WorldWideScience

Sample records for international radiation protection association

  1. Role of the International Radiation Protection Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kase, Kenneth R; Metcalf, Phil

    2011-01-01

    Global concerns over energy supply and climate change have given rise to an increase in uranium prospecting, mining and extraction. The changing world economy is spreading the use of advanced nuclear and radiation-related technologies to many parts of the world, giving rise to global initiatives on nuclear energy and operation of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. The emerging global nuclear safety regime promotes and encourages high standards of radiation safety worldwide. These developments call for increasing capacity and capabilities in radiation protection expertise and continue to present both challenges and opportunities to the International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA), an association of 46 societies representing 58 countries with an individual membership of approximately 17,000. IRPA's objectives include: (1) assisting the development of competent radiation protection programs; (2) fostering the exchange of scientific and technical information through its international and regional congresses; (3) promoting the scientific and professional recognition of the radiation protection expert; and (4) supporting continuing education programs at each IRPA congress. IRPA has adopted a Code of Ethics and Guiding Principles for the Conduct of Stakeholder Engagement. Recently work began to develop guidance for maintaining and improving current levels of radiation protection and transferring this culture to future radiation protection professionals. These IRPA projects are developed through the Associate Society Forum discussions that are held at each IRPA international and regional congress. Finally, IRPA maintains a close working relationship with various international organizations and is also represented on the Inter-Agency Committee on Radiation Safety. Copyright © 2010 Health Physics Society

  2. The International radiation protection association (IRPA) 2010-2011 strategic plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kase, K.

    2010-01-01

    The membership of IRPA consists of 46 national or regional associate societies, 58 countries and about 17,000 individual members. The goals of IRPA strategic Plan 2008-2012 are: Promote excellence in the conduct of IRPA Promote excellence in national and regional associate societies Promote excellence in radiation protection professionals IRPA is recognized by its members and stakeholders as the international voice of the radiation protection profession. The role of IRPA is to: Provide a medium for communication and advancement of radiation protection throughout the world Encourage the establishment of radiation protection societies Support international meetings Encourage international publications dedicated to radiation protection Encourage the establishment and continuous review of universally acceptable radiation protection standards and recommendations Encourage professional enhancement

  3. International radiation protection standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aghayev, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Today the recommendations of ICRP have a profound influence on radiation protection all over the world. The latest recommendations were issued as publication no 60 (ICRP 60 1991). This document elaborated a conceptual framework for radiation protection based on ethics, experimental work, and risk assessment. The justification principle prohibits practices involving additional radiation exposures unless they produce sufficient societal benefits. The three main principles of the ICRP for proposed or continuing radiation-protection practices are: 1) the justification principle; 2)the optimization principle; 3) the dose limitation principle.The optimization principle requires managers to keep radiation exposures as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA), taking into account economic and social factors. the dose-limitation principle limits exposure of individuals to radiation. The system of radiological protection recommended by CRP for intervention is based on two additional principles: the proposed intervention should do more good than harm; one should optimize the form, scale and duration of intervention. Although the ICRP does not employ the term precautionary principle it does use the concept, at least implicitly

  4. International standards for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrosi, P.

    2011-01-01

    International standards for radiation protection are issued by many bodies. These bodies differ to a large extent in their organisation, in the way the members are designated and in the way the international standards are authorised by the issuing body. Large differences also exist in the relevance of the international standards. One extreme is that the international standards are mandatory in the sense that no conflicting national standard may exist, the other extreme is that national and international standards conflict and there is no need to resolve that conflict. Between these extremes there are some standards or documents of relevance, which are not binding by any formal law or contract but are de facto binding due to the scientific reputation of the issuing body. This paper gives, for radiation protection, an overview of the main standards issuing bodies, the international standards or documents of relevance issued by them and the relevance of these documents. (authors)

  5. International regulations for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daw, H.T.

    1982-01-01

    A review of the development of the IAEA Radiological Protection standards is given. The basic features of the latest revision recently adopted by the governing bodies of the sponsoring organizations, i.e. IAEA, WHO, ILO, NEA/OECD are discussed and some of the features of the future Agency programme for its implementation will be outlined. In particular, attention will be given to development of the basic principles for setting release limits of radioactive materials into the environment. An important aspect of this is when the release of radioactive materials into the environment crosses international boundaries. The Agency is best suited to try to reach a consensus on the minimum monetary value for the unit collective dose. (orig./RW)

  6. Recommendations of International Commission of Radiation Protection 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The book summarizes the recommendations on radiation protection of International of Radiation Protection. The main chapters are: 1.- Rates in radiation protection 2.- Biological aspects of radiation protection 3.- Framework of radiation protection. 4.- System of protection. 5.- Implantation of commission's recommendations. 6.- Summary of recommendations

  7. International education and training in radiation protection as a commitment of the International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA); Internationale Aus- und Weiterbildung im Strahlenschutz als Aufgabe der International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wernli, C.

    2001-07-01

    The following aspects and commitments are addressed: The role of IRPA: what can, what must be done in the eyes of the Executive Council? The Council's proposals for future activities in four stages at international level are: 1. Enhancing information about IRPA refresher courses. 2. The IRPA as an agency offering and coordinating the services of experts from among its Members, for instruction and training assignments across the world. 3. Preparing and maintaining a database for information about available courses at international level. 4. Continuing the activities for international, reciprocal acknowledgement of education and training organisations and their respective certificates. (orig./CB) [German] Folgende Aspekte und Aufgaben werden angesprochen: Die Rolle der IRPA: Was kann, was muss aus der Sicht des Exekutivrates getan werden? - Vier Stufen des weiteren internationalen Vorgehens. 1. IRPA-Refresherkurse 2. Vermittlung von Fachleuten durch die IRPA 3. Aufbau einer Datei von Kursen auf internationaler Ebene 4. Anerkennung von Ausbildungen auf internationaler Ebene. (orig./MG)

  8. International Society of Radiology and Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Standertskjoeld-Nordenstam, C.G.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the International Society of Radiology (ISR), as being the global organization of radiologists, is to promote and help co-ordinate the progress of radiology throughout the world. In this capacity and as a co-operating organization of the IAEA, the ISR has a specific responsibility in the global radiological protection of patients. Globally, there are many users of medical radiation, and radiology may be practised in the most awkward circumstances. The individuals performing X ray studies as well as those interpreting them may be well trained, as in industrialized parts of the world, but also less knowledgeable, as in developing areas. The problems of radiological protection, both of patients and of radiation workers, still exist, and radiation equipment is largely diffused throughout the world. That is why a conference like this is today as important as ever. Radiation protection is achieved through education, on the one hand, and legislation, on the other. Legislation and regulation are the instruments of national authorities. The means of the ISR are education and information. Good radiological practice is something that can be taught. The ISR is doing this mainly through the biannual International Congress of Radiology (ICR), now arranged in an area of radiological need; the three previous ICRs were in China, in India and in South America; the next one is going to be in Mexico in 2002. The goal of the ICR is mainly to be an instructive and educational event, especially designed for the needs of its surrounding region. The ISR is aiming at producing educational material. The International Commission on Radiological Education (ICRE), as part of the ISR, is launching the production of a series of educational booklets, which also include radiation protection. The ICRE is actively involved in shaping and organizing the educational and scientific programme of the ICRs

  9. Abstracts of 20. International Symposium Radiation Protection Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    51 papers are presented as titles with abstracts which are processed individually for the INIS data base. They deal with general aspects of radiation protection physics, international activities in radiation protection, solid state dosimetry, models and calculation methods in radiation protection, and measuring techniques in radiation protection

  10. Activities of Moroccan Radiation Protection Association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choukri, A.

    2010-01-01

    Encourage activities and information exchange in the field of radiation protection and related areas; Assist in informing both the public and the professionals on the problems and requirements related to radiation protection for the protection of man and the environment; Promote professional training in radiation protection. The use of nuclear technology in medicine, agriculture and industry is very advanced in Morocco. This technological progress has been accompanied by fairly detailed legislation and significant involvement on the part of Morocco in international conventions and agreements

  11. Internal contamination as a problem of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loessner, V.

    1978-01-01

    An overview is given of the most important problems associated with internal contamination. Topics discussed include the various routes of entry into the body and the metabolism of radionuclides, methods for assessing internal doses and specifying maximum permissible values for internal contamination as well as direct and indirect methods for detecting incorporated radionuclides. The material should be of value to participants in radiation protection courses. (author)

  12. Radiation protection for humans and environment. 50 years competence in the professional association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bucher, Benno; Wilhelm, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The conference proceedings of the IRPA (International radiation protection association) annual meeting 2016 contain the contribution of invited referents, other contributions and poster contributions concerning radiation protection in nuclear facilities, radiation protection of the public and environment, radioactive waste management, uranium mining, environmental monitoring, natural radioactivity, and radiation protection laws and regulations.

  13. Radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ures Pantazi, M.

    1994-01-01

    This work define procedures and controls about ionizing radiations. Between some definitions it found the following topics: radiation dose, risk, biological effects, international radioprotection bodies, workers exposure, accidental exposure, emergencies and radiation protection

  14. Radiation protection instrumentation: A comparison of US and international standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selby, J.M.; Hickey, E.E.; Swinth, K.L.

    1988-09-01

    The quality and performance of radiation protection instruments are extremely important in providing conservative protection to radiation workers. The recent American National Standards Institute (ANSI) draft standards on radiation protection instrumentation provide more specific performance requirements and definitive performance tests. International standards for radiation protection instrumentation, published by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), specify general performance, type, and acceptance test requirements. This paper discusses the similarities and differences between the two sets of standards. The results of testing selected instruments against the new draft ANSI standards also are presented. Pacific Northwest Laboratory has tested more than 100 instruments against criteria in draft ANSI N42.17A, which has resulted in changes in the standard. For example, the test for temperature performance was changed to permit more time for equilibration at each test temperature, and the instrument precision requirement was changed from ≤2.5% to ≤10%. 2 refs., 2 tabs

  15. Proceedings of 8th Symposium of the Croatian Radiation Protection Association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krajcar Bronic, I.; Kopjar, N.; Milic, M.; Branica, G.

    2011-01-01

    The 8th symposium of the Croatian Radiation Protection Association discussed the following topics: general topics; radiation dosimetry and instrumentation; public exposure; biological effects of radiation; radiation protection in medicine; radioecology and non-ionizing radiation. For each subject many investigations, experiments, examples and results are presented. International character of this symposium shows importance of these topics not only in region but world wide.

  16. Radiation protection planning for the international FAIR project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fehrenbacher, G.; Belousov, A.; Conrad, I.

    2015-01-01

    FAIR (=Facility for AntiProton and Ion Research) is an international accelerator facility which will be built near the GSI site in Darmstadt, where protons and heavy ion beams can be accelerated in a synchrotron to energies up to 30 GeV/nucleon with intensities partially up to 1E13/sec. The accelerated particles will be used for experiments in atomic, nuclear and plasma physics as well as for radiation biology and medicine and materials research. The radiation protection planning focuses on the estimation of radiation fields produced by heavy ions and its shielding. As examples, the radiation protection planning for the heavy ion synchrotron SIS100 as well as for two experiment caves are presented. Moreover, further important topics in this radiation protection planning are the estimation of the distribution and production of radionuclides in media and the handling before disposal.

  17. Proceedings of the 3. Regional Meeting on Radiological and Nuclear Safety, Regional Meeting on International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA)and 3. Peruvian Meeting on Radiological Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-10-01

    There we show works of the Third Regional Meeting on Radiological and Nuclear Safety held on 23-27 October, 1995 in Cusco-Peru. Latin americans specialists talk about nuclear safety and radiological protection, radiation natural exposure, biological effect of radiation, radiotherapy and medical radiological safety, radiological safety in industry and research. Also we deal with subjects related to radiological safety of nuclear and radioactive facilities, radioactive waste management, radioactive material transport, environmental radiological monitoring program, radiological emergency and accidents, instruments and dosimetry, basic safety standards of protection against radiation. More than 225 works were presented on the meeting

  18. Proceedings of 9th Symposium of the Croatian Radiation Protection Association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knezevic, Z.; Krajcar Bronic, I.; Majer, M.

    2013-01-01

    The 9th symposium of the Croatian Radiation Protection Association discussed the following topics: general topics; radiation dosimetry; public exposure; biological effects of radiation; radiation protection in medicine; radioecology and instrumentation and measuring techniques. For each subject many investigations, experiments, examples and results are presented. International character of this symposium shows importance of these topics not only in region but world wide.

  19. Proceedings of 7th Symposium of the Croatian Radiation Protection Association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barisic, D.; Grahek, Z.; Krajcar Bronic, I.; Miljanic, S.

    2008-01-01

    The 7th symposium of the Croatian Radiation Protection Association discussed the following topics: general topics; radiation dosimetry and instrumentation; biological effects of radiation; radiation protection in medicine; radioecology and radon. For each subject many investigations, experiments, examples and results are presented. International character of this symposium shows importance of these topics not only in region but world wide

  20. International Society of Radiographers and Radiological Technologists and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yule, A.

    2001-01-01

    The ISRRT was formed in 1962 with 15 national societies and by the year 2000 has grown to comprise more than 70 member societies. The main objects of the organization are to: Improve the education of radiographers; Support the development of medical radiation technology worldwide; Promote a better understanding and implementation of radiation protection standards. The ISRRT has been a non-governmental organization in official relations with the World Health Organization (WHO) since 1967. It is the only international radiographic organization that represents radiation medicine technology and has more than 200 000 members within its 70 member countries. Representatives of the ISRRT have addressed a number of assemblies of WHO regional committees on matters relating to radiation protection and radiation medicine technology. In this way, the expertise of radiographers worldwide contributes to the establishment of international standards in vital areas, such as: Quality control; Legislation for radiation protection; Good practice in radiographic procedures; Basic radiological services. The ISRRT believes that good and consistent standards of practice throughout the world are essential

  1. International and national radiation protection standards and recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swindon, T.N.

    1989-01-01

    The recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and their basis are discussed with particular emphasis on the extensive review of its earlier recommendations undertaken by the ICRP during the 1970s. The new recommendations issued in 1977 after this review are described. The dose limits for various organs and tissues before and after 1977 are compared. The optimization principle contained in the 1977 recommendations is assessed. The implementation of the 1977 recommendations, the subsequent changes to them and the ICRP's 1987 statement on cancer risk assessments are discussed. The National Radiological Protection Board's October 1987 radiation protection recommendations are outlined. 8 refs., 1 fig

  2. Proceedings of the third international congress of the International Radiation Protection Association, Washington, D. C. , September 9--14, 1973. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1974-02-01

    Complete texts of 123 communications to the Congress (in the original language; the majority in English, some in Russian, French), on the following topics; radiation perspective in the U.S., radiation and man, non-ionising radiation, radiation effects on animals, radiation quantities, radioecology, reactor experience, late radiation effects, dose calculations and radiation accidents.

  3. Assessment of the international meeting of radiation protection professionals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikodemova, Denisa; Cabanekova, Helena

    2012-01-01

    The conclusions from and main agenda of the conference are summarized. The conference was divided into 8 sections, dealing with biological effects of ionizing radiation, general aspects of radiation protection, dosimetry and metrology of ionizing radiation, radiation protection problems in nuclear power plants, management of nuclear radiation emergencies, radiation load of patients and staff during medical applications of ionizing radiation (radiodiagnosis, nuclear medicine and radiation oncology), control of exposure to radiation from natural sources in the environment and at workplaces, and education in radiation protection. The programme included round-table discussions devoted to the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident, optimization of the radiation load of children in radiology, and recent advances in the radon risk countermeasures area. (orig.)

  4. International workshop on non-ionizing radiation protection in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sienkiewicz, Zenon

    2013-11-01

    An international workshop brought together a range of stakeholders to consider protection from non-ionizing radiation used in medicine, research and cosmetics. Presentations on specific topics were followed by a general discussion on possible improvements in protection. Participants considered that adherence to science-based, harmonized exposure guidelines to limit exposures for clinical staff and other workers was a key prerequisite to safety in all situations. In addition, to engender an awareness of the risks involved to both the patient as well as the operator, equipment should be operated only by suitably qualified persons who have received appropriate training in the safe use of that device. This training should be carried out under the auspices of an accredited safety provider, and preferably offer a recognized qualification. Specific advice included the necessity for correct eye protection with higher power optical radiation sources, and avoiding the use of ultrasound for all exposures without medical benefit. Finally, the possibility of a harmonized approach to safety for both non-ionizing and ionizing radiation was considered worthy of further discussion.

  5. Experience of the international network in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina Gironzini, Eduardo

    2008-01-01

    With the aim of exchanging information on various subjects about radiation protection and designing a site where the members can send and receive information on courses, scientific activities, articles, technical opinions, commentaries and everything that promotes the communication, collaboration and integration, the 15th March 2002 the networking: 'radioproteccion' is created with 11 persons from 11 countries. The number of members had been increased. By the first month it had 117 members and by the end of the year 2002 it had already 179 members, 315 messages were send by then. By December 2007, there were 726 members from 28 countries mainly from Latin America: Argentina, Brazil, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay and Venezuela. There were also members from Austria, Canada, France, Israel, Italy, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom and United States. There have been distributed 2049 messages about Congress, courses and activities on national and international radiation protection and related issues which initially were in Latin American and the Caribbean. This has allowed diverse specialists that work in different themes to interchange experiences and information about subjects of common interest. This objective is the continuation of the spreading of activities that since 1991 and for 10 consecutive years had been made through the Bulletin 'Proteccion Radiologica', from which 65000 samples were published and distributed to specialists from 40 countries thanks to the support of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Pan-American Health Organization (PAHO). This idea is complemented by the Web: www.radioproteccion.org. Interesting topics have been discussed in the network for example: Pregnancy and medical radiation, emergency response, occupational exposure, radiation protection responsibilities, lessons learned from accidental

  6. Radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koelzer, W.

    1975-01-01

    Physical and radiological terms, quantities, and units. Basic principles of radiation protection (ICRP, IAEA, EURATOM, FRG). Biological effects of ionizing radiation. Objectives of practical radiation protection. (HP) [de

  7. Radiation protection in medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vano, E.; Holmberg, O.; Perez, M. R.; Ortiz, P.

    2016-08-01

    Diagnostic, interventional and therapeutic used of ionizing radiation are beneficial for hundreds of millions of people each year by improving health care and saving lives. In March 2001, the first International Conference on the Radiological Protection of Patients was held in Malaga, Spain, which led to an international action plan for the radiation protection of patients. Ten years after establishing the international action plan, the International Conference on Radiation Protection in Medicine: Setting the Scene for the Next Decade was held in Bonn, Germany, in December 2012. the main outcome of this conference was the so called Bonn Call for Action that identifies then priority actions to enhance radiation protection in medicine for the next decade. The IAEA and WHO are currently working in close cooperation to foster and support the implementation of these ten priority actions in Member States, but their implementation requires collaboration of national governments, international agencies, researchers, educators, institutions and professional associations. (Author)

  8. Current radiation protection activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, G.A.M.

    1996-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) program of the Radiation Safety Section is described in this paper. The Section has two main components: (1) the development of consensus safety documentation and (2) the use of that documentation as the basis for assisting countries to deal safely with their applications of radiation and radioactivity. Main activities of the section are listed for each of these components. Activities include documentation, coordinated research programs, and assistance to developing countries. 14 tabs

  9. A History of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repacholi, M H

    2017-10-01

    Concern about health risks from exposure to non-ionizing radiation (NIR) commenced in the 1950s after tracking radars were first introduced during the Second World War. Soon after, research on possible biological effects of microwave radiation in the former Soviet Union and the U.S. led to public and worker exposure limits being much lower in Eastern European than in Western countries, mainly because of different protection philosophies. As public concern increased, national authorities began introducing legislation to limit NIR exposures from domestic microwave ovens and workplace devices such as visual display units. The International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA) was formed in 1966 to represent national radiation protection societies. To address NIR protection issues, IRPA established a Working Group in 1974, then a Study Group in 1975, and finally the International NIR Committee (INIRC) in 1977. INIRC's publications quickly became accepted worldwide, and it was logical that it should become an independent commission. IRPA finally established the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP), chartering its remit in 1992, and defining NIR as electromagnetic radiation (ultraviolet, visible, infrared), electromagnetic waves and fields, and infra- and ultrasound. ICNIRP's guidelines have been incorporated into legislation or adopted as standards in many countries. While ICNIRP has been subjected to criticism and close scrutiny by the public, media, and activists, it has continued to issue well-received, independent, science-based protection advice. This paper summarizes events leading to the formation of ICNIRP, its key activities up to 2017, ICNIRP's 25th anniversary year, and its future challenges.

  10. Proceedings of the Sixth Symposium of the Croatian Radiation Protection Association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garaj-Vrhovac, V.; Kopjar, N.; Miljanic, S.

    2005-01-01

    Croatian Radiation Protection Association (CRPA) organised symposium with international participation. Co-organisers (Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Zagreb, Croatia and Institute for Medical Research and Occupational Health, Zagreb, Croatia) show importance of this symposium, which was under the auspices of several ministries (Ministry of Economy, Labour and Entrepreneurship, Ministry of Environmental Protection, Physical Planning and Construction, Ministry of Science, Education and Sports of the Republic of Croatia) and State Institute of Radiation Protection, State Office for Standardization and Metrology and APO Ltd. - Hazardous Waste Management Agency. All topics are of great interest for Croatia. They present recent researches in Croatia and in other almost same oriented countries in Europe.The distribution of topics at the Sixth symposium shows same parts with articles from radiation dosimetry and instrumentation, biological effects of radiation, public exposure, radiation protection in medicine, as well as radioecology. Also, non-ionising radiations take their share as very interesting topics at present. (S.P.)

  11. International basic safety standards for protecting against ionizing radiation and for the safety of radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of the Standards is to establish basic requirements for protection against the risks associated with exposure to ionizing radiation (hereinafter termed radiation) and for the safety of radiation sources that may deliver such exposure. The Standards have been developed from widely accepted radiation protection and safety principles, such as those published in the Annals of the ICRP and the IAEA Safety Series. They are intended to ensure the safety of all types of radiation sources and, in doing so, to complement standards already developed for large and complex radiation sources, such as nuclear reactors and radioactive waste management facilities. For the sources, more specific standards, such as those issued by the IAEA, are typically needed to achieve acceptable levels of safety. As these more specific standards are generally consistent with the Standards, in complying with them, such more complex installations will also generally comply with the Standards. The Standards are limited to specifying basic requirements of radiation protection and safety, with some guidance on how to apply them. General guidance on applying some of the requirements is available in the publications of the Sponsoring Organizations and additional guidance will be developed as needed in the light of experience gained in the application of the Standards. Tabs

  12. Croatian Participation at National Symposia and International Congresses on Radiation Protection 1992-2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krajcar Bronic, I.; Ranogajec-Komor, M

    2003-01-01

    Croatian Radiation Protection Association (CRPA) was formed as an independent association in 1991, and since 1992 it is a member of the International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA). CRPA organises regular national symposia with international participation, and takes part in organisation of regional IRPA congresses. The members of CRPA take part also in international and European congresses. In this paper we analyse the participation of Croatian authors in national symposia and international congresses in the period from 1992 to 2002. The number of papers in proceedings of the national symposia is rather constant (about 60), while at the First symposium in 1992 it was slightly higher (68). The fraction of papers by Croatian authors was also the highest at the First Symposium (∼ 90%), while at the following symposia it varied between 70% and 80%. Although the analysed period is rather short, one can see slight changes in the research topics. Radioecology, including radon and related topics, was the most frequent research area (36% of all papers) at the national CRPA symposia 1992-1998, followed by the biological effects of radiation and radiation protection in medicine (24%), dosimetry, methods and instrumentation (21%), general topics (11%) and radioactive waste (7%). The distribution of topics at the Fifth symposium is: 27% radioecology and radon, 30% biological and medical topics, as well as professional and public exposure, 24% dosimetry, 14% general topics and 5% non-ionising radiations. In this Symposium we have separate sections for non-ionising radiations and public exposure, although several papers on these subjects were presented already at the previous symposia. (author)

  13. Radiation protection infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    A prerequisite for the safe use of ionizing radiation in a country is the availability of an adequate infrastructure to achieve the desired degree of protection. The extent of such an infrastructure, generally comprising regulatory mechanisms and technical capabilities for application and enforcement of regulations, has to be commensurate with the stage of technological development. The expanding application of ionizing radiation in medicine, industry and research calls for vigorous promotion of effective radiation protection efforts, not only to prevent any unsafe practices but also to assess correctly and provide authoritative information on the safety of adopted practices. Experience reveals that radiation protection practices vary considerably from one country to another. The regulatory structures and type of organization with regard to radiation protection are very different, depending on a number of factors such as the constitutional framework, the legal and administrative systems of the country concerned, the state of technical development, the status of application of radiation sources, the existence of research and associated institutions, and the technical skills and financial resources available. Radiation protection principles evolve with time as further experience is gained and as new research evidence becomes available. Regulation of radiation protection has to take account of such changes and adapt to changing conditions. Forty-eight papers from 29 Member States and two International Organizations were presented in nine scientific sessions. Topics included radiation protection regulation and licensing notification, registration, inspection and control programmes, education and training, the role of supporting institutions such as national laboratories and research institutes, the role of professional associations, the contribution of radiation protection services, and international activities. A concluding panel addressed development strategies to

  14. Proceedings of the Conference and Symposium Korean Association for Radiation Protection Fall Meeting 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-11-01

    This proceedings contains articles of the Korean Association for Radiation Protection Fall Meeting, 2014. It was held on Nov.19-21, 2014 in Jeju, Korea and subject of the Korean Association for Radiation Protection Fall Meeting 2014. This proceedings is comprised of 8 sessions. The main topic titles of session are as follows: Radiation protection 1, Medical treatment and Biology 1, Radiation measurement 1, Radiation environment and protection 1, Radiation protection 2, Medical treatment and Biology 2, Radiation Measurement 2, Radiation environment and protection 2

  15. Proceedings of the Conference and Symposium Korean Association for Radiation Protection Fall Meeting 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-12-15

    This proceedings contains articles of the Korean Association for Radiation Protection Fall Meeting, 2016. It was held on Dec. 1, 2016 Phoenix Island in Jeju, Korea and subject of the Korean Association for Radiation Protection Fall Meeting 2016. This proceedings is comprised of 5 sessions. The main topic titles of session are as follows: Radiation protection, Biotechnology of radiation, Radiation measurement, Radiation environment and prevention, Radiation epidemiography.

  16. Proceedings of the Conference and Symposium Korean Association for Radiation Protection Fall Meeting 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-12-01

    This proceedings contains articles of the Korean Association for Radiation Protection Fall Meeting, 2016. It was held on Dec. 1, 2016 Phoenix Island in Jeju, Korea and subject of the Korean Association for Radiation Protection Fall Meeting 2016. This proceedings is comprised of 5 sessions. The main topic titles of session are as follows: Radiation protection, Biotechnology of radiation, Radiation measurement, Radiation environment and prevention, Radiation epidemiography.

  17. Radiation protection

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2001-01-01

    This will be a simple explanation of the reasons why CERN has to be careful about radiation protections issues, a practical guide on how to recognize radiation dangers, the monitoring systems that make sure radiation levels are well tolerable norms, and a quick summary of what radiation levels mean in terms of personal risk.

  18. Radiation protection and safety of radiation sources international basic safety standards

    CERN Document Server

    International Atomic Energy Agency. Vienna

    2014-01-01

    The Board of Governors of the IAEA first approved Basic Safety Standards in June 1962; they were published by the IAEA as IAEA Safety Series No. 9. A revised edition was issued in 1967. A third revision was published by the IAEA as the 1982 Edition of IAEA Safety Series No. 9 ; this edition was jointly sponsored by the IAEA, ILO, OECD/NEA and the WHO. The next edition was International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources, published by the IAEA as IAEA Safety Series No. 115 in February 1996, and jointly sponsored by the FAO, IAEA, ILO, OECD/NEA, PAHO and the WHO.

  19. Proceedings of the Conference and Symposium Korean Association for Radiation Protection Spring Meeting 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-04-15

    This proceedings contains articles of the Korean Association for Radiation Protection Spring Meeting, 2016. It was held on Apr. 6-8, 2016 Daemyung Resort in Byeonsan, Korea and subject of the Korean Association for Radiation Protection Spring Meeting 2016. This proceedings is comprised of 4 sessions. The main topic titles of session are as follows: Radiation protection, Biotechnology of radiation, Radiation Measurement, Radiation environment and prevention.

  20. Proceedings of the Conference and Symposium Korean Association for Radiation Protection Spring Meeting 2017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2017-04-15

    This proceedings contains articles of the Korean Association for Radiation Protection Spring Meeting, 2017. It was held on 13 April 2017 Gunsan Saemangeum Covention Center in Gunsan, Korea and subject of the Korean Association for Radiation Protection Spring Meeting 2017. This proceedings is comprised of 5 ssessions. The main topic titles of session are as follows: Radiation protection, Biotechnology of radiation, Radiation measurement and prevention, Radiation epidemiography.

  1. Proceedings of the Conference and Symposium Korean Association for Radiation Protection Spring Meeting 2017

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-04-01

    This proceedings contains articles of the Korean Association for Radiation Protection Spring Meeting, 2017. It was held on 13 April 2017 Gunsan Saemangeum Covention Center in Gunsan, Korea and subject of the Korean Association for Radiation Protection Spring Meeting 2017. This proceedings is comprised of 5 ssessions. The main topic titles of session are as follows: Radiation protection, Biotechnology of radiation, Radiation measurement and prevention, Radiation epidemiography.

  2. Radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    A NRPB leaflet in the 'At-a-Glance' series explains in a simple but scientifically accurate way what radiation is, the biological effects and the relative sensitivity of different parts of the human body. The leaflet then discusses radiation protection principles, radiation protection in the UK and finally the effectiveness of this radiation protection as judged by a breakdown of the total dose received by an average person in the UK, a heavy consumer of Cumbrian seafood, an average nuclear industry worker and an average person in Cornwall. (UK)

  3. Introduction to radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudens, H. de; Troesch, G.

    1985-01-01

    The following topics are developed through the five chapters of the manual: radiation dosimetry, basic principles, dose units and radiation protection instrumentation; protection against external irradiation and internal contamination; safety of nuclear facilities, principles, regulations and organization; radiation protection into nuclear reactors; environmental monitoring of radioactive wastes and effluents [fr

  4. Proceedings of the Conference and Symposium Korean Association for Radiation Protection Fall Meeting 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-10-01

    This proceedings contains articles of the Korean Association for Radiation Protection Fall Meeting, 2015. It was held on Oct.23, 2015 Mayfield Hotel in Seoul, Korea and subject of the Korean Association for Radiation Protection Fall Meeting 2015. This proceedings is comprised of 8 sessions. The main topic titles of session are as follows: Radiation protection 1, Medical treatment and Biology 1, Radiation Measurement 1, Radiation environment and disasters prevention 1, Radiation protection 2, Medical treatment and Biology 2, Radiation Measurement 2, Radiation environment and disasters prevention 2

  5. Proceedings of the Conference and Symposium Korean Association for Radiation Protection Spring Meeting 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-04-01

    This proceedings contains articles of the Korean Association for Radiation Protection Spring Meeting, 2015. It was held on Apr. 22-24, 2015 in Yeosu, Korea and subject of the Korean Association for Radiation Protection Spring Meeting 2014. This proceedings is comprised of 8 sessions. The main topic titles of session are as follows: Radiation protection 1, Medical treatment and Biology 1, Radiation Measurement 1, Radiation environment and disasters prevention 1, Radiation protection 2, Medical treatment and Biology 2, Radiation Measurement 2, Radiation environment and disasters prevention 2

  6. European developments on radiation protection in health care. An international public health perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neira, M.; Del Rosario Perez, M.

    2010-01-01

    The World Health Organisation's Programme on Radiation and Environmental Health is engaged in a range of global, regional and national collaborations to protect patients, workers and the public from planned, existing and emergency radiation exposures. Collaboration with European countries in this field is very active, with the ultimate goal of ensuring appropriate use of radiation worldwide. The WHO 'Global Initiative on Radiation Safety in Health Care Settings' is now being developed to mobilize the health sector towards safer and effective use of radiation in medicine. European collaboration in this initiative can have impact not only regionally but globally. This article provides an overview of relevant European developments in radiation protection in health care, from an international public health perspective. The 'Global Initiative' presents new opportunities for European countries to expand the horizons of their achievements globally, therefore contributing to improved radiation protection worldwide. (authors)

  7. Basic safety standards for radiation protection and their application to internal exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dousset, M.

    Following a summary of the basic concepts on radiation protection units, the safety standards now in effect in France and those recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP Publication 9, 1965) to be used as a basis to the next Euratom regulations are developed [fr

  8. Radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koelzer, W.

    1976-01-01

    The lecture is divided into five sections. The introduction deals with the physical and radiological terms, quantities and units. Then the basic principles of radiological protection are discussed. In the third section attention is paid to the biological effects of ionizing radiation. The fourth section deals with the objectives of practical radiological protection. Finally the emergency measures are discussed to be taken in radiation accidents. (HP) [de

  9. Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loos, M.

    2001-01-01

    Major achievements of SCK-CEN's Radiation Protection Department in 2000 are described. The main areas for R and D of the department remain neutron dosimetry and neutron activation analysis, safeguards information handling and non-destructive assay techniques. Further activities include low-level radioactivity measurements in environmental and biological samples and radiation protection research. Finally, achievements in decision strategy research and social sciences in nuclear research are reported

  10. International conference on the protection of the environment from the effects of ionizing radiation. Contributed papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    An International Conference on the Protection of the Environment from the Effects of Ionizing Radiation, organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in co-operation with the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), the European Commission (EC) and the International Union of Radioecology (IUR), will be held in Stockholm, Sweden, from 6-10 October 2003. This Conference will be hosted by the Government of Sweden through the Swedish Radiation Protection Authority (SSI). This publication contains contributed papers submitted on issues within the scope of the conference, which were accepted following a review by the Conference Programme Committee. The primary objective of this Conference is to foster information exchange, with the aim of promoting the development of a coherent international policy on the protection of the environment from effects attributable to ionizing radiation. This Conference is one in a series of meetings organized by, or held in co-operation with, the IAEA on this subject. It will include a review of recent developments in this area, and consideration of their implications for future work at national and international levels. The topics on which contributed papers were requested are as follows: Existing environmental protection approaches; Development of an international assessment framework; The scientific basis for environmental radiation assessment; Development of management approaches

  11. 7th Expert meeting radiation protection. International developments, waste management, challenges for the radiation protection in aging nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The proceedings of the 7th Expert meeting on radiation protection include contributions to the following topics: nuclear power and public opinion, IAEA safety standards, ISOE - information system on occupational exposure, European harmonization of the radiation protection education, WANO - challenges and results, CTBTO's global radiation measurement network, state of final radioactive waste disposal in Germany and worldwide, radioactive waste management and disposal in French NPPs, preparedness for final waste disposal in Schacht Konrad, actualization of the transport study Konrad, transport of NPPs' operational radioactive waste and waste from decommissioned reactor demolition to the final repository Konrad, qualification of radioactive waste casks for the final repository Konrad, radioactive waste disposal management concept in Switzerland, aging management and radiation protection, decontamination as effective measure for dose rate reduction - long-term and sustainable dose rate reduction by primary circuit decontamination, system and component decontamination for individual and collective dose reduction - practical examples, radiation protection map - electronic assistance for work planning, EPR dismantling already today? radiation protection register 2002-2010 - knowledge based on a decade of radiation monitoring, actual information on radiation protection in medicine, mobile telecommunication - actual research results.

  12. Radiation protection planning for the international FAIR project; Strahlenschutzplanung fuer das internationale FAIR-Projekt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fehrenbacher, G. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); FAIR - Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Europe GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Belousov, A.; Conrad, I. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); and others

    2015-07-01

    FAIR (=Facility for AntiProton and Ion Research) is an international accelerator facility which will be built near the GSI site in Darmstadt, where protons and heavy ion beams can be accelerated in a synchrotron to energies up to 30 GeV/nucleon with intensities partially up to 1E13/sec. The accelerated particles will be used for experiments in atomic, nuclear and plasma physics as well as for radiation biology and medicine and materials research. The radiation protection planning focuses on the estimation of radiation fields produced by heavy ions and its shielding. As examples, the radiation protection planning for the heavy ion synchrotron SIS100 as well as for two experiment caves are presented. Moreover, further important topics in this radiation protection planning are the estimation of the distribution and production of radionuclides in media and the handling before disposal.

  13. Radiation protection seminar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The Radiation Protection Seminar, was organized by the Argentina Association of Biology and Nuclear Medicine, and Bacon Laboratory, the 20 june 2012, in the Buenos Aires city of Argentina. In this event were presented some papers on the following topics: methods of decontamination, radiation protection of patients; concepts of radiation protection and dosimetry.

  14. Concepts of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This seventh chapter presents the concepts and principles of safety and radiation protection, emergency situations; NORM and TENORM; radiation protection care; radiation protection plan; activities of the radiation protection service; practical rules of radiation protection and the radiation symbol

  15. Proceedings of the Conference and Symposium Korean Association for Radiation Protection Spring Meeting 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-04-15

    This proceedings contains articles of the Korean Association for Radiation Protection Spring Meeting, 2014. It was held on Apr.23-25, 2014 Grand Hotel in Busan, Korea and subject of the Korean Association for Radiation Protection Spring Meeting 2014. This proceedings is comprised of 8 sessions. The main topic titles of session are as follows: Medical treatment and Biology 1, Measurement and Analysis 1, Measurement and Analysis 2, Radiation protection 1, Radiation protection 2, Medical treatment and Biology 2, Measurement and Analysis 3, Radiation protection 3.

  16. Proceedings of the Conference and Symposium Korean Association for Radiation Protection Spring Meeting 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-04-01

    This proceedings contains articles of the Korean Association for Radiation Protection Spring Meeting, 2014. It was held on Apr.23-25, 2014 Grand Hotel in Busan, Korea and subject of the Korean Association for Radiation Protection Spring Meeting 2014. This proceedings is comprised of 8 sessions. The main topic titles of session are as follows: Medical treatment and Biology 1, Measurement and Analysis 1, Measurement and Analysis 2, Radiation protection 1, Radiation protection 2, Medical treatment and Biology 2, Measurement and Analysis 3, Radiation protection 3

  17. Radiation protection - Monitoring of workers occupationally exposed to a risk of internal contamination with radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    In the course of employment, individuals might work with radioactive materials that, under certain circumstances, could be taken into the body. Protecting workers against risks of incorporated radionuclides requires the monitoring of potential intakes and/or the quantification of actual intakes and exposures. The selection of measures and programmes for this purpose requires decisions concerning methods, techniques, frequencies etc. for measurements and dose assessment. The criteria permitting the evaluation of the necessity of such a monitoring programme or for the selection of methods and frequencies of monitoring usually depend upon the legislation, the purpose of the radiation protection programme, the probabilities of potential radionuclide intakes, and the characteristics of the materials handled. This International Standard offers guidance for the decision whether a monitoring programme is required and how it should be designed. Its intention is to optimise the efforts for such a monitoring programme consistent with legal requirements and with the purpose of the radiation protection programme. Recommendations of international expert bodies and international experience with the practical application of these recommendations in radiation protection programmes have been considered in the development of this International Standard. Its application facilitates the exchanges of information between authorities, supervisory institutions and employers. The International Standard is not a substitute for legal requirements. In the International Standard, the word 'shall' is used to denote a requirement and no deviation is allowed. The word 'should' is used to denote a recommendation from which justified deviations are allowed. The word 'may' is used to denote permission

  18. Manual of Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambini, D.J.; Granier, R.; Boisserie, G.

    1992-01-01

    This manual explains the principles and practice of radiation protection for those whose work in research, in the field of medicine or in the industry requires the use of radiation sources. It provides the information radiation users need to protect themselves and others and to understand and comply with international recommendations, regulations and legislation regarding the use of radionuclides and radiation machines. It is designed to teach a wide audience of doctors, biologists, research scientists, technicians, engineers, students and others

  19. Radiation protection glossary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The glossary is intended to be used as a terminology standard for IAEA documentation on radiation protection. An effort has been made to use definitions contained in internationally accepted publications such as recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), standards of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), reports of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), with only slight modifications in order to tailor them more closely to IAEA needs. The glossary is restricted to ionizing radiation

  20. Proceedings of the Fourth Symposium of the Croatian Radiation Protection Association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    New Croatian Act on ionizing radiation protection is in a final stage of genesis. Ministry of Health is responsible to the Government of the Republic of Croatia, closely collaborating with the Croatian Radiation Protection Institute and the Croatian Institute for the Occupational Health. Responsibilities include all aspects relating sources of ionizing radiation in Croatia: practices, licenses, users, transport, in medicine and industry as well, workers with sources of ionizing radiation, emergency preparedness in radiological accidents, storage of radioactive wastes, x-ray machines and other machines producing ionizing radiation and radioactive materials in the environment. Papers from the Fourth Symposium of the Croatian Radiation Protection Association are presented in seven sessions: 1. General Topics of Interest for Radiation Protection 2. Biological Effects of Radiation 3. Radioactive Waste Management 4. Radioecology 5. Dosimetry and Instrumentation 6. Radiation Protection in Medicine 7. Radon

  1. Proceedings of the International Conference on Modern Radiotherapy. Advances and Challenges in Radiation Protection of Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-12-01

    The use of ionizing radiation in medicine has led to major improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of human diseases. While bringing new benefits for cancer treatment, modern radiotherapy also poses new challenges in terms of radiation protection of patients. Prevention of radiotherapy incidents and accidents is a major issue in this area. In December 2009, the French Nuclear Safety Authority (ASN) organised the 1. international conference on radiation protection of patients in radiotherapy. The major objective of the conference was to provide a platform for exchanging experience, and reviewing the actions implemented to improve the radiation safety in radiotherapy both at national and international level. The expected result was: - to reach a consensus about the necessity to strengthen existing international actions for prevention of incidents and accidents, - to set up an international cooperation to improve management for overexposed patients, - to outline a strategy for strengthening regulation, - to contribute to the elaboration of an international scale to rate patient related events for communication and reporting purpose. 360 delegates from 50 countries across the world participated at the 3-day conference. 41 presentations were made and 67 posters were displayed. The conference brought together a broad spectrum of expertise: scientists, health professionals, medical devices manufacturers, risk management specialists, radiation protection experts, representatives from Radiation Protection and Health Authorities as well as patient's associations. The programme covered both scientific and medical issues, such as patient sensitivity to ionising radiation and the treatment of complications. It also provided scope to discuss the benefits and risks of modern radiotherapy and to explore treatment safety issues from various perspectives, including human resources, expertise, education and training along with control and prevention strategies. The conference

  2. The issue concerning the use of an annual as opposed to a committed dose limit for internal radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skrable, K.W.; Chabot, G.E.; Alexander, E.L.; French, C.S.

    1985-01-01

    The scientific, technical, practical, and ethical considerations that relate to the use of an annual as opposed to a committed dose limitation system for internal radiation protection are evaluated and presented. The concerns about problems associated with the more recent ICRP committed dose recommendations that have been expressed by persons who are currently operating under an annual dose limitation system are reviewed and discussed in terms of the radiation protection programme elements that are required for an effective ALARA programme. We include in this and a follow-up article a comparison of how these alternative dose limitation systems affect the economic and professional livelihood of radiation workers and the requirements that they impose upon employers. Finally, we recommend the use of an ICRP based committed dose limitation system that provides protection of workers over an entire occupational lifetime without undue impact on their livelihood and without undue requirements for employers. (author)

  3. The Association of German Radiation Protection Physicians: Its origins, pathways and objectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, H.R.

    1985-01-01

    The paper highlights three principles which will hold good for future development, too: 1) In terms of the protection of the health of personnel, patients and total population, radiation protection constitutes a primary task for the physician; 2) The association endeavours to make a realistic assessment of the radiation hazard and dismisses both its overestimation and its underestimation; 3) Training and vocational qualification appear to be more important for radiation protection than perfectionist-bureaucratic provisions. (orig./HSCH) [de

  4. Proceedings of the Fifth Symposium of the Croatian Radiation Protection Association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krajcar Bronic, I.; Miljanic, S.; Obelic, B.

    2003-01-01

    Croatian Radiation Protection Association (CRPA) organised symposium with international participation. Co-organisers (Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Zagreb, Croatia and Institute for Medical Research and Occupational Health, Zagreb, Croatia) show importance of this symposium, which was under the auspices of several ministries (Ministry of Economy, Ministry of Environmental Protection and Physical Planning, Ministry of Health, Ministry of Science and Technology of the Republic of Croatia) and State Office for Standardization and Metrology. All topics are of great interest for Croatia. They present recent researches in Croatia and in other almost same oriented countries in Europe.The distribution of topics at the Fifth symposium shows same parts with articles from radioecology and radon, biological and medical topics, as well as professional and public exposure and dosimetry. Also, non-ionising radiations take its share as very interesting topics at present. (S.P.)

  5. EURATOM radiation protection policy - in expectation of the European Internal Market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriskat, H.

    1991-01-01

    Everything should be avoided in order that varying radiation protection regulations of individual member states may not hamper the realization of the EC Internal Market, whereby the EURATOM Treaty does not really allow variability because of the following: It is the task of the Community to set up and implement uniform safety standards for the public health of the population and the working force. From this can be deduced that member states may not deviate from EURATOM basic norms when putting these standards into practice. Summarizing, it can be said that on the basis of the EURATOM Treaty the implementation of industrial targets and of the aims of public health policy do not compete with each other in principle. When observing the regulations of the European Atomic Community Treaty, no serious obstacles are to be expected for radiation protection when the European Internal Market becomes reality. (orig./HSCH) [de

  6. Optimisation of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    Optimisation of radiation protection is one of the key elements in the current radiation protection philosophy. The present system of dose limitation was issued in 1977 by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and includes, in addition to the requirements of justification of practices and limitation of individual doses, the requirement that all exposures be kept as low as is reasonably achievable, taking social and economic factors into account. This last principle is usually referred to as optimisation of radiation protection, or the ALARA principle. The NEA Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH) organised an ad hoc meeting, in liaison with the NEA committees on the safety of nuclear installations and radioactive waste management. Separate abstracts were prepared for individual papers presented at the meeting

  7. Current problems of radiation hygiene, radiation protection and radiobiology. Proceedings of the national (jubilee) conference with international participation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opopol, N.

    2009-01-01

    The proceedings content 28 articles in fields of radiological protection, radioactive pollution, preventive medicine, public health protection. The history of creation, development and activity of the national radiation protection service is described.

  8. Data compiled by a study group of the managing board on the association's attitude towards issues of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-11-01

    The study group concentrated on general aspects of radiation protection. The data compilation is subdivided into general regulations, principles of radiation protection, radiation protection measures for occupationally exposed personnel, protection of the environment and of the population. A description of the association's attitude towards a certain aspect is followed in each case by an exhaustive discussion. (orig./HSCH) [de

  9. Concepts in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oncescu, M.

    1996-01-01

    This monograph provides basic notions and principles in dosimetry and radiation protection in compliance with two fundamental works: IAEA Safety Series No.115 - International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources - and Publication no. 60 of International Commission on Radiological Protection. After the review of quantities and units necessary in radiation protection, the book presents the new values of dose limits as well as the values of 'radiation weighting factor', 'tissue weighting factor' and 'conversion factor intake-dose' (committed effective dose per unit intake) by ingestion and inhalation for 30 most important radionuclides. The new values of dose limits, lower than the old values, are a challenge for the radiation protection, especially of the 'public' where the dose limit diminished by a factor of five relative to the earlier edition. The new value of dose limit for public, 1 mSv per year (obviously over the natural exposure of 2.4 mSv per year), imposes new action ways and levels in radiation protection, especially in some cases of exacerbated natural radioactivity. The book provides the calculus of external exposure with the Gamma constant expressed in adequate units, to make the calculation easier. In the calculus of protection shield for gamma sources one uses a method, which while approximate helps save time. The calculus of internal exposure is made using the conversion factor intake-dose. Finally, the 'dosimetric watch' of the natural and artificial radioactivity of the atmosphere, hydrosphere and biosphere is intended to comply with the International Basic Safety Standards. Each chapter ends with a set of illustrative problems which enhances the reader's understanding of underlying concepts and current methods used in the field

  10. Amendment of the guideline for physical radiation protection monitoring of internal exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheler, R.; Dalheimer, A.; Dettmann, K.; Frasch, G.; Hartmann, M.; Koenig, K.; Nosske, D.

    2002-01-01

    The paper deals with the current status of the revised version of the Guideline for Radiation Protection Surveillance. The consequences of the amended Radiation Protection Ordinance of July 20, 2001, especially the reduced dose limits and the protection of the unborn child in case of occupational radiation exposure are discussed in detail. Moreover, a general survey of the intended regulations is given and the new content of the guideline is explained. (orig.)

  11. Comments to the German society's for radiation protection (Gesellschaft fur Strahlenschutz) proposed principles for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, L.

    2002-01-01

    The German Society for Radiation Protection (in German Gesellschaft fur Strahlenschutz) is a separate society for radiation protection in Germany in addition to the leading society named Association of German and Swiss Radiation Protection Specialists (in German Fachverband fur Strahlenschutz). The Society is an international professional society. There are several hundreds members of the German Society for Radiation Protection. The German Society for Radiation Protection is not a member of IRPA (the International Radiation Protection Society). The IRPA member is the Association of German and Swiss Radiation Protection Specialists. According to information given on the web site of the Society for Radiation Protection (www.gfstrahlenschutz.de) the Society was founded in 1990 because in the opinion of the founding members the older professional societies and associations have not adequately considered and implemented the present knowledge of radiation risks and radiation protection. In accordance with its statutes the society pursues besides other aims the best possible protection of humans and the environment from the detrimental action of ionising and non-ionising radiation. The dealing with ionising and non-ionising radiation can according to the Society only be justified on the basis of biological and medical state of the art knowledge

  12. International radiation protection recommendations. Five years experience of ICRP Publication 26

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindell, B.; Beninson, D.; Sowby, F.D.

