WorldWideScience

Sample records for international nuclear information

  1. INIS - International Nuclear Information System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents International Nuclear Information System (INIS): history of its development; INIS support products (INIS Reference Series, Friendly Inputting of Bibliographic Records software); INIS output products (INIS Atomindex, magnetic tapes, online service, database on CD-ROM, microfiche service); INIS philosophy; input of INIS database by subject areas; and examples of INIS input

  2. INIS - International Nuclear Information System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nevyjel, A.

    1983-10-01

    The International Nuclear Information System is operated by the IAEA in close cooperation with its participating countries. Each country is responsible for the acquisition of the literature published within its boundaries. These data are collected by the INIS secretariat in Vienna and the resulting comprehensive data base is available for all member states. On behalf of Austrian Federal Chancellor's Office the Austrian Research Centre Seibersdorf operates the Austrian INIS-Center, which offers information services in form of retrospective searches and current awareness services. (Author) [de

  3. International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Depicts the nature and operations of the first truly international, decentralized and computerized information processing and dissemination system, INIS. The products of the system, consisting of various literature indexes issued in both printed form and on magnetic tapes are described and their utility to scientists is demonstrated

  4. International Nuclear Information System in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samsurdin Ahamad

    1984-01-01

    Practice of the International Nuclear Information System (INIS) in Malaysia is reviewed. The Nuclear Energy Unit, a participating representative of Malaysia, holds the responsibilities of disseminating information through this system. Its available services relevant to the aims of INIS are discussed

  5. International Nuclear Information System 25 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrens, H.; Prinz, H.

    1996-01-01

    In May 1970, the first information was published in the International Nuclear Information System (Inis). This makes Inis the first system in the world to establish a decentralized international database. In creating Inis, the International Atomic Energy Agency wanted to promote the exchange of information about the peaceful uses of nuclear energy among its members. References to the nuclear literature were to be compiled in the most complete way possible. The number of IAEA member countries participating in Inis has increased from an original 38 to 90, that of international organizations, from 12 to 17. The database holds more than 1.8 million documentation units; stocks grow by some 75,000 units annually. The German literature about nuclear research and nuclear technology is collected, evaluated and entered into Inis by the Fachinformationszentrum Karlsruhe. (orig.) [de

  6. International nuclear information system (INIS) at ANSTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huxlin, M.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: INIS is the world-leading information system in the field of nuclear science and technology. It is operated by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in collaboration with 103 Member States and 19 international organisations. It contains over 2 million bibliographic references (1970-present) and a unique collection of scientific and technical reports, conference papers, dissertations, patents and others documents, known as the g rey literature . ANSTO hosts the Australian INIS Centre, which is responsible for the collection and processing of the Australian material for inclusion in the database as well as dissemination of INIS output products in Australia. Through its participation in INIS Australia gains access to the result of billions of dollars of nuclear-related R and D from around the world, and promote nuclear scientific and technical developments in Australia to the international science community. A particular case is presented, which illustrates how INIS could be used to evaluate the research effort in nuclear science and technology. Citation analysis, usually based on journals indexed by Institute for Scientific Information, measures the impact of the research or rather the usefulness of research to other scientists doing related work. However, a bibliometric analysis of this kind will not be representative of the whole research effort in the field of nuclear science and technology where a relatively high proportion of the output (45%) is captured in the non-journal literature. Publication counts based upon all publications indexed in the INIS database, enables us to obtain statistics and scientific indicators regarding the overall research effort, trends and gaps within this particular field. Average productivity counts and time series analysis (1976-2000) give a glimpse into the Australia's performance in the sub-fields of Nuclear Chemistry, Nuclear Physics, Materials Science and Nuclear Medicine. It shows that Australia's share of

  7. The International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1973-01-01

    The International Nuclear Information System (INIS) is the world's first computer-based international documentation service for which input is prepared on a decentralized basis. It was set up co-operatively by the International Atomic Energy Agency and its Member States, within the Agency's Division of Scientific and Technical Information, to construct a data base identifying publications relating to nuclear science and its peaceful applications; it commenced operation in May 1970. Each participating Member State and international and regional organization is responsible for scanning the scientific and technical literature it produces and reporting the input data for INIS to the IAEA. Since INIS is a world-wide information system and highly decentralized, standards for preparing the INIS document input were formulated to take into account the requirements and practices of the participants. These standards are laid down in the INIS Reference Series Nos 1-13. In addition, training seminars on input preparation are held both in Vienna and abroad, and individual trainees from participating Member States take courses at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna. Although English has been adopted as the working language of INIS, abstracts are accepted in any of the four IAEA official languages - English, French, Russian and Spanish - and non-conventional literature in the original language

  8. INIS-International nuclear information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinkovic, N.

    1997-01-01

    INIS is the worlds leading decentralized information system on the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. It is operated by the International Atomic Energy Agency in co-operation with the member states and international organisations. Being one of the INIS member states, our country has began co-operation with INIS in 1975. INIS National Centre is acting within the Institute of Nuclear Sciences and according to the strictly defined organisation of the information system supplies the users with the available INIS products, meaning bibliographic data from the INIS data base. At the same time it is responsible for submitting information concerning domestic publications to the INIS Secretariat, including supplying foreign users with non-conventional literature if demanded. During the period 1990 - 1996 co-operation with INIS Secretariat was interrupted due to reasons which are not subject of this paper. Since then collaboration is established again, and updated INIS data base on CD-ROM is available at the National Centre. INIS on-line retrieval is not yet available

  9. Recent initiative in information exchange throughout the international nuclear community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simard, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    Two key systems essential to the gathering and dissemination of operating experience, the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System (NPRDS) and NUCLEAR NOTEPAD are described. The NPRDS is a collection of detailed engineering data on systems and components important to nuclear plant safety and productivity. NUCLEAR NOTEPAD is an international telecommunications network which provides a mechanism for the rapid, widespread dissemination of information pertinent to the design, licensing, safe and reliable operation of nuclear plants. Both systems have been managed by the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations since 1982 and are used extensively by 84 organizations in 14 countries. (U.K.)

  10. The International Nuclear Information System online services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanenko, A.G.; Todeschini, C.

    Development of the bibliographic data base covering the world-wide nuclear science literature is described along with the network arrangements by which the data base and associated services are made available. The consequences of the system's decentralized operating philosophy are also addressed. (U.K.)

  11. Digital Preservation at International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    OpenAIRE

    Savic, Dobrica (IAEA); St-Pierre, Germain (IAEA); GreyNet, Grey Literature Network Service

    2014-01-01

    Since its creation in 1970 until 1996, the International Nuclear Information System (INIS) collected and converted to microfiche over 312 000 non-conventional literature (NCL) reports received from IAEA member states and international organizations. The microfiche collection contains over 1 million items, with an estimated total of 25 million pages of full-texts. In 1997, the INIS Secretariat replaced the microfiche-based production system with an imaging system to process and to d...

  12. Information on Nuclear Malaysia Internal Auditee Since 2012-2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazila Said; Nur Hanisah Adnan; Noor Azreen Maslan

    2016-01-01

    Audits carried out in the Quality Management System (QMS) aims to determine whether the quality management system complies with the standard requirements, assess the implementation of the system and its effectiveness in achieving organizational objectives, for improvement, as input to the management and find a loophole quality improvement. An organization must carry out a series of audits for the purpose of maintaining the certification is based on standards. To maintain and enhance the credibility of the audit, only a competent auditor selected. RMC has developed procedures for managing the activities of the Internal Audit and Internal Audit to all QMS certification in Malaysian Nuclear Agency. Effectiveness and efficiency of the internal audit activity depends on the skill and experience in addition to the availability of an internal auditor that time. The following information is shared activeness line Internal Auditors Malaysia Nuclear Agency from 2012 until 2016. (author)

  13. International Nuclear Information System: Researchers' Platform for Knowledge Sharing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Hafizal Yusof; Habibah Adnan; Samsurdin Ahamad

    2011-01-01

    International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is an organization under the United Nations (UN), which serves to disseminate accurate information about the nuclear world. In accordance with its role, an International Nuclear Information System (INIS) was established in 1970, provides the opportunities for member countries under the auspices of the IAEA to share information, expertise and knowledge, particularly in the nuclear field. Malaysia has become a member since 1978, and the first country input was posted in the 1980's. INIS member countries are supervised by a specially appointed liaison officers to monitor and oversee matters related to that. Each issue is associated with 49 subject matter (subject heading) will be checked and recorded by using Win fibre before being sent to the INIS database at IAEA headquarters in Vienna, Austria. Material received will be distributed directly to all IAEA member states through the INIS web site and CD distribution to subscribers countries. Today, INIS is still a successful nuclear-related information provider through nearly 3 million data have been recorded including journals, reports, scientific papers, patents, nuclear laws, the web sites contents, and many more. (author)

  14. Digital Preservation at International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savic, Dobrica; St-Pierre, Germain

    2013-01-01

    Since its creation in 1970 until 1996, the International Nuclear Information System (INIS) collected and converted to microfiche over 312 000 non-conventional literature (NCL) reports received from IAEA member states and international organizations. The microfiche collection contains over 1 million items, with an estimated total of 25 million pages of full-texts. In 1997, the INIS Secretariat replaced the microfiche-based production system with an imaging system to process and to disseminate all NCL documents in electronic format. That marked the beginning of digital preservation efforts that still continue today. This paper provides an overview of the digital preservation practices and the technical infrastructure of the International Nuclear Information System (INIS). It describes the technical processes, the standards in place, the hardware and software used, as well as all practices related to scanning, quality control, OCR, preservation and storage. (author)

  15. Thirty-five years of successful international cooperation in nuclear knowledge preservation: The International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atieh, T.; Workman, R.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the operations and main activities of the International Nuclear Information System (INIS), which was established 35 years ago as the international mechanism for exchanging information in the fields of peaceful uses of nuclear sciences and technology. It outlines the system's main features, users and products. International cooperation and decentralisation are the distinguishing features of this system. INIS produces, maintains and preserves Member States knowledge in these fields. The system has been instrumental in supporting national nuclear programmes, and thousands of scientists, researchers and universities students are using INIS products to retrieve current and historical nuclear information. (author)

  16. INIS Today. An Introduction to the International Nuclear Information System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    What is INIS? The acronym INIS stands for International Nuclear Information System. INIS was planned and is operated by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in collaboration with its Member States. Its purpose is to provide a comprehensive nuclear information and abstracting service, using modern computer and micrographic techniques. This includes: 1. processing input received from Member States, 2. providing Member States with output in a variety of forms for dissemination on a national basis, and 3. assisting Member States in improving their methods of information handling. History: The origins of INIS go back to 1965. In that year the IAEA, recognizing that it had a statutory obligation to foster the exchange of nuclear information amongst its members, invited consultants from the USSR and from the USA to draw up an outline scheme for an international information system, that would cover adequately the expanding amount of literature on the peaceful uses of atomic energy. The consultants proposed to the IAEA a cooperative system, one that would serve the information requirements of countries of varying levels of development and with different backgrounds and traditions in the methods and techniques of information handling. The system would make use of the latest computer and micrographic techniques. During the next few years the consultants' proposals were submitted by the Agency to a number of international panels of experts for discussion and elaboration into a detailed systems design. In February 1969, the Board of Governors of the IAEA approved the setting up of INIS on an experimental basis. The first output products of the new system were issued in April 1970.

  17. INIS annual report 2000. International nuclear information system 30 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Qinglin; Xue Enjie

    2001-01-01

    Main achievements of INIS (International Nuclear Information System) since its founding in 1970 are presented. More than 2 220 000 records have been collected in INIS Database; the INIS bibliographic database and full text database of NCL (Non-conventional literature) are produced and distributed in electronic form on CD-ROM; INIS database can also be accessed on Internet since 1998. 65 719 bibliographic records and 12 992 full text of NCL documents were added to INIS during 2000. INIS is made up of 103 Member States and 19 International Organizations

  18. Knowledge preservation in scope of International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Hafizal Yusof; Habibah Adnan; Iberahim Ali

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge preservation is one of the important aspects in knowledge management. Developing organization must look back how they preserve their knowledge from loss because of retirement and so on. One approach suggested by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) through establishment of International Nuclear Information System (INIS) that can functioned as database and research centres where its operation based on cooperation between the member states. This system also can function as main contributor to knowledge preservation centres based on research in nuclear science and technology related. The main objectives of this paper is to see how far this system relevant to meet this agency to preserve their knowledge. Besides that, the process of increasing individual competency also is discussed in context of INIS scope. (author)

  19. International Nuclear Information System 1983-1996. International Atomic Energy Agency Publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-03-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with the International Nuclear Information System (INIS). INIS was established in 1969 to announced the scientific literature published worldwide on the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. All books are published in English. It should be noted that prices of books are quoted in Austrian Schillings. The prices do not include local taxes and are subject to change without notice. All books in this catalogue are 21 x 30 cm, paper-bound, unless otherwise stated. In addition all books in this catalogue, except for the INIS Input Training Kit, are available on microfiche. For information on the microfiche versions, contact the INIS Clearinghouse of the IAEA

  20. International Nuclear Information System. 1988-2002. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-08-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications and products of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with the International Nuclear Information System (INIS), and issued during the period 1 January 1990 - 31 July 2002. Most publications are issued in English, though some are also available in other languages. This is noted as E for English, F for French, G for German, R for Russian and S for Spanish before the relevant ISBN number. Some INIS Reference Series publications are available in electronic form from the INIS Clearinghouse. For more details on the INIS publications programme, please visit the INIS web site mentioned above

  1. International Nuclear Information System (INIS): Malaysia contribution for nuclear knowledge preservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Hafizal Yusof; Habibah Adnan; Iberahim Ali

    2012-01-01

    International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is an organization under the United Nations (UN), which serves to disseminate accurate information about the nuclear matters. In accordance with its role, an International Nuclear Information System (INIS) was established in 1970 to provide opportunities for member countries under the auspices of the IAEA to share information, expertise and knowledge, particularly in the nuclear field. Malaysia became a member since 1978, and the first country's input was posted in 1980. INIS activities are supervised by liaison officers (LO) to monitor and oversee matters relating to INIS management. INIS has developed 49 subject matters (subject heading) and LO needs to prepare, review and compile the records before sending to INIS database at IAEA headquarters in Vienna, Austria. Material received will be processed before distributing to all IAEA member states through INIS web site or CD to countries that subscribe to it. This paper focused on how Malaysia contributes to development of INIS and to promote Malaysian about the existence of this database that not only focused on nuclear science but also related technologies. (Author)

  2. Computer-based control of nuclear power information systems at international level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boniface, Ekechukwu; Okonkwo, Obi

    2011-01-01

    In most highly industrialized countries of the world information plays major role in anti-nuclear campaign. Information and discussions on nuclear power need critical and objective analysis before the structured information presentation to the public to avoid bias anti-nuclear information on one side and neglect of great risk in nuclear power. This research is developing a computer-based information system for the control of nuclear power at international level. The system is to provide easy and fast information highways for the followings: (1) Low Regulatory dose and activity limit as level of high danger for individuals and public. (2) Provision of relevant technical or scientific education among the information carriers in the nuclear power countries. The research is on fact oriented investigation about radioactivity. It also deals with fact oriented education about nuclear accidents and safety. A standard procedure for dissemination of latest findings using technical and scientific experts in nuclear technology is developed. The information highway clearly analyzes the factual information about radiation risk and nuclear energy. Radiation cannot be removed from our environment. The necessity of radiation utilizations defines nuclear energy as two-edge sword. It is therefore, possible to use computer-based information system in projecting and dissemination of expert knowledge about nuclear technology positively and also to use it in directing the public on the safety and control of the nuclear energy. The computer-based information highway for nuclear energy technology is to assist in scientific research and technological development at international level. (author)

  3. PIME '89 (Public Information Materials Exchange): International workshop on public information problems of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    Presentations included in this proceedings are describing the following; Mass media and public information on nuclear energy and radiation: striving for two-way confidence and understanding; case studies of different countries having developed nuclear programs, problems of communication between nuclear promoters and/or operators and its adversaries; public attitude concerning nuclear power; different attitudes of men and women

  4. PIME '89 (Public Information Materials Exchange): International workshop on public information problems of nuclear energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-07-01

    Presentations included in this proceedings are describing the following; Mass media and public information on nuclear energy and radiation: striving for two-way confidence and understanding; case studies of different countries having developed nuclear programs, problems of communication between nuclear promoters and/or operators and its adversaries; public attitude concerning nuclear power; different attitudes of men and women.

  5. ENS PIME 2002 - Accelerating nuclear communication. 14. international workshop on nuclear public information in practice. Transactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    The papers presented at this Meeting were devoted to: Winning the sustainable development debate; proper information of the public on nuclear power safety, especially the young generation as a target group; improving the methods of communication between nuclear industry and the press; different public attitudes depending on the previous experiences, and efforts in education and/or information of the public.

  6. ENS PIME 2002 - Accelerating nuclear communication. 14. international workshop on nuclear public information in practice. Transactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The papers presented at this Meeting were devoted to: Winning the sustainable development debate; proper information of the public on nuclear power safety, especially the young generation as a target group; improving the methods of communication between nuclear industry and the press; different public attitudes depending on the previous experiences, and efforts in education and/or information of the public

  7. Construction of APR1000 nuclear power information management system based on international standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Seung Hwan; Song, Deok Yong; Han, Byung Sub; An, Kyung Ik; Hwang, Jin Sang

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, due to speedy rise of international oil prices, orders of nuclear power plant construction have been in progress by many countries to solve the stable supply of power. Our country has continued to perform nuclear power construction. As only a few developed countries like Japan and European countries have its own nuclear power construction technology, competition among them is keen. Our country has awarded the contract of UAE nuclear power plants based on the accumulated nuclear power plant construction technologies so far. In this regard, KEPCO has recognized the needs of information management system to manage nuclear power information and proceeded the implementation of nuclear power information management system for export-model

  8. Construction of APR1000 nuclear power information management system based on international standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Seung Hwan [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Song, Deok Yong; Han, Byung Sub [Enesys Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); An, Kyung Ik; Hwang, Jin Sang [PartDB Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    In recent years, due to speedy rise of international oil prices, orders of nuclear power plant construction have been in progress by many countries to solve the stable supply of power. Our country has continued to perform nuclear power construction. As only a few developed countries like Japan and European countries have its own nuclear power construction technology, competition among them is keen. Our country has awarded the contract of UAE nuclear power plants based on the accumulated nuclear power plant construction technologies so far. In this regard, KEPCO has recognized the needs of information management system to manage nuclear power information and proceeded the implementation of nuclear power information management system for export-model

  9. INIS - International Nuclear Information System. CEA-users relations. Nuclear information in total freedom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surmont, J.; Paillard, M.D.; Constant, A.; Guille, N.; Le Blanc, A.; Mouffron, O.; Anguise, P.; Jouve, J.J.; Lilin, A.

    2009-01-01

    This poster, prepared for the seventh edition of the meetings of scientific and technical information professionals (RPIST, Nancy (France)), presents the principle of operation of the INIS system, based on a cooperative and decentralized preparation of the data which are centralized by the IAEA for the preparation of the INIS products: the database (on Internet and on CD/DVD-Rom), the collection of grey literature documents in full text (microfiches and CD/DVD-roms), and the multilingual thesaurus available in 7 different languages and under various formats. The poster presents these different products, and the role of the INIS members in the distribution of these products towards their national users. One insert presents the French INIS team of the CEA-Saclay and its daily work. (J.S.)

  10. International exchange of radiological information in the event of a nuclear accident - future perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De-Cort, M.; De-Vries, G.; Breitenbach, L.; Leeb, H.; Weiss, W.

    1996-01-01

    Immediately after the Chernobyl accident most European countries established or enhanced their national radioactivity monitoring and information systems. The large transboundary effect of the radioactive release also triggered the need for bilateral and international agreements on the exchange of radiological information in case of a nuclear accident. Based on the experiences gained from existing bi- and multilateral data exchange the Commission of the European Communities has made provision for and is developing technical systems to exchange information of common interest. Firstly the existing national systems and systems based on bilateral agreements are summarized. The objectives and technical realizations of the EC international information exchange systems ECURIE and EURDEP, are described. The experiences gained over the past few years and the concepts for the future, in which central and eastern European countries will be included, are discussed. The benefits that would result from improving the international exchange of radiological information in the event of a future nuclear accident are further being described

  11. International conference on nuclear knowledge management: Strategies, information management and human resource development. Unedited papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The nuclear industry is knowledge based, similar to other highly technical industries, and relies heavily on the accumulation of knowledge. Recent trends such as workforce ageing and declining student enrolment numbers, and the risk of losing accumulated knowledge and experience, have drawn attention to the need for better management of nuclear knowledge. In 2002 the IAEA General Conference adopted a resolution on nuclear knowledge, which was reiterated in 2003; the resolution emphasized the importance of nuclear knowledge and information management and urged both the IAEA and Member States to strengthen their activities and efforts in this regard. Consequently, the International Conference on Nuclear Knowledge Management: Strategies, Information Management and Human Resource Development, which was held on 7-10 September 2004 in Saclay, was organized by the IAEA and the Government of France through the Commissariat a l'energie atomique in cooperation with the European Commission, OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, European Atomic Forum, Japan Atomic Industrial Forum, World Council of Nuclear Workers, World Nuclear University and European Association of Information Services. The conference was attended by 250 experts, scientists and officials from 54 Member States and nine international organizations, giving the conference a very broad representation of the nuclear sector. The objective of the conference was to reach a clear and common understanding of the issues related to nuclear knowledge management for sustaining knowledge and expertise in nuclear science and technology and to define a strategic framework for developing IAEA cross-cutting knowledge management activities. The conference provided a forum for professionals and decision makers in the nuclear sector, comprising industry, government and academia, as well as professionals in the knowledge management and information technology sectors. The unedited papers are presented in this report

  12. The International Nuclear Information System. The first forty years 1970-2010 (Translated document)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itabashi, Keizo

    2010-10-01

    The Statute of the IAEA that came into force in July 1957. It was with the desire to more adequately fulfill the statutory function that during the 1960's the Agency began exploring the possibility of establishing a scheme that would provide computerized access to a comprehensive collection of references to the world's nuclear literature. The outcome of these efforts was the establishment of the International Nuclear Information System (INIS) and produced its first products in May 1970. The system was designed as an international cooperative venture, requiring the active participation of its members. It started operations with 25 members and the success and usefulness of the system has been proven by the fact that present membership is 146. The present report describes the road that led to the creation of INIS. It also describes the present operation of the system, the current methods used to collect and process the data on nuclear literature and the various products and services that the system places at the disposal of its users. Furthermore, it gives insights into current thinking for future developments that will facilitate access to an increasing variety of nuclear related information available from the IAEA, bibliographic and numerical data, full text of published and 'grey literature', multilingual nuclear terminological information as well as facilitate access to other sources of nuclear related information maintained outside the IAEA. (author)

  13. The International Nuclear Information System. The first forty years 1970-2010 (Translated document)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itabashi, Keizo [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Intellectual Resources Department, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2010-10-15

    The Statute of the IAEA that came into force in July 1957. It was with the desire to more adequately fulfill the statutory function that during the 1960's the Agency began exploring the possibility of establishing a scheme that would provide computerized access to a comprehensive collection of references to the world's nuclear literature. The outcome of these efforts was the establishment of the International Nuclear Information System (INIS) and produced its first products in May 1970. The system was designed as an international cooperative venture, requiring the active participation of its members. It started operations with 25 members and the success and usefulness of the system has been proven by the fact that present membership is 146. The present report describes the road that led to the creation of INIS. It also describes the present operation of the system, the current methods used to collect and process the data on nuclear literature and the various products and services that the system places at the disposal of its users. Furthermore, it gives insights into current thinking for future developments that will facilitate access to an increasing variety of nuclear related information available from the IAEA, bibliographic and numerical data, full text of published and 'grey literature', multilingual nuclear terminological information as well as facilitate access to other sources of nuclear related information maintained outside the IAEA. (author)

