacco, 29% reported purchasing cartons, and 63% reported using at least one of these high price avoidance behaviors. Respondents categorized as having low SES were approximately 26% less likely to report using low or untaxed sources and 43% less likely to purchase tobacco by the carton. However, respondents with low SES were 85% more likely to report using discount brands/RYO compared to participants with higher SES. Overall, lower SES smokers were 25% more likely to engage in at least one or more tax avoidance behaviors compared to their higher SES counterparts. Price and tax avoidance behaviors are relatively common among smokers of all SES strata, but strategies differed with higher SES groups more likely to report traveling to a low-tax location to avoid paying higher prices, purchase duty free tobacco, and purchase by cartons instead of packs all of

  13. Socio-Economic Variation in Price Minimizing Behaviors: Findings from the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Four Country Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licht, Andrea S.; Hyland, Andrew J.; O’Connor, Richard J.; Chaloupka, Frank J.; Borland, Ron; Fong, Geoffrey T.; Nargis, Nigar; Cummings, K. Michael

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines how socio-economic status (SES) modifies how smokers adjust to changes in the price of tobacco products through utilization of multiple price minimizing techniques. Data come from the International Tobacco Control Policy Evaluation (ITC) Four Country Survey, nationally representative samples of adult smokers and includes respondents from Canada, the United States, the United Kingdom and Australia. Cross-sectional analyses were completed among 8,243 respondents (7,038 current smokers) from the survey wave conducted between October 2006 and February 2007. Analyses examined predictors of purchasing from low/untaxed sources, using discount cigarettes or roll-your-own (RYO) tobacco, purchasing cigarettes in cartons, and engaging in high levels of price and tax avoidance at last purchase. All analyses tested for interactions with SES and were weighted to account for changing and under-represented demographics. Relatively high levels of price and tax avoidance behaviors were present; 8% reported buying from low or untaxed source; 36% used discount or generic brands, 13.5% used RYO tobacco, 29% reported purchasing cartons, and 63% reported using at least one of these high price avoidance behaviors. Respondents categorized as having low SES were approximately 26% less likely to report using low or untaxed sources and 43% less likely to purchase tobacco by the carton. However, respondents with low SES were 85% more likely to report using discount brands/RYO compared to participants with higher SES. Overall, lower SES smokers were 25% more likely to engage in at least one or more tax avoidance behaviors compared to their higher SES counterparts. Price and tax avoidance behaviors are relatively common among smokers of all SES strata, but strategies differed with higher SES groups more likely to report traveling to a low-tax location to avoid paying higher prices, purchase duty free tobacco, and purchase by cartons instead of packs all of which were less

  14. Hospital antibiotic management in Belgium--results of the ABS maturity survey of the ABS International group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struelens, Marc J; Costers, Michiel

    2008-01-01

    While debate about optimal organization for hospital antibiotic stewardship programs is ongoing, limited information is available about the implementation of such programs in acute-care institutions. The ABS International project conducted a survey on the implementation and characteristics of hospital antibiotic management programs in several European countries. This paper summarizes the results for Belgium, where a federal program for developing multidisciplinary antibiotic management teams was started in 2002. The survey was conducted in April and May 2007. A questionnaire with 39 items to be scored from 0 (absent) to 5 (fully available) was sent to medical directors and chairs of drugs and therapeutics committees in all acute-care hospitals to measure five dimensions of hospital antibiotic management. The results were analyzed by calculating the mean scores for the various items and topics. Of 120 questionnaires sent, 46 (38%) were completed and returned in time for analysis. The three regions of the country were well represented by the respondents. The mean country maturity score of 3.75 (range 2.15-4.90) indicated that a well developed antibiotic management system was in place in most hospitals. Over 90% of hospitals had key structural resources and tools available for effective stewardship programs. Performance items that scored high were those related to microbiological diagnostics and surveillance of bacterial resistance (4.41), surveillance of antibiotic consumption (4.16) and organization of antibiotic guidance and support by trained antibiotic management officers (3.81). Items that scored lower were professional development of personnel (3.43) and co-ordination with outside healthcare providers (2.95). Hospitals with several years of funding for their antibiotic officer showed higher scores for antibiotic management but not for diagnostics. Antibiotic stewardship programs are well developed in Belgian hospitals, particularly in those which first

  15. Modified international e-Delphi survey to define healthcare professional competencies for working with teenagers and young adults with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Rachel M; Feltbower, Richard G; Aslam, Natasha; Raine, Rosalind; Whelan, Jeremy S; Gibson, Faith

    2016-05-03

    To provide international consensus on the competencies required by healthcare professionals in order to provide specialist care for teenagers and young adults (TYA) with cancer. Modified e-Delphi survey. International, multicentre study. Experts were defined as professionals having worked in TYA cancer care for more than 12 months. They were identified through publications and professional organisations. Round 1, developed from a previous qualitative study, included 87 closed-ended questions with responses on a nine-point Likert scale and further open-ended responses to identify other skills, knowledge and attitudes. Round 2 contained only items with no consensus in round 1 and suggestions of additional items of competency. Consensus was defined as a median score ranging from 7 to 9 and strength of agreement using mean absolute deviation of the median. A total of 179 registered to be members of the expert panel; valid responses were available from 158 (88%) in round 1 and 136/158 (86%) in round 2. The majority of participants were nurses (35%) or doctors (39%) from Europe (55%) or North America (35%). All 87 items in round 1 reached consensus with an additional 15 items identified for round 2, which also reached consensus. The strength of agreement was mostly high for statements. The areas of competence rated most important were agreed to be: 'Identify the impact of disease on young people's life' (skill), 'Know about side effects of treatment and how this might be different to those experienced by children or older adults' (knowledge), 'Honesty' (attitude) and 'Listen to young people's concerns' (aspect of communication). Given the high degree of consensus, this list of competencies should influence education curriculum, professional development and inform workforce planning. Variation in strength of agreement for some competencies between professional groups should be explored further in pursuit of effective multidisciplinary team working. Published by the BMJ

  16. Designing Health Apps to Support Dietetic Professional Practice and Their Patients: Qualitative Results From an International Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Juliana; Lieffers, Jessica; Bauman, Adrian; Hanning, Rhona; Allman-Farinelli, Margaret

    2017-03-31

    Dietitians are engaging with mobile health (mHealth) technologies, particularly with diet and nutrition apps in their patient care. Despite the plethora of apps available, the majority are not designed with a dietitian's input. The aim of this study was to identify the user preferences of dietitians in relation to tools, resources, and design features for smartphone health apps that would support their dietetic professional practice and their patients. As part of a larger international Web-based survey of health-app use among dietitians, three open-ended responses were included for specific exploration of app design features and additional resources or tools that could guide the development of apps for use in dietetic practice and patient care. Inductive thematic analysis of responses was conducted using the qualitative data analysis program, NVivo version 11 (QSR International Pty Ltd), to understand the design preferences and features valued by dietitians. The responses from 381 dietitian respondents were analyzed. Five key themes were identified. Dietitians wanted access to credible apps, suggesting that dietetic associations should have greater involvement in reviewing and endorsing evidence-based apps for use in dietary counseling. Improvements to the usability of apps, relating to their ease of use and design, were also raised, as self-monitoring of dietary behaviors using existing nutrition apps was deemed to be burdensome. Furthermore, apps providing dietitian-oriented support were favored, for example, those with the ability to streamline the dietary assessment process, so that dietitians could spend more time on dietary counseling and negotiating patient goals for dietary and lifestyle behavior change. Provision of patient-oriented support, such as functionality to tailor apps to patient-specific needs, was also considered important. Finally, respondents valued apps that could integrate into their work systems to enhance the quality of the dietitian

  17. Factors Associated with Discussion of Disasters by Final Year High School Students: An International Cross-sectional Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codreanu, Tudor A; Celenza, Antonio; Alabdulkarim, Ali A Rahman

    2015-08-01

    Introduction The effect on behavioral change of educational programs developed to reduce the community's disaster informational vulnerability is not known. This study describes the relationship of disaster education, age, sex, and country-specific characteristics with students discussing disasters with friends and family, a measure of proactive behavioral change in disaster preparedness. Three thousand eight hundred twenty-nine final year high school students were enrolled in an international, multi-center prospective, cross-sectional study using a pre-validated written questionnaire. In order to obtain information from different educational systems, from countries with different risk of exposure to disasters, and from countries with varied economic development status, students from Bahrain, Croatia, Cyprus, Egypt, Greece, Italy, Portugal, Romania, and Timor-Leste were surveyed. Logistic regression analyses examined the relationship between the likelihood of discussing disasters with friends and family (dependent variable) and a series of independent variables (age, gender, participation in school lessons about disasters, existence of a national disaster educational program, ability to list pertinent example of disasters, country's economic group, and disaster risk index) captured by the questionnaire or available as published data. There was no statistically significant relationship between age, awareness of one's surroundings, planning for the future, and foreseeing consequences of events with discussions about potential hazards and risks with friends and/or family. The national educational budget did not have a statistically significant influence. Participants who lived in a low disaster risk and high income Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) country were more likely to discuss disasters. While either school lessons or a national disaster education program had a unique, significant contribution to the model, neither had a better

  18. An international survey of decabromodiphenyl ethane (deBDethane) and decabromodiphenyl ether (decaBDE) in sewage sludge samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricklund, Niklas; Kierkegaard, Amelie; McLachlan, Michael S

    2008-12-01

    Decabromodiphenyl ethane (deBDethane) is an additive flame retardant marketed as a replacement for decabromodiphenyl ether (decaBDE). The structures of the two chemicals are similar, and hence deBDethane may also become an environmental contaminant of concern. Environmental data on deBDethane are scarce. Since sewage sludge is an early indicator of leakage of these chemicals into the environment, an international survey of deBDethane and decaBDE levels in sludge was conducted. Samples were collected from 42 WWTPs in 12 different countries and analyzed with GC/LRMS. DeBDethane was present in sludge from all countries and may therefore be a worldwide concern. The levels of deBDethane in sludge samples from the Ruhr area of Germany were the highest so far reported in the literature (216 ng g(-1)d.wt.). The [deBDethane]/[decaBDE] quotient for the whole data set ranged from 0.0018 to 0.83. High ratios were found in and around Germany where deBDethane imports are known to have been high and substitution of decaBDE with deBDethane is likely to have occurred. Low ratios were found in the USA and the UK, countries that have traditionally been large users of decaBDE. An estimate of the flux of deBDEthane from the technosphere via WWTPs to the environment within the European Union gave 1.7+/-0.34 mg annually per person. The corresponding value for decaBDE was 41+/-22 mg annually per person.