    1983-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection has issued radiation protection recommendations since 1928. The latest set of basic recommendations was adopted by the Commission on 17 January 1977, and subsequently published as ICRP Publication 26. This document has met with a wider interest than any of the previous ICRP recommendations. It has been considered to mark a radical change in the protection policy advocated by ICRP. It is not often appreciated that recommendations which are believed to be 'new' in ICRP Publication 26 had already been made in ICRP Publication 9 more than ten years earlier. In any event, ICRP Publication 26 has had a substantial impact on regulatory work in countries all over the world. It forms the basis for the Basic Safety Standards of the international organizations IAEA, ILO, OECD/NEA and WHO. The paper refers to the experience gained in using the new ICRP recommendations over the five years that have passed since ICRP Publication 26 was adopted and discusses some of the problems that have arisen in the practical application of the new recommendations in various countries. (author)

  13. Development of a personalized dosimetric tool for radiation protection in case of internal contamination and targeted radiotherapy in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiavassa, S.

    2005-12-01

    Current internal dosimetric estimations are based on the M.I.R.D. formalism and used standard mathematical models. These standard models are often far from a given patient morphology and do not allow to perform patient-specific dosimetry. The aim of this study was to develop a personalized dosimetric tool, which takes into account real patient morphology, composition and densities. This tool, called O.E.D.I.P.E., a French acronym of Tool for the Evaluation of Personalized Internal Dose, is a user-friendly graphical interface. O.E.D.I.P.E. allows to create voxel-based patient-specific geometries and associates them with the M.C.N.P.X. Monte Carlo code. Radionuclide distribution and absorbed dose calculation can be performed at the organ and voxel scale. O.E.D.I.P.E. can be used in nuclear medicine for targeted radiotherapy and in radiation protection in case of internal contamination. (author)

  14. Laser radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantelic, D.; Muric, B.; Vasiljevic, D.

    2011-01-01

    We have presented the effects of laser radiation on human organism, with special emphasize on eye as the most sensitive organ. It was pointed-out that there are many parameters that should be taken into account when determining the level of protection from laser light. In that respect it is important to be aware of international standards that regulate this area. In addition, we have described a new material which efficiently protects human eye, by formation of microlens and carbonization. [sr

  15. Proceedings. Protection of the natural environment. International symposium on ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amiro, B.; Johansson, Gunnar; Larsson, Carl-Magnus; Luening, M.

    1996-01-01

    The symposium was organised jointly by the Swedish Radiation Protection Institute and the Atomic Energy Control Board of Canada. The programme was organised around six major topics: Biological effects of ionising radiation; Ecological effects of ionising radiation; Behaviour and transport of radionuclides in the natural environment; Criteria for environmental protection; Assessment methodology; and Social and economic aspects. All 86 contributions (excluding the opening addresses) have been separately indexed

  16. Proceedings of the Third symposium of the Croatian Radiation Protection Association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The Third Symposium of the Croatian Radiation Protection Association (20-22 Nov 1996) coorganized by Institute for Medical Research and Occupational Health and 'Rudjer Boskovic' Institute, with the support of Ministry of Science and Technology of the Republic of Croatia, Hazardous Waste Management Agency Ltd., Ecotec Ltd. and Tourist Association of the City of Zagreb, covered a vast range of subjects concerning radiation protection, management of industrial and medical radioactive wastes, environmental transport of radionuclides, dosimetric methods and equipment, contamination and decontamination etc. 57 contributions were delivered

  17. Epidemiology and Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Epidemiology aims at providing direct evidence of the long term health effects in humans due to potentially dangerous exposures to various nuisance agents, including ionising radiation. Inappropriate interpretation and use of the results of epidemiological studies may result in inaccurate assessments of the risks associated with radiation exposure. This report presents the proceedings of a Workshop organised by the NEA to create an opportunity for epidemiologists and radiation protection specialists to exchange their experiences and views on the problems of methodology in epidemiological research and on the application of its results to the assessment of radiation risks

  18. ICRP 2015. International symposium on the radiation protection system. Report and reflection on a significant symposium; ICRP 2015. 3. Internationales Symposium zum System des Strahlenschutzes. Bericht und Reflexion ueber ein bedeutsames Symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, Bernd

    2016-08-01

    The ICRP international symposium on the radiation protection system provides always extensive information on new developments in radiation protection. The ICRP 2105 discussed the following issues: radiation effects of low dose irradiation, dose coefficients for internal and external exposures, radiation protection in nuclear medicine, application of ICRP recommendations, environmental protection, studies on existing exposure situations, medical radiation protection today, science behind radiation doses, new developments in radiation effects, and ethics in radiation protection.

  19. The development of an international framework for the radiation protection of the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, A.; Jova Sed, L.

    2004-01-01

    This paper comprises an overview of the Agency responsibilities, related to environmental radiation protection; its historical involvement in this issue; the context of its current work programme; and a number of issues for further consideration. (authors)

  20. Foundations for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    Full text; In 1996, the IAEA published the latest edition of the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection Against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (Basic Safety Standards or BSS) comprising basic requirements to be filled in all activities involving radiation exposure. The standards define internationally harmonized requirements and provide practical guidance for public authorities and services, employers and workers, specialized radiation protection bodies, enterprises and health and safety communities. In the same year, the IAEA, through the technical cooperation programme, launched the Model Project on Upgrading Radiation Protection Infrastructure, a global initiative designed to help Member States establish the infrastructure needed to adhere to the BSS. To address the complexity of this task, the radiation protection team identified key elements, known as Thematic Safety Areas. These are: 1. Legislative Framework and Regulatory Infrastructure, Draft and put into effect radiation protection laws and regulations and establish and empower a national regulatory authority. 2. Occupational Exposure Control Protect the health and safety of each individual who faces the risk of radiation exposure in the workplace through individual and workplace monitoring programmes, including dose assessment, record keeping of doses and quality management. 3. Medical Exposure Control: Develop procedures and activities to control the exposure of patients undergoing diagnosis and/or treatment via diagnostic and interventional radiology, nuclear medicine or radiotherapy through staff training, provision of basic quality control equipment, and the establishment of quality assurance programmes. 4. Public and Environmental Exposure Control: Develop means to protect both the public and the environment including: a) programmes to register, inventory and provide safe storage of unused radioactive sources and material; b) procedures to control and safely

  1. Focus radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebermann, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    The publication of the Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz on radiation protection covers the following issues: (i) exposure from natural sources: health hazard due to radon, radiation protection in residential homes, radon in Germany, natural raw materials in industrial processes; (ii) clearance of radioactive wastes: clearance in the frame of nuclear power plant dismantling, the situation in Germany and Europe; (iii) emergency management: principles of radiation protection, fictive sequence of accident events; (iiii) other actual radiation protection topics: more limits - more protection? radiation protection in medicine, occupational radiation protection.

  2. Health protection of radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norwood, W.D.

    1975-01-01

    Essential information on the health protection of radiation workers which has accumulated since the advent of nuclear fission thirty years ago is presented in simple terms. Basic facts on ionizing radiation, its measurement, and dosimetry are presented. Acute and chronic somatic and genetic effects are discussed with emphasis on prevention. Radiation protection standards and regulations are outlined, and methods for maintaining these standards are described. Diagnosis and treatment of radiation injury from external radiation and/or internally deposited radionuclides is considered generally as well as specifically for each radioisotope. The medical supervision of radiation workers, radiation accidents, atomic power plants, and medicolegal problems is also covered. (853 references) (U.S.)

  3. Radiation protection in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Ashkar, Mohamed

    2008-01-01

    Full text: People are exposed to ionizing radiation in many different forms: cosmic rays that penetrate earth atmosphere or radiation from soil and mineral resources are natural forms of ionizing radiation. Other forms are produced artificially using radioactive materials for various beneficial applications in medicine, industry and other fields. The greatest concerns about ionizing radiation are tied to its potential health effects and a system of radiation protection has been developed to protect people from harmful radiation. The promotion of radiation protection is one of the International Atomic Energy Agency main activities. Radiation protection concerns the protection of workers, members of public, and patients undergoing diagnosis and therapy against the harmful effects of ionizing radiation. The report covers the responsibility of radiation protection officer in Egypt Second Research Reactor (ETRR-2) in Inshas - Egypt, also presents the protection against ionizing radiation from external sources, including types of radiation, sources of radiation (natural - artificial), and measuring units of dose equivalent rate. Also covers the biological effects of ionizing radiation, personal monitoring and radiation survey instruments and safe transport of radioactive materials. The report describes the Egypt Second Research Reactor (ETRR-2), the survey instruments used, also presents the results obtained and gave a relations between different categories of data. (author)

  4. Atoms, Radiation, and Radiation Protection

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, James E

    2007-01-01

    Atoms, Radiation, and Radiation Protection offers professionals and advanced students a comprehensive coverage of the major concepts that underlie the origins and transport of ionizing radiation in matter. Understanding atomic structure and the physical mechanisms of radiation interactions is the foundation on which much of the current practice of radiological health protection is based. The work covers the detection and measurement of radiation and the statistical interpretation of the data. The procedures that are used to protect man and the environment from the potential harmful effects of

  5. Radiation Protection Studies of International Space Station Extravehicular Activity Space Suits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A. (Editor); Shavers, Mark R. (Editor); Saganti, Premkumar B. (Editor); Miller, Jack (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    This publication describes recent investigations that evaluate radiation shielding characteristics of NASA's and the Russian Space Agency's space suits. The introduction describes the suits and presents goals of several experiments performed with them. The first chapter provides background information about the dynamic radiation environment experienced at ISS and summarized radiation health and protection requirements for activities in low Earth orbit. Supporting studies report the development and application of a computer model of the EMU space suit and the difficulty of shielding EVA crewmembers from high-energy reentrant electrons, a previously unevaluated component of the space radiation environment. Chapters 2 through 6 describe experiments that evaluate the space suits' radiation shielding characteristics. Chapter 7 describes a study of the potential radiological health impact on EVA crewmembers of two virtually unexamined environmental sources of high-energy electrons-reentrant trapped electrons and atmospheric albedo or "splash" electrons. The radiological consequences of those sources have not been evaluated previously and, under closer scrutiny. A detailed computational model of the shielding distribution provided by components of the NASA astronauts' EMU is being developed for exposure evaluation studies. The model is introduced in Chapters 8 and 9 and used in Chapter 10 to investigate how trapped particle anisotropy impacts female organ doses during EVA. Chapter 11 presents a review of issues related to estimating skin cancer risk form space radiation. The final chapter contains conclusions about the protective qualities of the suit brought to light form these studies, as well as recommendations for future operational radiation protection.

  6. The Radiation Protection in Guatemala

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillen, J.A.

    1992-04-01

    A brief account of the activities on radiation safety carried out by the General Directorate of Nuclear Energy of Guatemala in the period 1991-1992 is presented. The activities are reported under organization, activities on occupational radiation protection in medicine, industry and research, personnel monitoring, radiation metrology, regulations and international cooperation are described

  7. INTDOS: a computer code for estimating internal radiation dose using recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, M.T.

    1981-09-01

    INTDOS is a user-oriented computer code designed to calculate estimates of internal radiation dose commitment resulting from the acute inhalation intake of various radionuclides. It is designed so that users unfamiliar with the details of such can obtain results by answering a few questions regarding the exposure case. The user must identify the radionuclide name, solubility class, particle size, time since exposure, and the measured lung burden. INTDOS calculates the fractions of the lung burden remaining at time, t, postexposure considering the solubility class and particle size information. From the fraction remaining in the lung at time, t, the quantity inhaled is estimated. Radioactive decay is accounted for in the estimate. Finally, effective committed dose equivalents to various organs and tissues of the body are calculated using inhalation committed dose factors presented by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). This computer code was written for execution on a Digital Equipment Corporation PDP-10 computer and is written in Fortran IV. A flow chart and example calculations are discussed in detail to aid the user who is unfamiliar with computer operations

  8. Radiation monitoring. Lecture 26, course on advances in radiation: International School of Radiation Damage and Protection, Erice, Italy, September 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, R.H.

    1979-09-01

    The practices and rationales of radiation monitoring as applied at high-energy accelerator laboratories are presented. Area, environmental, and personal techniques are discussed and examples given. (ACR)

  9. Radiation protection standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koelzer, W.

    1980-01-01

    The present paper deals with: Objectives and basic concepts of radiation protection, basic radiobiological considerations, the ICRP system of dose limitation and with operational radiation protection (limits, reference levels, occupational exposure). (RW)

  10. Radiation protection in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volodin, V.; Hanson, G.P.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of this Chapter is to give a general outline of the essential principles and procedures for radiation protection in a nuclear medicine department where radionuclides are used for diagnosis and therapy. More detailed recommendations regarding radiation protection in nuclear medicine are given in the publications of the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP, publications 25, 57, 60) and in ILO/IAEA/WHO Manual on Radiation Protection in Hospitals and General Practice (Volume 2: Unsealed Sources, WHO, Geneva, 1975), on which this Chapter is based. This chapter is not intended to replace the above-mentioned international recommendations on radiation protection, as well as existing national regulations on this subject, but intended only to provide guidance for implementing these recommendations in clinical practice

  11. Radiation Protection: Introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loos, M.

    2007-01-01

    As a federal research Centre, SCK-CEN has the statutory assignment to give priority to research related to safety, radioactive waste management, protection of man and environment, management of fissile and other strategic materials and social implications as part of the pursuit of sustainable development and to develop and gather the necessary knowledge and spread this knowledge through formation and communication. At the Division of Radiation Protection at SCK-CEN we are therefore active to maintain and enhance knowledge and expertise in each aspect of radiation protection: we study the risk of exposure - the way that radioactive materials spread in the environment and the potential for human contact - and the risk from exposure - how radiation affects human health; we perform health physics measurements; we are involved in emergency planning and preparedness and support to risk governance and decision taking. These activities are supported by radiation specific analysis and measurement techniques. These activities are not performed in isolation but in context of national and international collaborations or demands

  12. Early national and international recommendations for X-ray and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tesinska, E.

    2008-01-01

    The first three decades of pioneering work in the field of X-ray and natural radioactivity research and use took its toll all over the world because of lack of knowledge and caution. Coordinated, international cooperation in the field of X-ray and radium protection and standardization of measures was established after the World War I. The First and the Second International Congress of Radiology held in London in 1925 and in Stockholm in 1928 respectively, played a crucial role in it. Based on these congresses' initiatives and resolutions, the International X-ray Unit Committee and the International X-ray and Radium Protection Committee were established in 1828. The early recommendations on the international X-ray unit and on X-ray and radium protection, as passed by the Second International Congress of Radiology in Stockholm in 1928, are presented and compared with two related national initiatives, namely with the Memorandum No. 1 (July 1921) of the British X-ray and Radium Protection Committee, and with a draft of a legal measure regarding the X-ray and radium treatment regulation in Czechoslovakia, which was put together by the Czechoslovak Society of Radiology and the Vereinigung der deutschen Roentgenologen und Radiologen in der Tschechoslowakischen Republik in 1927 at a request of the Chamber of Doctor of Medicine for Bohemia and Moravia and in response to the international initiatives in that field. (author)

  13. Radiation protection in Bolivia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda Cuadros, A.A.

    2001-01-01

    Radiation protection in Bolivia has gone through a number of stages. Initially, in the 1970s, the focus was mainly on the analysis of environmental sources resulting from the nuclear tests carried out by France in the Pacific Ocean. Subsequently, the focus switched somewhat to radiation protection in connection with the mining of uranium and in the area of public health. During the third stage, radiation protection in other areas became important as the use of radiation sources was introduced. Finally, during the present -- fourth -- stage, radiation protection regulations are being introduced and mechanisms for the control of radiation sources are being established. (author)

  14. Radiation protection in Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elamin, O.I.; Hajmusa, E.A.; Shaddad, I.A.

    2001-01-01

    The regulatory framework as established by the Sudan Atomic Energy Commission (SAEC) Act, promulgated in 1996, is described in the report. Three levels of responsibility in meeting radiation protection requirements are established: the Board, the Radiation Protection Technical Committee as the competent authority in the field of radiation protection, and the SAEC Department of Radiation Protection and Environmental Monitoring as the implementing technical body. The report also refers to environmental activities, patient doses in diagnostic radiology, the management of disused sources, emergency preparedness and orphan sources, and the national training activities in the radiation protection field. (author)

  15. Ethical problems in radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shrader-Frechette, K.; Persson, Lars

    2001-05-01

    In this report the authors survey existing international radiation-protection recommendations and standards of the ICRP, the IAEA, and the ILO. After outlining previous work on the ethics of radiation protection, professional ethics, and the ethics of human radiation experiments, the authors review ethical thinking on seven key issues related to radiation protection and ethics. They formulate each of these seven issues in terms of alternative ethical stances: (1) equity versus efficiency, (2) health versus economics, (3) individual rights versus societal benefits, (4) due process versus necessary sacrifice, (5) uniform versus double standards, (6) stake holder consent versus management decisions, and (7) environmental stewardship versus anthropocentric standards.

  16. Ethical problems in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrader-Frechette, K.; Persson, Lars

    2001-05-01

    In this report the authors survey existing international radiation-protection recommendations and standards of the ICRP, the IAEA, and the ILO. After outlining previous work on the ethics of radiation protection, professional ethics, and the ethics of human radiation experiments, the authors review ethical thinking on seven key issues related to radiation protection and ethics. They formulate each of these seven issues in terms of alternative ethical stances: (1) equity versus efficiency, (2) health versus economics, (3) individual rights versus societal benefits, (4) due process versus necessary sacrifice, (5) uniform versus double standards, (6) stake holder consent versus management decisions, and (7) environmental stewardship versus anthropocentric standards

  17. Radiation protection in medical imaging and radiation oncology

    CERN Document Server

    Stoeva, Magdalena S

    2016-01-01

    Radiation Protection in Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology focuses on the professional, operational, and regulatory aspects of radiation protection. Advances in radiation medicine have resulted in new modalities and procedures, some of which have significant potential to cause serious harm. Examples include radiologic procedures that require very long fluoroscopy times, radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies, and intravascular brachytherapy. This book summarizes evidence supporting changes in consensus recommendations, regulations, and health physics practices associated with these recent advances in radiology, nuclear medicine, and radiation oncology. It supports intelligent and practical methods for protection of personnel, the public, and patients. The book is based on current recommendations by the International Commission on Radiological Protection and is complemented by detailed practical sections and professional discussions by the world’s leading medical and health physics professionals. It also ...

  18. Radiation protection forum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabral, W.

    2010-01-01

    The National Director of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority and Radiation Protection of Uruguay in the first forum for radiation protection set out the following themes: activity of regulatory body, radiation safety, physical security, safeguards, legal framework, committed substantive program, use of radiation, risks and benefits, major sources of radiation, the national regulatory framework, national inventory of sources, inspections, licensing, import and export of sources control , radioactive transport, materials safety, agreements, information and teaching, radiological emergencies and prompt response.

  19. Radiation protection instrument 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    The Radiation Protection Instrument, 1993 (Legislative Instrument 1559) prescribes the powers and functions of the Radiation Protection Board established under the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission by the Atomic Energy Commission (Amendment) Law, 1993 (P.N.D.C. Law 308). Also included in the Legislative Instrument are schedules on control and use of ionising radiation and radiation sources as well as procedures for notification, licensing and inspection of ionising radiation facilities. (EAA)

  20. On ethical issues in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, L.

    1996-01-01

    From an ethical viewpoint the author surveys existing international radiation protection recommendations and standards. After outlining previous work on the ethics of radiation protection, professional ethics, and the ethics of human radiation experiments, the author discusses ethical thinking on seven key issues related to radiation protection and ethics. (author)

  1. Training in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, F.

    1998-01-01

    Persons who are exposed to ionizing radiation at their workplace have to be trained in radiation protection. According to the Radiation Protection Ordinance the person with responsibility in radiation protection has to guarantee that the training is performed twice a year. Our training material was created especially for the persons defined in the Radiation Protection Ordinance and the X-ray Ordinance. It enables persons who teach (generally the radiation protection officer) to perform the training without tedious study and preparation of the documents. Our material is not just another textbook for radiation protection but rather a folder with colour transparencies and explanatory texts which make a difference in volume and price in comparison to other existing materials. (orig.) [de

  2. Radiation Protection Infrastructure In Madagascar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andriambololona, R.; Ratovonjanahary, J.F.; Zafimanjato, J.L.R.; Randriantseheno, H.F.; Ramanandraibe, M.J.; Randriantsizafy, D.R.

    2008-01-01

    Radiation sources are widely used in medicine, industry, research and education in Madagascar. Safety and security of these sources are the main statutory functions of the Regulatory Authority as defined by the regulations in Radiation Protection in Madagascar. These functions are carried out through the system of notification, authorization and inspection, inventory of radiation source and emergency preparedness. The law no 97-041 on radiation protection and radioactive waste management in Madagascar was promulgated on 2nd January 1998. It governs all activities related to the peaceful use of nuclear energy in Madagascar in order to protect the public, the environment and for the safety of radiation sources. This law complies with the International Basic Safety Standards for protection against ionising Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (BSS, IAEA Safety Series no 115). Following the promulgation of the law, four decrees have been enacted by the Malagasy Government. With an effective implementation of these decrees, the ANPSR will be the Highest Administrative Authority in the Field of Radiation Protection and Waste Management in Madagascar. This Regulatory Authority is supported by an Executive Secretariat, assisted by the OTR for Radiation Protection and the OCGDR for Managing Radioactive Waste.The paper includes an overview of the regulatory infrastructure and the organizations of radiation protection in Madagascar

  3. Optimization and radiation protection culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, In Young; Shin, Hyeong Ki; Lee, Chan Mi

    2013-01-01

    Safety culture or radiation protection culture is based in common on the term, 'culture'. Culture is defined as the learned, shared set of symbols and patterns of basic assumptions, which is invented, discovered, or developed by a given group as it learns to cope with its problem of external adaptation and internal integration. Safety culture generally refers to the attitude and behaviors affecting safety performance. The concept of 'Safety Culture' was introduced after the Chernobyl accident in 1986. For the accident, nuclear society reached the conclusion that the cause was the wrong management attitude of the NPP, that is, deficient 'Safety Culture'. Recently, 'Radiation Protection Culture' was introduced as the core concept of nuclear safety culture. There have been many efforts to establish definition and develop assessment tool for radiation protection culture in international level such as ICRP and IRPA as well as NRC. In the same context with the safety culture, radiation protection culture is defined as 'the core values and behaviors resulting from a collective commitment by leaders and individual's to emphasize safety over competing goals to ensure protection of people and the environment.' It is worthwhile to recognize that regulatory enforcement in establishing healthy radiation protection culture of operators should be minimized because culture is not in the domain of regulatory enforcement. However, as 'ALARA', the most important concept in radiation protection, may be successfully achieved only in well established radiation protection culture, the least regulatory intervention would be needed in promoting and nurturing radiation protection culture in licensee. In addition, the concept of radiation protection culture should be addressed in plant operational policy to achieve the goals of ALARA. The pre-condition of the successful radiation protection culture is a healthy organizational

  4. Australia's radiation protection standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    In Australia, public exposure to ionizing radiation above background is considered to be negligible. Average occupational exposures are about 0.5 millisievert per year, although there are some specialized industries and professions where they are much higher. The National Health and Medical Research Council has therefore adopted a position similar to that of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. For the moment, no revision of exposure limits is recommended, but users are remined of their responsibility to ensure that exposures are kept low, particularly in those workplaces where significant exposures take place

  5. Radiation protection to firemen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, E.S. de.

    1985-01-01

    The basic Knowledge about ionizing radiation oriented for firemen, are presented. The mainly damage and effects caused by radiation exposure as well as the method of radiation protection are described in simple words. The action to be taken in case of fire involving radiation such as vehicles transporting radioactive materials are emphasized. (author)

  6. Epistemological basis of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nouailhetas, Yannick; Acar, Maria E.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Regarding natural phenomena understood or not, the absolute truth must be somewhere. In fact, there is no evidence that neither nature nor the phenomena that it includes were 'created' to be understood. Except for the fact that Man appeared through the same process, with his curiosity, capacity to perceive and manipulate, his greed for power and fears. In general, the attitude towards questions for which the absolute truth has not been reached varies from ignorance/indifference to the search of knowledge through scientific methodology, and may even be based on beliefs. The fact that the interaction between ionizing radiations and living beings results in biological effect is true. That the biological effect of high doses of radiation, absorbed outside the context of medicine, is hazardous for the irradiated individuals also seems to be true. That any dose is dangerous, or not, is debatable: the available information and knowledge are not consistent enough to end the question; and so, the absolute truth remains hidden. Radiological Protection is founded on the principle that any increase of dose results in an increase in the risk of cancer, and that this risk must be kept as low as possible. It is therefore based on this 'belief' that the international organisms of radiological protection emit recommendations aiming the protection of people and the environment. What is interesting about this question is that because of restrictions imposed by regulating agencies, populations, members of the public and the environment are properly protected against harmful effects of ionizing radiations, which makes the truth no longer interesting. Radiological Protection is a requirement associated to all activities involving nuclear energy. It satisfies several interests and opposes others. The greater the opposed interests and the perception that the absolute truth can represent dialectic advantage to one of the parts, the greater the perception of the importance of its

  7. Radiation protection standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitch, J.

    1983-11-01

    Topics covered include biological radiation effects, radiation protection principles, recommendations of the ICRP and the National Health and Medical Research Council, and dose limits for individuals, particularly the limit applied to the inhalation of radon daughters

  8. Comparison between Brazilian radiation protection standard and the recommendation of the International Commission on Radiological Protection published in 2007; Comparacao entre a norma brasileira de radioprotecao e a recomendacao da International Commission on Radiological Protection - ICRP, publicadas em 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, W.S. [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (INB), Itatiaia, RJ (Brazil). Fabrica do Combustivel Nuclear. Servico de Radioprotecao; Kelecom, A. [Universidade Federal Fluminense (LARARA-PLS/GETA/UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Grupo de Estudos em Temas Ambientais. Lab. de Radiobiologia e Radiometria Pedro Lopes dos Santos; Pereira, J.R.S. [Universidade Veiga de Almeida (UVA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Curso de Graduacao em Direito

    2015-07-01

    This study aims to evaluate the differences between the CNEN's standard and the publication of ICRP-103, analyzing the philosophy for radiation protection, dose limits and other relevant aspects of radiation protection.

  9. Regulations in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    On the occasion of the twenty fifth anniversary of the Dutch Society for Radiation Protection, a symposium was held about Regulations in Radiation Protection. The program consisted of six contributions of which four are included in this publication. The posters presented are published in NVS-nieuws, 1985, vol. 11(5). (G.J.P.)

  10. Radiation protection products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The basic terms of radiation protection means, these means and their parts are defined. Radiation protection products are classified into nine groups and their outer appearance and design are described. The standard also gives equivalent terms in Czech, Russian, Polish, Hungarian, German, Bulgarian and Romanian. (E.S.)

  11. Compton scattering by internal shields based on melanin-containing mushrooms provides protection of gastrointestinal tract from ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revskaya, Ekaterina; Chu, Peter; Howell, Robertha C; Schweitzer, Andrew D; Bryan, Ruth A; Harris, Matthew; Gerfen, Gary; Jiang, Zewei; Jandl, Thomas; Kim, Kami; Ting, Li-Min; Sellers, Rani S; Dadachova, Ekaterina; Casadevall, Arturo

    2012-11-01

    There is a need for radioprotectors that protect normal tissues from ionizing radiation in patients receiving high doses of radiation and during nuclear emergencies. We investigated the possibility of creating an efficient oral radioprotector based on the natural pigment melanin that would act as an internal shield and protect the tissues via Compton scattering followed by free radical scavenging. CD-1 mice were fed melanin-containing black edible mushrooms Auricularia auricila-judae before 9 Gy total body irradiation. The location of the mushrooms in the body before irradiation was determined by in vivo fluorescent imaging. Black mushrooms protected 80% of mice from the lethal dose, while control mice or those given melanin-devoid mushrooms died from gastrointestinal syndrome. The crypts of mice given black mushrooms showed less apoptosis and more cell division than those in control mice, and their white blood cell and platelet counts were restored at 45 days to preradiation levels. The role of melanin in radioprotection was proven by the fact that mice given white mushrooms supplemented with melanin survived at the same rate as mice given black mushrooms. The ability of melanin-containing mushrooms to provide remarkable protection against radiation suggests that they could be developed into oral radioprotectors.

  12. Regulatory requirements for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, E.A.; Cunningham, R.E.; Hard, J.E.; Mattson, R.J.; Smith, R.D.; Peterson, H.T. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Regulatory requirements for radiation protection have evolved and matured over several decades. Due to the wide adoption of recommendations of the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP), there exists international agreement on the principles to be followed for radiation protection. This foundation will be increasingly important due to the growing need for international agreements and standards for radiation protection and radioactive materials management. During the infancy of the commercial nuclear industry, primary reliance was placed on the protection of the individual, both in the work force and as a member of the public. With the growth of nuclear power in the 1960's and 1970's, environmental impact assessments and expert reviews of bio-effects data have focused attention on statistical risks to large population groups and the use of the collective dose commitment concept to estimate potential effects. The potential release of long-lived radionuclides from the nuclear fuel cycle requires further consideration of radionuclide accumulation in the biosphere and calls for controls conceived and implemented at the international level. The initial development efforts for addressing these concerns already have been instituted by the ICRP and the IAEA. However, formal international agreements and a unified set of international standards may be required to implement the recommendations of these groups. Further international efforts in the field of radiation protection are also called for in developing waste management practices and radioactive effluent control technology, in site selection for fuel reprocessing plants and waste dispersal facilities, and for ensuring safe transport of high-level wastes in various forms. Since the regulation of very low dose rates and doses will be involved, it will be useful to reexamine dose-effect relationships and societal goals for health protection. Improved criteria and methodologies for ''as low as readily

  13. Ethics and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansson, Sven Ove

    2007-01-01

    Some of the major problems in radiation protection are closely connected to issues that have a long, independent tradition in moral philosophy. This contribution focuses on two of these issues. One is the relationship between the protection of individuals and optimisation on the collective level, and the other is the relative valuation of future versus immediate damage. Some of the intellectual tools that have been developed by philosophers can be useful in radiation protection. On the other hand, philosophers have much to learn from radiation protectors, not least when it comes to finding pragmatic solutions to problems that may be intractable in principle

  14. Perspectives for environmental radiation protection in EU radiation protection legislation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssens, A.

    2000-01-01

    The basis of EU radiation protection legislation is the EURATOM Trealy. It is discussed whether the Treaty offers a legal basis for the protection of the natural environment. The incorporation of provisions pertaining to the nuclear fuel cycle or to radioactive substances in general environmental legislation is explained, as well as the possible implications of international conventions subscribed by the European Union. The European Commission is in the process of developing an overall approach to risk analysis for the protection of health, consumer interests, and the environment. It is examined to what extent the consideration of the impact of radiation on the natural environment fits in the overall framework and whether the principles underlying classical radiation protection are applicable to biota. Specific attention is given to situations where high levels of environmental radioactivity would require intervention. (Author)

  15. Radiation protection textbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambini, D.J.; Granier, R.

    2007-01-01

    This textbook of radiation protection presents the scientific bases, legal and statutory measures and technical means of implementation of the radioprotection in the medical and industrial sectors, research and nuclear installations. It collects the practical information (organization, analysis of post, prevention, evaluation and risks management, the controls, the training and the information) usually scattered and the theoretical knowledge allowing every person using ionizing radiation: To analyze jobs in controlled areas, to watch the respect for the current regulations, to participate in the training and in the information of the staffs exposed to intervene in accidental situation. This third edition is widely updated and enriched by the most recent scientific and legal data concerning, notably, the human exposure, the dosimetry, the optimization of the radiation protection and the epidemiological inquiries. The contents is as follows: physics of ionizing radiation, ionizing radiation: origin and interaction with matter, dosimetry and protection against ionizing radiation, detection and measurement of ionizing radiation, radiobiology, legal measures relative to radiation protection, human exposure of natural origin, human exposure of artificial origin, medical, dental and veterinarian radiology, radiotherapy, utilization of unsealed sources in medicine and research, electronuclear industry, non nuclear industrial and aeronautical activities exposing to ionizing radiation, accidental exposures. (N.C.)

  16. Radiation protecting clothing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mio, Kotaro; Ijiri, Yasuo.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To provide radiation protecting clothing materials excellent in mechanical strength, corrosion resistance, flexibility and flexing strength. Constitution: The radiation protecting clothing materials according to this invention has pure lead sheets comprising a thin pure lead foil of 50 to 150 μm and radiation resistant organic materials, for example, polyethylene with high neutron shielding effect disposed to one or both surfaces thereof. The material are excellent in the repeating bending fatigue and mechanical strength, corrosion resistance and flexibility and, accordingly, radiation protecting clothings prepared by using them along or laminating them also possess these excellent characteristics. Further, they are excellent in the handlability, particularly, durability to the repeated holding and extension, as well as are preferable in the physical movability and feeling upon putting. The clothing materials may be cut into an appropriate size, or stitched into clothings made by radiation-resistant materials. In this case, pure lead sheets are used in lamination. (Horiuchi, T.)

  17. Radiation protection in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benitez, Manuel

    1996-02-01

    It covers technical procedures in medical applications for cancer treatment. Radiation protection principles in brachytherapy. Medical uses in therapy for Sr-90, Cs-137, Co-60, Ra-226, Ir-192, Au-198, Bi-214, Pb-214. (The author)

  18. Physics for radiation protection

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, James E

    2013-01-01

    A much-needed working resource for health physicists and other radiation protection professionals, this volume presents clear, thorough, up-to-date explanations of the basic physics necessary to address real-world problems in radiation protection. Designed for readers with limited as well as basic science backgrounds, Physics for Radiation Protection emphasizes applied concepts and carefully illustrates all topics through examples as well as practice problems. Physics for Radiation Protection draws substantially on current resource data available for health physics use, providing decay schemes and emission energies for approximately 100 of the most common radionuclides encountered by practitioners. Excerpts of the Chart of the Nuclides, activation cross sections, fission yields, fission-product chains, photon attenuation coefficients, and nuclear masses are also provided.

  19. Analysis of the experience of providing radiation protection of population and environment within the international collaboration network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergei Aleksanin; Eugene Zheleznyakov; Regina Fedortseva

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The All-Russian Center of Emergency and Radiation Medicine (ARCERM) in St. Petersburg is a specialized radiation health institution and World Health Organization (WHO) collaborating center within the Radiation Emergency Medical Preparedness and Assistance Network (REMPAN), which primary objectives are: - To promote medical preparedness for radiation accidents and radio-nuclear threats among WHO Member States; - To provide medical and public health advice, assistance and coordination of medical management at international and regional levels in the case of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency; - To assist in follow-up studies and rehabilitation. ARCERM serves as a national focal point for advice and possible medical care in cases of radiation injuries in humans as well as assists WHO to prepare relevant documents and guidelines, provides training in radiation medicine, distributes relevant information to the medical community and the public and carries out scientific investigations on radiation effects on humans. The Center is prepared to undertake actions on medical management of possible radiation emergencies both on national and international level as a member of REMPAN network. The assistance provided by ARCERM may also include providing radiation medicine and other appropriate specialists, scientific services and expertise, equipment and medical services for diagnosis, prognosis, medical treatment and medical follow-up of persons affected by radiation. In case of radiation accident the Center has standard operating procedures at country level. It includes the system of warning and data collection, setting up special wards for receiving radiation victims, radioactivity control station, primary deactivation and treatment as well as providing personal protection for staff. WHO, as well as other co-operating international organizations, are notified and provided with relevant information through the International Atomic

  20. Radiation protection philosophy alters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firmin, G.

    1977-01-01

    Two significant events that have taken place this year in the field of radiation protection are reported. New SI units have been proposed (and effectively adopted), and the ICRP has revised its recommendations. Changes of emphasis in the latest recommendations (ICRP Publication 26) imply an altered radiation protection philosophy, in particular the relation of dose limits to estimates of average risk, an altered view of the critical organ approach and a new attitude to genetic dose to the population. (author)

  1. Nordic society for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soegaard-Hansen, J.; Damkjaer, A.

    1999-11-01

    The key themes of teh 12th ordinary general meeting of the Nordic Society for Radiation Protection were: RADIATION - ENVIRONMENT - INFORMATION. A number of outstanding international experts accepted to contribute on the meetings first day with invited presentations, which focussed on these themes. In all 38 oral presentations and 28 posters are included in the present Proceedings, which furthermore contains a resume of discussions from the special session on 'Controllable Dose'. (EHS)

  2. Radiation Protection in Guatemala

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carazo, N.

    1979-01-01

    The tasks connected with radiation protection are allocated to the National Institute for Nuclear Energy in Guatemala. Regulatory measures are further needed to identify the responsibilities of various authorities to ensure that all radiation workers are provided with personal dosemeters. (author)

  3. Endodontic radiology, practice, and knowledge of radiation biology, hazard, and protection among clinical dental students and interns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Emien Enabulele

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the practice and knowledge of endodontic radiology as well as assess the knowledge of radiation biology, hazard, and protection among clinical dental students and interns. Materials and Methods: Cross-sectional study of clinical dental students and interns at University of Benin and University of Benin Teaching hospital respectively. Data was collected using a questionnaire which covered practice and knowledge of endodontic radiography, knowledge of radiation biology, hazard, and protection. Data was analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS version 17.0. Result: Seventy participants were included in the study, 40% were final year students and 24.3% house officers. Majority (95.7% agreed that they exposed radiographs as part of endodontic treatment. Only 18.6% knew that the apices of teeth should be 3mm from the border of the X-ray film, while 24.3% knew that 3mm of periapical bone should be visible on X-ray. Less than half (31.4% knew that paralleling technique was the technique of choice for endodontic radiography and this was statistically Significant in relationship to the status of the of the respondents. A few (4.3% of the respondents had knowledge of new horizons in endodontic imaging. Half of the respondents knew that damage by X-rays is mainly due to formation of free radicals. The most frequently reported radiation hazards was reduced salivary flow, while the least reported was rampant caries. Most knew how to protect patients, themselves, and other persons while exposing radiographs. Conclusion: There is need for inclusion of endodontic radiography in the undergraduate curriculum to ensure proper and correct radiographs during endodontic procedure.

  4. Radiation safety: New international standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, A.J.

    1994-01-01

    This article highlights an important result of this work for the international harmonization of radiation safety: specifically, it present an overview of the forthcoming International Basic Safety Standards for Protection Against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources - the so-called BSS. They have been jointly developed by six organizations - the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the International Labour Organization (ILO), the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (NEA/OECD), the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), and the World Health Organization (WHO)

  5. Proceedings of the International Workshop on Occupational Radiation Protection in Severe Accident Management 'sharing practices and experiences'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-06-01

    The objective of the Workshop on Occupational Radiation Protection in Severe Accident Management was to share practices and experiences in approaches to severe accident management. The workshop: provided an international forum for information and experience exchange amongst nuclear electricity utilities and national regulatory authorities on approaches to, and issues in severe accident management, including national and international implications. Focus was placed on sharing practices and experiences in many countries on approaches to severe accident management; identified best occupational radiation protection approaches in strategies, practices, as well as limitations for developing effective management. This included experiences in various countries; identified national experiences to be incorporated into the final version of ISOE EG-SAM report. The workshop included a series of plenary presentations that provided participants with an overview of practices and experiences in severe accident management from various countries. Furthermore, by taking into account the structure of the interim report, common themes and issues were discussed in follow-up breakout sessions. Sessions included invited speakers, moderated by designated experts, allowing participants to discuss their national experiences and possible inputs into the report. The outcomes of the breakout sessions were presented in plenary by the respective moderators followed by an open discussion, with a view towards elaborating ways forward to achieve more effective severe accident management. This document brings together the abstracts and the slides of the available presentations

  6. Radiation Protection Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, H.M.; Schnuer, K.

    1992-01-01

    The contributions presented during the seminar provided clear evidence that radiation protection of the patient plays an increasingly important role for manufacturers of radiological equipment and for regulatory bodies, as well as for radiologists, doctors and assistants. The proceedings of this seminar reflect the activities and work in the field of radiation protection of the patient and initiate further action in order to harmonize dosimetric measurements and calculations, to ameliorate education and training, to improve the technical standards of the equipment and to give a push to a more effective use of ionising radiation in the medical sector

  7. Radiation protection in education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viragh, Elemer

    1985-01-01

    The education of secondary school students in the fields of nuclear sciences was strictly limited according to the 9th recommendations of the ICRP issued in 1966 saying that people under age 18 are not allowed to deal with ionizing radiations. Due to the changes concerning the concept of radiation protection, new opportunities for teaching nuclear technology even in the secondary schools were opened. The 36th recommendations of the ICRP published in 1983 dealing with the maximum permissible doses and the measures taken for radiation protection should be kept in mind while organizing the education of the pupils between age 16 and 18. (V.N.)

  8. Instructed officers Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    This law contains instructions on the prevention of radiological and contains 4 articles Article I: describe the responsibilities of the institutions that operate within the scope of radiological protection in terms of the number of radiation protection officers and personal Supervisors who available in the practices radiation field. Article II: talking about the conditions of radiation protection officers that must be available in the main officers and working field in larg institutions and thecondition of specific requirements for large enterprises of work permits in the field of radiological work that issued by the Council. Article III: the functions and duties of officers in the prevention of radiological oversee the development of radiation protection programmes in the planning stages, construction and preparing the rules of local labour and what it lead of such tasks.Article IV: radiation protection officers powers: to modify and approve the programme of prevention and radiation safety at the company, stop any unsafe steps, amend the steps of the usage, operation of materials, devices and so on

  9. Radiation protection in medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frischauf, H.; Kletter, H.; Dudczak, R.

    1983-01-01

    Radiation burden of medical personnel is low in trained medical staff. Higher doses can occur with therapeutic application of unsealed or sealed sources, if adequate shielding is not possible or not cared for or if radiation protection measures are not observed in work with higher activities of radionuclides. More important than immoderate structural alterations for shielding purposes is individual inspection with advice on the working place and optimisation of working methods, also in regard to the radiation protection. This is possible only by cooperation and by discussing risks and problems between the radiation protection officer and the working personnel in an overt manner, assuring the mutual understanding. Radiation protection concerning medical uses of radiation in the whole population and in patients especially is determined by the necessity of indication for the medical application of radiation, by quality control and lastly by the correct interpretation of results or consequences. The latter necessitates a good collaboration between nuclear medicine specialists and clinicians because of the individual particularity of the patient which must be considered in the evaluation of results. (Author)

  10. Education in Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodig, D.; Kasal, B.; Tezak, S.; Poropat, M.; Kubelka, D.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: This paper discussed the problem of the education in radiation protection. All aspects of education are included started with primary school and lasted with very specialised courses for the experts. In the last few years the lack of interest for education in radiation protection was recognised by many agencies included also IAEA and EU commission. In this paper the reasons for this situation will be presented and the way how to promote this subject again. It is not possible to prevent effects of radiation on environment and population if qualified and well educated experts do not exist. The situation in the field of education in radiation protection in Croatia will be presented, according to the new regulations in this field. (author)

  11. History of international symbol for ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franic, Z.

    1996-01-01

    The year 1996 marks the 50th anniversary of the radiation warning symbol as we currently know it. It was (except the colours used) doodled out at the University of California, Berkeley, sometime in 1946 by a small group of people. The key guy responsible was Nelson Garden, then the head of the Health Chemistry Group, at the Radiation Laboratory. The radiation warning symbol should not be confused with the civil defence symbol (circle divided into six equal sections, three of these being black and three yellow), designed to identify fallout shelters. The basic radiation symbol was eventually internationally standardized by ISO code: 361-1975 (E). Variations of this symbol are frequently used in logotypes radiation protection organizations or associations. Particularly nice are those of International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA) and Croatian Radiation Protection Association (CRPA) that combines traditional Croatian motives with high technology. However, apart from speculations, there is no definite answer why did the Berkeley people chose this particular symbol. Whatever the reason was, it was very good choice because the ionizing radiation symbol is simple, readily identifiable, i.e., not similar to other warning symbols, and discernible at a large distance. (author)

  12. Opening Address by U. Heinen-Esser [International Conference on Radiation Protection In Medicine, Bonn (Germany), 3-7 December 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinen-Esser, U.

    2015-01-01

    Ten years ago, the IAEA invited us to Malaga to discuss radiation protection in medicine. The outcome of that conference was the adoption of an Action Plan, which has guided international efforts on protecting patients from ionizing radiation ever since. Since then, developments in medicine have progressed at a rapid pace. New diagnosis and treatment techniques using ionizing radiation and radioactive substances have become well established. At the same time, there is also a growing awareness of both the benefits and risks of using ionizing radiation on humans. In the face of such rapid progress, and all opportunities currently available for using ionizing radiation, we should continue to be guided by the following three pillars of radiation protection: (1) Justification — weighing up the benefits and risks, i.e. the benefits of treatment must outweigh the risks. The increasing use of ionizing radiation in medicine worldwide (4 billion diagnostic procedures in 2008) is an indication of its benefits. However, it must benefit all countries. Radiation supported health services (e.g. for cancer diagnosis and treatment) must also be made accessible to developing countries. Conversely, with the wide range of diagnostic techniques using ionizing radiation, we must never lose sight of the associated risks. This is particularly true of early detection screening. Clear framework conditions on the admissibility of such screening must be drawn up. (2) Optimization — achieving the treatment objectives with the lowest possible dose. Whichever diagnostic method or treatment is chosen, it should always be performed with the lowest possible radiation dose for both the patient and the medical personnel. We have a social and an ethical responsibility to control exposure appropriately. The protection and safe treatment of children is particularly key in this regard. Optimizing exposure is an ongoing challenge. (3) Risk minimization — limiting the risk (for example, when setting

  13. [Radiation protection in interventional radiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamus, R; Loose, R; Wucherer, M; Uder, M; Galster, M

    2016-03-01

    The application of ionizing radiation in medicine seems to be a safe procedure for patients as well as for occupational exposition to personnel. The developments in interventional radiology with fluoroscopy and dose-intensive interventions require intensified radiation protection. It is recommended that all available tools should be used for this purpose. Besides the options for instruments, x‑ray protection at the intervention table must be intensively practiced with lead aprons and mounted lead glass. A special focus on eye protection to prevent cataracts is also recommended. The development of cataracts might no longer be deterministic, as confirmed by new data; therefore, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has lowered the threshold dose value for eyes from 150 mSv/year to 20 mSv/year. Measurements show that the new values can be achieved by applying all X‑ray protection measures plus lead-containing eyeglasses.

  14. 1993 Radiation Protection Workshop: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The 1993 DOE Radiation Protection Workshop was conducted from April 13 through 15, 1993 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Over 400 Department of Energy Headquarters and Field personnel and contractors from the DOE radiological protection community attended the Workshop. Forty-nine papers were presented in eleven separate sessions: Radiological Control Manual Implementation, New Approaches to Instrumentation and Calibration, Radiological Training Programs and Initiatives, External Dosimetry, Internal Dosimetry, Radiation Exposure Reporting and Recordkeeping, Air Sampling and Monitoring Issues, Decontamination and Decommissioning of Sites, Contamination Monitoring and Control, ALARA/Radiological Engineering, and Current and Future Health Physics Research. Individual papers are indexed separately on the database

  15. 1993 Radiation Protection Workshop: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    The 1993 DOE Radiation Protection Workshop was conducted from April 13 through 15, 1993 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Over 400 Department of Energy Headquarters and Field personnel and contractors from the DOE radiological protection community attended the Workshop. Forty-nine papers were presented in eleven separate sessions: Radiological Control Manual Implementation, New Approaches to Instrumentation and Calibration, Radiological Training Programs and Initiatives, External Dosimetry, Internal Dosimetry, Radiation Exposure Reporting and Recordkeeping, Air Sampling and Monitoring Issues, Decontamination and Decommissioning of Sites, Contamination Monitoring and Control, ALARA/Radiological Engineering, and Current and Future Health Physics Research. Individual papers are indexed separately on the database.

  16. Principles of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karamourtzounis, J.N.

    1969-01-01

    In the rapidly developing areas of occupational and public health devoted to the protection of people from both immediate and delayed harmful (and sometimes Irreversible) effects of radiation exposure, industrial hygienists, radiological physicists and radiologists must now assume the additional responsibility of protection against radiation. Everyone during his life will have had one or more X-rays taken for diagnostic purposes. The doses received, depending upon the site, are not harmful to the individual, from the genetic aspect, however, the increasing use of X-ray examinations does present a danger,since almost the whole population is involved. Rapid progress in the development of nuclear energy and the practical extension of its use in medicine, agriculture and industry are steadily increasing the potential danger of large groups of the population being exposed to radiation, and radiation hazards are becoming an important aspect of industrial and public hygiene. WHO is concerned with the overall evaluation of population exposure from peaceful uses of atomic energy and through medical practice, the evaluation of radiation risks,and the control of medical radiation exposure. WHO stimulates and provides technical assistance for the development of appropriate programs of radiation protection with respect to the agricultural, industrial and medical applications of radioisotopes. X-rays and radium. (author)

  17. National congress of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The congress of radiation protection tackled different areas of radiation protection. The impact of ionizing radiations on environment coming from radioactive activities. The biological radiation effects, the dosimetry, the different ways of doing relative to radiation protection,the risks analysis and the communications with populations, information about accidents and the lessons learned from them are included in this congress. (N.C.)

  18. Global view on the radiological protection of patients: Position paper by the International Society for Radiation Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svensson, H.