  14. The International Nuclear Information System. The first forty years 1970-2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todeschini, Claudio

    2010-10-01

    The Statute of the IAEA came into force in July 1957. It was with the desire to more adequately fulfill the statutory function that during the 1960's the Agency began exploring the possibility of establishing a scheme that would provide computerized access to a comprehensive collection of references to the world's nuclear literature. The outcome of these efforts was the establishment of the International Nuclear Information System (INIS) that produced its first products in May 1970. The system was designed as an international cooperative venture, requiring the active participation of its members. It started operations with 25 members and the success and usefulness of the system has been proven by the fact that present membership is 146. The present report describes the road that led to the creation of INIS. It also describes the present operation of the system, the current methods used to collect and process the data on nuclear literature and the various products and services that the system places at the disposal of its users. Furthermore, it gives insights into current thinking for future developments that will facilitate access to an increasing variety of nuclear related information available from the IAEA, bibliographic and numerical data, full text of published and 'grey literature', multilingual nuclear terminology information as well as facilitate access to other sources of nuclear related information maintained outside the IAEA

  15. The Republic of Macedonia in the International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sejmenova-Gichevska, Marija

    1999-01-01

    INIS (International Nuclear Information System) is the world's leading information system on the peaceful uses of atomic energy. It is operated by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in collaboration with its Member States and co-operating international organizations. Republic of Macedonia is 95th member who actively has participated in INIS since 1996. The INIS center for Republic of Macedonia is acting within the framework of the National and University Library 'Kliment Ohridski' - Skopje. The Macedonian INIS center is responsible for processing the literature covering the peaceful uses of nuclear science and technology, published in: our national journals; proceeding books from the seminars and symposiums organized in our country; internal publications of Macedonian scientific organizations. The center provides comprehensive information of the world's nuclear scientific and technical literature through the INIS Database CD-ROM retrieval as well as online via the Internet. Information of the INIS Database is available in the INIS center for Republic of Macedonia at the National and University Library 'Kliment Ohridski' - Skopje, as well as at the Host and University Library 'Kliment Ohridski' - Bitola. (Author)

  16. The Advisory Committee of International Nuclear Information System (INIS) for Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunii, Katsuhiko; Itabashi, Keizo

    2016-10-01

    Under the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the International Nuclear Information System (INIS) Programme commenced in 1970 and ever since INIS has been acting as a database system available worldwide through information networks each time providing bibliographic information then full text documents of literature, technical reports, etc. on peaceful use of nuclear science and technology, thoroughly supported and maintained by INIS Secretariat in Vienna, on the other hand the inputs for INIS are provided by Member States and Organizations in their own boundaries. As for the INIS activity in Japan, while, the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), then succeeded as the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) as of today, the both have been responsible with the INIS activity in Japan as the INIS National Centre for Japan based on the request of the “former” Science and Technology Agency of the Japanese Government, an advisory committee had have a very important role for the INIS activity in Japan by enthusiastically advising the whole related to the activity from advanced and comprehensive viewpoints of expertise. This report describes about it, the Advisory Committee of International Nuclear Information System (INIS) for Japan, successfully been held 34 times from Oct. 1970 to Mar. 2005. Included are the history and its records, change of the member and topics of the Advisory Committee, and the minutes. (author)

  17. Compilation of INES (International Nuclear Event Scale) information. Japanese translation (Vol.2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Norio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-03-01

    The International Nuclear Event Scale (INES) is a means designed for providing prompt, clear and consistent information related to nuclear events, that occurred at nuclear power plants and at other nuclear facilities, and facilitating communication between the nuclear community, the media and the public on such events. The INES is jointly operated by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD/NEA). Nuclear events reported to the INES Information System from member countries of IAEA and/or OECD/NEA are rated by the 'Scale', a consistent safety significance indicator. The scale runs from level 0, for events with no safety significance, to level 7 for a major accident with widespread health and environmental effects. The INES was introduced in March 1990 for a trial and then formally adopted in March 1992. In Japan, the INES was formally introduced in August 1992. The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been receiving the INES information through the Science and Technology Agency, promptly translating into Japanese and providing to the relevant sections inside and outside JAERI. As well, we published the report compiling the Japanese translation of individual INES reports until May 31, 1998. Since then, we have developed a world-wide-web database for the Japanese translation and made it available to the public through the internet. This report compiles the Japanese version of approximately 70 INES reports we received from June 1, 1998 to December 31, 2000. (author)

  18. International conference on nuclear knowledge management: Strategies, information management and human resource development. Book of extended synopses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    In recent years, a number of trends have drawn attention to the need for better management of nuclear knowledge. Depending on region and country, they include an ageing workforce, declining student enrolment figures, the risk of losing nuclear knowledge accumulated in the past, the need for capacity building and transfer of knowledge and recognition of achieving added value through knowledge sharing and networking. The objective of this conference is to reach a clear and common understanding of issues related to nuclear knowledge management for sustaining knowledge and expertise in nuclear science and technology. The conference will provide a forum for professionals and decision makers in the nuclear sector, comprising industry, governments and academia as well as professionals in the knowledge management and information technology sectors; to exchange information and share experience on nuclear knowledge management, comprising strategies, information management and human resource development; to identify lessons learned and to embark on the development of new initiatives and concepts for nuclear knowledge management in IAEA Member States; for the INIS session, to discuss the present status and future developments of INIS. The conference comprised the following topical sessions: Session 1: Nuclear knowledge management - policies and strategies; Managing nuclear information - policies and strategies; Managing nuclear information - case studies; Human resources for the nuclear sector; Networking nuclear education and training. Special sessions were held on: the International Nuclear Information System (INIS); Young Generation in the Nuclear Sector; and 'Innovation and Nuclear Knowledge'.

  19. A state-of-the-art report on international nuclear information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sung Ho; Keum, Jong Yong

    1997-02-01

    INIS (International Nuclear Information System) established in 1969 by IAEA, is the world's leading information system for the peaceful uses of nuclear energy in collaboration with its 98 member states and 17 international organizations. As a member state, Korea has participated in the INIS activities from the beginning of INIS establishment. The technical information department of KAERI plays the role of the National Center of the Republic of Korea. The purpose of this study is to prepare the method for the activation of domestic INIS operation. To accomplish the purpose, we investigated and analyzed the status of INIS, domestic INIS activities, and the recent INIS projects. Especially some projects are expected to influence domestic INIS activities deeply in the near future. The analyzed results show that for better INIS activities in Korea, we need to review politically and technically on the methods to amplify the rate of the INIS input, to construct and manage the INIS local host, and to use the source documents on CD-ROMs. (author). 24 refs., 6 tabs., 6 figs

  20. ENS PIME '95: International workshop on nuclear public information in practice. Transactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    PIME is a regular meeting, organised by European Nuclear Society. PIME stands for Public Information Material Exchange and was launched for the first time in 1988. This proceedings includes papers dealing with public acceptance of nuclear power, young generation project; descriptions of visitor centres; advertising and public information; education and/or information issues; political aspects; dealing with environmentalists and opponents; maintaining media relations; contacts of regulators with the public; ethics and nuclear energy.

  1. ENS PIME '95: International workshop on nuclear public information in practice. Transactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    PIME is a regular meeting, organised by European Nuclear Society. PIME stands for Public Information Material Exchange and was launched for the first time in 1988. This proceedings includes papers dealing with public acceptance of nuclear power, young generation project; descriptions of visitor centres; advertising and public information; education and/or information issues; political aspects; dealing with environmentalists and opponents; maintaining media relations; contacts of regulators with the public; ethics and nuclear energy

  2. INIS: international nuclear information system. World first international database on pacific uses of nuclear sciences and technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surmont, J.; Constant, A.; Guille, N.; Le Blanc, A.; Mouffron, O.; Anguise, P.; Jouve, J.J.

    2007-01-01

    This poster, prepared for the 2007 CEA meetings on scientific and technical information, presents the INIS information system, the document-types content and subject coverage of the database, the French contribution to this system thanks to the INIS team of the CEA-Saclay, the input preparation process, and an example of valorization of a scientific and historical patrimony with the CEA/IAEA joint project of digitization of about 2760 CEA reports published between 1948 and 1969. All these reports have been digitized by the IAEA and analyzed by CEA, and entered in the INIS database with a link to the full text. (J.S.)

  3. Nuclear Information Democratization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savić, Dobrica

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear information (Nl) interests people for many reasons, with energy supply, safety, and security being at the top of the list. Democratizing nuclear information has its roots in the growth of a knowledge-based economy, the knowledge worker as a user of nuclear information, developments in information and communication technologies (ICT), and the impact of internet growth. Results of democratization are apparent in the process of information creation, in how nuclear information is distributed and accessed, and in the conditions for using the information found. The International Nuclear Information System (INIS) both reflects and contributes to these trends. Nuclear information falls under the overall umbrella of scientific and technical information (STI). It is highly specialized, but it follows general principles and trends of STI. The world of STI has its own culture and its own long-established rules of use and existence. These have brought us many inventions and improvements, introduced important technological changes, and made our lives and work much easier and more pleasurable. However, the world is constantly changing, and the traditional closed STI environment, including the world of nuclear information, is not keeping up with today’s changes. (author)

  4. 13th international workshop on nuclear public information in practice. Transactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stritar, Andrej [' Jozef Stefan' Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2001-07-01

    PIME is a regular meeting, organised by European Nuclear Society. PIME stands for Public Information Material Exchange and was launched for the first time in 1988. Since that time it has grown into the well established meeting of professionals, involved in informing public about nuclear from all over the world. During this meeting papers were presented during the following sessions: Nuclear and Public Acceptance - Where are we and where are we going; Good news in three countries (Sweden, Czech republic, Russian federation); Nuclear and Politics; Radioactivity and Radwaste; News from Japan and Russia; Communication Methods; Sustainablity of Nuclear. Posters, Videos and CD-Roms presented were examples of information and/or educational tools for successful promotion.

  5. 13th international workshop on nuclear public information in practice. Transactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stritar, Andrej

    2001-01-01

    PIME is a regular meeting, organised by European Nuclear Society. PIME stands for Public Information Material Exchange and was launched for the first time in 1988. Since that time it has grown into the well established meeting of professionals, involved in informing public about nuclear from all over the world. During this meeting papers were presented during the following sessions: Nuclear and Public Acceptance - Where are we and where are we going; Good news in three countries (Sweden, Czech republic, Russian federation); Nuclear and Politics; Radioactivity and Radwaste; News from Japan and Russia; Communication Methods; Sustainablity of Nuclear. Posters, Videos and CD-Roms presented were examples of information and/or educational tools for successful promotion

  6. International nuclear power status 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauritzen, B.; Majborn, B.; Nonboel, E.; Oelgaard, P.L.

    2002-04-01

    This report is the eighth in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power with special emphasis on reactor safety. For 2001, the report contains: 1) General trends in the development of nuclear power; 2) Nuclear terrorism; 3) Statistical information on nuclear power production (in 2000); 4) An overview of safety-relevant incidents in 2001; 5) The development in West Europe; 6) The development in East Europe; 7) The development in the rest of the world; 8) Development of reactor types; 9) The nuclear fuel cycle; 10) International nuclear organisations. (au)

  7. International nuclear power status 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauritzen, B.; Majborn, B.; Nonboel, E.; Oelgaard, P.L.

    2003-03-01

    This report is the ninth in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power with special emphasis on reactor safety. For 2002, the report contains: 1) General trends in the development of nuclear power; 2) Decommissioning of the nuclear facilities at Risoe National Laboratory: 3) Statistical information on nuclear power production (in 2001); 4) An overview of safety-relevant incidents in 2002; 5) The development in West Europe; 6) The development in East Europe; 7) The development in the rest of the world; 8) Development of reactor types; 9) The nuclear fuel cycle; 10) International nuclear organisations. (au)

  8. The International Science and Technology Center (ISTC) and ISTC projects related to nuclear safety. Information review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tocheny, Lev V.

    2003-01-01

    The ISTC is an intergovernmental organization created ten years ago by Russia, USA, EU and Japan in Moscow. The Center supports numerous science and technology projects in different areas, from biotechnologies and environmental problems to all aspects of nuclear studies, including those focused on the development of effective innovative concepts and technologies in the nuclear field, in general, and for improvement of nuclear safety, in particular. The presentation addresses some technical results of the ISTC projects as well as methods and approaches employed by the ISTC to foster close international collaboration and manage projects towards fruitful results. (author)

  9. International Youth Nuclear Congress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fern, A.

    2017-01-01

    International Youth Nuclear Congress (IYNC) was Initiated by an international YG group of enthusiasts in 1997. Mission statement developed at ENC1998 in Nice, France Growth in enthusiasm and support: IAEA, Nuclear Societies, companies. IYNC run by the Young Generation with full support of experienced advisors, nuclear societies and companies. First came to African continent when IYNC 2010 was hosted by South Africa

  10. ENS PIME '93: International workshop on nuclear public information in practice. Transactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This proceedings includes presentations concerned with experiences of 'Nuclear States' in dealing with public acceptance of NPPs, fuel reprocessing plants and waste storage facilities, methods of obtaining public confidence by educating and informing the local inhabitants as well as the public in general

  11. ENS PIME '93: International workshop on nuclear public information in practice. Transactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-07-01

    This proceedings includes presentations concerned with experiences of 'Nuclear States' in dealing with public acceptance of NPPs, fuel reprocessing plants and waste storage facilities, methods of obtaining public confidence by educating and informing the local inhabitants as well as the public in general.

  12. International nuclear technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cartwright, P.; Rocchio, J.P.

    1978-01-01

    Light water reactors (LWRs), originally developed in the United States, became the nuclear workhorses for utilities in Europe and Japan largely because the U.S. industry was willing and able to transfer its nuclear know-how abroad. In this international effort, the industry had the encouragement and support of the U.S. governement. In the case of the boiling water reactor (BWR) the program for technology transfer was developed in response to overseas customer demands for support in building local designs and manufacturing capabilities. The principal vehicles have been technology exchange agreements through which complete engineering and manufacturing information is furnished covering BWR systems and fuel. Agreements are held with companies in Germany, Japan, Italy, and Sweden. In recent years, a comprehensive program of joint technology development with overseas manufacturers has begun. The rapidly escalating cost of nuclear research and development make it desirable to minimize duplication of effort. These joint programs provide a mechanism for two or more parties jointly to plan a development program, assign work tasks among themselves, and exchange test results. Despite a slower-than-hoped-for start, nuclear power today is playing a significant role in the economic growth of some developing countries, and can continue to do so. Roughly half of the 23 free world nations that have adopted LWRs are developing countries

  13. The international nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remick, F.J.

    1992-01-01

    With today's technology, isolationism is virtually impossible. The world's economies are so strongly intertwined that what affects one country will, in some way, influence another. Nuclear technology is no exception. If anything, nuclear technology is a catalyst for international cooperation. In the United States of America, nuclear technology is undergoing significant changes. Many of these changes are being greatly influenced by programs of international cooperation

  14. Presence of renewable sources of energy, cogeneration, energy efficiency and distributed generation in the International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pares Ferrer, Marianela; Oviedo Rivero, Irayda; Gonzalez Garcia, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    The International Nuclear Information System (INIS) it was created in 1970 by the International Atomic Energy Agency (OIEA) with the objective of propitiating the exchange of scientific information and technique on the peaceful uses of the energy atomic. INIS processes most of scientific literature and technique in engineering matters nuclear, safeguard and non proliferation and applications in agriculture and health that it generates in the world and it contributes to create a repository of nuclear information for present and future generations. Additionally it includes economic aspects and environmental of other energy sources that facilitate comparative studies for the taking of decisions. The database INIS, is its main informative product and it counts with more than 3 million registrations. One of the services that lends the Center of Administration of the Information and Development of the Energy (CUBAENERGIA), like center INIS in Cuba, is the search of information on the peaceful use of the science and nuclear technology in the Countries Members and the registration of information on their applications in Cuba. More recently, it extends this service to the Renewable Sources application of Energy in the country; as part of the works of administration of the information that it carries out for the National Group of Renewable Energy, Cogeneration, Saving and Energy Efficiency, created in the 2007 and coordinated by the MINBAS with the participation of institutions belonging to Organisms of the Administration Central of the State. In this work the results of a preliminary study are presented on the witnesses in the INIS of the Renewable Sources of Energy, the Cogeneration, Energy Efficiency, and the Distributed Generation. As well as of the application of metric tools to the opposing registrations for the case of the Distributed generation, that which allowed to characterize their historical evolution, the participation for countries in their development and

  15. International nuclear energy guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    Separate abstracts are included for each of the papers presented concerning current technical and economical events in the nuclear field. Twelve papers have been abstracted and input to the data base. The ''international nuclear energy guide'' gives a general directory of the name, the address and the telephone number of the companies and bodies quoted in this guide; a chronology of the main events 1982. The administrative and professional organization, the nuclear courses and research centers in France are presented, as also the organization of protection and safety, and of nuclear fuel cycle. The firms concerned by the design and the construction of NSSS and the allied nuclear firms are also presented. The last part of this guide deals with the nuclear energy in the world: descriptive list of international organizations, and, the nuclear activities throughout the world (alphabetical order by countries) [fr

  16. International nuclear trade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biad, A.; Cormis, F. de; Kerever, A.

    1998-01-01

    This third part is relative to the international nuclear trade it includes: the 1996 EURATOM/Usa Agreement on the peaceful Uses of nuclear energy: EURATOM Strengthened, a case study on IVO Power engineering Oy as a supplier to Russia, lessons learned from the Us/EURATOM Agreement for Cooperation, negotiating the parameters of nuclear regulation: lessons from South Africa, Good and new business in Brazil's nuclear energy field, cooperation between Russia and european union in the nuclear field: the legal basis, present status and future prospects, the industrial implications of the non proliferation policy. (N.C.)

  17. Joint Thesaurus. Part I (A-L) + Part II (M-Z)[International Nuclear Information System. Energy Technology Data Exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-04-01

    This is the 1st revision of the INIS/ETDE Joint Thesaurus. It contains 20 953 valid descriptors and 8 600 forbidden terms. It was last updated in December 2003. The Joint Thesaurus contains the controlled terminology for indexing all information within the subject scope of both INIS (International Nuclear Information System) and ETDE (Energy Technology Data Exchange) information systems. The terminology is intended for use in subject description for input or retrieval of information in those systems. The thesaurus is a terminological control device used in translating from the natural language of documents, indexers or users into a more constrained system language It is also a controlled and dynamic vocabulary of semantically and generically related terms which covers a specific domain of knowledge. The domain of knowledge covered by this Thesaurus includes physics (in particular, plasma physics, atomic and molecular physics, and especially nuclear and high-energy physics), chemistry, materials, earth sciences, radiation biology, radioisotope effects and kinetics, applied life sciences, radiology and nuclear medicine, isotope and radiation source technology, radiation protection, radiation applications, engineering, instrumentation, fossil fuels, synthetic fuels, renewable energy sources, advanced energy systems, fission and fusion reactor technology, safeguards and inspection, waste management, environmental aspects of the production and consumption of energy from nuclear and non-nuclear sources, energy efficiency and energy conservation, economics and sociology of energy production and use, energy policy, and nuclear law. The terms in the Thesaurus are listed alphabetically, and with each alphabetic entry a word block containing the terms associated with the particular entry is displayed. In the word block, terms that have a hierarchical relationship to the entry are identified by the symbols BT and NT, for Broader Term and Narrower Term. Those with an affinitive

  18. International nuclear power status 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauritzen, B.; Majborn, B.; Nonboel, E.; Oelgaard, P.L.

    2001-03-01

    This report is the seventh in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power with special emphasis on reactor safety. For 2000, the report contains: 1. General trends in the development of nuclear power. 2. Deposition of low-level radioactive waste. 3. Statistical information on nuclear power production (in 1999). 4. An overview of safety-relevant incidents in 2000. 5. The development in Sweden. 6. The development in Eastern Europe. 7. The development in the rest of the world. 8. Trends in the development of reactor types. 9. Trends in the development of the nuclear fuel cycle. (au)

  19. INIS - International Nuclear Information System. CEA-users relations. Nuclear information in total freedom; INIS - International Nuclear Information System. Relations CEA utilisateurs. L'information nucleaire en toute liberte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surmont, J.; Paillard, M.D.; Constant, A.; Guille, N.; Le Blanc, A.; Mouffron, O.; Anguise, P.; Jouve, J.J.; Lilin, A

    2009-07-01

    This poster, prepared for the seventh edition of the meetings of scientific and technical information professionals (RPIST, Nancy (France)), presents the principle of operation of the INIS system, based on a cooperative and decentralized preparation of the data which are centralized by the IAEA for the preparation of the INIS products: the database (on Internet and on CD/DVD-Rom), the collection of grey literature documents in full text (microfiches and CD/DVD-roms), and the multilingual thesaurus available in 7 different languages and under various formats. The poster presents these different products, and the role of the INIS members in the distribution of these products towards their national users. One insert presents the French INIS team of the CEA-Saclay and its daily work. (J.S.)

  20. ENS PIME '98: 10th international workshop on nuclear public information in practice. Transactions. Case studies, discussion documents, posters, videos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This proceedings includes papers dealing with public acceptance of nuclear power, young generation project; descriptions of visitor centres; internet usage in advertising and public information; role of nuclear power under market deregulation circumstances; waste issues; role of WANO and WIN (Women in nuclear) organizations in public education and/or information; political aspects; dealing with environmentalists and opponents; education and motivation of 'nuclear' workers

  1. ENS PIME '98: 10th international workshop on nuclear public information in practice. Transactions. Case studies, discussion documents, posters, videos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    This proceedings includes papers dealing with public acceptance of nuclear power, young generation project; descriptions of visitor centres; internet usage in advertising and public information; role of nuclear power under market deregulation circumstances; waste issues; role of WANO and WIN (Women in nuclear) organizations in public education and/or information; political aspects; dealing with environmentalists and opponents; education and motivation of 'nuclear' workers.

  2. International nuclear power status 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoejerup, C.F.; Majborn, B.; Oelgaard, P.L.