  19. Pre-travel preparation practices among business travellers to tropical and subtropical destinations: results from the Athens International Airport Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavli, Androula; Silvestros, Chrysovalantis; Patrinos, Stavros; Lymperi, Ioanna; Maltezou, Helena C

    2014-01-01

    The number of business travellers from Greece to tropical and subtropical areas has recently increased. The study aimed to assess travel health preparation practices of business travellers departing to Africa, the Middle East and Asia. A questionnaire-based survey was conducted at Athens International Airport, from 1st of November 2011 to 30th of April 2013. A total of 684 business travellers participated in the study; the majority were men (86.1%), of Greek nationality (95.3%), with tertiary education (90.8%) and employed (98%). Their mean age was 40 years; 62% and 26% of them were 35-49 and 19-34 years of age respectively. 84.8% were travelling alone. Most frequent destinations were the Middle East (46.8%) and sub-Saharan Africa (16%). For 23.5% of the travellers it was their first trip to a tropical or subtropical country. Only 58.8% pursued pre-travel health consultation; vaccination and malaria chemoprophylaxis were administered to 24.7% and 25.7% of the travellers, respectively. Hepatitis A and typhoid vaccination rates were lower than expected (70% and 35%, respectively). Nearly half of the travellers who visited malaria endemic areas did not receive any chemoprophylaxis. Having elementary education level, travelling to the Middle East or North Africa, travelling for less than 1 month duration, and staying in a house or a hotel were associated with a higher probability of not pursuing health consultation. Significant gaps were found in pre-travel health practices of business travellers departing to Africa, the Middle East and Asia. Strategies should be developed in order to improve awareness of business travellers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A national survey of residents in combined Internal Medicine and Dermatology residency programs: educational experience and future plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostaghimi, Arash; Wanat, Karolyn; Crotty, Bradley H; Rosenbach, Misha

    2015-10-16

    In response to a perceived erosion of medical dermatology, combined internal medicine and dermatology programs (med/derm) programs have been developed that aim to train dermatologists who take care of medically complex patients. Despite the investment in these programs, there is currently no data with regards to the potential impact of these trainees on the dermatology workforce. To determine the experiences, motivations, and future plans of residents in combined med/derm residency programs. We surveyed residents at all United States institutions with both categorical and combined training programs in spring of 2012. Respondents used visual analog scales to rate clinical interests, self-assessed competency, career plans, and challenges. The primary study outcomes were comfort in taking care of patients with complex disease, future practice plans, and experience during residency. Twenty-eight of 31 med/derm residents (87.5%) and 28 of 91 (31%) categorical residents responded (overall response rate 46%). No significant differences were seen in self-assessed dermatology competency, or comfort in performing inpatient consultations, cosmetic procedures, or prescribing systemic agents. A trend toward less comfort in general dermatology was seen among med/derm residents. Med/derm residents were more likely to indicate career preferences for performing inpatient consultation and taking care of medically complex patients. Categorical residents rated their programs and experiences more highly. Med/derm residents have stronger interests in serving medically complex patients. Categorical residents are more likely to have a positive experience during residency. Future work will be needed to ascertain career choices among graduates once data are available.

  1. The International Law Commission at the Mid-point of its Quinquennium (Survey of its Work in 2014)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šturma, Pavel

    -, č. 5 (2014), s. 453-462 ISSN 1805-0565. E-ISSN 1805-0999 Institutional support: RVO:68378122 Keywords : International Law Commission * public international law * programme of the meeting Subject RIV: AG - Legal Sciences

  2. International relations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2009-01-01

    The French nuclear safety authority (A.S.N.) has participated at different meeting in European Union as nuclear decommissioning assistance programme(N.D.A.P.), Regulatory assistance management group (R.A.M.G.) and Instrument for nuclear safety cooperation (I.N.S.C.). The members of Western European nuclear regulator association (W.E.N.R.A.) met and discussed about the future of W.E.N.R.A. and its representativeness and its cooperation with European nuclear safety regulator group (E.N.S.R.E.G.) and head of European radiation control authorities (H.E.R.C.A.). About International relations it is to noticed a meeting at the invitation of IAEA to discuss about the possibility to resort to the Ines scale for medical events. An audit mission under the IAEA aegis stood at Fessenheim, O.S.A.R.T. for operational safety review team. Two years and a half passed by between the audit mission Integrated regulatory review service (I.R.S.S.) welcome by A.S.N. in november 2006 and the audit mission follow up in 2009, 12 experts from 11 different countries and coordinated by three representatives of IAEA worked, the conclusions were that 90% of recommendations made to A.S.N. in 2006 were treated in a satisfying way; the evaluation gives three new recommendations, 7 new suggestions and 11 new correct practices. A meeting of the commission on safety standards (C.S.S.) stood in april 2009. Some others meeting are to be noticed: nuclear safety and security group (N.S.S.G.), expert group on nuclear and radiation safety (E.G.N.R.S.) instituted by the council of the Baltic sea states (C.B.S.S.) treats data exchange on the national networks of dose rates and surveillance of radioactivity in air. International nuclear regulator association (I.N.R.A.) held its first meeting in april 2009 at Seoul (Korea). Bilateral relations with Poland, Italy, Ukraine and Germany planed cooperation or information exchange in the field of nuclear safety. Participation to conference in Usa, meetings with United

  3. Infrastructure improvement project for rationalization of international energy use. Survey project on energy conservation in chief industries in ASEAN countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    With objectives to understand ASEAN countries for their current situation in energy consumption in the typical factories and businesses in their chief industries, prepare appropriate advices on energy saving methods, and establish energy inspection means, surveys were carried out working with experts in the ASEAN countries. In the workshop held in Singapore in November 2000, the textile factory, Arab-Malaysia Development Berhad was selected for Malaysia, on which the survey was performed from January 15 through 19, 2001. Energy saving proposals were submitted based on the survey results. For Indonesia, the paper and pulp mill, P.T. Kertas Leces (Persoro) Pulp Paper Mill was selected, on which the survey was performed from January 22 through 26, 2001. Based on the survey results, the energy saving means and their effects, necessary investment amount, and amortization period were prepared. For Brunei, the cement factory, Butra Djajanti Cement SDN BHD was surveyed, whereas improvements of the facilities were proposed. (NEDO)

  4. Fiscal 1997 report on the results of the international standardization R and D. Overall survey; 1997 nendo seika hokokusho kokusai hyojun soseigata kenkyu kaihatsu. Sogo chosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    The paper summed up the results of the survey of tackling with the international standardization by enterprises and organizations involved in the standardization in the U.S., Europe and Japan, the results of the R and D on 20 themes for the international standardization, and the development toward the international standardization. As the R and D themes, the following were selected: the development of chemical method to analyze/evaluate metallic coatings of surface treated steel coating sheets, R and D of the basic evaluation method of functional composite particles, international standards for computer/manikins, basic technology of color image management, study on optimizing design/evaluation technology using quality engineering, study of the international standardization by economic evaluation of environmental impacts, R and D of the standardization of a method to test acceleration life of phosphorous acid fuel cells, development of a test method of halogen-free flame-retardant cables and a study of the cable standards, standard measuring methods of hormone effects of chemical substances, quantification of the sensory evaluation and international standardization in the paint field, experimental study on the international standardization for immunochemical measurement of chemical substances, etc. 24 figs., 16 tabs.

  5. International Academy of Astronautics 5th cosmic study—preparing for a 21st century program of integrated, Lunar and Martian exploration and development (executive summary)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelle, H. H.; Stephenson, D. G.

    2003-04-01

    This report is an initial review of plans for a extensive program to survey and develop the Moon and to explore the planet Mars during the 21st century. It presents current typical plans for separate, associated and fully integrated programs of Lunar and Martian research, exploration and development, and concludes that detailed integrated plans must be prepared and be subject to formal criticism. Before responsible politicians approve a new thrust into space they will demand attractive, defensible, and detailed proposals that explain the WHEN, HOW and WHY of each stage of an expanded program of 21st century space research, development and exploration. In particular, the claims of daring, innovative, but untried systems must be compared with the known performance of existing technologies. The time has come to supersede the present haphazard approach to strategic space studies with a formal international structure to plan for future advanced space missions under the aegis of the world's national space agencies, and supported by governments and the corporate sector.