    2001-01-01

    The International Society for Radiation Oncology (ISRO) is a federation of regional and national societies. These societies include about 80 000 radiation oncologists, physicists and related specialists. The incidence of cancer per year in developing countries is about 0.08 to about 0.2% of the population. In some developed countries, up to 0.5% of the population will be diagnosed with cancer each year - this is a very high figure. You must also look at prevalence: that is, how many of those that have had the diagnosis 'cancer' are still alive. In some developed countries, up to 3% of the population have had the diagnosis 'cancer' at some stage in their life. The projected number of new cases in the year 2000 is five million for developing and five million for developed countries. On the basis of practices exercised today in many advanced developed countries, it is estimated that 50% of these would need radiotherapy. In some countries, up to 60% of cancer cases receive at least one course of radiation treatment. Of course, good quality assurance is a matter of life and death for the patient, and radiation protection and quality assurance are in many situations much the same thing. What can the international societies do in this context? We can try to inform and teach our friends in less developed countries. For this reason, many educational meetings have been organized by the ISRO. The society tries to hold these meetings outside developed areas such as Europe and north America, and to convene them in developing regions of the world, instead. By including experienced teachers from more developed areas, the society seeks to help those who do not yet have all the knowledge they need

  19. Radiation protection - radiographer's role and responsibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popli, P.K.

    2002-01-01

    Ever since discovery of x-rays, radiographers has been the prime user of radiation. With the passage of time, the harmful effects of radiation were detected. Some of radiographers, radiologists and public were affected by radiation, but today with enough knowledge of radiation, the prime responsibility of radiation protection lies with the radiographers only. The radiologist and physicist are also associated with radiation protection to some extent

  20. Radiation protection of non-human species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leith, I.S.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of radiation on non-human species, both animals and plants, have long been investigated. In the disposal of radioactive wastes, the protection of non-human species has been investigated. Yet no radiation protection standard for exposure of animals and plants per se has been agreed. The International Commission on Radiological Protection has long taken the view that, if human beings are properly protected from radiation, other species will thereby be protected to the extent necessary for their preservation. However, the International Atomic Energy Agency has found it necessary to investigate the protection of non-human species where radioactivity is released to an environment unpopulated by human beings. It is proposed that the basis of such protection, and the knowledge of radiation effects on non-human species on which it is based, suggest a practical radiation protection standard for non-human species. (1 tab.)

  1. Radiation and radiation protection; Strahlung und Strahlenschutz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartholomaeus, Melanie (comp.)

    2017-04-15

    The publication of the Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz covers the following issues: (i) Human beings in natural and artificial radiation fields; (ii) ionizing radiation: radioactivity and radiation, radiation exposure and doses; measurement of ionizing radiation, natural radiation sources, artificial radiation sources, ionizing radiation effects on human beings, applied radiation protection, radiation exposure of the German population, radiation doses in comparison; (iii) non-ionizing radiation; low-frequency electric and magnetic fields, high-frequency electromagnetic fields, optical radiation; (iiii) glossary, (iv) units and conversion.

  2. Radiation Protection in the Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zemkajus, K.

    2002-01-01

    Information on use, effects of the use of ionizing radiations is provided. Ionizing radiation sources used in Lithuania are listed, description of characteristics of equipment using ionizing radiation sources is presented. Description of requirements for the licence holder is provided. Radiation protection requirements working with Ionizing radiation sources and legislation regulating radiation protection requirements in the industry is listed

  3. The principles of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The aim of radiation protection is to avoid or to reduce the risks linked to ionizing radiation. In order to reduce these risks, the radiation protection uses three great principles: justification, optimization and limitation of radiation doses. to apply these principles, the radiation protection has regulatory and technical means adapted to three different categories of people: public, patients and workers. The nuclear safety authority elaborates the regulation, and carries out monitoring of the reliable application of radiation protection system. (N.C.)

  4. Recent advances in radiation protection instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babu, D.A.R.

    2012-01-01

    Radiation protection instrumentation plays very important role in radiation protection and surveillance programme. Radiation detector, which appears at the frontal end of the instrument, is an essential component of these instruments. The instrumental requirement of protection level radiation monitoring is different from conventional radiation measuring instruments. Present paper discusses the new type of nuclear radiation detectors, new protection level instruments and associated electronic modules for various applications. Occupational exposure to ionizing radiation can occur in a range of industries, such as nuclear power plants; mining and milling; medical institutions; educational and research establishments; and nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Adequate radiation protection to workers is essential for the safe and acceptable use of radioactive materials for different applications. The radiation exposures to the individual radiation workers and records of their cumulative radiation doses need to be routinely monitored and recorded

  5. Introduction and fundamentals: Lecture No. 2. Course on advances in radiation, International School of Radiation Damage and Protection, Erice, Italy, September 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, R.H.

    1979-09-01

    This lecture discusses advances in the fundamental sciences which underlie that science variously called health physics or radiation. Some of the underlying assumptions of radiation protection are discussed, and some developments in the radiological sciences since 1975 described

  6. Introduction and fundamentals: Lecture No. 2. Course on advances in radiation, International School of Radiation Damage and Protection, Erice, Italy, September 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, R.H.

    1979-09-01

    This lecture discusses advances in the fundamental sciences which underlie that science variously called health physics or radiation. Some of the underlying assumptions of radiation protection are discussed, and some developments in the radiological sciences since 1975 described. (ACR)

  7. The historical development of radiation protection limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuettmann, W.

    1976-01-01

    The present internationally largely corresponding radiation protection limits are based on recommendations given by the ICRP in 1965. In order to better understand the underlying concepts, a historical sketch of the development is presented including actual discussions of trends to be excepted. Although exposure of healthy individuals by man-made sources up to these maximum levels is legally permissible, it should be emphasized again and again that any unavoidable exposure must be justified by the need for its associated cause. (author)

  8. Radiation protective clothing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Choshin; Takaura, Katsutoshi

    1998-01-01

    An external clothing as a main portion of the radiation protective clothing of the present invention is adapted to cover substantially the entire body of a wearer, comprises a moisture permeable material partially or entirely, and has an air supply device equipped with a filter for feeding air to a head portion of the wearer in the external clothing. Cleaned air filtered by the filter is supplied to the head portion of a wearer in the external clothing. The air passes through remarkably perspiratory head, face, shoulder, chest and back portions to remove heat and sweat at sensitively important upper portions of a body, so that humidity is released to remove fatigues and improve workability. In addition, since some extent of internal pressure is exerted to the inside of the external clothing by the air supply, contaminated air does not intrude from the outside to the external clothing. Since the air supply device is attached and carried to the external clothing, there is no air line hose which disturbs operation. (I.S.)

  9. Radiation protection optimization of workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lochard, J.

    1994-11-01

    This report presents the contribution of CEPN (study center on protection evaluation in nuclear area) to the Days of the French Radiation Protection Society (SFRP) on optimization of workers radiation protection in electronuclear, industrial and medical areas

  10. Radiation protection in Qatar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Maadheed, Khalid; Al Khatibeh, Ahmad

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The State of Qatar has become a member State of IAEA since 1974. Later the Department of Industrial Development (DID) beam the focal point and the competent authority regarding all aspects of the peaceful application of Nuclear Technology. In July, 2000 the Supreme Council was established and charged with all matters related to environmental protection. The Supreme Council joined the IAEA Projects on upgrading protection infrastructure in West Asia region. A preliminary research was initiated to discover where radiation sources are being used, and the legal framework, if any, to regulate their use. The research indicated that radiation sources were being used in the industrial practices (well logging, industrial radiography and nuclear gauges) and in medical practices (mainly diagnostic radiology). The research also indicated that there was virtually no legal framework to regulate them. In less than five years, the State of Qatar was able to issue the radiation protection law, three sets of regulations, namely: Radiation Protection Regulations, Radioactive Waste Management Regulations and the Safe Transport of Radioactive Materials Regulations. In addition, several specific regulation work, dose limits and radiation protection officers were issued. A radiation Protection Department, comprising three sections was established. We are providing individual exposure monitoring for most of the radiation workers in the public sector and some in the private sector. We have set up a proper licensing and inspections procedures, where our inspectors are enforcing the law. More recently, we established an early warning network for nuclear of radiological emergencies, consisting of 6 transplantable stations, five mobile stations and two navigating stations. This year, the network was augmented with five fixed station and an advanced early warning centre, which provides early warning via multiple means (MMS, Fax, E-mail and audio alarms). Last year we signed a nuclear

  11. Evaluation of radiation protection in nuclear medicine diagnostic procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammed, Ezzeldien Mohammed Nour

    2013-05-01

    This study conducted to evaluate the radiation protection in nuclear medicine diagnostic procedures in four nuclear medicine departments in Sudan. The evaluated procedures followed in these departments were in accordance with the standards, International Recommendations and code of practice for radiation protection in nuclear medicine. The evolution included the optimum design for diagnostic nuclear medicine departments, dealing with radioactive sources, quality assurance and quality control, training and responsibilities for radiation worker taking into account economic factors in Sudan. Evaluation of radiation protection procedures in diagnostic investigations was carried out by taken direct measurements of dose rate and the contamination level in some areas where radiation sources, radiation workers and public are involved. Designated questionnaires covered thirteen areas of radiation protection based on inspection check list for nuclear medicine prepared by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and American Association of Physicist in Medicine (AAPM) were used in the evaluation. This questionnaire has been Filled by Radiation Protection Officer (RPO), nuclear medicine technologist, nuclear medicine specialist in the nuclear medicine departments. Four hospitals, two governmental hospital and two private hospitals, have been assisted, the assessment shows that although the diagnostic nuclear medicine department in Sudan are not applying a fully safety and radiation protection procedures, but the level of radiation dose and the contamination level were found within acceptable limits. The private hospital D scored the higher level of protection (85.25%) while the governmental hospital C scored the lower level of protection (59.02%). Finally, this study stated some recommendations that if implemented could improve the level of radiation protection in nuclear medicine department. One of the most important recommendations is that a proper radiation protection

  12. Biological Research for Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, In Gyu; Kim, Kug Chan; Jung, Il Lae; Choi, Yong Ho; Kim, Jin Sik; Moon, Myung Sook; Byun, Hee Sun; Phyo, Ki Heon; Kim, Sung Keun

    2005-04-01

    The work scope of 'Biological Research for the Radiation Protection' had contained the research about ornithine decarboxylase and its controlling proteins, thioredoxin, peroxiredoxin, S-adenosymethionine decarboxylase, and glutamate decarboxylase 67KD effect on the cell death triggered ionizing radiation and H 2 O 2 (toxic agents). In this study, to elucidate the role of these proteins in the ionizing radiation (or H 2 O 2 )-induced apoptotic cell death, we utilized sensesed (or antisensed) cells, which overexpress (or down-regulate) RNAs associated with these proteins biosynthesis, and investigated the effects of these genes on the cytotoxicity caused by ionizing radiation and H 2 O 2 (or paraquat). We also investigated whether genisteine(or thiamine) may enhance the cytotoxic efficacy of tumor cells caused by ionizing radiation (may enhance the preventing effect radiation or paraquat-induced damage) because such compounds are able to potentiate the cell-killing or cell protecting effects. Based on the above result, we suggest that the express regulation of theses genes have potentially importance for sensitizing the efficiency of radiation therapy of cancer or for protecting the radiation-induced damage of normal cells

  13. Biological Research for Radiation Protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In Gyu; Kim, Kug Chan; Jung, Il Lae; Choi, Yong Ho; Kim, Jin Sik; Moon, Myung Sook; Byun, Hee Sun; Phyo, Ki Heon; Kim, Sung Keun

    2005-04-15

    The work scope of 'Biological Research for the Radiation Protection' had contained the research about ornithine decarboxylase and its controlling proteins, thioredoxin, peroxiredoxin, S-adenosymethionine decarboxylase, and glutamate decarboxylase 67KD effect on the cell death triggered ionizing radiation and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}(toxic agents). In this study, to elucidate the role of these proteins in the ionizing radiation (or H{sub 2}O{sub 2})-induced apoptotic cell death, we utilized sensesed (or antisensed) cells, which overexpress (or down-regulate) RNAs associated with these proteins biosynthesis, and investigated the effects of these genes on the cytotoxicity caused by ionizing radiation and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}(or paraquat). We also investigated whether genisteine(or thiamine) may enhance the cytotoxic efficacy of tumor cells caused by ionizing radiation (may enhance the preventing effect radiation or paraquat-induced damage) because such compounds are able to potentiate the cell-killing or cell protecting effects. Based on the above result, we suggest that the express regulation of theses genes have potentially importance for sensitizing the efficiency of radiation therapy of cancer or for protecting the radiation-induced damage of normal cells.

  14. Radiation protection in nuclear energy. V.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The conference was convened to provide a forum for the exchange of international views on the principles of radiation protection for regulators and practitioners, to highlight issues of current importance, to examine the problems encountered in applying the principles of radiation protection, and, where possible, to identify generic solutions. A special session entitled ''The dose-response relationship: implications for nuclear energy'', and a panel on ''Radiation protection education and training'' were included in the conference programme. Refs, figs and tabs

  15. Lectures on radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachsmann, F.; Consentius, K.

    1981-01-01

    All important subjects of radiation protection are presented in concise form; the explanations may serve as lecture manuscripts. The lectures are divided into 16 to 19 teaching units. Each teaching unit is supplemented by a slide to be projected on a screen while the text is read. This method of visual teaching has already been tried with good results in medicine and medical engineering. Pictures of the slides are given in the text so that the book may also be used for self-studies. The main facts are summarized at the end of each lesson. The finished book will consist of 8 lessons; the first three of these discuss 1. Radiation effects and hazards 2. Dose definitions and units and their role in radiology and radiation protection 3. Dose limits and legal specifications. (orig.) [de

  16. Preventive Radiation Protection Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roewer, H.

    1988-01-01

    The commentary is intended to contribute to protection of the population by a practice-oriented discussion and explanation of questions arising in connection with the Preventive Radiation Protection Act. Leaving aside discussions about abandonment of nuclear power, or criticism from any legal point of view, the commentary adopts the practical approach that accepts, and tries to help implementing, the act as it is. It is a guide for readers who are not experts in the law and gives a line of orientation by means of explanations and sometimes by citations from other acts (in footnotes). The commentary also presents the EURATOM Directive No. 3954/87 dated 22 December 1987, the EC Directive No. 3955/87 dated 22 December 1987, and the EC Directive No. 1983/88 dated 5 July 1988. A tabular survey shows the system of duties and competences defined by the Preventive Radiation Protection Act. (RST) [de

  17. Calibration of radiation protection monitoring instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Occupational radiation protection is a major component of the support for radiation safety provided by the International Atomic Energy Agency to its Member States. The objective of the IAEA Occupational Protection Programme is to promote an internationally harmonized approach to optimizing occupational radiation protection through the development and application of guidelines for restricting radiation exposures in the workplace and for applying current occupational radiation protection techniques. Occupational exposure to ionizing radiation can occur in industry, medical institutions, research establishments, universities and nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Adequate radiation protection for workers is an essential requirement for the safe and acceptable use of radiation, radioactive materials and nuclear energy. Guidance on the application of the requirements of the BSS to occupational protection is given in three interrelated Safety Guides: Occupational Radiation Protection; Assessment of Occupational Exposure due to External Sources of Radiation Assessment of Occupational Exposure due to Intakes of Radionuclides. This Safety Report provides guidance on the establishment and operation of calibration facilities for radiation monitoring instruments. It reflects the current internationally accepted principles and recommended practices in calibration procedures, taking into account of the major changes and developments that have occurred over the past decade

  18. II International Conference: Radiation Protection Training. Future Strategies. Ciemat, 17-19 September, 2003. Book of Papers and Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Safety in the use of ionising radiation and protection against potential risks due to exposure to radiation sources are not static concepts, rather their evolution runs parallel with an increased knowledge of the technologies and basic concepts employed. Education and training, which are inherently tied to with research, are the means to disseminate the advances made to the scientists and professionals working with ionising radiation. At present, Radiation Protection (RP) training is considered to be the best means to promote a safety culture and to improve the competence of exposed workers. Indeed, progress in both RP teaching and training, which form part of this transfer of technology and specialized knowledge, are fields that are in continuous motion. The first conference on Radiation Protection training was celebrated in Saclay (France) under the slogan Radiation Protection: What are the Future Training needs?. It can be considered as the first such meeting dedicated to the community of professionals, from a wide range of scientific and technological backgrounds, related in some way to Radiation Protection training. (Author)

  19. Enhancing radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    When a new radiotherapy center in Gezira, Sudan, delivers its first therapeutic dose to a cancer patient, two things happen: A young man begins to regain his health and looks forward to being better able to support his family and contribute to his community; and a developing nation realizes an important step toward deriving the social and economic benefits of nuclear science. The strategic application of nuclear technology in particular fields- human health, industry, food and agriculture, energy, water resources and environmental protection - has enormous potential to help shape the future of developing countries. But past radiological incidents, several of which involved high levels of exposure or death (Bolivia, Brazil, Cost Rica, Georgia, Ghana, Morocco, Panama and Thailand), underscore the inherent and very serious risks. For this reason, the IAEA's Departments of Technical Cooperation and Nuclear Safety and Security partner closely, particularly in the area of radiation protection. They strive to consider every minute detail in the equation that brings together radiation sources, modern technologies, people and the environment. Launched in 1996, the Model Project on Upgrading Radiation Protection Infrastructure (the Model Project) aimed to help Member States: achieve capacities that underpin the safe and secure application of nuclear technologies; establish a legislative framework and regulatory infrastructure; develop exposure control mechanisms to protect workers, medical patients, the public and the environment; and achieve preparedness and planned response to radiological emergencies. In fact, the hospital scenario above typically marks several years of intense collaboration amongst scientists, legislators, regulators, politicians and administrators from both Member States and the IAEA, orchestrated and aided by regional managers and technical experts from the IAEA. As radiation protection team members can attest, every application of nuclear technology

  20. Radiation protection - the employer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldfinch, E.

    1983-01-01

    A brief report is given of a paper presented at the symposium on 'Radiation and the Worker - where do we go from here' in London 1983. The paper concerned the employers' viewpoint on the draft of the proposed Ionising Radiations Regulations in the Health and Safety Commission Consultative Document. It was concluded that there was already a very good standard of radiological protection in the UK and that any improvements could therefore only be fringe improvements, although the cost to the employer of introducing and implementing the new proposed Regulations was bound to be high. (U.K.)

  1. Determining Nuclear Fingerprints: Glove Boxes, Radiation Protection, and the International Atomic Energy Agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentetzi, Maria

    2017-06-01

    In a nuclear laboratory, a glove box is a windowed, sealed container equipped with two flexible gloves that allow the user to manipulate nuclear materials from the outside in an ostensibly safe environment. As a routine laboratory device, it invites neglect from historians and storytellers of science. Yet, since especially the Gulf War, glove boxes have put the interdependence of science, diplomacy, and politics into clear relief. Standing at the intersection of history of science and international history, technological materials and devices such as the glove box can provide penetrating insight into the role of international diplomatic organizations to the global circulation and control of scientific knowledge. The focus here is on the International Atomic Energy Agency. Copyright © 2017 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Fundamentals of health physics for the radiation-protection officer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, B.L.; Traub, R.J.; Gilchrist, R.L.; Mann, J.C.; Munson, L.H.; Carbaugh, E.H.; Baer, J.L.

    1983-03-01

    The contents of this book on health physics include chapters on properties of radioactive materials, radiation instrumentation, radiation protection programs, radiation survey programs, internal exposure, external exposure, decontamination, selection and design of radiation facilities, transportation of radioactive materials, radioactive waste management, radiation accidents and emergency preparedness, training, record keeping, quality assurance, and appraisal of radiation protection programs

  3. Fundamentals of health physics for the radiation-protection officer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, B.L.; Traub, R.J.; Gilchrist, R.L.; Mann, J.C.; Munson, L.H.; Carbaugh, E.H.; Baer, J.L.

    1983-03-01

    The contents of this book on health physics include chapters on properties of radioactive materials, radiation instrumentation, radiation protection programs, radiation survey programs, internal exposure, external exposure, decontamination, selection and design of radiation facilities, transportation of radioactive materials, radioactive waste management, radiation accidents and emergency preparedness, training, record keeping, quality assurance, and appraisal of radiation protection programs. (ACR)

  4. Some perspectives on radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinclair, W.K.

    1979-01-01

    A brief review of the history and organizational structure of the NCRP is given. Summaries are given of a number of NCRP radiation protection guides dealing with hazards from 85 Kr, radiation exposures from consumer products, basic radiation protection criteria, and doses from natural background radiation

  5. Radiation protection, optimization and justification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordoliani, Y.S.; Brisse, H.; Foucart, J.M.; Clement, J.P.; Ribeiro, A.; Gomes, H.; Marcus, C.; Rehel, J.L.; Talbot, A.; Aubert, B.; Scanff, P.; Roudier, C.; Donadieu, J.; Pirard, P.; Bar, O.; Maccia, C.; Benedittini, M.; Bouziane, T.; Brat, H.; Bricoult, M; Heuga, O.; Hauger, O.; Bonnefoy, O.; Diard, F.; Chateil, J.F.; Schramm, R.; Reisman, J.; Aubert, B.

    2005-01-01

    Nine articles in the field of radiation protection relative to the medical examinations concern the new legislation in radiation protection, the optimization of this one in order to reduce the radiation doses delivered to the patients, the side effects induced by irradiation and to give an evaluation of the medical exposure of french population to ionizing radiations. (N.C.)

  6. Problems of radiation protection optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morkunas, G.

    2003-01-01

    One of the basic principles - optimization of radiation protection - is rather well understood by everybody engaged in protection of humans from ionizing radiation. However, the practical application of this principle is very problematic. This fact can be explained by vagueness of concept of dose constraints, possible legal consequences of any decision based on this principle, traditions of prescriptive system of radiation protection requirements in some countries, insufficiency of qualified expertise. The examples of optimization problems are the different attention given to different kinds of practices, not optimized application of remedial measures, strict requirements for radioactive contamination of imported products, uncertainties in optimization in medical applications of ionizing radiation. Such tools as international co-operation including regional networks of information exchange, training of qualified experts, identification of measurable indicators used for judging about the level of optimization may be the helpful practical means in solving of these problems. It is evident that the principle of optimization can not be replaced by any other alternative despite its complexity. The means for its practical implementation shall be searched for. (author)

  7. Radiation protection design for the Super-FRS and SIS100 at the international FAIR facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozlova Ekaterina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The new accelerator SIS100 and the Super-FRS will be built at the international Facility for Antiprotons and Ion Research FAIR. The synchrotron SIS100 is a core part of the FAIR facility which serves for acceleration of ions like Uranium up to 2.7 GeV/u with intensities of 3x1011 particles per second or protons up to 30 GeV with intensities of 5x1012 particles per second. The Super-FRS is a superconducting fragment separator, it will be able to separate all kinds of nuclear projectile fragments of primary heavy ion beams including Uranium with energies up to 1.5 GeV/u and intensities up to 3x1011 particles per second. During operation activation of several components, especially the production target and the beam catchers will take place. For handling of highly activated components it is foreseen to have a hot cell with connected storage place. All calculations for the optimisation of the shielding design of the SIS100, the Super-FRS and the hot cell were performed using the Monte Carlo code FLUKA, results are presented.

  8. International Commission on Radiological Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mettler, F.A.

    2001-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has been involved with protection of patients in medicine since the commission was formed in 1928. The past and current work of the commission emphasizes the importance of patient protection. Committee 3 is concerned with the protection of persons and unborn children when ionizing radiation is used for medical diagnosis, therapy of for biomedical research as well as with the assessment of the medical consequences of accidental exposures. The current committee membership includes eleven practicing physicians and four physicists from ten different countries. The current work of the committee has centred on producing short, readable, user friendly documents related to important and current issues. In this regard the committee and task groups have just published a document on Pregnancy and Medical Radiation. A document on Avoidance of Radiation Injuries from Medical Interventional Procedures is in press, and two documents, Prevention of Accidents to Patients undergoing Radiation Therapy, and Management of Patient Dose in Computed Tomography are being finalized for publication. Some of these documents have been put on the Internet for comment, and many useful comments have been received before manuscript completion

  9. Radiation protection and monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruecher, L.; Langmueller, G.; Tuerschmann, G.

    1997-01-01

    The safety, the quality and efficiency of the radiological monitoring systems for block one and two of the NPP Mochovce, designed and delivered by the general designer, should be increased by EUCOM Siemens. Modern, accident resistant and/or more powerful monitoring systems have been designed by Siemens will be added to the existing systems. To achieve this radiation measuring units will be installed inside the hermetic zone, in the reactor hall, at the stack, at the release water system and in the environment in the vicinity of the NPP. The presentation, the storage distribution and the processing of all measuring results also will be optimised by installing a modern high-performance computer system, the so-called Central Radiological Computer System 'CRCS', featuring a high availability. The components will be installed in the relevant control rooms all over the plant. With this computer system it is easy to control the radiation level inside and outside the NPP during normal operation and during and after an accident. Special programs, developed by Siemens support the staff by interpreting the consequences of radioactive releases into the environment and by initiating protection procedures during and after an accident. All functions of the system are available for emergency protection drills and training the staff interruption of the normal control procedure. For the personal protection a digital personal dosimetry system completely considering with the requirements of ICRP 60 and several contamination monitors will be installed. (authors)

  10. Summary of radiation protection in exploitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcier, Yves; Guers, Rene; Bidard, Francoise; Colson, Philippe; Gonin, Michele; Delabre, Herve; Hemidy, Pierre-Yves; Corgnet, Bruno; Perrin, Marie-Claire; Phan Hoang, Long; Abela, Gonzague; Crepieux, Virginie; Guyot, Pierre; Haranger, Didier; Warembourg, Philippe

    2004-01-01

    This document proposes a large and detailed overview of notions and practices regarding radiation protection in relationship with an NPP exploitation framework. It presents the main notions: matter structure, radioactivity, interactions between matter and radiations, types of ionizing radiation, magnitudes and measurement units, exposure modes, main principles of radiation protection, means of protection against internal and external exposures. The second part proposes an overview of the origin of radiological risks in a nuclear power plant. This origin can be found in fission products, activation products, actinides, designed protections, or circuit contaminations. These radiological risks are more precisely identified and described in terms of detection and prevention (internal exposure risk, contamination risk, iodine-related risk, alpha radiation-related risk, access to the reactor building). The next part addresses the medical and radiological follow-up of exposed workers by a special medical control, by an individual exposure control, by a specific control of female personnel, and by attention to exceptional exposures. Measurement means are presented (detection principles, installation continuous control, workspaces control, personnel contamination control, follow-up of individual dose) as well as collective and individual protection means. The management of radiation protection is addressed through a presentation of decision and management structures for radiation protection, and of EDF objectives and ambitions in this domain. The organization of radiation protection during exploitation is described: responsibilities for radiation protection in a nuclear power station, requirements for workers, preparation of interventions in controlled zone, work execution in controlled zone, zone controls and radiological cleanness of installations. The two last chapters address issues and practices of radiation protection in the case of deconstruction or dismantling, and

  11. Radiation protection research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanmarcke, H

    2002-04-01

    The objectives of the research in the field of radiation protection research performed at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN are (1) to elaborate and to improve methods and guidelines for the evaluation of restoration options for radioactively contaminated sites; (2) to develop, test and improve biosphere models for the performance assessment of radioactive waste disposal in near-surface or geological repositories; (3) to asses the impact of releases from nuclear or industrial installations; (4) to increase capabilities in mapping and surveying sites possibly or likely contaminated with enhanced levels of natural radiation; (5) to identify non nuclear industries producing NORM waste, to make an inventory of occurring problems and to propose feasible solutions or actions when required; (6) to maintain the know-how of retrospective radon measurements in real conditions and to assess radon decay product exposure by combining these techniques. Main achievements in these areas for 2001 are summarised.

  12. Radiation protection research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanmarcke, H.

    2002-01-01

    The objectives of the research in the field of radiation protection research performed at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN are (1) to elaborate and to improve methods and guidelines for the evaluation of restoration options for radioactively contaminated sites; (2) to develop, test and improve biosphere models for the performance assessment of radioactive waste disposal in near-surface or geological repositories; (3) to asses the impact of releases from nuclear or industrial installations; (4) to increase capabilities in mapping and surveying sites possibly or likely contaminated with enhanced levels of natural radiation; (5) to identify non nuclear industries producing NORM waste, to make an inventory of occurring problems and to propose feasible solutions or actions when required; (6) to maintain the know-how of retrospective radon measurements in real conditions and to assess radon decay product exposure by combining these techniques. Main achievements in these areas for 2001 are summarised

  13. Health protection of radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norwood, W.D.

    1975-01-01

    This textbook is addressed to all those concerned with the protection of radiation workers. It provides full coverage of the implications of radiation in exposed workers, and, after a chapter outlining, in simple terms, the basic facts about radiation, deals with measurement of ionising radiation; radiation dosimetry; effectiveness of absorbed dose; general biological effects of ionising radiation; somatic effects of radiation; the acute radiation syndrome; other somatic effects; hereditary effects; radiation protection standards and regulations; radiation protection; medical supervision of radiation workers; general methods of diagnosis and treatment; metabolism and health problems of some radioisotopes; plutonium and other transuranium elements; radiation accidents; emergency plans and medical care; atomic power plants; medico-legal problems

  14. Radiation protection standards for radioluminous timepieces. Recommendations of the European Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1967-01-01

    Users of radioluminous timepieces are exposed to ionizing radiations from the luminous paints contained in the timepieces. There standards have been prepared to ensure that users of radioluminous timepieces are exposed to as little ionizing radiation as practicable, and not to levels in excess of the maximum permissible levels laid down in basic radiation protection standards; and that the contribution to the dose received by the whole population from the use of radioluminous timepieces is kept within the limits adopted by the appropriate national authority.

  15. Radiation risks and radiation protection at CRNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, D.K.

    1986-01-01

    Radiation exposure is an occupational hazard at CRNL. The predicted health effects of low levels of radiation are described and compared with other hazards of living. Data related to the health of radiation workers are also considered. Special attention is given to the expected effects of radiation on the unborn child. Measures taken to protect CRNL employees against undue occupational exposure to radiation are noted

  16. New general radiation protection training course

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Some members of CERN personnel, including users, may have to work in supervised or controlled radiation areas, or may be involved in activities involving the use of radioactive sources. According to CERN Safety Rules all persons whose work may be associated with ionising radiation risk must be adequately trained. This training must ensure that workers are informed about the potential health risks which could result from radiation exposure, the basic principles of radiation protection and the relevant radiation protection regulations as well as safe working methods and techniques in radiation zones. Therefore the Organization organises mandatory general and work-specific radiation protection (RP) courses for its personnel. These courses are also open to contractors’ personnel, in addition to the RP training they must receive from their employers. Based on the results of a pilot project, an improved general radiation protection course has been prepared. This new ½ day cours...

  17. Radiation Protection in Paediatric Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade and a half, special issues have arisen regarding the protection of children undergoing radiological examinations. These issues have come to the consciousness of a gradually widening group of concerned professionals and the public, largely because of the natural instinct to protect children from unnecessary harm. Some tissues in children are more sensitive to radiation and children have a long life expectancy, during which significant pathology can emerge. The instinct to protect children has received further impetus from the level of professional and public concern articulated in the wake of media responses to certain publications in the professional literature. Many institutions have highlighted the need to pay particular attention to the special problems of protecting paediatric patients. The International Commission on Radiological Protection has noted it and the IAEA's General Safety Requirements publication, Radiation Protection and Safety of Radiation Sources: International Basic Safety Standards (BSS), requires it. This need has been endorsed implicitly in the advisory material on paediatric computed tomography scanning issued by bodies such as the US Food and Drug Administration and the National Cancer Institute in the United States of America, as well as by many initiatives taken by other national and regional radiological societies and professional bodies. A major part of patient exposure, in general, and paediatric exposure, in particular, now arises from practices that barely existed two decades ago. For practitioners and regulators, it is evident that this innovation has been driven both by the imaging industry and by an ever increasing array of new applications generated and validated in the clinical environment. Regulation, industrial standardization, safety procedures and advice on best practice lag (inevitably) behind industrial and clinical innovations. This Safety Report is designed to consolidate and provide timely advice on

  18. Modeling Internal Radiation Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, Egon; Schouten, Theo E.; Pellegrini, M.; Fred, A.; Filipe, J.; Gamboa, H.

    2011-01-01

    A new technique is described to model (internal) radiation therapy. It is founded on morphological processing, in particular distance transforms. Its formal basis is presented as well as its implementation via the Fast Exact Euclidean Distance (FEED) transform. Its use for all variations of internal

  19. Radiation protection and safety infrastructures in Albania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paci, Rustem; Ylli, Fatos

    2008-01-01

    The paper intends to present the evolution and actual situation of radiation protection and safety infrastructure in Albania, focusing in its establishing and functioning in accordance with BBS and other important documents of specialized international organizations. There are described the legal framework of radiation safety, the regulatory authority, the services as well the practice of their functioning. The issue of the establishing and functioning of the radiation safety infrastructure in Albania was considered as a prerequisite for a good practices development in the peaceful uses of radiation sources . The existence of the adequate legislation and the regulatory authority, functioning based in the Basic Safety Standards (BSS), are the necessary condition providing the fulfilment of the most important issues in the mentioned field. The first document on radiation protection in Albania stated that 'for the safe use of radiation sources it is mandatory that the legal person should have a valid permission issued by Radiation Protection Commission'. A special organ was established in the Ministry of Health to supervise providing of the radiation protection measures. This organization of radiation protection showed many lacks as result of the low efficiency . The personnel monitoring, import, transport, waste management and training of workers were in charge of Institute of Nuclear Physics (INP). In 1992 an IAEA RAPAT mission visited Albania and proposed some recommendations for radiation protection improvements. The mission concluded that 'the legislation of the radiation protection should be developed'. In 1995 Albania was involved in the IAEA Model Project 'Upgrading of Radiation Protection Infrastructure'. This project, which is still in course, intended to establish the modern radiation safety infrastructures in the countries with low efficiency ones and to update and upgrade all aspects related with radiation safety: legislation and regulations, regulatory

  20. Limited internal radiation exposure associated with resettlements to a radiation-contaminated homeland after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaharu Tsubokura

    Full Text Available Resettlement to their radiation-contaminated hometown could be an option for people displaced at the time of a nuclear disaster; however, little information is available on the safety implications of these resettlement programs. Kawauchi village, located 12-30 km southwest of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, was one of the 11 municipalities where mandatory evacuation was ordered by the central government. This village was also the first municipality to organize the return of the villagers. To assess the validity of the Kawauchi villagers' resettlement program, the levels of internal Cesium (Cs exposures were comparatively measured in returnees, commuters, and non-returnees among the Kawauchi villagers using a whole body counter. Of 149 individuals, 5 villagers had traceable levels of Cs exposure; the median detected level was 333 Bq/body (range, 309-1050 Bq/kg, and 5.3 Bq/kg (range, 5.1-18.2 Bq/kg. Median annual effective doses of villagers with traceable Cs were 1.1 x 10(-2 mSv/y (range, 1.0 x 10(-2-4.1 x 10(-2 mSv/y. Although returnees had higher chances of consuming locally produced vegetables, Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel test showed that their level of internal radiation exposure was not significantly higher than that in the other 2 groups (p=0.643. The present findings in Kawauchi village imply that it is possible to maintain internal radiation exposure at very low levels even in a highly radiation-contaminated region at the time of a nuclear disaster. Moreover, the risks for internal radiation exposure could be limited with a strict food control intervention after resettlement to the radiation-contaminated village. It is crucial to establish an adequate number of radio-contaminated testing sites within the village, to provide immediate test result feedback to the villagers, and to provide education regarding the importance of re-testing in reducing the risk of high internal radiation exposure.

  1. Workstations studies and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahaye, T.; Donadille, L.; Rehel, J.L.; Paquet, F.; Beneli, C.; Cordoliani, Y.S.; Vrigneaud, J.M.; Gauron, C.; Petrequin, A.; Frison, D.; Jeannin, B.; Charles, D.; Carballeda, G.; Crouail, P.; Valot, C.

    2006-01-01

    This day on the workstations studies for the workers follow-up, was organised by the research and health section. Devoted to the company doctors, for the competent persons in radiation protection, for the engineers of safety, it presented examples of methodologies and applications in the medical, industrial domain and the research, so contributing to a better understanding and an application of regulatory measures. The analysis of the workstation has to allow a reduction of the exposures and the risks and lead to the optimization of the medical follow-up. The agenda of this day included the different subjects as follow: evolution of the regulation in matter of demarcation of the regulated zones where the measures of workers protection are strengthened; presentation of the I.R.S.N. guide of help to the realization of a workstation study; implementation of a workstation study: case of radiology; the workstation studies in the research area; Is it necessary to impose the operational dosimetry in the services of radiodiagnostic? The experience feedback of a competent person in radiation protection (P.C.R.) in a hospital environment; radiation protection: elaboration of a good practices guide in medical field; the activities file in nuclear power plant: an evaluation tool of risks for the prevention. Methodological presentation and examples; insulated workstation study; the experience feedback of a provider; Contribution of the ergonomics to the determiners characterization in the ionizing radiation exposure situations;The workstations studies for the internal contamination in the fuel cycle facilities and the consideration of the results in the medical follow-up; R.E.L.I.R. necessity of workstation studies; the consideration of the human factor. (N.C.)

  2. Pregnancy and Radiation Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerogiannis, J.; Stefanoyiannis, A. P.

    2010-01-01

    Several modalities are currently utilized for diagnosis and therapy, by appropriate application of x-rays. In diagnostic radiology, interventional radiology, radiotherapy, interventional cardiology, nuclear medicine and other specialties radiation protection of a pregnant woman as a patient, as well as a member of the operating personnel, is of outmost importance. Based on radiation risk, the termination of pregnancy is not justified if foetal doses are below 100 mGy. For foetal doses between 100 and 500 mGy, a decision is reached on a case by case basis. In Diagnostic Radiology, when a pregnant patient takes an abdomen CT, then an estimation of the foetus' dose is necessary. However, it is extremely rare for the dose to be high enough to justify an abortion. Radiographs of the chest and extremities can be done at any period of pregnancy, provided that the equipment is functioning properly. Usually, the radiation risk is lower than the risk of not undergoing a radiological examination. Radiation exposure in uterus from diagnostic radiological examinations is unlikely to result in any deleterious effect on the child, but the possibility of a radiation-induced effect can not be entirely ruled out. The effects of exposure to radiation on the foetus depend on the time of exposure, the date of conception and the absorbed dose. Finally, a pregnant worker can continue working in an x-ray department, as long as there is reasonable assurance that the foetal dose can be kept below 1 mGy during the pregnancy. Nuclear Medicine diagnostic examinations using short-lived radionuclides can be used for pregnant patient. Irradiation of the foetus results from placental transfer and distribution of radiopharmaceuticals in the foetal tissues, as well as from external irradiation from radioactivity in the mother's organ and tissues. As a rule, a pregnant patient should not undergo therapy with radionuclide, unless it is crucial for her life. In Radiotherapy, the patient, treating

  3. Basic standards for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, G.A.M.

    1982-01-01

    The basic standards for radiation protection have been based, for many years, on the recommendations of the International Commission of Radiological Protection. The three basic standards recommended by the Commission may be summarized as ''justification, optimization of protection and adherence to dose limitations. The applications of these basic principles to different aspects of protection are briefly summarized and the particular ways in which they have been applied to waste described in more detail. The application of dose limits, both in the control of occupational exposure and in regulating routine discharges of radioactive effluents is straight forward in principle although the measurement and calculational requirements may be substantial. Secondary standards such as derived limits may be extremely useful and the principles underlying their derivation will be described. Optimization of protection is inherently a more difficult concept to apply in protection and the various techniques used will be outlined by with particular emphasis on the use of cost benefit analysis are recommended by the ICRP. A review will be given of the problems involved in extending these basic concepts of the ICRP to probabilistic analyses such as those required for assessing the consequences of accidents or disruptive events in long term repositories. The particular difficulties posed by the very long timescales involved in the assessment of waste management practices will be discussed in some detail. (orig./RW)

  4. Radiation protection and society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skryabin, A.M.

    1997-01-01

    The radiological protection of population, living on the contaminated territories, is actual 10 years after the Chernobyl accident. Eventually, the whole system of countermeasures application is aimed to protect society as a complex community of individuals . The variety of levels of society, i.e. family, settlement on the whole, can be considered as certain harmonic systems differing in their public consciousness levels and lifestyles, this explain the difference in their 'behaviour' in terms of radiation protection and attitude to the information obtained. Each level of society possesses a certain degree of liberty of choice, that finally influence the magnitude and the character of dose distribution within certain population groups. In general, the dose distribution in the settlement can be explained only on the bases of 'family' analysis. This concerns the rural settlement as a society too. All rural settlement can be divided into two or three classes: with low, high and intermediate social features. Small settlements (< 100 persons), where the advanced in age persons with low material income and high degree of natural economy are applied to the first class. This results in higher doses (2-3 fold), than in the settlements with higher social level. The analysis shows that in socially 'waning' settlements the countermeasures are less efficient and the term of their action is shorter. (this class is the largest, About 50% among all the rural settlements). Due to the deterioration of the economic situation in the Republic of Belarus after 1991-1992 resulted in the increase of doses mainly in the habitants first of all of this class of settlements. It seems problematic to increase countermeasures efficiency in this class of settlements without the refuse of the accustomed lifestyle and radical improvement of social-demographic and economic conditions. The present material shows the necessity of the differential approach based on 'society-analysis' in the

  5. Radiation protection for human spaceflight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajek, M.

    2009-01-01

    Cosmic radiation exposure is one of the most significant risks associated with human space exploration. Except for the principles of justification and optimization (ALARA), the concepts of terrestrial radiation protection are of limited applicability to human spaceflight, as until now only few experimentally verified data on the biological effectiveness of heavy ions and the dose distribution within the human body exist. Instead of applying the annual dose limits for workers on ground also to astronauts, whose careers are of comparatively short duration, the overall lifetime risk is used as a measure. For long-term missions outside Earth's magnetic field, the acceptable level of risk has not yet been defined, since there is not enough information available to estimate the risk of effects to the central nervous system and of potential non-cancer radiation health hazards. (orig.)

  6. Selective internal radiation therapy for liver tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundram, Francis X; Buscombe, John R

    2017-10-01

    Primary and secondary liver malignancies are common and associated with a poor prognosis. Surgical resection is the treatment of choice; however, many patients have unresectable disease. In these cases, several liver directed therapies are available, including selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT). SIRT is a multidisciplinary treatment involving nuclear medicine, interventional radiology and oncology. High doses of localised internal radiation are selectively delivered to liver tumour tissues, with relative sparing of adjacent normal liver parenchyma. Side effects are minimal and radiation protection measures following treatment are straightforward. In patients who have progressed following chemotherapy, clinical trials demonstrate prolonged liver progression-free survival. SIRT is offered at 10 centres in England via the NHS England Commissioning through Evaluation programme and is approved by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence for certain liver malignancies. SIRT holds unique promise for personalised treatment of liver tumours. © Royal College of Physicians 2017. All rights reserved.

  7. Radiation Protection Officer certification scheme. Malaysian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pungut, Noraishah; Razali, Noraini; Mod Ali, Noriah

    2011-01-01

    In Malaysia, the need for maintaining competency in radiation protection is emerging, focusing on the qualification of Radiation Protection Officers (RPO). Regulation 23 of Malaysian Radiation Protection (Basic Safety Standards) Regulations 1988, requires the applicant to employ an RPO, with the necessary knowledge, skill and training, enabling effective protection of individuals and minimizing danger to life, property and the environment for all activities sought to be licensed. An RPO must demonstrate the knowledge required, by attending RPO courses organised by an accredited agency and pass the RPO certification examination. Maintaining a high level of competency is crucial for future development of safe applications of ionising radiation. The major goal of training is to provide essential knowledge and skills and to foster correct attitudes on radiation protection and safe use of radiation sources. Assessment of the competency is through theoretical and practical examination. A standard criterion on the performance of the individuals evaluated has been established and only those who meet this criterion can be accepted as certified RPO. The National Committee for the Certification of Radiation Protection Officer (NCCRPO), comprising experts in various fields, is responsible to review and update requirements on competency of a certified RPO. With increasing number of candidates (i.e. 701 in 2008) and the international requirement for radioactive source security, it is incumbent upon the NCCRPO to improve the syllabus of the certification scheme. The introduction of a Radiation Protection Advisor (RPA) to provide service and advice to the radiation industry in Malaysia is also seriously considered. (author)

  8. National Sessions of Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sociedad Argentina de Radioproteccion

    2012-01-01

    The Radioprotection Argentine Society (SAR) was organized the National Sessions on Radiation Protection 2012 in order to continue the exchange in the radiation protection community in the country, on work areas that present a challenge to the profession. The new recommendations of the ICRP and the IAEA Safety Standards (2011), among others, includes several topics that are necessary to develop. The SAR wants to encourage different organizations from Argentina, to submit projects that are developing in order to strengthen radiation protection.

  9. Plowshare radiation protection guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, H.M.

    1969-01-01

    The recommendations of the ICRP and the NCRP were developed primarily for occupational radiation exposures. They were later modified and applied to non-occupational exposures of populations. These, with appropriate interpretations, can be used to provide Plowshare radiation protection guidance. Exposures from Plowshare operations will tend to be acute, arising from radionuclides of relatively short half-life, but will have some chronic aspects due to small amounts of long-lived radionuclides generated. In addition, the neutron activation process of Plowshare technology will produce radionuclides not commonly encountered in routine nuclear energy programs. How these radionuclides contribute to personnel exposure is known for only a few situations that may not be representative of Plowshare exposure. Further complications arise from differences in radionuclide deposition and physiological sensitivity among individuals of different ages and states of health in the exposed population. All parameters necessary to evaluate such exposures are not available, even for good quantitative approximations, resulting in the need for interpretive experience. (author)

  10. The purpose of radiation protection monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, K.Z.

    1979-01-01

    In the early period (1942-1960) of nuclear energy programmes with which I was associated, most radiation protection standards seem to have been formulated on the assumption that there is a threshold dose of ionizing radiation below which no radiation damage is expected to result in the lifetime of the exposed individual. It was in this climate of opinion that health physics began as a profession, and levels of maximum permissible exposure (MPE) to external sources of radiation, maximum permissible concentrations in air, water and food, and maximum permissible body burdens of radionuclides inside the human body were set and enforced. Some of the levels of MPE were quite high in comparison with present standards but, fortunately, the health physicists at the national laboratories in which most radiation workers were employed were very conservative; in most cases the average annual exposures were less than 10% of the MPE levels. However, there was not much concern with the man-rem concept, as exemplified by rather high levels of radioactive waste discharged from the plants or placed in temporary holding facilities - where there was a likely possibility of seepage into the environment. This situation was understandable and justifiable at a time when the purpose of radiation protection monitoring was simply to prevent individuals from exceeding a threshold dose. The period of the recent past up to the present time (1978) has been one in which there has been a gradual change from the concept of a threshold dose hypothesis to the linear hypothesis. In this period the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the national standards setting bodies have pointed out that the levels they have selected are based on the linear hypothesis, but in most respects they leave us with the impression that this is most probably a conservative assumption, subject to revision when better data become available. Also, during this period, the concept of exposure As Low As

  11. Effective dose: a radiation protection quantity

    CERN Document Server

    Menzel, H G

    2012-01-01

    Modern radiation protection is based on the principles of justification, limitation, and optimisation. Assessment of radiation risks for individuals or groups of individuals is, however, not a primary objective of radiological protection. The implementation of the principles of limitation and optimisation requires an appropriate quantification of radiation exposure. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has introduced effective dose as the principal radiological protection quantity to be used for setting and controlling dose limits for stochastic effects in the regulatory context, and for the practical implementation of the optimisation principle. Effective dose is the tissue weighted sum of radiation weighted organ and tissue doses of a reference person from exposure to external irradiations and internal emitters. The specific normalised values of tissue weighting factors are defined by ICRP for individual tissues, and used as an approximate age- and sex-averaged representation of th...

  12. Radiation protection primer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aigner, R.; Melzer, E.; Seissler, H.

    1986-01-01

    This 'radiation protection primer' does not pretend to give absolute, final answers to the many questions that have been arising after the Chernobyl accident. What it is intended to supply, as a schematic overview of problems resulting from nuclear accidents, and a likewise systematic outline of possible solutions and sensible reactions to such an event. The book takes up questions such as: What has happened to the soil. Will future harvests be 'clean' again. What does radioactivity to our drinking water and other waters. What are the effects of a radioactive fallout on food. What may we eat or drink. What happens to the human body after intake of radioactive air, or - even only slightly - contaminated food or water. What can we do to protect our health, and the health of our children. Is there anything else we can do in order to avoid such a disaster in future, except from shutting-off all reactors. The book itself presents some answers and advice, along with a list of terms and explanations, and addresses to apply to for further advice and information. (orig./HP) [de

  13. Radiation protection program for assistance of victims of radiation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fajardo, P.W.; Costa Silva, L.H. da; Rosa, R.

    1991-11-01

    The principles aspects of a radiological protection program for hospitals in case of medical assistance to external and internal contaminated persons are showed. It is based on the experience obtained at Centro Medico Naval Marcilio Dias during the assistance to the victims of Goiania accident in 1987. This paper describes the basic infrastructure of a nursery and the radiation protection procedures for the access control of people and materials, area and personal monitoring, decontamination and the support activities such as calibration of radiation monitors and waste management. Is is also estimated the necessary radiation protection materials and the daily quantity of waste generated. (author)

  14. Radiation protection programme for nuclear gauges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muzongomerwa, A.