    1995-02-01

    This report is the first in a planned series of annual reports covering the international development in the field of nuclear power. The report deals with: statistical information on the electricity produced by nuclear power plants; major safety-related incidents in 1994; the development in Sweden, Eastern Europe, and the rest of the world; the trends of development of a number of reactor types; the trends of development in the fuel cycle. (au)

  3. Managing nuclear information in Tanzania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawe, S.F.; Sungita, Y.Y.

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear information management and the applications of nuclear technology in Tanzania are limited to medical, agriculture, research and some industrial applications. It is demanding that the National database for nuclear information be established to keep the track of the information on radiation facilities, manpower development, radiation sources and radioactive waste management. In this paper the current status of nuclear information management in Tanzania is presented. The development, setbacks and future plans for establishment of national database with consequent improvement of nuclear information management are discussed. The National Radiation Commission (NRC) which is an official government body responsible for atomic energy matters in collaboration with other institutions applying nuclear technology keeps the records and inventory of facilities, manpower development and projects related to the nuclear field. The available information about nuclear application activities has been obtained through possessors' declaration, monitoring at entry/exit points, periodic reports from the licensees, radiation safety inspections, and the available link with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). In order to facilitate the dissemination of information, five ICT centres to serve in the fields of research, nuclear instrumentation, human health and agriculture have been established. The inventory of radiation facilities/materials and human resource is being build up as an initial input to the National database. Establishment of INIS centre is expected to improve the nuclear information management system in the country. The government and the IAEA are encouraged to support nuclear information management especially by strengthening ICT centres and facilitating the establishment of INIS National centre. (author)

  4. Managing nuclear information in Tanzania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawe, S.F.; Sungita, Y.Y.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear information management and the applications of nuclear technology in Tanzania are limited to medical, agriculture, research and some industrial applications. It is demanding that the National database for nuclear information be established to keep the track of the information on radiation facilities, manpower development, radiation sources and radioactive waste management. In this paper the current status of nuclear information management in Tanzania is presented. The development, setbacks and future plans for establishment of national database with consequent improvement of nuclear information management are discussed. The National Radiation Commission (NRC) which is an official government body responsible for atomic energy matters in collaboration with other institutions applying nuclear technology, keeps the records and inventory of facilities, manpower development and projects related to the nuclear field. The available information about nuclear application activities has been obtained through possessors' declaration, monitoring at entry/exit points, periodic reports from the licensees, radiation safety inspections, and the available link with the International Atomic Agency (IAEA). In order to facilitate the dissemination of information, five ICT centers to serve in the fields of research, nuclear instrumentation, human health and agriculture have been established. The inventory of radiation facilities/materials and human resource is being build up as an initial input to the National database. Establishment of INIS center is expected to improve the nuclear information management system in the country. The government and the IAEA are encouraged to support nuclear information management especially by strengthening ICT centers and facilitating the establishment of INIS National center. (author)

  5. International Nuclear Security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyle, James E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-14

    This presentation discusses: (1) Definitions of international nuclear security; (2) What degree of security do we have now; (3) Limitations of a nuclear security strategy focused on national lock-downs of fissile materials and weapons; (4) What do current trends say about the future; and (5) How can nuclear security be strengthened? Nuclear security can be strengthened by: (1) More accurate baseline inventories; (2) Better physical protection, control and accounting; (3) Effective personnel reliability programs; (4) Minimize weapons-usable materials and consolidate to fewer locations; (5) Consider local threat environment when siting facilities; (6) Implement pledges made in the NSS process; and (7) More robust interdiction, emergency response and special operations capabilities. International cooperation is desirable, but not always possible.

  6. Status and trends of nuclear technologies - Report of the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO). Additional information (Companion CD-ROM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-09-01

    The International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) was launched in the year 2000, based on a resolution by the IAEA General Conference (GC(44)/RES/21). INPRO intends to help to ensure that nuclear energy is available in the 21st century in a sustainable manner, and seeks to bring together all interested Member States, both technology holders and technology users, to consider, jointly, actions to achieve desired innovations. INPRO is taking care of the specific needs of developing countries. This IAEA publication is part of Phase 1 of INPRO. It intends to provide an overview on history, present situation and future perspectives of nuclear fuel cycle technologies. While this overview focuses on technical issues, nevertheless, the aspects of economics, environment, and safety and proliferation resistance are important background issues for this study. After a brief description about the INPRO project and an evaluation of existing and future reactor designs the publication covers nuclear fuel cycle issues in detail. It is expected that this documentation will provide IAEA Member States and their nuclear engineers and designers, as well as policy makers with useful information on status and trends of future nuclear fuel cycle technologies. Due to the size of the full report it was decided to attach a CD-ROM in the back of the summary report

  7. Joint study on activation of international nuclear information use through implementation INIS DB server with IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H. C.; Yi, J. H.; Kim, T. W.; Chun, Y. C.; Yoo, A. N.

    2003-03-01

    In order to install the INIS DB host site in Korea, the Korea INIS national center has cooperated with KAERI and organizations concerned, contacted the INIS secretariat participated in the consultative meeting of INIS liaison officers, and strengthened the relationship with Asian and Oceanian countries. And KAERI staff and a maintenance engineer participated training seminar on INIS DB installation and maintenance. The Korea national center obtained the INIS DB server code and data by international cooperation activity. Based these code and data, hardware and software for INIS DB server are purchased. INIS DB server system was installed the software and INIS database(2,347,302) was constructed. In 2003 INIS host DB site started to provide web service in Korea. Also It enables the users in the member countries in Asia as well as domestic users to get quick information. It will also bring the active use of the domestic INIS DB and the increase of the productivity of domestic research activities

  8. International nuclear material safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syed Azmi Syed Ali

    1985-01-01

    History can be a very dull subject if it relates to events which have long since lost their relevance. The factors which led to the creation of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), however, are as important and relevant today as they were when the Agency was first created. Without understanding these factors it is impossible to realise how important the Agency is in the present world or to understand some of the controversies surrounding its future. Central to these controversies is the question of how best to promote the international transfer of nuclear technology without contributing further to the problem of proliferating nuclear explosives or explosive capabilities. One effective means is to subject nuclear materials (see accompanying article in box), which forms the basic link between the manufacture of nuclear explosives and nuclear power generation, to international safeguards. This was realized very early in the development of nuclear power and was given greater emphasis following the deployment of the first two atomic bombs towards the end of World War II. (author)

  9. The role of informing society and international cooperation in improving the nuclear 'image'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazakevich, Yu.; Biryukova, P.

    2000-01-01

    lt is well known that there is a negative relationship between Russian society and modem nuclear energy. Upon analysing this situation we may come to the conclusion that most people have a one-sided point of view. Due to the pressure of the 'Greens', the mass media depicts only the negative sides of the nuclear industry such as nuclear weapons testing and nuclear industry accidents. Without a doubt, accidents at the chemical production plant 'Mayak' in 1957 , the tragedy of Chernobyl's NPP, and fear of potential nuclear war, still prevent people from seeing the positive side of the atomic industry. lt is very hard to ease society's fear of atomic energy. Specialists, administrators of plants, and local administrations are all combining their efforts to reach this goal. (authors)

  10. International nuclear law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mello, M.M. de.

    1981-01-01

    The peculiar feature of a developing nuclear law is discussed. Opinions from various writers and jurists are presented. It is concluded that it should be considered as international law, whose main sources are the various treaties, conventions and agreements. (A.L.) [pt

  11. Joint thesaurus Part I (A-L) + II (M-Z)[International Nuclear Information System. Energy Technology Data Exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-04-15

    This is the second revision of the ETDE/INIS Joint Thesaurus, including all updates up to September 2006. It contains 21 147 valid descriptors and 9 114 forbidden terms. The Joint Thesaurus contains the controlled terminology for indexing all information within the subject scopes of the International Nuclear Information System (INIS) and the Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDE). The terminology is intended for use in subject descriptions for input or retrieval of information in these systems. The thesaurus is a terminological control device used in translating from the natural language of documents, indexers or users into a more constrained system language It is also a controlled and dynamic vocabulary of semantically and generically related terms which covers a specific domain of knowledge. The basic terminology in this thesaurus goes back to the 1969 edition of the EURATOM Thesaurus. The structure subsequently given to that terminology was the result of a systematic study performed by INIS subject specialists. Further expansion of the thesaurus terminology was done by ETDE to incorporate information on all forms of energy. The ETDE/INIS Joint Thesaurus is the result of continued editing, carried out in parallel to the processing of the INIS and ETDE databases. The domain of knowledge covered by the Joint Thesaurus includes physics (in particular, plasma physics, atomic and molecular physics, and especially nuclear and high-energy physics), chemistry, materials science, earth sciences, radiation biology, radioisotope effects and kinetics, applied life sciences, radiology and nuclear medicine, isotope and radiation source technology, radiation protection, radiation applications, engineering, instrumentation, fossil fuels, synthetic fuels, renewable energy sources, advanced energy systems, fission and fusion reactor technology, safeguards and inspection, waste management, environmental aspects of the production and consumption of energy from nuclear and non-nuclear

  12. Informing parliamentarians on nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This publication contains a selection of the papers presented at an international seminar on informing parliamentarians in the nuclear field. This seminar has been organized by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency to respond to important information needs. As a matter of fact, providing clear and accurate information to decision-makers is a key element that contributes to the quality of work for legislation for a safe use of nuclear energy. The sessions dealt with : meeting the information needs of parliamentarians and other elected representatives on nuclear energy questions, actors and their respective roles in the information process, means and tools for communicating information on nuclear energy, case studies in communication with elected officials. Abstracts have been prepared for all of the papers in this volume. (TEC)

  13. preparation and distribution of microfiche in International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajiro, Tadashi; Habara, Tadashi

    1981-01-01

    INIS started the activity in 1970 aiming at the unified treatment of atomic energy literatures in the world. At present, 66 countries and 13 international organs participate in it, and the INIS Section in IAEA supervises the system. The participants treat the atomic energy literatures published in respective countries and send to the INIS Section in the form of magnetic tapes and others. These informations are returned to respective countries through the publication of ''INIS Atomindex'' and the distribution of the magnetic tapes for mechanized retrieval. Recently, the number of abstracted papers reached about 80000/year. One of the features of this system is to utilize microfiche as the medium of literature distribution, and the literatures which cannot be bought through bookstores are available in the form of microfiche from the INIS Clearing House. The microfiche before the establishment of INIS, the troubles concerning the equipment and the problems of the originals to make microfiche, the change of duplicating films and the conversion of frame number, the adoption of the standard for microfiche production and quality inspection, the second change of duplicating films, the recent improvement of microfiche, and the present state of the production and distribution of microfiche in the INIS Section are described. (Kako, I.)

  14. A Framework for an Integrated Risk Informed Decision Making Process. INSAG-25. A Report by the International Nuclear Safety Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    There is general international agreement, as reflected in various IAEA Safety Standards on nuclear reactor design and operation, that both deterministic and probabilistic analyses contribute to reactor safety by providing insights, perspective, comprehension and balance. Accordingly, the integration of deterministic and probabilistic analyses is increasing to support design, safety evaluation and operations. Additionally, application of these approaches to physical security is now being considered by several Member States. Deterministic and probabilistic analyses yield outputs that are complementary to each other. There is thus a need to use a structured framework for consideration of deterministic and probabilistic techniques and findings. In this process, it is appropriate to encourage a balance between deterministic approaches, probabilistic analyses and other factors (see Section 3) in order to achieve an integrated decision making process that serves in an optimal fashion to ensure nuclear reactor safety. This report presents such a framework - a framework that is termed 'integrated risk informed decision making' (IRIDM). While the details of IRIDM methods may change with better understanding of the subject, the framework presented in this report is expected to apply for the foreseeable future. IRIDM depends on the integration of a wide variety of information, insights and perspectives, as well as the commitment of designers, operators and regulatory authorities to use risk information in their decisions. This report thus focuses on key IRIDM aspects, as well considerations that bear on their application which should be taken into account in order to arrive at sound risk informed decisions. This report is intended to be in harmony with the IAEA Safety Standards and various INSAG reports relating to safety assessment and verification, and seeks to convey an appropriate approach to enhance nuclear reactor safety

  15. A Framework for an Integrated Risk Informed Decision Making Process. INSAG-25. A Report by the International Nuclear Safety Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    There is general international agreement, as reflected in various IAEA Safety Standards on nuclear reactor design and operation, that both deterministic and probabilistic analyses contribute to reactor safety by providing insights, perspective, comprehension and balance. Accordingly, the integration of deterministic and probabilistic analyses is increasing to support design, safety evaluation and operations. Additionally, application of these approaches to physical security is now being considered by several Member States. Deterministic and probabilistic analyses yield outputs that are complementary to each other. There is thus a need to use a structured framework for consideration of deterministic and probabilistic techniques and findings. In this process, it is appropriate to encourage a balance between deterministic approaches, probabilistic analyses and other factors (see Section 3) in order to achieve an integrated decision making process that serves in an optimal fashion to ensure nuclear reactor safety. This report presents such a framework - a framework that is termed 'integrated risk informed decision making' (IRIDM). While the details of IRIDM methods may change with better understanding of the subject, the framework presented in this report is expected to apply for the foreseeable future. IRIDM depends on the integration of a wide variety of information, insights and perspectives, as well as the commitment of designers, operators and regulatory authorities ers, operators and regulatory authorities to use risk information in their decisions. This report thus focuses on key IRIDM aspects, as well considerations that bear on their application which should be taken into account in order to arrive at sound risk informed decisions. This report is intended to be in harmony with the IAEA Safety Standards and various INSAG reports relating to safety assessment and verification, and seeks to convey an appropriate approach to enhance nuclear reactor safety

  16. International nuclear energy guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    The aim of this French-English bilingual Guide is to present a synthesis embracing all the aspects and all the implications of the development of nuclear energy by situating it both within the French administrative and professional framework and in the world context. Special attention has been paid to the protection of man and the environment and to safety and security problems; most of the other questions -technological, economic, industrial- which arise at all points in the nuclear cycle. Teaching and research are outlined and a special appendix is devoted to nuclear information [fr

  17. INIS: international nuclear information system. World first international database on pacific uses of nuclear sciences and technologies; INIS: International Nuclear Information System. Premiere base de donnees internationale sur les applications pacifiques des sciences et technologies nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surmont, J.; Constant, A.; Guille, N.; Le Blanc, A.; Mouffron, O.; Anguise, P.; Jouve, J.J

    2007-07-01

    This poster, prepared for the 2007 CEA meetings on scientific and technical information, presents the INIS information system, the document-types content and subject coverage of the database, the French contribution to this system thanks to the INIS team of the CEA-Saclay, the input preparation process, and an example of valorization of a scientific and historical patrimony with the CEA/IAEA joint project of digitization of about 2760 CEA reports published between 1948 and 1969. All these reports have been digitized by the IAEA and analyzed by CEA, and entered in the INIS database with a link to the full text. (J.S.)

  18. Nuclear reactor internals arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frisch, E.; Andrews, H.N.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear reactor internals arrangement is disclosed which facilitates reactor refueling. A reactor vessel and a nuclear core is utilized in conjunction with an upper core support arrangement having means for storing withdrawn control rods therein. The upper core support is mounted to the underside of the reactor vessel closure head so that upon withdrawal of the control rods into the upper core support, the closure head, the upper core support and the control rods are removed as a single unit thereby directly exposing the core for purposes of refueling

  19. International nuclear agreements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miatello, A.; Severino, R.

    1988-01-01

    This multilingual glossary, in the laborious compilation of which the authors have been greatly assisted by a group of professional translators and experts, presents for the first time a substantial number of entries in four languages (English, French, German and Italian), whose terminology and phraseology, all bearing the appropriate normative reference, has been drawn from the official text of the most relevant international agreements on nuclear policy. It is complemented by a thorough critical study on the status of nonproliferation by Lawrence Scheinman and Josef Pilat. Librarians, translators and interpreters as well as scholars and researchers in international law will find this volume a reference tool of specific interest

  20. Nuclear information access system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ham, C. H.; Yang, M. H.; Yoon, S. W.

    1998-01-01

    The energy supply in the countries, which have abundant energy resources, may not be affected by accepting the assertion of anti-nuclear and environment groups. Anti-nuclear movements in the countries which have little energy resources may cause serious problem in securing energy supply. Especially, it is distinct in Korea because she heavily depends on nuclear energy in electricity supply(nuclear share in total electricity supply is about 40%).The cause of social trouble surrounding nuclear energy is being involved with various circumstances. However, it is very important that we are not aware of the importance of information access and prepared for such a situation from the early stage of nuclear energy's development. In those matter, this paper analyzes the contents of nuclear information access system in France and Japan which have dynamic nuclear development program and presents the direction of the nuclear access regime through comparing Korean status and referring to progresses of the regime

  1. Perspectives on the International and Internal Nuclear Security Regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Sung Soon

    2015-01-01

    The term, 'Nuclear Security' became more familiar to Korean public after the government hosted 2012 Seoul Nuclear Security Summit. Nuclear Security is prevention of, detection of and response to criminal or intentional unauthorized acts involving or directed at nuclear material, other radioactive material, associated facilities, or associated activities. Nuclear Security includes physical protection, security of radioactive sources, nuclear forensics, nuclear smuggling prevention, border monitoring, and cyber security with regard to nuclear and other radiological materials. This abstract will review recent international trends and discuss the nuclear security regime in the Republic of Korea (ROK). The international Nuclear Security Regime has been strengthened. The upcoming Chicago Summit in 2016 and the entry into force of the Amendment of Convention on Physical Protection of Nuclear Materials (CPPNM) will bring major changes in nuclear security. The Republic of Korea hosted the 2012 Seoul Summit and strengthened domestic regime to meet international standards. The ROK has worked hard to contribute to the international security regime and to establish a robust domestic security regime against terrorist threats. Even if the nuclear security regime is robust, Risk-informed Nuclear Security management should be established to meet international standards and to implement effective as well as an efficient nuclear security regime

  2. Perspectives on the International and Internal Nuclear Security Regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Sung Soon [Korea Nuclear Non-proliferation and Control, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The term, 'Nuclear Security' became more familiar to Korean public after the government hosted 2012 Seoul Nuclear Security Summit. Nuclear Security is prevention of, detection of and response to criminal or intentional unauthorized acts involving or directed at nuclear material, other radioactive material, associated facilities, or associated activities. Nuclear Security includes physical protection, security of radioactive sources, nuclear forensics, nuclear smuggling prevention, border monitoring, and cyber security with regard to nuclear and other radiological materials. This abstract will review recent international trends and discuss the nuclear security regime in the Republic of Korea (ROK). The international Nuclear Security Regime has been strengthened. The upcoming Chicago Summit in 2016 and the entry into force of the Amendment of Convention on Physical Protection of Nuclear Materials (CPPNM) will bring major changes in nuclear security. The Republic of Korea hosted the 2012 Seoul Summit and strengthened domestic regime to meet international standards. The ROK has worked hard to contribute to the international security regime and to establish a robust domestic security regime against terrorist threats. Even if the nuclear security regime is robust, Risk-informed Nuclear Security management should be established to meet international standards and to implement effective as well as an efficient nuclear security regime.

  3. Nuclear Safety through International Cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flory, Denis

    2013-01-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident was the worst at a nuclear facility since the Chernobyl accident in 1986. It caused deep public anxiety and damaged confidence in nuclear power. Following this accident, strengthening nuclear safety standards and emergency response has become an imperative at the global level. The IAEA is leading in developing a global approach, and the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety is providing a comprehensive framework and acting as a significant driving force to identify lessons learned and to implement safety improvements. Strengthening nuclear safety is addressed through a number of measures proposed in the Action Plan including 12 main actions focusing on safety assessments in the light of the accident. Significant progress has been made in assessing safety vulnerabilities of nuclear power plants, strengthening the IAEA's peer review services, improvements in emergency preparedness and response capabilities, strengthening and maintaining capacity building, as well as widening the scope and enhancing communication and information sharing with Member States, international organizations and the public. Progress has also been made in reviewing the IAEA's safety standards, which continue to be widely applied by regulators, operators and the nuclear industry in general, with increased attention and focus on accident prevention, in particular severe accidents, and emergency preparedness and response.

  4. International nuclear power status 2002; International kernekraftstatus 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauritzen, B.; Majborn, B.; Nonboel, E.; Oelgaard, P.L. (eds.)

    2003-03-01

    This report is the ninth in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power with special emphasis on reactor safety. For 2002, the report contains: 1) General trends in the development of nuclear power; 2) Decommissioning of the nuclear facilities at Risoe National Laboratory: 3) Statistical information on nuclear power production (in 2001); 4) An overview of safety-relevant incidents in 2002; 5) The development in West Europe; 6) The development in East Europe; 7) The development in the rest of the world; 8) Development of reactor types; 9) The nuclear fuel cycle; 10) International nuclear organisations. (au)

  5. International nuclear power status 2001; International kernekraftstatus 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauritzen, B.; Majborn, B.; Nonboel, E.; Oelgaard, P.L. (eds.)

    2002-04-01

    This report is the eighth in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power with special emphasis on reactor safety. For 2001, the report contains: 1) General trends in the development of nuclear power; 2) Nuclear terrorism; 3) Statistical information on nuclear power production (in 2000); 4) An overview of safety-relevant incidents in 2001; 5) The development in West Europe; 6) The development in East Europe; 7) The development in the rest of the world; 8) Development of reactor types; 9) The nuclear fuel cycle; 10) International nuclear organisations. (au)

  6. International School of Nuclear Law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2004-01-01

    This is a report about the fourth International School of Nuclear Law (ISNL) held in Montpellier, France, on 23 August to 3 September 2004 by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) and the University of Montpellier 1 with the support of the International Nuclear Law Association (INLA), the European Commission, and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). (orig.)

  7. The role of informing society and international cooperation in improving the nuclear 'image'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazakevich, Yu.; Biryukova, P.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this report is an endeavor to estimate the meaning of international contacts and cooperation for the public acknowledgement of the atomic energy and technologies. In this report the potential ways of working with the public in Chelyabinsk region taking into account its specific features have been suggested. The conclusion contains practical recommendations about the organization of working with the public and directions of activity. (authors)

  8. International Symposium on Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-03-01

    Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic and the Embassy of Japan in the Slovak Republic, under the auspices of the Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign and European Affairs Mr Lajcak organized International Symposium on Nuclear Safety on 14 and 15 March 2013. The symposium took place almost exactly two years after the occurrence of accidents at the Japanese nuclear power plant Fukushima Daichi. The main mission of the symposium was an attempt to contribute to the improvement of nuclear safety by sharing information and lessons presented by Japanese experts with experts from the region, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the European Commission. The aim of the symposium, unlike many other events organized in connection with the events in Fukushima Daichi NPP, was a summary of the results of stress tests and measures update adopted by the international community, especially within Europe. Panel discussion was included to the program of the symposium for this aim was, mainly focused on the current state of implementation of the National Action Plan of the Slovak Republic, the Czech Republic, Poland, Ukraine and Switzerland and the IAEA Action Plan.

  9. Nuclear energy and information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Baisong

    1996-01-01

    The information tells us that since the first chain reaction discovery about 50 years ago up to now, there are more than 400 commercial nuclear power plants connected to electricity supply net works. The electricity supplied by nuclear power plants has exceeded 2000 TWH, which represents almost 17% of the total electricity generated in the world and this proportion is still increasing. The accumulated operating experience of nuclear power plants reach more than 6000 reactor-year. Quite high average life time energy availability factors demonstrate the good reliability of nuclear power plants. The present status of the electricity development in the world shows that nuclear power has become an imperative and exclusively realistic alternative energy source. All of these information demonstrate that nuclear power as a safe, clean and less cost power source has already been widely accepted in the world. In Asia and Pacific region, the fast development of economy provides a vast possibility for the development of nuclear power. In China, shortage of electricity has become the 'bottle neck' which retards the economic development nowadays. China has already drawn up the plan for the development of nuclear power. The information is of great significance to promote the development of nuclear power. It could be said that without information, nuclear power could not be smoothly introduced in any country or region. (J.P.N.)

  10. ENS PIME '99: 11. international workshop on nuclear public information in practice. Transactions. Case studies, discussion documents, posters, videos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    The papers of this 11th in the row international meeting were presented during the sessions named as follows: The young generation and communication with the public; Handling minor incidents; Nuclear power - what's it worth? Advertising; It's not what you say, it's how you say it; Workshop: handling the media; inside out communications - communicating with own staff; transport problems; nuclear subsidiaries - the black sheep of the family; campaigns and strategies; general updates and breaking news.