  6. Continuing to Confront COPD International Physician Survey: physician knowledge and application of COPD management guidelines in 12 countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis KJ

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Kourtney J Davis,1 Sarah H Landis,2 Yeon-Mok Oh,3 David M Mannino,4 MeiLan K Han,5 Thys van der Molen,6 Zaurbek Aisanov,7 Ana M Menezes,8 Masakazu Ichinose,9 Hana Muellerova11Worldwide Epidemiology, GlaxoSmithKline, Wavre, Belgium; 2Worldwide Epidemiology, GlaxoSmithKline, Uxbridge, UK; 3University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, South Korea; 4University of Kentucky College of Public Health, Lexington, KY, USA; 5Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA; 6University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands; 7Pulmonology Research Institute, Moscow, Russia; 8Federal University of Pelotas, Pelotas, Brazil; 9Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, JapanAim: Utilizing data from the Continuing to Confront COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease International Physician Survey, this study aimed to describe physicians’ knowledge and application of the GOLD (Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease Global Strategy for the Diagnosis, Management and Prevention of COPD diagnosis and treatment recommendations and compare performance between primary care physicians (PCPs and respiratory specialists.Materials and methods: Physicians from 12 countries were sampled from in-country professional databases; 1,307 physicians (PCP to respiratory specialist ratio three to one who regularly consult with COPD, emphysema, or chronic bronchitis patients were interviewed online, by telephone or face to face. Physicians were questioned about COPD risk factors, prognosis, diagnosis, and treatment, including knowledge and application of the GOLD global strategy using patient scenarios.Results: Physicians reported using spirometry routinely (PCPs 82%, respiratory specialists 100%; P<0.001 to diagnose COPD and frequently included validated patient-reported outcome measures (PCPs 67%, respiratory specialists 81%; P<0.001. Respiratory

  7. Global priorities for research and the relative importance of different research outcomes: an international Delphi survey of malaria research experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Jo-Ann; Conteh, Lesong

    2016-12-06

    As global research investment increases, attention inevitably turns to assessing and measuring the outcomes and impact from research programmes. Research can have many different outcomes such as producing advances in scientific knowledge, building research capacity and, ultimately, health and broader societal benefits. The aim of this study was to test the use of a Delphi methodology as a way of gathering views from malaria research experts on research priorities and eliciting relative valuations of the different types of health research impact. An international Delphi survey of 60 malaria research experts was used to understand views on research outcomes and priorities within malaria and across global health more widely. The study demonstrated the application of the Delphi technique to eliciting views on malaria specific research priorities, wider global health research priorities and the values assigned to different types of research impact. In terms of the most important past research successes, the development of new anti-malarial drugs and insecticide-treated bed nets were rated as the most important. When asked about research priorities for future funding, respondents ranked tackling emerging drug and insecticide resistance the highest. With respect to research impact, the panel valued research that focuses on health and health sector benefits and informing policy and product development. Contributions to scientific knowledge, although highly valued, came lower down the ranking, suggesting that efforts to move research discoveries to health products and services are valued more highly than pure advances in scientific knowledge. Although the Delphi technique has been used to elicit views on research questions in global health this was the first time it has been used to assess how a group of research experts value or rank different types of research impact. The results suggest it is feasible to inject the views of a key stakeholder group into the research

  8. The WFNMB Survey on the Introduction of New Radiopharmaceuticals for Clinical Research: Snapshot of the international perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, J.M.; Choe, Y.S.; Knapp, F.F. Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Development of new radiopharmaceuticals and their introduction into clinical trials ensures continuing improvement in the practice of nuclear medicine. Although it is crucial that safety and efficacy are established prior to use in humans, the characteristics of radiopharmaceuticals are quite different from other drugs since these agents are generally administered in trace, sub-pharmacological amounts. Diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceutical agents are used only in restricted and controlled areas and are administered only by trained personnel. In many cases - as often for PET -- such diagnostic agents are often used in the same institution where they are prepared. Thus, regulations for the preparation and use of radiopharmaceuticals should be different from other drugs. To evaluate the current status of radiopharmaceutical regulations, we surveyed radiopharmaceutical experts and nuclear medicine societies on an international basis. A questionnaire was provided which focused on the regulations required for the in-house non-commercial preparation of new radiopharmaceutical for routine clinical use or for use in clinical trials. Responses were received from participants in 36 countries. Although both government and institutional approval are required for introduction of new radiopharmaceuticals in the majority of countries, some countries require only institutional approval. In the case of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals, as may be expected, only physician responsibility is more often required compared with similar approval for use of diagnostic agent in these settings. The requirement of current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) for PET agents was higher than with the other agents. This preponderance of cGMP requirements may be interpreted as much higher than may be expected, since many PET radiopharmaceuticals are used in-house and are prepared in the hospital by pharmaceutical compounding and not by manufacturing. Compounding is not regulated by c

  9. Nature-based care opportunities and barriers in oncology contexts: a modified international e-Delphi survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaschke, Sarah; O'Callaghan, Clare C; Schofield, Penelope

    2017-10-16

    To develop recommendations regarding opportunities and barriers for nature-based care in oncology contexts using a structured knowledge generation process involving relevant healthcare and design experts. Four-round modified electronic Delphi study. Oncology patients' nature-based recommendations, uncovered in preceding qualitative investigation, were included in the first round for the expert participants' consideration. Key items (opportunities and barriers) were developed using data aggregation and synthesis, followed by item prioritisation and 10-point Likert scale ranking (1=not important, 10=very important). Descriptive statistics were calculated to assess items of highest importance representing expert recommendations. Online Delphi process constituting an electronic international survey. A purposive sample of 200 potential panellists (recruitment target n=40) comprising healthcare practitioners, managers, designers, architects and researchers were invited to participate; experts were identified via research networks, snowballing and systematic literature review. 38 experts across seven countries (Australia, USA, UK, New Zealand, Canada, Denmark and Sweden) returned questionnaire 1, which determined consent and acceptance for participation. Initial response rate was 19%, and subsequent response rates were 84%, 82% and 84% for rounds 2, 3 and 4, respectively. The Delphi panel developed recommendations consisting of 10 opportunities and 10 barriers. The following opportunities were rated to be of highest importance: window views from clinical areas onto nature; outdoor settings, gardens and courtyards with easy and effortless access; and nature-based physical exercise adapted to patient requirements. Highest-rated barriers for nature-based oncology care included lack of knowledge and awareness about benefits of nature engagement and inaccessibility, not considering access requirements for the very sick and frail. Experts suggested and agreed on a set of

  10. Mental health care utilisation among internally displaced persons in Ukraine: results from a nation-wide survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, B; Makhashvili, N; Javakhishvili, J; Karachevskyy, A; Kharchenko, N; Shpiker, M; Richardson, E

    2017-07-27

    Aims There are an estimated 1.5 million internally displaced persons (IDPs) in Ukraine because of the armed conflict in the east of the country. The aim of this paper is to examine utilisation patterns of mental health and psychosocial support (MHPSS) care among IDPs in Ukraine. A cross-sectional survey design was used. Data were collected from 2203 adult IDPs throughout Ukraine between March and May 2016. Data on mental health care utilisation were collected, along with outcomes including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression and anxiety. Descriptive and multivariate regression analyses were used. PTSD prevalence was 32%, depression prevalence was 22%, and anxiety prevalence was 17%. Among those that likely required care (screened positive with one of the three disorders, and also self-reporting a problem) there was a large treatment gap, with 74% of respondents who likely required MHPSS care over the past 12 months not receiving it. For the 26% (N = 180) that had sought care, the most common sources of services/support were pharmacies, family or district doctor/paramedic (feldsher), neurologist at a polyclinic, internist/neurologist at a general hospital, psychologists visiting communities, and non-governmental organisations/volunteer mental health/psychosocial centres. Of the 180 respondents who did seek care, 163 could recall whether they had to pay for their care. Of these 163 respondents, 72 (44%) recalled paying for the care they received despite government care officially being free in Ukraine. The average costs they paid for care was US$107 over the previous 12 months. All 180 respondents reported having to pay for medicines and the average costs for medicines was US$109 over the previous 12 months. Among the 74% had not sought care despite likely needing it; the principal reasons for not seeking care were: thought that they would get better by using their own medications, could not afford to pay for health services or medications, no awareness

  11. A Review of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development's International Education Surveys: Governance, Human Capital Discourses, and Policy Debates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Clara; Volante, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Given the influential role that the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) plays in educational governance, we believe it is timely to provide an in-depth review of its education surveys and their associated human capital discourses. By reviewing and summarizing the OECD's suite of education surveys, this paper identifies the…

  12. Achievement report for fiscal 1999. FS surveys to excavate international joint research seeds; 1999 nendo kokusai kyodo kenky seeds hakkutsu no tame no FS chosa seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    The FS surveys to excavate international joint research seeds are intended to promote international joint researches, whereas surveys have been carried out in fiscal 1999 on eight themes covering as wide scope as new energies, resource conservation, energy conservation, environment preservation, functional materials, information communication technologies, and bio-technologies. The eight themes are: researches on energy conservation in petroleum and petrochemical industries by using advanced distillation processes (to develop an internal heat exchange type distillation column, and realize energy conservation exceeding the minimum reflux status being the limitation of conventional energy saving means), researches on treatment of hard-to-decompose chemical substances by utilizing surface reformation by means of discharge, a new process monitoring technology (process tomography), establishment of human immortalization cells due to co-manifestation of mortalin and telomerase and elucidation of their structure, a remote maintenance technology using integrated type sensors, application of new heat resistant plastics to photo and electronic materials, preparation processes of petroleum catalysts utilizing in situ XAFS, elucidation and design of the structure of the ultra-micro metal activation point in the reaction process, and surveys on necessity of developing a continuous and massive separation system of high-level energy and resource saving type using liquid-liquid distribution. (NEDO)

  13. Survey on the possibility of international cooperation on production technology of biohydrogen; Bio suiso seizo gijutsu ni kakawaru kokusai kyoryoku kanosei chosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    R and D on the production technology of hydrogen by biotechnology is one of the effective projects for worldwide energy supply technology and global environment protection technology in the 21st century. The research trend of various institutions promoting R and D on production technology of biohydrogen in the U.S.A. and other countries was surveyed together with the possibility of international cooperation. The production technology of biohydrogen is being watched over the world. Various researches are in promotion corresponding to environmental conditions as follows: search of not only photosynthetic bacteria but also such bacteria with hydrogen productivity as algae and anaerobic bacteria, and the gene engineering study for improving the hydrogen productivity of target microorganisms. All the institutions visited for this survey have great expectations in wide cooperative study in the future. On the possibility of international cooperation on the production technology of biohydrogen, the further precise survey should be promoted for developing more effective technologies based on the previous survey results. 156 refs., 10 tabs.

  14. Editorial policy in reporting ethical processes: A survey of ‘instructions for authors’ in International Indexed Dental Journals

    OpenAIRE

    Navaneetha, Cugati

    2011-01-01

    Background: The International Committee of Medical Journal Editors expects authors to report if their studies were carried out in accordance with the International Ethical Guidelines and Declaration of Helsinki; and inform readers regarding the same. Aims: To determine the proportion of International Indexed Dental Journals reporting on ethical clearance for human and animal research, obtaining of informed consent and / or assent, and the conduction of research in accordance with the Declarat...