    2014-04-01

    Ionizing radiation including the use of nuclear gauges can be very hazardous to humans and steps must be taken to minimize the risks so as to prevent deterministic effects and limiting chances for stochastic effects. The availability of a Radiation Protection Programme and its effective implementation ensures appropriate safety and security provisions for sealed radiation sources and promotes a safety culture within a facility that utilizes these sources. This study aims at establishing a guide on the radiation protection programme in nuclear gauges that comply with national requirements derived from current international recommendations. Elements that form part of a radiation protection programme are covered in detail as well as recommendations. The overall objective is to protect people (operators and the public) and the environment from the harmful effects of these sources if they are not properly controlled. Nuclear gauges for well logging and X-ray based gauges are outside the scope of this study. (au)

  15. Radiation Protection Training in Lithuania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jankauskiene, D.

    2003-01-01

    Radiation Protection Training is an important component of Radiation Protection and serves for human radiation safety. According to the Lithuanian Law on Radiation Protection the legal persons and enterprises without the status of legal persons to conduct practices with sources or which workers work under exposure must organize at their own expenses a compulsory training and assessment of knowledge of the workers engaging in activities with the sources and radiation protection officers. Such training has been started in 1999. In Lithuania there are few institutions executing Radiation Protection training. Under requirements of legal act On Frequency and Procedure of Compulsory Training and Assessment Knowledge of the Workers Engage in Activities with the Sources of Ionising Radiation and Radiation Protection Officers these institutions have to prepare and coordinate training programs with the Radiation Protection Center. There are adopted different educating programs for Radiation Protection Training to the Workers and Radiation Protection Officers depending on character of work and danger of sources. The duration of Training is from 30 to 270 hours. The Training shall be renewed every five years passing 30 hors course. To ensure the adequate quality of training a great deal of attention is paid to qualifying the lectures. For this purpose, it was established an Evaluation commission to estimate the adequacy of lecturer's knowledge to requirements of Training programs. After passing exams the lectures get the qualification confirming certificates. The main task of our days is to establish and arrange the National Training Centre on Radiation Protection Training that would satisfy requirements and recommendations of legal documents of IAEA and EU for such kind of institutions of institutions. (Author)

  16. ENSURING OF RADIATION PROTECTION DURING WORKS ON TRANSFORMATION OF THE OBJECT SHELTER INTO ECOLOGICALLY SAFE SYSTEM. BIOPHYSICAL MONITORING OF THE PERSONNEL INTERNAL EXPOSURE DOSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yu. Nechaev

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Given paper, states the ensuring of the interpretation of the basic radiation protection principles, relative to the works at the Object Shelter (OS. Analysis of the factors of radiation situation at the OS is figured out. Functioning at the present time individual dose monitoring (IDM system at the OS is describe. The system is based on the methods of biophysical monitoring. A series of the results, obtained during internal exposure individual dose monitoring of the personnel is presented. It is mentioned, that implementation of the internal exposure dose biophysical monitoring system (during the works on transformation of the OS into ecologically safe system allows:  provide adequate level of the IDM of the internal exposure dose (the level is corresponds to the present day requirements of the radiation protection; develop the recommendations on selection of individual means of protection of respiratory tract; ensure determination of the parameters of radioactive air contamination in the work areas; and, provide the optimal planning of dose load to the personnel.

  17. Ethical issues in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, Lars

    2000-03-01

    Ethical theories are relevant to the current recommendations and standards for radiation protection. Radiation protection is not only a matter for science. It is also a problem of philosophy. In order for protection regulations to be respected, it must correspond to widely accepted ethical values among those who are affected by the regulations. The workshop covered the following issues: Problems in Present Protection Policy, ICRP Protection Policy - A Historical Perspective, Radiation Risk - What we know and what we believe, Present ICRP Recommendations, Ethical Values in the Context of ICRP Recommendations, Collective Responsibility for Invisible Harm, Environmental Protection - Ethical Issues, The Global Change of Values, and Procedural justice and Radiation Protection. Six workshop contributions and a workshop summary are presented in this report

  18. Ethical issues in radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Lars (ed.)

    2000-03-15

    Ethical theories are relevant to the current recommendations and standards for radiation protection. Radiation protection is not only a matter for science. It is also a problem of philosophy. In order for protection regulations to be respected, it must correspond to widely accepted ethical values among those who are affected by the regulations. The workshop covered the following issues: Problems in Present Protection Policy, ICRP Protection Policy - A Historical Perspective, Radiation Risk - What we know and what we believe, Present ICRP Recommendations, Ethical Values in the Context of ICRP Recommendations, Collective Responsibility for Invisible Harm, Environmental Protection - Ethical Issues, The Global Change of Values, and Procedural justice and Radiation Protection. Six workshop contributions and a workshop summary are presented in this report.

  19. The role of NCRRP in education and training on radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chobanova, N.

    2017-01-01

    Radiological protection is in constant motion, raised by new developments and research in the medical and industrial sectors. Radiation protection and safety associated with the application of ionizing radiation depends strongly on the skills and expertise of the professionals. The International Basic Safety Standard places great emphasis on education and training for all persons engaged in activities relevant to the protection and safety. For the professionals involved the most critical aspect it is the radiation protection. NCRRP is an established research center for education and training in radiation protection. Training is conducted by expert trainers with years of experience in the field of radiation protection. NCRRP organized courses and individual training on topics related to radiation protection: enhancing the qualifications of professionals from the medical and non medical fields; specialized training in radiation protection of different groups of professionals working with ionizing radiation sources; postgraduate education in radiation protection education of PhD within existing academic programs and give guidance to Master Students. In parallel the NCRRP aims to play a role in national and international policy through participation in European programs. Such is “CONCERT European Joint Programme for the integration of Radiation Protection Research”. The NCRRP develops, publish and distribute programs, newsletters, manuals and information materials for the benefit of the society. The implementation of a coherent approach to education and training becomes crucial in a world of dynamic markets and increasing workers’ mobility. Keywords: education, training, radiation protection, NCRRP

  20. Ethics in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corbett, R.H.

    2002-01-01

    Ethics is a branch of philosophy. Its object is the study of both moral and immoral behaviour in order to make well founded judgements and to arrive at adequate recommendations. The Collins English Dictionary provides the following definitions of the word ethic: Ethic: a moral principle or set of moral values held by an individual or group; Ethics(singular): the philosophical study of the moral value of human conduct and of the rules and principles that ought to govern it; Ethics(pleural): a social, religious or civil code of behaviour considered correct, especially that of a particular group, profession or individual; Ethics(pleural): the moral fitness of a decision, course of action, etc. Ethics has a two-fold objective: Firstly it evaluates human practices by calling upon moral standards; it may give prescriptive advice on how to act morally in a specific kind of situation. This implies analysis and evaluation. Sometimes this is known as Normative ethics. The second is to provide therapeutic advice, suggesting solutions and policies. It must be based on well-informed opinions and requires a clear understanding of the vital issues. In the medical world, we are governed by the Hippocratic Oath. Essentially this requires medical practitioners (doctors) to do good, not harm. There is great interest and even furore regarding ethics in radiation protection

  1. Obligatory Radiation Protection Course

    CERN Multimedia

    SC Unit

    2008-01-01

    Since February 2008, participation in the radiation protection course has been a prerequisite for obtaining a CERN personal dosimeter for all Staff Members and Users. All Staff and Users holding a personal dosimeter were informed by the Bulletin and by a personal e-mail sent in February 2008 that they were required to participate in the course before the annual exchange of their dosimeter. Many people had not done so by that time and the Dosimetry Service exceptionally classified them for 2 months as short-term visitors (VCT), a category of monitored personnel to whom the training requirement does not presently apply. As all personnel concerned have since had time to participate in an RP course, this "grace period" will no longer be granted as of 1 October 2008 and the RP course must be completed before the personal dosimeter is exchanged. For newcomers to CERN, and for those returning to CERN after an absence of more than 1 year, one registration as a VCT for two months ...

  2. Development of Australia's radiation protection standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, G.C.; Lokan, K.H.

    1994-01-01

    Australia is revising its existing recommendations concerning radiation protection in the light of guidance from the International Commission on Radiological Protection's Publication 60 and the International Atomic Energy Agency's revision of its Basic Safety Standards. The paper discusses the major refinements of the ICRP's recommendations and the additional guidance on its practical implementation offered by the IAEA's new Basic Safety Standards. Following public comment, the revised Australian recommendations are expected to be adopted by the end of 1994. 15 refs

  3. Scientific aspects of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    A brief review is given of the basic radiation physics background knowledge required to aid the understanding of the scientific aspects of radiation protection. The different types of electromagnetic and particulate radiation are described together with general information on ray energy, radioactivity units and radionuclide half-life. (U.K.)

  4. XXXVI. Days of Radiation Protection. Book of Presentations and Posters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-11-01

    The publication has been set up as a book of presentations and posters of the conference dealing with health protection during work with ionizing radiation for different activities which involve the handling of ionizing radiation sources. The main conference topics are focused on current problems in radiation protection and radioecology. In this book totally 94 abstracts are published. The Conference consists of following sections: (I) General aspects and new trends of radiation protection); (II) Radiation protection in medicine; (III): Dosimetry and metrology of external and internal radiation exposure; (IV) Regulation of radiation exposure to natural sources and control of radon exposure; (V) Radiation protection in nuclear power plants, their decommissioning and waste management; (VI) Application of radiation protection standards in the emergency management; (VII) Biological effects of ionizing radiation and risk estimation; (VIII) Education and training in radiation protection in the light of new recommendations of EU, ICRP and IAEA.

  5. XXXVI. Days of Radiation Protection. Book of Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-11-01

    The publication has been set up as a proceedings of the conference dealing with health protection during work with ionizing radiation for different activities which involve the handling of ionizing radiation sources. The main conference topics are focused on current problems in radiation protection and radioecology. In this proceedings totally 93 abstracts are published. The Conference consists of following sections: (I) General aspects and new trends of radiation protection); (II) Radiation protection in medicine; (III): Dosimetry and metrology of external and internal radiation exposure; (IV) Regulation of radiation exposure to natural sources and control of radon exposure; (V) Radiation protection in nuclear power plants, their decommissioning and waste management; (VI) Application of radiation protection standards in the emergency management; (VII) Biological effects of ionizing radiation and risk estimation; (VIII) Education and training in radiation protection in the light of new recommendations of EU, ICRP and IAEA.

  6. Ethical codes. Fig leaf argument, ballast or cultural element for radiation protection?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gellermann, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    The international association for radiation protection (IRPA) adopted in May 2004 a Code of Ethics in order to allow their members to hold an adequate professional level of ethical line of action. Based on this code of ethics the professional body of radiation protection (Fachverband fuer Strahlenschutz) has developed its own ethical code and adopted in 2005.

  7. Chernobyl accident: lessons learned for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenigsberg, Jacov

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The long-term nature of the consequences of the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, which was a major technological catastrophe in terms of its scope and complexity and created humanitarian, environmental, social, economic and health consequences. After more than twenty years we can conclude that Chernobyl accident was requested the big efforts of the national governments and international organisations for improvement new approaches to radiation safety, radiation protection, health care, emergency preparedness and response. During first years after accident some response actions did more harm than good because not based on international radiation protection principles, based on criteria developed during emergency and associated with mistrust, emotions, political pressure. As a result was inappropriate government reaction: unjustified relocation and decontamination - loss jobs, homes, billions of $ cost; unjustified compensation (high portion of annual national budgets). Non-radiological (e.g. detrimental economic, social and psychological) consequences was worse than direct radiological consequences. Psychological effects do not correlate with real exposure but with perception of risk. The affected people believe in threat to their health, doubt what has been reported about accident and resulted doses, got modification in life style, have somatic complains, got substance abuse (alcohol, tranquilizers, sleeping pills). The lack of accurate information and misperception of real radiation risk is believed also to have lead to change in behavior of some affected people. Possible long-term health effect due to the accidental exposure remains an issue. There is no doubt that excess thyroid cancer incidence results from exposure to radioactive iodines, mainly by iodine-131. Radiation induced thyroid cancer could easily be prevented by timely warning, effective thyroid blocking, timely restriction of consumption for contaminated food. The

  8. Development of radiation protection and measurement technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Si Young; Lee, T. Y.; Kim, J. L.; Kim, B. H.; Lee, B. J.; Chung, K. K.; Lee, K. C.; Chung, R. I.; Han, Y. D.; Kim, J. S.; Lee, H. S.; Kim, C. K.; Yoon, K. S.; Jeong, D. Y.; Yoon, S. C.; Yoon, Y. C.; Lee, S. Y.; Kim, J. S.; Seo, K. W. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J. K.; Lee, J. K. [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    Reference X-, gamma, beta and neutron radiation fields complying with the ISO and ANSI standards have been established and evaluated to provide a basic technical support in national radiation protection dosimetry program and to provide calibration measurement devices. Personal dose evaluation algorithm has been developed with these reference radiation fields, which comply well with both domestic and the new ANSI N13.11, to evaluate accurate personal dose equivalents. A personal internal dosimetry algorithm which can estimate the intakes of radionuclides from the results of in vivo bioassay and the resulting internal doses has been developed and verified its performance. It was also evaluated to be equality excellent compared with those being used in foreign countries and used to make a computer code for internal dose evaluation which can be run with PC under the Windows environment. A BOMAB phantom for precise calibration of in vivo system has been also designed, fabricated and test-evaluated. Based on the ALARA concept of the optimization principle of radiation protection, a method for estimating the cost for radiation protection has been studied and an objective monetary cost of detriment due to radiation exposure, called {alpha} value ($/man-Sv) has been derived and proposed based on the Korean socio-economic situation and human risk factors to provide basic data for the radiation protection optimization study in Korea. (author). 100 refs., 104 tabs., 69 figs.

  9. ISO 20553 radiation protection: monitoring of workers occupationally exposed to a risk of internal contamination with radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-07-01

    Although exposure to ionizing radiation - whether accidental or chronic - carries risks, a monitoring programme plays a key role in greatly minimizing them. The new standard offers guidance for deciding whether a monitoring programme is required and how it should be designed, established and maintained. Its intention is to optimize the efforts of such a monitoring programme, consistent with legal requirements, and with the aim of the overall radiation protection programme, which starts with an assessment to identify work situations where there is a risk of radionuclide intake by workers. 'Application of this standard will enhance the harmonization of monitoring practices and facilitate the exchange of information between regulatory bodies, supervisory institutions and employers which may include nuclear facilities, hospitals, research organizations, radio pharmaceutical companies, governmental or private laboratories

  10. Relations between radiation risks and radiation protection measuring techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, K.; Kraus, W.

    Relations between radiation risks and radiation protection measuring techniques are considered as components of the radiation risk. The influence of the exposure risk on type and extent of radiation protection measurements is discussed with regard to different measuring tasks. Based upon measuring results concerning the frequency of certain external and internal occupational exposures in the GDR, it has been shown that only a small fraction of the monitored persons are subjected to a high exposure risk. As a consequence the following recommendations are presented: occupationally exposed persons with small exposure risk should be monitored using only a long-term desimeter (for instance a thermoluminescence desimeter). In the case of internal exposure, the surface and air contamination levels should be controlled so strictly that routine measurements of internal contamination need not be performed

  11. Some radiation protection problems in a cancer hospital and associated research institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trott, N.G.; Anderson, W.; Davis, R.P.; Carden, D.M.

    1980-01-01

    Experience gained at the Royal Marsden Hospital and Institute of Cancer Research has shown that with attention to the design of facilities and procedures and an active personnel monitoring policy, relatively large scale radiation commitments can proceed with individual whole body doses to staff being held well below 15 mSv/annum. In spite of detailed attention to control of radiation work, traumatic radiation incidents may still occur. (H.K.)

  12. The implementation of the operational dose quantities into radiation protection dosimetry (NRPB Association)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Riordan, M.C.; Chartier, J.L.

    1993-01-01

    The main objectives of this project are to improve the measurement of spectral and angular distributions of external radiations in the workplace and to examine the implications of these measurements for personal dosimetry. They include measurement techniques for X-ray, γ-radiation and neutron radiation, performance testing of personal dosemeters, the implications of spectral and spatial distributions measurements on personal dosimetry. (R.P.)

  13. European Radiation Protection Course - Basics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massiot, Philippe; Ammerich, Marc; Viguier, Herve; Jimonet, Christine; Bruchet, Hugues; Vivier, Alain; Bodineau, Jean-Christophe; Etard, Cecile; Metivier, Henri; Moreau, Jean-Claude; Nourredine, Abdel-Mijd

    2014-01-01

    Radiation protection is a major challenge in the industrial applications of ionising radiation, both nuclear and non-nuclear, as well as in other areas such as the medical and research domains. The overall objective of this textbook is to participate to the development of European high-quality scheme and good practices for education and training in radiation protection (RP), coming from the new Council Directive 2013/59/Euratom laying down basic safety standards for protection against the dangers arising from exposure to ionising radiation. These ERPTS (European Radiation Protection Training Scheme) reflects the needs of the Radiation Protection Expert (RPE) and the Radiation Protection Officer (RPO), specifically with respect to the Directive 2013/59/Euratom in all sectors where ionising radiation are applied. To reflect the RPE training scheme, six chapters have been developed in this textbook: Radioactivity and nuclear physics; Interaction of ionising radiation with matter; Dosimetry; Biological effects of ionising radiation; Detection and measurement of ionising radiation; Uses of sources of ionising radiation. The result is a homogeneous textbook, dealing with the ERPTS learning outcomes suggested by ENETRAPII project (European Network on Education and Training in Radiological Protection II) from the 7. Framework Programme. A cyber-book is also part of the whole training material to develop the concept of 'learning more' (http://www.rpe-training.eu). The production of this first module 'basics' training material, in the combined form of a textbook plus a cyber-book as learning tools, will contribute to facilitate mutual recognition and enhanced mobility of these professionals across the European Union. (authors)

  14. An introduction to radiation protection

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Alan; Beach, Karen; Cole, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The sixth edition of this established text takes the reader through the general background to the subject, the technical principles underlying the control of radiation hazards, radiation detection and measurement and the biological effects of radiation. These are followed by a consideration of radiation protection issues in the nuclear industry, the non-nuclear sector and the medical field. Further specialised topics include risk assessment, waste management and decommissioning, radiological incidents and emergencies, relevant legislation and organizational issues.

  15. Radiation protection in Spanish nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmena, P.; Iniguez, J.

    1997-01-01

    Radiation Protection was born as a discipline at the same time as the use of ionizing radiation, once the potential harmful effects on living beings of this new phenomenon was recognized. The evolution of the use of the nuclear energy at an industrial scale brought about the evolution of this discipline , initially in association with responsibilities relating to hygiene and safety at work and subsequently as an independent responsibility within organizations involved in nuclear electricity production. From the very beginning, in the year 1968, the Spanish nuclear plant organizations included specific resources for the radiation protection of both the plant workers and the general public living around the installations. Since that time, however, radiation protection organizations and technology have evolved considerably. The purpose of this article is to present a general overview of the current status of the radiation protection activities carried out at Spanish nuclear power plants. (Author)

  16. BNFL's experience in preparing and implementing radiation protection programmes for the control of exposure to workers involved with the international transport of nuclear cargoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billing, D.

    2004-01-01

    BNFL International Transport have successfully developed appropriate Radiation Protection Programmes for their business. The business supports BNFL's worldwide Nuclear Fuel Services with key customer bases in Europe, Japan and the UK, utilising marine, rail and road modal transports. Experience in the business spans over 4 decades. The preparation of RPP's for each aspect of its operations has been made relatively straight forward in that the key elements within the internationally recognised model RPP (by WNTI) were already in place in BNFL's procedures to satisfy current National UK and International Regulations. Arrangements are supported by Management systems which comply with International Standards for Quality Assurance. Exposure to key worker groups continues to be within Category 1 (less than 1mSv/y) of the IAEA Transport Regulations TS-R-1 (ST-1 revised)

  17. Training aspects contributing to radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, M.S.

    2001-01-01

    Radiation Protection assumes special significance with increasing use of radioactive materials and processes. Scientific and industrial organisations dealing with radioactive materials have prime responsibility of ensuring effective control of all activities which may lead to radiation exposure. Training of all the persons involved in the work associated with radioactivity is absolutely necessary to develop radiation protection skill, radiation measurement proficiency and special precautions to be taken in abnormal situations. NPCIL having responsibility for design, construction, operation and de-commissioning of nuclear power plants, employs about 10,000 workers on several project/station sites all over the country. NPCIL has developed a good training system to accurately control the exposure of workers to radiation. This paper covers the system and other relevant details of radiation protection training organised by NPCIL. (author)

  18. Strengthening the radiation protection culture: a priority of EDF radiation protection policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcier, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: In order to improve the management of radiation protection at EDF nuclear power plants, the Human Factors Group of the Research and Development Division of EDF has performed some studies on the appropriation process of the radiation protection requirements. These studies have notably shown that an efficient application of the radiation protection requirements lies on a comprehension by all workers of the meaning of these requirements. Furthermore, they should not be applied under the constraint or because of the fear of a sanction, but the workers need to perceive and understand the benefits in terms of protection associated with the radiation protection requirements. The strengthening of the radiation protection culture is therefore a key element of the radiation protection policy developed by EDF. This culture lies on an awareness of the health risks potentially associated with low levels of ionising radiations, as well as on the knowledge of tools, techniques and good practices developed to control the level of exposures and improve the radiation protection. Various type of actions have been undertaken to reinforce among the relevant players (exposed and non-exposed workers, contractors, all levels of management,... ) an awareness of radiation protection in order to integrate it in their day to day work: elaboration of a 'radiation protection system of reference' explaining how the radiation protection regulatory requirements are applied at EDF, publication of a 'radiation protection handbook' available for all workers (including contractors), training sessions, creation of networks of specialists from the various nuclear power plants on specific radiation protection issues, organisation of feed-back experience forum, etc. Beyond these specific actions, i t is also important to ensure a support and an assistance on the field by dedicated specialists. In this perspective, the health physicists have to play a key role in order to

  19. Survey of International Rules and Practices Regarding Delineation of and Access to Regulated Areas for Radiation Protection - Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schieber, C.; Crouail, P.; Beltrami, L.-A.; Reaud, C.; Lehtinen, Maaret; Stritt, Nicolas; Thomas, Gareth

    2013-06-01

    European requirements for radiological protection, especially work on transposing the new EURATOM Directive on the basic radiological protection standards, are currently being revised. The Direction generale du travail (DGT - General Directorate of Labour) and the Autorite de Surete Nucleaire (ASN - Nuclear Safety Authority) therefore commissioned the Radiological Protection Standing Groups of experts (GPRAD and GPMED)1 to engage in a forward-looking debate on the delimitation of and access to regulated areas, within an ad hoc working group (called hereafter 'Classification of Area WG'). To fuel its debates, the 'Classification of Area WG' sought elements on international regulations and practices focusing on problem exposure situations in various areas of activity (nuclear, industrial, research, medical, transport and natural boosted). CEPN was entrusted with this study. This report presents a summary of rules applicable in seven countries in terms of delimitation of and access to regulated radiological protection areas. The countries are: Belgium, Spain, United States, Finland, United Kingdom, Sweden and Switzerland. Detailed sheets for each country can be found in the Annex. Based on these summaries, three countries have been selected to apply their rules and practices in force to a dozen or so particular cases put together by the 'Classification of Area WG' that are representative of exposure situations. The three countries are Finland, United Kingdom and Switzerland. The case studies applied to each country are presented in the second part of this report

  20. Epistemology of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malcolm, C.

    2010-01-01

    The scientific committee had assess Status of levels, effects and risks of ionizing radiation for General assembly, scientific community and public. The review of levels, sources and exposures. The natural sources of radiation include cosmic rays, terrestrial and artificial sources include medical issues, military activities, civil nuclear power occupational exposure and accidents. The global average exposure is 80% natural source, 20% medical examination 0.2% weapon fallout < 0.1% cherbonyl accidents and < 0.1 nuclear power. The effects of radiation incudes health effects, hereditable effects, bystander effects, and abscopal effects. The randon risks include lancer risk, plant and animal

  1. Radiation protection experience in Yugoslavia from the Vinca accident to nowadays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninkovic, M.M

    2000-01-01

    This Paper is the expression of the author opinion about development of radiation protection in Yugoslavia from its beginning forty years ago, which might affect its status in the foreseeable future at the first decades of the 21st century. It focuses on key events in this field starting from the Vinca Accident, which happened in the October 1958, to nowadays. Shortly reviewed some of key events are: Vinca Accident; Foundation of the Radiation Protection Laboratory in the Vinca Institute; International Vinca Dosimetry Experiment; First National Symposium and foundation of the Yugoslav Radiation Protection Association; International Intercomparison Experiment on Nuclear Accident Dosimetry and, International Summer Schools and Symposium on Radiation Protection organized in Yugoslavia. Finally, some specific experimental data obtained during and after Chernobyl Accident up to nowadays in radiation protection action in Yugoslavia are presented also. (author)

  2. Radiation protection information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From the measurements and discussion presented in this report, the following conclusions may be drawn: The population doses from naturally occuring radiation is on average lower in Denmark and much lower in Iceland than in the other Nordic countries. In Sweden, Finland and Norway the largest contributors to the population doses from naturally occuring radiation are radon daughters in indoor air. For Denmark and Iceland, radon daughters contribute about the same to the total effective dose equivalent as the external gamma radiation. Some groups of people in the Nordic countries are highly exposed to radon daughters. In some cases, the received doses are very high (higher than the dose limit for radiation workers). From the conclusions above, the radon daughter problem should be given priority, at least in Sweden, Finland and Norway, especially regarding the search for population groups receiving the highest doses

  3. Healing Arts Radiation Protection Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-07-01

    The Healing Arts Radiation Protection Act is concerned with regulating the registration, installation, operation, inspection and safety of X-ray machines. The Act provides for the establishment of the Healing Arts Radiation Protection Commission which is responsible for reporting on all the above matters to the Ontario Minister of Health. In addition the board is responsible for the continuing development of an X-ray safety code and for the submission of an annual report of their activities to the minister

  4. Radiation Protection and Civil defence Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomaa, M.A.; Elshinawy, R.M.K.; Abdelfattah, A.T.

    1991-01-01

    This conference involves subjects of radiation protection, programming of civil defence, on the implementation of 1990 ICRP recommendation, thermoluminescence properties of bone equivalent calcium phosphate ceramics, potassium body burdens in occupational users of egyptian nuclear research centre, transport of radionuclides in fresh water stream, water treatment process for nuclear reactor, research activities related to internal contamination and bioassay and experience and environmental radiation monitoring in inshass. it contains of figures and tables

  5. Radiation protection in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeburrun, V.

    2013-04-01

    Radiation protection in nuclear medicine in this project is concerned with the reduction of doses to workers, patients and members of the public. Protection of workers is achieved by adopting good personal habits, good housekeeping, proper use of personal protective devices and equipment, attend training and have continuous education. Exposure to radiation of workers and the members of the public are minimised by proper management of radioactive waste and safe transport of radioactive material. The design and shielding of a nuclear medicine department shall further provide for the protection of the worker, the patient and the general public. Protection of patient is achieved by justifying the procedure, delivering the minimum radiation dose possible to the patient while obtaining the best image quality and applying guidance levels. Special considerations shall be given to pregnant and breast-feeding patients. Quality assurance programme through image quality, radiopharmaceutical quality and patient records on nuclear medicine procedures shall provide assurance to the patient. (au)

  6. Occupational radiation protection: Protecting workers against exposure to ionizing radiation. Contributed papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-07-01

    Occupational exposure to ionizing radiation can occur in a range of industries, mining and milling; medical institutions, educational and research establishments and nuclear fuel cycle facilities. The term 'occupational exposure' refers to the radiation exposure incurred by a worker, which is attributable to the worker's occupation and committed during a period of work. According to the latest (2000) Report of the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), an estimated 11 million workers are monitored for exposure to ionizing radiation. They incur radiation doses attributable to their occupation, which range from a small fraction of the global average background exposure to natural radiation up to several times that value. It should be noted that the UNSCEAR 2000 Report describes a downward trend in the exposure of several groups of workers, but it also indicates that occupational exposure is affecting an increasingly large group of people worldwide. The International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (BSS), which are co-sponsored by, inter alia, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the International Labour Organization (ILO), the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) and the World Health Organization (WHO), establish a system of radiation protection which includes radiation dose limits for occupational exposure. Guidance supporting the requirements of the BSS for occupational protection is provided in three interrelated Safety Guides, jointly sponsored by the IAEA and the ILO. These Guides describe, for example, the implications for employers in discharging their main responsibilities (such as setting up appropriate radiation protection programmes) and similarly for workers (such as properly using the radiation monitoring devices provided to them). The IAEA i organized its first International Conference on Occupational Radiation Protection. The

  7. Radiation protection in the application of ionizing radiation in industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad Yusof Mohamad Ali

    1987-01-01

    There is a substantial increase in the use of ionizing radiation in industry throughout the country especially in the last five years or so. With this growth in the number of users and activity of sources used, and together with the introduction of the new Atomic Energy Licensing Act (AELA) in 1984, the question of radiation safety and protection of workers and members of the public in general, can no longer be taken lightly. It has to be dealt with effectively. In this paper, a general discussion and clarification on certain practical aspects of radiation protection as recommended by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is presented. Amongst the topics chosen are those on area monitoring, personnel monitoring, leak testing of sealed sources and training of personnel. Also presented in the paper is a brief discussion about UTN's experience in giving out radiation protection services to various agencies throughout the country. (author)

  8. Radiation protection, 1975. Annual EPA review of radiation protection activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-06-01

    The EPA, under its Federal Guidance authorities, is responsible for advising the President on all matters pertaining to radiation and, through this mechanism, to provide guidance to other Federal agencies on radiation protection matters. Highlights are presented of significant radiation protection activities of all Federal agencies which were completed in 1975, or in which noteworthy progress was made during that period, and those events affecting members of the public. State or local activities are also presented where the effects of those events may be more far-reaching. At the Federal level significant strides have been made in reducing unnecessary radiation exposure through the efforts of the responsible agencies. These efforts have resulted in the promulgation of certain standards, criteria and guides. Improved control technologies in many areas make it feasible to reduce emissions at a reasonable cost to levels below current standards and guides. This report provides information on the significant activities leading to the establishment of the necessary controls for protection of public health and the environment. Radiation protection activities have been undertaken in other areas such as medical, occupational and consumer product radiation. In the context of radiation protection, ancillary activities are included in this report in order to present a comprehensive overview of the events that took place in 1975 that could have an effect on public health, either directly or indirectly. Reports of routine or continuing radiation protection operations may be found in publications of the sponsoring Federal agencies, as can more detailed information about activities reported in this document. A list of some of these reports is included

  9. International Conference Medical Radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Full text : The second edition of the international conference Medical radiation : research and applications which took place in Marrakech (Morocco) from 7 to 9 April 2010, was designed to bring together researchers and physicians from different countries who dedicated their talents and time to this endeavour. The conference's program defined goals were is to identify the most reliable techniques among the several tested so far and to establish the most practical standardized methodologies, taking into account such recent technological development in radiation medical research. The scientific objectives of this conference are as follows : present the state of the art of the various topics of the congress, give a progress report on the impact of the interaction of the various scientific and technical disciplinary fields (Medicine, Biology, Mathematics, Physics,..) on the applications of radiations in medicine, promote the interdisciplinary efforts of research among researchers, present new technologies and research and development tasks prepared in the field of medical radiations, contribute to the emergence of new ideas of research and development of new collaborations [fr

  10. Protective prostheses during radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poole, T.S.; Flaxman, N.A.

    1986-01-01

    Current applications and complications in the use of radiotherapy for the treatment of oral malignancy are reviewed. Prostheses are used for decreasing radiation to vital structures not involved with the lesion but located in the field of radiation. With a program of oral hygiene and proper dental care, protective prostheses can help decrease greatly the morbidity seen with existing radiotherapy regimens

  11. Proceedings of Asia congress on radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    203 articles were collected in the proceedings. The contents of the proceedings included the principle and practices of radiation protection, biological effects of radiation, radiation monitoring, protection in medical and other fields, radiation dosimetry, nuclear energy and the environment, natural radiation, radioactive waste management, and other radiation protection issues

  12. Foundations of radiation physics and radiation protection. 5. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krieger, Hanno

    2017-01-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Types of radiation and radiation fields, the atomic structure, radioactive decays, decay law, natural and artificial radioactivity, interactions of ionizing photon radiation, attenuation of neutral-particle beams, interactions of neutron radiation, interactions of charged particles, ionization and energy transfer, radiation doses, radiation protection phantoms, foundations of the radiation biology of cells, effects and risks of ionizing radiation, radiation expositions of men with ionizing radiation, radiation protection law, practical radiation protection against ionizing radiations, radiation eposures in medical radiology. (HSI)

  13. Implication on future priorities in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchmann, R.

    1986-01-01

    As a result of the consequences of the Chernobyl accident, the aspects of health effects from radiation as well as the protection norms are reviewed. In particular the radioprotection of the workers and the population, the emergency planning and the information of the public at national and international levels are discussed. (A.F.)

  14. Radiation protection: Philosophy, recommendations and practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodhead, D.S.

    1997-01-01

    The philosophy developed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection for the control of human radiation exposure will be described. The application of the ICRP recommendations to the authorization and control of the disposal of radioactive wastes to the sea will be discussed in the context of the practice in the United Kingdom. (author)

  15. Radiation Protection, Nuclear Safety and Security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faye, Ndeye Arame Boye; Ndao, Ababacar Sadikhe; Tall, Moustapha Sadibou

    2014-01-01

    Senegal has put in place a regulatory framework which allows to frame legally the use of radioactive sources. A regulatory authority has been established to ensure its application. It is in the process of carrying out its regulatory functions. It cooperates with appropriate national or international institutions operating in fields related to radiation protection, safety and nuclear safety.

  16. Radiation Protection Research: Radiobiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desaintes, C

    2000-07-01

    The main objectives of research in the field of radiobiology and epidemiology performed at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN are (1) to study cancer mortality in nuclear workers in Belgium; to document the feasibility of retrospective cohort studies in Belgium; (2) to participate in the IARC study; (3) to elucidate the molecular basis of the effects of ionising radiation in the mammalian embryo during the early phases of its development; (4) to assess the genetic risk of maternal exposure to ionizing radiation; (5) to elucidate the cellular mechanisms leading to brain damage after prenatal irradiation; (6) to advise authorities and to provide the general population with adequate information concerning the health risk arising from radiation exposure. Progress and major achievements in these topical areas in 1999 are reported.

  17. Radiation protection - the unions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacques, P.

    1983-01-01

    A brief report is given of a paper presented at the symposium on 'Radiation and the Worker - where do we go from here' in London 1983. The paper concerned trade union viewpoints on the draft of the proposed Ionising Radiations Regulations in the Health and Safety Commission Consultative Document. The main contentious issue was that the 5 rem dose limit might have been lower if ICRP had agreed to involve employers and the trade union movement in their considerations. However, it was concluded that, on balance, the trade union movement would welcome the proposed Regulations. (U.K.)

  18. On the Occasion of the 50th Anniversary of Organised Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciraj-Bjelac, O.; Kovacevic, M.; Pantelic, G.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation protection, both as a multidisciplinary scientific discipline and as an attitude, has largely contributed to the protection of man and the environment against the potential harm of ionizing radiation, allowing its beneficial and safe use. Over the past decades, almost a century, professionals active in the domain of radiation protection have immensely contributed to the development of legislation and regulations, to monitoring and control, to prediction of consequences and to the assessment of risks. This paper summarizes evolution and achievements of the radiation protection professionals in the region known as former Yugoslavia the occasion of the fifty years of organized professional activities in the area of radiation protection. The paper covers activities related to the early days of the radiation protection association brings the information about relevant activities as organization of symposia and other meetings, participation in international organizations and publishing activities of the society.(author)

  19. Radiation protection Ordinance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-06-01

    This Ordinance lays down the licensing system for activities in Switzerland involving possible exposure to radiation, with the exception of nuclear installations, fuels and radioactive waste which, under the 1959 Atomic Energy Act, are subject to licensing. The Ordinance applies to the production, handling, use, storage, transport, disposal, import and export of radioactive substances and devices and articles containing them; and generally to any activity involving hazards caused by ionizing radiation. The Federal Public Health Office is the competent authority for granting licences. Provision is also made for the administrative conditions to be complied with for obtaining such licences as well as for technical measures required when engaged in work covered by the Ordinance. This consolidated version of the Ordinance contains all the successive amendments up to 26 September 1988. (NEA) [fr

  20. Standard radiation protection instructions. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, F.; Bauer, N.; Haug, T.; Koehler, G.; Poulheim, K.F.

    1992-01-01

    The booklet presents case-specific standard instructions compiled by the Arbeitskreis Ausbildung of the Fachverband Strahlenschutz (Radiation Protection Association) for: (1) work requiring a permit according to section 20 of the Radiation Protection Ordinance, performed by external personnel; (2) the installation, maintenance, transport and storage of ionization smoke detectors; (3) application of gamma-ray and X-ray equipment; (4) the testing of X-ray equipment and equipment emitting stray radiation at the stage of manufacturing; (5) application of Ni-63 electron capture detectors. (HP) [de

  1. Third conference on radiation protection and dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This conference has been designed with the objectives of promoting communication among applied, research, regulatory, and standards personnel involved in radiation protection and providing them with sufficient information to evaluate their programs. To partly fulfill these objectives, a technical program consisting of more than 75 invited and contributed oral presentations encompassing all aspects of radiation protection has been prepared. General topics include external dosimetry, internal dosimetry, instruments, regulations and standards, accreditation and test programs, research advances, and applied program experience. This publication provides a summary of the technical program and a collection of abstracts of the oral presentations

  2. Radiation protection measurement. Philosophy and implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recht, P.; Lakey, J.R.A.

    1975-01-01

    A selection from the proceedings of the International Symposium held by the U.K. Society for radiological protection in June 1974 was presented. The central theme was the philosophy of radiation protection measurement and its interpretation although some specific areas of good health physics practice were included. The 28 papers selected were chosen to be either representative of the central theme or of wider interest. The papers have been grouped in 6 main sections: philosophy of measurements; interpretation of measurements; implementation by legislation and monitoring; radiation exposure and control; reactor safety and siting; accidents

  3. Amendment of the guideline for physical radiation protection monitoring of internal exposure; Novellierung der Richtlinie fuer die physikalische Strahlen-Schutzkontrolle bei innerer Exposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheler, R.; Dalheimer, A.; Dettmann, K.; Frasch, G.; Hartmann, M.; Koenig, K.; Nosske, D. [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz Berlin/Oberschleissheim (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    The paper deals with the current status of the revised version of the Guideline for Radiation Protection Surveillance. The consequences of the amended Radiation Protection Ordinance of July 20, 2001, especially the reduced dose limits and the protection of the unborn child in case of occupational radiation exposure are discussed in detail. Moreover, a general survey of the intended regulations is given and the new content of the guideline is explained. (orig.)

  4. New radiobiological, radiation risk and radiation protection paradigms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodhead, Dudley T.

    2010-01-01

    The long-standing conventional paradigm for radiobiology has formed a logical basis for the standard paradigm for radiation risk of cancer and heritable effects and, from these paradigms, has developed the internationally applied system for radiation protection, but with many simplifications, assumptions and generalizations. A variety of additional radiobiological phenomena that do not conform to the standard paradigm for radiobiology may have potential implications for radiation risk and radiation protection. It is suggested, however, that the current state of knowledge is still insufficient for these phenomena, individually or collectively, to be formulated systematically into a new paradigm for radiobiology. Additionally, there is at present lack of direct evidence of their relevance to risk for human health, despite attractive hypotheses as to how they might be involved. Finally, it remains to be shown how incorporation of such phenomena into the paradigm for radiation protection would provide sufficient added value to offset disruption to the present widely applied system. Further research should aim for better mechanistic understanding of processes such as radiation-induced genomic instability (for all radiation types) and bystander effects (particularly for low-fluence high-LET particles) and also priority should be given to confirmation, or negation, of the relevance of the processes to human health risks from radiation.

  5. Encouraging the radiation protection practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Natanael O.; Cunha, Paulo C.N.; Junior, Jose N.S.; Silva, Jessyca B.

    2013-01-01

    The radiological protection of workers occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation (X-ray diagnoses, Nuclear Medicine, Radiotherapy and Dental) is essential to minimize the appearance of radiation effects. The ways to reduce the potential for exposure of workers are: Time, Distance , and Shielding. The most important purpose of radiation protection is to provide safe conditions for activities involving ionizing radiation, basic safety conditions that must be observed in professional practice. The professional must have full knowledge of the subject and deepen in the revision of norms and guidelines related to radiation protection establish by the Vigilancia Sanitaria - ANVISA, and Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear - CNEN, Brazil. The study was conducted in a technical school for the Technical Training Course in Radiology, where the students are invited to think deeply about the radiation protection of themselves, the patients and the environment. Developed since July 2012, with the participation of 30 students, with a leading class -three teachers assisting in the development of the project . With this project there was an awareness of both students, as instructors stage accompanying the daily lives of students and their own colleagues. Following the same objective in 2013 the project continues with more adept at radioprotection

  6. Radiation protection in medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sacc, R.A.; Rubiolo, J.; Herrero, F.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: The goal of this paper is to identify the areas in which radiation protection is actually needed and the relative importance of protection measures. A correlation between the different medical applications of the ionizing radiations and the associated risks, mainly due to ignorance, has been a constant throughout the history of mankind. At the beginning, the accidents were originated in research nuclear laboratories working on the atomic bomb, while the incidents occurred in medical areas because of virtual ignorance of the harmful effects on humans. The 60's were characterized by the oil fever, which produced innumerable accidents due to the practice of industrial radiography; in the 70's the use of radiations on medical applications was intensified, to such and extent that a new type of victim appeared: the patient. Unfortunately, during 80's and 90's the number of accidents in different medical practices has increased, projecting the occurred in Zaragoza (Spain) on 1990 with a linear accelerator for radiotherapy treatments. In some developed countries, foreseeing the probability of producing biological effects as a result of different radiology practices, more strict security rules are adopted to guarantee the application of the three principles of the radioprotection: justification, optimization and limitation of individual dose. In this way, in the U.S.A., the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Health Care Organization (JCAHO), favors a vigilance politics in the different departments of Radiodiagnostic and Nuclear Medicine to secure an effective management in security, communications and quality control, in which the medical physicists play an important role. One of the requirements for example is to attach the value of entrance exposition dose in the radiological diagnostic report. So, the doses in the different organs are compared with the tabulated doses. Basically, a quality control programme is designed to minimize the risks for patients

  7. Actual global problems of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninkovic, M.

    1995-01-01

    Personal views on some actual problems in radiation protection are given in this paper. Among these problems are: evolution methodology used in radiation protection regulations; radiation protection, nuclear energy and safety, and new approaches to the process of the hazardous substances management. An interesting fact relating to the X-ray, radiation protection and Nikola Tesla are given also. (author)

  8. Discussion on several problems in evolution of radiation protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziqiang, P.

    2004-01-01

    As viewed from the standpoint of radiation protection practice, it is necessary that the current system of radiological protection should be made more simple and coherent. The human-based protective measures alone are far from having met the requirements of environmental protection in many circumstances. Protecting the environment from ionising radiation would be implicated in radiation protection. Collective dose is an useful indicator, of which applicable extent should be defined. Using such an quantity could help improve radiation protection level, but applicable conditions should be indicated, temporal or spatial. Natural radiation is the largest contributor to the radiation exposure of human. Occupational exposure from natural radiation should be controlled, for occupations such as underground miners and air crew. Controlling both man-made and natural radiation exposure of pregnant women and children needs to be enhanced, especially radiological diagnosis and treatment. China radiation protection community, as a whole, is paying considerable attention to the ICRP's new Recommendations. Prof. Clarke's article 'A Report on Progress towards New Recommendations', a communication from the International Commission on Radiological Protection, has been translated into Chinese and published on Radiation Protection, the Official Journal of China Radiation Protection Society with a view of intensifying awareness of the new Recommendations within more radiation protection workers and people concerned. In addition, a special meeting was convened in early 2002 to address the comments on the new Recommendations. (author)

  9. Deficiencies in radiation protection record systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.B.; Lyon, M.

    1991-01-01

    Radiation protection records are a fundamental part of any program for protecting radiation workers. Records are essential to epidemiological studies of radiation workers and are becoming increasingly important as the number of radiation exposure litigation cases increases. Ready retrievability of comprehensive records is also essential to the adequate defense of a radiation protection program. Appraisals of numerous radiation protection programs have revealed that few record-keeping systems comply with American National Standards Institute, Standard Practice N13.6-1972. Record-keeping requirements and types of deficiencies in radiation protection records systems are presented in this paper, followed by general recommendations for implementing a comprehensive radiation protection records system

  10. The International Employment Protection Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otenko Pavlo V.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the need for corporate protection of staff in accordance with both the European and the International labor law. The author defines the essence of the category of «protection of staff», its constituent elements and the importance of function of this mechanism in terms of corporate security. The main methods used in the international practice to achieve a high degree of protection of staff have been systematized and presented. The main stages of development and tendencies concerning the formation of instruments for protection of staff have been analyzed, and the principal indices to assess the degree of protection of staff have been determined.

  11. IAEA occupational radiation protection programme: current status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deboodt, P.; Mrabit, K.

    2006-01-01

    As stated in Art.III.A.6 of its Statute, the International Atomic Energy Agency (commonly referred to as the Agency) is authorized to establish or adopt, in consultation and, where appropriate, in collaboration with the competent organs of the United Nations and with the specialized agencies concerned, standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property (including such standards for labour conditions), and to provide for the application of these standards to its own operation as well as to the operations making use of materials, services, equipment, facilities, and information made available by the Agency or at its request or under its control or supervision. The Agency s Occupational Radiation Protection Programme aims at harmonizing infrastructures for the control of radiation exposure of workers and for optimizing radiation protection in situation s of exposures due to external radiation and intakes of radionuclides from both artificial and natural sources of radiation. Under its regular and technical cooperation programmes, the Agency has been assigning high priority to both the establishment of safety standards for labour conditions and for the application of these standards through, Interalia, direct assistance under its technical cooperation (TC) programme, the rendering of services, the promotion of education and training, the fostering of information exchange and the coordination of research and development. The purpose of this paper is to present the current status and future IAEA activities in support of occupational radiation protection. (authors)

  12. Designing radiation protection signs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, M.A.; Richey, C.L.

    1995-01-01

    Entry into hazardous areas without the proper protective equipment is extremely dangerous and must be prevented whenever possible. Current postings of radiological hazards at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) do not incorporate recent findings concerning effective warning presentation. Warning information should be highly visible, quickly, and easily understood. While continuing to comply with industry standards (e.g., Department of Energy (DOE) guidelines), these findings can be incorporated into existing radiological sign design, making them more effective in terms of usability and compliance. Suggestions are provided for designing more effective postings within stated guidelines

  13. Preventive radiation protection in Hamburg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boikat, U.; Lauer, R.; Plath, S.; Sachde, Z.G.

    2001-01-01

    Monitoring of environmental radioactivity as well as complex investigations for precautionary radiation protection are carried out in Hamburg by two radiation monitoring labs. The spectrum of their tasks is specified by the media to be investigated. The tasks are originating from the Federal Precautionary Radiation Protection Act and from local needs. Mostly since a lot of years all interesting materials are analysed for their radioactivity content, as a safe and precautionary radiation protection demands. Until today samples show the influence of global nuclear weapon fallout of the period until 1964. Partly they show the radioactivity of Caesium originating from the Chernobyl accident. Since ten years the radioactivity contents in the material investigated are decreasing. Mostly the activity reached levels as at the end of 1985. The basic food stuff investigated in Hamburg can be considered as to be uncontaminated by radioactivity. With the introduction of the Federal Precautionary Radiation Protection Act, a series of new investigation programs and investigation methods were developed. This allows a better preparedness for extraordinary situations of increased radioactivity in the environment as 12 years ago. Thus a precise assessment of situations of increased radioactivity levels can be given together with coordinated and solid information to the public concerning provisions and actions. (orig.) [de

  14. PET scan and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoya, F.; Lahmi, A.; Rousseau, A.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose was the optimization of the radiation protection during examinations with 18 F-FDG, The immediate validation by the D.G.S.N.R., the results of dosimetry (h.p.10 = 12 μ sievert (average value/ technician / day for 6 patients) demonstrate the efficiency of the implemented means. From the very beginning, the installation of a PET-scanner requires a multidisciplinary conception. This essential thought contributes to an optimal radiation protection of the entire personnel of the service. (N.C.)

  15. Radiation protection/shield design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disney, R.K.

    1977-01-01

    Radiation protection/shielding design of a nuclear facility requires a coordinated effort of many engineering disciplines to meet the requirements imposed by regulations. In the following discussion, the system approach to Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) radiation protection will be described, and the program developed to implement this approach will be defined. In addition, the principal shielding design problems of LMFBR nuclear reactor systems will be discussed in realtion to LWR nuclear reactor system shielding designs. The methodology used to analyze these problems in the U.S. LMFBR program, the resultant design solutions, and the experimental verification of these designs and/or methods will be discussed. (orig.) [de

  16. Activities of Radiation Protection Centre in 2000

    CERN Document Server

    Radiat. Prot. Cent. Vilnius

    2001-01-01

    Description of the activities of Radiation Protection Centre in 2000 is presented. Radiation Protection Centre is responsible for radiation protection issues. Currently there are six departments at Radiation Protection Centre: two in Vilnius - Department of Radiation Protection Supervision and Control and Department of Programs and Expertise, and four in the districts. Brief information on subject controlled by each departments is provided focusing on main achievements and events.

  17. Procedure and methodology of Radiation Protection optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hengde

    1995-01-01

    Optimization of Radiation Protection is one of the most important principles in the system of radiation protection. The paper introduces the basic principles of radiation protection optimization in general, and the procedure of implementing radiation protection optimization and methods of selecting the optimized radiation protection option in details, in accordance with ICRP 55. Finally, some economic concepts relating to estimation of costs are discussed briefly

  18. Code of practice of radiation protection in fixed nuclear gauges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eltayeb, M. A. M.