  11. ENS PIME '99: 11. international workshop on nuclear public information in practice. Transactions. Case studies, discussion documents, posters, videos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The papers of this 11th in the row international meeting were presented during the sessions named as follows: The young generation and communication with the public; Handling minor incidents; Nuclear power - what's it worth? Advertising; It's not what you say, it's how you say it; Workshop: handling the media; inside out communications - communicating with own staff; transport problems; nuclear subsidiaries - the black sheep of the family; campaigns and strategies; general updates and breaking news

  12. International aspects of nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uematsu, K.

    1989-09-01

    The accident at Chernobyl revealed that there were shortcomings and gaps in the existing international mechanisms and brought home to governments the need for stronger measures to provide better protection against the risks of severe accidents. The main thrust of international co-operation with regard to nuclear safety issues is aimed at achieving a uniformly high level of safety in nuclear power plants through continuous exchanges of research findings and feedback from reactor operating experience. The second type of problem posed in the event of an accident resulting in radioactive contamination of several countries relates to the obligation to notify details of the circumstances and nature of the accident speedily so that the countries affected can take appropriate protective measures and, if necessary, organize mutual assistance. Giving the public accurate information is also an important aspect of managing an emergency situation arising from a severe accident. Finally, the confusion resulting from the unwarranted variety of protective measures implemented after the Chernobyl accident has highlighted the need for international harmonization of the principles and scientific criteria applicable to the protection of the public in the event of an accident and for a more consistent approach to emergency plans. The international conventions on third party liability in the nuclear energy sector (Paris/Brussels Conventions and the Vienna Convention) provide for compensation for damage caused by nuclear accidents in accordance with the rules and jurisdiction that they lay down. These provisions impose obligations on the operator responsible for an accident, and the State where the nuclear facility is located, towards the victims of damage caused in another country

  13. International cooperative information systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Developing countries need mechanisms by which the information they generate themselves and development information from the rest of the world can be retrieved. The international cooperative information system is such a mechanism. Delegates to the Seminar on International Cooperative Information Systems were informed about various existing systems (INIS, AGRIS, INFOTERRA, TCDC/INRES, POPIN, DEVSIS, and INPADROC), some specialized information systems and services (CDS/ISIS and the Cassava Information Centre), and computer programs for information processing (INIS/AGRIS, CDS/ISIS, and MINISIS). The participants suggested some changes that should be made on both the national and the international levels to ensure that these systems meet the needs of developing countries more effectively. (LL)

  14. International Nuclear Physics Conference

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    We are pleased to announce that the 26th International Nuclear Physics Conference (INPC2016) will take place in Adelaide (Australia) from September 11-16, 2016. The 25th INPC was held in Firenze in 2013 and the 24th INPC in Vancouver, Canada, in 2010. The Conference is organized by the Centre for the Subatomic Structure of Matter at the University of Adelaide, together with the Australian National University and ANSTO. It is also sponsored by the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP) and by a number of organisations, including AUSHEP, BNL, CoEPP, GSI and JLab. INPC 2016 will be held in the heart of Adelaide at the Convention Centre on the banks of the River Torrens. It will consist of 5 days of conference presentations, with plenary sessions in the mornings, up to ten parallel sessions in the afternoons, poster sessions and a public lecture. The Conference will officially start in the evening of Sunday 11th September with Registration and a Reception and will end late on the afternoon of Fri...

  15. Information technology impact on nuclear power plant documentation. Report prepared within the framework of the International Working Group on Nuclear Power Plant Control and Instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-04-01

    As the majority of the nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the world were designed and constructed about twenty to forty years ago, these older power plants may have shortcomings in documentation on construction, commissioning, operations, maintenance, or decommissioning. Therefore, facility documentation does not always reflect actual plant status after years of plant operation, modification, and maintenance. To deal with these shortcomings, computer and information technologies that provide sophisticated and modern design tools as well as information processing and storage facilities can offer dramatic innovation from paper-centric documentation towards data-centric documentation. This report addresses all aspects of documentation associated with various life-cycle phases of NPPs and the information technology (IT) that are relevant to the documentation process. It also provides a guide for planning, designing, and executing an IT documentation project. Examples are given to demonstrate successful implementations at plants. Finally, it discusses the issues related to the application of the IT in NPPs and the trends for applications of the IT at NPPs as well as the technology itself. It is recognized that this can also improve configuration management. reliability of data, quality of personnel work, and ultimately plant performance reliability and safety. The aspects of using the IT for NPP documentation are closely related to configuration management at NPPs. The report consists of nine sections, a reference section, and five additional appendices. The development of this report which was initiated by the IAEA International Working Group on Nuclear Power Plant Control and Instrumentation (IWG-NPPCI). It is the result of a series of consultants meetings held by the IAEA in Vienna (October 1999, November 2000). It was prepared with the participation and contributions of experts from Canada, Germany, Norway, Sweden, and the United States of America. In addition, a

  16. Information technology impact on nuclear power plant documentation. Report prepared within the framework of the International Working Group on Nuclear Power Plant Control and Instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-04-01

    As the majority of the nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the world were designed and constructed about twenty to forty years ago, these older power plants may have shortcomings in documentation on construction, commissioning, operations, maintenance, or decommissioning. Therefore, facility documentation does not always reflect actual plant status after years of plant operation, modification, and maintenance. To deal with these shortcomings, computer and information technologies that provide sophisticated and modern design tools as well as information processing and storage facilities can offer dramatic innovation from paper-centric documentation towards data-centric documentation. This report addresses all aspects of documentation associated with various life-cycle phases of NPPs and the information technology (IT) that are relevant to the documentation process. It also provides a guide for planning, designing, and executing an IT documentation project. Examples are given to demonstrate successful implementations at plants. Finally, it discusses the issues related to the application of the IT in NPPs and the trends for applications of the IT at NPPs as well as the technology itself. It is recognized that this can also improve configuration management. reliability of data, quality of personnel work, and ultimately plant performance reliability and safety. The aspects of using the IT for NPP documentation are closely related to configuration management at NPPs. The report consists of nine sections, a reference section, and five additional appendices. The development of this report which was initiated by the IAEA International Working Group on Nuclear Power Plant Control and Instrumentation (IWG-NPPCI). It is the result of a series of consultants meetings held by the IAEA in Vienna (October 1999, November 2000). It was prepared with the participation and contributions of experts from Canada, Germany, Norway, Sweden, and the United States of America. In addition, a

  17. International safeguards and international nuclear trade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felten, P.

    1991-01-01

    A particular feature of nuclear trade is the need to ensure a good equilibrium between technology transfer and the requirements linked to non proliferation of nuclear weapons. The recent dramatic changes that occurred on the international scene have particularly underlined the difficulty to reach this equilibrium, reminding us the fragility of the existing order and the responsibility of the nuclear community in the field of non-proliferation. Consequently, there is a need for an international thorough review of the actual non proliferation tools developed until now. This review could lead to reconsider some of the dogmas upon which the present safeguard system is based

  18. Anthropology and nuclear information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Nuffelen, D.

    1994-01-01

    In this article is sketched a paradigm which permits to envisage nuclear information as an anthropologic problem. The author modelizes public information by a general theory of exchange. For him the most urgent problem is to refounding the circulation between the different components of social system. 3 figs,. 2 tabs,. 12 refs

  19. Nuclear information: An overview of IAEA's activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchesi, I.H.; Konstantinov, L.V.

    1986-01-01

    As stated in this overview of IAEA nuclear information activities the Agency's role in information services is rapidly evolving and multifaceted. The Agency maintains more than 200 computerized files of information. Some 60 of these are part of systems directly related to nuclear activities. Some of these are briefly profiled in this overview such as INIS, the IAEA Nuclear Data Programme, the IAEA Incident Reporting System, the IAEA Energy and Economic Databank, the IAEA Power Reactor Information System, the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Information System, and the International Uranium Geology Information System. Future directions are pointed out. Different ways to upgrade information systems are listed

  20. International nuclear trade and nonproliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potter, W.C.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this book, the culmination of one phase of an ongoing international research project on nuclear suppliers and nonproliferation, is to explore the international political and economic dimensions of nuclear trade, especially as they pertain to the behavior of eleven emerging nuclear-supplier states. More specifically, the book sets forth a conceptual framework for analyzing international nuclear trade; details the domestic and external factors that shape the nuclear export policies of Argentina, Brazil, India, Israel, Japan, Pakistan, the People's Republic of China, South Korea, South Africa, Spain and Taiwan; and identifies and assesses alternative strategies for containing the new proliferation risks posed by these emerging suppliers. The book also describes an innovative effort to utilize a computer-based system for tracking international nuclear trade

  1. An international nuclear safety regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, M.

    1995-01-01

    For all the parties involved with safe use of nuclear energy, the opening for signature of the 'Convention on Nuclear Safety' (signed by 60 countries) and the ongoing work to prepare a 'Convention on Radioactive Waste Safety' are particularly important milestones. 'Convention on Nuclear Safety' is the first legal instrument that directly addresses the safety of nuclear power plants worldwide. The two conventions are only one facet of international cooperation to enhance safety. A review of some cooperative efforts of the past decades, and some key provisions of the new safety conventions, presented in this paper, show how international cooperation is increasing nuclear safety worldwide. The safety philosophy and practices involved with legal framework for the safe use of nuclear power will foster a collective international involvement and commitment. It will be a positive step towards increasing public confidence in nuclear power

  2. International nuclear power status 1999; International kernekraftstatus 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoejerup, C.F.; Oelgaard, P.L. [eds.

    2000-03-01

    This report isthe sixth in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power with special emphasis on reactor safety. For 1999, the report contains: General trends in the development of nuclear power; The past and possible future of Barsebaeck Nuclear Power Plant; Statistical information on nuclear power production (in 1998); An overview of safety-relevant incidents in 1999; The development in Sweden; The development in Eastern Europe; The development in the rest of the world; Trends in the development of reactor types; Trends in the development of the nuclear fuel cycle. (au)

  3. Nuclear energy and international cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshima, Keiichi

    1981-01-01

    There is no need to emphasize that nuclear energy cannot be developed without international cooperation at either the industrial or the academic level. In the meanwhile, there have been some marked political, economic and social changes in recent years which are posing constraints to the international cooperation in nuclear energy. The problems and constraints impeding nuclear power programs cannot be overcome by only one nation; international cooperation with common efforts to solve the problems is essential. Nuclear energy is different from fossil energy resources in that it is highly technology-intensive while others are resource-intensive. International cooperation in technology has an entirely different importance in the field of nuclear energy. Educational institutions will play a role in a new era of the international cooperation. (Mori, K.)

  4. Nuclear fuel cycle: international market, international constraints and international cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imai, R.

    1977-01-01

    Some of the constraints on the nuclear fuel cycle are ones arising from economic and financial reasons, those caused by uranium resources and their distribution, those arising from technical reasons, issues of public acceptance, and those quite independent of normal industrial considerations, but caused by elements of international politics. The nuclear fuel cycle and the international market, matters of nuclear non-proliferation, and international cooperation are discussed

  5. Nuclear technology international 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geary, Neville

    1987-01-01

    A total of 59 articles cover a wide range of subjects within the scope of nuclear power generation. The first 13 are concerned with the design and construction of nuclear reactors - PWRs, AGRs, Magnox reactors, fast reactors. The final article in this section is on reactor decommissioning. The next 33 papers all concern services to the nuclear power industry. These include the supply of uranium, uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, reprocessing, spent fuel storage, robotics and remote handling and radioactive waste disposal. The 13 articles in the safety and public acceptability section concern fears over the Chernobyl accident, safety aspects of nuclear power including risk assessment, fire protection, quality assurance, earthquake tolerance, non-proliferation of nuclear weapons and finally, general problems of balancing advances in nuclear technology and economic desirability against a lack of public confidence in the industry. All reactor and fuel types are represented. Most of the articles concern nuclear power in Europe or North America. All are indexed separately. (UK)

  6. The International Science and Technology Center (ISTC) - Fifteen-Year Experience in Management of Innovative Nuclear and Other Programs (Information Review)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudowski, W.; Tocheny, L.V. [ISTC - International Science and Technology Center, Krasnoproletarskaya 32-34, PO Box 20, 127473 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2009-06-15

    projects: - Are managing internationally; - Have plans and results, available for international collaborators; - Results may be passed to international centers (OECD/NEA and/or others) for further international benchmarking. As for today - a set of demonstration and basic-type experiments, which fit closely with IAEA/ INPRO and GIF program, with EU Frame-Work programs, - had been done or under development now in the frame of ISTC projects and programs with active international collaboration. The ISTC - as a unique international tool - is ready to take part and manage further this activity. Among five thousand project proposals submitted to ISTC, there are about five hundred related to different aspects of nuclear technologies and Nuclear Fuel Cycle (NFC). Survey of the ISTC project results: The following information will be included in the review, with special attention on details of corresponding experimental programs: - Novel reactor concepts, corresponding to GIF: - Fast reactors (Sodium-, Lead-and Lead-Bismuth-cooled); - Supercritical Pressure Water aspects; - HTGR - critical modeling, engineering. - Molten salts. - Nuclear Fuel Cycle options (including Partitioning and Transmutation). - Reactor data benchmarking and verification, critical experiments. - Nuclear Power Plant life management (Reactor pressure vessel and internals control, etc.). - Nuclear data measurements. - Severe accident study (Corium modelling, Quench-effect, Chernobyl). - Sky-shine experiments. - Depleted Uranium for RAW storage. - Technical and economical analysis of NFC, including non-proliferation issues. - Novel reactor engineering systems - experimental and computer modelling (steam-generators, etc.). - Accelerator Driven Systems (experimental modeling). References: The ISTC Annual Reports - ISTC, Moscow, 1996 - 2007. Web-site: www.istcinfo.ru. (authors)

  7. International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnesale, A.

    1980-01-01

    As nuclear power expands globally, so too expands the capability for producing nuclear weapons. The International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation (INFCE) was organized in 1977 for the purpose of exploring two areas: (1) ways in which nuclear energy can be made available to help meet world energy needs, and (2) means by which the attendant risk of weapons proliferation can be held to a minimum. INFCE is designed for technical and analytical study rather than negotiation. Its organizational structure and issues under consideration are discussed. Some even broader issues that emerge from consideration of the relationships between the peaceful and military use of nuclear energy are also discussed. These are different notions of the meaning of nuclear proliferation, nuclear export policy, the need of a nuclear policy to be both a domestic as well as a foreign one, and political-military measures that can help reduce incentives of countries to acquire nuclear weapons of their own

  8. International control of nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koponen, Hannu

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear materials are subject to both national and international safeguards control. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) takes care of the international safeguards control. The control activities, which are discussed in this article, are carried out according to the agreements between various countries and the IAEA

  9. Communication received from the permanent mission of Austria regarding the provision of certain additional information on production, inventories and international transfers of nuclear material and on exports of certain relevant equipment and non-nuclear material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The Director General received a note verbale of 13 June 1996 from Permanent Mission of Austria regarding the provision of certain additional information on production, inventories and international transfers of nuclear material and on exports of certain relevant equipment and non-nuclear material. In the light of the request expressed at the end of the note verbale, the text of the note verbale is being circulated

  10. Communication received from the Permanent Mission of Sweden regarding the provision of certain additional information on production, inventories and international transfers of nuclear material and on exports of certain relevant equipment and non-nuclear material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of a note verbale dated 28 June 1996 received by the Director General of IAEA from the Permanent Mission of Sweden through which the Government of Sweden provides, on a voluntary basis, certain additional information on production, inventories and international transfers of nuclear material and on exports of certain relevant equipment and non-nuclear material, in order to assist the Agency in the discharge of its safeguards responsibilities

  11. Communication received from the permanent mission of Finland regarding the provision of certain additional information on production, inventories and international transfers of nuclear material and on exports of certain relevant equipment and non-nuclear material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The Director General received a note verbale of 8 February 1996 from Permanent Mission of Finland regarding the provision of certain additional information on production, inventories and international transfers of nuclear material and on exports of certain relevant equipment and non-nuclear material. In the light of the request expressed at the and of the note verbale, the text of the note verbale is being circulated

  12. International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leigh, I.W.; Patridge, M.D.

    1991-05-01

    As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need has developed for a ready source of information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book was compiled to meet that need. The information contained in the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book has been obtained from many unclassified sources: nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECN/NEA activities reports; not reflect any one single source but frequently represent a consolidation/combination of information.

  13. International nuclear fuel cycle fact book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    The International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book has been compiled in an effort to provide current data concerning fuel cycle and waste management facilities, R ampersand D programs and key personnel on 23 countries, including the US, four multi-national agencies, and 21 nuclear societies. The Fact Book is organized as follows: National summaries-a section for each country which summarizes nuclear policy, describes organizational relationships, and provides addresses and names of key personnel and information on facilities. International agencies-a section for each of the international agencies which has significant fuel cycle involvement and a listing of nuclear societies. Glossary-a list of abbreviations/acronyms of organizations, facilities, technical and other terms. The national summaries, in addition to the data described above, feature a small map for each country as well as some general information. The latter presented from the perspective of the Fact Book user in the United States

  14. Nuclear information and knowledge, No. 7, June 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecossois, B.

    2009-06-01

    This bi-annual newsletter reports on the activities of the INIS and Nuclear Knowledge Management Section of the IAEA Department of Nuclear Energy. Issue no. 7 is centred on cooperation and partnerships in nuclear information, focusing specifically on two international networks coordinated by the IAEA's nuclear information and knowledge management services: the International Nuclear Information System (INIS) and the International Nuclear Libraries Network (INLN). Table of contents : To our Readers; INIS and International Cooperation in Nuclear Information; INLN: Facilitating Exchange and Building Partnerships; News from INIS and NKM; Recent Publications; IAEA Library Update; 2009 Meetings

  15. International arrangements against nuclear terrorism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunn, G.

    1987-01-01

    International efforts to show the spread of nuclear weapons have created an international norm of nonproliferation, backed by a variety of enforcement mechanisms. Together they are often referred to as the nonproliferation regime. This regime is reviewed, starting with the 1963 Limited Test Ban Treaty. The centerpiece of the regime, the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), signed in 1968, now has 135 parties, including most of the advanced industrial nuclear countries. Results of the 1985 NPT Review Conference are briefly discussed; the 86 NPT parties that attended reaffirmed the treaty's value, pledged continued support for the IAEA safeguards system, and called upon nonsigners to renounce nuclear weapons and accept IAEA safeguards. A section is devoted to the physical protection of nuclear materials, facilities, and weapons. Finally, recommendations are presented to improve international arrangements against nuclear terrorists

  16. International nuclear power status 2000; International kernekraftstatus 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauritzen, B.; Majborn, B.; Nonboel, E.; Oelgaard, P.L. [eds.

    2001-03-01

    This report is the seventh in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power with special emphasis on reactor safety. For 2000, the report contains: 1. General trends in the development of nuclear power. 2. Deposition of low-level radioactive waste. 3. Statistical information on nuclear power production (in 1999). 4. An overview of safety-relevant incidents in 2000. 5. The development in Sweden. 6. The development in Eastern Europe. 7. The development in the rest of the world. 8. Trends in the development of reactor types. 9. Trends in the development of the nuclear fuel cycle. (au)

  17. Nuclear exports and international cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCardle, J.J.

    1981-06-01

    Canada's nuclear export policy together with its non-proliferation and safeguards policy embrace both the country's desire to promote international cooperation in the peaceful uses of nuclear energy and its effort to minimize the risk of further proliferation of nuclear weapons. This policy reflects the belief that only if Canadian parliamentary and public opinion can be convinced that Canada's nuclear exports will not contribute to nuclear proliferation will the long-term health of the country's nuclear industry be assured. Canada requires a political commitment to non-proliferation from its nuclear partners, and looks to the IAEA to administer safeguards on nuclear material of Canadian origin to guarantee that commitment. Agreements reached with its nuclear partners are in accordance with provisions of the non-proliferation treaty and include a contingency provision for fall-back safeguards if the other state should withdraw from the NPT. Provision is made for mutual agreement on reprocessing and enrichment of nuclear material. Agreements have been reached with some twenty nuclear partners, and efforts are continuing to come to new international understanding on reprocessing, enrichment, and plutonium storage

  18. International Youth Nuclear Congress (IYNC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janin, D.

    2017-01-01

    International Youth Nuclear Congress (IYNC) is the global network of a new generation of nuclear professionals to: Communicate the benefits of nuclear energy; Promote the peaceful use of nuclear science and technology; Facilitate knowledge transfer between generations; Provide a platform for networking. The benefits of IYNC's biannual congress maintain IYNC. Innovation for Nuclear: To propose and reward innovative ideas focused on nuclear technologies for a sustainable development; To support young energy in thinking innovative solutions. The congress is funded from sponsorship (between 1000 and 45,000 euros) and individual participant's registration fees (400 euros including meals, technical visit and networking events). Knowledge Transfer at IYNC congress involves Speakers: top managers and nuclear experts, Publication of technical papers, Face-to-face with keynote speakers and organising Workshops

  19. The nuclear controversy international

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doederlein, J.M.

    1975-01-01

    The present paper deals with the following questions: How quickly can the developed nations get as much energy as possible from the nuclear power plants they are building. How can we get a maximum output from a maximum number of nuclear plants to reduce the health and the environment damage that we get from fossil fired power plants. How can we reduce the strain on future generations because of the atmospheric pollution and reduce the strain on future generations because we use up all the oil and the gas that we should leave to them for worthier purposes than energy production. (orig.) [de

  20. International Aspects of Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lash, T.R.

    2000-01-01

    Even though not all the world's nations have developed a nuclear power industry, nuclear safety is unquestionably an international issue. Perhaps the most compelling proof is the 1986 accident at Chornobyl nuclear power plant in what is now Ukraine. The U.S. Department of Energy conducts a comprehensive, cooperative effort to reduce risks at Soviet-designed nuclear power plants. In the host countries : Armenia, Ukraine, Russia, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Lithuania, Slovakia, and Kazakhstan joint projects are correcting major safety deficiencies and establishing nuclear safety infrastructures that will be self-sustaining.The U.S. effort has six primary goals: 1. Operational Safety - Implement the basic elements of operational safety consistent with internationally accepted practices. 2. Training - Improve operator training to internationally accepted standards. 3. Safety Maintenance - Help establish technically effective maintenance programs that can ensure the reliability of safety-related equipment. 4. Safety Systems - Implement safety system improvements consistent with remaining plant lifetimes. 5. Safety Evaluations - Transfer the capability to conduct in-depth plant safety evaluations using internationally accepted methods. 6. Legal and Regulatory Capabilities - Facilitate host-country implementation of necessary laws and regulatory policies consistent with their international treaty obligations governing the safe use of nuclear power

  1. International proliferation on nuclear weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, J.

    1977-01-01

    The subject is dealt with under the following headings: introduction; routes to proliferation (preparation of U 235 , Pu 239 , U 233 ); nuclear power fuel cycles and proliferation; the fast reactor fuel cycle; security aspects of the existing fuel cycle; the IAEA and the nuclear non-proliferation treaty. It is concluded that 'the basis for sound international control exists, and taken together with the further technical steps which will be taken to make the existing fuel cycles more robust against the diversion of materials by terrorists and the abuse of civil nuclear power programmes by governments, we have good reason to proceed now with the orderly exploitation of ...nuclear energy...'. (U.K.)

  2. International nuclear power status 1994; International kernekraftstatus 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoejerup, C.F.; Majborn, B.; Oelgaard, P.L. [eds.