  15. Working with International Students in the U.S. and Beyond: A Summary of Survey Research by NCDA International Student Services Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balin, Elif; Anderson, Nicole M.; Chudasama, Satomi Y.; Kanagasingam, Sutha K.; Zhang, Lily

    2016-01-01

    The career development process is one of the most important aspects of the international student experience. Providing comprehensive and culturally competent services requires institutional efforts that utilize best practices developmentally throughout the college experience and beyond. This article is based on the work of the International…

  16. Lessons learned from the EURADOS survey on individual monitoring data and internal dose assessments of foreigners exposed in Japan following the Fukushima Daiichi NPP accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, M.A.; Fojtik, P.; Franck, D.; Osko, J.; Gerstmann, U.; Scholl, C.; Lebacq, A.L.; Breustedt, B.; Del Risco Norrlid, L.

    2016-01-01

    European Radiation Dosimetry Group e.V. (EURADOS) survey on individual monitoring data and dose assessment has been carried out for 550 foreigners returning home after being exposed in Japan to intakes of radionuclides (mainly 131 I, 132 I, 132 Te, 134 Cs and 137 Cs) as a consequence of the Fukushima Daiichi NPP accident. In vivo and in vitro measurements were performed in their respective countries at an early stage after that accident. Intakes of radionuclides were detected in 208 persons from Europe and Canada, but the committed effective dose E(50) was below the annual dose limit for the public (<1 mSv) in all the cases. Lessons learned from this EURADOS survey are presented here regarding not only internal dosimetry issues, but also the management of the emergency situation, the perception of the risk of health effects due to radiation and the communication with exposed persons who showed anxiety and lack of trust in monitoring data and dose assessments. A survey was proposed in the frame of European Radiation Dosimetry Group e.V. (EURADOS) in collaboration with National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS, Japan) for the collection of individual monitoring data of exposed foreigners in Japan, obtained by in vivo and/or in vitro methods in their respective countries at an early stage after the Fukushima Daiichi NPP accident. The EURADOS survey has been carried out in 2013-15, managing internal dosimetry data of population from Europe and Canada. The interest was focussed not only in internal dosimetry issues but also in lessons learned regarding the management of the emergency situation. A great effort was made by internal dosimetry services evaluating doses just after the accident when the official information on internal exposures in Japan was scarcely available. European Regulatory bodies, National Administrations or dosimetry laboratories took care of the collection of information about the location of their citizens in Japan during the Fukushima

  17. Toward an International Comparison of Economic and Educational Mobility: Recent Findings from the Japan Child Panel Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akabayashi, Hideo; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Naoi, Michio; Shikishima, Chizuru

    2016-01-01

    In the past decades, income inequality has risen in most developed countries. There is growing interest among economists in international comparisons of economic and educational mobility. This is aided by the availability of internationally comparable, large-scale data. The present paper aims to make three contributions. First, we introduce the…

  18. Impact of Point-of-Sale Tobacco Display Bans in Thailand: Findings from the International Tobacco Control (ITC Southeast Asia Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Li

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In September 2005 Thailand became the first Asian country to implement a complete ban on the display of cigarettes and other tobacco products at point-of-sale (POS. This paper examined the impact of the POS tobacco display ban in Thailand, with Malaysia (which did not impose bans serving as a comparison. The data came from the International Tobacco Control Southeast Asia Survey (2005–2011, a prospective cohort survey designed to evaluate the psychosocial and behavioral impacts of tobacco control policies. Main measures included smokers’ reported awareness of tobacco displays and advertising at POS. At the first post-ban survey wave over 90% of smokers in Thailand were aware of the display ban policy and supported it, and about three quarters thought the ban was effective. Noticing tobacco displays in stores was lowest (16.9% at the first post-ban survey wave, but increased at later survey waves; however, the levels were consistently lower than those in Malaysia. Similarly, exposure to POS tobacco advertising was lower in Thailand. The display ban has reduced exposure to tobacco marketing at POS. The trend toward increased noticing is likely at least in part due to some increase in violations of the display bans and/or strategies to circumvent them.

  19. Impact of Point-of-Sale Tobacco Display Bans in Thailand: Findings from the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Southeast Asia Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin; Borland, Ron; Yong, Hua-Hie; Sirirassamee, Buppha; Hamann, Stephen; Omar, Maizurah; Quah, Anne C K

    2015-08-13

    In September 2005 Thailand became the first Asian country to implement a complete ban on the display of cigarettes and other tobacco products at point-of-sale (POS). This paper examined the impact of the POS tobacco display ban in Thailand, with Malaysia (which did not impose bans) serving as a comparison. The data came from the International Tobacco Control Southeast Asia Survey (2005-2011), a prospective cohort survey designed to evaluate the psychosocial and behavioral impacts of tobacco control policies. Main measures included smokers' reported awareness of tobacco displays and advertising at POS. At the first post-ban survey wave over 90% of smokers in Thailand were aware of the display ban policy and supported it, and about three quarters thought the ban was effective. Noticing tobacco displays in stores was lowest (16.9%) at the first post-ban survey wave, but increased at later survey waves; however, the levels were consistently lower than those in Malaysia. Similarly, exposure to POS tobacco advertising was lower in Thailand. The display ban has reduced exposure to tobacco marketing at POS. The trend toward increased noticing is likely at least in part due to some increase in violations of the display bans and/or strategies to circumvent them.

  20. An international survey of nutritional practices in low- and middle-income countries: a report from the International Society of Pediatric Oncology (SIOP) PODC Nutrition Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, A J; Mosby, T T; Rogers, P C; Cohen, J; Ladas, E J

    2014-12-01

    Optimal nutritional status is important in children with cancer, as it can influence clinical outcomes. To improve the nutritional health of children and adolescents receiving treatment for cancer residing in low income and middle-income countries (LMIC), we investigated nutrition practices among these nations' institutions providing treatment for childhood cancer. A cross-sectional survey of nutrition practice was administered to staff members at institutions providing treatment for children with cancer between 2011 and 2012. Countries classified as low income and middle income were divided by geographical region. Final analysis was performed with 96 surveys, which included 27 institutions from Asia, 27 institutions from Latin America and Caribbean, 27 institutions from Africa and 15 institutions from Europe. The study found that 55% of institutions had a dietician available on their service. Access to dieticians, lack of nutrition resources and lack of nutrition education of staff were the main barriers to providing nutrition care in LMIC. Half of the institutions performed nutritional assessment at diagnosis, and the methods used varied widely. Twenty-nine percent of all institutions used complementary and alternate therapies within their clinical practice, and 35% of institutions reported that nutrition education was provided to patients and families. Priority areas for improving the nutritional management in LMIC include the following: (1) improved nutrition education and assessment tools for doctors and nurses; (2) increased availability of nutrition education resources for families and patients; and (3) identification of the role of complementary and alternative therapies in closing gaps in symptom management in these institutions.

  1. First on-line survey of an international multidisciplinary working group (MightyMedic) on current practice in diagnosis, therapy and follow-up of dyslipidemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanutti, C; D'Alessandri, G; Petta, A; Harada-Shiba, M; Julius, U; Soran, H; Moriarty, P M; Romeo, S; Drogari, E; Jaeger, B R

    2015-05-01

    The MightyMedic (Multidisciplinary International Group for Hemapheresis TherapY and MEtabolic DIsturbances Contrast) Working Group has been founded in 2013. The leading idea was to establish an international network of interdisciplinary nature aimed at working to cross national borders research projects, clinical trials, educational initiatives (meetings, workshops, summer schools) in the field of metabolic diseases, namely hyperlipidemias, and diabetes, preventive cardiology, and atherosclerosis. Therapeutic apheresis, its indications and techniques, is a parallel field of investigation. The first on-line survey of the Group has been completed in the first half of 2014. The survey included # 24 Centers in Italy, Germany, Greece, UK, Sweden, Japan and USA. Relevant data have been collected on current practice in diagnosis, therapy and follow-up of dyslipidemias. 240 subjects with hyperlipidemia and treated with lipoprotein apheresis have been reported in the survey, but a large percentage of patients (35%) who could benefit from this therapeutic option are still treated by conventional drug approach. Genetic molecular diagnosis is performed in only 33% of patients while Lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)) is included in cardiovascular disease risk assessment in 71% of participating Centers. New detailed investigations and prospective multicenter studies are needed to evaluate changes induced by the impact of updated indications and strategies, as well as new treatment options, targeting standardization of therapeutic and diagnostic approaches. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. An International Survey on Taking Up a Career in Cardiovascular Research: Opportunities and Biases toward Would-Be Physician-Scientists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Biondi-Zoccai

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular research is the main shaper of clinical evidence underpinning decision making, with its cyclic progression of junior researchers to mature faculty members. Despite efforts at improving cardiovascular research training, several unmet needs persist. We aimed to appraise current perceptions on cardiovascular research training with an international survey.We administered a 20-closed-question survey to mentors and mentees belonging to different international institutions. A total of 247 (12% surveys were available (out of 2,000 invitations. Overall, mentees and mentors were reasonably satisfied with the educational and research resources. Significant differences were found analyzing results according to gender, geographic area, training and full-time researcher status. Specifically, women proved significantly less satisfied than men, disclosed access to fewer resources and less support from mentors (all P<0.05. People working in institutions not located in North America or Northern/Central Europe were significantly less satisfied and disclosed much less support (both P<0.05. Those in training reported limited opportunities for collaboration (P = 0.009, and non-full-time researchers disclosed more limited access to tutors and formal grant writing training (both P<0.05.Several potential biases appear to be present in the way training in cardiovascular research is provided worldwide, including one against women. If confirmed, these data require proactive measures to decrease discriminations and improve the cardiovascular research training quality.