    2012-09-01

    The present work aims at developing and updating a code of practice of radiation protection in fixed nuclear gauges that comply with current international recommendations. The work also intended to evaluate the current radiation protection situation in two selected companies using nuclear gauges in Sudan. A draft of the code is proposed which includes the basic principle of protection such as source construction and gauges radiation monitoring, storage maintenance and leak testing as well as specific issues related to nuclear gauges. The practical part of this study included investigation of radiation protection in the comparisons using nuclear gauges for level detection, to evaluate the level of radiation protection and the compliance to the regulatory authority regulations. The result revealed that the two companies do not have an effective radiation protection program and that can lead to exposure of workers to unnecessary doses. Some recommendations were stated, if implemented they could improve the status of radiation protection in those companies. (Author)

  19. Philosophy of radiological protection and radiation hazard protection law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kai, Michiaki; Kawano, Takao

    2013-01-01

    The radiation protection and the human safety in radiation facilities are strictly controlled by law. There are rules on the radiation measurement, too. In the present review, philosophy of the radiological protection and the radiation hazard protection law is outlined with reference to ICRP recommendations. (J.P.N.)

  20. XXX. Days of Radiation Protection. Conference Proceedings of the 30-th Days of Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-11-01

    The publication has been set up as a proceedings of the conference dealing with health protection during work with ionizing radiation for different activities which involve the handling of ionizing radiation sources. The main conference topics are focused on current problems in radiation protection and radioecology. In this proceedings totally 107 papers are published. The Conference consists of following sections: Effects of ionizing radiation; Regulation of radiation protection; Dosimetry and Metrology of ionizing radiation; Radiation protection in nuclear Power plants; Medical exposure and radiation protection in diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine and radiation oncology; Natural radioactivity issues in radiation protection; Education, societal aspects and public involvement in radiation protection, trends and perspectives

  1. Radiation Protection Research: Radioecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandecasteele, C.; Vandenhove, H.

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of SCK-CEN's Radioecology programme are (1) to evaluate, based on laboratory and field experiments, the mechanisms and dynamic (fluxes) of radionuclide transfers in the biosphere, considering all factors affecting the transfer parameters and their variability; (2) to develop and optimise models to predict the fate of radionuclides in the biosphere; (3) to advise on appropriate countermeasures and remediation options to reduce public exposure to artificial and man-enhanced natural radioactivity and to evaluate their feasibility, cost effectiveness and sustainable character; (4) to provide information to national and international authorities to enable these to assess the consequences of routine and accidental releases for populations and to select the most adequate mitigation actions. Main achievements in 1999 are reported

  2. Radiation and Environmental Protection Programme for the First Upcoming Nuclear Power Plant in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syahrir

    2007-01-01

    Indonesia plans to operate the first nuclear power plant (NPP) by 2016. A radiation and environmental protection arrangement for NPPs is part of the whole safety system which is embedded in every practice involved radiation exposure to workers and members of public. A radiation and environmental protection programme for the NPP should adhere to international standards and mainstream in order to be acceptable to the public and international communities. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has recommended a radiation protection standard for NPPs as studied in this paper. Focus is given to the operational aspects of radiation protection program and discharge control to the environment. Some documents related to Safety Analysis Reports were used as working examples on its implementation. The study includes the classification of working areas and access control; local rules and supervision of work; work planning and work permits; protective clothing and protective equipment; facilities, shielding and equipment; application of the principle of optimization of protection; and removal or reduction in intensity of sources of radiation. The radiological protection aspects blend together in the whole NPP practices, each individual has his/her own responsibility in association with the radiation protection program implementation. It also present in the whole steps of NPP preparation up to its decommissioning. Promise on safety improvement and significant dose reduction in the recent development in NPP technology should scrutinized so that the option of proven technology as required in commercial power reactor licensing considers this tendency. (author)

  3. RCA - a regional approach to radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, R.; Easey, J.

    1996-01-01

    The Regional Cooperative Agreement (RCA) for Asia and Oceania is the oldest of four International Atomic Energy Agency Member State regional programs. Organized in 1972, 17 countries are now members of RCA - Australia, Bangladesh, Peoples Republic of China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Republic of Korea, Malaysia, Mongolia, Myanmar, New Zealand, Pakistan, Philippines, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Viet Nam. A number of projects related to the application of a wide range of nuclear technologies are conducted through RCA. The program is established by national coordinators for each project area, in consultation with IAEA technical officers. Most of the funding comes directly from RCA regional donor countries, with about one third supplied through the IAEA Technical Cooperation program. In 1986, following the Chernobyl accident, national coordinators and the IAEA staff recognized the value of establishing an RCA project aimed at strengthening regional radiation protection programs. The potential importance of RCA involvement in radiation protection is underscored by the fact that its member states comprise more than half of the world's population. The regional approach to addressing radiation protection issues allows member states to take advantage of regional resources to solve common regional problems. RCA provides the opportunity for specialists who may have few professional colleagues in their country to develop valuable contacts with regional radiation protection experts. In a very real way, specialists can network with their neighbours, often establishing bilateral programs outside of the RCA auspices. The current five year RCA Project to strengthen radiation protection infrastructure, with the IAEA designation - RAS/9/006, will be completed at the end of 1997. The project was developed to address five mayor areas of activity: Off-site emergency response; individual monitoring, internal and external; characterization of the physical, anatomical, physiological

  4. Symposium on radiation protection in neighbouring countries in Central Europe - 1995. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glavic-Cidro, D.

    1996-01-01

    The 1995 Symposium on Radiation Protection in Neighbouring Countries in Central Europe was a continuation of a series of conferences held by radiation protection societies and/or associations in Central Europe to promote the knowledge in radiation protection and to exchange scientific information and experience between countries in this region. Radiation hazards present a small part of all hazards to which the mankind is exposed these days. However, radiation protection do have a leading role in creating a strategy to minimize and regulate practices where various hazards are involved. This time the symposium was organized by Radiation Protection Association of Slovenia and J. Stefan Institute in cooperation with Austrian Association for Radiation Protection, Croatian Radiation Protection Association, Czech Society for Radiation Protection, Health Physics Section of Hungary, Italian Radiation Protection Association and Slovak Society of Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Hygiene. It was held in Portoroz, Slovenia. 112 papers were contributed as oral or poster presentations by 194 authors from 15 countries and two international organizations. Papers and posters covered a wide range of subjects, including: radiation protection at work place, natural radioactivity, nuclear instrumentation and dosimetry, emergency exposure situations, waste management, radiation protection principles and policies, radiation protection infrastructure, education, training and public relations and non-ionizing radiation. The well being of humans and other biota is tied in a very fundamental way to the environment, which make the environment a primary target for protection. That's why we believe that the activities of our Societies in future should be aimed at the protection of the environment in general, through a global and multi-disciplinary approach and the symposium demonstrated that there is a clear need for international communication and co-operation. The symposium was sponsored by

  5. Non-ionizing radiation and health protection problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jammet, Henri.

    1979-01-01

    Wavelength and frequency are two closely related properties which determine the characteristics of any particular type of electromagnetic radiation and which can be used interchangeably to describe it. For protection purposes the determination of the energy absorbed (absorbed dose) and of its distribution within living systems, whatever the radiation concerned, is still one of the chief problems to be solved. Therefore, although thermal effects are often prevailing, no appropriate dose-effect relationships could be established in most cases and more particularly as far as non-thermal effects are concerned. The problems associated with the different types of NIR are briefly reviewed. An increasing number of countries is promulgating regulatory measures for limiting exposure to NIR of occupationally exposed individuals and of the general population. Harmonization of basic concepts and internationally acceptable protection standards are therefore urgently needed. IRPA is probably the only international, non-governmental scientific organization able to promote wide international and interdisciplinary cooperation in the field of health protection against NIR. Therefore, after having carefully considered the situation, IRPA felt that it was its responsibility to produce guidance on basic protection criteria and standards and created the International NIR-Committee with the objective of developing background documents and internationally accepted recommendations

  6. Radiation protection in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piechowski, J.; Lochard, J.; Lefaure, Ch.; Schieber, C.; Schneider, Th; Lecomte, J.F.; Delmont, D.; Boitel, S.; Le Fauconnier, J.P.; Sugier, A; Zerbib, J.C.; Barbey, P.

    1998-01-01

    Close ties exist between nuclear safety and radiation protection. Nuclear safety is made up of all the arrangements taken to prevent accidents occurring in nuclear facilities, these accidents would certainly involved a radiological aspect. Radiation protection is made up of all the arrangements taken to evaluate and reduce the impact of radiation on workers or population in normal situations or in case of accident. In the fifties the management of radiological hazards was based on the quest for minimal or even zero risk. This formulation could lead to call some activities in question whereas the benefits for the whole society were evident. Now a new attitude more aware of the real risks and of no wasting resources prevails. This attitude is based on the ALARA principle whose purpose is to maintain the exposure to radiation as low as reasonably achievable taking into account social and economic concerns. This document regroups articles illustrating different aspects of the radiation protection in nuclear facilities such as a research center, a waste vitrification workshop and a nuclear power plant. The surveillance of radiological impacts of nuclear sites on environment is examined, a point is made about the pending epidemiologic studies concerning La Hague complex. (A.C.)

  7. Chemical protection against ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livesey, J.C.; Reed, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    Over 40 years have passed since the research of the Manhattan Project suggested the possibility of chemical protection against ionizing radiation. During that time, much has been learned about the nature of radiation-induced injury and the factors governing the expression of that injury. Thousands of compounds have been tested for radioprotective efficacy, and numerous theories have been proposed to account for these actions. The literature on chemical radioprotection is large. In this article, the authors consider several of the mechanisms by which chemicals may protect against radiation injury. They have chosen to accent this view of radioprotector research as opposed to that research geared toward developing specific molecules as protective agents because they feel that such an approach is more beneficial in stimulating research of general applicability. This paper describes the matrix of biological factors upon which an exogenous radioprotector is superimposed, and examines evidence for and against various mechanisms by which these agents may protect biological systems against ionizing radiation. It concludes with a brief outlook for research in chemical radioprotection

  8. Radiation protection in veterinary radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hone, C.P.

    1989-06-01

    This Code of Practice is designed to give guidance to veterinary surgeons in ensuring that workers and members of the public are adequately protected from the hazards of ionising radiation arising from the use of x-ray equipment in veterinary practice. (author)

  9. Radiation protection and radiological cleanliness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stricker, L.

    1999-01-01

    The improvement of radiation protection goes through the management, the way of doing at work, the rigor in daily activities; recent difficulties show that the vigilance must not be relaxed. That is what should allow to E.D.F to progress beyond the only application of regulation by the implication of everybody. (N.C.)

  10. Radiation protection training programmes Spanish approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arboli, M. Marco; Suarez, M. Rodriguez; Cabrera, S. Falcon

    2002-01-01

    Radiation Protection Programmes are being considered the best way to promote safety culture and to spread and propagate European basic safety standards. It is widely accepted that training is an important tool to upgrade competence for radiation exposed workers. The Spanish Radiation Protection Education and Training Programmes provide a solid and integrated educational model, which takes into account the variety of applied fields, the different levels of responsibilities, the technological and methodological advances, as well as the international tendencies. The needs for a specialised training on Radiation Protection (RP) for exposed workers appears into the Spanish regulation in 1964. National initial training programmes are well established since 1972. Individual certifications, based on personal licences are required for exposed workers. The Spanish regulation also includes continuous and on the job RP training. The educational programmes are being continuously updating and improving. CIEMAT plays an important role in RP Spanish training, improving and modifying the previous RP courses and developing new programmes in order to complete the RP training levels. To achieve Radiation Protection objectives, new technological media for educational methods and material are taking into account. Nevertheless, Spanish RP education and training model has to be improved in some aspects. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the situation and the future needs to be considered in order to complete the RP training processes

  11. Regulations for radiation protection in industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    These Regulations specify that responsibility for applying radiation protection regulations in industrial radiography rests with the owner of the establishment who will designate a radiation protection officer to this effect. They provide for the organisation of radiation protection, including the measures to be observed, exposure limits, etc. The competent authority for these questions is the State Institute of Radiation Hygiene [fr

  12. Biological protection against nuclear radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mateescu, Silvia; Stanciu, Marcela

    2001-01-01

    This monograph is addressed to physicists, chemists, engineers, under-, graduated and enrolled towards PhD degree students, wishing to orient their activity towards research, design, education or production in nuclear power and nuclear technology field. Specifically, the work deals with the biological protection against nuclear radiations. The chapter 1 presents selectively the nuclear radiation types, the interaction of neutrons, gamma radiations and charged particles with matter. Particularly focused is the issue of biological effects of nuclear radiations and the implied permissible limits of irradiation. Chapter 2 describes one of the most intense sources of nuclear radiation, namely, the reactor core; reviewed are the reactor neutron spectra, as well as, the spectra of primary and secondary radiations. Chapter 3 deals with the activation process as a source of nuclear radiations; analyzed are the processes of activation of coolant, structural elements and soils, as well as the tritium production. Chapter 4 treats the nuclear fission process and formation of fission products, another major source of radiations. The principal features of fission products are mentioned such as: decay characteristics, fission yields, fission product activity, decay heat. Chapter 5 tackles the problem of influence of geometric form of the source upon radiation flux spatial distribution. In chapter 6 briefly are described the elements of neutron transport theory, diffusion equation, neutron slowing-down, age theory, i.e. all the knowledge implied in neutron attenuation calculation in shields. Chapter 7 deals with gamma radiation attenuation in shields, namely, spatial distribution of gamma-ray dose rates from point-like sources in an infinite medium, gamma radiation build-up factors, etc. In chapter 8 the phenomenon of heating of biological shields due to nuclear radiation is described. Calculation of heat rate generated by gamma and neutron radiation is sketched. Chapter 9 treats

  13. Radiation protection at nuclear fuel cycle facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Kuniaki; Momose, Takumaro; Furuta, Sadaaki

    2011-07-01

    Radiation protection methodologies concerning individual monitoring, workplace monitoring and environmental monitoring in nuclear fuel facilities have been developed and applied to facilities in the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories (NCL) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) for over 40 y. External exposure to photon, beta ray and neutron and internal exposure to alpha emitter are important issues for radiation protection at these facilities. Monitoring of airborne and surface contamination by alpha and beta/photon emitters at workplace is also essential to avoid internal exposure. A critical accident alarm system developed by JAEA has been proved through application at the facilities for a long time. A centralised area monitoring system is effective for emergency situations. Air and liquid effluents from facilities are monitored by continuous monitors or sampling methods to comply with regulations. Effluent monitoring has been carried out for 40 y to assess the radiological impacts on the public and the environment due to plant operation.

  14. Radiation and man. From radiology to radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-04-01

    Man first became aware of the invisible radiation surrounding him in 1895, when Wilhelm Roentgen showed that a photographic plate could be affected by an invisible radiation capable of passing through matter. He called this radiation 'X-rays' from X, the unknown. Doctors immediately saw the usefulness of this type of radiation and began to use it in medical research. This was the birth of radiology. 'Mankind has been exposed to radiation since his first appearance on Earth. We first became aware of this at the end of the 19. century'. However, it was not long before some of the doctors and radiologists treating their patients with X-rays began to fall ill. It began to be understood that exposure to high doses of radiation was dangerous and protective measures were necessary. From the 1920's onwards, international commissions were established to specify regulations for the use of radiation and for the radiological protection of personnel. (authors)

  15. Seventh meeting of radiation protection skilled persons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhel, Th.; Briandchamplong, J.; Gambini, D.J.; Ammerich, M.; Aubert, B.; Barbey, P.; Biau, A.; Bruchet, H.; Capelle, M.H.; Flon, E.; Gauron, Ch.; Gravelotte, D.; Guerin, Ch.; Le Denmat, D.; Lemoine, Th.; Lombard, J.; Lucas, St.; Menechal, Ph.; Mignien, S.; Million, M.; Mozziconacci, J.G.; Prevot, S.; Radecki, J.J.; Rigaud, S.; Taillandier, P.; Timbert, M.; Vidal, J.P.; Bardelay, Ch.; Lahaye, Th.; Balduyck, S.; Chasson, E.; Rehel, J.L.; Chatellier, Ch.; Barret, Ch.; Guersen, J.; Degrange, J.P.; Sevestre, B.; Lahaye, Th.; Rodde, S.; Marchal, C.; Lefaure, Ch.; Bouk'il, H.; Gneiting, M.; Auboiroux, B.; Riedel, A.; Feuardent, J.; Scanff, P.; Bof, M.; Lochard, J.; Godet, J.L.

    2011-01-01

    This document gathers the slides of the available presentations given during these conference days. Twenty-three presentations out of 25 are assembled in the document and deal with: 1 - the evolution of workers' international protection rules against ionizing radiation risks (C. Bardelay); 2 - presentation of the report of the working group on radiation protection (P. Barbey); 3 - position of the French nuclear safety authority and of the labor general direction about the position of permanent expert groups in radiation protection concerning the expected evolutions in the occupation and training of radioprotection skilled persons (RSP), (T. Lahaye); 4 - experience feedback: RSP in surgery operating theater - a sometimes delicate intervention (S. Balduyck); 5 - workplace analysis in dental surgery: constraints and specificities (D. Le Denmat); 6 - workplace analysis: tritium atmospheric contamination (S. Rigaud); 7 - revision of the NFC 15-160 standard relative to radiology facilities (J.L. Rehel); 8 - example of area tele-dosimetry usage - the Pitie Salpetriere hospital experiment (C. Chatellier and C. Barret); 9 - contribution of radio-attenuation lead gloves in interventional radiology (J. Guersen); 10 - zoning in the medical domain: encountered problems typology and evaluation of possible solutions (Degrange, J.P.); 11 - management of used sealed sources distributed by the CEA and CISBIO (B. Sevestre); 12 - how to perform a measurement in radiation protection - how about measurement uncertainty (M. Ammerich); 13 - national campaign of control about the application of workers radiation protection rules (T. Lahaye); 14 - transparency and inspection approach in local nuclear applications: gamma-graphy, research, nuclear medicine, interventional radiography and radiotherapy (S. Rodde and C. Marchal); 15 - local/regional networks of RSPs and radiation protection actors: 2008 audit results and recent evolutions (C. Lefaure); 16 - role and missions of the external RSP

  16. Radiation Protection at Light Water Reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Prince, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This book is aimed at Health Physicists wishing to gain a better understanding of the principles and practices associated with a light water reactor (LWR) radiation protection program. The role of key program elements is presented in sufficient detail to assist practicing radiation protection professionals in improving and strengthening their current program. Details related to daily operation and discipline areas vital to maintaining an effective LWR radiation protection program are presented. Programmatic areas and functions important in preventing, responding to, and minimizing radiological incidents and the importance of performing effective incident evaluations and investigations are described. Elements that are integral in ensuring continuous program improvements are emphasized throughout the text.

  17. Radiation protection aspects in importing metallic scraps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risica, S.; Di Ciaccio, P.

    1996-09-01

    The meeting deals with radiation protection problems caused by the possibility that radioactive metal scraps or radioactive sources hidden in the scraps, may arrive in a foundry. The importance of this issue and of rational and systematic solutions is showed by several accidents, happened in the past in numerous countries, by many signals in Italy and by some papers published in international scientific journals or reports issued by authorities and institutions in different countries

  18. Apoptosis signaling and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Akinori; Suzuki, Norio; Hosoi, Yoshio

    2005-01-01

    Radiation protection by apoptosis control is the suppression of cell death in highly radiosensitive tissues. This paper describes the outline of radiation-induced apoptosis framework, apoptosis-concerned target molecules possibly related to apoptosis by radiation and their inhibitors. Although there are intrinsic (via mitochondria) and extrinsic (via death receptor) pathways in apoptosis, this review mainly mentions the former which is more important in radiation-induced apoptosis. Those molecules known at present in the apoptosis are caspase, Bcl-2 family and p53. Caspase, a group of cystein proteases, initiates apoptosis but its inhibition is known not always to result in apoptosis suppression, suggesting the existence of caspase-independent pathways. Bcl-2 family involves apoptosis-suppressing (possessing BH domains) and -promoting (lacking BH domains or possessing BH3 domain alone/BH3-only protein) groups. Two p53-transcription-dependent and one -independent pathways in p53-induced apoptosis are known and p53 can be a most possible target molecule since it positions at the start of apoptosis. Authors have found a vanadate inactivates p53. Inhibitors affecting upstream molecules of apoptosis will be the most useful candidate for apoptosis suppression/radiation protection. (S.I.) 106 refs

  19. Research projects in radiobiology and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1960-01-01

    Of the research projects sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency quite a large number are concerned with the biological effects of ionizing radiation. That itself, of course, is a very wide field covering such subjects as the nature and mechanism of radiation damage, genetic mutations, the varying radiosensitivity of different organisms, ways of modifying the natural sensitivity or resistance, and biological and chemical means of protection. In all these branches of enquiry, the Agency has awarded research contracts to scientific institutes or laboratories in different countries

  20. Radiation protection at new reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brissaud, A.

    2000-01-01

    The theoretical knowledge and the feedback of operating experience concerning radiations in reactors is now considerable. It is available to the designer in the form of predictive softwares and data bases. Thus, it is possible to include the radiation protection component throughout all the design process. In France, the existing reactors have not been designed with quantified radiation protection targets, although considerable efforts have been made to reduce sources of radiation illustrated by the decrease of the average dose rates (typically a factor 5 between the first 900 MWe and the last 1300 MWe units). The EDF ALARA PROJECT has demonstrated that good practises, radiation protection awareness, careful work organization had a strong impact on operation and maintenance work volume. A decrease of the average collective dose by a factor 2 has been achieved without noticeable modifications of the units. In the case of new nuclear facilities projects (reactor, intermediate storage facility,...), or special operations (such as steam generator replacement), quantified radiation protection targets are included in terms of collective and average individual doses within the frame of a general optimization scheme. The target values by themselves are less important than the application of an optimization process throughout the design. This is because the optimization process requires to address all the components of the dose, particularly the work volume for operation and maintenance. A careful study of this parameter contributes to the economy of the project (suppression of unecessary tasks, time-saving ergonomy of work sites). This optimization process is currently applied to the design of the EPR. General radiation protection provisions have been addressed during the basic design phase by applying general rules aiming at the reduction of sources and dose rates. The basic design optimization phase has mainly dealt with the possibility to access the containment at full

  1. Radiation protection in hospital radiopharmacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kini, K.S.; Gaur, P.K.

    1997-01-01

    Short-lived radiopharmaceuticals, such as 99m Tc labelled compounds, are prepared in the in-house pharmacy of the hospital. In addition, preparation of smaller doses for administration from the bulk material of the finished product received from the manufacturers, also involves considerable work for the radiopharmacist in the hospital. Hence they should be well informed about the radiation hazards and should be aware of the protective measures to be taken while handling radioactive materials for keeping the radiation levels in the laboratory and their personnel doses well within the specified limits. 3 refs., 5 tabs

  2. Global view on radiation protection in medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vano, E.

    2011-01-01

    When planning good management of ionising radiation in medicine, key factors such as ensuring that health professionals work together and convincing them that radiation protection (RP) represents a substantial part of the quality management system in their clinical practice are of utmost importance. The United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation has decided that one of the thematic priorities will be medical radiation exposure of patients. The International Commission on Radiological Protection has recently updated the report on RP in medicine and continues to work on focused documents centred on specific areas where advice is needed. The roles of the International Atomic Energy Agency, World Health Organization and the European Commission, in the area of RP in medicine, are described in the present document. The industry, the standardisation organisations as well as many scientific and professional societies are also dedicating significant effort to radiation safety aspects in medicine. Some of the efforts and priorities contemplated in RP in medicine over the coming years are suggested. The best outcome will be accomplished when all the actors, i.e. medical doctors, other health professionals, regulators, health authorities and the industry manage to work together. (authors)

  3. Days of Radiation Protection 2001. Conference Proceedings of the 24th Days of Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohunice NPP

    2001-11-01

    Already the 24 th annual international conference 'Days of Protection from Radiation' was taking place in Jan Sverma Hotel in Demaenova dolina on 26-29 November 2001. More than 180 participants from the Slovak Republic and the Czech Republic participated in the meetings of experts on protection from radiation. Representative of IAEA Division for Protection from Radiation and the representatives of several European companies securing the project, advisory and supplier's activities in dosimetry of ionising radiation also participated in the conference. The participants discussed in 7 expert panels the issue of protection from radiation in the legislative field, in the nuclear facilities operation and in medicine. The expert part of the other panels concerned the issues of ionising radiation impact on the environment and working environment, natural radio-nuclides, including radon and biologic impacts of radiation. One separate panel was dedicated to device techniques and methods of dosimetry of ionising radiation. More than 45 expert lectures and more than 40 poster presentations were presented at the conference during 3 days. The exhibition and presentation of measuring technique products and devices and of materials used in the area of radiation protection and nuclear medicine was prepared during the course of the conference. Participation in the conference showed that a great interest in problems of protection from radiation persists. This was proved by rich lecturing activity and wide discussions on the floor and during the poster presentations. Participants were satisfied since the organisers of the event prepared a worthy event with the rich expert themes at a good organisational and social level in a beautiful environment of Low Tatras

  4. Protection in handling ionizing radiation sources in national economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The collection of study texts is divided into 13 chapters giving an explanation of the structure of the atom, the properties of ionizing radiation and its interactions, quantities and units used, basic dosimetric methods, biological radiation effects, the sources of population exposure, the principles of radiation protection, technological applications of ionizing radiation, the monitoring of personnel and environment, the method of recording and filing, the method of protection from external radiation and internal contamination, health care, and requirements for protection in handling nonsealed sources. (M.D.)

  5. International Physical Protection Advisory Service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soo Hoo, M.S.; Ek, D.; Hageman, A.; Jenkin, T.; Price, C.; Weiss, B.

    1998-01-01

    Since its inception in 1996, the purpose of the International Physical Protection Advisory Service (IPPAS) has been to provide advice and assistance to International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Member States on strengthening and enhancing the effectiveness of their state system of physical protection of nuclear materials and facilities. Since the protection of nuclear materials and facilities is a Member State's responsibility, participation within the IPPAS program is voluntary. At the request of a Member State, the IAEA forms a multinational IPPAS team consisting of physical protection specialists. These specialists have broad experience in physical protection system design, implementation, and regulatory oversight. The exact make-up of the team depends upon the needs of the requesting state. IPPAS missions to participating states strive to compare the domestic procedures and practices of the state against international physical protection guidelines (IAEA Information Circular 225) and internationally accepted practice. The missions utilize a top to bottom approach and begin by reviewing the legal and regulatory structure and conclude with reviews of the implementation of the state regulations and international guidelines at individual facilities. IPPAS findings are treated as IAEA Safeguards Confidential Information. To date, IPPAS missions have been concluded in Slovenia, Bulgaria, Romania, Hungary, and Poland

  6. Training courses on radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    Many Member States are developing or already have developed their own national training programmes. The IAEA is actively involved in promoting training in radiological protection, and this report has been prepared to provide the guidance that may be required in this development. The original version of the report on this subject was published in 1964 as Technical Reports Series No. 31 entitled ''Training in Radiological Protection: Curricula and Programming''. In 1975 a second version was published entitled ''Training in Radiological Protection for Nuclear Programmes'' as Technical Reports Series No. 166. This publication is intended mainly for use by persons who are responsible for organizing training programmes in radiation protection. It also reflects the policy of the Agency to have continuing standardized training in radiation protection. In addition to a small change in the title of the report, some concepts and ideas which are no longer applicable have been omitted and new information included. An important part of this report is the list of courses now offered in many Member States

  7. Radiation protection and reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    The Chernobyl reactor accident caused bewilderment, fear and anxiety among the population. How safe are reactors? Which precautions to protect lives and health have been taken? These questions are posed particularly in the areas of radiation protection, reactor safety, supply and waste management of nuclear power plants and other nuclear installations. For all these areas the present report contains an analysis of facts; it informs about political measures during the 11th legislative period of the German Bundestag, and shows prospects of future developments. (orig.) [de

  8. Evolution of Radiation Protection System in Kenya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maina, J. A. W.

    2004-01-01

    attainment of the objectives of the National policy on radiation protection and waste safety. The current Radiation Protection Act is limited in scope, regulatory independence and empowerment. A new draft of the revised Act was submitted to the IAEA for review and comments. The revised version is aimed, inter alia, at meeting the principal requirements of the International Basic Safety Standards and incorporating aspects of non-ionizing radiation. The revised draft is now under discussion with stakeholders for their input before enactment. Development of a sustainable national infrastructure requires years of national effort and government commitment. Over the last two years, there has been sufficient government commitment and there have been solid achievements. Kenya has placed the issue of human resource development high on her development agenda and has provided support for expanding technical staffing of the Regulatory Authority with an initial recruitment of ten (10) Radiation Protection Officers. Other factors impacting on quality, effectiveness and efficiency of radiation protection programmes, are being appropriately addressed in order to realize a fully sustainable radiation protection infrastructure. (Author)

  9. Excellence through radiation protection practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D.A.; Armitage, G.; Popple, R.T.; Carrigan, J.T.

    1987-01-01

    The nuclear generation program at Ontario Hydro was initiated in the early 1960s. Over the last two decades the program has expanded to a planned capacity of ∼ 14,000 MW(electric) by 1992. Each of the nuclear stations consists of four identical reactor units and they range in size from 520 to 880 MW(electric). The overall objectives of Ontario Hydro's radiation protection program are stated as follows: (1) to prevent detrimental nonstochastic health effects to employees and the public; (2) to limit detrimental stochastic health effects occurring in employees or the public to levels as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA), social and economic factors being taken into account; and (3) to provide a level of health and safety that is as good as, or better than, comparable safe industries. Although many elements of the radiation protection program are similar to those adopted by other electrical utilities around the world, there are some unique features that have played an important part in the improvements achieved. These include: management commitment, design responsibility, radiation protection training, operations control, and work planning. The issues that need to be addressed in striving for overall excellence in radiological safety over the next decade are summarized

  10. New Radiation Protection training room

    CERN Multimedia

    HSE Unit

    2013-01-01

    From now on, the theory and practical components of the Radiation Protection training, developed by the RP Group and offered by the HSE Unit’s Safety Training team to people working in a Controlled Radiation Area, will take place in a dedicated teaching room, designed specifically for this kind of training.   The new room is in the Safety Training Centre on the Prévessin site and has been open since 16 October. It has an adjoining workshop that, like the room itself, can accommodate up to 12 people. It is also equipped with an interactive board as well as instruments and detectors to test for ionising radiation. This room is located near the recently inaugurated LHC tunnel mock-up where practical training exercises can be carried out in conditions almost identical to those in the real tunnel. To consult the safety training catalogue and/or sign up for Radiation Protection training, please go to: https://cta.cern.ch For further information, please contact the Safety Trainin...

  11. Radiation Protection Legislation in the Nordic Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Person, Lars.

    1990-01-01

    Recent alterations in the radiation protection laws of the Nordic countries are presented. The report amends the previous SS-report 87-37 with the title Radiation Protection and Atomic Energy Legislation in the Nordic Countries. (au)

  12. Establishments of scientific radiation protection management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Ziqiang

    1988-01-01

    Some aspects for establishing the radiation protection management program have been discussed. Radiation protection management program includes: definite aims of management, complete data register, strict supervision system, and scientific management methodology

  13. Introduction to radiation protection practical knowledge for handling radioactive sources

    CERN Document Server

    Grupen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    The book presents an accessible account of the sources of ionising radiation and the methods of radiation protection. The basics of nuclear physics which are directly related to radiation protection are briefly discussed. The book describes the units of radiation protection, the measurement techniques, biological effects of radiation, environmental radiation, and many applications of radiation. For each chapter there is a problem section with full solutions. A detailed glossary and many useful information in appendixes complete the book. The author has addressed the issue of internationality to make sure that the text and, in particular, the complicated regulations can be easily interpreted not only in Europe and the United States but also in other countries. The subject of radiation protection requires a certain amount of mathematics. For those who have forgotten the basic rules of calculus a short refresher course in the form of a mathematical appendix is added.

  14. Development of a training programme for radiation protection officers in industrial irradiators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mumuni, I. I.

    2014-01-01

    The International Basic Safety Standards (BSS) for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources establish the basic requirements for protection against the risks associated with exposure to ionizing radiation and for the safety of radiation sources that may deliver such exposure. One important aspect of the Safety Standard is education and training of all personnel involved in the activities of radiation and radioactive sources. According to the BSS a Radiation Protection Officer is an individual technically competent in radiation protection matters relevant for a given type of practice who is designated by the registrant or licensee to oversee the application of the requirements of the standards. By this assigned role, radiation protection officers for industrial irradiators should be adequately trained since these facilities involve very high dose rates during irradiation, such that a person accidentally exposed can receive a lethal dose within minutes or seconds and fatalities can occur. This training among others things will enable the radiation protection officers to understand practical application of the IAEA Safety Standard to industrial irradiator facilities, understand the requirements for safety assessments and emergency plans, be able to develop a radiation protection programme for irradiators, be familiar with the different types of industrial irradiators and their applications and understand the safety philosophy and design requirements for industrial irradiators. (author)

  15. Coastal sea radiation environment and biodiversity protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Senming; Shang Zhaorong

    2009-01-01

    This paper characterizes the types, trend and the potential of radiation contamination in the sea against the development of nuclear power stations. Combined with the present status of radioactive contamination and marine biodiversity in China seas, it is pointed out that non-human radiation protection should be considered on the bases of marine biodiversity protection. Besides, the reference species for marine radiation protection and some viewpoints on the work of marine radiation protection in China are pro- posed. (authors)

  16. An introduction to radiation protection principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, R.W.; Kalos, F.; Bond, J.A.

    1985-05-01

    The purpose of the document is to outline the fundamentals of radiation protection, to describe methods that enable employees to work safely with radiation and to aquaint employees with CRNL's radiation and industrial safety organization

  17. Minimum exposure limits and measured relationships between the vitamin D, erythema and international commission on non-ionizing radiation protection solar ultraviolet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Nathan; Parisi, Alfio; Butler, Harry; Turner, Joanna; Wainwright, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    The International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) has established guidelines for exposure to ultraviolet radiation in outdoor occupational settings. Spectrally weighted ICNIRP ultraviolet exposures received by the skin or eye in an 8 h period are limited to 30 J m(-2). In this study, the time required to reach the ICNIRP exposure limit was measured daily in 10 min intervals upon a horizontal plane at a subtropical Australian latitude over a full year and compared with the effective Vitamin D dose received to one-quarter of the available skin surface area for all six Fitzpatrick skin types. The comparison of measured solar ultraviolet exposures for the full range of sky conditions in the 2009 measurement period, including a major September continental dust event, show a clear relationship between the weighted ICNIRP and the effective vitamin D dose. Our results show that the horizontal plane ICNIRP ultraviolet exposure may be used under these conditions to provide minimum guidelines for the healthy moderation of vitamin D, scalable to each of the six Fitzpatrick skin types. © 2014 The American Society of Photobiology.

  18. Radiation protection. The past and the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    After a short summary of the history of radiation protection and its scientific basis a survey is given on the actual state of radiation protection, thereby entering into open questions like risk perception and communication with the general public. Finally, the future tasks of radiation protection are described.

  19. Radiation protection in medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maldonado M, H.

    2008-12-01

    The justification of the practices is the fundamental principle on which rests the peaceful use of ionizing radiations. They actually contain as aspirations to improve the quality of people's lives, contributing to sustainable development through environmental protection, so that the sources security and the individuals protection will be conditions which are not and should can not be operated. For medical applications is a highly illustrative example of this, since both for the diagnosis and therapy, the goal is to achieve what is sought for the white tissue, secured the least possible damage to the neighboring tissues so that in turn reduce the negative effects for the patient. As a basis for achieving the above, it is essential to have qualified personnel in all areas incidents, for example users, workers, officials and staff members. There are a variety of specialists in the field of medical applications as, nuclear chemistry, nuclear engineering, radiation protection, medical physics, radiation physics and others. Among the human resource in the country must make up the majority are medical radiologists, highlighting gaps in the number of radiotherapy and nuclear medicine but specially in the medical physics, who is in some way from a special viewpoint of the formal school, new to the country. This is true for the number of facilities which are in the country. The radiation protection responsibilities in medical applications focus primarily on two figures: the radiology safety manager, who is primarily dedicated to the protection of occupationally exposed personnel and the public, and the medical physicist whose functions are geared towards the radiological protection of the patient. The principal legislation in the medical applications area has been enacted and is monitored by the Health Secretary and National Commission on Nuclear Safety and Safeguards, entities that have reached agreements to avoid overlap and over-regulation. Medical applications in the

  20. Current trends in radiation protection in Egypt. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomma, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    The treatise presents the development of radiation protection in egypt over the past four decades. The contents will include a historical synopsis, and the current state of art regarding competent authorities, the hierarchy involved, and the respective responsibilities. The recent publications of the international trends in radiation protection are also mentioned. The efforts made towards the implementation of the new recommendations on radiation protection, and updating of the radiation protection legislations are also discussed. The 1994 international safety standards, and the collective opinion of the committee on radiation protection and public health (CRPPH) of the organization for economic Co-operation and development of the Nuclear energy agency OECD/NEA are also summarized

  1. Radiation protection and the development of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bovard, P.; Fitoussi, L.

    1975-01-01

    Radiological hazards are defined. Following a short explanation of the International Commission on Radiation Protection's permissible values of exposure, some indicators are given about the component of natural radioactivity [fr

  2. Operational radiation protection: A guide to optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this publication is to provide practical guidance on the application of the dose limitation system contained in the Basic Safety Standards for Radiation Protection to operational situations both in large nuclear installations and in much smaller facilities. It is anticipated that this Guide will be useful to both the management and radiation protection staff of operations in which there is a potential for occupational radiation exposures and to the competent authorities with responsibilities for providing a programme of regulatory control. Contents: Dose limitation system; Optimization and its practical application to operational radiation protection; Major elements of an effective operational radiation protection programme; Review of selected parts of the basic safety standards with special reference to operational radiation protection; Optimization of radiation protection; Techniques for the systematic appraisal of operational radiation protection programmes. Refs and figs

  3. Radiation protection in well logging: case studies in the Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eltayeb, B. A.

    2010-12-01

    This study is performed to improve radiation protection level in well logging include tow case studies in Sudan (Lost or misplaced sources). General review of radiation and radiation protection basic concept is highlighted discussed. Also preview of well logging practice and source of radiation use in well logging, safety of radiation sources, storage and manage of not use sources (weak sources) and protection of worker and potential exposure for public and worker, investigations in cause of lost or misplaced sources in well. Assessment was made in well logging using checklist prepared in accordance with the International Atomic Energy Agency IAEA basic safety standard, International Committee for Radiological Protection ICRP and safety in transport of radiation sources. The checklist includes all requirement of radiation protection. It is found that all requirement was present except the delay of calibration of radiation detectors, the movement of radiation sources form storage to base of manipulated area need adequate care for shielding and safe transport and personal monitoring service must be provide in Sudan. Investigation was made in cause of lose of nine radiation source in well it is found that all those sources were loss in different depth in the well and with deferent location and there was no risk because there was no contamination of fluids which caused by damage of loss sources. Some recommendations were stated that, if implemented could improve the status of radiation protection in well logging. (Author)

  4. Radiation protection requirements for medical application of ionizing radiation in the Republic of Macedonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nestoroska, Svetlana; Angelovski, Goran; Shahin, Nuzi

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the regulatory infrastructure in radiation protection in the Republic of Macedonia is presented. The national radiation protection requirements for the medical application of ionizing radiation are reviewed for both occupational exposed persons and patients undergoing a medical treatment with ionizing radiation and their compliance with the international standards is considered. The gaps identified on the national level are presented and steps for overcoming such gaps are analyzed.(Author)

  5. Patient Radiation Protection in Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegazy, M.

    2010-01-01

    The Role of Radiotherapy is treatment modalities for cancer which is generally assumed that 50 to 60% of cancer patients will benefit from radiotherapy. It constitutes a peaceful application of ionizing radiation and an essential part of cancer management. The two aims of radiation protection Prevention is of deterministic effect and Reduction of the probability of stochastic effects. The Shielding fundamentals is to limit radiation exposure of staff, patients, visitors and the public to acceptable levels it also optimize protection of patients, staff and the public. Diagnosis is important for target design and the dose required for cure or palliation while Simulator is often used twice in the radiotherapy process where Patient data acquisition - target localization, contours, outlines and Verification. The Prescription is the responsibility of individual clinicians, depending on the patient’s condition, equipment available, experience and training. An ultimate check of the actual treatment given can only be made by using in vivo dosimetry. Treatment records must be kept of all relevant aspects of the treatment – including Session and Summary Record information, Records all treatment parameters, Dose Calculations and Dose Measurements

  6. Distributed radiation protection console system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chhokra, R.S.; Deshpande, V.K.; Mishra, H.; Rajeev, K.P.; Thakur, Bipla B.; Munj, Niket

    2004-01-01

    Radiation exposure control is one of the most important aspects in any nuclear facility . It encompasses continuous monitoring of the various areas of the facility to detect any increase in the radiation level and/or the air activity level beyond preset limits and alarm the O and M personnel working in these areas. Detection and measurement of radiation level and the air activity level is carried out by a number of monitors installed in the areas. These monitors include Area Gamma Monitors, Continuous Air Monitors, Pu-In-Air Monitors, Criticality Monitors etc. Traditionally, these measurements are displayed and recorded on a Central Radiation Protection Console(CRPC), which is located in the central control room of the facility. This methodology suffers from the shortcoming that any worker required to enter a work area will have to inquire about the radiation status of the area either from the CRPC or will get to know the same directly from the installed only after entering the area. This shortcoming can lead to avoidable delays in attending to the work or to unwanted exposure. The authors have designed and developed a system called Distributed Radiation Protection Console (DRPC) to overcome this shortcoming. A DRPC is a console which is located outside the entrance of a given area and displays the radiation status of the area. It presents to health physicist and the plant operators a graphic over-view of the radiation and air activity levels in the particular area of the plant. It also provides audio visual annunciation of the alarm status. Each radioactive area in a nuclear facility will have its own DRPC, which will receive as its inputs the analog and digital signals from radiation monitoring instruments installed in the area and would not only show those readings on its video graphic screen but will also provide warning messages and instructions to the personnel entering the active areas. The various DRPCs can be integrated into a Local Area Network, where the

  7. Radiation Protection of Patients program (Argentina)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Touzet, R.; Perez, M. R.; Buzzi, A.; Andisco, D.

    2006-01-01

    After an initial period of conviction for installing an active discussion on Radiation Protection of Patients inside the medical community, there were organized working groups in Radiodiagnosis, Radiotherapy, Nuclear Medicine and on radiation protection of pregnant women. These groups began systematical activities, which received a strong institutional support of the Argentine Society of Radiology, toward the implementation of a Program of RPP that is being put nowadays into practice. This program has three aims and a series of targets to be fulfilled in successive stages: Basic aims and short term targets: 1) To guarantee the Justification. First goal: Development of the Prescription Guide (achieve) 2) To optimize the radioprotection: First goal: Development of a Manual of Procedures (achieved) 3) To prevent potential exposures. First goal: Design of a Basic Quality System in Health (achieved) The effective participation of the professional's and technician's associations in the development of the program of radiological protection of the patient is a key aspect for the success. (Author)

  8. National Fire Protection Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Harvey became 'a landmark in the evolution of drone usage.' Learn more in NFPA Journal Storm stats ... YouTube GooglePlus Blogger Pinterest RSSFeeds Instagram Terms of Use Privacy Policy © National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 2017

  9. Radiation protection safety in Uganda -- Experience and prospects of the National Radiation Protection Service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kisolo, A.

    2001-01-01

    The Uganda National Radiation Protection Service (NRPS) is a technical body under the Atomic Energy Control Board, established by Law - the Atomic Energy Decree of 1972, Decree No. 12, to oversee and enforce safety of radiation sources, practices and workers; and to protect the patients, members of the public and the environment from the dangers of ionizing radiation and radioactive wastes. The Ionizing Radiation Regulations (Standards) - Statutory Instruments Supplement No. 21 of 1996 -- back up the Law. The Law requires all users, importers and operators of radiation sources and radioactive materials to notify the NRPS for registration and licensing. The NRPS is responsible for licensing and for the regulatory enforcement of compliance to the requirements for the safety of radiation sources and practices. There are about 200 diagnostic X-ray units, two radiotherapy centres, one nuclear medicine unit, several neutron probes, about three level gauges and two non-destructive testing sources and a number of small sealed sources in teaching and research institutions. About 50% of these sources have been entered in our inventory using the RAIS software provided by the IAEA. There are about 500 radiation workers and 250 underground miners. The NRPS covers about 50% of the radiation workers. It is planned that by June 2001, all occupational workers will be monitored, bringing coverage to 100%. The Government of Uganda is making the necessary legal, administrative and technical arrangements aimed at establishing the National Radiation Protection Commission as an autonomous regulatory authority. The Atomic Energy Decree of 1972 and Regulations of 1996 are being revised to provide for the National Radiation Protection Commission and to make it comply with the requirements of the International Basic Safety Standards Safety Series No. 115. (author)

  10. Radiation protection technologist training and certification program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-10-01

    The purpose of this program is to establish training requirements and methods for certifying the technical competence of Radiation Protection Technologists. This manual delineates general requirements as well as academic training, on-the-job training, area of facility training, and examination or evaluation requirements for Radiation Protection Trainees (Trainees), Junior Radiation Protection Technologists (JRPT), Radiation Protection Technologists (RPT), and Senior Radiation Protection Technologists (SRPT). This document also includes recertification requirements for SRPTs. The appendices include training course outlines, on-the-job training outlines, and training certification record forms

  11. Training for Radiation Protection in Interventional Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartal, G.; Sapoval, M.; Ben-Shlomo, A.

    1999-01-01

    Program in radiological equipment has incorporated more powerful x-ray sources into the standard Fluoroscopy and CT systems. Expanding use of interventional procedures carries extensive use of fluoroscopy and CT which are both associated with excessive radiation exposure to the patient and personnel. During cases of Intravenous CT Angiography and direct Intraarterial CT Angiography, one may substitute a substantial number of diagnostic angiography checks. Basic training in interventional radiology hardly includes some of the fundamentals of radiation protection. Radiation Protection in Interventional Radiology must be implemented in daily practice and become an integral part of procedure planning strategy in each and every case. Interventional radiological most master all modern imaging modalities in order to choose the most effective, but least hazardous one. In addition, one must be able to use various imaging techniques (Fluoroscopy, CTA, MM and US) as a stand-alone method, as well as combine two techniques or more. Training programs for fellows: K-based simulation of procedures and radiation protection. Special attention should be taken in the training institutions and a basic training in radiation protection is advised before the trainee is involved in the practical work. Amendment of techniques for balloon and stent deployment with minimal use of fluoroscopy. Attention to the differences between radiation protection in cardiovascular and nonvascular radiology with special measures that must be taken for each one of them (i.e., peripheral angiography vs. stenting, Endo luminal Aortic Stent Graft, or nonvascular procedures such as biliary or endo urological stenting or biliary intervention). A special emphasis should be put on the training techniques of Interventional Radiologists, both beginners and experienced. Patient dose monitoring by maintaining records of fluoroscopic time is better with non-reset timer, but is optional. Lee of automated systems that

  12. Review on radiation protection in diagnostic radiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Karami

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Discovery of x-ray and using of it for medical imaging have produced tremendous outcomes for diagnosis and treatment of diseases. More than 10 million diagnostic radiological procedures and 100,000 nuclear medicine exams are being performed daily around the world. According to the national commission on radiological protection and measurements (NCRP-report 160, medical x-ray is contribute to approximately 95% of all radiological examinations that is responsible for 74% of the collective dose to the US population. Despite of unique benefits of ionizing radiations, in the field of radiation protection, they are associated with potential risks such as cancer and genetically abnormalities. The cancer risk attributable to diagnostic radiology is estimated about 0.6% to 3%. It is estimated that the radiation dose from diagnostic x-ray procedures are annually responsible for 7,587 and 5,695 cases of radiation induced cancer in the population of Japan and US, respectively. Although the radiation dose associated with most radiological procedures are very low, but rapid increasing use of radiography procedures during two past decades have been concerned due to the cancer risk associated with ionizing radiations. On the base of linear no-threshold (LNT model of dose-response curve, any level of exposure is dangerous. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA is the main target of ionizing radiation. For radiological exposure with low dose, the stochastic effects such as genetic damages and leukemia are concerned. According to the recommendations of the radiation protection regulatory organizations, radiological procedure must be done with respect to social and economic factors in which exposure of patient and population kept as low as reasonable and achievable. Hence, prescription of a radiological test is acceptable only when its advantages are higher than its damages. Optimizing the different parameters such as: collimating the primary beam field to the area of

  13. Radiation Protection Using Carbon Nanotube Derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conyers, Jodie L., Jr.; Moore, Valerie C.; Casscells, S. Ward

    2010-01-01

    BHA and BHT are well-known food preservatives that are excellent radical scavengers. These compounds, attached to single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), could serve as excellent radical traps. The amino-BHT groups can be associated with SWNTs that have carbolyxic acid groups via acid-base association or via covalent association. The material can be used as a means of radiation protection or cellular stress mitigation via a sequence of quenching radical species using nano-engineered scaffolds of SWNTs and their derivatives. It works by reducing the number of free radicals within or nearby a cell, tissue, organ, or living organism. This reduces the risk of damage to DNA and other cellular components that can lead to chronic and/or acute pathologies, including (but not limited to) cancer, cardiovascular disease, immuno-suppression, and disorders of the central nervous system. These derivatives can show an unusually high scavenging ability, which could prove efficacious in protecting living systems from radical-induced decay. This technique could be used to protect healthy cells in a living biological system from the effects of radiation therapy. It could also be used as a prophylactic or antidote for radiation exposure due to accidental, terrorist, or wartime use of radiation- containing weapons; high-altitude or space travel (where radiation exposure is generally higher than desired); or in any scenario where exposure to radiation is expected or anticipated. This invention s ultimate use will be dependent on the utility in an overall biological system where many levels of toxicity have to be evaluated. This can only be assessed at a later stage. In vitro toxicity will first be assessed, followed by in vivo non-mammalian screening in zebra fish for toxicity and therapeutic efficacy.