    1995-02-01

    This report is the first in a planned series of annual reports covering the international development in the field of nuclear power. The report deals with: statistical information on the electricity produced by nuclear power plants; major safety-related incidents in 1994; the development in Sweden, Eastern Europe, and the rest of the world; the trends of development of a number of reactor types; the trends of development in the fuel cycle. (au).

  3. International nuclear cycle fact book: Revision 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leigh, I.W.

    1989-01-01

    The International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book has been compiled in an effort to provide current data concerning fuel cycle and waste management facilities, R and D programs and key personnel. The Fact Book contains: national summaries in which a section for each country which summarizes nuclear policy, describes organizational relationships and provides addresses, names of key personnel, and facilities information; and international agencies in which a section for each of the international agencies which has significant fuel cycle involvement, and a listing of nuclear societies. The national summaries, in addition to the data described above, feature a small map for each country as well as some general information. The latter is presented from the perspective of the Fact Book user in the United States

  4. International nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, P.H.W.

    1978-01-01

    The background to the development of internationally agreed safety principles and practices is discussed. The activities of the IAEA and the scope, structure, and organisation of its programme of Reactor Safety Codes and Guides are described. Attention is drawn to certain areas needing further considerations. (UK)

  5. Nuclear criticality information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koponen, B.L.; Hampel, V.E.

    1981-01-01

    The nuclear criticality safety program at LLNL began in the 1950's with a critical measurements program which produced benchmark data until the late 1960's. This same time period saw the rapid development of computer technology useful for both computer modeling of fissile systems and for computer-aided management and display of the computational benchmark data. Database management grew in importance as the amount of information increased and as experimental programs were terminated. Within the criticality safety program at LLNL we began at that time to develop a computer library of benchmark data for validation of computer codes and cross sections. As part of this effort, we prepared a computer-based bibliography of criticality measurements on relatively simple systems. However, it is only now that some of these computer-based resources can be made available to the nuclear criticality safety community at large. This technology transfer is being accomplished by the DOE Technology Information System (TIS), a dedicated, advanced information system. The NCIS database is described

  6. International nuclear waste management fact book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrahms, C.W.; Patridge, M.D.; Widrig, J.E.

    1995-11-01

    The International Nuclear Waste Management Fact Book has been compiled to provide current data on fuel cycle and waste management facilities, R and D programs, and key personnel in 24 countries, including the US; four multinational agencies; and 20 nuclear societies. This document, which is in its second year of publication supersedes the previously issued International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book (PNL-3594), which appeared annually for 12 years. The content has been updated to reflect current information. The Fact Book is organized as follows: National summaries--a section for each country that summarizes nuclear policy, describes organizational relationships, and provides addresses and names of key personnel and information on facilities. International agencies--a section for each of the international agencies that has significant fuel cycle involvement and a list of nuclear societies. Glossary--a list of abbreviations/acronyms of organizations, facilities, and technical and other terms. The national summaries, in addition to the data described above, feature a small map for each country and some general information that is presented from the perspective of the Fact Book user in the US

  7. International nuclear waste management fact book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrahms, C W; Patridge, M D; Widrig, J E

    1995-11-01

    The International Nuclear Waste Management Fact Book has been compiled to provide current data on fuel cycle and waste management facilities, R and D programs, and key personnel in 24 countries, including the US; four multinational agencies; and 20 nuclear societies. This document, which is in its second year of publication supersedes the previously issued International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book (PNL-3594), which appeared annually for 12 years. The content has been updated to reflect current information. The Fact Book is organized as follows: National summaries--a section for each country that summarizes nuclear policy, describes organizational relationships, and provides addresses and names of key personnel and information on facilities. International agencies--a section for each of the international agencies that has significant fuel cycle involvement and a list of nuclear societies. Glossary--a list of abbreviations/acronyms of organizations, facilities, and technical and other terms. The national summaries, in addition to the data described above, feature a small map for each country and some general information that is presented from the perspective of the Fact Book user in the US.

  8. Nuclear energy and international organizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindemann, B.

    1975-01-01

    The historical perspectives of the international organizations' role concerning the development and spreading of the peaceful uses of nuclear energy, taking into account the national interests within and towards these organizations, are portrayed. The difference in political status between the so-called nuclear and non-nuclear States, lodged in Articles I and II of the Non-Proliferation Treaty is an important factor. The effects so far of these differences in status on the interest of nuclear States to participate in organizations and on factors which might possibly lead to conflict between these two groups are presented. The author skirts the cooperation between organizations (international bureaucracies, group-formation of states). (HP/LN) [de

  9. Nuclear pharmacy education: international harmonization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, S.M.; Cox, P.H.

    1998-01-01

    Education of nuclear pharmacists exists in many countries around the world. The approach and level of education varies between countries depending upon the expectations of the nuclear pharmacist, the work site and the economic environment. In Australia, training is provided through distance learning. In Europe and Canada, nuclear pharmacists and radiochemists receive postgraduate education in order to engage in the small-scale preparation and quality control of radiopharmaceuticals as well as research and development. In the U.S.A., nuclear pharmacy practitioners obtain basic knowledge primarily through undergraduate programs taken when pursuit the first professional degree in pharmacy. Licensed practitioners in pharmacy enter the practice of nuclear pharmacy through distance learning programs or short courses. While different approaches to education exist, there is a basic core of knowledge and a level of competence required of all nuclear pharmacists and radiochemists providing radiopharmaceutical products and services. It was with this realization that efforts were initiated to develop harmonization concepts and documents pertaining to education in nuclear pharmacy. The benefits of international harmonization in nuclear pharmacy education are numerous. Assurance of the availability of quality professionals to provide optimal products and care to the patient is a principle benefit. Spanning national barriers through the demonstration of self governance and unification in education will enhance the goal of increased freedom of employment between countries. Harmonization endeavors will improve existing education programs through sharing of innovative concepts and knowledge between educators. Documents generated will benefit new educational programs especially in developing nations. A committee on harmonization in nuclear pharmacy education was formed consisting of educators and practitioners from the international community. A working document on education was

  10. Nuclear Regulatory Commission information digest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission information digest provides summary information regarding the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, its regulatory responsibilities, and areas licensed by the commission. This is an annual publication for the general use of the NRC Staff and is available to the public. The digest is divided into two parts: the first presents an overview of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the second provides data on NRC commercial nuclear reactor licensees and commercial nuclear power reactors worldwide

  11. Nuclear education and international nuclear university

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, C.S.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper author deals with the concept of establishing the International Nuclear University (INU) would be one of the most viable options. The INU would provide young professionals with not only university-level education but also high-skill training in the fields of nuclear technology. The program will emphasize on global and multi- disciplinary perspectives, which should offer our young generation broader opportunities of advanced education and motivate professional staffs in the enhancement of their knowledge and skills. The 'World Council of Nuclear Education' could be formed to steer the INU for close international cooperation under the auspices of the IAEA. The INU would organize a world network of existing nuclear- related educational organizations and training centers which already exist in Member States. Existing facilities and can be utilized at maximum. Use of cyber-lecturing through Internet, cross-approval of credits among educational organizations in degree work, certification of credits by the authorized body like IAEA, human resources placement services, etc. are some of the activities that the INU could provide in addition to its professional training and higher education. (authors)

  12. INDC International Nuclear Data Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, A. [Univ. of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom); McCutchan, E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Dimitriou, P. [Intl Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Vienna (Austria)

    2017-12-11

    The 22nd meeting of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators was convened at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, USA, from 22 to 26 May 2017 under the auspices of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section. This meeting was attended by 38 scientists from 12 Member States and the IAEA, all of whom are concerned primarily with the measurement, evaluation and dissemination of nuclear structure and decay data. A summary of the meeting, data centre reports, various proposals considered, technical discussions, actions agreed by the participants, and the resulting recommendations/conclusions are presented within this document.

  13. Transferring nuclear knowledge - An international partnership

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badawy, I.I.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The fast decrease of coal, oil and natural gas as energy resources is pushing the world towards the use of nuclear energy. The expectation of growth in the nuclear field seems to be a great challenge -specially- in developing countries which are in hard need of acquiring nuclear knowledge and nuclear technology as well. In this situation, various factors would have great influence on the implementation of nuclear projects -in particular- for electricity generation. As a matter of fact, it is essential for each country to have its own strategy for national development. In practice, the implementation of such a strategy would need the collective efforts of specialized and efficient human resources for executing the tasks. This would need cooperation with, and/or technical aid of developed countries and international organizations. There are various parameters that may contribute in the national development in a country, the most important of which are the development in science and technology. Then, the industrial development becomes essential for the nuclear industry. In order to achieve this, the information acquiring and knowledge transfer are fundamental tools. The partnership between developed and developing countries would mean cooperation and aid directed to nuclear technology and knowledge transfer; and specialized technical training in the nuclear industry. Supplier countries might need to use high technology in implementing nuclear safeguards commitments, but with minimum side effects. This paper investigates some factors that may have influence on transferring peaceful uses of nuclear knowledge and/or nuclear technology; such as establishing and sustaining the national nuclear workforce, building of public understanding and public acceptance of nuclear science and technology. Also, it discusses the importance of activating and strengthening the international regime of partnership for the welfare and prosperity of human kind; with specific

  14. International cooperation in nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, M.

    1991-01-01

    The mechanisms of international co-operations, co-ordinated by International Atomic Energy Agency, are presented. These co-operations are related to international safety standards, to the safety of the four hundred existing reactors in operation, to quick help and information in case of emergency, and to the already valid international conventions. The relation between atomic energy and environmental protection is also discussed briefly. (K.A.)

  15. Communication received from the Member States of the European Community regarding the provision of certain additional information on production, inventories and international transfers of nuclear material and on exports of certain relevant equipment and non-nuclear material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-12-01

    The document reproduces the text of the note verbale received by the Director General on 30 November 1992 from the Permanent Missions to the Agency of Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Portugal, Spain and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, relating to the provision of certain additional information on production, inventories and international transfer of nuclear material and on exports of certain relevant equipment and non-nuclear material. The note verbale dated 23 November 1992, received by the Director General from the Commission of the European Communities and relating to the same subject, is reproduced as well

  16. Evolution of international nuclear cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldschmidt, Bertrand

    1978-01-01

    The various stages of the history of the International Cooperation in nuclear matters are reviewed: isolationism period at the end of the war with the anglosaxon monopoly; opening period with the 1955 Geneva Conference and the creation of organisms within the framework of Euratom (the six European countries), of OCED (NEA) and of UNO (IAEA); industrial realizations period with Euratom research centres (Ispra, Geel, Karlsruhe and Petten) and the NEA enterprises (Halden, Dragon project, Eurochemic). The international industrial accords in the domains of exploitation and uranium enrichment are recalled and the program for the international evaluating of the fuel cycle (INFCE) is mentioned [fr

  17. International agreements on nuclear weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dombey, N.

    1982-01-01

    The satellite detection of a nuclear explosion in the South Atlantic and Israel's destruction of a research reactor in Iraq make it essential to strengthen existing monitoring and enforcement programs to prevent proliferation. While there was no reliable evidence that either South Africa or Iraq was violating non-proliferation agreements, worst case scenarios can demonstrate to unfriendly countries that South Africa had diverted fuel to test a nuclear weapon and that Iraq is intending to produce weapons-grade plutonium 239. The situation can be improved by formulating better terms and conditions for internationalizing access to materials. Nuclear suppliers need to agree on terms that will assure their customers that contracts for civil programs will be honored. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), which includes both nuclear suppliers and customers, could achieve stronger agreements that take into account recent technological advances that will expand enrichment and reprocessing activities. 23 references, 1 figure

  18. General information about nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-04-01

    The following briefing notes were written to provide background information about nuclear power in Europe for journalists covering ENC 2002. They deal with four separate aspects of nuclear electricity generation: Economics; Environment; Safety; Waste Management. (authors)

  19. NEA, Nuclear law and information processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyners, P.

    1977-01-01

    NEA has for many years now been collating information on, and analysing, laws and regulations on the peaceful uses of nuclear energy, and this work has resulted in a series of publications. However, as seen by the multiplication of computer-based legal information centres, both at national and international level, conventional information systems are no longer adequate to deal with the increasing volume of information and with users' needs. In view of the particular aspects of nuclear law and of its own availabilities, NEA has endeavoured to make the best possible use of existing structures by opting for participation in the IAEA International Nuclear Information System rather than by creating a specialised centre. Before becoming operational, the arrangements concluded between NEA and IAEA required that the INIS rules be altered somewhat to take account of the specific problems raised by treatment of legal literature and also to improve the quality of information provided to users. (auth.) [fr

  20. International Nuclear Model. Volume 3. Program description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andress, D.

    1985-01-01

    This is Volume 3 of three volumes of documentation of the International Nuclear Model (INM). This volume presents the Program Description of the International Nuclear Model, which was developed for the Nuclear and Alternate Fuels Division (NAFD), Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), US Department of Energy (DOE). The International Nuclear Model (INM) is a comprehensive model of the commercial nuclear power industry. It simulates economic decisions for reactor deployment and fuel management decision based on an input set of technical economic and scenario parameters. The technical parameters include reactor operating characteristics, fuel cycle timing and mass loss factors, and enrichment tails assays. Economic parameters include fuel cycle costs, financial data, and tax alternatives. INM has a broad range of scenario options covering, for example, process constraints, interregional activities, reprocessing, and fuel management selection. INM reports reactor deployment schedules, electricity generation, and fuel cycle requirements and costs. It also has specialized reports for extended burnup and permanent disposal. Companion volumes to Volume 3 are: Volume 1 - Model Overview, and Volume 2 - Data Base Relationships

  1. ENS PIME 2000: 12th international workshop on nuclear public information in practice. Transactions: Case studies, discussion documents, posters, videos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    Papers presented at this Meeting were devoted to the following main subjects: European key issues concerning nuclear power; Workshop dealing with building and maintaining media relations; Climatic change; waste management; siting new NPPs, INES scale revisited; contacts of regulators with the public; Ethics and nuclear energy.

  2. ENS PIME 2000: 12th international workshop on nuclear public information in practice. Transactions: Case studies, discussion documents, posters, videos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Papers presented at this Meeting were devoted to the following main subjects: European key issues concerning nuclear power; Workshop dealing with building and maintaining media relations; Climatic change; waste management; siting new NPPs, INES scale revisited; contacts of regulators with the public; Ethics and nuclear energy

  3. International safeguards and nuclear terrorism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moglewer, S.

    1987-01-01

    This report provides a critical review of the effectiveness of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards against potential acts of nuclear terrorism. The author argues that IAEA safeguards should be made applicable to deterring diversions of nuclear materials from civil to weapons purposes by subnational groups as well as by nations. Both technical and institutional factors are considered, and suggestions for organizational restructuring and further technical development are made. Awareness of the necessity for effective preventive measures is emphasized, and possible directions for further effort are suggested

  4. International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leigh, I.W.

    1992-05-01

    As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need exists costs for a ready source of information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book has been compiled to meet that need. The information contained in the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book has been obtained from many unclassified sources: nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECD/NMEA activities reports; and proceedings of conferences and workshops. The data listed typically do not reflect any single source but frequently represent a consolidation/combination of information

  5. International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leigh, I W; Mitchell, S J

    1990-01-01

    As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need has developed for a ready source of information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book was compiled to meet that need. The information contained in the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book has been obtained from many unclassified sources: nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECD/NEA activities reports; proceedings of conferences and workshops, etc. The data listed do not reflect any one single source but frequently represent a consolidation/combination of information.

  6. International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leigh, I.W.; Mitchell, S.J.

    1990-01-01

    As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need has developed for a ready source of information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book was compiled to meet that need. The information contained in the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book has been obtained from many unclassified sources: nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECD/NEA activities reports; proceedings of conferences and workshops, etc. The data listed do not reflect any one single source but frequently represent a consolidation/combination of information

  7. INIS: Nuclear information helping the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atieh, T.

    2005-01-01

    The International Nuclear Information System of the IAEA, called INIS is the leading information source on peaceful application of nuclear sciences and technology. It is based on international cooperation and decentralized responsibilities. The INIS secretariat cooperates with 114 national and 19 international centres. INIS comprises more than 2.6 mill bibliographic references and more than 600 non-conventional full text papers. INIS assists the user to locate information in his/her field of interest over the time and informs about colleagues as well as the locations of research. INIS offers a single point of access to current and historical information, reliable and value-added information, ensures worldwide visibility for the researcher and addresses the need of developing and developed countries

  8. International Nuclear Safety Center (INSC) database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sofu, T.; Ley, H.; Turski, R.B.

    1997-01-01

    As an integral part of DOE's International Nuclear Safety Center (INSC) at Argonne National Laboratory, the INSC Database has been established to provide an interactively accessible information resource for the world's nuclear facilities and to promote free and open exchange of nuclear safety information among nations. The INSC Database is a comprehensive resource database aimed at a scope and level of detail suitable for safety analysis and risk evaluation for the world's nuclear power plants and facilities. It also provides an electronic forum for international collaborative safety research for the Department of Energy and its international partners. The database is intended to provide plant design information, material properties, computational tools, and results of safety analysis. Initial emphasis in data gathering is given to Soviet-designed reactors in Russia, the former Soviet Union, and Eastern Europe. The implementation is performed under the Oracle database management system, and the World Wide Web is used to serve as the access path for remote users. An interface between the Oracle database and the Web server is established through a custom designed Web-Oracle gateway which is used mainly to perform queries on the stored data in the database tables

  9. International nuclear fuel cycle evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witt, P.

    1980-01-01

    In the end of February 1980, the two-years work on the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation (INFCE) was finished in Vienna with a plenary meeting. INFCE is likely to have been a unique event in the history of international meetings: It was ni diplomatic negotiation meeting, but a techno-analytical investigation in which the participants tenaciously shuggled for many of the formulations. Starting point had been a meeting initiated by President Carter in Washington in Oct. 1979 after the World Economy Summit Meeting in London. The results of the investigation are presented here in a brief and popular form. (orig./UA) [de

  10. Keynote address: International nuclear cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, R.T.

    1989-01-01

    These meetings provide an important opportunity for the nuclear community to assess the scope and direction of its wide-ranging activities. Nuclear technology has given us the tools to understand and shape our physical environment in ways which can solve ancient problems of health, food supply, energy, and many others which affect the quality of our lives. International cooperation is necessary to secure the peaceful benefits of nuclear technology. Meeting global energy needs must be high on any priority list of issues for the coming decade and the 21st century. The satisfaction of energy needs is today and will increasingly be a crucial factor in international stability. Hand in hand with the need to assure energy sufficiency is the need to assure the long-term protection of the environment. Three key elements that give a useful framework for approaching the future of nuclear cooperation are technological factors, economic issues, and political acceptability. Technological avenues to greater safety must be vigorously pursued. Economic alternatives must be identified and objectively weighed. Most important of all, the framework of public confidence must be strengthened

  11. Nuclear information seminar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The fourth meeting of this type (previous ones were held in 1976, 1977, and 1980) presented papers from ten speakers representing Canadian nuclear power utilities, contractors, and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. Topics discussed were: the development of nuclear power in Canada and elsewhere, potential use of CANDU reactors for steam generation, waste management, public perceptions, and comparison of nuclear power with coal-fired plants in western Canada

  12. International nuclear energy law - present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrie, G.N.

    1988-01-01

    International nuclear energy law, as discussed in this article, is the law relating to the global, peaceful uses of nuclear science and technology. The position of nuclear law in the wide realm of law itself as well as the present status of nuclear legislation is assessed. This article also covers the development of international nuclear energy law, from the first nuclear law - the New Zealand Atomic Energy Act of 1945-, the present and the future. National and international organizations concerned with nuclear energy and their contribribution to nuclear law are reviewed

  13. International Nuclear Safeguards Inspection Support Tool (INSIST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    St. Pierre, D.E.; Steinmaus, K.L.; Moon, B.D.

    1994-07-01

    DOE is committed to providing technologies to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to meet escalating monitoring and inspection requirements associated with the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT). One example of technology provided to the IAEA is the information management and remote monitoring capabilities being customized for the IAEA by the International Safeguards Division of the Office of Non-Proliferation and National Security. The ongoing Safeguards Information Management Systems (SIMS) program is an interlaboratory effort providing the IAEA with a range of information management capabilities designed to enhance the effectiveness of their nuclear inspection activities. The initial commitment involved the customization of computer capabilities to provide IAEA with the basic capability to geographically organize, store, and retrieve the large quantity of information involved in their nuclear on site inspection activities in Iraq. This initial system, the International Nuclear Safeguards Inspection Support Tool (INSIST), was developed by DOE's Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). To date, two INSIST workstations have been deployed at the IAEA. The first has been used to support the IAEA Action Team in the inspection of Iraqi nuclear facilities since August 1993. A second, and similar, workstation has been deployed to support environmental monitoring under the IAEA 93+2 Programme. Both INSIST workstations geographically integrate analog (video) and digital data to provide an easy to use and effective tool for storing retrieving and displaying multimedia site and facility information including world-wide maps, satellite and aerial imagery, on site photography, live inspection videos, and treaty and inspection textual information. The interactive, UNIX-based workstations have a variety of peripheral devices for information input and output. INSIST software includes commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) modules and application-specific code developed at PNL

  14. Topical problems of nuclear law viewed internationally

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bischof, W.

    1978-01-01

    The International Nuclear Law Association, on its 3rd Congress Nuclear Inter Jura from October 2-5, 1977 in Italy, dealt with a number of topical problems of nuclear law, in particular aspects concerning agreements in connection with the construction of nuclear facilities, the influence of nuclear energy on the environment and the public acceptance, third party liability, and nuclear insurance, radiation protection law and international judicial problems. (orig.) [de

  15. Information Warfare and International Law

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Greenberg, Lawrence T; Goodman, Seymour E; Soo Hoo, Kevin J

    1998-01-01

    .... Some legal constraints will certainly apply to information warfare, either because the constraints explicitly regulate particular actions, or because more general principles of international law...

  16. The Nuclear Fuel Cycle Information System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-02-01

    The Nuclear Fuel Cycle Information System (NFCIS) is an international directory of civilian nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Its purpose is to identify existing and planned nuclear fuel cycle facilities throughout the world and to indicate their main parameters. It includes information on facilities for uranium ore processing, refining, conversion and enrichment, for fuel fabrication, away-from-reactor storage of spent fuel and reprocessing, and for the production of zirconium metal and Zircaloy tubing. NFCIS currently covers 271 facilities in 32 countries and includes 171 references

  17. The international politics of nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blowers, A.; Lowry, D.; Solomon, B.D.

    1993-01-01

    This book depicts the wide diversity and the striking similarities in the international politics of nuclear waste management, using good organization and well defined terminology. The authors provide a background of geography, geology and demographics, and provide informed and common-sensical observations and conclusions. They question the ethics of leaving nuclear wastes where they are and waiting for better solutions, and they put forward a rational set of siting options, including coupling repository plans with environmental enhancement programs such as protection of coastal access, landscape improvements, and erosion control

  18. INTERNET and information about nuclear sciences. The world wide web virtual library: nuclear sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuruc, J.