  3. Physician stated atrial fibrillation management in light of treatment guidelines: data from an international, observational prospective survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kowey, Peter R; Breithardt, Günter; Camm, John

    2010-01-01

    The Registry on Cardiac Rhythm Disorders Assessing the Control of Atrial Fibrillation (RecordAF) study is the first worldwide, prospective, survey of real-life management of atrial fibrillation (AF) in recently diagnosed patients (n = 5604) with a 1-year follow-up.......The Registry on Cardiac Rhythm Disorders Assessing the Control of Atrial Fibrillation (RecordAF) study is the first worldwide, prospective, survey of real-life management of atrial fibrillation (AF) in recently diagnosed patients (n = 5604) with a 1-year follow-up....

  4. "Real-world" pediatric endocrine practice; how much is it influenced by physician's gender and region of practice. Results of an international survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smuel, Keren; Yeshayahu, Yonatan

    2017-08-01

    To determine whether hormonal treatments for frequent clinical cases (short stature, delayed and precocious puberty) are prescribed strictly according to clinical guidelines or based on personal tendencies, and whether the decisions correlate with physician's personal demographics (age, sex, and place of practice). Cross-sectional survey, with made-up clinical cases, distributed to pediatric endocrinologists using 2 web-based professional forums, Israeli and an international. The questionnaire included 8 clinical cases and 5 demographic questions regarding the physician. Differences in practice between Israeli and international endocrinologists were assessed, and correlation between the physician's gender and their decisions regarding treatment. One hundred fifty-five physicians responded, 28% Israeli and 72% international. In girls with early puberty, 60% of international and 26% of Israeli physicians chose not to treat with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist. In girls with short stature, 79% of Israeli and 34% of international physicians offered growth hormone treatment. In girls with early puberty, both male and female physicians responded similarly in the international group, but in the Israeli group 47% of male and 15% of female doctors would not treat. In girls with constitutional growth delay, 67% of Israeli male doctors would not treat with growth hormone compared to 30% of Israeli female physicians. Our study demonstrated significant practice differences between Israeli and international pediatric endocrinologists. Within the Israeli group, significant practice differences were seen between male and female physicians. Given that Israeli physicians follow the same clinical guidelines it is clear that a large "grey zone" of clinical cases exist and much of the decisions on treatment are personal and influenced by personal beliefs or gender. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Physician stated atrial fibrillation management in light of treatment guidelines: data from an international, observational prospective survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kowey, Peter R; Breithardt, Günter; Camm, John

    2010-01-01

    The Registry on Cardiac Rhythm Disorders Assessing the Control of Atrial Fibrillation (RecordAF) study is the first worldwide, prospective, survey of real-life management of atrial fibrillation (AF) in recently diagnosed patients (n = 5604) with a 1-year follow-up....

  6. Increasing both the public health potential of basic research and the scientist satisfaction. An international survey of bio-scientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrentino, Carmen; Boggio, Andrea; Confalonieri, Stefano; Hemenway, David; Scita, Giorgio; Ballabeni, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Basic scientific research generates knowledge that has intrinsic value which is independent of future applications. Basic research may also lead to practical benefits, such as a new drug or diagnostic method. Building on our previous study of basic biomedical and biological researchers at Harvard, we present findings from a new survey of similar scientists from three countries. The goal of this study was to design policies to enhance both the public health potential and the work satisfaction and test scientists' attitudes towards these factors. The present survey asked about the scientists' motivations, goals and perspectives along with their attitudes concerning  policies designed to increase both the practical (i.e. public health) benefits of basic research as well as their own personal satisfaction. Close to 900 basic investigators responded to the survey; results corroborate the main findings from the previous survey of Harvard scientists. In addition, we find that most bioscientists disfavor present policies that require a discussion of the public health potential of their proposals in grants but generally favor softer policies aimed at increasing the quality of work and the potential practical benefits of basic research. In particular, bioscientists are generally supportive of those policies entailing the organization of more meetings between scientists and the general public, the organization of more academic discussion about the role of scientists in the society, and the implementation of a "basic bibliography" for each new approved drug.

  7. FY1998 survey of overseas coal import base arrangement promotion. Survey of the international coal situation; 1998 nendo kaigaitan yunyu kiban seibi sokushin chosa. Kokusai sekitan jijo chosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    The paper summarized in a fixed form the coal situation of the major coal producing countries (exporting countries) in the world and major European countries. The survey outlined general circumstances, economy/industry/trade, etc. of each country. As to the coal relation, described are coal reserves, production/supply-demand/export, properties of the main brands, the mining industry law, foreign investment control, working custom, etc. In Part 1, the paper selected the following as coal exporting countries: Australia, Canada, China, Columbia, Indonesia, New Zealand, Poland, Russia, South Africa, the U.S., and Venezuela. In Part 2, the paper described coal trends in the main European countries such as France, Germany, the U.K., and Spain, in terms of maps, general circumstances, main economic indexes, changes in imports/exports, imports/exports from/to the main countries, trade configuration by item, recent energy policy and coal policy, changes in coal supply/demand and future, coal-related governmental organizations, etc. (NEDO)

  8. Age and educational inequalities in smoking cessation due to three population-level tobacco control interventions: findings from the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Netherlands Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagelhout, Gera E; Crone, Matty R; van den Putte, Bas; Willemsen, Marc C; Fong, Geoffrey T; de Vries, Hein

    2013-02-01

    This study aimed to examine age and educational inequalities in smoking cessation due to the implementation of a tobacco tax increase, smoke-free legislation and a cessation campaign. Longitudinal data from 962 smokers aged 15 years and older were used from three survey waves of the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Netherlands Survey. The 2008 survey was performed before the implementation of the interventions and the 2009 and 2010 surveys were performed after the implementation. No significant age and educational differences in successful smoking cessation were found after the implementation of the three tobacco control interventions, although smokers aged 15-39 years were more likely to attempt to quit. Of the three population-level tobacco control interventions that were implemented simultaneously in the Netherlands, only the smoke-free legislation seemed to have increased quit attempts. The price increase of cigarettes may have been only effective in stimulating smoking cessation among younger smokers. Larger tax increases, stronger smoke-free legislation and media campaigns about the dangers of (second-hand) smoking are needed in the Netherlands.

  9. Educational differences in the impact of pictorial cigarette warning labels on smokers: findings from the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Europe surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagelhout, Gera E; Willemsen, Marc C; de Vries, Hein; Mons, Ute; Hitchman, Sara C; Kunst, Anton E; Guignard, Romain; Siahpush, Mohammad; Yong, Hua-Hie; van den Putte, Bas; Fong, Geoffrey T; Thrasher, James F

    2016-05-01

    To examine (1) the impact of pictorial cigarette warning labels on changes in self-reported warning label responses: warning salience, cognitive responses, forgoing cigarettes and avoiding warnings, and (2) whether these changes differed by smokers' educational level. Longitudinal data of smokers from two survey waves of the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Europe Surveys were used. In France and the UK, pictorial warning labels were implemented on the back of cigarette packages between the two survey waves. In Germany and the Netherlands, the text warning labels did not change. Warning salience decreased between the surveys in France (OR=0.81, p=0.046) and showed a non-significant increase in the UK (OR=1.30, p=0.058), cognitive responses increased in the UK (OR=1.34, peducation. However, in the UK, avoidance increased especially among low (OR=2.25, p=0.001) and moderate educated smokers (OR=3.21, peducational inequalities among continuing smokers. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  10. Transfusion practice in anemic, non-bleeding patients: Cross-sectional survey of physicians working in general internal medicine teaching hospitals in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Babo, Michelle; Chmiel, Corinne; Müggler, Simon Andreas; Rakusa, Julia; Schuppli, Caroline; Meier, Philipp; Fischler, Manuel; Urner, Martin

    2018-01-01

    Transfusion practice might significantly influence patient morbidity and mortality. Between European countries, transfusion practice of red blood cells (RBC) greatly differs. Only sparse data are available on transfusion practice of general internal medicine physicians in Switzerland. In this cross-sectional survey, physicians working in general medicine teaching hospitals in Switzerland were investigated regarding their self-reported transfusion practice in anemic patients without acute bleeding. The definition of anemia, transfusion triggers, knowledge on RBC transfusion, and implementation of guidelines were assessed. 560 physicians of 71 hospitals (64%) responded to the survey. Anemia was defined at very diverging hemoglobin values (by 38% at a hemoglobin Switzerland. Identifying and subsequently correcting this deficit in knowledge translation may have a significant impact on patient care.

  11. Climate policy and ancillary benefits. A survey and integration into the modelling of international negotiations on climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pittel, Karen; Ruebbelke, Dirk T.G.

    2008-01-01

    Currently informal and formal international negotiations on climate change take place in an intensive way since the Kyoto Protocol expires already in 2012. A post-Kyoto regulation to combat global warming is not yet stipulated. Due to rapidly increasing greenhouse-gas emission levels, industrialized countries urge major polluters from the developing world like China and India to participate in a future agreement. Whether these developing countries will do so, depends on the prevailing incentives to participate in international climate protection efforts. This paper identifies ancillary benefits of climate policy to provide important incentives to attend a new international protocol and to positively affect the likelihood of accomplishing a post-Kyoto agreement which includes commitments of developing countries. (author)

  12. Is Support for International Climate Action Conditional on Perceptions of Reciprocity? Evidence from Survey Experiments in Canada, the us, Norway, and Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tvinnereim, Endre; Lachapelle, Erick; Borick, Christopher

    The challenges of collective action are presented by leaders in many industrialized countries as a major obstacle to effective action on climate change. Notably, the argument goes, a fair international solution must appropriately constrain large greenhouse gas emitters like China. This paper asks whether citizen support for multilateral climate policies also depends on whether other countries are seen to reciprocate. We analyze results from population-based survey experiments in the US, Canada, Norway, and Sweden, asking subjects whether they think their country should commit internationally to emission reductions. Randomly assigned sub-samples were presented with statements suggesting that China may or may not choose to cooperate, or alternatively making no mention of China. We find that reciprocity is important to respondents in the smaller Scandinavian countries but not in North America. These findings suggest that country size is more important than national traditions of multilateral cooperation in predicting support for unilateral climate action.