  14. Radiation protection in dental radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jozani, F.; Parnianpour, H.

    1976-08-01

    In considering the special provisions required in dental radiography, investigations were conducted in Iran. Radiation dose levels in dental radiography were found to be high. Patient exposure from intraoral radiographic examination was calculated, using 50kV X-ray. Thermoluminescent dosimeters were fastened to the nasion, eyes, lip, philtrum, thyroid, gonads and to the right and left of the supra-orbital, infra-orbital temporomandibular joints of live patients. The highest exposure value was for the lower lip. Recommendations concerning educational training and protection of staff and patients were included

  15. Comparison of Radiation Protection Training in European Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozelj, M.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Practice and implementation of radiation protection in European countries and in majority of other countries all over the world relies on common principles and recommendations established by international organisations. These principles and recommendations were incorporated in national legislation ensuring similar and compatible standards of protection for occupationally exposed workers and members of the public. One of the basic requirements derived from international recommendations is also formal request for training of occupationally exposed workers. The final goals of the training are defined only indirectly through standards of safety and protection. Therefore national regulation regarding radiation protection training in particular country is a result of general approach to education and training, historical circumstances, influence and importance of nuclear technology and other factors influencing health protection and national well-being in general. The result is variety of national regulations ranging from very stringent and detailed to rather general and flexible. Nevertheless, results of implemented training do not differ sufficiently to significantly affect achieved standards of radiation protection. According to available information European countries implement radiation protection training in dissimilar ways. Institutions and organisations involved, as well as form and duration of training varies from country to country. Therefore, it is not possible to determine common rules just by reviewing radiation protection training in different countries. It is the intention of this contribution to analyse and discuss available information regarding radiation protection training and point out the necessity of international co-operation in this field, especially in the sense of the future trends. (author)

  16. Nuclear analysis methods. Rudiments of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, E.

    1998-01-01

    The nuclear analysis methods are generally used to analyse radioactive elements but they can be used also for chemical analysis, with fields such analysis and characterization of traces. The principles of radiation protection are explained (ALARA), the biological effects of ionizing radiations are given, elements and units used in radiation protection are reminded in tables. A part of this article is devoted to how to use radiation protection in a nuclear analysis laboratory. (N.C.)

  17. Standard Guide for Radiation Protection Program for Decommissioning Operations

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1987-01-01

    1.1 This guide provides instruction to the individual charged with the responsibility for developing and implementing the radiation protection program for decommissioning operations. 1.2 This guide provides a basis for the user to develop radiation protection program documentation that will support both the radiological engineering and radiation safety aspects of the decommissioning project. 1.3 This guide presents a description of those elements that should be addressed in a specific radiation protection plan for each decommissioning project. The plan would, in turn, form the basis for development of the implementation procedures that execute the intent of the plan. 1.4 This guide applies to the development of radiation protection programs established to control exposures to radiation and radioactive materials associated with the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. The intent of this guide is to supplement existing radiation protection programs as they may pertain to decommissioning workers, members of...

  18. Radiation protection of the public: Past, present, and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses the historical development of radiation protection standards for the public, the present system in the United States for limiting radiation exposures of the public primarily by means of environmental radiation standards for specific practices or sources, and recent developments that may affect future standards and policies for radiation protection of the public. The radiobiological and epidemiological basis for radiation protection standards and policies is emphasized. Difficulties associated with the current regulatory framework are discussed, and proposal for addressing these difficulties are presented. 16 refs., 1 tab

  19. Nuclear energy - Radioprotection - Procedure for radiation protection monitoring in nuclear installations for external exposure to weakly penetrating radiation, especially to beta radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This International Standard specifies a procedure for radiation protection monitoring in nuclear installations for external exposure to weakly penetrating radiation, especially to beta radiation and describes the procedure in radiation protection monitoring for external exposure to weakly penetrating radiation in nuclear installations. This radiation comprises β - radiation, β + radiation and conversion electron radiation as well as photon radiation with energies below 15 keV. This International Standard describes the procedure in radiation protection planning and monitoring as well as the measurement and analysis to be applied. It applies to regular nuclear power plant operation including maintenance, waste handling and decommissioning. The recommendations of this International Standard may also be transferred to other nuclear fields including reprocessing, if the area-specific issues are considered. This International Standard may also be applied to radiation protection at accelerator facilities and in nuclear medicine, biology and research facilities

  20. Stakeholders and Radiation Protection in Today's World

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rick Jones, C.; Lochard, J.; Lazo, T.

    2006-01-01

    In looking forward the C.R.P.P.H.(Nea 's Committee on radiation protection and public health) identified three influences that will condition the way we address emerging issues, and will alter how we address ongoing issues. These are the involvement of stakeholders in decision making processes, the evolution of radiological protection science and its changing place in risk assessment and management, and the experience gained in implementing the current system of radiological protection. First among there is the growing importance of stakeholder involvement in radiation protection decision making. This has affected the way that the principles of justification, optimization and limitation are viewed, the way the role of the radiation protection professional in risk assessment and management is viewed, and the relative importance of case specific circumstances in relation to harmonized, internationally accepted criteria. In the wake of this change, the international system of radiological protection is being updated by the ICRP, and discussions of the most appropriate direction to take are nearing their end. Second, radiological protection science continues to identify specific aspects that do not fit the conventional linear non threshold model, and which us to consider that, at the very least, the risks from different exposures and exposure situations may not be as simply and universally comparable assumed. This will affect the way that risks are managed, and all relevant stakeholder involvement processes. In addition, decisions relating to public, worker and environmental health and safety are increasingly seen as judgement social choices. Although such choices must be guided by an understanding of state-of-the-art scientific and its uncertainties, the final, choice will generally be made by society, not scientists. Third, since the issuance of ICRP Publication 60 in 1990, and the International Basic Safety Standards in 1996, extensive experience has been amassed in

  1. Radiation protection in hospitals of Equatorial Guinea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabat Macambo, P.

    2001-01-01

    With a population of four hundred thousand (400.000) inhabitants and distributed in a territory of 28 thousand (28.000) km 2 , the use of ionizing radiations for medical practice in Equatorial Guinea is few and decreasing. It is used for diagnostic practices in the main hospitals of the country, where the work burden is not over 20 patients per day. The political, social and economical embryonic development of the country until recently had a negative influence on indicators and health organisations, so that even now the country does not have any radiological protection law, this shortness, in addition with the old architectural structure that x ray tools is lodging, as well as dosimetrical lack of employed staff, put this staff under risk of electromagnetic energy. This is to show the present survey of medical activities with ionizing radiation and to request technical support for implementing suitably the basic standards of radiation protection which will help us as basis for the elaboration outline law, on radiological protection in accordance with the new guidelines of the International Atomic Energy Agency. (author)

  2. Radiation protection programme progress report 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The progress report of the radiation protection programme outlines the research work carried out in 1988 under contracts between the Commission of the European Communities and research groups in the Member States. Results of more than 350 projects are reported. They are grouped into six sectors: Radiation dosimetry and its interpretation; Behaviour and control of radionuclides in the environment; Nonstochastic effects of ionizing radiation; Radiation carcinogenesis; Genetic effects of ionizing radiation; Evaluation of radiation risks and optimization of protection. Within the framework programme, the aim of this scientific research is to improve the conditions of life with respect to work and protection of man and his environment and to assure a safe production of energy, i.e.: (i) to improve methods necessary to protect workers and the population by updating the scientific basis for appropriate standards; (ii) to prevent and counteract harmful effects of radiation; (iii) to assess radiation risks and provide methods to cope with the consequences of radiation accidents

  3. Assessment of radiation protection practices among radiographers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Use of ionising radiation in diagnostic radiography could lead to hazards such as somatic and genetic damages. Compliance to safe work and radiation protection practices could mitigate such risks. The aim of the study was to assess the knowledge and radiation protection practices among radiographers in ...

  4. XXVII. Days of Radiation Protection. Conference Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-11-01

    The publication has been set up as a proceedings of the conference dealing with health protection during work with ionizing radiation for different activities which involve the handling of ionizing radiation sources. The main conference topics are focused on current problems in radiation protection and radioecology. In this proceedings totally 83 papers are published

  5. The healing arts radiation protection guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaffe, M.

    1987-06-01

    The objective of these guidelines is to help the health professional render the risks associated with diagnostic radiation as low as reasonably achievable. The guidelines contain advice and recommendations, but no mandatory requirements. They assist radiation protection officers in establishing and maintaining a Quality Assurance Program and in carrying out other duties required by the Healing Arts Radiation Protection Act; assist staff to comply with the X-ray Safety Code in a way that will raise the standards of x-ray diagnosis and patient safety; address the relationship between the radiation exposure of the patient and the quality of the image; address the problem of protecting the patient in x-ray examinations; summarize x-ray safety problems from the point of view of the operator and other staff; indicate what remedial measures can be taken; define the quality assurance needs of x-ray users; and encourage the users of x-rays for diagnostic purposes to go beyond the scope of the Act and comply with the ALARA principle

  6. Assessment of exposure to MRI motion-induced fields based on the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilberti, Luca; Bottauscio, Oriano; Chiampi, Mario

    2016-10-01

    The goal of this study was to conduct an exposure assessment for workers moving through the stray stationary field of common MRI scanners, performed according to the recent International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) Guidelines, which aim at avoiding annoying sensory effects. The analysis was performed through numerical simulations, using a high-resolution anatomical model that moved along realistic trajectories in proximity to a tubular and open MRI scanner. Both dosimetric indexes indicated by ICNIRP (maximum variation of the magnetic flux density vector and exposure index for the motion-induced electric field) were computed for three statures of the human model. A total of 51 exposure situations were analyzed. None of them exceeded the limit for the maximum variation of the magnetic flux density, whereas some critical cases were found when computing the induced electric field. In the latter case, the exposure indexes computed via Fourier transform and through an equivalent filter result to be consistent. The results suggest the adoption of some simple precautionary rules, useful when sensory effects experienced by an operator could reflect upon the patient's safety. Moreover, some open issues regarding the quantification of motion-induced fields are highlighted, putting in evidence the need for clarification at standardization level. Magn Reson Med 76:1291-1300, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Environmental Radiation Protection in Medical Institutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Eun Ok; Dong, Kyung Rae

    2010-01-01

    The study aimed to measure the levels of radiation protection for radiologists in medical institutions in three environmental categories (physical, administrative and social) and to establish a data base which can be used to increase awareness of environmental radiation protection in medical institutions within Korea. The study surveyed 10% of radiologists working in radiology departments in medical institutions which are supervised by the National Dose Registry overseen by the Korean Food and Drug Administration(KFDA). This study found that the level of environmental radiation protection was higher in the capital area and in larger hospitals. On the other hand, the study shows environmental radiation protection was lower in the Youngnam area and in clinics. Results from the questionnaires indicate the level of environmental radiation protection was higher when radiologists were given an individual dosimeter but lowest when the radiation protection apron quality test was conducted. Environmental radiation protection is an important factor for radiologists to conduct activities in a safe and protected environment. However, this study shows there are differences in the level of environmental radiation protection in medical institutions and location within Korea. In particular, the level of environmental radiation protection was lower in clinics, appropriate intervention strategies befitting these conditions are needed based on medical institution classification and location in order to improve the level of environmental protection

  8. The reference individual of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckerman, K.F.; Cristy, M.

    1995-01-01

    The 70-kg open-quotes standard manclose quotes representing a typical Western adult male has been used in physiological models since at least the 1920s. In 1949 at the Chalk River conference, health physicists from the U.S., UK, and Canada agreed on the concept of a standard man to facilitate comparison of internal dose estimates. The 70-kg standard man included specifications of the masses of 25 organs and tissues, total body content of 15 elements, total water intake and output, water content of the body, and some anatomical and physiological data for the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts. In 1959, in its Publication 2 2 on permissible doses for internal radiation the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) modified standard man. In 1963 the ICRP established a task group to revise and extend the standard man concept. The name was changed later to Reference Man and the task group's work was published in 1975 as ICRP Publication 23 3 . Publication 23 similar to Publication 2, updates and documents the sources of the data. Data on women, children, and fetuses were also collected, where available, but these data were limited primarily to anatomical data and only a few reference values were established for these groups. Information assembled during the course of the effort on the Reference Man report was used at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to construct a mathematical representation of the body (a phantom) that was suitable for use with Monte Carlo methods in the calculation of organ doses. That effort was undertaken to improve estimates of dose from photon-emitting radionuclides residing within organs, so-called internal emitters. The phantom, although updated throughout the years, remains today as the basis for organ dose estimates in nuclear medicine and radiation protection and underlies the radiation risk data derived from the epidemiologic studies of the atomic bomb survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki

  9. Optimization of radiation protection at Bohunice NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobis, L.; Svitek, J.

    2003-01-01

    Bohunice Nuclear Power Plant is situated in south - western part of Slovakia about 50 km away from Bratislava. There are four PWR reactors 440 MW e each - two units with reactors WWER - 230 (V1 NPP) and two units with WWER - 213 (V2 NPP). requirements for the optimization process are given in the mentioned Code No.12 of Ministry of Health. Code 12 stipulates the technical and organizational requirements for proving the Rational Achievable Level (RAL) of radiation protection. This level can be proved by means of the comparison of the dose distribution to the costs of protection. An example of two figures of dose constraints is: collective dose 20 man mSv for the specific task; individual exposure 1 mSv per day. The values of the financial equivalents of personal exposure - so called the alpha coefficients - are used for the calculation of the benefit of proposed measures. Impact of legislative changes into Bohunice NPP and optimization process are presented. Apparently the new law and the associate code created a base of transparent and understandable policy of radiation protection and optimization in Slovak Republic. The radiation protection legislative was implemented into the praxis and persons became familiar with it. Defining clear and unambiguous terms facilitated the communication between users and the regulatory body - State Health Institute. Optimization was generally accepted by the workers and managers and began to be a part of safety culture of operation at nuclear power plants. (authors)

  10. Swimming in a sea of contradictions and uncertainties. 5. international conference on high levels of natural radiation, Muenchen, 4.-7. Sept. 2000, and 2. Dresden symposium on radiation protection, Dresden, 10.-14. Sept. 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, K.

    2000-01-01

    As there is no difference in biological response between natural and artificial radiation, regulations should cover both, but this seems to be a 'shaking of the coconut tree'. It would amount to the evacuation of large populated areas, the end of important non-nuclear industries - or the politically not correct upward adjustment of the current 1 mSv/y limit towards the substantial fluctuations in the natural exposure by a factor of 10 and more. During a large international conference in Munich in September, and a smaller follow-up symposium in Dresden, scientists from about forty countries discussed the science and the politics in establishing the present double standards. There were, for example, reports about basic differences in the biological effects of low and high doses; results showing that it is the dose-rate, not the dose, which matters; consistent reports about the lack of detrimental health effects in high natural radiation areas (>10 mSv/y) in China, India, etc.; and the usual controversies about the value and limits of radon epidemiology - all contributing to serious questions about various basic contradictions and uncertainties in the self-inflicted ghetto situation of current radiation protection. (orig.)

  11. New radiation protection legislation in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jender, M.; Persson, Lars

    1984-01-01

    The objective of the new Act is to protect humans, animals and the environment from the harmful effects of ionizing as well as non-ionizing radiation. As previously, the main responsibility for public radiation protection will rest with a single central radiation protection authority. According to the Act, the general obligations with regard to radiation protection will assign greater responsibility than in the past to persons carrying out activities involving radiation. Persons engaged in such activities will be responsible for the safe processing and storage of radioactive waste. The Act also contains rules governing decommissioning of technical equipment capable of generating radiation. The Act contains several rules providing for more effective supervision. The supervisory authority may, in particular, decide on the necessary regulations and prohibitions for each individual case. The scope for using penal provisions has been extended and a rule on the mandatory execution of orders regarding radiation protection measures has been introduced. (authors)

  12. Occupational radiation protection legislation in Israel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tadmor, J.; Schlesinger, T.; Lemesch, C.

    1980-01-01

    Various governmental agencies, including the Ministry of Health, the Ministry of Labor and the Israel AEC are responsible for the control of the use of radioactive materials and medical X-ray machines in Israel. Present legislation deals mainly with the legal aspects of the purchase, transport and possession of radioactive materials and the purchase and operation of medical X-ray machines. No legislation refers explicitly to the protection of the worker from ionizing (and non-ionizing) radiation. A special group of experts appointed by the Minister of Labor recently worked out a comprehensive draft law concerning all legal aspects of occupational radiation protection in Israel. Among the main chapters of the draft are: general radiation protection principles, national radiation protection standards, medical supervision of radiation workers, personal monitoring requirements. The present situation with regard to radiation hazard control in Israel and details of the proposed radiation protection law is discussed. (Author)

  13. Radiation protection in the pharmaceutical-chemical industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griesser, R.

    1992-01-01

    Some aspects of the use of ionizing radiation in research in the pharmaceutical and chemical industries will be discussed, the emphasis being placed on the handling of open radioactive materials in research laboratories. The compliance with official regulations and the preparation of company internal radiation protection regulations are described. 1 tab., 9 refs

  14. New general radiation protection training course

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Some members of CERN personnel, users included, may have to work in supervised or controlled radiation areas, or may be concerned with activities involving the use of radioactive sources. According to CERN Safety rules all persons whose work may encounter ionising radiation risk must be adequately trained. This training must ensure that workers are informed about the potential health risks which could result from radiation exposure, about the basic principles of radiation protection and of the relevant radiation protection regulations as well as about safe working methods and techniques in radiation zones. Therefore the Organization organises mandatory general and work-specific radiation protection (RP) courses addressed to its personnel. These courses are also open to contractors’ personnel, in addition to the RP training they must receive from their employers. Based on the results of a pilot project, an improved general radiation protection course has been prepared. This...

  15. CERN Radiation Protection (RP) calibration facilities

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2082069; Macián-Juan, Rafael

    Radiation protection calibration facilities are essential to ensure the correct operation of radiation protection instrumentation. Calibrations are performed in specific radiation fields according to the type of instrument to be calibrated: neutrons, photons, X-rays, beta and alpha particles. Some of the instruments are also tested in mixed radiation fields as often encountered close to high-energy particle accelerators. Moreover, calibration facilities are of great importance to evaluate the performance of prototype detectors; testing and measuring the response of a prototype detector to well-known and -characterized radiation fields contributes to improving and optimizing its design and capabilities. The CERN Radiation Protection group is in charge of performing the regular calibrations of all CERN radiation protection devices; these include operational and passive dosimeters, neutron and photon survey-meters, and fixed radiation detectors to monitor the ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), inside CERN accelera...

  16. Computer applications in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, P.R.; Moores, B.M.

    1995-01-01

    Computer applications in general and diagnostic radiology in particular are becoming more widespread. Their application to the field of radiation protection in medical imaging, including quality control initiatives, is similarly becoming more widespread. Advances in computer technology have enabled departments of diagnostic radiology to have access to powerful yet affordable personal computers. The application of databases, expert systems and computer-based learning is under way. The executive information systems for the management of dose and QA data that are under way at IRS are discussed. An important consideration in developing these pragmatic software tools has been the range of computer literacy within the end user group. Using interfaces have been specifically designed to reflect the requirements of many end users who will have little or no computer knowledge. (Author)

  17. National congress of radiation protection - Book of presentations (slides)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-06-01

    This document brings together all the available presentations (slides) of the 9. French national congress of radiation protection. The congress comprised 9 tutorial sessions and 13 ordinary sessions. The tutorial sessions covered the following topics: T1 - Fukushima accident's consequences on terrestrial environment; T2 - The efficient dose: use and limitations in the industrial and medical domains; T3 - Revision of the NFC 15-160 standard relative to radiological facilities; T4 - Medical implants and low frequency electromagnetic fields; T5 - Report from the working group on radiological zoning; T6 - Incidents in medical environment; T7 - ADR: European agreement about the international road transport of dangerous goods; T8 - Cigeo project: industrial geologic disposal facility; T9 - Dose control in medical imaging: what progress since 2010? The ordinary sessions gathered fifty-nine presentations dealing with the following subjects: 1 - effects of ionising radiations on man and ecosystems; 2 - radiation protection regulation and standards; 3 - radiation protection in incident, accident and post-accident situation; 4 - radiation protection of populations and ecosystems; 5 - Radiation protection and society; 6/11 - Radiation protection of patients; 7/8 - Eye lens irradiation and dosimetry; 9 - Non-ionising radiations; 10/12 - Radiation protection in professional environments; 13 - advances in dosimetry and metrology

  18. Biological research for radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In Gyu; Kim, Kug Chan; Shim, Hae Won; Oh, Tae Jeong; Park, Seon Young; Lee, Kang Suk

    2000-04-01

    The work scope of Biological research for the radiation protection had contained the search of biological microanalytic methods for assessing the health effect by {gamma}-radiation and toxic agents, the standardization of human T-lymphocyte cell culture and polymerase chain reaction, T-cell clonal assay, and the quantification of mutation frequency in the hypoxanthine (guanine) phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) gene locus by single exposure or combined exposure. Especially, the polymerase chain reaction methods using reverse transcriptase has been developed to analyze the mutant gene induced by {gamma}-radiation and chemical (pentachlorophenol) agent exposure, and to investigate the point mutations in the HPRT gene locus of T-lymphocytes. The HPRT T-cell clonal assay revealed that it could not differentiate {gamma}-irradiation from pentachlorophenol, because the frequency of somatic mutations induced by both damaging agents increased in a dose-dependent manner. The analysis of DNA sequence alterations of HPRT mutant clones clearly showed that both damaging agents induced different mutational spectra in the HPRT locus of T-cells. The large deletions, which account for 75 percent of the analyzed mutants, are characteristic mutations induced by {gamma}-irradiation. By contrast, point mutations such as base substitutions and insertion, come up to 97 percent in the case of pentachlorophenol-treated cells. The point mutation frequencies at 190 base pair and 444 base pair positions are 3-6 folds as high as in those at other mutation positions. It may be that these mutation sites are hot spots induced by pentachlorophenol. These results suggest that the HPRT mutation spectrum can be used as a potential bio marker for assessing a specific environmental risk. (author)

  19. 100 years of ionizing radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baltrukiewicz, Z.; Musialowicz, T.

    1999-01-01

    The development of radiation protection from the end of 19. century and evolution of opinion about injurious effect of ionizing radiation were presented. Observations of undesirable effects of ionizing radiation exposition, progress of radiobiology and dosimetry directed efforts toward radiation protection. These activities covered, at the beginning, limited number of persons and were subsequently extended to whole population. The current means, goals and regulations of radiological control have been discussed

  20. Radiation Protection Training frame in Virgen del Rocio University Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrador, M.; Baeza, M.; Luis-Simon, J.; Carbajo, J.; Gomez-Puerto, A.; Gonzalez, V.; Mateos; Haro, G.; Gomez, M.

    2003-01-01

    The International Community has established a dose limitation system to control the risks due to the ionizing radiation pacific use. The education and training of the occupational exposed workers is necessary to achieve the objectives of this dose limitation system.The second largest contribution to exposures of the individuals worldwide after natural background radiation, comes from medical radiation procedures. For this reason, the radiation protection training of medical workers is essential. In the particular autonomous region of Andalusia, most medical radiation procedures comes from the Public Health Service. Therefore, Andalusia Healthy Service maintains a radiation protection training plan for their occupational exposed workers. This training plan includes: training of the radioactive facilities supervisors and operators in both nuclear medicine and radiotherapy areas; training for medical radiodiagnosis facility management; quality assurance in medical diagnosis and therapy; and update on radiation protection. The training plan is performed with theoretical and practical course homologated by the Spanish Nuclear Safety Council. These courses cover four basic fields related to radiation: Physics, Radiobiology, Radiation Protection and Legislation. These courses have been organised by the Andalusia Healthy System since 1993. A total of 722 medical workers have been trained for radiation protection. Therefore, optimum conditions for the safe and correct use of ionizing radiation have been provided to these workers. The supervisor or operator's license of the radioactive facility can be also obtained by these courses. (Author) 17 refs

  1. Basic principles of radiation protection in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    The major goal of radiation protection in Canada is to ensure that individuals are adequately protected against the harm that might arise from unwarranted exposure to ionizing radiation. This report deals with the basic principles and organizations involved in protection against ionizing radiation. Three basic principles of radiation protection are: 1) that no practice shall be adopted unless its introduction produces a positive net benefit for society, 2) that all exposures shall be kept as low as reasonably achievable, relevant economic and social factors being taken into account, and 3) that doses to individuals should not exceed specified annual limits. The limit for radiation workers is currently 50 mSv per year, and exposures of the general public should not exceed a small fraction of that of radiation workers. Other specific areas in radiation protection which have received considerable attention in Canada include limitations on collective dose (the sum of the individual doses for all exposed individuals), exemption rules for extremely small radiation doses or amounts of radioactive materials, occupational hazards in uranium mining, and special rules for protection of the foetus in pregnant female radiation workers. Implementation of radiation protection principles in Canada devolves upon the Atomic Energy Control Board, the Department of National Health and Welfare, provincial authorities, licensees and radiation workers. A brief description is given of the roles of each of these groups

  2. Radiation Protection Group annual report (1997)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoefert, M.

    1998-01-01

    The Annual Report of the Radiation Protection Group is intended to inform the Host State Authorities, as well as the CERN Management and staff, about the radiological situation at CERN during the year 1997. The structure of the present report follows that of previous years and has five sections. It presents the results of environmental radiation monitoring, gives information about the radiation control on the sites of the Organization, describes the radiation protection activities around the CERN accelerators, reports on personnel dosimetry, calibration and instrumentation, and briefly comments on the non-routine activities of the Radiation Protection Group

  3. The Radiation Protection Service in Asuncion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaldivar de Basualdo, I.

    1979-01-01

    This report details the activities of radiation protection services concerning radioisotopes, personal monitoring and film dosimetry service. Historical, organizational and regulatory aspects are also covered. (author)

  4. Radiation protection activities and status in Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strohal, P.

    1993-01-01

    The status of radiation protection practices in Asian countries is monitored by different means, e.g. the IAEA technical cooperation activities, by an overall assessment of conditions in a country by RAPAT missions, and on the basis of data collected through various regional activities. The radiation protection situation in Asia is very heterogeneous. There is a group of countries with very well developed radiation protection practices and advanced in the application of the Basic Safety Standards, but the majority of Asian member states still need improvement, several lacking the necessary fundamental infrastructure for radiation protection

  5. New infrastructures for training in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marco, M.; Rodriguez, M.; Van der Steen, J.

    2007-01-01

    In this work, an analysis of the new infrastructure used in the radiation protection training and professional education, which is developed nowadays, is carried out. CIEMAT has been making many efforts in the education and training of professionals at all levels, for years. At present CIEMAT is developing educational activities in radiation protection general courses and professionals updating courses. The newest strategies for the radiation protection learning are developing in collaboration with professional societies. These try to encourage the technology transference, the collaboration between the actors involved with the radiation protection and the new information technology implementation. (Author) 11 refs

  6. Nevada Test Site Radiation Protection Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radiological Control Managers' Council, Nevada Test Site

    2007-08-09

    Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection', establishes radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities. 10 CFR 835.101(a) mandates that DOE activities be conducted in compliance with a documented Radiation Protection Program (RPP) as approved by DOE. This document promulgates the RPP for the Nevada Test Site (NTS), related (onsite or offsite) DOE National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) operations, and environmental restoration offsite projects.

  7. Health and radiation protection management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huhn, A.; Vargas, M.; Lorenzetti, J.; Lança, L.

    2017-01-01

    Quality management and continuous improvement systems are becoming part of daily health services, including radiodiagnostic services, which are designed to meet the needs of users, operating in an environment where the differential is due to the competence and quality of the services provided. The objective of this study is to show the scope of the management of health services, especially radiodiagnosis and radiological protection. Method: Exploratory and descriptive study, based on a review of the literature on the subject. Results: Radiodiagnosis has demonstrated the need for efficient management, especially because ionizing radiation is present in this environment and it is imperative that the professionals working in this area are aware of the need to perform adequate radiological protection for themselves and for users. Conclusion: Universal access to information has changed the attitude of the user and the user has become more demanding in his choices, wanting to understand, express, interact and choose the best quality service in view of the various options available in the market

  8. Some remarks on the Austrian radiation protection legislation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vetter, H.

    1979-01-01

    Some of the provisions of the Austrian Radiation Protection Law and Radiation Protection Ordinance differ from those recommended by ICRP and IAEO. This is particularly true for the definition of working conditions, the categorization of radiation areas and the classification of radiation workers. It is suggested that the responsible authorities when considering a revision of the legislation in the light of ICRP 26 and the revised IAEA Basic Safety Standards, also study the desirability of adapting the currently applicable provisions to the universally accepted international norms. (Auth.)

  9. Solar ultraviolet radiation : personal exposure and protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, C.; Gies, H.P.; Elliott, G.

    1988-01-01

    Overexposure to solar ultraviolet radiation ( [1TUVR) can result in serious health effects including skin cancer. Good skin and eye protection against solar UVR is available and the outdoor worker should be educated to use such protection at all times

  10. Development of a personalized dosimetric tool for radiation protection in case of internal contamination and targeted radiotherapy in nuclear medicine; Developpement d'un outil dosimetrique personnalise pour la radioprotection en contamination interne et la radiotherapie vectorisee en medecine nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiavassa, S

    2005-12-15

    Current internal dosimetric estimations are based on the M.I.R.D. formalism and used standard mathematical models. These standard models are often far from a given patient morphology and do not allow to perform patient-specific dosimetry. The aim of this study was to develop a personalized dosimetric tool, which takes into account real patient morphology, composition and densities. This tool, called O.E.D.I.P.E., a French acronym of Tool for the Evaluation of Personalized Internal Dose, is a user-friendly graphical interface. O.E.D.I.P.E. allows to create voxel-based patient-specific geometries and associates them with the M.C.N.P.X. Monte Carlo code. Radionuclide distribution and absorbed dose calculation can be performed at the organ and voxel scale. O.E.D.I.P.E. can be used in nuclear medicine for targeted radiotherapy and in radiation protection in case of internal contamination. (author)

  11. New Croatian Act on Ionizing Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grgic, S.

    1998-01-01

    According to the new Croatian Act on ionizing radiation protection which is in a final stage of genesis, Ministry of Health of the Republic of Croatia is the governmental body responsible for all aspects relating sources of ionizing radiation in Croatia: practices, licenses, users, transport, in medicine and industry as well, workers with sources of ionizing radiation, emergency preparedness in radiological accidents, storage of radioactive wastes, x-ray machines and other machines producing ionizing radiation and radioactive materials in the environment. Ministry of Health is responsible to the Government of the Republic of Croatia, closely collaborating with the Croatian Radiation Protection Institute, health institution for the performance of scientific and investigation activities in the field of radiation protection. Ministry of Health is also working together with the Croatian Institute for the Occupational Health. More emphasis has been laid on recent discussion among the world leading radiation protection experts on justification of the last recommendations of the ICRP 60 publication. (author)

  12. Radiation protection optimization using a knowledge based methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes-Jimenez, J.; Tsoukalas, L.H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a knowledge based methodology for radiological planning and radiation protection optimization. The cost-benefit methodology described on International Commission of Radiation Protection Report No. 37 is employed within a knowledge based framework for the purpose of optimizing radiation protection and plan maintenance activities while optimizing radiation protection. 1, 2 The methodology is demonstrated through an application to a heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system. HVAC is used to reduce radioactivity concentration levels in selected contaminated multi-compartment models at nuclear power plants when higher than normal radiation levels are detected. The overall objective is to reduce personnel exposure resulting from airborne radioactivity, when routine or maintenance access is required in contaminated areas. 2 figs, 15 refs

  13. Nevada National Security Site Radiation Protection Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-04-30

    Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835, “Occupational Radiation Protection,” establishes radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities. 10 CFR 835.101(a) mandates that DOE activities be conducted in compliance with a documented Radiation Protection Program (RPP) as approved by DOE. This document promulgates the RPP for the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), related (on-site or off-site) U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) operations, and environmental restoration off-site projects. This RPP section consists of general statements that are applicable to the NNSS as a whole. The RPP also includes a series of appendices which provide supporting detail for the associated NNSS Tennant Organizations (TOs). Appendix H, “Compliance Demonstration Table,” contains a cross-walk for the implementation of 10 CFR 835 requirements. This RPP does not contain any exemptions from the established 10 CFR 835 requirements. The RSPC and TOs are fully compliant with 10 CFR 835 and no additional funding is required in order to meet RPP commitments. No new programs or activities are needed to meet 10 CFR 835 requirements and there are no anticipated impacts to programs or activities that are not included in the RPP. There are no known constraints to implementing the RPP. No guides or technical standards are adopted in this RPP as a means to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 835.

  14. The Duty of the ANARAP-MAD for the Development of Radiation Protection in Madagascar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratovonjanahary, F.

    2010-01-01

    Association NAtionale de Radio Protection-MADagascar (ANARAP-MAD), to develop the radiation protection in Madagascar; to promote the radiation protection in Madagascar; to set up links with international institutions dealing with the same objectives (I.A.E.A., W.H.O., etc...); to care for the enforcement of the regulation in radiation protection; to propose improvements and amendments; to find solutions to problems relevant to the enforcement of the regulation; to inform and to train in the field of radiation protection; to contribute in the development of the science, all activities carried out by the association are based on the existing legislation in the country. Despite the insufficiency of financial support, the ANARAP-MAD had always made an effort to carry out activities for the development of radiation protection infrastructure in Madagascar. The main problem is also that the regulatory Authority is not yet operational. However, the ANARAP-MAD, with the support of the Madagascar-INSTN, has the challenge to effectively promoting radiation protection in Madagascar

  15. Nuclear safety and radiation protection in France in 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The first part of this voluminous report describe the different ASN (Nuclear Safety Authority) actions: nuclear activities (ionising radiation and health and environmental risks), principles and stakeholders in nuclear safety regulation, radiation protection and protection of the environment, regulation, regulation of nuclear activities and exposure to ionizing radiation, radiological emergencies, public information and transparency, international relations. It also gives an overview of nuclear safety and radiation protection activities in the different French regions. The second part addresses activities regulated by the ASN: medical uses of ionizing radiation, non-medical uses of ionizing radiation, transport of radioactive materials, nuclear power plants, nuclear fuel cycle installations, nuclear research facilities and various nuclear installations, safe decommissioning of basic nuclear installations, radioactive waste and contaminated sites and soils

  16. Sense and purpose of radiation protection training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malasek, A.

    1992-04-01

    Training in radiation protection is of great significance in connection with the activities of the executive, the federal army and emergency organizations in emergency operations for the protection of the population in the case of large-scale radioactive contamination due to diverse causes. The presently valid legal situation of radiation protection training is presented in connection with the expected modification in the amendment to the SSVO. The special situation of radiation protection training for the executive, the federal army and emergency organizations is described and discussed in connection with the new aspects outlined in the draft of the new radiation protection regulation. In conclusion, problems arising in the conveyance of basic knowledge in radiation protection are illustrated by means of a concrete example. (author)

  17. Radiation protection for nurses. Regulations and guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jankowski, C.B.

    1992-01-01

    Rules and regulations of federal agencies and state radiation protection programs provide the bases for hospital policy regarding radiation safety for nurses. Nursing administrators should work with the radiation safety officer at their institutions to ensure that radiation exposures to staff nurses will be as low as reasonably achievable and that special consideration will be given to pregnant nurses. Nurses' fears about their exposure to radiation can be greatly reduced through education

  18. An introduction to radiation protection principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    The fundamentals of radiation hazards and their control are outlined. This report is for use by all radiation workers at CRNL and copies are available for all who want one. The purposes of the document are to outline the fundamentals of radiation protection, to describe methods that enable employees to work safely with radiation and to acquaint employees with the CRNL radiation and industrial safety organization

  19. Occupational Radiation Protection in Severe Accident Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    protection job coverage during severe accident response. The IAEA defines a 'Severe Accident' as a beyond design basis accident comprising of accident conditions more severe than a design basis accident, involving significant core degradation. Preparation of the report The expert group met several times to share their experience and develop an interim (preliminary) report by the end of 2013. The content of the report is thus based on current reflections and action plans undertaken by the ISOE participating utilities and regulatory authorities to improve the emergency response plans in the event of a severe nuclear accident from the point of view of occupational radiation protection. A specific attention has been given to the analysis of past nuclear accidents (TMI-2, USA-1979; Chernobyl, USSR-1986 and Fukushima Daiichi, Japan-2011) and to the integration of the occupational radiation protection (ORP) lessons learned from these accidents into the various chapters of the report (See synthesis of these lessons learned in Appendix-1). To finalize the report, an international workshop was organized in 2014 to present and discuss the content of the interim version and share national experiences on best occupational RP management practices and protocols for optimum RP job coverage during severe accident, initial response and recovery efforts (see Appendix-2). The workshop notably allowed to improve and complete the report which has then be submitted to the ISOE Management Board for approval. This report comprises five main chapters. Chapter 2 provides essential information on radiation protection management and organisation. Chapter 3 establishes the goal of radiation protection training and exercises related to severe accident management. Chapter 4 discusses facility characteristics that must be considered when planning actions in response to a severe accident. Chapter 5 introduces an overall approach for the protection of workers / responders with its interpretation and

  20. Swedish Radiation Protection Institute: information activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, Lars

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of SSI's Information and PR Service is to broaden public awareness of radiation and radiation risks as well as to fulfill other performance goals. SSI achieves this through its advisory, educational and informative activities. SSI publishes two external magazines, Stralskyddsnytt and SSI News. Stralskyddsnytt - which is available in Swedish only - has a circulation of 2,000 and is published four times a year. SSI News - which is in English - is published twice a year and has a circulation of about 1,800. Another important channel of communication is the web site (www.ssi.se). Taking advantage of PUSH technology, SSI also distributes, by e-mail, press releases and other important information on radiation to radiation protection professionals in Sweden. SSI continuously monitors news by subscribing to a press clipping service. SSI Training is a commercial unit within the Information and PR Service. A policy for mass media contacts exists as well as a policy for internal communication. SSI has a graphic profile. SSI has a specialized research library. (author)

  1. Swedish radiation protection institute. Information activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, Lars

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of SSI's information and PR Service is to broaden public awareness of radiation and radiation risks as well as to fulfil other performance goals. SSI achieves this through its advisory, educational and informative activities. SSI publishes two external magazines, Straalskyddsnytt and SSI News. Straalskyddsnytt - which is available in Swedish only - has a circulation of 2,400 and is published four times a year. SSI News - which is in English - is published twice a year and has a circulation of about 1,500. Another important channel of communication is the web site (www.ssi.se). Taking advantage of PUSH technology, SSi also distributes, by e-mail, press releases and other important information of radiation to radiation protection professionals in Sweden. SSI continuously monitors news by subscribing to a press clipping service. SSI Training is a commercial unit within the Information and PR Service. A policy for mass media contacts exists as well as a policy for internal communication. SSI has a graphic profile. SSI has a specialised research library. (au)

  2. Manual for medical problems of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    The manual deals comprehensively and topically with the theoretical and practical fundamentals of radiation protection of the population considering the present knowledge in the fields of radiobiology and radiation protection medicine. The subject is covered under the following headings: (1) physics of ionizing radiations, (2) biological radiation effects, (3) the acute radiation syndrome, (4) medical treatment of the acute radiation syndrome, (5) combined radiation injuries, and (6) prophylaxis and therapy of injuries caused by fission products of nuclear explosions. The book is of interest to medical doctors, medical scientists, and students in medicine who have to acquire special knowledge in the field of radiation protection and it is of value as a reference book in daily routine

  3. Ionizing radiation, nuclear energy and radiation protection for school

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucena, E.A.; Reis, R.G.; Pinho, A.S.; Alves, A.S.; Rio, M.A.P.; Reis, A.A.; Silva, J.W.S.; Paula, G.A. de; Goncalves Junior, M.A.

    2017-01-01

    Since the discovery of X-rays in 1895, ionizing radiation has been applied in many sectors of society, such as medicine, industry, safety, construction, engineering and research. However, population is unaware of both the applications of ionizing radiation and their risks and benefits. It can be seen that most people associate the terms 'radiation' and 'nuclear energy' with the atomic bomb or cancer, most likely because of warlike applications and the stealthy way radioactivity had been treated in the past. Thus, it is necessary to clarify the population about the main aspects related to the applications, risks and associated benefits. These knowledge can be disseminated in schools. Brazilian legislation for basic education provides for topics such as nuclear energy and radioactivity to high school students. However, some factors hamper such an educational practice, namely, few hours of class, textbooks do not address the subject, previous concepts obtained in the media, difficulty in dealing with the subject in the classroom, phobia, etc. One solution would be the approximation between schools and institutions that employ technologies involving radioactivity, which would allow students to know the practices, associated radiological protection, as well as the risks and benefits to society. Currently, with the increasing application of ionizing radiation, especially in medicine, it is necessary to demystify the use of radioactivity. (author)

  4. Current trends in radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metivier, H.; Arranz, L.; Gallego, E.; Sugier, A

    2004-07-01

    Organizers of the 11. IRPA International Congress have wished to take advantage of this occasion to launch a new series of books dedicated to review the current important problems of concerns in radioprotection. The four editors have combined their efforts to assemble within this book contributions from the worldwide and most famous specialists in their respective fields. Their signatures lead to the insurance of a first class information. all aspects of radioprotection are treated, through synthetic articles accessible to all. Very didactic, this book will be useful to radioprotection professionals willing to take the stake of all aspects within their profession, but also to engineers, physicists, physicians, researchers, and non-specialist people who will find here a thorough synthesis of all aspects of radiological protection. (author)

  5. Current trends in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metivier, H.; Arranz, L.; Gallego, E.; Sugier, A.

    2004-01-01

    Organizers of the 11. IRPA International Congress have wished to take advantage of this occasion to launch a new series of books dedicated to review the current important problems of concerns in radioprotection. The four editors have combined their efforts to assemble within this book contributions from the worldwide and most famous specialists in their respective fields. Their signatures lead to the insurance of a first class information. all aspects of radioprotection are treated, through synthetic articles accessible to all. Very didactic, this book will be useful to radioprotection professionals willing to take the stake of all aspects within their profession, but also to engineers, physicists, physicians, researchers, and non-specialist people who will find here a thorough synthesis of all aspects of radiological protection. (author)

  6. Issues related to radiation protection in the medical application of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatt, B.C.; Tripathi, U.B.; Sharma, S.D.

    2002-01-01

    The medical application of ionising radiation is by far the largest contributor (about 95%) to human exposures from manmade sources of radiation. Diagnostic radiology, radiotherapy, nuclear medicine and interventional radiology procedures are common sources of the medical exposures. In addition to medical exposures, exposures also result from other radiation related occupational activities. This paper endeavours to summarise the relevant findings, conclusions and recommendations of UNSCEAR Report 2000 and the two recent IAEA international conferences, namely, (1) International Conference on the Radiological Protection of Patients in Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Radiotherapy, Malaga, Spain, 2001, and (2) International Conference on Occupational Radiological Protection: Protecting Workers against exposure to ionising radiation, Geneva, Switzerland, 2002, with reference to medical applications of ionising radiation

  7. An introduction to radiation protection. Fourth edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, A.; Harbison, S.A.

    1996-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive account of radiation hazards and their control. The presentation, which assumes no previous knowledge of the subject, is based on methods which the authors have found, over a number of years of teaching radiation protection at all levels, to be most easily understood by students. The book is intended to meet the requirements of a wide range of readers who are involved, either directly or indirectly, with ionizing radiation, including doctors, dentists, research workers, nuclear plant designers and operators. In particular the authors believe that the work is suitable for the health physics monitors and technicians who are concerned with the day-to-day control of radiation hazards in nuclear power stations, research establishments, hospitals and in industry. In the UK, the generally accepted standard of training in this type of work is that set by the City and Guilds of London Institute courses in Radiation Safety Practice which are held in various centers. The chapters of the book dealing with the general aspects of health physics are aimed a this standard. Later chapters dealing with particular aspects of the subject are more detailed. In the second half of the book there are individual chapters on the more specialized topics of nuclear reactor health physics, problems associated with X-rays and radiography, health physics in medicine, the disposal of radioactive waste and radiological emergencies. Chapters are also presented on legislation and on the organization of health physics

  8. The optimization of radiation protection composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashlykov, O.L.; Shcheklein, S.E.; Luk'yanenko, V.Yu.; Mikhajlova, A.F.; Russkikh, I.M.; Seleznev, E.N.; Kozlov, A.V.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to develop an algorithm of design of homogeneous composition of the radiation protective materials (RPM) for the optimization of radiation protection. The homogeneous RPM such as Abris have been used for the investigation, the production technology of which allows to obtain the desired concentration of fillers [ru

  9. Radiation protection laws in the Nordic countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, Lars

    1991-01-01

    Sweden has since 1988 a totally revised radiation protection law and Finland has recently enacted a new law. The legal situation of the Nordic countries in the radiation protection field is reviewed with the main emphasis on the Swedish law. (author)

  10. General organisation of radiation protection in Senegal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casanova, P.; Ndiaye, M.; Sow, M.L.; Ndao, A.S.

    2015-01-01

    Organization of radiation protection in Senegal is governed by three main texts that define the general principles and implement legal means for their actions. Efficient control of nuclear activities to ensure protection of workers, the environment and patients against ionizing radiation is subject to criminal penalties in case of breach of this legislation. (authors)

  11. Radiation protection culture: a global challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, Rolf; Henrichs, Klaus; Wernli, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The central motto 'Radiation Protection Culture-A Global Challenge' of the fourth European IRPA Congress is discussed on the basis of the IRPA Guiding Principles Establishing a Radiation Protection Culture and the contributions presented in the plenary sessions of the conference. (authors)

  12. The radiation protection infrastructure in Madagascar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andriambololona, R.; Ratovonjanahary, J.F.; Randriantseheno, H.F.; Ramanandraibe, M.J.

    2001-01-01

    Madagascar is participating in the Model Project RAF/9/024 on 'Upgrading Radiation Protection Infrastructure'. Its radiation protection legislation is based on the BSS. The efforts being made to upgrade the country's regulatory infrastructure and the problems encountered are described below, as is the national information and training programme for the authorities, the public, workers and students. (author)

  13. Radiation Protection in PET-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-10-01

    The presentation is based on the following areas: radiological monitoring installations in the production of PET radiopharmaceuticals, personal dose, dosage advertising, nuclear medicine, PET, radiation protection of patients, requirements for medical practice, regulatory aspects, dose calculation, shields, quantities, center Cudim, cyclotron and synthesis of radiopharmaceuticals, biological effects of radiation protection practices.

  14. Radiation Protection Institute - Annual Report 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The Radiation Protection Institute (RPI) of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission was established to provide the scientific and technical support for executing the operational functions of the Radiation Protection Board. The operational activities of the Institute are listed. Also included in the report are the various research projects, training programmes and publications for the year 2015.

  15. Implantation of inspection and radiation protection plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha, J.L.R. da

    1988-01-01

    Methods, means and procedures adopted by Petrobras engineering service to survey safety radiation protection of the companies that carry out radiographic services of PETROBRAS are showed. The systematic used in certification of personel, procedures, audits and field survey concerning radiation protection, are described. (C.M.) [pt

  16. International radiation commissions 1896 to 2008. Research into atmospheric radiation from IMO to IAMAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolle, H.J. (comp.); Moeller, F.; London, J.

    2008-05-15

    The document covers a historical compilation on research into atmospheric radiation from 1896 to 2008. The first part is a brief history of the radiation commissions of IMO (International Meteorological Organization) and IUGG (International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics) for the period 1824 to 1948. Part 2 Covers the International Radiation Commission (IRC) of IAM (International Association of Meteorology)/IAMAS (International Association of Meteorology and Atmospheric Sciences)/IAMAP (International Association of Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics); the Re-constitution of the IUGG Radiation Commision, the Officers of the International Radiation Commission of IUUG 1948-2008, and the activities of the Radiation Commision of the IUGG 1948-2008. The appendices include the Radiation Commission Members, the summaries of presented papers from 1954 and 1957, the IRC publications, and acronyms.

  17. International radiation commissions 1896 to 2008. Research into atmospheric radiation from IMO to IAMAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolle, H.J.; Moeller, F.; London, J.

    2008-01-01

    The document covers a historical compilation on research into atmospheric radiation from 1896 to 2008. The first part is a brief history of the radiation commissions of IMO (International Meteorological Organization) and IUGG (International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics) for the period 1824 to 1948. Part 2 Covers the International Radiation Commission (IRC) of IAM (International Association of Meteorology)/IAMAS (International Association of Meteorology and Atmospheric Sciences)/IAMAP (International Association of Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics); the Re-constitution of the IUGG Radiation Commision, the Officers of the International Radiation Commission of IUUG 1948-2008, and the activities of the Radiation Commision of the IUGG 1948-2008. The appendices include the Radiation Commission Members, the summaries of presented papers from 1954 and 1957, the IRC publications, and acronyms

  18. Regional radiation protection initiatives by Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grey, J.

    1993-01-01

    Australia both through the auspices of the IAEA and from Government Aid Grants has contributed to the improvement of radiation protection throughout the Asia/Pacific region. The assistance has been in the form of training and improvement to radiation protection infrastructures. The presentation describes the objectives, scope and diversity of the radiation protection infrastructure program and the benefits to the large number of persons included in the program. An outline of the current IAEA program is also discussed together with an explanation of how the program will assist national regulators in the education of radiation workers, in hazardous operations such as industrial radiography

  19. Radiation Protection Research Needs Workshop: Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewji, Shaheen A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Davis, Jason [Oak Ridge Associated Univ., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hertel, Nolan E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Abelquist, Eric [Oak Ridge Associated Univ., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-09-01

    In order to protect humans and the environment when using ionizing radiation for the advancement and benefit of society, accurately quantifying radiation and its potential effects remains the driver for ensuring the safety and secure use of nuclear and radiological applications of technology. In the realm of radiation protection and its various applications with the nuclear fuel cycle, (nuclear) medicine, emergency response, national defense, and space exploration, the scientific and research needs to support state and federal radiation protection needs in the United States in each of these areas are still deficient.