    1999-01-01

    In this work author proposes to constitute new virtual library which should centralize the information from nuclear disciplines on the INTERNET, in order to them to give first and foremost the connection on the most important links in set nuclear sciences. The author has entitled this new virtual library The World Wide Web Library: Nuclear Sciences. By constitution of this virtual library next basic principles were chosen: home pages of international organizations important from point of view of nuclear disciplines; home pages of the National Nuclear Commissions and governments; home pages of nuclear scientific societies; web-pages specialized on nuclear problematic, in general; periodical tables of elements and isotopes; web-pages aimed on Chernobyl crash and consequences; web-pages with antinuclear aim. Now continue the links grouped on web-pages according to single nuclear areas: nuclear arsenals; nuclear astrophysics; nuclear aspects of biology (radiobiology); nuclear chemistry; nuclear company; nuclear data centres; nuclear energy; nuclear energy, environmental aspects of (radioecology); nuclear energy info centres; nuclear engineering; nuclear industries; nuclear magnetic resonance; nuclear material monitoring; nuclear medicine and radiology; nuclear physics; nuclear power (plants); nuclear reactors; nuclear risk; nuclear technologies and defence; nuclear testing; nuclear tourism; nuclear wastes; nuclear wastes. In these single groups web-links will be concentrated into following groups: virtual libraries and specialized servers; science; nuclear societies; nuclear departments of the academic institutes; nuclear research institutes and laboratories; centres, info links

  19. The Nuclear Criticality Information System: An update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koponen, B.L.

    1991-07-01

    The US Department of Energy's Nuclear Criticality Information System (NCIS) has served the criticality community for the past ten years with publications and with an online information system. NCIS provides a mean for widely distributed nuclear criticality specialists to communicate and work together instantly. Users of the system may receive assistance from all members of the NCIS community, which provides a much broader base of support than is available at any single site. When unified by NCIS, these diverse specialists provide a resource that has proven to be very useful in the safe handling of fissile material. NCIS also is a source of current nuclear criticality safety information; the rapid access of such up-to-date information on the handling of fissile materials outside of nuclear reactors is international in scope, extending beyond political and geographical boundaries

  20. Nuclear fusion and international cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Taijiro

    1987-01-01

    Work for design, research and development is expected to start in 1988 for a new nuclear fusion reactor called ITER (international thermonuclear experimental reactor), which is to be constructed and operated through cooperation among Japan, U.S., Soviet Union and EC. Many talks and discussions concerning the work have been made on various occasions, including the Reagan-Gorbachev talks at Geneva in November 1985, 5th Fusion Working Group meeting in Germany in January 1986, extraordinary FWG meeting at Tokyo in February-March 1986, 11th International Conference on Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion Control held under IAEA at Kyoto in November 1986, and first formal four-party (Japan, U.S., Soviet Union, EC) meeting at the IAEA headquarters in March this year. The ITER Technical Working Group was established and its first meeting was held on May 21 - 23, 1987. It was concluded in the meeting that the operation of ITER will be performed in two phases intended for nuclear combustion plasma physics studies and stationary operation, respectively. Major research and development activities carried out in the U.S., Europe, the Soviet Union, Japan and IAEA in connection with the development of ITER are outlined. (Nogami, K.)

  1. Information integration in control rooms and technical offices in nuclear power plants. Report prepared within the framework of the International Working Group on Nuclear Power Plant Control and Instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-11-01

    The majority of the nuclear power plants in the world were designed 25 to 45 years ago. The information, instrumentation, safety, and control systems in these plant designs were based on analog, relay, and primitive digital technology. Computers that were available when most of the nuclear power plants were built were unsophisticated compared with those currently available. These less powerful machines with limited computational capabilities and memory were used to collect and store information. The main means for obtaining information from the plant were analog meters and strip chart recorders. In many cases these pieces of data had to be integrated and correlated with other data manually, in order to be usable. Procedures and plant information resided on paper only and were frequently hard to find and access in a timely manner. This report provides guidance to help with the integration of information in order to enhance the usability and usefulness of the information. It can also be used to help avoid the pitfalls that can occur when implementing new systems with respect to the information they need and produce. This reports philosophy is based on three important issues that allow the convenient structuring of the problem and to keep all of its important features. The first issue is the process of information systems integration and use. This is achieved by long term planning and the creation of the plant infrastructure plan. The second is to take care of the end users' needs in relation to their abilities. This is realized through analyses of user needs. Third is the design of the human-system interface (HSI), for example to distinguish between types of information for use in the plant control room and in technical offices. The development of this report was initiated by the IAEA International Working Group on Nuclear Power Plant Control and Instrumentation (IWG-NPPCI). It is a logical follow-up to IAEA-TECDOC-1016, Modernization of Instrumentation and Control

  2. Nuclear risk and citizen information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charbonneau, S.

    1999-01-01

    This issue studies the citizen information relative to the nuclear risk. If the regulation about the information and the participation of the citizen on the nuclear risk is relatively complete, the industrial and administrative practice is marked by the habits of information retention. The official caution has for motive the fact to provoke the unjustified anxiety of the populations. An opposite strategy is actually experimented with the operators of nuclear industry in informing the public opinion with the slightest technical incidents. (N.C.)

  3. International students’ information seeking behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldegård, Jette Seiden

    2016-01-01

    This report presents the first results and reflections from an exploratory case study carried out at The Royal School of Library and Information Science in 2015 on international students’ information seeking behavior. A convenient sample of five international master students participated...

  4. International views on nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birkhofer, A.

    2002-01-01

    Safety has always been an important objective in nuclear technology. Starting with a set of sound physical principles and prudent design approaches, safety concepts have gradually been refined and cover now a wide range of provisions related to design, quality and operation. Research, the evaluation of operating experiences and probabilistic risk assessments constitute an essential basis and international co-operation plays a significant role in that context. Concerning future developments a major objective for new reactor concepts, such as the EPR, is to practically exclude a severe core damage accident with large scale consequences outside the plant. (author)

  5. International collaboration for nuclear competence building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haapalehto, T.; Storey, P.

    2004-01-01

    The life cycle of the nuclear industry is no different to that of any other industry, indeed to most forms of human activity: birth, growth, maturity, decline, rebirth and renewal or death. As a result of the twin facets of long time scales and essential technical competence the industry now faces two problems: how to retain existing skills and competences for the 50 plus years that a plant is operating and how to develop and retain new skills and competences in the areas of decommissioning and radioactive waste management. Different countries are at different stages of the nuclear technology life cycle, a competence that may have declined or be lost in one country may be strong in another. And therein lies one solution to the problems the sector faces - international collaboration. The initiatives such as the NEA Halden project and the Generation IV International Forum lay a ground for quiet optimism that collaboration, information exchange and exchange of personnel continue to be an integral part of the development of nuclear power. Also there is evidence that myriad initiatives are underway in the area of nuclear education and training. Though, national surveys show that still more engineers and scientists having nuclear knowledge are required than are graduating. (author)

  6. International nuclear panorama; Panorama nucleaire international

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This document takes stock on the nuclear power in the world. The nuclear power place in the energy policy of many countries is discussed and the development programs are presented. It seems that the USA attitude, favourable to a development of nuclear power plants, had an real impact on the other countries energy policy. (A.L.B.)

  7. Scottish Nuclear's information systems strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inglis, P.

    1991-01-01

    Scottish Nuclear, the company which has owned and operated Scotland's nuclear power generating capacity since privatization, inherited a substantial amount of computer hardware and software from its predecessor, the South of Scotland Electricity Board. Each of the two power stations, Torness and Hunterston, were using Digital Vax clusters as the Scottish Nuclear company was formed. This had a major influence on the information systems strategy which has subsequently been adopted. (UK)

  8. Nuclear knowledge and information management in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pleslic, S.; Novosel, N.

    2004-01-01

    Since the IAEA was authorized for exchange of technical and scientific information on peaceful uses of atomic energy, it established INIS in 1970 as an international bibliographic database in nuclear field and in nuclear related areas. All Member States, which are at different levels of technological development, could derive benefits from INIS output products and get the support from the IAEA in systematic knowledge preservation and information exchange. Intention is the transferring of practical experience to the younger generation and the archiving of important information. Croatia is successfully involved in activities in knowledge and information management from 1994 when joined INIS. Accumulation of knowledge including technical information in databases and documents, and knowledge of scientists, engineers, researchers and technicians is base for the use of nuclear technology. Nuclear knowledge and information exchange are important for process of decision-making. Thanks to development and application of new information technologies within INIS information management framework, Members improve the collection, production and dissemination of nuclear knowledge and information. (author)

  9. International Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Naohiko; Dunaeva, Svetlana

    2010-11-01

    The activities of fourteen nuclear data centres are summarized, and their cooperation under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency is described. Each of the centres provides coverage for different geographical zones and/or specific types of nuclear data, thus together providing a complete service for users worldwide. The International Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres (NRDC) was established with the objective of providing nuclear physics databases that are required for nuclear technology (encompassing energy and non-energy applications) by coordinating the collection, compilation and dissemination of nuclear data on an international scale. (author)

  10. 10. anniversary International School of Nuclear Law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    session. ISNL alumni now count more than 500 participants who come from all around the world, and represent various governmental and non-governmental institutions, different nationalities and cultures, different levels of education and experience and diverse age groups. They have all contributed to the further enhancement of the programme and today, the significant educational value of the ISNL is undisputed. In addition to an intensive programme of lectures, case studies and discussion periods, participants benefit from the knowledge and enthusiasm of guest speakers and mentors, the link to the University of Montpellier 1 and its facilities, and an ideal location in the beautiful South of France. All these elements contribute to what can only be called a close community of ISNL members, most of whom remain in contact well beyond their two-week stay in Montpellier. The ISNL's focus will remain on the professional needs of participants and will strive to provide the best possible education to help them understand the scope and complexity of international nuclear law. The information and illustrations of this brochure provide, in a relaxed and informal style, an overview of the past nine sessions

  11. Potential information requirements for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disbrow, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that the Energy Information Administration (EIA) has performed analyses of the requirements for data and information for the management of commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) designated for disposal under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA). Subsequently, the EIA collected data on the amounts and characteristics of SNF stored at commercial nuclear facilities. Most recently, the EIA performed an analysis of the international and domestic laws and regulations which have been established to ensure the safeguarding, accountability, and safe management of special nuclear materials (SNM). The SNM of interest are those designated for permanent disposal by the NWPA. This analysis was performed to determine what data and information may be needed to fulfill the specific accountability responsibilities of the Department of Energy (DOE) related to SNF handling, transportation, storage and disposal; to work toward achieving a consistency between nuclear fuel assembly identifiers and material weights as reported by the various responsible parties; and to assist in the revision of the Nuclear Fuel Data Form RW-859 used to obtain spent nuclear fuel characteristics data from the nuclear utilities

  12. Information Sharing and International Taxation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keen, M.; Ligthart, J.E.

    2004-01-01

    The sharing between national tax authorities of taxpayer-specific information has emerged over the last few years as a-probably "the"-central issue in the formation of international tax policy.Yet this refocusing of the debate on international taxation-away from parametric tax coordination and

  13. International Legal Framework for Nuclear Security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, G.M.

    2010-01-01

    The responsibility for nuclear security rests entirely with each State. There is no single international instrument that addresses nuclear security in a comprehensive manner. The legal foundation for nuclear security comprises international instruments and recognized principles that are implemented by national authorities. Security systems at the national level will contribute to a strengthened and more universal system of nuclear security at the international level. The binding security treaties are; Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material, the 2005 amendment thereto, Safeguards Agreements between the Agency and states required in Connection with the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons. Model Protocol additional to agreement(s) between State(s) and the Agency for the application of Safeguards Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident, Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency, Convention on Nuclear Safety, Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management

  14. Development of international law concerning nuclear liability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ifflaender, G.; Kantner, G.

    1979-01-01

    A short overview is given of the most important international conventions relating to civil liability for damage to, or loss of, life of persons or property, caused by nuclear incidents during the operation of stationary and non-stationary nuclear installations or transport of nuclear material. In accord with the international provisions, in the German Democratic Republic too, nuclear operators are exclusively liable for such damage unless it has been caused intentionally by the injury party. (author)

  15. Nuclear explosion and internal contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aeberhardt, A.

    1956-01-01

    By the study of the conditions of internal contamination due to the radioactive mixture produced by a nuclear explosion, the parts played by the relative weights of the different elements and the mode of expression of the doses are considered. Only the knowledge of the weight composition of the contamination mixture and of its evolution as a function of time can provide the required basis for the study of its metabolism in the organism. The curves which give the composition of the fission product mixture - in number of nuclei - - as a function of time - have been established. These curves are applied to some practical examples, particularly relative to the nature of contamination, radiotoxicity of some elements and assessment of hazards. (author) [fr

  16. The international dimensions of nuclear safety standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    The paper reviews the activities of the major international organisations in the field of nuclear safety standards; the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the OECD's Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) and the Commission of the European Communities. Each organisation encourages the concept of international nuclear safety standards. After Chernobyl, there were calls for some form of binding international nuclear safety standards. Many Member States of IAEA accepted these Codes as a suitable basis for formulating their national safety standards, but the prevailing view was that voluntary compliance with the Codes was the preferred path. With few reactor vendors in a limited international market, the time may be approaching when an internationally licensable nuclear reactor is needed. Commonly accepted safety standards would be a prerequisite. The paper discusses the issues involved and the complexities of standards making in the international arena. (author)

  17. International Youth Nuclear Congress 2000: Youth, Future, Nuclear. Transactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-04-01

    The publication has been set up as abstracts of the meeting dealing with different nuclear problems. In the work of the International Youth Nuclear Congress 2000 participated more than 200 young scientific works from 28 countries. The address discusses the following issues: Nuclear education and transfer of know-how; Nuclear technology; Political aspects; Environment and safety; Communication and public perception; Economics; Nuclear programs and technical cooperation; Fuel Cycle Challenges.

  18. International Youth Nuclear Congress 2000: Youth, Future, Nuclear. Transactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-04-01

    The publication has been set up as abstracts of the meeting dealing with different nuclear problems. In the work of the International Youth Nuclear Congress 2000 participated more than 200 young scientific works from 28 countries. The address discusses the following issues: Nuclear education and transfer of know-how; Nuclear technology; Political aspects; Environment and safety; Communication and public perception; Economics; Nuclear programs and technical cooperation; Fuel Cycle Challenges

  19. Nuclear information for video presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalton, J.

    1979-01-01

    In an effort to help calm the turbulence left in the wake of the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear accident, the Georgia Society of Professional Engineers sponsored the production of a video tape on the inner workings of a nuclear power plant. A 30-minute segment was shown on public television and a longer version is being prepared for use on a commercial network. The tape is neither pro nor con in the multitude of issues surrounding the future of nuclear energy. It simply gives a layman's tour of a nuclear power plant and hopes to provide the public with objective information on how nuclear power is generated. The article discusses the background of the taping program project, and how it was put together

  20. Nuclear technology databases and information network systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwata, Shuichi; Kikuchi, Yasuyuki; Minakuchi, Satoshi

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the databases related to nuclear (science) technology, and information network. Following contents are collected in this paper: the database developed by JAERI, ENERGY NET, ATOM NET, NUCLEN nuclear information database, INIS, NUclear Code Information Service (NUCLIS), Social Application of Nuclear Technology Accumulation project (SANTA), Nuclear Information Database/Communication System (NICS), reactor materials database, radiation effects database, NucNet European nuclear information database, reactor dismantling database. (J.P.N.)

  1. International and national organizations within nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandstroem, S.

    1975-03-01

    A survey is given of the organization, objective and action of international and national organizations working with nuclear energy. Five types of organizations are treated: international governmental organizations, international non-governmental organizations, international organizations dealing with ionizing radiation, nordic organizations, and Swedish organizations. Special attention is payed to the Swedish participation in the different organizations. (K.K)

  2. International nuclear cooperation in Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Yong-Kyu

    1987-01-01

    Nuclear power project traditionally involve huge financial investment, highly sophisticated technology, and long lead time. Many countries, particularly developing ones, find it impossible to implement their nuclear power programs without technical cooperation and assistance from advanced countries. In this Asia and Pacific Region, seven countries have commercial nuclear power units in operation and/or under construction. Korea has six nuclear power units in operation, and three under construction. Active nuclear cooperation has been instrumental in implementing her abmitious nuclear power programs successfully. Nuclear cooperation is one of the widely recognized necessities, which is quite often talked about among the countries of the Asia and Pacific Region. But the differences in nuclear maturity and national interests among those in the region seem to be standing against it. Given the constraints, it is not easy to select appropriate areas for cooperation. There is no doubt, however, that they should include the nuclear policy, nuclear safety, radwaste management, radiological protection, and the management of nuclear units. In order to effectively promote nuclear cooperation in the Region, the scope of RCA activities must be expanded to include the nuclear power area. The Regional Nuclear Data Bank, the Regional Training Center and the Nuclear Emergency Response Center, for example, would be the effective tools for cooperation to meet the demands of the countries in the Region. In view of the technological gap between Japan and all others in the region, we cannot speak of a regional nuclear cooperation without heavily counting on Japan, the most advanced nuclear state in the region. For these reasons, Japan is expected to share an increasing portion of her nuclear technology with others. (author)

  3. Nuclear insurance in the future Internal Market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller-Stein, J.

    1991-01-01

    Summarizing, it is prognosticated that nuclear insurance practice will not drastically change on account of the Internal Market. This assumption is based on the unanimous estimation of the nuclear energy risk by the international insurance industry, as is documented by their traditional good cooperation in pools. (orig.) [de

  4. Establishment of an international nuclear safety body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, M.

    1983-01-01

    During the past year there has been increasing interest in the establishment of new international mechanisms for developing a more uniform approach to nuclear safety. The tasks, organizational nature and affiliation, composition and structure, and financial support of an international nuclear safety body are discussed in the article

  5. Spanish Nuclear Safety Research under International Frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herranz, L. E.; Reventos, F.; Ahnert, C.; Jimenez, G.; Queral, C.; Verdu, G.; Miro, R.; Gallardo, S.

    2013-10-01

    The Nuclear Safety research requires a wide international collaboration of several involved groups. In this sense this paper pretends to show several examples of the Nuclear Safety research under international frameworks that is being performed in different Universities and Research Institutions like CIEMAT, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya (UPC), Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (UPM) and Universitat Politenica de Valencia (UPV). (Author)

  6. International nuclear low and atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aouinet, Nejib

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this work is to put points on the codification of international law of nuclear energy and its uses in military and peaceful in the first part. The second part was devoted for the imperfection of the law of international nuclear.

  7. Nuclear Information and Knowledge, News from the Nuclear Information Section, No. 13, September 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-09-01

    This issue of the Nuclear Information and Knowledge Newsletter conveys some general information about the Nuclear Information Section and its activities. Special emphasis was placed on the INIS Collection search application. This search application is based on Google technology and represents the main access point not only to the INIS collection of 3.4 million records, but also to the IAEA Library holdings. Combined together, the INIS and IAEA Library collections comprise one of the world's largest resources of published and unpublished information on the peaceful uses of nuclear science and technology. Articles on the International Nuclear Library Network (INLN) and digital preservation efforts are just some of the many INIS and IAEA Library activities. Recent mobile customization of the INIS website proves our commitment to bringing our products and services closer to scientists, researchers and students.

  8. International technical working group cooperation to counter illicit nuclear trafficking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.K.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The Nuclear Smuggling International Technical Working Group (ITWG) is an international group of nuclear forensic experts that cooperate to deter the illicit trafficking of nuclear materials. The objective of the ITWG is to provide a common approach and effective technical solutions to governments who request assistance in nuclear forensics. The ITWG was chartered in 1996 and since that time more than 28 nations and organizations have participated in 9 international meetings and 2 analytical round-robin trials. Soon after its founding the ITWG adopted a general framework to guide nuclear forensics investigations that includes recommendations for nuclear crime scene security and analysis, the best application of radioanalytical methods, the conduct of traditional forensic analysis of contaminated materials, and effective data analysis to interpret the history of seized nuclear materials. This approach has been adopted by many nations as they respond to incidents of illicit nuclear trafficking. ITWG members include policy and decision makers, law enforcement personnel, and scientists with expertise in, and responsibility for, nuclear forensics. It remains an association of active practitioners of nuclear forensics underwritten by funding from sponsoring countries and organizations. While the primary mission of the ITWG continues to be advancing the science and techniques of nuclear forensics and sharing technical and information resources to combat nuclear trafficking, recently the ITWG has focused on improvements to its organization and outreach. Central is the establishment of guidelines for best practices in nuclear forensics, conducting international exercises, promoting research and development, communicating with external organizations, providing a point-of-contact for nuclear forensics assistance, and providing mutual assistance in nuclear forensics investigations. By its very nature nuclear trafficking is a transboundary problem; nuclear materials

  9. Nuclear power information at the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiegelberg-Planer, R.

    1999-01-01

    The reliable and adequate supply of energy, and especially electricity, is necessary not only for economic development but, for economic and political stability. Since its establishment in the second half of the 20th century, nuclear power has evolved from the research and development stage to a mature industry that supplies more than 17% of the world's total electricity. Well designed, constructed and operated nuclear power plants have proved to be reliable, safe and economic. Although many countries are heavily reliant on nuclear power, in the last decade, expansion of nuclear power has been almost stagnating in the Western industrialized world, experiencing a low growth in Eastern Europe and expanding only in East Asia. On one side, one of the most important aims of the IAEA is to support the national effort to improve the nuclear power generation and to assist in promoting improvements in their safe, reliable and economic performance. On the other side, the IAEA also provides the only truly international forum for exchange, collection and dissemination of information in many areas related to nuclear energy. The Power Reactor Information System, PRIS, is one fundamental tool for these activities. The PRIS database is managed by the staff of the Nuclear Power Division in the IAEA. In the scope of PRIS various publications and reports have been published, as well as the IAEA has been satisfying request from Member States ranging from simple query to complex analysis. This paper presents an overview of the status of nuclear power world-wide and the related IAEA activities on collecting and disseminating nuclear power information. (author)

  10. Nuclear power information at the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiegelberg-Planer, R.

    2001-01-01

    The reliable and adequate supply of energy, and especially electricity, is necessary not only for economic development but, for economic and political stability. Since its establishment in the in the second half of the 20th century, nuclear power has evolved from the research and development stage to a mature industry that supplies more than 17% of the world's total electricity. Well designed, constructed and operated nuclear power plants have proved to be reliable, safe and economic. Although many countries are heavily reliant on nuclear power, in the last decade, expansion of nuclear power has been almost stagnating in the Western industrialized world, experiencing a low growth in Eastern Europe and expanding only in East Asia. On one side, one of the most important aims of the IAEA is to support the national effort to improve the nuclear power generation and to assist in promoting improvements in their safe, reliable and economic performance. On the other side, the IAEA also provides the only truly international forum for exchange, collection and dissemination of information in many areas related to nuclear energy. The Power Reactor Information System, PRIS, is one fundamental tool for these activities. The PRIS database is managed by the staff of the Nuclear Power Division in the IAEA. In the scope of PRIS various publications and reports have been published, as well as the IAEA has been satisfying request from Member States ranging from simple query to complex analysis. This paper presents an overview of the status of nuclear power world-wide and the related IAEA activities on collecting and disseminating nuclear power information. (author)

  11. International Nuclear Waste Management Fact Book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leigh, I.W.

    1994-05-01

    International Nuclear Waste Management Fact Book has been compiled in an effort to provide current data concerning fuel cycle and waste management facilities, R ampersand D programs, and key personnel in 24 countries, including the US, four multinational agencies and 21 nuclear societies. This publication succeeds the previously issued International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book (PNL-3594), which appeared annually for 13 years. While the title is different, there are no substantial changes in the content

  12. A strategy study on international nuclear cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Hong Rae; Kim, Kyung Pyo; Kim, Young Min; Shin, Kyung Hye; Yoon, Sung Won; Lee, Myung Ho; Lee, Jong Hee; Hong Young Don

    1995-12-01

    The implementing methodologies suggested from this study cover the following: 1) strategies for the promotion of the nation's leading roles in such international organizations as the IAEA and OECD/NEA; 2) strategies for the implementation of national nuclear policy, positively coping with international nuclear trends; 3) strategies for the promotion of technical cooperation with the Russian Federation to introduce essential nuclear technology by utilizing its new environment of science and technology. 39 tabs., 28 figs., 64 refs. (Author)

  13. International co-operation through scientific and technical nuclear societies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manning Muntzing, L.