  13. International cooperation in water resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J.R.; Beall, R.M.; Giusti, E.V.

    1979-01-01

    Advancements in hydrology proceeded slowly until the late 1800's when new ventures created a surge of interest and accomplishment. Progress waned again until the middle 20th century when an International Hydrological Decade was conceived, eventually receiving wide multinational support from governmental agencies and nongovernmental institutions. Organized by UNESCO, the Decade program was launched January 1, 1965. Participation included 107 nations, six United Nations agencies, and more than a dozen international scientific organizations. The initial program emphasized scientific research, and international cooperation; the second half of the Decade, emphasized technical assistance and technology transfer, largerly through education, training and demonstration. The success of the Decade led to the establishment of the International Hydrological Program, again under the aegis of UNESCO, to continue the work of the Decade indefinitely. The five major program activities, now involving about 90 countries and several international organizations, include: the scientific program, the promotion of education and training, the enhancement of information exchange, support of technical assistance, and the enlargement of regional cooperation. A significant amount of activity related to hydrological data networks and forecasting is carried on in an Operational Hydrology Programme by the WMO, chiefly through its Commission for Hydrology. Other international governmental organizations with a strong interest in water include the UN, the UN Development Programme, the FAO, the WHO, the International Atomic Energy Agency, the UN Environment Programme, the International Standardization Organization, and developmental institutions such as the World Bank. The specialized interests of researchers outside of the governmental structure, are met through association in various scientific and technical organizations which are world wide in scope and membership. Notwithstanding a sometimes

  14. Content validity, face validity and internal consistency of the Slovene version of Caring Factor Survey for care providers, caring for co-workers and caring of managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrbnjak, Dominika; Pahor, Dušica; Nelson, John W; Pajnkihar, Majda

    2017-06-01

    Caring relationships are important for developing a caring culture. It is important that care provider's relationships with patients, co-workers and managers are caring relationships. However, in the Slovene language, there is a lack of psychometrically sound instruments to measure these caring relationships. To explore the psychometric properties of the Slovenian version of the Caring Factor Survey (CFS) for care providers, the care given by co-workers and managers as judged by the providers, by evaluating its content validity, face validity and internal consistency. In the process of our instrument, we used translation and back translation and validation based on experts' agreement. Content validity was quantified by the content validity index (CVI) and a modified Cohen's kappa index. Face validity was evaluated by ten nurses who reviewed the instruments. In the process of psychometric testing based on survey data, we used a cross-sectional research design with a convenience sample of 91 caregivers working in internal or surgical wards in two health care institutions. Cronbach's alpha and corrected item-total correlations were used to test internal consistency. All items in all three versions of the CFS had a CVI score higher than 0.78 and excellent modified Cohen's kappa index, showing excellent content validity. The average content validity indices were 0.990, 0.975 and 0.963. The face validity was good with no major remarks given. Cronbach's alpha was 0.941, 0.962 and 0.970. The item-total correlations reached a criterion of 0.2 validity, face validity and internal consistency; however, due to some methodological shortcomings, results should be interpreted with caution. Further psychometric testing is needed. © 2016 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  15. Development of a survey instrument to investigate the primary care factors related to differences in cancer diagnosis between international jurisdictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Peter W; Hamilton, Willie; Aldersey, Kate

    2014-01-01

    Overlevelsen efter kræft varierer betydeligt mellem lande. Derfor blev the International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership (ICBP) etableret i 2009. ICBP er et internationalt samarbejde mellem Australien, Canada, Norge, Sverige, Storbritannien og Danmark, der særligt fokuserer på, hvordan og hvorfor...

  16. Internal migration of Canadian immigrants, 1993–2004: Evidence from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen M. King

    2011-12-01

    migration modeling results may differ when pre- and post-migration measures are used. Results suggest that internal migration of the foreign-born generally does not increase their dispersion across Canada, with the foreign-born primarily choosing one of the three immigrant gateway cities of Toronto, Montreal, and Vancouver, or moving to other relatively large CMAs.

  17. Support for and aspects of use of educational games in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs in the US: a survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Mark C

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evidence supporting the effectiveness of educational games in graduate medical education is limited. Anecdotal reports suggest their popularity in that setting. The objective of this study was to explore the support for and the different aspects of use of educational games in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs in the United States. Methods We conducted a survey of family medicine and internal medicine residency program directors in the United States. The questionnaire asked the program directors whether they supported the use of educational games, their actual use of games, and the type of games being used and the purpose of that use. Results Of 434 responding program directors (52% response rate, 92% were in support of the use of games as an educational strategy, and 80% reported already using them in their programs. Jeopardy like games were the most frequently used games (78%. The use of games was equally popular in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs and popularity was inversely associated with more than 75% of residents in the program being International Medical Graduates. The percentage of program directors who reported using educational games as teaching tools, review tools, and evaluation tools were 62%, 47%, and 4% respectively. Conclusions Given a widespread use of educational games in the training of medical residents, in spite of limited evidence for efficacy, further evaluation of the best approaches to education games should be explored.

  18. Support for and aspects of use of educational games in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs in the US: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akl, Elie A; Gunukula, Sameer; Mustafa, Reem; Wilson, Mark C; Symons, Andrew; Moheet, Amir; Schünemann, Holger J

    2010-03-25

    The evidence supporting the effectiveness of educational games in graduate medical education is limited. Anecdotal reports suggest their popularity in that setting. The objective of this study was to explore the support for and the different aspects of use of educational games in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs in the United States. We conducted a survey of family medicine and internal medicine residency program directors in the United States. The questionnaire asked the program directors whether they supported the use of educational games, their actual use of games, and the type of games being used and the purpose of that use. Of 434 responding program directors (52% response rate), 92% were in support of the use of games as an educational strategy, and 80% reported already using them in their programs. Jeopardy like games were the most frequently used games (78%). The use of games was equally popular in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs and popularity was inversely associated with more than 75% of residents in the program being International Medical Graduates. The percentage of program directors who reported using educational games as teaching tools, review tools, and evaluation tools were 62%, 47%, and 4% respectively. Given a widespread use of educational games in the training of medical residents, in spite of limited evidence for efficacy, further evaluation of the best approaches to education games should be explored.

  19. Education techniques for lifelong learning: international variations in initial certification and maintenance of certification in radiology: a multinational survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresolin, Linda; McLoud, Theresa C; Becker, Gary J; Kwakwa, Francis

    2008-01-01

    A survey was sent to representatives of national and regional radiology societies around the world regarding the status of certification, maintenance of certification (MOC), and continuing medical education (CME) requirements. Data were forthcoming from 24 countries (response rate, 71%), including the United States. The survey results indicated that most responding countries now have a standardized process and requirements for initial certification of diagnostic and therapeutic radiologists. Similarly, most reporting countries now have some form of mandatory CME, although the degree to which compliance is tracked varies. There is considerable heterogeneity in what these countries require for recertification or MOC, and the development of such requirements is cited as a goal for many of the countries. The standardization and institutionalization of certification and recertification requirements is in rapid evolution globally.

  20. Patients' perception of DED and its relation with time to diagnosis and quality of life: an international and multilingual survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labetoulle, Marc; Rolando, Maurizio; Baudouin, Christophe; van Setten, Gysbert

    2017-08-01

    To improve understanding of patients' experience and perception of dry eye disease (DED) and its impact on quality of life (QoL). This survey was observational, non-interventional and cross-sectional. The survey was conducted online on 706 patients with DED from five European countries (France, Germany, Italy, Spain and the UK). All patients met the following inclusion criteria: 40 years or older with DED diagnosed by a healthcare professional (HCP), not wearing contact lenses and using tear substitutes daily for at least 6 months. The survey (performed in the five native languages) included 9 screening questions (inclusion criteria) and 26 complementary questions about patients' demography, disease history, DED diagnosis, use of relief treatments, perceptions of DED condition and its impact on QoL. Overall, 218 of 706 (31%) patients perceived DED as a 'disease' or even a 'handicap', and 468 of 706 (66%) as a 'discomfort'. High impact of DED on patients' QoL was associated with negative perception, delay in diagnosis, visits to more than one HCP before diagnosis and high frequency of treatment use. This survey also provided us with a list of language-specific keywords that patients used most frequently to spontaneously describe their condition. Findings showed that negative perception of DED, delayed diagnosis and high frequency of treatment use were inter-related, and that all have a negative impact on patients' QoL. The generated language-specific keywords used to describe DED could serve as the basis for a comprehensive QoL questionnaire to be used in clinical settings. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  1. Impact on and use of an inner-city London Infectious Diseases Department by international migrants: a questionnaire survey

    OpenAIRE

    Cooke, Graham; Hargreaves, Sally; Natkunarajah, Jana; Sandhu, Gurjinder; Dhasmana, Devesh; Eliahoo, Joseph; Holmes, Alison; Friedland, Jon S

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background The UK has witnessed a considerable increase in immigration in the past decade. Migrant may face barriers to accessing appropriate health care on arrival and the current focus on screening certain migrants for tuberculosis on arrival is considered inadequate. We assessed the implications for an inner-city London Infectious Diseases Department in a high migrant area. Methods We administered an anonymous 20-point questionnaire survey to all admitted patients during a 6 week ...

  2. Factors that Can Promote or Impede the Advancement of Women as Leaders in Surgery: Results from an International Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase, Kazumi; Carpelan-Holmström, Monika; Kwong, Ava; Sanfey, Hilary

    2016-02-01

    Compared with male surgeons, women have less success advancing their careers and are underrepresented in leadership positions in surgery. The purpose of this study is to identify the qualifications necessary to become leaders in surgery and the career barriers faced by women surgeons in various cultural environments. A survey was performed with women surgeons in Japan, USA, Finland, and Hong Kong, China, to assess various barriers faced by women surgeons in the respective countries. To develop appropriate survey tool, a preliminary questionnaire was distributed to leaders in surgery and also in various organizations worldwide. The response rate was 23 % with 225 of 964 survey returned. Japanese women surgeons identify lacked family support as impeding a successful surgical career. US women surgeons feel more latent gender discrimination. Finnish women surgeons are less likely to need to sacrifice work-life balance, when holding leadership positions. Women surgeons worldwide are highly motivated to develop their career and agree the percentage of women surgeons in leadership positions should be increased. Women surgeons in different countries perceive different challenges. We must develop strategies and should not hesitate to negotiate to overcome these issues to reach leadership positions in surgery. This may be accomplished through networking worldwide to improve current conditions and obstacles.