  20. Radiation protection guidelines for space missions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1987-01-01

    The original recommendations for radiation protection guidelines were made by the National Academy of Sciences in 1970. Since that time the US crews have become more diverse in their makeup and much has been learned about both radiation-induced cancer and other late effects. While far from adequate there is now some understanding of the risks that high-Z and -energy (HZE) particles pose. For these reasons it was time to reconsider the radiation protection guidelines for space workers. This task was undertaken recently by National Council on Radiation Protection (NCRP). 42 refs., 2 figs., 9 tabs

  1. INES rating of radiation protection related events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hort, M.

    2009-01-01

    In this presentation, based on the draft Manual, a short review of the use of the INES rating of events concerning radiation protection is given, based on a new INES User's Manual edition. The presentation comprises a brief history of the scale development, general description of the scale and the main principles of the INES rating. Several examples of the use of the scale for radiation protection related events are mentioned. In the presentation, the term 'radiation protection related events' is used for radiation source and transport related events outside the nuclear installations. (authors)

  2. Rules and regulations of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The finality of this legislative text is to guarantee the radiation protection of the exposed personnel, of the people in general and the environment against the ionizing radiations risks. Its scope includes all the natural and juridical persons that work with ionizing radiation sources into the peruvian territory

  3. Radiation protection training in health care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-02-01

    The Guide presents the content and minimum amount of radiation protection training for health care staff with respect to the use of ionizing radiation. This Guide does not apply to training with respect to non-ionizing radiation and its use

  4. Using of ionizing radiation in environment protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuruc, J.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, there is given the review of application of the radiation chemistry techniques in the environment protection . Using of sources of ionization radiation in underground water, drinking water and waste waters as well as in exhaust gases radiation processing and treatment are reviewed [sk

  5. Radiation protection in a nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, K.H.

    1988-01-01

    For the personnel that is occupied with operation, monitoring, maintenance and repair work, working in a nuclear power station inevitably means spending a certain amount of time in areas exposed to radiation and handling radio-active materials. Effective radiation protection of these persons starts with the planning and designing the nuclear power station. The most important aspects of radiation protection in a nuclear power station are thorough preparation of the work, that is connected with exposure to radiation, appropriate and effective application of technical and administrative measures during the work, reliable and complete determination of the existing radiation level. The main objective in this respect is to keep the radiation level as low as possible, while using all reasonable means. This summary gives a description of radiation protection in the nuclear power plant and the experiences and results of the 10-year operation of the Gemeinschaftskernkraftwerk Neckar (GKN). (orig.) [de

  6. International Radiation Monitoring and Information System (IRMIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Baciu, Florian; Stowisek, Jan; Saluja, Gurdeep; Kenny, Patrick; Albinet, Franck

    2017-09-01

    This article describes the International Radiation Monitoring Information System (IRMIS) which was developed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) with the goal to provide Competent Authorities, the IAEA and other international organizations with a client server based web application to share and visualize large quantities of radiation monitoring data. The data maps the areas of potential impact that can assist countries to take appropriate protective actions in an emergency. Ever since the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident in April of 19861 European Community (EC) has worked towards collecting routine environmental radiological monitoring data from national networked monitoring systems. European Radiological Data Exchange Platform (EURDEP) was created in 19952 to that end - to provide radiation monitoring data from most European countries reported in nearly real-time. During the response operations for the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident (March 2011) the IAEA Incident and Emergency Centre (IEC) managed, harmonized and shared the large amount of data that was being generated from different organizations. This task underscored the need for a system which allows sharing large volumes of radiation monitoring data in an emergency. In 2014 EURDEP started the submission of the European radiological data to the International Radiation Monitoring Information System (IRMIS) as a European Regional HUB for IRMIS. IRMIS supports the implementation of the Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident by providing a web application for the reporting, sharing, visualizing and analysing of large quantities of environmental radiation monitoring data during nuclear or radiological emergencies. IRMIS is not an early warning system that automatically reports when there are significant deviations in radiation levels or when values are detected above certain levels. However, the configuration of the visualization features offered by IRMIS may

  7. Current Trends in Radiation Protection Recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomaa, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    The third generation of the ICRP recommendations was adopted in April 2007. The recommendations rely on situations (planned, emergency and existing), individual (occupational, public and patient) and radiation protection system (justification, optimization and dose limits). In the present work attention is paid to discuss the new recommendations and role of IAEA in updating its Basic Safety Standards for protection against ionizing radiation and safety of radiation sources and its impact for the national regulations

  8. The workers and public radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Guen, B.; Roupioz, A.; Rabu, B.

    2003-01-01

    Six texts develop the question of the radiation protection of workers and public. Monitoring of the exposure risk to alpha emitters during the unit outage of nuclear power plant of Cattenom is the first one, the second article concerns the ALARA approach applied to the yard that controls the welding of vapor generators of the Phenix reactor. The third one treats the evaluation of impact in environment of tritium releases associated to a fusion reactor accident. Some systems of radiological detection are studied, the notion of dose constraint is discussed, and what about the cooperation around nuclear and non nuclear installations. (N.C.)

  9. Ethical codes. Fig leaf argument, ballast or cultural element for radiation protection?; Ethik-Codes. Feigenblatt, Ballast oder Kulturelement fuer den Strahlenschutz?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gellermann, Rainer [Nuclear Control and Consulting GmbH, Braunschweig (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    The international association for radiation protection (IRPA) adopted in May 2004 a Code of Ethics in order to allow their members to hold an adequate professional level of ethical line of action. Based on this code of ethics the professional body of radiation protection (Fachverband fuer Strahlenschutz) has developed its own ethical code and adopted in 2005.

  10. Radiological protection, safety and security issues in the industrial and medical applications of radiation sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Pedro

    2015-11-01

    The use of radiation sources, namely radioactive sealed or unsealed sources and particle accelerators and beams is ubiquitous in the industrial and medical applications of ionizing radiation. Besides radiological protection of the workers, members of the public and patients in routine situations, the use of radiation sources involves several aspects associated to the mitigation of radiological or nuclear accidents and associated emergency situations. On the other hand, during the last decade security issues became burning issues due to the potential malevolent uses of radioactive sources for the perpetration of terrorist acts using RDD (Radiological Dispersal Devices), RED (Radiation Exposure Devices) or IND (Improvised Nuclear Devices). A stringent set of international legally and non-legally binding instruments, regulations, conventions and treaties regulate nowadays the use of radioactive sources. In this paper, a review of the radiological protection issues associated to the use of radiation sources in the industrial and medical applications of ionizing radiation is performed. The associated radiation safety issues and the prevention and mitigation of incidents and accidents are discussed. A comprehensive discussion of the security issues associated to the global use of radiation sources for the aforementioned applications and the inherent radiation detection requirements will be presented. Scientific, technical, legal, ethical, socio-economic issues are put forward and discussed.

  11. The case against protecting the environment from ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.T.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present the (rarely heard) argument in favour of retention of the present system of radiation protection of the environment. There has been a recent trend in the radioecological and radiation protection community towards greater regulation of the effects of ionising radiations on biota. In particular, the often quoted International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) hypothesis that: If humans are protected from the effects of ionising radiation, then flora and fauna are also adequately protected has been criticised as being too anthropocentric and not adequate for protection of the environment. In this paper I will challenge this view, arguing firstly that this statement is almost always quoted out of its proper context, and secondly that the ICRP hypothesis does adequately protect the environment from the effects of ionising radiations. In view of the relatively insignificant effect of regulated releases of ionising radiation on the environment, the economic cost of further regulation will not result in a significant environmental benefit. Whilst empirical research to test the ICRP hypothesis should continue, until there is clear evidence against it, this simple and cost-effective approach should be retained. This would benefit the environment by directing scarce resources to more urgent environmental problems. (author)

  12. Education in radiation protection in the National Customs of Paraguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordon, Oscar

    2013-01-01

    According to the IAEA-TECDOC-1312, as it is required by international agreements, the displacement of radioactive material within and among States should be subject to strict regulatory, administrative, safety and technical controls to ensure conditions of technological and physical safety. The Customs Office is one of the institutions responsible for monitoring shipments crossing international borders. Increasing illicit trafficking of radioactive materials, the use of ionizing radiation generating equipment for checking loads, and trade in radioactive substances have informed the need for education in radiation protection of customs officials. Thus, based on a course on radiation protection for Customs officials, organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency, in March 2008 was initiated a course of radiation protection, of 30 hours Carrera Tecnica del Centro de Formacion y Capacitacion Aduanera de Paraguay, which highlights the basic chapters and for transporting, nomenclature, new equipment emitting ionizing radiation and smuggling. Since then, to date, at least 10 groups have completed the training. Within the training program for customs officials, was incorporated a course for radiation protection of operators of baggage scanners with a four-hour program. Finally, since from 2011 and periodically, at various country customs, a workshop on Illicit trafficking of radioactive and nuclear materials is performed. The results of these courses have been very positive, as well as know the proper procedures for dealing with ionizing radiation has increased the safety culture within the institution

  13. Radiation protection in occupational health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The document is a training manual for physicians entering the field of occupational medicine for radiation workers. Part 1 contains the general principles for the practice of occupational health, namely health surveillance and the role of the occupational physician in the workplace, and Part 2 provides the essential facts necessary to understand the basic principles of radiation physics, radiobiology, dosimetry and radiation effects which form the basis for occupational radiation health

  14. The necessity of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Merwe, E.J.

    1979-01-01

    The use of ionizing radiation as an aid in dentistry, medicine and industry is still on the increase. Although much research has already been done on the effect of ionizing radiation on living matter much can still be done. The author discusses a few guidelines to be followed in dentistry to keep the radiation dose the patient is exposed to as low as possible

  15. Program of radiation protection of patients (Argentina)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Touzet, Rodolfo E.; Buzzi, Alfredo; Rojas, Roberto; Andisco Daniel

    2008-01-01

    After an initial period of conviction for installing an active discussion on Radiation Protection of Patients inside the medical community, there were organized 'working groups' in Radiodiagnosis, Radiotherapy, Nuclear Medicine and on radiation protection of pregnant women. These groups began systematical activities, which received a strong institutional support of the Argentine Society of Radiology, toward the implementation of a 'Program of RPP' that is being put nowadays into practice. The rapid advances which are present in medicine today, both in equipment and work protocol, determine that 'norms and regulations never arrive on time' which is why it is paramount that health services have 'systems of dynamic quality' and 'continual improvement' that can be adapted quickly to changes. This program has 6 principal aims and a series of targets to be fulfilled in successive stages: Basic aims and short term targets: 1) To guarantee the Justification. First goal: Development of the 'Prescription Guide' (achieved); 2) To optimize the radioprotection: First goal: Development of a 'Manual of Procedures' (In process); 3) To prevent potential exposures. First goal: Design of a 'Basic Quality System' in Health (achieved); 4) To achieve a qualification of the professionals by means of a process of certification and re-certification (In process); 5) To spread PRP's criteria by means of chats, meetings and the use of the media and graphical means. (Partially fulfilled); 6) To establish criteria for the protection of patient and operators in Interventional Radiology by creating a referral service. Strategies to cope with different interests within society are described. Main problems, failures and difficulties are also described. The effective participation of the professional and technicians' associations in the development of the program for radiation protection of the patient is a key aspect for the success of the whole national programme. (author)

  16. National congress of radiation protection - SFRP 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagroye, I.; Gonzague, A.; Ammerich, M.; Blanc, D.; Lecomte, J.F.; Boucher, D.; Boucher, D.; Averbeck, D.; Gourmelon, P.; Barbey, P.; Bourguignon, M.; Cordoliani, Y.S.; Dutrillaux, B.; Radecki, J.J.; Schieber, C.; Cosset, J.M.; Lecomte, J.F.; Lochard, J.; Metivier, H.; Sugier, A.; Tirmarche, M.; Aurengo, A.; Lamartine, J.; Martin, M.; Mallard, C.; Malfoy, B.; Ugolin, N.; Chevillard, S.; Schlumberger, M.; Laurier, D.; White-Koning, M.L.; Hemon, D.; Tirmarche, M.; Jougla, E.; Clavel, J.; Miccoli, L.; Barber, R.; Angulo, J.F.; Dubrova, Y.E.; Le Gall, B.; Phan, G.; Grillon, G.; Rouit, E.; Benech, H.; Fattal, E.; Deverre, J.R.; Legros, A.; Beuter, A.; Verrier, A.; Magne, I.; Souques, M.; Lambrozo, J.; Schmitt, P.; Roth, P.; Nadi, M.; Joly, L.; Chapel, C.; Burgain, A.; Marliot, F.; Cordier, E.; Courant, D.; Elabbassi, E.B.; Seze, R. de

    2005-01-01

    contamination; C.H.A.V.I.R., an interactive simulator for radiation protection; an ALARA engineering commune to the operating reactors; evolution of the radiological zoning and monitoring rules associated on the Cogema la Hague facility; an ambitious project for the nuclear park of EDF power plants : the purification project and its implementation for the Chinon B2 reactor - 2004); the eighth session concerns the environmental exposures and their consequences with the following presentations ( the concept of radioecological sensitivity and its interest in the risk management; phenomenal and analytical interpretation of the rain-deposit relationship used for the building of cesium 137 deposits in France consecutively to the Chernobyl accident; study of radioactivity source terms and transfer from medical origin in the purification network of the town of Toulouse; natural and artificial radioactivity in some marine species in manche. Case of polonium and plutonium alpha emitters. Synthesis of data acquired in the north Cotentin since 1990. elements of comparison; the role of local commissions of information (C.L.I.) in the follow up of release and monitoring of nuclear facilities); the ninth session concerns the dosimetry; the tenth session is divided in two parts radiation protection in accidental situations and radiation protection in post accidental situations with their respective presentations as follow ( evaluation of the dispersion of an aero contaminant in a ventilated area in field near an accidental source of emissions; study of the containment efficiency by gloveboxes in functioning accidental situations; the radiation protection and health; study by R.P.E. of the response of different materials in mixed field ( gamma, neutrons), application to the dosimetry reconstruction of an accident; nuclear or radiological events: organisation of medical intervention; and rehabilitation of life conditions in the contaminated territories: the contribution of radiation protection

  17. Radiation Protection Procedures to Individuals According to Situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomaa, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    The new recommendations of the International Commission for Radiological Protection (ICRP) had been adopted in March 2007. Historically, the first main ICRP recommendations were adopted in 1976. Hence, IAEA issued its publication (safety series no 9) entitled Basic safety standards for radiation protection, EU issued its legislative directive. Furthermore, U K issued its 1985 Ionizing Radiation Regulations . These recommendations were based upon system of dose limitation (justification, optimization and annual dose limits and Four types of exposures (occupational, medical, public and planned special exposure) The second main ICRP recommendations were adopted in 1990. Hence, IAEA together with other international organizations issued its publication (safety series no 115) entitled International Basic Safety Standards for protection against ionizing radiation and safety of radiation sources in 1996. Furthermore, EU issued its new legislative directive and UK issued its updated Ionizing radiation regulations in 1999. These recommendations based upon two systems of protection, these are system of protection in practice and system of protection in intervention. The new ICRP or 2007 recommendations is based upon situations 1- Planned situations, 2- Emergency situations, and 3- Existing situations. The 2007 recommendations rely also on Individuals 1- Occupational, 2- Public and 3- Patient and Furthermore, elements of Radiation Protection system are 1- Justification, 2- Optimization and 3- Dose limits. Updated numerical values for radiation weighting factors for proton is 2 instead of 5 and for neutron , its continuous function instead of discrete values . New numerical values for tissue weighting factors include value of 8% for Gonads instead of 20%. The recommended nominal probability is around 5 per cSv. IAEA as well other international organization are updating its Basic Safety Standards . National regulations shall also be updated accordingly

  18. The Swedish Radiation Protection Institute's protection criteria for disposal of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-12-01

    In this document the Swedish Radiation Protection Institute reports the preliminary protection criteria for personnel and public concerned with, or in other ways affected by, the disposal of high level radioactive waste. The document will be submitted for consideration by the parties concerned and also serve as a basis for preparing a Swedish viewpoint which can be asserted in future international discussions

  19. Radiation protection recommendations 2007. The Finnish translation of the publication ICRP-103

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustonen, R.; Sjoeblom, K-L.; Bly, R.; Havukainen, R.; Ikaeheimonen, T. K.; Kosunen, A.; Markkanen, M.; Paile, W.

    2009-02-01

    instance, the International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA) arranged reviews through its member organisations world-wide for their 2000 and 2004 congresses. The Nuclear Energy Agency of the OECD organised seven international workshops and performed four detailed assessments of draft ICRP texts. Now that the new ICRP recommendations have been published, they will, without any doubt, have an influence to development of the Basic Safety Standards of the European Union and after that the Finnish radiation protection legislation. STUK decided to translate the recommendations into a Finnish report, because the ICRP publication in question contains, at the principle level, all central guides of radiation protection for the forthcoming years. (orig.)

  20. IAEA regional basic professional training on radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This book contains the manuscripts of lectures of the Basic Professional Training Course on Radiation Protection which was organized and prepared on the basis of the standard syllabus put together in accordance with the recommendations of the International Basic safety standards for radiation protection against ionizing radiation and for safety of radiation sources (BSS). The course was intended to meet the educational and initial training requirements of personnel working in this field. The course is aimed at workers of a graduate level who are called on to take up position in the radiation protection field and who might someday become trainers in their home countries and institutions. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  1. Radiation protection of workers at nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The guide applies to the radiation protection of nuclear facility workers during the operation of the facility. The monitoring of occupational exposure at nuclear facilities, the radiation monitoring systems and equipment in nuclear facilities, the requirements for radiation safety aspects in the design of nuclear facilities and medical surveillance of exposed workers are presented in separate guides of the Finnish Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK)

  2. Squares of the natural numbers in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, H.M.

    1977-01-01

    An informal history of radiation protection is given. The following topics are included: the discovery of x rays and their effects, the formation of the International Committee on X-ray and Radium Protection, the Manhattan Project and its plutonium aspects, dose limits and their origin, the increase in antinuclear writings, the publication of reports on radiation levels and effects, the role of the EPA in medical radiation, and the Oklo phenomenon. Recommendations for NCRP and ICRP actions are given. The publication also contains brief biographies of Lauriston S. Taylor and Herbert M. Parker

  3. Some problems concerning the radiation protection in nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozoky, L.

    1977-01-01

    The appearance and fast spreading of the nuclear power stations raised new and difficult questions in connection with the theoretical bases of radiation protection. The new standpoint of the International Commission on Radiological Protection is that both the workers at a pile and the inhabitants take less risk because of ionizing radiation than they usually take in everyday life. The maximum dose which can be permitted remained 5 rem/year for those who professionally deal with ionizing radiation and 0.5 rem/year for the groups in special situation. (V.N.)

  4. Situation of the radiation protection in the Burkina Faso

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dayamba, M.

    1999-01-01

    The Burkina Faso is a french-speaking country, it represents a population of eight millions of inhabitants, it is situated in the west of Africa. The difference between the situation of practice, equipment, organization in radiation protection and international standards is increasing. The fear of radiations is become excessive. A study about the situation of radiation protection is necessary. An inquiry has been realized, in march 1999, the results reveal a situation very difficult and far from the standards. The last part of the work gathers the aspirations and recommendations of the radiology actors: a proposition of solutions does the conclusion. (N.C.)

  5. Common strategic research agenda for radiation protection in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Reflecting the change in funding strategies for European research projects, and the goal to jointly improve medical radiation protection through sustainable research efforts, five medical societies involved in the application of ionising radiation (European Association of Nuclear Medicine, EANM; European Federation of Organizations for Medical Physics. EFOMP; European Federation of Radiographer Societies, EFRS; European Society of Radiology, ESR; European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology, ESTRO) have identified research areas of common interest and developed this first edition of the Common Strategic Research Agenda (SRA) for medical radiation protection. The research topics considered necessary and most urgent for effective medical care and efficient in terms of radiation protection are summarised in five main themes: 1. Measurement and quantification in the field of medical applications of ionising radiation 2. Normal tissue reactions, radiation-induced morbidity and long-term health problems 3. Optimisation of radiation exposure and harmonisation of practices 4. Justification of the use of ionising radiation in medical practice 5. Infrastructures for quality assurance The SRA is a living document; thus comments and suggestions by all stakeholders in medical radiation protection are welcome and will be dealt with by the European Alliance for Medical Radiation Protection Research (EURAMED) established by the above-mentioned societies. • Overcome the fragmentation of medical radiation protection research in Europe • Identify research areas of joint interest in the field of medical radiation protection • Improve the use of ionising radiation in medicine • Collect stakeholder feedback and seek consensus • Emphasise importance of clinical translation and evaluation of research results.

  6. Radiation protection training award - an innovative approach of testing radiation protection skills in catastrophe management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geringer, T.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: ARC Seibersdorf research is Austria's largest independent research institution. Apart from research and technical development, ARCS also offers special training an radiation protection. Having undergone intensive radiation protection training, security forces are also entitled to test their knowledge in a special 'radiation protection training award'. The prize is awarded in three different grades. ARCS Bronze award guarantees that the holder is competent in, both theoretical and practical aspects of a radiological accident. The follow-up Silver award requires additional competence in emergency management. Candidates having at least five years of professional experience and presenting a written thesis are considered for the Golden award. The holder is not only experienced in radiological catastrophe management including a competent theoretical background, but is also experienced enough to work out and improve his own emergency planning. ARC Seibersdorf research started with their radiation protection award as early as 1968. More then 10 000 candidates have been awarded since then. Most candidates are members of the Austrian Army or other security forces, although everyone above the age of 18 and undergone a basic course in radiation protection is entitled to participate. Even company internal awards have been given to ensure the quality of training applies to ARC Seibersdorf members as well. The prize is awarded in three different grades. ARCS Bronze award guarantees that the holder is competent in both theoretical and practical aspects of a radiological accident. The followup Silver award requires additional competence in emergency management. Candidates having at least five years of professional experience and presenting a written thesis, are considered for the Golden award. The holder is not only experienced in radiological catastrophe management including a competent theoretical background, but is also experienced enough to work out and improve his

  7. From regulations towards radiation protection culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehler, M.C.

    1996-01-01

    Compliance with the technical standards and specifications is a necessary but not sufficient condition for quality in radiation protection. Reaching this quality objective is not a matter of forcing improvements by a regulatory policy of reducing dose limits, but of promoting a real radiation protection culture. The spread of such a radiological protection culture encourages the deliberate adoption in everyday practice of behaviour likely to reduce exposure to ionizing radiation as loser as reasonably achievable. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate that the need to diffuse a radiological protection culture is inspired by the philosophy behind the system recommended by ICPR Publication 60 on the management of residual radiological risk and, in particular by the behavioural and incentive approach implied by the optimization principle. Special attention will be given to the fundamentals likely to contribute in a definition of radiation protection culture. (author)

  8. Radiation risk and radiation protection concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerschel, B.

    1989-01-01

    The revised dosimetry for the survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki implies an increased risk from low LET radiation compared with that currently used. During its meeting in 1987 the ICRP stated that the new data at present do not require any change in the dose limits. However, two other factors can cause larger changes in the present risk estimates. Firstly, for some types of cancer the relative risk model seems to describe the observed data better than the absolute risk model currently used by the ICRP. Secondly, the shape of the dose-response relationship considerably influences the derived risks. In the present paper the factor causing a substantial increase in radiation risk are analyzed. Conclusions are drawn in how far a change in the currently recommended dose limits seems to be necessary. (author)

  9. External dosimetry - Applications to radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faussot, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Dosimetry is the essential component of radiation protection. It allows to determine by calculation and measurement the absorbed dose value, i.e. the energy amounts deposited in matter by ionizing radiations. It deals also with the irradiation effects on living organisms and with their biological consequences. This reference book gathers all the necessary information to understand and master the external dosimetry and the metrology of ionizing radiations, from the effects of radiations to the calibration of radiation protection devices. The first part is devoted to physical dosimetry and allows to obtain in a rigorous manner the mathematical formalisms leading to the absorbed dose for different ionizing radiation fields. The second part presents the biological effects of ionizing radiations on living matter and the determination of a set of specific radiation protection concepts and data to express the 'risk' to develop a radio-induced cancer. The third part deals with the metrology of ionizing radiations through the standardized study of the methods used for the calibration of radiation protection equipments. Some practical exercises with their corrections are proposed at the end of each chapter

  10. SABS helps with radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    The General Physics Division of the SABS is mainly concerned with two branches of Physics, i.e. ionized radiation and temperature. The branch concerned with ionizing radiation is largely responsible for the provision of a radiation monitoring service for people working with X-ray machines and radioactive material. Dosemeters are regularly sent out to X-ray workers and people working with radioactive materials. The radiation dose to which these workers have been exposed over a period of time can then be determined

  11. Provision of operational radiation protection services at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this publication is to provide practical guidance on establishing and maintaining a radiation protection programme for a nuclear power plant that is consistent with the optimization process recommended in the Basic Safety Standards. This publication is written with a view to providing guidance to every person associated with the radiation protection programme for a nuclear power plant and develops the theme that radiation protection requires the commitment of all plant staff, including higher levels of executive management. 12 refs, 2 figs

  12. The USA prepares to change its radiation protection regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is preparing to revise its basic regulation on protection of people from ionizing radiation. The current regulation, ''Standards for protection against radiation'' -commonly referred to as ''Part 20'' - was originally published for comment in 1955. The regulation was based on early recommendations from the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). In 1977, the ICRP made major changes in its recommendations, known as ICRP-26. In 1990, the NRC Commissioners approved a new Part 20 reflecting ICRP-26, but improvements are to be specified and considered before a new regulation is published. (author)

  13. A critical review of the system of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Our modern, information society is increasingly interested in transparency and participation in many aspects of government, and this is particularly true in areas involving public health and environmental protection. Radiation protection is no exception to this trend. Scientific rationale that was once sufficient to explain radiation protection theory and practice is no longer adequate. The need to address and communicate theory, practice and the decision-making process to a wider audience has given rise to numerous debates and led the radiation protection community to revisit the framework of the system of radiation protection. The very fundamentals of the system of radiation protection continue to be questioned in a healthy fashion, and many aspects have been identified which could better serve stakeholders given some additional thought in the light of modern societal needs. This report is the summary of the NEA's first reflections in this area, and describes those aspects of the current international system of radiation protection that could be improved. Suggested directions for improvement are provided. (author)

  14. Survey of radiation protection programmes for transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lizot, M.T.; Perrin, M.L.; Sert, G.; Lange, F.; Schwarz, G.; Feet, H.J.; Christ, R.; Shaw, K.B.; Hughes, J.S.; Gelder, R.

    2001-07-01

    The survey of radiation protection programmes for transport has been jointly performed by three scientific organisations I.P.S.N. (France), G.R.S. ( Germany), and N.R.P.B. (United kingdom) on behalf of the European Commission and the pertaining documentation summarises the findings and conclusions of the work that was undertaken with the principal objectives to provide guidance on the establishment, implementation and application of radiation protection programmes for the transport of radioactive materials by operators and the assessment and evaluation of such programmes by the competent authority and to review currently existing radiation protection programmes for the transport of radioactive materials. (N.C.)

  15. Research on radiation effect and radiation protection at JAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Kimiaki

    2007-01-01

    Researches on radiation effect and radiation protection at JAEA have been carried out in different sections. In recent years, the organizations were rearranged to attain better research circumstances, and new research programs started. At present, radiation effect studies focus on radiation effect mechanisms at atomic, molecular and cellular levels including simulation studies, and protection studies focus on dosimetry for conditions difficult to cover with currently used methods and data as well as the related basic studies. The outlines of the whole studies and also some descriptions on selected subjects will be given in this paper. (author)

  16. Beta emitters and radiation protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jødal, Lars

    2009-01-01

    preparing 90Y-Zevalin were measured. CONCLUSIONS. Good laboratory practice is important to keep radiation doses low. To reduce bremsstrahlung, 90Y should not be shielded by lead but instead perspex (10 mm) or aluminium (5 mm). Bremsstrahlung radiation can be further reduced by adding a millimetre of lead...

  17. Common strategic research agenda for radiation protection in medicine

    OpenAIRE

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Reflecting the change in funding strategies for European research projects, and the goal to jointly improve medical radiation protection through sustainable research efforts, five medical societies involved in the application of ionising radiation (European Association of Nuclear Medicine, EANM; European Federation of Organizations for Medical Physics. EFOMP; European Federation of Radiographer Societies, EFRS; European Society of Radiology, ESR; European Society for Radiotherapy and...

  18. Accidents and emergency conditions: Tasks of the radiation protection expert

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hacke, J.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reviews and explains the tasks of the radiation protection expert at a given site in the event of accidents or emergencies involving a radiation hazard to the personnel. The various measures recommended discriminate between the main two types of hazards, namely external radiation or internal radiation. The paper discusses the first-aid and emergency measures recommended in various publications (BG, 1982; ICRP, 1980; MO, 1972; ME, 1980) and also cites recommendations contained therein, referring to preventive means and measures and to communications to the press and the general public. (DG) [de

  19. Radiation protection in pediatric radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzen, Gerhard; Benz-Bohm, Gabriele

    2011-06-01

    The German Federal Law on Radiation Control contains no special provisions for X-ray studies in children and adolescents, even though exposure to ionizing radiation must be kept especially low in young persons, because their tissues are highly radiosensitive. Children, who have many years left to live, are more likely than adults to develop radiation-induced cancer; also, as future parents, they are at risk for passing on radiation-induced genetic defects to the next generation. Whenever possible, radiological studies on children and adolescents should be of a type that does not involve ionizing radiation, such as ultrasonography or magnetic resonance imaging. Pediatric conventional X-rays and computerized tomography (CT) require special examining techniques and protocols that are adapted to the patient's age and to the indication for the study. We selectively review the literature on pediatric dose reduction and discuss our own investigations on the subject as well. The essential technical prerequisites for lowering the dose of ionizing radiation in conventional X-ray studies include the proper setting of tube voltage, the use of tube filters, suitable patient positioning and fixation, variable use of a scattered-radiation grid, and a modern storage-plate system. In CT studies, the use of age- and indication-adapted protocols can lower radiation exposure by as much as 95%. There are now many ways to lower the exposure of children and adolescents to ionizing radiation without sacrificing diagnostic reliability. The main factors in lowering exposure are proper attention to clinical indications, the use of special X-ray protocols, the use of alternative imaging studies without ionizing radiation wherever possible, and the expertise of the examiner.

  20. Radiation Litigation and Internal Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jose, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    Radiation Litigation refers to those lawsuits filed by individuals who claim to have been injured by some past exposure to ionizing radiation. Law classifies these cases as personal injury or tort cases. However, they are a new breed of such cases and the law is presently struggling with whether these cases can be resolved using the traditional methods of legal analysis or whether new forms of analysis, such as probability of causation, need to be applied. There are no absolutely certain rules concerning how these particular lawsuits will be tried and analyzed. The United States presently is defending cases filed by approximately 7000 plaintiffs. The private nuclear industry is defending cases filed by over 2000 plaintiffs. While not all of these cases will actually be tried on their merits, at least some will and internal dosimetry will play a very important part in many of these trials

  1. Introduction to symposium 'radiation protection at nuclear facilities'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stricker, L.

    1996-01-01

    An introduction to the symposium 'radiation protection of nuclear facilities' on Wednesday, April 17, 1996 in Vienna has been given. The number of operating reactors and the total collective dose per reactor in OECD countries has been discussed. The evolution of the total collective dose associated with the replacement of steam generators at nuclear power reactors from 1979 to 1995 is presented. The background and culture of radiation protection, regulatory aspects, strategic formulation, plan management policy and organization responsibilities are discussed generally. (Suda)

  2. Law of the Republic of Belarus about radiation protection of the population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Law of Republic of Belarus about radiation protection of the population determines bases of legal regulation in the field of guarantee of radiation protection of the population and is directed on creation of conditions for protection of life and health of the people from harmful influence of ionising radiation. The law contains the following mail articles: Legal regulation in the field of guarantee of radiation protection; Principles of guarantee of radiation protection; Measures for guarantee of radiation protection; Functions of the state in the field of guarantee of radiation protection; System of the executive authority bodies in the field of guarantee of radiation protection; The state programs in the field of guarantee of radiation protection; State standardisation in the field of guarantee of radiation protection; Licensing of activity in sphere of handling with ionising radiation sources; Industrial control for guarantee of radiation protection; Estimation of a condition of radiation protection; Duties of the user for guarantee of radiation protection at handling with ionising radiation sources; Guarantee of radiation protection at influence of radon and gamma - radiation of natural radioisotopes; Guarantee of radiation protection at production of foodstuff and usage of drinking water; Guarantee of radiation protection of the citizens (patients) at a medical irradiation; Control and account of individual irradiation dozes; Protection of the population and workers (personnel) from radiation accident; Duties of the user of ionising radiation sources for guarantee of radiation protection at radiation accident; Standardisation of irradiation of the citizens attracted for liquidation of consequences of radiation accidents; Right of the citizens of Republic of Belarus, foreign citizens and persons without citizenship for radiation protection; Right of the citizens and public associations on receiving of information; The public control for guarantee of radiation

  3. Radiation protection and the laws and regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Takuo

    1980-01-01

    In hospitals and clinics, when cobalt remote irradiation apparatuses, betatrons and linear accelerators are installed, the provisions of medical and radiation injury prevention laws and other related laws and regulations must be observed. The following matters are described: the laws and regulations concerning the prevention of radiation injuries, the definitions of the therapeutical equipments, the radiation protection standards for such facilities, radiation exposure dose and permissible dose, the procedures concerning the application before usage, the responsibilities of hospitals and clinics for radiation measurement and management, and shielding and shield calculations. (J.P.N.)

  4. Radiation Protection and Safety infrastructure in Albania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ylli, F.; Dollani, K.; Paci, R.

    2005-01-01

    On 1995 Albania Parliament approved the Radiation Protection Act, which established the Radiation Protection Commission as Regulatory Body and Radiation Protection Office as an executive office. The licensing of private and public companies is a duty of RPC and the inspections, enforcement, import - export control, safety and security of radioactive materials, are tasks of RPO. Regulations on licence and inspection, safe handling of radioactive sources, radioactive waste management and transport of radioactive materials have been approved. The Codes of practice in diagnostic radiology, radiotherapy and nuclear medicine have been prepared. Institute of Nuclear Physics carry out monitoring of personal dosimetry, response to the radiological emergencies, calibration of dosimetric equipment's, management of radioactive waste, etc. Based in the IAEA documents, a new Radiation Protection Act is under preparation

  5. Radiation protection on nuclear medicine services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear medicine is a sector of the medicine that studies and applies radionuclide in diagnosis and therapy. Nuclear medicine is a very specific area of the medicine, making use of non-sealed radioactive sources which are prescribed to the patient orally or are injected. Special procedures in radiation protection are required in nuclear medicine to manipulate these kind of sources and to produce technetium-99m through molybdenum generator. The present paper addresses the them radiation protection in a Nuclear Medicine Department (NMD), showing the main requirements of the CNEN- National Commission of Nuclear Energy and the Public Health. Radiation protection procedures adopted in assembling a NMD, as well the daily techniques for monitoring and for individual dosimetry are discussed. Past and present analyses in a level of radiation protection are presented. (author)

  6. Quality assurance of radiation protection monitoring instruments in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripathi, S.M.; Daniel, Liji; Rao, Suresh; Sharma, D.N.

    2008-01-01

    Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) is the National Metrology Institute (NMI) for developing, maintaining and disseminating standards for ionizing radiation in India. Radiation Safety Systems Division (RSSD) of BARC has the requisite infrastructure in the form of experts, trained manpower, laboratories, equipment and facilities for providing calibration services to users and ascertaining traceability to international standards. It periodically participates in various international inter-comparisons. RSSD maintains reference radiation fields that are required for calibrating Radiation Protection Monitoring Instruments that form the backbone of the radiation monitoring programme for harnessing the benefits of nuclear energy and ionizing radiations. These instruments are type-tested and periodically calibrated at standard reference radiation fields to ensure their healthy working condition and fitness for their intended use. This paper describes the details of the standardization procedures adopted for reference radiation fields and infrastructure established and maintained at RSSD, BARC in accordance with the recommendations of ISO-4037. The paper describes the various tests that are carried out for radiation protection monitoring instrument to study the variation of the calibration factor with influencing quantities like linearity of response, energy response, angular dependence and overload characteristics. The results of these tests for typical instruments are also discussed. The present work also describes various types of indigenously developed radiation protection monitoring instruments and their performance characteristics. Adaptability of these instruments for the implementation of operational quantities are discussed briefly. It also dwells on the IAEA Quality Audit for radiation protection level calibrations, which RSSD has been participating since 2001. Our results of the quality audit are well within the acceptance limit (±7%) set by IAEA for the

  7. Radiation protection and the safety of radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    These Safety Fundamentals cover the protection of human beings against ionizing radiation (gamma and X rays and alpha, beta and other particles that can induce ionization as they interact with biological materials), referred to herein subsequently as radiation, and the safety of sources that produce ionizing radiation. The Fundamentals do not apply to non-ionizing radiation such as microwave, ultraviolet, visible and infrared radiation. They do not apply either to the control of non-radiological aspects of health and safety. They are, however, part of the overall framework of health and safety

  8. Radiation - Risk and protection in manned space flight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, V.M.; Kovalev, E.E.; Sakovich, V.A.

    1981-09-01

    Radiation hazard for cosmonauts and necessary protective measures are considered. The radiation is either permanent, such as in the inner terrestrial radiation belts, or temporary, such as in the fluctuating outer belts, from solar flares, or from cosmic ray showers. An effective level of 33 rem is offered as a justified risk dose, based on U.S.S.R. and international safety standards. Estimated radiation levels are provided for a one year spaceflight, noting that exposures to 50 rem doses should be more than one month apart. Increased orbital inclination, lengthy flight duration, and higher orbits all lead to increased radiation risks, and shielding with aluminum to 5 g/sq cm is recommended, along with a radiation shelter for long term workers on space stations. The calculated permissible dose rates are designed to bring the probabilities of death due to tumors caused by radiation in line with hazards faced in other occupations, such as test pilots.

  9. Radiation protection in dental practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This guide provides the dentist and dental support personnel with basic information on the safe use of x-rays in dental radiography. Included in this CODE are specific recommendations for eliminating unnecessary radiation exposure of both patients and staff

  10. Radiation protection program of Petrobras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Signorini, M.

    1988-01-01

    Risks present in oil industry require specific control programs, specialy when using radioactive sources. Main uses of ionizing radiation in oil industry are in process control systems, industrial radiography and oilwell logging. A comprehensive and sistemic program is presented in order to assure the safe use of ionizing radiation in these activities. Principal subjects of this program are the control of radioactive sources, personel training in order to difuse knowledge at operations level and procedures standardization. (author) [pt

  11. Chemical Protection Against Ionizing Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-08-01

    1154). The presence of nuclear power plants , and their finite Tifetime, will result in occupational exposure to radiation as they are decommissioned...radiation sensitivity (in viruses, bacteria, yeast, cultured cells, and plants ) with DNA content, rather than with the size of the cell or .N some...399]. In aqueous media, reduced paraquat (methyl viologen N + ) combines with 02 to give a stoichimetric yteld of 02:. In an aprotic solvent such as 38

  12. Knowledge plus Attitude in Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velez, G. R.; Sanchez, G. D.

    2003-01-01

    Since the introduction of the Basic Safety Standards recommendations, the scope of the radiation protection was broadening. On behalf of the incorporation of radiation protection of the patient in medical exposures, the different groups of professionals involved: physicians, medical physicists, radiation protection officers, regulators, etc., have to work together. The objective of radiation protection, that is, to reduces doses from practices, to prevent potential exposures, to detect its occurrence as well as to evaluate and spread such abnormal situations, will be obtained only if it were possible to joint two basic conditions: knowledge and attitude. It should be well known the differences between the backgrounds needed to be for example, a medical physicist or an R.P.O., However, their attitude to solve an eventual problem involving radiation protection should be the same; as well as the behavior of the specialized physician and regulators, in order to add towards common goals. In this work, we show as an example the curricula contents about radiation protection of the cancer of medical physics in the Universidad Nacional de San Martin (UNSAM), and the corresponding module on medical exposures from the Post-Graduate course on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety, held since the 80s in Buenos Aires by the National Commission of Atomic Energy, ARN, IAEA, and the Universidad de Buenos Aires. On the other hand, we describe different attitudes which leads or could start major radiological accidents, regardless the level of knowledge in radiation protection. We conclude that the larger numbers of accidents are due to problems in the attitude than in the level of knowledge of the person involved. Consequently; we suggest emphasizing the discussion on how to generate positive attitudes in every professional involucrated, independently of its cognitive profile or level. (Author) 2 refs

  13. ALARA in the radiation protection training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolibe, D.; Lefaure, Ch.

    1998-01-01

    This part treats especially the question of the training in radiation protection. The electro nuclear sector has given an ALARA principle culture and succeeded to sensitize each level of hierarchy, but for small industry, the research and the medical world the same method appears more difficult to use. It seems better to reinforce the importance of the competent person and to include a training in radiation protection on the initial formation in numerous professional categories. (N.C.)

  14. Radiation protection in the dental profession

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holyoak, B.; Overend, J.K.; Gill, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    A survey, conducted by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE), on the standard of radiation protection in the dental profession in the United Kingdom is described. The results are compared with UK advisory standards. The preliminary survey results were reported in the professional press and each participating dental practitioner received comments and advice concerning the basic requirements for radiation protection. The method of survey has been broadened to form the basis of inspection of dental radiography by the HSE. (H.K.)

  15. Building up the radiation protection infrastructure in Estonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lust, Merle; Muru, Karin

    2008-01-01

    This paper will provide a timeline overview of the of radiation protection infrastructure following the 1999 declaration of independence. In Estonia, an independent competent authority was inaugurated in 1996 and the first Radiation Act was approved by Parliament the following year, in 1997. This paper will address several important factors and the means which promoted development. International cooperation was and remains an essential factor worthy of discussion. For example participation in International Atomic Energy Agency technical co-operation programme and co-operation with neighbouring countries greatly facilitated greatly the development. Political choices and the long term goal of accession to the European Union had great importance to the process also. Today, the Republic of Estonia is member of European Union and has built up a well functioning radiation protection system according the international standards and requirements. This paper is intended to share the experience and to facilitate the learning process. (author)

  16. Radiological protection, safety and security issues in the industrial and medical applications of radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaz, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    The use of radiation sources, namely radioactive sealed or unsealed sources and particle accelerators and beams is ubiquitous in the industrial and medical applications of ionizing radiation. Besides radiological protection of the workers, members of the public and patients in routine situations, the use of radiation sources involves several aspects associated to the mitigation of radiological or nuclear accidents and associated emergency situations. On the other hand, during the last decade security issues became burning issues due to the potential malevolent uses of radioactive sources for the perpetration of terrorist acts using RDD (Radiological Dispersal Devices), RED (Radiation Exposure Devices) or IND (Improvised Nuclear Devices). A stringent set of international legally and non-legally binding instruments, regulations, conventions and treaties regulate nowadays the use of radioactive sources. In this paper, a review of the radiological protection issues associated to the use of radiation sources in the industrial and medical applications of ionizing radiation is performed. The associated radiation safety issues and the prevention and mitigation of incidents and accidents are discussed. A comprehensive discussion of the security issues associated to the global use of radiation sources for the aforementioned applications and the inherent radiation detection requirements will be presented. Scientific, technical, legal, ethical, socio-economic issues are put forward and discussed. - Highlights: • The hazards associated to the use of radioactive sources must be taken into account. • Security issues are of paramount importance in the use of radioactive sources. • Radiation sources can be used to perpetrate terrorist acts (RDDs, INDs, REDs). • DSRS and orphan sources trigger radiological protection, safety and security concerns. • Regulatory control, from cradle to grave, of radioactive sources is mandatory.

  17. Ecological radiation protection criteria for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryshev, I.I.

    1993-01-01

    By now a large quantity of radioactive hazards of all sizes and shapes has accumulated in Russia. They include RBMK, VVER, and BN (fast-neutron) nuclear power plants, nuclear fuel processing plants, radioactive waste dumps, ships with nuclear power units, etc. In order to evaluate the radioecological situation correctly, the characteristics of the radioactive contamination must be compiled in these areas with some system of criteria which will provide an acceptable level of ecological safety. Currently health criteria for radiation protection are, which are oriented to man's radiation protection, predominate. Here the concept of a thresholdless linear dose-response dependence, which has been confirmed experimentally only at rather high doses (above 1 Gy), is taken as the theoretical basis for evaluating and normalizing radiation effects. According to one opinion, protecting people against radiation is sufficient to protect other types of organisms, although they are not necessarily of the same species. However, from the viewpoint of ecology, this approach is incorrect, because it does not consider radiation dose differences between man and other living organisms. The article discusses dose-response dependences for various organisms, biological effects of ionizing radiation, and appropriate radiation protection criteria

  18. Applied physics of external radiation exposure dosimetry and radiation protection

    CERN Document Server

    Antoni, Rodolphe

    2017-01-01

    This book describes the interaction of living matter with photons, neutrons, charged particles, electrons and ions. The authors are specialists in the field of radiation protection. The book synthesizes many years of experiments with external radiation exposure in the fields of dosimetry and radiation shielding in medical, industrial and research fields. It presents the basic physical concepts including dosimetry and offers a number of tools to be used by students, engineers and technicians to assess the radiological risk and the means to avoid them by calculating the appropriate shields. The theory of radiation interaction in matter is presented together with empirical formulas and abacus. Numerous numerical applications are treated to illustrate the different topics. The state of the art in radiation protection and dosimetry is presented in detail, especially in the field of simulation codes for external exposure to radiation, medical projects and advanced research. Moreover, important data spread in differ...

  19. Domestic hygienic legislation concerning population radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marej, A.N.

    1984-01-01

    Problems and principles of domestic sanitary legislation, concerning population radiation protection, are considered. The legislation envisages preventive measures, directed to contamination preventation of the main environmental objects, it regulates their content in the objects, their human intake and ionizing radiation doses, which might affect population. Existing domestic hygienic guides and safety standards for personnel and population are enumerated and characterized

  20. Radiation protection philosophy: time for changes?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovanovich, J.V.

    1994-01-01

    Radiation protection philosophy, or paradigm, has evolved over a number of decades and it is still evolving. Traditionally, it has dealt only with man-made, planned, in principle avoidable, radiation exposures of workers and general public. This philosophy, as presently accepted around the world, has some deficiencies. The object of this paper is to discuss these deficiencies and propose some changes. (author)

  1. Medical aspects of radiation protection law contribution to Austrian radiation protection law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, B.

    1977-01-01

    Some medical aspects of the radiation protection law, esp. in conjunction with medical surveillance of persons exposed to radiation, are dealt with. The discussion refers to the countries of the European Community and Austria and Switzerland. (VJ) [de

  2. Radiation protection in equine radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, A.K.W.; Reynolds, K.M.; Leith, I.S.; Burns, P.A.

    1974-01-01

    During radiography of the carpus of horses calcium fluoride thermoluminescent dosemeters were used to measure the radiation exposure to the hand of an assistant positioning the x-ray film. Three portable x-ray machines and a mobile machine were used during the recordings. The effects of x-ray machine, radiographic technique, and lead rubber gloves upon radiation exposure to the hand were investigated. The size of the primary beam of the x-ray machine was found to be the major factor in determining the dose of radiation received by the hand. The highest radiation exposures were recorded when using two portable machines which were fitted with beam limiting devices that permitted only one primary beam size. The lowest exposures were measured when radiographs were taken with the mobile machine that was fitted with a light beam diaphragm. The control of primary beam size with a light beam diaphragm was found to be the most effective method of reducing radiation dosage to the hand. It is strongly recommended that for equine radiography a light beam diaphragm be fitted to and used on all x-ray machines, and a cassette holder be used to keep the hands out of the primary beam. (author)

  3. Protection contre les radiations recommandations

    CERN Document Server

    Claude, A; Kipfer, P; Bacq, Z

    Considérations générales ; mesures de sécurité vis-à-vis des sources de rayonnement externes ; mesures de sécurité vis-à-vis des radioisotopes ; étude spéciale de la protection dans quelques cas particuliers ; mesures de sécurité vis-à-vis des neutrons ; mesures de protection pour les appareils de supervoltage ; appareils physiques de mesure et de contrôle pour la protection.

  4. Information systems in radiation protection: the INIS database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberdi Larranaga, I.; Marco Arboli, M.

    2011-01-01

    INIS provides a comprehensive service references on literature information on radiation protection (RP), nuclear science and technology, medicine, etc.., Processing most of the world's scientific and technical literature in the area to meet the information needs international community in the areas of interest of the IAEA and the activities related to peaceful use of nuclear science and technology.

  5. Radiation Protection Programme in the Venezuelan Institute of Scientific Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Barrios, A.; Diaz, J.; Gonzalez, E.; Lea, D.

    1979-01-01

    The paper describes the main activities of the radiation protection service in the IVIC concerning: 1. the operation of nuclear reactor RV-1, 2. utilization of radioisotopes, 3. radioactive waste management, 4. personal dosimetry and control of internal contamination, 5. environmental radioactivity and 6. technical assistance to other units of the Institute. (author)

  6. Radiation Protection Ordinance. Preventive Radiation Protection Act. 3. rev. and enlarged ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, R.; Zerlett, G.