    1983-01-01

    As an international organization the American Nuclear Society (ANS) has played an active role in international co-operation of nuclear technology exchange since its establishment in 1954. The ANS has a membership of over 13,000 individuals, of whom approximately 1200 live overseas in forty countries. To carry out the goals of the Society, local sections have been established. Currently the ANS maintains 48 local sections in the United States of America and 8 overseas local sections in Africa, Asia, Europe and South America. The ANS also has formal agreements for co-operation with The Asociacion Argentina de Tecnologia Nuclear (AATN), the Israel Nuclear Society (INS), and the Chinese Nuclear Society (CNS). In 1977 the Japan Atomic Energy Society (JAES), the European Nuclear Society (ENS), and the ANS co-operation in sponsoring the First International Conference on Transfer of Nuclear Technology (ICONTT I) in Tehran, Iran. In 1982, the Second International Conference on Transfer of Nuclear Technology (ICONTT II), Buenos Aires, Argentina, was sponsored through the co-operation of the AATN, the ENS and the ANS. The ANS and its overseas sections sponsor the Pacific Basin Conference approximately every three years to discuss nuclear matters of concern to the countries around the Pacific Ocean. In 1981 the ANS held a Nuclear Technology Exhibit in Beijing, the People's Republic of China. In addition to meetings, the ANS is extensively involved in the co-operative exchange of applied nuclear research information through its publications. Nuclear Technology, a technical journal, is published monthly under joint ownership of the ENS and the ANS. The ANS has been a leader in voluntary standards development since 1958. In its dedication to the co-operation of international nuclear technology the ANS maintains a comprehensive international exchange of nuclear standards

  14. Case studies: Managing nuclear information in Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oviedo, L.G.

    2004-01-01

    The advances in the managing of nuclear information in Colombia are present, this has allowed recapturing the activities starting from 1999 contributing the INIS the results of the investigations related with the AIEA mission, for benefit of the international scientific community. Thanks to the support of the directive and to my own managing, year after year the efforts are reflected, through a constant increase of the records to the INIS, like in the participation in the RRIAN in Latin America. (author)

  15. South Africa: The Good International Nuclear Citizen?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maitre, Emmanuelle

    2016-01-01

    Since South Africa destroyed its nuclear arsenal, it has claimed the status of 'good international nuclear citizen', a position confirmed by its engagement in the nonproliferation regime. Pretoria plays a bridge-building role between states with and without nuclear weapons as well as in instances of proliferation. Recent changes have raised doubts around its position, a movement which could threaten South Africa's nuclear diplomacy

  16. Thirteen international workshop on nuclear theory. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This brochure contains the abstracts of reports delivered by 40 participants at the 13. International Workshop on Nuclear Theory organized by the Nuclear Theory Group in the Institute for Nuclear research and Nuclear Energy of the Bulgarian academy of Sciences. The main topics treated in the lectures were nucleon correlation effects in nuclei, collective nuclear motions, Wigner quantum systems, pre-equilibrium neutron and photon emission from nuclei, particle-nuclei collision processes at high energies, few-body states, optical potential for neutron-nucleus scattering, relativistic generator coordinate calculations and variational nuclear structure calculations. All reports are included in INIS separately

  17. International nuclear fuel cycle fact book. Revision 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, K.M.; Lakey, L.T.; Leigh, I.W.; Jeffs, A.G.

    1986-01-01

    The International Fuel Cycle Fact Book has been compiled in an effort to provide (1) an overview of worldwide nuclear power and fuel cycle programs and (2) current data concerning fuel cycle and waste management facilities, R and D programs and key personnel. Additional information on each country's program is available in the International Source Book: Nuclear Fuel Cycle Research and Development, PNL-2478, Rev. 2

  18. International nuclear fuel cycle fact book. Revision 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmon, K.M.; Lakey, L.T.; Leigh, I.W.; Jeffs, A.G.

    1986-01-01

    The International Fuel Cycle Fact Book has been compiled in an effort to provide (1) an overview of worldwide nuclear power and fuel cycle programs and (2) current data concerning fuel cycle and waste management facilities, R and D programs and key personnel. Additional information on each country's program is available in the International Source Book: Nuclear Fuel Cycle Research and Development, PNL-2478, Rev. 2.

  19. Assuring nuclear energy's future through international co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upson, P.

    1999-01-01

    It is invited lecture as the introduction to the sixt international meeting entitled Nuclear Energy in Central Europe. Good commercial operation, public information and education are needed to win the confidence of the public, and to attract young people to take over the industry's founding generation. Stimulating international co-operation and transfer of best practices can assure this happens across the whole of the Europian nuclear industry

  20. Stakeholder involvement in international conventions governing civil nuclear activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmerechts, Sam

    2017-01-01

    Mr Emmerechts explained that international conventions have varying positions on stakeholders and their involvement depending upon the intent of the legislator and the field they cover, ranging from a narrow to a broad interpretation. He addressed stakeholder involvement in two other international conventions governing civil nuclear activities, namely the Convention on Nuclear Safety, and the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management (the Joint Convention), both concluded under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). He noted that the Convention on Nuclear Safety remains a 'traditional' international legal instrument, focusing on governments and governmental bodies as the main stakeholders and limiting obligations regarding the involvement of the public and intergovernmental organisations to their receiving information and observing. Likewise, the Joint Convention limits obligations regarding public involvement to access to information, notably as to the siting of proposed facilities. However, he noted that in the European Union, the Directive on Nuclear Safety (2014/87/Euratom) and the Directive for the Safe Management of Spent Fuel and Radioactive Waste (2011/70/Euratom) have more advanced public participation requirements in nuclear decision making. Mr Emmerechts explained that the substantial differences between nuclear legislation and the Aarhus and Espoo Conventions with regards to public involvement requirements could partly be explained by the technicality of nuclear information and by issues related to nuclear security

  1. Progress of international cooperation of nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Sadaaki; Ishikawa, Hidetaka; Eda, Hisao; Noda, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Ichiro; Kawahara, Akira; Nagano, Akira

    1999-01-01

    International cooperation on nuclear power technology under promotion of the Japan Electric Power Information Center can be divided roughly to two items: one is an assistant project of Japan Keirin Association and another is an international training of operation management and so forth on nuclear power plant trusted by Ministry of International Trade and Industry. Among upgrading needs of technical cooperation on nuclear power to the developing nations, the electric companies were received a request on private cooperation by the Ministry of International Trade and Industry. In 1985, it was decided that the nuclear power technical cooperation through an subsidy project of the Japan Keirin Association was advanced mainly by every electric companies as a window of the Japan Electric Power Information Center in Japan Electric Industry Association. And, by receiving another request, the Japan Electric Power Information Center began an international training on operation management and so one of the nuclear power plant since October, 1992. Here were introduced outlines of both technical cooperation on nuclear power and international training on operation management. (G.K.)

  2. Nuclear information and knowledge. News from the INIS and Nuclear Knowledge Management Section. No. 2, September 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-09-01

    This newsletter, a bi-annual publication, is aimed at informing about current developments in Nuclear Knowledge Management (NKM) and the International Nuclear Information System (INIS), in particular about usage of nuclear information and developing nuclear knowledge management programmes. This second issue constitutes a review of the year 2006 in these fields and informs about some planned activities for 2007. In particular the strategies, vision and mission of the International Nuclear Information System are outlined and the activities of the Nuclear Knowledge Management Unit in training the next generation of nuclear experts are described

  3. Nuclear Information and Knowledge. News from the Nuclear Information Section, No. 12, March 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-03-15

    This issue of the Nuclear Information and Knowledge newsletter is devoted to the topic of constant change. We start with a summary of INIS and IAEA Library activities in 2011, write about the introduction of the new INIS search system based on Google technology, and continue with the restructuring of the Department of Nuclear Energy (NE). This restructuring included the establishment of a new section to deal with synergetic aspects of information management in the form of modern library services combined with a powerful, and one of the world's largest, collections of published information on the peaceful uses of nuclear science and technology. Articles on the International Nuclear Library Network (INLN) and INIS in the World show just some of the ways to bring NIS products and services closer to the world of scientists, researchers and students around the world, while an article on eBooks in Libraries talks about a future beyond circulating collections.

  4. Nuclear Information and Knowledge. News from the Nuclear Information Section, No. 12, March 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-03-01

    This issue of the Nuclear Information and Knowledge newsletter is devoted to the topic of constant change. We start with a summary of INIS and IAEA Library activities in 2011, write about the introduction of the new INIS search system based on Google technology, and continue with the restructuring of the Department of Nuclear Energy (NE). This restructuring included the establishment of a new section to deal with synergetic aspects of information management in the form of modern library services combined with a powerful, and one of the world's largest, collections of published information on the peaceful uses of nuclear science and technology. Articles on the International Nuclear Library Network (INLN) and INIS in the World show just some of the ways to bring NIS products and services closer to the world of scientists, researchers and students around the world, while an article on eBooks in Libraries talks about a future beyond circulating collections.

  5. IAEA Nuclear Security Programme: The role of information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Discusses collecting and collating information on needs integrated in Nuclear Security Support Plans and analyzing data on illicit trafficking and nuclear security incidents. Coordination with donor States and international organizations on Illicit trafficking Database reports and other related information provided by states.

  6. The International Legal Framework for Nuclear Security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The term 'nuclear security' is generally accepted to mean 'the prevention and detection of, and response to, theft, sabotage, unauthorized access, illegal transfer or other malicious acts involving nuclear material, other radioactive substances or their associated facilities.' While the ultimate responsibility for nuclear security within a State rests entirely with that State, the need for regional and international cooperation has become increasingly evident with the growing recognition that the ability to prevent, detect and respond to the threats to nuclear security within one State is affected by the adequacy and effectiveness of nuclear security measures taken by other States, particularly when nuclear material is transported across national frontiers. Since the early 1970s, the IAEA has been called upon to play an ever increasing role in assisting States, upon request, to strengthen their national legal infrastructures and physical protection systems, as well as to facilitate regional and international efforts to enhance nuclear security, including measures to protect against nuclear terrorism. This publication brings together the legally binding primary international instruments and the internationally accepted non-binding instruments that constitute the international legal framework for nuclear security. It does not discuss the safety and safeguards related instruments, which also form a part of the broader legal framework for nuclear security. By setting out the legislative bases for the mandate of the IAEA in the area of nuclear security, it is hoped that this publication will increase awareness of the IAEA's role in facilitating national, regional and international efforts to enhance nuclear security , including measures to protect against nuclear terrorism. It is also intended to serve as a guide in carrying out the IAEA's nuclear security mandate and functions assigned to it under these instruments, including in the elaboration of nuclear security

  7. Visual Information Communications International Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen, Quang Vinh; Zhang, Kang; VINCI'09

    2010-01-01

    Visual Information Communication is based on VINCI'09, The Visual Information Communications International Conference, September 2009 in Sydney, Australia. Topics covered include The Arts of Visual Layout, Presentation & Exploration, The Design of Visual Attributes, Symbols & Languages, Methods for Visual Analytics and Knowledge Discovery, Systems, Interfaces and Applications of Visualization, Methods for Multimedia Data Recognition & Processing. This cutting-edge book addresses the issues of knowledge discovery, end-user programming, modeling, rapid systems prototyping, education, and design activities. Visual Information Communications is an edited volume whose contributors include well-established researchers worldwide, from diverse disciplines including architects, artists, engineers, and scientists. Visual Information Communication is designed for a professional audience composed of practitioners and researchers working in the field of digital design and visual communications. This volume i...

  8. Canadian involvement in international nuclear cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jennekens, Jon.

    1981-01-01

    Since 1945 Canada has been actively involved in the development of an international consensus on measures to prevent the proliferation of nuclear weapons. In parallel with this involvement, Canada has entered into cooperation agreements with several countries under which nuclear materials, equipment and facilities have been supplied in connection with the medical, industrial, agricultural and electrical power applications of nuclear energy. This paper summarizes the actions taken by Canada to encourage the peaceful uses of nuclear energy and to avoid the spread of nuclear weapons [fr

  9. Nuclear power - international and national dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanev, Ya.

    1994-01-01

    A strong internationalization of nuclear problems is observed recently. International links have acted as a powerful force for improvement of safety standards and plant performance. The prospects for nuclear industry, its safety and excellent operation, its acceptance and tolerance from society in general will strongly influence the future of nuclear power generation in Bulgaria. The most important problems of Bulgarian nuclear energy are: implementation of safety upgrading program; building and operating new nuclear units; developing infrastructure which will permit safe and reliable operation of the existing units and solve the fuel cycle problems in a reliable and acceptable by the society manner. (I.P.)

  10. Canadian involvement in international nuclear cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jennekens, J.

    1981-01-01

    Since 1945 Canada has been actively involved in the development of an international consensus on measures to prevent the proliferation of nuclear weapons. In parallel with this involvement, Canada has entered into cooperative agreements with several countries under which nuclear materials, equipment and facilities have been supplied in connection with the medical, industrial, agricultural and electrical power applications of nuclear energy. This paper summarizes the actions taken by Canada to encourage the peaceful uses of nuclear energy and to avoid the spread of nuclear weapons. (author)

  11. International Nuclear Security Education Network (INSEN): Promoting nuclear security education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhamad Samudi Yasir

    2013-01-01

    Full-text: The need for human resource development programmes in nuclear security was underlined at several International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) General Conferences and Board of Governors Meetings. Successive IAEA Nuclear Security Plans, the most recent of which was agreed by the Board of Governors in September 2009, give high priority to assisting States in establishing educational programmes in nuclear security in order to ensure the sustainability of nuclear security improvements. The current Nuclear Security Plan 1 covering 2010-2013 emphasizes on the importance of considering existing capacities at international, regional and national levels while designing nuclear security academic programmes. In the course of implementing the Plan, the IAEA developed a guide entitled Educational Programme in Nuclear Security (IAEA Nuclear Security Series No. 12) that consists of a model of a MAster of Science (M.Sc.) and a Certificate Programme in Nuclear Security. This guide was aims at assisting universities or other educational institutes to developed academic programmes in nuclear security. Independently, some universities already offered academic programmes covering some areas of nuclear security, while other universities have asked the IAEA to support the implementation of these programmes. In order to better address current and future request for assistance in this area, the IAEA establish a collaboration network-International Nuclear Security Education Network (INSEN), among universities who are providing nuclear security education or who are interested in starting an academic programme/ course(s) in nuclear security. Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM) is a first local university became a member of INSEN since the beginning of the establishment. (author)

  12. International nuclear fuel cycle evaluation (INFCE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlupp, C.

    1986-07-01

    The study describes and analyzes the structures, the procedures and decision making processes of the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation (INFCE). INFCE was agreed by the Organizing Conference to be a technical and analytical study and not a negotiation. The results were to be transmitted to governments for their consideration in developing their nuclear energy policies and in international discussions concerning nuclear energy cooperation and related controls and safeguards. Thus INFCE provided a unique example for decision making by consensus in the nuclear world. It was carried through under mutual respect for each country's choices and decisions, without jeopardizing their respective fuel cycle policies or international co-operation agreements and contracts for the peaceful use of nuclear energy, provided that agreed safeguards are applied. (orig.)

  13. Blended Learning in International Nuclear Education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, Z. [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    The spread of nuclear power ambitions beyond the few early-adopter nations requires more globalized education. Two of the learning problems specific to international education are the need for a common instructional language and different cultural styles of learning. Blended learning, a mix of personal interaction between teacher and impersonal computer-based learning, can solve these problems. The new KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School outside Ulsan, Korea is investing heavily in blended learning.

  14. Blended Learning in International Nuclear Education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, Z.

    2012-01-01

    The spread of nuclear power ambitions beyond the few early-adopter nations requires more globalized education. Two of the learning problems specific to international education are the need for a common instructional language and different cultural styles of learning. Blended learning, a mix of personal interaction between teacher and impersonal computer-based learning, can solve these problems. The new KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School outside Ulsan, Korea is investing heavily in blended learning

  15. International trade in nuclear fuel cycle services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, D.

    1989-01-01

    This paper analyses and discusses general trends in international trade in nuclear fuel cycle services with particular emphasis on the development of trading patterns between Europe, North America and the Far East. The paper also examines the role of collaborative ventures in the development of the nuclear industry. Barriers to international trade, the effect of government regulations and restrictions and the impact of non-proliferation issues are discussed. (author)

  16. International nuclear planning and manpower requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simnad, M.

    1977-01-01

    In the transfer of nuclear technology to developing countries one of the most pressing needs is the manpower requirements for the planning, construction, and operation of the nuclear power systems. The indigenous human resources of the respective countries must be educated and trained to a level commensurate with the demands of such an advanced and challenging technology. The issues to be addressed when discussing international nuclear planning and manpower requirements are summarized

  17. IAEA and the international nuclear law development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jankowitsh, O.

    1996-01-01

    This paper summarizes the different objectives of the IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) as far as nuclear energy use is concerned. It presents the status of the organization, its action int the non-proliferation treaty, and its work on the safeguard regulations. These measures have been taken during the Convention on nuclear safety in 1994. This convention concerns nuclear power plants as well as storage of radioactive wastes. (TEC)

  18. International Efforts for the Nuclear Security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Ho Sik; Kwak, Sung Woo; Lee, Ho Jin; Shim, Hye Won; Lee, Jong Uk

    2005-01-01

    Many concerns have been focused on the nuclear security since the 9.11. With increasing the threat related to nuclear material and nuclear facilities, the demand of strengthening the international physical protection system has been raised. Along with this, the international communities are making their efforts to increase nuclear security. The agreement of revising the 'Convention on Physical Protection of Nuclear Materials'(hereafter, CPPNM), which was held in Vienna on the July of 2005, was one of these efforts. U.N is also preparing the 'International Convention for the Suppression of Acts of Nuclear Terrorism' to show its firm resolution against nuclear terror. It is important to understand what measures should be taken to meet the international standard for establishing national physical protection system. To do this, international trend on the physical protection system such as CPPNM and U.N. convention should be followed. This paper explains about the content of the CPPNM and U.N convention. They will be helpful to consolidate the physical protection system in Korea

  19. 3.International conference 'Nuclear and Radiation Physics'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The 3-rd International Conference 'Nuclear and Radiation Physics' was held in Almaty (Kazakhstan) 4-7 June 2001. The primary purpose of the conference is consolidation of the scientists efforts in the area of fundamental and applied investigations on nuclear physics, radiation physics of solids and radioecology. In the conference more than 350 papers were presented by participants from 17 countries

  20. International conference on Asian nuclear prospects 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-10-01

    The proceedings of the second international conference on Asian nuclear prospects was held during October 10-13, 2010. The topics covered were atomic minerals exploration, fuels and fuel fabrication, fast reactor engineering and technology, thermal reactors, fuel reprocessing, materials development, nuclear instrumentation and electronics, reactor and environmental safety, waste management, knowledge management and HRD. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  1. Internal communication within the Slovak Nuclear Regulatory Authority

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seliga, Mojmir

    2000-01-01

    One of the primary objectives of the Slovak Nuclear Regulatory Authority (UJD) Public Relations Program is to make available to the public full and complete information on UJD activities to assist the public in making informed judgments regarding UJD activities. The primary means of keeping the public informed about the regulatory activities and programs of the UJD is through the news media. A central state administration body, the UJD provides on request within its province in particular information on operational safety of nuclear energy installations independently of those responsible for the nuclear programme, thereby allowing the public and the media to control data and information on nuclear installations. A major element of providing information is the demonstration that the area of nuclear energy uses has its binding rules in the Slovak Republic and the observance thereof is controlled by the state through an independent institution - UJD. As early as 1995 were laid on the UJD the foundations of the concept of broadly keeping the public informed on UJD activity and the safety of nuclear installations by opening the UJD Information Centre. Information Centre provides by its activity communications with the public and mass media, which is instrumental in creating in the public a favourable picture of the independent state nuclear regulation. Internal and external communications are equally important

  2. New Initiatives for International Cooperation for Nuclear Education in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strikhanov, M.

    2014-01-01

    Final remarks: Planned activities under the IAEA/MePhI cooperation - Assistance in implementing the IAEA initiative on Virtual Nuclear Management University; • Collecting and preserving information on peaceful use of nuclear science and technology through the Russian International Nuclear Information System (INIS) Center; • Assistance in implementing the educational laboratories of Virtual Nuclear laboratories for CLP4NET and T urbine-installation of NPP with VVER-1000 reactor“ simulator; • Develop and implement the selected courses using the CLP4NET or other suitable platform (3 Master’s degree programs on Nuclear Engineering, Nuclear Reactors and Nuclear Nonproliferation); • Assistance in implementing the IAEA/ICTP School of NKM, August 2014 ; • A set of regional workshops on “The role of computer-based educational laboratories in Nuclear Engineering University Programmes”. New possible activities under the IAEA umbrella - • Cooperation with regional networks; • Establish a new network for Nuclear Education (CIS, EvrAzES, …) and develop together with other countries curricula, training programs and training materials on nuclear power and non-power applications; • Build public awareness of the benefits of nuclear technology and its applications; Support the IAEA in implementation of the selected courses in Member States. • Cooperation with foreign nuclear universities and training organizations for development of master and bachelor programs and postgraduate training

  3. NCIS - a Nuclear Criticality Information System (overview)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koponen, B.L.; Hampel, V.E.

    1983-07-01

    A Nuclear Criticality Information System (NCIS) is being established at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in order to serve personnel responsible for safe storage, transport, and handling of fissile materials and those concerned with the evaluation and analysis of nuclear, critical experiments. Public concern for nuclear safety provides the incentive for improved access to nuclear safety information

  4. International Conference on Spin Observables of Nuclear Probes

    CERN Document Server

    Goodman, Charles; Walker, George; Spin Observables of Nuclear Probes

    1988-01-01

    The proceedings of the "International Conference on Spin Observables of Nuclear Probes" are presented in this volume. This conference was held in Telluride, Colorado, March 14 -17, 1988, and was the fourth in the Telluride series of nuclear physics conferences. A continuing theme in the Telluride conference series has been the complementarity of various intermediate-energy projectiles for elucidating the nucleon-nucleon interaction and nuclear structure. Earlier conferences have contributed significantly to an understanding of spin currents in nuclei, in particular the distribution of Gamow-Teller strength using charge-exchange reactions. The previous conference on "Antinucleon and Nucleon Nucleus Interactions" compared nuclear information from tra­ tional probes to recent results from antinucleon reactions. The 1988 conference on Spin Observables of Nuclear Probes, put special emphasis on spin observables and brought together experts using spin information to probe nuclear structure. Spin observabl...

  5. International nuclear energy organizations; Internationale Organisationen auf dem Gebiet der Kernenergie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-12-15

    The publication on International nuclear energy organizations describes the scope of work of the following organizations: IAEA, EURATOM, OECD-NEA, ENSREG, WANO, INSCEAR and ICRO. The issues covered by the organizations include nuclear electricity generation, radiation protection, nuclear safeguards, nuclear liability, public information, reactor safety, radioactive waste management, non-proliferation, marketing, safety technology, utility requirements, effects of nuclear radiation.