  3. Impact on and use of an inner-city London Infectious Diseases Department by international migrants: a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Graham; Hargreaves, Sally; Natkunarajah, Jana; Sandhu, Gurjinder; Dhasmana, Devesh; Eliahoo, Joseph; Holmes, Alison; Friedland, Jon S

    2007-07-20

    The UK has witnessed a considerable increase in immigration in the past decade. Migrant may face barriers to accessing appropriate health care on arrival and the current focus on screening certain migrants for tuberculosis on arrival is considered inadequate. We assessed the implications for an inner-city London Infectious Diseases Department in a high migrant area. We administered an anonymous 20-point questionnaire survey to all admitted patients during a 6 week period. Questions related to sociodemographic characteristics and clinical presentation. Analysis was by migration status (UK born vs overseas born). 111 of 133 patients completed the survey (response rate 83.4%). 58 (52.2%) were born in the UK; 53 (47.7%) of the cohort were overseas born. Overseas-born were over-represented in comparison to Census data for this survey site (47.7% vs 33.6%; proportional difference 0.142 [95% CI 0.049-0.235]; p = 0.002): overseas born reported 33 different countries of birth, most (73.6%) of whom arrived in the UK pre-1975 and self-reported their nationality as British. A smaller number (26.4%) were new migrants to the UK (arrival and once settled through primary care services. A more organised and holistic approach to migrant health care is required.

  4. 1998 Annual Study Report. New industry supporting type international standard development program (Comprehensive survey); 1998 nendo seika hokokusho. Shinki sangyo shiengata kokusai hyojun kaihatsu jigyo (sogo chosa)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    Summarized herein are results of the survey on a total of 13 themes for international standardization. These themes are for standardization of (1) color control, (2) securing interoperability between optical disk systems, (3) digital image processing for home digital electronic appliances, (4) securing interconnectability between home electronic information appliances, (5) production process systems, (6) testing and evaluation methods for fine ceramic materials for communications, (7) evaluation methods for high-temperature properties of new glass melts, (8) corrosion testing and evaluation methods for surface-treated steel plates, (9) testing and evaluation methods for high-purity titanium, (10) testing and evaluation methods for plastic optical fibers, (11) evaluation methods for high-strength, large-size steel pipe characteristics for superhigh-pressure natural gas pipelines, (12) methods for measuring mileage of hybrid electric vehicles, and (13) methods for determining recycle ratios of automobile components. This comprehensive survey also includes overseas trends for the standardization, establishment/expansion of the international standardization processes, and standardization for determining recycle ratios of home electric appliances. (NEDO)

  5. A survey of sleep deprivation patterns and their effects on cognitive functions of residents and interns in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee Jin; Kim, Jee Hyun; Park, Kee-Duk; Choi, Kyoung-Gyu; Lee, Hyang Woon

    2011-04-01

    To investigate the effects of sleep deprivation on physical health, cognition, and work performance in residents and interns who suffer from chronic sleep deprivation. Fifty-eight residents and interns were recruited in this study. They completed sleep diary for 2 weeks and questionnaires including health complaints, daytime sleepiness and work performance, and were evaluated with actigraphy. Stroop test, continuous performance test (CPT), trail-making test (TMT) and Korean-California verbal learning test (K-CVLT) were done as neuropsychological evaluations. Subjects were divided into severe sleep deprived (S-SD, average night sleep less than 4 h), mild to moderate deprived (M-SD, 4-6 h), and non-sleep deprived (Non-SD, more than 6 h) groups. Forty-one subjects (70.7%) were sleep-deprived. Mean sleep duration was 5.0±1.2 h/night and work duration was 14.9±2.7 h/day. The S-SD group showed higher Epworth Sleepiness Scales than M-SD and Non-SD groups. Severe sleep deprivation was associated with higher level of stress, more frequent attention deficit, and difficulty in learning (Psleep deprivation in residents and interns might affect their health as well as work performance that might influence the quality of patient care, although active compensatory brain mechanisms could be involved to preserve their performance. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Association between socioeconomic status and overweight and obesity among Inuit adults: International Polar Year Inuit Health Survey, 2007–2008

    OpenAIRE

    Zienczuk, Natalia; Egeland, Grace M.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the socio-economic correlates of overweight and obesity among Inuit undergoing rapid cultural changes. Study design. A cross-sectional health survey of 2,592 Inuit adults from 36 communities in the Canadian Arctic. Methods. Main outcome measures were overweight and obesity (BMI>25 kg/m2 and >30 kg/m2, respectively) and as characteristics were similar, groups were combined into an at-risk BMI category (BMI>25 kg/m2). Logistic regression was used to determine th...

  7. Assessment of long-term radon concentration measurement precision in field conditions (Serbian Schools) for a survey carried out by an international collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpentieri, C; Zunic, Z S; Carelli, V; Cordedda, C; Ferrigno, G; Veselinovic, N; Bossew, P; Tollefsen, T; Cuknic, O; Vojinovic, Z; Bochicchio, F

    2011-05-01

    In an international collaboration, a long-term radon concentration survey was carried out in schools of Southern Serbia with radon detectors prepared, etched and read-out in Italy. In such surveys it is necessary to evaluate measurement precision in field conditions, and to check whether quality assurance protocols were effective in keeping uncertainties under control, despite the complex organisation of measurements. In the first stage of the survey, which involves only some of the total number of municipalities, paired detectors were exposed in each monitored room in order to experimentally assess measurement precision. Paired passive devices (containing CR-39 detectors) were exposed for two consecutive 6-month periods. Two different measurement systems were used to read out CR-39s of the first and second period, respectively. The median of the coefficient of variation (CV) of the measured exposures was 8 % for 232 paired devices of the first 6-month period and 4 % for 242 paired devices of the second 6-month period, respectively. This difference was mainly due to a different track count repeatability of the two read-out systems, which was 4 and 1 %, respectively, as the median value of CV of repeated countings. The in-field measured precision results are very similar to the precision assessed in calibration conditions and are much lower than the room-to-room variation of radon concentration in the monitored schools. Moreover, a quality assurance protocol was followed to reduce extra-exposures during detector transport from Rome to schools measured and back.

  8. Investigations and referral for suspected cancer in primary care in New Zealand-A survey linked to the International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Htun, H W; Elwood, J M; Ioannides, S J; Fishman, T; Lawrenson, R

    2017-05-01

    A national internet-based survey of New Zealand (NZ) primary care physicians (n = 192) used the survey instrument developed by the International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership (ICBP). Practitioners were recruited by a range of methods assisted by NZ general practice networks and contacts. Compared to 11 other ICBP jurisdictions, direct access to diagnostic tests was more limited and took more time than in most other areas; the average wait for a test to be done and reported was 3.0 weeks for X-rays and 8.0 for ultrasound, compared to ICBP averages of 1.6 and 4.7 weeks respectively. Forty-five per cent of respondents could get specialist advice within 48 hr. Sixty-six per cent were aware of NZ guidelines for cancer in primary care, and of those 44% consulted them sometimes or often. Access to tests was greater, and time required much less, in the private than the public care system. NZ respondents each answered two of five clinical vignettes, with results similar to other ICBP areas. The survey also included general practice trainees (N = 42); their results were similar to the main group. The results suggest that improvements in prompt access to diagnostic tests and referrals for suspected cancer need to be given priority in NZ. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Hematology oncology practice in the Asia-Pacific APHCON survey results from the 6th international hematologic malignancies conference: bridging the gap 2015, Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiao Jun; Liu, Kaiyan; Ritchie, David; Andersson, Borje; Lu, Jin; Hou, Jian; Burguera, Adolfo de la Fuente; Wang, JianXiang; Yeoh, Allen; Yan, Chenhua; Zhou, Daobin; Tan, Daryl; Kim, Dong Wook; Wu, Depei; Shpall, Elizabeth; Kornblau, Stephen; Neelapu, Sattava; Hongeng, Suradej; Li, Jianyong; Hu, Jiong; Zhang, Lian Sheng; Wang, Michael; Malhotra, Pankaj; Jiang, Qian; Qin, Yazhen; Wong, Raymond; Champlin, Richard; Hagemeister, Frederick; Westin, Jason; Iyer, Swaminathan; Mathews, Vikram; Wang, Yu; Hu, Yu; Xiao, Zhijian; Shao, Zonghong; Orlowski, Robert Z; Chim, Chor Sang; Mulligan, Stephen; Sanz, Miguel; Ozawa, Keiya; Parmar, Simrit; Issaragrisil, Surapol

    2017-06-20

    This report serves as a snapshot of the state-of-knowledge in the Asia Pacific (APAC) Hematology Oncology community, and establishes a baseline for longitudinal investigations to follow changes in best practices over time. The objective of this study was to understand the approach to hematologic diseases, common standards of care and best practices, issues that remain controversial or debated, and educational or resource gaps that warrant attention. We used mobile application to disseminate and distribute questionnaires to delegates during the 6th international hematologic malignancies conference hosted by the APAC Hematology Consortium at Beijing, China. User responses were collected in an anonymous fashion. We report survey results in two ways: the overall responses, and responses as stratified between Chinese physicians and "Other" represented nationalities. Overall geographical concordance in survey responses was positive and strong. Perhaps more interesting than instances of absolute agreement, these data provide a unique opportunity to identify topics in which physician knowledge or opinions diverge. We assigned questions from all modules to broad categories of: patient information; diagnosis; treatment preference; transplantation; and general knowledge/opinion. On average, we observed a geographic difference of 15% for any particular answer choice, and this was fairly constant across survey modules. These results reveal utility and need for widespread and ongoing initiatives to assess knowledge and provide evidence-based education in real time. The data will be made more valuable by longitudinal participation, such that we can monitor changes in the state of the art over time.