    1990-01-01

    This 3rd edition presents the official explanations of the legislative intent behind the Radiation Protection Ordinance of 1976 and the 2nd amending ordinance, and the commentaries which as usual refer to the legal aspects and the related medical, scientific, and technical aspects. As a consequence of the reactor accident at Chernobyl, the existing radiation protection law has been extended by the Act for Preventive Measures for Pretection of the Population Against the Hazards of Ionizing Radiation (Preventive Radiation Protection Act), establishing preventive legal provisions and measures, so that this new edition has likewise been extended by commentaries on the Protective Radiation Protection Act and an introduction to the new area of law. The material also includes the Act for Establishment of a Federal Office for Radiation Protection, of October 9, 1989, which amended the Atomic Energy Act and the Preventive Radiation Protection Act. The correction of the Radiation Protection Ordinance of October 16, 1989 (BGBl. I p. 1926) has been incorporated into the text of the amended version of the Radiation Protection Ordinance. Court decisions and literature referred to cover material published up to the first months of 1989. (orig.) [de

  7. The South African Forum for Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basson, J.K.; Le Roux, P.R.

    1993-01-01

    The use of ionising radiation in South Africa since the turn of the century was initially limited to x-rays and radium, with predominant applications in medicine for diagnosis and therapy. Since 1948 artificial radio-isotopes have been increasingly available and such applications have been widely extended to industry, agriculture and science. Initially, the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research developed radiation protection in South Africa. It was later recommended that an independent forum, the South African Forum for Radiation Protection, be established. The activities of the Forum are described

  8. HERCA, a forum for practical cooperation between the European radiation protection authorities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzmán, O.

    2015-01-01

    HERCA (Heads of the European Radiological protection Competent Authorities) is an association bringing together the Heads of 51 Radiation Protection Authorities from 31 European countries. It has the ambition to develop new harmonized approaches to radiation protection without duplicating other international efforts. The association enables close contacts between the national authorities both on the managerial level and between experts in several Working Groups. Close contacts with the European Commission ensures relevance and avoids duplication of work. Through the establishment of HERCA, a forum for closer cooperation between the radiological protection authorities in Europe has been established. HERCA is also ready and willing to collaborate with other relevant stakeholders and partners and in this context it has developed relations with more than fifty of them, including international organizations. This article describes, the origin of the association, the structure & membership mentioning some major achievements of the association. It then focus on HERCA’s relations with relevant stakeholders to conclude with an outlook on HERCA’s role in the radiation protection arena. [es

  9. A European handbook for teachers on radiation and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teunen, D.

    1994-01-01

    The Commission of the European Communities (Directorate General XI) has taken several initiatives to assist Member States, one of them being the development of a handbook for teachers on radiation and radiation protection, in order to give teachers a clear, scientifically valid and objective set of materials to enable those who so wish to includes courses on radiation protection in their teaching programmes. The draft handbook has been tested in five countries and is to be published in English and French in 1993. Translations in all Community languages are envisaged

  10. Radiation protection guidelines for the skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1989-01-01

    With the exception of the function of cells in the skin associated with immunocompetence nonstochastic effects have been well characterized and threshold doses are known with a precision appropriate for setting radiation protection standards. A dose limitation of 0.5 Sv per year and a working lifetime dose limit of 20 Sv should protect the worker population adequately and therefore, the current protection standards are quite adequate. The risk estimate for skin cancer is very dependent on the selection of the projection model and on the mortality rate assumed. Based on the relative risk model, a mortality rate of 0.2% and summing risks for both UVR exposed and shielded skin the risk is about twice (1.94/10{sup {minus}4} Sv{sup {minus}1}) that which ICRP derived in 1977. With the absolute model the risk is considerably less, about 0.5/10{sup {minus}4} Sv{sup {minus}1}. 47 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Management information system on radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossi, Pablo Andrade; Souza, Leonardo Soares de; Figueiredo, Geraldo Magela, E-mail: pabloag@cdtn.b, E-mail: lss@cdtn.b, E-mail: gmf@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Considering the flux complexity and the multi source information of all radiation protection activities on nuclear organizations, an effective management information system based on technology, information and people is necessary to improve the safety on all processes and operations subjected to radiation risks. An effective management information system is an essential tool to highlight the strengths and weaknesses and identify behaviors and trends on the activities requiring radiation protection programs. Such kind of distinct knowledge is useful to reach an effective management and support the human decision-making on nuclear organization. This paper presents a management information system based on Brazilian directives and regulations on radiation protection. Due to its generic characteristics, this radiation protection control system can be implemented on any nuclear organization by reediting the non restricted parameters which could differ considering all facilities and laboratories expected on-site with diverse technologies applications. This system can be considered as a powerful tool applied on the continuous management of radiation protection activities on nuclear organizations and research institutes as well as for long term planning, not only indicating how the safety activities are going, but why they are not going as well as planned where that is the case. (author)

  12. Management information system on radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossi, Pablo Andrade; Souza, Leonardo Soares de; Figueiredo, Geraldo Magela

    2011-01-01

    Considering the flux complexity and the multi source information of all radiation protection activities on nuclear organizations, an effective management information system based on technology, information and people is necessary to improve the safety on all processes and operations subjected to radiation risks. An effective management information system is an essential tool to highlight the strengths and weaknesses and identify behaviors and trends on the activities requiring radiation protection programs. Such kind of distinct knowledge is useful to reach an effective management and support the human decision-making on nuclear organization. This paper presents a management information system based on Brazilian directives and regulations on radiation protection. Due to its generic characteristics, this radiation protection control system can be implemented on any nuclear organization by reediting the non restricted parameters which could differ considering all facilities and laboratories expected on-site with diverse technologies applications. This system can be considered as a powerful tool applied on the continuous management of radiation protection activities on nuclear organizations and research institutes as well as for long term planning, not only indicating how the safety activities are going, but why they are not going as well as planned where that is the case. (author)

  13. Reflections concerning radiation protection philosophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seelentag, W.

    1981-01-01

    Critical philosophy also includes observations of the technical amplified senses make, i.e. the application of accessory instruments, measuring instruments and statistic methods. The application of this philosophy is, among other things, referred to when taking the linear dose response relationship for stochastic radiation effects as an example. (DG) [de

  14. Radiation protection 1/87

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holeczke, F.; Kaercher, K.H.; Kainberger, F.; Mader, H.; Seyss, R.

    1987-01-01

    There is a paper on medical first aid after radiation accidents and another on positive effects of low-dose irradiation which are treated separately. In addition there are four contributions on question of conventional X-ray diagnosis. (G.Q.)

  15. Radiation protection instrumentation test and calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selby, J.M.; Larson, H.V.; Bartlett, W.T.; Mulhern, O.R.; Fleming, D.M.

    1978-01-01

    The operational requirements of radiation protection instrumentation are set forth in the recommendations of various commissions and committees. Additionally, the user may establish the need for different or more restrictive requirements. The ability to meet these requirements will depend not only on the instrument capabilities but also on periodic recalibrations, preventative maintenance and testing of the instruments. A new standard, ANSI N323, ''Radiation Protection Instrumentation Test and Calibration'', has been prepared and approved for use in the USA. This standard establishes calibration methods for portable radiation protection instruments used for detection and measurement of levels of ionizing radiation fields or levels of radioactive surface contamination. Included within the scope of this standard are conditions, equipment and techniques for calibration, as well as the degree of precision and accuracy required. The salient points of the new standard will be presented in the paper. The nature of improvements at our laboratory required by the standard will be discussed. (author)

  16. Radiation protection in medical and biomedical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuente Puch, A.E. de la

    2013-01-01

    The human exposure to ionizing radiation in the context of medical and biomedical research raises specific ethical challenges whose resolution approaches should be based on scientific, legal and procedural matters. Joint Resolution MINSAP CITMA-Regulation 'Basic Standards of Radiation Safety' of 30 November 2001 (hereafter NBS) provides for the first time in Cuba legislation specifically designed to protect patients and healthy people who participate in research programs medical and biomedical and exposed to radiation. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the need to develop specific requirements for radiation protection in medical and biomedical research, as well as to identify all the institutions involved in this in order to establish the necessary cooperation to ensure the protection of persons participating in the investigation

  17. Strategies of NSC in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentijo, J. C.; Gil, E.; Rodriguez, M.; Ramos, L. M.

    2004-01-01

    The Spanish radiation protection model is consistent with the recommendations established in the ICRP-60, and it is strongly implemented in all practices and related activities of the country. the practical implementation of that model is assuring a high level of protection of workers, public and environment. The Nuclear Safety Council (CSN), as Spanish regulator, is currently involved in the implementation of a new Strategic Plan, which contains, among others, strategic and operational objectives to improve the national system of radiation protection, so they will drive the activities of the CSN in this field during the coming years. A summary of those objectives and the related action plan are described. (Author)

  18. Radiation protection in Baden-Wuerttemberg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The tasks of radiation protection and nuclear safety to be looked after by the land Baden-Wuerttemberg consist essentially in licensing and control activities carried out by the Federal Government. With regard to radiation protection the focal points of the second medium-term programme of the Laender Government Baden-Wuerttemberg are: 1. the technical development plan 'power plant sites', 2. construction of nuclear power plants in the borderline areas of neighbouring foreign countries, 3. disposal of radioactive waste, 4. pollution protection measures against nuclear power plants, 5. safety measures when dealing with radioactive materials outside nuclear power plants. (GL) [de

  19. Controlled administration of penicillamine reduces radiation exposure in critical organs during 64Cu-ATSM internal radiotherapy: a novel strategy for liver protection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukie Yoshii

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: (64Cu-diacetyl-bis (N (4-methylthiosemicarbazone ((64Cu-ATSM is a promising theranostic agent that targets hypoxic regions in tumors related to malignant characteristics. Its diagnostic usefulness has been recognized in clinical studies. Internal radiotherapy (IRT with (64Cu-ATSM is reportedly effective in preclinical studies; however, for clinical applications, improvements to reduce radiation exposure in non-target organs, particularly the liver, are required. We developed a strategy to reduce radiation doses to critical organs while preserving tumor radiation doses by controlled administration of copper chelator penicillamine during (64Cu-ATSM IRT. METHODS: Biodistribution was evaluated in HT-29 tumor-bearing mice injected with (64Cu-ATSM (185 kBq with or without oral penicillamine administration. The appropriate injection interval between (64Cu-ATSM and penicillamine was determined. Then, the optimal penicillamine administration schedule was selected from single (100, 300, and 500 mg/kg and fractionated doses (100 mg/kg×3 at 1- or 2-h intervals from 1 h after (64Cu-ATSM injection. PET imaging was performed to confirm the effect of penicillamine with a therapeutic (64Cu-ATSM dose (37 MBq. Dosimetry analysis was performed to estimate human absorbed doses. RESULTS: Penicillamine reduced (64Cu accumulation in the liver and small intestine. Tumor uptake was not affected by penicillamine administration at 1 h after (64Cu-ATSM injection, when radioactivity was almost cleared from the blood and tumor uptake had plateaued. Of the single doses, 300 mg/kg was most effective. Fractionated administration at 2-h intervals further decreased liver accumulation at later time points. PET indicated that penicillamine acts similarly with the therapeutic (64Cu-ATSM dose. Dosimetry demonstrated that appropriately scheduled penicillamine administration reduced radiation doses to critical organs (liver, ovaries, and red marrow below tolerance levels

  20. Optimization of radiation protection in the control of occupational exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    One of the three main principles on which protection against ionizing radiation is based is the principle of the optimization of radiological protection. The principle of the optimization of protection was first enunciated by the International Commission on Radiological Protection in the 1960s. A principal requirement for the optimization of protection and safety has been incorporated into the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (Basic Safety Standards) from the first edition in 1962 up to the current (1996) edition. The principle of optimization, that all reasonable efforts be made to reduce doses (social and economic factors being taken into account), necessitates considerable effort to apply in practice. The requirement of the Basic Safety Standards to apply the principle of optimization applies to all categories of exposure: occupational, public and medical. The categories of public and medical exposure are rather specific and are covered in other publications; this Safety Report concentrates on the application of the principle to what is probably the largest category, that of occupational exposure. This Safety Report provides practical information on how to apply the optimization of protection in the workplace. The emphasis throughout is on the integration of radiation protection into the more general system of work management, and on the involvement of management and workers in setting up a system of radiation protection and in its implementation. This Safety Report was drafted and finalized in three consultants meetings held in 1999 and 2000. The draft was sent for review and comment to a number of experts, which yielded valuable comments from a number of reviewers whose names are included in the list of contributors to drafting and review

  1. Optimization of radiation protection in the control of occupational exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    One of the three main principles on which protection against ionizing radiation is based is the principle of the optimization of radiological protection. The principle of the optimization of protection was first enunciated by the International Commission on Radiological Protection in the 1960s. A principal requirement for the optimization of protection and safety has been incorporated into the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (Basic Safety Standards) from the first edition in 1962 up to the current (1996) edition. The principle of optimization, that all reasonable efforts be made to reduce doses (social and economic factors being taken into account), necessitates considerable effort to apply in practice. The requirement of the Basic Safety Standards to apply the principle of optimization applies to all categories of exposure: occupational, public and medical. The categories of public and medical exposure are rather specific and are covered in other publications. This Safety Report concentrates on the application of the principle to what is probably the largest category, that of occupational exposure. This Safety Report provides practical information on how to apply the optimization of protection in the workplace. The emphasis throughout is on the integration of radiation protection into the more general system of work management, and on the involvement of management and workers in setting up a system of radiation protection and in its implementation. This Safety Report was drafted and finalized in three consultants meetings held in 1999 and 2000. The draft was sent for review and comment to a number of experts, which yielded valuable comments from a number of reviewers whose names are included in the list of contributors to drafting and review

  2. Optimization of radiation protection in the control of occupational exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    One of the three main principles on which protection against ionizing radiation is based is the principle of the optimization of radiological protection. The principle of the optimization of protection was first enunciated by the International Commission on Radiological Protection in the 1960s. A principal requirement for the optimization of protection and safety has been incorporated into the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (Basic Safety Standards) from the first edition in 1962 up to the current (1996) edition. The principle of optimization, that all reasonable efforts be made to reduce doses (social and economic factors being taken into account), necessitates considerable effort to apply in practice. The requirement of the Basic Safety Standards to apply the principle of optimization applies to all categories of exposure: occupational, public and medical. The categories of public and medical exposure are rather specific and are covered in other publications. This Safety Report concentrates on the application of the principle to what is probably the largest category, that of occupational exposure. This Safety Report provides practical information on how to apply the optimization of protection in the workplace. The emphasis throughout is on the integration of radiation protection into the more general system of work management, and on the involvement of management and workers in setting up a system of radiation protection and in its implementation. This Safety Report was drafted and finalized in three consultants meetings held in 1999 and 2000. The draft was sent for review and comment to a number of experts, which yielded valuable comments from a number of reviewers whose names are included in the list of contributors to drafting and review

  3. Establishment of a national radiation protection infrastructure. The Philippine experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdezco, E.M.

    2000-01-01

    Radiation and radioactive materials have been used widely in the Philippines for the last four decades and have made substantial contributions to the improvement of the life and welfare of the Filipino people. In spite of the unsuccessful attempt to operate a nuclear power, plant, the country, through the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute has consistently pursued an active small nuclear applications program to promote the peaceful applications of nuclear energy while also mandated to ensure radiation safety through nuclear regulations and radioactive materials licensing. Another government agency, the Radiation Health Services (RHS) of the Department of Health was created much later to address the growing concern on radiation hazards from electrically generated radiation devices and machines. The RHS has been strengthened later to include non-ionizing radiation health hazards and has expanded to include a biomedical engineering and non-radiation related medical equipment. The paper will describe the historical perspective highlighting the basis of the national regulatory framework to ensure that only qualified individuals are authorized to use radioactive materials and radiation emitting machines/devices. The development of national training programs in radiation protection and experiences in implementing these programs will be presented. National efforts to strengthen the radiation protection infrastructure through the establishment, improvement and upgrading of a number of facilities and capabilities in radiation protection related work activities will be discussed including participation in national, regional and international intercomparison programs to ensure accuracy, reliability, reproducibility and comparability of dose measurements. Lastly, data on the status of small nuclear applications and related activities in the country will be presented including a number of current issues related to the adoption of the new international basic safety standards

  4. Standard Syllabus for Postgraduate Educational Courses in Radiation Protection and the Safe use of Radiation Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arias, C.; Biaggio, A.; Nasazzi, N.

    2004-07-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) published the Standard Syllabus for Post Graduate Educational Courses in Radiation Protection and the Safety of Radiation Sources in 2002. Along more than two decades, Argentina has obtained valuable experience on building professional knowledge at postgraduate level in Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety. Such experience made advisable to review the IAEA Standard Syllabus and to modify it accordingly. The whole content of the Standard Syllabus is included in the syllabus developed for the Argentinean Regional Post Graduate Course in Radiation Protection and Safety of Radiation Sources. But a few additional topics were incorporated and changes were introduced in the sequence of subjects. The paper describes those modifications and explains the pedagogic motivations that induce them. (Author) 3 refs.

  5. Second Ordinance amending the Radiation Protection Ordinance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The amendment of the Radiation Protection Ordinance brings about the following changes: (1) Introduction of the concept of effective dose, reduction of limits for partial body dose, adoption of the radiotoxicity values of radionuclides as established by the EC Basis Standards; (2) introduction of a working-life-related dose limit of 400 mSv; (3) supplementing provisions for the protection of the population, particularly by the standard procedure for radioecological impact assessment and determination of dose factors; (4) supplementing provisions on the use of radioactive substances in medicine and medical research; (5) supplementing provisions on health physics monitoring; (6) provisions for improving the supervision and controls in the transport of radioactive substances; (7) definition of activities and their assignment to the provisions of the Radiation Protection Ordinance; (8) revision of the waste management provisions of the Radiation Protection Ordinance. (HP) [de

  6. Radiation Protection Elephants in the Room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetter, R. J.

    2004-07-01

    As our system of radiological protection evolves, several significant issues loom within radiation protection discussions and publications. These issues influence the nature of epidemiological and radiobiological research and the establishment of radiation protection recommendations, standards, and regulations. These issues are like the proverbial ''elephants in the room''. They are large, and it is unwise to ignore them. This paper discusses the impact of three young elephants as they make their presence increasingly obvious: increased cancer susceptibility from early-life exposure to radiation, terrorism and fear of radiation, and patient safety. Increased cancer susceptibility from early-life exposure to radiation is emerging as a discussion topic related to the safety of computed tomography (CT) and other medical modalities. Shortly after publication of CT dose data, manufacturers were helping to reduce doses to children by increasing flexibility for adjustment of technique factors. Also, radiation epidemiological data are being used in the development of guidance on exposure to chemical carcinogens during early life. Re-emergence of public fear of radiation has been fueled by threats of radiological dispersion devises and confusing messages about personal decontamination, emergency room acceptance or rejection of contaminated victims, and environmental clean-up. Finally, several professional publications have characterized risk of medical radiation exposure in terms of patient deaths even though epidemiological data do not support such conclusions. All three of these elephants require excellent science and sophisticated data analysis to coax them from the room. Anecdotal communications that confuse the public should be avoided. These are not the only elephants in the room, but these three are making their presence increasingly obvious. This paper discusses the need for radiation protection professionals to rely on good science in the

  7. Code of practice for radiation protection in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamed, M. I.

    2010-05-01

    In aim of this study was to develop a draft for a new code practice for radiation protection in nuclear medicine that meets the current relevant international recommendation. The draft includes the following main fields: methods of radiation protection for workers, patients and public. Also, the principles of safe design of nuclear medicine departments, quality assurance program, proper manipulation of radiation sources including radioactive waste and emergency preparedness and response. The practical part of this study includes inspections of three nuclear medicine departments available in Sudan so as to assess the degree of compliance of those departments with what is stated in this code. The inspection missions have been conducted using a checklist that addresses all items that may affect radiation raincoat issues in addition to per formin area radiation monitoring around the installation of the radioactive sources. The results of this revealed that most of the departments do not have effective radiation protection program which in turn could lead to unnecessary exposure to patients, public and workers. Finally, some recommendations are given that - if implemented - could improve the status of radiation protection in nuclear medicine department. (Author)

  8. Compliance of national radiation protection regulatory infrastructure with international norms: a prerequisite for self-sustainability of technical support organization in a small 'non-nuclear' country: example of Montenegro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovanovic, Slobodan

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Regulatory control of radiation sources in a country is based upon two essential elements of regulatory infrastructure: national RP legislation system (including nuclear law and subsequent regulations) at one side and institutions regulatory authority (RA) and technical support organizations (TSO) at the other. International norms and standards in radiation protection are (or should be, in principle) transposed through international legal instruments (conventions, treaties, directives, codes) into national regulatory systems, thus making radiation protection regulatory practices standardized and omnipresent. We know, however, that this is often not the case, to more or less extent. More one goes down the pyramid (i.e. from international norms via national regulatory infrastructure to actual RP practice), more there is chance that ultimate/bottom practical actions will not be undertaken properly, or even not at all. One of the key elements in the above mentioned (potentially problematic) RP bottom level is how technical support to regulatory authority is organized. RP legal requirements create a market of services to be effectuated by competent professional organizations, TSO 's. In a small country, there is usually not more than one (if any) of the kind not rarely just surviving at the edge of existence. A TSO scope of RP interests/activities typically include: (1) radiation monitoring and measurements in the environment (air, soil, waters, biota), as well as in public areas, working and living places, (2) personal, workplace and field dosimetry, (3) import, export and trade control of radioactivity in food, forage, construction materials, toys, cosmetics and other goods/consumables, (4) quality control (QC) of radiation sources in medicine, industry, etc., (5) low/medium activity radioactive waste management, (6) transport of radioactive materials, (7) a role in national radiological emergency preparedness and response scheme and (8) advisory services

  9. Radiation protection code of practice in academic and research institutes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdalla, A. A. M.

    2010-05-01

    The main aim of this study was to establish a code of practice on radiation protection for safe control of radiation sources used in academic and research institutes, another aim of this study was to assess the current situation of radiation protection in some of the academic and research institutes.To achieve the aims of this study, a draft of a code of practice has been developed which is based on international and local relevant recommendation. The developed code includes the following main issues: regulatory responsibilities, radiation protection program and design of radiation installations. The second aim had been accomplished by conducting inspection visits to five (A, B, C, D and E) academic and to four (F, G, H and I ) research institutes. Eight of such institutes are located in Khartoum State and the ninth one is in Madani city (Aljazeera State). The inspection activities have been carried out using a standard inspection check list developed by the regulatory authority of the Sudan. The inspection missions to the above mentioned institutes involved also evaluation of radiation levels around the premises and storage areas of radiation sources. The dose rate measurement around radiation sources locations were found to be quite low. This mainly is due to the fact that the activities of most radionuclides that are used in these institutes are quite low ( in the range of micro curies). Also ,most the x-ray machines that were found in use for scientific academic and research purposes work at low k Vp of maximum 60 k Vp. None of the radiation workers in the inspected institutes has a personal radiation monitoring device, therefor staff dose levels have not been assessed. However it was noted that in most of the academic/ research studies radiation workers are only exposed to very low levels of radiation and for a very short time that dose not exceed 1 minute, therefore the expected occupational exposure of the staff is very low. Radiation measurement in public

  10. Radiation dosimetry in radiotherapy with internal emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stabin, Michael G.

    1997-01-01

    Full text. Radiation dosimetry radionuclides are currently being labeled to various biological agents used in internal emitter radiotherapy. This talk will review the various technologies and types of radiolabel in current use, with focus on the characterization of the radiation dose to the various important tissues of the body. Methods for obtaining data, developing kinetic models, and calculating radiation doses will be reviewed. Monoclonal antibodies are currently being labeled with both alpha and beta emitting radionuclides in attempts to find effective agents against cancer. Several radionuclides are also being used as bone pain palliation agents. These agents must be studied in clinical trials to determine the biokinetics and radiation dosimetry prior to approval for general use. In such studies, it is important to ensure the collection of the appropriate kinds of data and to collect the data at appropriate time intervals. The uptake and retention of activity in all significant source organs and in excreta be measured periodically (with at least 2 data points phase of uptake or clearance). Then, correct dosimetry methods must be applied - the best available methods for characterizing the radionuclide kinetic and for estimating the dosimetry in the various organs of the body especially the marrow, should be used. Attempts are also under way to develop methods for estimating true patient-specific dosimetry. Cellular and animal studies are also. Valuable in evaluating the efficacy of the agents in shrinking or eliminating tumors; some results from such studies will also be discussed. The estimation of radiation doses to patients in therapy with internal emitters involves several complex phases of analysis. Careful attention to detail and the use of the best available methods are essential to the protection of the patient and a successful outcome

  11. Radiation protection by medicinal plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagetia, Ganesh Chandra

    2002-01-01

    The development of effective non-toxic radioprotective agents is of considerable interest in the improvement of radiotherapy of cancer and protection against unplanned exposures. The synthetic drugs developed in post-world war II have had serious constrains in clinical applicable due to their toxicity at the optimal protective dose. Search for non-toxic protectors from natural sources have indicated that some of the commonly used medicinal plants and the poly herbal formulation could prove to be valuable sources of clinically useful radioprotectors as their ratio of effective dose to toxic dose is very high

  12. Training in radiation protection and the safe use of radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The need for education and training in the various disciplines of radiation protection has long been recognized by the IAEA, the International Labour Organization (ILO), the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, the World Health Organization and the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO). This need has been partially met through the many training courses undertaken by these organizations, either individually or in collaboration. The IAEA has assisted developing Member States in the training of specialists in radiation protection and safety through its organized educational and specialized training courses, workshops, seminars, fellowships and scientific visits. Training is an important means of promoting safety culture and enhancing the level of competence of personnel involved in radiation protection activities, and has acquired a place in the IAEA's programme accordingly. For example, the IAEA Post-graduate Educational Course in Radiation Protection and the Safe Use of Radiation Sources is regularly offered in countries around the world, and has been provided in Arabic, English, French, Spanish and Russian. The training provided by the IAEA is primarily aimed at regulators, professionals working in radiation protection and those responsible for the development of training programmes in their own countries. The importance of adequate and appropriate training for all those working with ionizing radiation has been highlighted by the results of the IAEA's investigations of radiological accidents. A significant contributory factor in a number of the accidents has been a lack of adequate training, which gave rise to errors with serious consequences. This report provides assistance in organizing training and complying with the requirements on training of the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (BSS). The previous version of this report. Technical Reports

  13. Third conference on radiation protection and dosimetry. Program and abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1991-01-01

    This conference has been designed with the objectives of promoting communication among applied, research, regulatory, and standards personnel involved in radiation protection and providing them with sufficient information to evaluate their programs. To partly fulfill these objectives, a technical program consisting of more than 75 invited and contributed oral presentations encompassing all aspects of radiation protection has been prepared. General topics include external dosimetry, internal dosimetry, instruments, regulations and standards, accreditation and test programs, research advances, and applied program experience. This publication provides a summary of the technical program and a collection of abstracts of the oral presentations.

  14. The radiologist's responsibilities for the radiation protection of patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etard, C.

    2010-01-01

    The obligations of the radiologist for the radiation protection of patients include a review of the appropriateness of the examination and optimization of the protocol. Both internal and external quality assurance programs are mandatory. The specific tasks and their frequency are defined by the AFSSAPS. The radiology report of procedures performed over radiosensitive regions must include the delivered dose. The imaging technique must be optimized based on published guidelines or law for the most frequent examinations. All radiologists should be familiar with radiation protection. Incidents should be reported to the Nuclear Safety Authority. (author)

  15. Obligations and responsibilities in radiation protection in the medical field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This document briefly presents the various obligations and responsibilities of the various actors involved in or concerned by radiation protection in the medical field: the hospital administration (with respect to workers and patients), the physician (authorization and declaration, justification, optimization), the medical electro-radiology operator, the person with expertise in medical radio-physics (PSRPM), the radio-pharmacist (he is required in nuclear medicine with internal use of pharmaceutical product), the personnel with expertise in radiation protection (PCR), and other health professionals

  16. Building competence in radiation protection and the safe use of radiation sources. Safety guide (Spanish ed.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This Safety Guide makes recommendations concerning the building of competence in protection and safety within a national radiation protection infrastructure and provides guidance for setting up the structure for a national strategy. It relates to the training and assessment of qualification of new personnel and the retraining of existing personnel in order to develop and maintain appropriate levels of competence. It provides the necessary guidance to meet the requirements laid down in Safety Series No. 115, International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Responsibilities for building competence in protection and safety; 3. Education, training and work experience; 4. A national strategy for building competence in protection and safety.

  17. Effects of ionizing radiation on plants and animals at levels implied by current radiation protection standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The 1977 Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection stated that the commission believes that if man is adequately protected from radiation, other organisms are also likely to be sufficiently protected. The present report examines this statement by considering the effects of ionizing radiation on animals and plants in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The conclusions are that chronic dose rates of IMGy.d -1 or less are unlikely to cause measurable deleterious effects in terrestrial populations, and that in the aquatic environment limiting chronic dose rates to 10MGy.d -1 to the maximally exposed individuals would provide adequate protection for the population. Thus specific radiation protection standards for non-human organisms are not needed. 193 refs, 2 figs, 7 tabs

  18. Regulatory System of Radiation Protection in Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, F. T.; Huang, C. C.

    2004-01-01

    After the radioactive contaminated buildings incident occurred in Taiwan in 1993, the competent authority for radiation protection the Atomic Energy Council (AEC) started to review the structured problem of radiation protection regulatory system. Through several years' investigation and study, the AEC has improved two important tools in radiation protection regulatory system, i.e., control regulations and actual practice, and made them more rigorous and efficient. This paper will make a brief introduction of the efforts that Taiwan has made in this respect. Taiwan's radiation protection control was based on the Atomic Energy Law promulgated in 1968, but the control idea and authorization scope were not sufficient to appropriately respond to the highly developed economy and democracy in Taiwan. After several years' legislative process, the Ionizing Radiation Protection Law (IRP Law) was promulgated and entered into force on February 1, 2003. This IRP Law specifically emphasizes categorized risk management of radiation sources, establishment of personnel licenses and training system, enhancement of public safety control, and implementation of quality assurance program for medical exposure. The Legislative Yuan (Congress) fully authorized the competent authority to establish various technological control regulations according to control necessity without prior review by the Legislative Yuan in advance. As to the penalties of the violations of the IRP Law, the AEC adopts high-rated administrative fines and applies the Criminal Law to those who seriously contaminate the environment. In actual practice, the AEC has constructed a Radiation Protection Control Information System compatible with the IRP Law that fully combines the functions of computers and Internet. The information of facility operators who own radiation sources, radiation protection specialists, and operating personnel are entered into this system, starting from the submission of application of the

  19. Protection of the environment from the effects of ionizing radiation. A report for discussion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-07-01

    The acceptability of practices which involve the release of radionuclides into the environment, and of situations where residual radionuclides from accidents or improperly controlled practices exist in the environment, are generally assessed on the basis of implied radiation doses to humans. This approach is consistent with the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), which include the statement that 'the standard of environmental control needed to protect man to the degree currently thought desirable will ensure that other species are not put at risk'. The general applicability of this statement has been explored in previous IAEA and other publications. These concluded that the statement is generally valid but that reliance upon human based radiological protection criteria may not be adequate for all possible space or time scales. In recent years awareness of the vulnerability of the environment has increased and the need to protect it against the effects of industrial pollutants has been recognized. This trend is reflected in new and developing international policies for environmental protection. In the context of protection of the environment against ionizing radiation, the existing international approach is being challenged in some IAEA Member States and proposals are being made for strategies which provide for explicit protection of the environment. The present publication represents a first step towards establishing an internationally accepted philosophy and associated methodology for protecting the environment against ionizing radiations. The report reviews the various related issues and examines possible approaches to establishing criteria. It is intended for use in stimulating discussion on the subject in Member States. For its part, the IAEA intends to continue a programme of work in this area with the long term objective of providing specific recommendations on primary protection criteria and methods for

  20. Research priorities for occupational radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    The Subpanel on Occupational Radiation Protection Research concludes that the most urgently needed research is that leading to the resolution of the potential effects of low-level ionizing radiation. This is the primary driving force in setting appropriate radiation protection standards and in directing the emphasis of radiation protection efforts. Much has already been done in collecting data that represents a compendium of knowledge that should be fully reviewed and understood. It is imperative that health physics researchers more effectively use that data and apply the findings to enhance understanding of the potential health effects of low-level ionizing radiation and improve the risk estimates upon which current occupational radiation protection procedures and requirements depend. Research must be focused to best serve needs in the immediate years ahead. Only then will we get the most out of what is accomplished. Beyond the above fundamental need, a number of applied research areas also have been identified as national priority issues. If effective governmental focus is achieved on several of the most important national priority issues, important occupational radiation protection research will be enhanced, more effectively coordinated, and more quickly applied to the work environment. Response in the near term will be enhanced and costs will be reduced by: developing microprocessor-aided open-quotes smartclose quotes instruments to simplify the use and processing of radiation data; developing more sensitive, energy-independent, and tissue-equivalent dosimeters to more accurately quantify personnel dose; and developing an improved risk assessment technology base. This can lead to savings of millions of dollars in current efforts needed to ensure personnel safety and to meet new, more stringent occupational guidelines

  1. The new German radiation protection ordinance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeffer, W.; Weimer, G.

    2003-01-01

    According to European law, the Basic Safety Standards (BSS) published by the European Council in 1996 and the Council Directive on health protection of individuals against dangers of ionising radiation in relation to medical exposure had to be transferred into national law within due time. In 2001 the new Ordinance for the Implementation of the Euratom Guidelines on Radiation Protection] was published, which replaces the old Radiation Protection Ordinance. The new German Ordinance adapts the European Directive to German law, covering the general principles but even giving more details in many fields of radiation protection. The BSS scope certainly is much broader than the prescriptions important for the field of radiation protection in nuclear power plants. According to the scope of this workshop on occupational exposure in nuclear power plants - and as the BSS most probably will be quite familiar to all of you - after a short general overview on relevant contents of the German Ordinance, this presentation will focus on the main issues important in the operation of NPP and especially on some areas which may give rise to necessary changes caused by the new Ordinance. (A.L.B.)

  2. Public understanding of radiation protection concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The Chernobyl accident in April 1986 clearly showed that communication with the public was one of the areas where there was a strong need for improvement, particularly concerning the nature and extent of the information provided by national authorities. The countermeasures adopted by public health authorities also raised difficulties in terms of public understanding and acceptance due, in part, to the perception of discrepancies in national, regional or local response to the accident, but also to a more basic lack of comprehension of the complex radiation protection considerations involved. In an attempt to help improve the situation, the NEA Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health decided to organise a Workshop on public communication in the event of a nuclear accident, centered on radiation protection issues. The purpose of this Workshop was to analyse appropriate methods and language to be used when explaining to the public the scientific concepts underlying radiation risks and radiation protection, and the technical rationale for the choice of protective actions in an emergency. Separate abstracts were prepared for individual papers presented at the meeting

  3. Assuring the quality of practical radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuburger, E.; Schroeder, H.J.

    1993-01-01

    There is no possibility in Germany to serve an apprenticeship in practical radiation protection in nuclear facilities. However, the scope of knowledge required for such activities is defined in a binding 'Directive about Ensuring the Knowledge Required in Persons otherwise Engaged in the Operation of Nuclear Power Plants'. That Directive by far exceeds the scope, in terms of safety, normally applied to a vocation or activity. The Directive implicitly contains three important provisions: Plant operators must ensure that radiation protection workers have all the knowledge they need to do their job safely; that radiation protection workers are autonomous, within certain limits, as a consequence of the depth of knowledge they have; that radiation protection workers are given formal advanced training possibilities. An examination to be taken by radiation protection workers before a Chamber of Industry and Commerce was introduced in 1982 in order to make available personnel trained in the whole range of possible activities as defined in the Directive referred to above. However, persons who have passed the exam before a Chamber of Commerce and Industry no longer automatically fulfill the criteria under the Directive after three years, but must undergo advanced training in a formal program. (orig.) [de

  4. Incorporation of ICRP 60 into relevant Korean radiation protection legislation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, K. W.

    1997-01-01

    The program for the incorporation of the 1990 Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the new International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (BSS) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) into relevant Korean radiation protection laws and regulations in introduced. The Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety has carried out a five-year research project for the implementation of ICRP 60 and the new BSS since 1992 and drafted a proposed revision of the Enforcement Decree and Regulation, and the Ministerial Notice of Korean radiation protection laws. The proposed revision of laws and regulations incorporates the various elements of ICRP 60 and the new BSS including the use of new concepts, quantities and units, stricter dose limits, ALARA, and classification of workers, etc. Taking into account the possible impact on the Korean nuclear industry, the acceptability of ICRP 60 recommendations, and the current technical and socio-economic environment of Korea, a step by step implementation plan is under consideration. (author)

  5. Ultraviolet radiation, measurements and safety evaluations for radiation protection purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witew, B.; Fischer, P.G.

    1983-01-01

    In order to evaluate the effects of ultraviolet radiation, one has to study that photobiologically effective radiation which induces a just measurable threshold reaction. For practical radiation protection, one has to determine the permissible duration of exposure at the end of which the threshold reaction is induced. This time limit is derived by means of spectral measurements and determination of radiation intensity. Detrimental photobiological effects can be avoided, and favourable effects optimized, by observing the time limit. Thus these measurements are used to determine the threshold at which the desired effects of ultraviolet radiation will be accompanied by unwanted effects or damage to persons, as for instance in the use of ultraviolet radiation for operating room sterilization, arc welding work, or cosmetic purposes. (orig.) [de

  6. Using computer-based training to facilitate radiation protection review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abercrombie, J.S.; Copenhaver, E.D.

    1989-01-01

    In a national laboratory setting, it is necessary to provide radiation protection overview and training to diverse parts of the laboratory population. This includes employees at research reactors, accelerators, waste facilities, radiochemical isotope processing, and analytical laboratories, among others. In addition, our own radiation protection and monitoring staffs must be trained. To assist in the implementation of this full range of training, ORNL has purchased prepackaged computer-based training in health physics and technical mathematics with training modules that can be selected from many topics. By selection of specific modules, appropriate radiation protection review packages can be determined to meet many individual program needs. Because our radiation protection personnel must have some previous radiation protection experience or the equivalent of an associate's degree in radiation protection for entry level, the computer-based training will serve primarily as review of major principles. Others may need very specific prior training to make the computer-based training effective in their work situations. 4 refs

  7. Consequences of the new Slovenian legislation on radiation protection and nuclear safety for radiation protection training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozelj, M.

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents brief description of the old Slovenian regulations and an overview of the new, harmonised regulations in the field of radiation protection training. The most important novelties were pointed out with possible consequences for the implementation of radiation protection training. Some suggestions on how to overcome transitional problems and how to improve training were also given. (author)

  8. Characteristics of radiation protection legislation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puig Cardozo, Diva E.

    2001-01-01

    The laws on radiological protection have special characteristics. They can exist laws that regulate dangerous activities that will be also applicable, if it corresponds to the activities that involve radioactive materials. But a law of radiological protection should exist. It foresees the existence of an appropriate regulatory body and specialized institutions, definitions, infractions and sanctions then the respective regulations will be elaborated for the different applications. The objective is to contribute to the development of the nuclear energy in the country and to provide the regulatory basis that assures a reasonable security for radioactive installations. The essential objectives of these laws are: 1. to establish the legislative framework for the development and employment of nuclear energy, without risks, according with treaties and conventions that the countries have approved. 2. To fix the fundamental principles and the conditions of their setting in practice allowing to a specific regulation determining application procedures. 3. To create a structure of regulation of enough authority to be able to control and to watch over in an effective way the authorized activities 4. To guarantee an appropriate financial protection against the derived damages of accidents or nuclear incidents. (author)

  9. Activities on calibration of radiation protection instruments in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trijoko, S.

    1995-01-01

    As the use of the ionizing radiation emitted by radionuclides or produced by modern machines in Indonesia has increased significantly in the past two decades, the demand for radiation protection measures has also grown up very rapidly. In the mind of Indonesian people, ionizing radiation is always associated with atomic bombs. Indonesian government has set up National Atomic Energy Agency (BATAN) through the Act No. 31/1964. The BATAN has responsibility in the research and development, implementation and inspection of the safe use of ionizing radiation for peaceful purposes, and always put a great concern on radiation protection matter. The Center for Standardization and Radiation Safety Research (CSRSR) has been founded to implement research and services in the fields of radiation safety, standardization, dosimetry, radiation health, as well as the application of nuclear techniques to medicine. In order to provide the national reference in terms of radiation dosimetry and calibration, the Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory was completely set up in Jakarta by 1984. As available facilities, radiation instruments and radiation sources are described. Calibration and personal monitoring services are reported. (K.I.)

  10. National congress of radiation protection; Congres national de radioprotection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The congress of radiation protection tackled different areas of radiation protection. The impact of ionizing radiations on environment coming from radioactive activities. The biological radiation effects, the dosimetry, the different ways of doing relative to radiation protection,the risks analysis and the communications with populations, information about accidents and the lessons learned from them are included in this congress. (N.C.)

  11. Nuclear instrumentation for radiation protection [Paper No.:N1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyer, M.R.

    1993-01-01

    Instrumentation for radiation protection surveillance should be primarily geared to generate and process a complete set of data on the radiological status in and around the nuclear installations for controlling the internal and external exposure of workers and to ensure that the dose to members of the public are kept below the mandatory limits. The paper reviews the status of development of radiation protection instruments in the national context and projects the requirements. The various category of instruments discussed in the paper cover survey instruments, installed monitors, personal monitoring devices, neutron monitors, air monitoring instruments, environmental dose logging systems and detectors. The development efforts need to be translated into regular production with proper quality assurance for meeting the growing demands of the radiation protection profession in the country. (author). 30 refs

  12. Proceedings of the third conference on radiation protection and dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swaja, R.E.; Sims, C.S.; Casson, W.H. [eds.

    1991-10-01

    The Third Conference on Radiation Protection and Dosimetry was held during October 21--24, 1991, at the Sheraton Plaza Hotel in Orlando, Florida. This meeting was designed with the objectives of promoting communication among applied, research, regulatory, and standards personnel involved in radiation protection, and providing them with sufficient information to evaluate their programs. To meet these objectives, a technical program consisting of more than 75 invited and contributed oral presentations encompassing all aspects of radiation protection was prepared. General topics considered in the technical session included external dosimetry, internal dosimetry, instruments, accident dosimetry, regulations and standards, research advances, and applied program experience. In addition, special sessions were held to afford attendees the opportunity to make short presentations of recent work or to discuss topics of general interest. Individual reports are processed separately on the database.

  13. Proceedings of the third conference on radiation protection and dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swaja, R.E.; Sims, C.S.; Casson, W.H.

    1991-10-01

    The Third Conference on Radiation Protection and Dosimetry was held during October 21--24, 1991, at the Sheraton Plaza Hotel in Orlando, Florida. This meeting was designed with the objectives of promoting communication among applied, research, regulatory, and standards personnel involved in radiation protection, and providing them with sufficient information to evaluate their programs. To meet these objectives, a technical program consisting of more than 75 invited and contributed oral presentations encompassing all aspects of radiation protection was prepared. General topics considered in the technical session included external dosimetry, internal dosimetry, instruments, accident dosimetry, regulations and standards, research advances, and applied program experience. In addition, special sessions were held to afford attendees the opportunity to make short presentations of recent work or to discuss topics of general interest. Individual reports are processed separately on the database

  14. Reflection Group on 'Ethical Choices in Radiation Protection'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggermont, G.

    2000-01-01

    As part of SCK-CEN's social sciences and humanities programme, a reflection group on 'Ethical Choices in Radiation Protection' was created. The objectives of the reflection group are (1) to brainstorm on critical issues of radiation protection; (2) to create a discussion forum with a variety os SCK-CEN researchers and external experts; (3) to make value judgements and open questions in radiation protection explicit; (4) to create an output for a topical day or workshop by editing a 'cahier' of contributed articles and discussion reports; (5) to complement the output of the SCK-CEN contribution in international ALARA workshops. The programme, achievements and perspectives of the refection group are summarised

  15. Workplace analysis and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Guen, B.; Bosquet, Ph.; Chevillard, S.; Gauron, Ch.; Lallemand, J.; Lombard, J.; Menetrier, F.; Feuardent, J.; Maccia, C.; Donadille, L.; Rehel, J.L.; Donnarieix, D.; Garrigou, A.; Gauthereau, V.; Truchi, F.; Chardin, J.; Debouck, F.; Clairand, I.; Amabile, J.Ch.; Vrigneaud, J.M.; Roussille, F.; Witschger, O.; Feuardent, J.; Scanff, P.; Rannou, A.

    2010-01-01

    This document gathers the slides of the available presentations given during this conference day. Fifteen presentations out of 16 are assembled in the document and deal with: 1 - the evolution of doses received by workers (J. Feuardent); 2 - evaluation of extremities dosimetry among interventional radiology practitioners (L. Donadille); 3 - practical guide for the realisation of workplace dosimetry studies presenting a ionizing radiation exposure risk: and example in nuclear medicine (J.L. Rehel); 4 - workplace studies in radiotherapy-curietherapy (D. Donnarieix); 5 - from dosimetry to physical intensity: the case of heat insulation activities (A. Garrigou and C. Piccadaci); 6 - the consideration of human factor during facility modifications (V. Gauthereau); 7 - how to carry out a workplace analysis in gamma-graphy? (F. Truchi); 8 - workplace studies in the framework of dismantling activities (J. Chardin); 9 - team synergy (F. Debouck); 10 - adaptation of individual dosimetry to the workplace: the case of external exposure (I. Clairand); 11 - technical aspects of the evaluation of ionizing radiations exposure induced by a new interventional radiology procedure (J.C. Amabile); 12 - the point of view of a radioprotection skilled person in a nuclear medicine service (J.M. Vrigneaud); 13 - workplace studies for the unique document (F. Roussille); 14 - occupational exposure to manufactured nano-particles: issues and knowledge status (O. Witschger); 15 - toxicological risk of nano-particles: 'health impact'? (S. Chevillard). (J.S.)

  16. International Organizations and Environmental Protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Jan-Henrik; Kaiser, Wolfram

    Pollution, resource depletion, habitat management, and climate change are all issues that necessarily transcend national boundaries. Accordingly, they and other environmental concerns have been a particular focus for international organizations from before the First World War to the present day...... between emerging environmental concerns and international politics during the last century. It illuminates the crucial role played by international organisations in developing environmental policies, and in particular it traces the political resolve and intellectual effort behind the concept...

  17. Scanography - Radiation protection: medical sector FR 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herain, C.; Machacek, C.; Menechal, P.; Aubert, B.; Rehel, J.L.; Vidal, J.P.; Biau, A.; Barbe, R.; Lahaye, T.; Gauron, C.; Gambini, D.; Pierrat, N.; Donnarieix, D.; Marande, J.L.; Barret, C.; Guerin, C.

    2011-09-01

    This document presents the various aspects and measures related to radiation protection when performing a scanography examination for diagnosis purposes, as well as interventional actions for diagnosis or treatment purposes. It presents the concerned personnel, describes the operational process, indicates the associated hazards and the risk related to ionizing radiation, and describes how the risk is to be assessed and how exposure levels are to be determined (elements of risk assessment, delimitation of controlled and monitored areas, personnel classification, and choice of the dose monitoring method). It describes the various components of a risk management strategy (risk reduction, technical measures regarding the installation and the personnel, training and information, prevention, incident and dysfunction). It indicates the different practices and aspects of medical monitoring (personnel, pregnant women, treatment of anomalies and incidents, medical file, certificate of occupational exposure). It evokes how risk management is to be assessed, and mentions other related risks (biological risk, handling and posture, electric risk). The appendix proposes an example of workstation study in the case of scanography

  18. Radiation induced cancer risk, detriment and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinclair, W.K.

    1992-01-01

    Recommendations on radiation protection limits for workers and for the public depend mainly on the total health detriment estimated to be the result of low dose ionizing radiation exposure. This detriment includes the probability of a fatal cancer, an allowance for the morbidity due to non-fatal cancer and the probability of severe hereditary effects in succeeding generations. In a population of all ages, special effects on the fetus particularly the risk of mental retardation at defined gestational ages, should also be included. Among these components of detriment after low doses, the risk of fatal cancer is the largest and most important. The estimates of fatal cancer risk used by ICRP in the 1990 recommendations were derived almost exclusively from the study of the Japanese survivors of the atomic bombs of 1945. How good are these estimates? Uncertainties associated with them, apart from those due to limitations in epidemiological observation and dosimetry, are principally those due to projection forward in time and extrapolation from high dose and dose rate to low dose and dose rate, each of which could after the estimate by a factor of 2 or so. Recent estimates of risk of cancer derived directly from low dose studies are specific only within very broad ranges of risk. Nevertheless, such studies are important as confirmation or otherwise of the estimates derived from the atomic bomb survivors. Recent U.S. British and Russian studies are examined in this light. (author)

  19. Radiation protection in neighbouring countries in Central Europe. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This proceeding is published in 3 volumes. Volume 1 covers the topics: (1) Environmental protection, and (2) Radiation Dosimetry. Volume 2 covers the topics: (3) Radiation Protection in Medical Exposures, (4) Radiation Protection in Applications of Radioisotopes and Nuclear Technology, (5) Radioactive Waste Management and Decommissioning, (6) Radiation Monitoring, and (7) Emergency Planning and Preparedness. Volume 3 covers the topics: (8) Operational Radiation Protection, (9) Non Ionising Radiation, (10) Radiation Protection Principles and Policies, (11) Natural Radiation, (12) Radiation Exposure Control: Methods and Means, and (13) Public Education and Information. (blahsl)

  20. Current Challenges in Radiation Protection in Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KASE, K.R.

    2008-01-01

    Radiation protection professionals in medical facilities and practices are being challenged by new imaging technologies that use x-rays or radioactive materials. These include faster computerized tomography (CT) scanners, new interventional techniques that use extended fluoroscopy time, increased use of positron emission tomography (PET), and digital imaging techniques. More frequently these technologies are being fused into a single procedure, such as combined CT and PET scanning. Radiation Protection professionals are challenged to (1) be aware of developing technologies and clinical techniques, (2) analyze the potential radiation risks to patients and staff, (3) initiate necessary radiation safety training for medical staff, and (4) be involved in planning, dose measurement and optimization of the procedure to achieve appropriate dose control and ALARA