  10. Management of neonates with right-sided aortic arch and esophageal atresia: International survey on IPEG AND ESPES members´ experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera-Pujabet, Monserrat; Gahete, Jose Andres Molino; Guillén, Gabriela; López-Fernández, Sergio; Martin-Giménez, Marta Patricia; Lloret, Josep; López, Manuel

    2017-11-23

    The optimum surgical approach of neonates with right-sided aortic arch (RAA) and esophageal atresia (EA)/tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) is still an unsolved question. In order to propose an operative algorithm in the era of endoscopic surgery, we performed an international survey to know the current practice between pediatric endoscopic surgeons. Two of the most important societies in endoscopic pediatric surgery were queried: the International Pediatric Endosurgery Group (IPEG) and the European Society of Paediatric Endoscopic Surgeons (ESPES). During December 2016, an anonymous online-based survey was sent to all IPEG and ESPES members, collecting data regarding perioperative management and surgical repair of EA/TEF with RAA. 144 surgeons from 23 countries completed the questionnaire. 69.2% of respondents were IPEG members, 30.8% were ESPES members. 71.5% of members who answered the survey had more than 10years of surgical experience. A preoperative echocardiography was almost uniformly performed (93.1%). 31.9% of the surveyed surgeons had never treated an EA/TEF with RAA. The remaining 98 surveyed surgeons had managed 279 cases of EA/TEF with RAA. Thoracotomy was considered the preferred approach for 54.2% of the surgeons, and 51.9% chose a right-sided approach. When RAA was an intraoperative finding, 76% would perform a contralateral thoracotomy if difficulties arose. Thoracoscopy was preferred by 45.8% of surgeons. If RAA was suspected preoperatively, 63.1% preferred to attempt a left-sided thoracoscopy and only 24.2% would change their approach to a thoracotomy. If RAA was an intraoperative finding and a safe surgical repair could not be achieved through right-sided thoracoscopy, 51.5% of them chose to perform a left sided thoracoscopy, rather than convert to thoracotomy. Preoperative echocardiography performed by experienced examiners helps in surgical planning. Preoperative diagnosis of RAA should not discourage thoracoscopic repair, which is increasingly

  11. Report of the results of the International Clinical Cytometry Society and American Society for Clinical Pathology workload survey of clinical flow cytometry laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolniak, Kristy; Goolsby, Charles; Choi, Sarah; Ali, Asma; Serdy, Nina; Stetler-Stevenson, Maryalice

    2017-11-01

    Thorough review of current workload, staffing, and testing practices in clinical laboratories allows for optimization of laboratory efficiency and quality. This information is largely missing with regard to clinical flow cytometry laboratories. The purpose of this survey is to provide comprehensive, current, and accurate data on testing practices and laboratory staffing in clinical laboratories performing flow cytometric studies. Survey data was collected from flow cytometry laboratories through the ASCP website. Data was collected on the workload during a 1-year time period of full-time and part-time technical and professional (M.D./D.O./Ph.D. or equivalent) flow cytometry employees. Workload was examined as number of specimens and tubes per full time equivalent (FTE) technical and professional staff. Test complexity, test result interpretation, and reporting practices were also evaluated. There were 205 respondent laboratories affiliated predominantly with academic and health system institutions. Overall, 1,132 FTE employees were reported with 29% professional FTE employees and 71% technical. Fifty-one percent of the testing performed was considered high complexity and 49% was low complexity. The average number of tubes per FTE technologist was 1,194 per year and the average number of specimens per FTE professional was 1,659 per year. The flow cytometry reports were predominantly written by pathologists (57%) and were typically written as a separate report (58%). This survey evaluates the overall status of the current practice of clinical flow cytometry and provides a comprehensive dataset as a framework to help laboratory departments, directors, and managers make appropriate, cost-effective staffing decisions. © 2016 International Clinical Cytometry Society. © 2016 International Clinical Cytometry Society.

  12. Survey of image quality and patient dose in simple radiographic examinations: establishing guidance levels and comparison with international standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manatrakul, N.; Bunsoong, T.; Krisanachinda, A.; Suwanpradit, P.; Rungruengthanakit, P.; Kanchart, S.; Chaiwong, Rajikorn; Tsapakig, V.A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate image quality and patient dose for commonly radiographic examinations in Thailand, to establish national reference or guidance levels (GL) and compare with international standards, as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) project on Radiation Protection of Patients and Medical Exposure Control (RAS/9/034 and RAS/9/047). Materials and Methods: Film reject rate analysis, image quality and patient dose assessment before and after Quality Control (QC) implementation were investigated in 8 X-ray machines in 4 hospitals. Air kerma (in mGy) at 1 meter focus-detector-distance for different kVp settings for each X-ray machines were measured using an ionization chamber under standardized condition. The entrance skin air kerma (ESAK) for Chest PA, Lumbar spine AP, Lumbar spine LAT, Pelvis AP, Abdomen AP, Skull AP and Skull LAT were calculated for at least 10 adult patients of average body mass (60 to 80 kg) for each projection. The obtained values were compared with international standards. Results: The highest film rejection rate reduction recorded after corrective actions from 9.15% to 6.8%. Mean ESAK values were less than international standards both before and after QC implementation in all projections but Chest PA projection. Maximum ESAK in Chest PA projection before corrective action was 0.55 mGy which was higher than the IAEA GL of 0.2 mGy. However, it was reduced to 0.25 mGy after QC tests on X- ray machine and using high kilovoltage (kV) technique. Conclusion: Proposed national GL of Thailand were obtained by estimating the 3rd quartile of the whole sample: Chest PA: 0.1 mGy, Lumbar Spine AP: 2.1 mGy, Lumbar Spine LAT: 6.3 mGy, Pelvis AP: 1.8 mGy, Abdomen: 1.5 mGy, Skull PA: 1.3 mGy and Skull LAT: 0.9 mGy. (author)

  13. Impact on and use of an inner-city London Infectious Diseases Department by international migrants: a questionnaire survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Graham; Hargreaves, Sally; Natkunarajah, Jana; Sandhu, Gurjinder; Dhasmana, Devesh; Eliahoo, Joseph; Holmes, Alison; Friedland, Jon S

    2007-01-01

    Background The UK has witnessed a considerable increase in immigration in the past decade. Migrant may face barriers to accessing appropriate health care on arrival and the current focus on screening certain migrants for tuberculosis on arrival is considered inadequate. We assessed the implications for an inner-city London Infectious Diseases Department in a high migrant area. Methods We administered an anonymous 20-point questionnaire survey to all admitted patients during a 6 week period. Questions related to sociodemographic characteristics and clinical presentation. Analysis was by migration status (UK born vs overseas born). Results 111 of 133 patients completed the survey (response rate 83.4%). 58 (52.2%) were born in the UK; 53 (47.7%) of the cohort were overseas born. Overseas-born were over-represented in comparison to Census data for this survey site (47.7% vs 33.6%; proportional difference 0.142 [95% CI 0.049–0.235]; p = 0.002): overseas born reported 33 different countries of birth, most (73.6%) of whom arrived in the UK pre-1975 and self-reported their nationality as British. A smaller number (26.4%) were new migrants to the UK (≤10 years), mostly refugees/asylum seekers. Overseas-born patients presented with a broad range and more severe spectrum of infections, differing from the UK-born population, resulting in two deaths in this group only. Presentation with a primary infection was associated with refugee/asylum status (n = 8; OR 6.35 [95% CI 1.28–31.50]; p = 0.023), being a new migrant (12; 10.62 [2.24–50.23]; p = 0.003), and being overseas born (31; 3.69 [1.67–8.18]; p = 0.001). Not having registered with a primary-care physician was associated with being overseas born, being a refugee/asylum seeker, being a new migrant, not having English as a first language, and being in the UK for ≤5 years. No significant differences were found between groups in terms of duration of illness prior to presentation or duration of hospitalisation (mean

  14. Impact on and use of an inner-city London Infectious Diseases Department by international migrants: a questionnaire survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holmes Alison

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The UK has witnessed a considerable increase in immigration in the past decade. Migrant may face barriers to accessing appropriate health care on arrival and the current focus on screening certain migrants for tuberculosis on arrival is considered inadequate. We assessed the implications for an inner-city London Infectious Diseases Department in a high migrant area. Methods We administered an anonymous 20-point questionnaire survey to all admitted patients during a 6 week period. Questions related to sociodemographic characteristics and clinical presentation. Analysis was by migration status (UK born vs overseas born. Results 111 of 133 patients completed the survey (response rate 83.4%. 58 (52.2% were born in the UK; 53 (47.7% of the cohort were overseas born. Overseas-born were over-represented in comparison to Census data for this survey site (47.7% vs 33.6%; proportional difference 0.142 [95% CI 0.049–0.235]; p = 0.002: overseas born reported 33 different countries of birth, most (73.6% of whom arrived in the UK pre-1975 and self-reported their nationality as British. A smaller number (26.4% were new migrants to the UK (≤10 years, mostly refugees/asylum seekers. Overseas-born patients presented with a broad range and more severe spectrum of infections, differing from the UK-born population, resulting in two deaths in this group only. Presentation with a primary infection was associated with refugee/asylum status (n = 8; OR 6.35 [95% CI 1.28–31.50]; p = 0.023, being a new migrant (12; 10.62 [2.24–50.23]; p = 0.003, and being overseas born (31; 3.69 [1.67–8.18]; p = 0.001. Not having registered with a primary-care physician was associated with being overseas born, being a refugee/asylum seeker, being a new migrant, not having English as a first language, and being in the UK for ≤5 years. No significant differences were found between groups in terms of duration of illness prior to presentation or duration of

  15. Patterns of smoking among adolescents in Malaysia and Thailand: findings from the International Tobacco Control Southeast Asia survey.