  6. Nuclear Fuel Cycle Information System. A directory of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. 2009 ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-04-01

    The Nuclear Fuel Cycle Information System (NFCIS) is an international directory of civilian nuclear fuel cycle facilities, published online as part of the Integrated Nuclear Fuel Cycle Information System (iNFCIS: http://www-nfcis.iaea.org/). This is the fourth hardcopy publication in almost 30 years and it represents a snapshot of the NFCIS database as of the end of 2008. Together with the attached CD-ROM, it provides information on 650 civilian nuclear fuel cycle facilities in 53 countries, thus helping to improve the transparency of global nuclear fuel cycle activities

  7. International cooperation in peaceful use of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filatkin, A.P.

    1985-01-01

    Main forms of international cooperation in peaceful use of nuclear energy are described. IAEA represents the organization called to establish the cooperation. For the purposes of wide nuclear power usage IAEA provides technical assistance to developing countries, conducting of meetings and conferences, accomplishes wide publishing activity and nuclear information exchange with the use of different data bases, including the INIS system, and coordinates the operating group activity through the INTOR program. Cooperation of socialist countries is accomplished in the framework of the CMEA. JINR, intimately connected with scientific organization of other countries including CERN, represents the center of nuclear investigations in socialist countries

  8. International co-operation in nuclear data evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordborg, C.

    2003-01-01

    The NEA Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Co-operation serves as a forum for the exchange of information on required improvements to evaluated nuclear data libraries used in all nuclear application areas. The main objective is to identify the major discrepancies in existing evaluated data libraries and to resolve these discrepancies in specifically established expert groups. The long-term goal is to have converging evaluated data libraries. This co-operative effort is very successful. It has resolved a number of outstanding nuclear data problems and has issued 15 reports in support of the studies undertaken jointly. (author)

  9. Information exchange of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan with nuclear societies worldwide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hori, Masao; Tomita, Yasushi

    2000-01-01

    The Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ) exchanges information with nuclear societies worldwide by intersocietal communication through international councils of nuclear societies and through bilateral agreements between foreign societies and by such media as international meetings, publications, and Internet applications

  10. OCRWM International Cooperation in Nuclear Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, R.; Levich, R.; Strahl, J.

    2002-01-01

    With the implementation of nuclear power as a major energy source, the United States is increasingly faced with the challenges of safely managing its inventory of spent nuclear materials. In 2002, with 438 nuclear power facilities generating electrical energy in 31 nations around the world, the management of radioactive material including spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste, is an international concern. Most of the world's nuclear nations maintain radioactive waste management programs and have generally accepted deep geologic repositories as the long-term solution for disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Similarly, the United States is evaluating the feasibility of deep geologic disposal at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This project is directed by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), which has responsibility for managing the disposition of spent nuclear fuel produced by commercial nuclear power facilities along with U.S. government-owned spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Much of the world class science conducted through the OCRWM program was enhanced through collaboration with other nations and international organizations focused on resolving issues associated with the disposition of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste

  11. ISO: international standards development for nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, K.

    1981-01-01

    The importance of internationally recognized standards for nuclear technology and safety is rapidly increasing for technical as well as economical and political reasons such as public acceptance and nuclear technology transfer to developing countries. The need for such standards is also evident because of the large number of nuclear installations sited close to international borders, and the export of nuclear installations from relatively few supplier countries to a large number of user countries. It is the purpose of this report to describe briefly the history, organizational structures and procedures, goals, accomplishments, problems, and future needs of the relevant activities of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). ISO is composed of the partly governmental, partly non-governmental national standards bodies of 86 countries including China. The work of its Technical Committee (TC) 85 'Nuclear Energy' is mostly concerned with industrial applications, contractual aspects and international communication, for the benefit of both developed and developing countries. It works in close liaison with IAEA, which develops Codes and Guides addressed mainly to the regulatory aspects of nuclear power plants in developing countries. ISO/TC 85 has four sub-committees dealing with: (a) Terminology, Definitions, Units and Symbols (Secretariat USA, four working groups (WGs)); (b) Radiation Protection (Secretariat France, ten WGs); (c) Power Reactor Technology (Secretariat Sweden, nine WGs); (d) Nuclear Fuel Technology (Secretariat F.R. Germany, seven WGs). (author)

  12. Standards: An international framework for nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Versteeg, J.

    2000-01-01

    The IAEA, uniquely among international organizations concerned with the use of radiation, radioactive materials and nuclear energy, has statutory functions to establish safety standards and to provide for their application in Member States. The IAEA also contributes towards another major element of the 'global safety culture', namely the establishment of legally binding international agreements on safety related issues. (author)

  13. SETT facility of International Nuclear Security Academy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Hyung Min

    2012-01-01

    After the Cold War was put to an end, the international community, especially the Western world, was concerned about Soviet nuclear materials falling into wrong hands, especially of terrorists. Later, the growing threat posed by terrorist networks such as the Taliban and al Qaeda led to a global campaign to deny such networks materials which may be used for the development of Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD). The 9 11 attacks made a section of the international community highly apprehensive of WMD terrorism, especially its nuclear version. From this point of view, it is clear that nuclear facilities which contain nuclear materials are very attractive targets for those who have intention of nuclear terror

  14. SETT facility of International Nuclear Security Academy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Hyung Min [Korea Institute of Nuclear Non-proliferation and Control, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    After the Cold War was put to an end, the international community, especially the Western world, was concerned about Soviet nuclear materials falling into wrong hands, especially of terrorists. Later, the growing threat posed by terrorist networks such as the Taliban and al Qaeda led to a global campaign to deny such networks materials which may be used for the development of Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD). The 9 11 attacks made a section of the international community highly apprehensive of WMD terrorism, especially its nuclear version. From this point of view, it is clear that nuclear facilities which contain nuclear materials are very attractive targets for those who have intention of nuclear terror

  15. Course on internal dosimetry in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This documentation was distributed to the participants in the Course of Internal Dosimetry in Nuclear Medicine organised by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) of Argentina and held in Buenos Aires, Argentina, August 9-13, 2004. The course was intended for people from IAEA Member States in the Latin American and Caribbean region, and for professionals and workers in medicine, related with the radiation protection. Spanish and English were the languages of the course. The following subjects were covered: radioprotection of the patient in nuclear medicine; injuries by ionizing radiations; MIRD methodology; radiation dose assessment in nuclear medicine; small scale and microdosimetry; bone and marrow dose modelling; medical internal dose calculations; SPECT and image reconstruction; principles of the gamma camera; scattering and attenuation correction in SPECT; tomography in nuclear medicine

  16. Towards an International Approach to Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomihiro Taniguchi

    2006-01-01

    This document presents in a series of transparencies the different activities of the IAEA: Introduction of International Atomic Energy Agency, Changing world, Changing Technology, Changing Global Security, Developing Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems, Global Nuclear Safety Regime, IAEA Safety Standards: Hierarchy - Global Reference for Striving for Excellence, IAEA Safety Reviews and Services: Integrated Safety Approach, Global Knowledge Network - Asian Nuclear Safety Network, Safety Issues and Challenges, Synergy between Safety and Security, Recent Developments: Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources, Convention on Physical Protection of Nuclear Material (CPPNM), Incident and Emergency Preparedness and Response, Holistic Approach for Safety and Security, Sustainable Development. (J.S.)

  17. Practices on nuclear security and international cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Ning

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear terrorism has been a great threat against the safety and security of the world. It has been reached the consensus by international community to strengthen the nuclear security regime to protect the nuclear and other radiological materials and related facilities. Protection of the security of nuclear and other radiological materials in use, storage and transport and related facilities is always a important issue faced by each country and it depends on the technologies, funds and human resources can be utilized. As nuclear technology has been widely used in different area, China competent authorities have issued a series of regulations, implementation rules and guidelines on security of nuclear and radioactive materials and related facilities. China supports and has taken an active part in the international efforts to strengthen the international nuclear security regime to combat nuclear terrorism. China has paid great importance on international cooperations on nuclear security with IAEA and other countries. More than 10 various national workshops and training courses on nuclear security and physical protection were delivered per year, which provided a communication platform for Chinese facility operators and managers to know the international technology-development and share the research achievements. In cooperation with the IAEA, China has held a great number of regional and national training courses on physical protection and nuclear security since 1998. Different types of training, such as training on awareness, Design Basis Threat (DBT), physical security system design, equipments operation and vulnerability analysis, benefited the administrators, facility operators, engineers and technical staff in charge of physical security system design, operation and maintenance from China and regional countries. Under the framework of the bilateral agreement on Peaceful Use of Nuclear Technology (PUNT), China and U.S. jointly conducted a Technical Demo

  18. Informational segmentation in international capital markets

    OpenAIRE

    Wahl, Jack E.

    1988-01-01

    The economic influence of barriers to international information acquisition and, hence, of informational segmentation in international capital markets depends heavily upon the prevailing level of risk aversion. We find that these barriers are likely to have second order economic impact only. Furthermore, improving international informational integration is likely to Increase all asset prices when causing less heterogeneity of international subjective probability beliefs.

  19. The international nuclear non-proliferation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, J.; McGrew, T.

    1985-01-01

    This volume focuses upon the issues raised at this Conference, and attempts to address the international diplomatic, political and trading, rather than technical, questions which surround nuclear non-proliferation policies. It does so by bringing together chapters contributed by participants in non-proliferation diplomacy, those with experience in shaping International Atomic Energy Agency and national policies and academic observers of non-proliferation activities and the international nuclear industry. An analysis is provided of past non-proliferation policies and activities and current issues, and an attempt is made to offer ideas for new initiatives which may sustain the non-proliferation system in the future

  20. Activities of nuclear training centre in Ljubljana for nuclear community in Slovenia and internationally

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stritar, Andrej

    1998-01-01

    It is the vision of the Nuclear Training Centre to be a respected source of knowledge about nuclear technologies in the country and internationally. Our main mission is training of NPP Krsko personnel. For that purpose the training centre was established ten years ago. In addition we are spreading our activities also to other users. We are organizing international training courses, mainly under the sponsorship of the International Atomic Energy Agency. We are also authorized to train professionals, dealing with ionizing radiation in medicine, industry and science. Growing importance is given to our public information activity in our information centre. (author)

  1. Nuclear Regulatory Commission 1989 Information Digest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission 1989 Information Digest provides summary information regarding the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, its regulatory responsibilities, and areas licensed by the Commission. This is the first of an annual publication for the general use of the NRC staff and is available to the public. The Digest is divided into two parts: the first presents an overview of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the second provides data on NRC commercial nuclear reactor licensees and commercial nuclear power reactors worldwide

  2. Fourteen international workshop on nuclear theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This brochure contains the abstracts of reports delivered by 30 participants at the 14. International Workshop on Nuclear Theory organized by the Nuclear Theory Group in the Institute for Nuclear research and Nuclear Energy of the Bulgarian academy of Sciences. The main topics treated in the lectures were short-range nucleon-nucleon correlations in nuclei, relativistic scaling in nuclear matter and finite nuclei, hadron structure in chiral quark-meson theory, residual interaction strength and surface effects in the multistep reaction calculations, theoretical and experimental studies of heavy ion collisions, quantum algebraic approach to nuclear collective properties, description of low-lying states in even-even nuclei, deformed oscillator potentials, studies of solar neutrinos by I-127 detectors and gamma-ray astronomy of ultra-high energies. All reports are included in INIS separately

  3. International nuclear fuel cycle fact book: Revision 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leigh, I.W.

    1989-01-01

    The International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book has been compiled in an effort to provide current data concerning fuel cycle and waste management facilities, R and D programs and key personnel. The Fact Book contains: national summaries in which a section for each country which summarizes nuclear policy, describes organizational relationships and provides addresses, names of key personnel, and facilities information; and international agencies in which a section for each of the international agencies which has significant fuel cycle involvement, and a listing of nuclear societies. The national summaries, in addition to the data described above, feature a small map for each country as well as some general information. The latter is presented from the perspective of the Fact Book user in the United States.

  4. Nuclear fuel cycle information workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    This overview of the nuclear fuel cycle is divided into three parts. First, is a brief discussion of the basic principles of how nuclear reactors work; second, is a look at the major types of nuclear reactors being used and world-wide nuclear capacity; and third, is an overview of the nuclear fuel cycle and the present industrial capability in the US

  5. International perceptions of US nuclear policy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanley, Elizabeth A. (Georgetown Universtiy, Washington, DC)

    2006-02-01

    The report presents a summary of international perceptions and beliefs about US nuclear policy, focusing on four countries--China, Iran, Pakistan and Germany--chosen because they span the spectrum of states with which the United States has relationships. A paradox is pointed out: that although the goal of US nuclear policy is to make the United States and its allies safer through a policy of deterrence, international perceptions of US nuclear policy may actually be making the US less safe by eroding its soft power and global leadership position. Broadly held perceptions include a pattern of US hypocrisy and double standards--one set for the US and its allies, and another set for all others. Importantly, the US nuclear posture is not seen in a vacuum, but as one piece of the United States behavior on the world stage. Because of this, the potential direct side effects of any negative international perceptions of US nuclear policy can be somewhat mitigated, dependent on other US policies and actions. The more indirect and long term relation of US nuclear policy to US international reputation and soft power, however, matters immensely to successful multilateral and proactive engagement on other pressing global issues.

  6. International perceptions of US nuclear policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanley, Elizabeth A.

    2006-01-01

    The report presents a summary of international perceptions and beliefs about US nuclear policy, focusing on four countries--China, Iran, Pakistan and Germany--chosen because they span the spectrum of states with which the United States has relationships. A paradox is pointed out: that although the goal of US nuclear policy is to make the United States and its allies safer through a policy of deterrence, international perceptions of US nuclear policy may actually be making the US less safe by eroding its soft power and global leadership position. Broadly held perceptions include a pattern of US hypocrisy and double standards--one set for the US and its allies, and another set for all others. Importantly, the US nuclear posture is not seen in a vacuum, but as one piece of the United States behavior on the world stage. Because of this, the potential direct side effects of any negative international perceptions of US nuclear policy can be somewhat mitigated, dependent on other US policies and actions. The more indirect and long term relation of US nuclear policy to US international reputation and soft power, however, matters immensely to successful multilateral and proactive engagement on other pressing global issues

  7. INDC correspondents for the exchange of nuclear data information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-05-01

    This list serves as a basis for the distribution of documents originated by or for the International Nuclear Data Committee and includes the names of all recipients of INDC documents. The INDC Secretariat tries to maintain this list up-to-date in order to facilitate an efficient interchange of information on nuclear data topics

  8. INDC correspondents for the exchange of nuclear data information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-05-01

    This list serves as a basis for the distribution of documents originated by or for the International Nuclear Data Committee and includes the names of all recipients of INDC documents. The INDC Secretariat tries to maintain this list up-to-date in order to facilitate an efficient interchange of information on nuclear data topics

  9. International cooperation for promotion of nuclear science and engineering research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Toshikazu; Sugiyama, Kazusuke; Nakazawa, Masaharu; Katoh, Toshio; Kimura, Itsuro.

    1993-01-01

    For promotion of nuclear science and engineering research, examinations were made on the possibilities and necessary measures to extend joint research at international level. The present article is a summary of the reports of investigations performed during FY 1986 through 1991 by the Special Committee of the AESJ for Feasibility Study on International Cooperation for Promotion of Nuclear Science and Engineering Research, under contract with Science and Technology Agency of Japan. Background information was collected on the present status of scientific research facilities in US, European and Asian countries on one hand, and on the expectations and prospects of Japanese scientists on the other hand. Based on the analysis of these data, some measures necessary to expand the international cooperation were proposed. It was emphasized that international joint research on a reciprocal basis would be effective in order to strengthen the technological basis of peaceful uses of nuclear energy. Problems to be solved for the new development were also discussed. (author)

  10. Liability for nuclear damage. An international perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopuski, J.

    1993-01-01

    The book deals with some of the complex issues of liability and compensation for nuclear damage which have been considered in the course of the work of the IAEA concerning the revision of the Vienna Convention on nuclear liability. It presents, in an orderly way, personal reflections of its author based on this experience gathered in years 1989-1992 when participating in this work. Necessarily it contains in some of its parts references to documents of the IAEA Standing Committee on Nuclear Liability; these documents because of their length could not be reproduced. Consequently these parts may be fully intelligible for those who have not participated in or closely followed in Committee's work. The IAEA work on liability for nuclear damage was initiated in the wake of the impact made on the world's public opinion by the Chernobyl incident and its transboundary effects; issues of international state liability and full compensation have been raised. But humanitarian ideas have quickly been confronted with cold calculations of the cost of financial protection for victims and an open unwillingness of some nuclear states the engage their liability; conflict of interests between nuclear and non-nuclear states has been manifested. After three years of discussion no wide consensus could be reached on some basic issues, such as: relationship between international state and civil liability regimes, structures of international legislation, concept of nuclear damage, limits of compensation, role of public funds or jurisdiction. The author presents his approach to these controversial issues, trying to provide at the same time a theoretical outline for the future international legislation on nuclear liability. (author)

  11. International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book. Revision 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, K.M.; Lakey, L.T.; Leigh, I.W.; Jeffs, A.G.

    1985-01-01

    This Fact Book has been compiled in an effort to provide: (1) an overview of worldwide nuclear power and fuel cycle programs; and (2) current data concerning fuel cycle and waste management facilities, R and D programs, and key personnel in countries other than the United States. Additional information on each country's program is available in the International Source Book: Nuclear Fuel Cycle Research and Development, PNL-2478, Rev. 2. The Fact Book is organized as follows: (1) Overview section - summary tables which indicate national involvement in nuclear reactor, fuel cycle, and waste management development activities; (2) national summaries - a section for each country which summarizes nuclear policy, describes organizational relationships and provides addresses, names of key personnel, and facilities information; (3) international agencies - a section for each of the international agencies which has significant fuel cycle involvement; (4) energy supply and demand - summary tables, including nuclear power projections; (5) fuel cycle - summary tables; and (6) travel aids international dialing instructions, international standard time chart, passport and visa requirements, and currency exchange rate

  12. International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book. Revision 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmon, K.M.; Lakey, L.T.; Leigh, I.W.; Jeffs, A.G.

    1985-01-01

    This Fact Book has been compiled in an effort to provide: (1) an overview of worldwide nuclear power and fuel cycle programs; and (2) current data concerning fuel cycle and waste management facilities, R and D programs, and key personnel in countries other than the United States. Additional information on each country's program is available in the International Source Book: Nuclear Fuel Cycle Research and Development, PNL-2478, Rev. 2. The Fact Book is organized as follows: (1) Overview section - summary tables which indicate national involvement in nuclear reactor, fuel cycle, and waste management development activities; (2) national summaries - a section for each country which summarizes nuclear policy, describes organizational relationships and provides addresses, names of key personnel, and facilities information; (3) international agencies - a section for each of the international agencies which has significant fuel cycle involvement; (4) energy supply and demand - summary tables, including nuclear power projections; (5) fuel cycle - summary tables; and (6) travel aids international dialing instructions, international standard time chart, passport and visa requirements, and currency exchange rate.

  13. International nuclear fuel cycle fact book. Revision 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmon, K.M.; Lakey, L.T.; Leigh, I.W.

    1984-03-01

    This Fact Book has been compiled in an effort to provide (1) an overview of worldwide nuclear power and fuel cycle programs and (2) current data concerning fuel cycle and waste management facilities, R and D programs, and key personnel in countries other than the United States. Additional information on each country's program is available in the International Source Book: Nuclear Fuel Cycle Research and Development, PNL-2478, Rev. 2. The Fact Book is organized as follows: (1) Overview section - summary tables which indicate national involvement in nuclear reactor, fuel cycle, and waste management development activities; (2) national summaries - a section for each country which summarizes nuclear policy, describes organizational relationships and provides addresses, names of key personnel, and facilities information; (3) international agencies - a section for each of the international agencies which has significant fuel cycle involvement; (4) energy supply and demand - summary tables, including nuclear power projections; (5) fuel cycle - summary tables; and (6) travel aids - international dialing instructions, international standard time chart, passport and visa requirements, and currency exchange rate.

  14. International nuclear fuel cycle fact book. Revision 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, K.M.; Lakey, L.T.; Leigh, I.W.

    1984-03-01

    This Fact Book has been compiled in an effort to provide (1) an overview of worldwide nuclear power and fuel cycle programs and (2) current data concerning fuel cycle and waste management facilities, R and D programs, and key personnel in countries other than the United States. Additional information on each country's program is available in the International Source Book: Nuclear Fuel Cycle Research and Development, PNL-2478, Rev. 2. The Fact Book is organized as follows: (1) Overview section - summary tables which indicate national involvement in nuclear reactor, fuel cycle, and waste management development activities; (2) national summaries - a section for each country which summarizes nuclear policy, describes organizational relationships and provides addresses, names of key personnel, and facilities information; (3) international agencies - a section for each of the international agencies which has significant fuel cycle involvement; (4) energy supply and demand - summary tables, including nuclear power projections; (5) fuel cycle - summary tables; and (6) travel aids - international dialing instructions, international standard time chart, passport and visa requirements, and currency exchange rate

  15. International Youth Nuclear Congress 2000: Youth, Future, Nuclear. Proceedings and Multimedia Presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The publication on CD-ROM and includes 145 presentations delivered at the congress. In the work of the International Youth Nuclear Congress 2000 participated 288 young scientific works from over 30 countries. The address discusses the following sessions: Young Generation Session Nuclear Education and Transfer of Know-How; Nuclear Technology I; Political Aspects; Nuclear Technology II; Environment and Safety; Communication and Public Perception I; Communication and Public Perception II; Nuclear Programs and Technical Cooperation; Economics; Fuel Cycle Challenges. Each paper has been indexed separately. Before of full papers the first CD contains next chapters: Introduction (in 19 languages); General Information; Day by Day; Y-Notes Session Results; Sponsors; Media Album, and Conclusions. The second CD-ROM contains 28 minutes of video-film about programme of International Youth Nuclear Congress 2000

  16. American Nuclear Society exchanges of information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Temple, O.J.

    2000-01-01

    Many are familiar with the technical journals and other publications that American Nuclear Society (ANS) members receive. However, there is a whole series of documents that is helpful to any nuclear society group for a modest fee or no fee. The author is referring to documents such as the ANS Bylaws and Rules, which have been made available to almost every existing nuclear society in the world. He remembers working with groups from Russia, Europe, China, Japan, Brazil, France, Germany, and others when they sought the experience of ANS in establishing a society. Financial planning guides are available for meetings, international conferences, technical expositions, and teacher workshops. Periodically, the ANS publishes position papers on the uses and handling of fuel materials and other publications helpful to public relations and teacher training courses. A few have had distributions in the hundreds of thousands, and one went as high as 750,000. Some of these have been translated in part into Spanish, French, Portuguese, and Japanese. Nuclear Standards are developed by a series of ANS committees consisting of about 1000 experts--the largest technical operation of ANS. Buyers guides and directories are very helpful in promoting the commerce in the nuclear industry. The Utility Directory covers utilities all over the globe. Radwaste Solutions, the new name for the former Radwaste Magazine, covers the efforts made by all sectors--private, government, and utility--to deal with radioactive waste. In the author's opinion, the one area in which all societies are weak is in interfacing with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Since his retirement 9 yr ago, he has become much more aware of the IAEA as a news and technical information source. The ANS is trying to be more aware of what the IAEA is doing for everyone

  17. Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission's intern program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilmour, P.E.

    2002-01-01

    The Intern Program was introduced at the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Canada's Nuclear Regulator in response to the current competitive market for engineers and scientists and the CNSC's aging workforce. It is an entry level staff development program designed to recruit and train new engineering and science graduates to eventually regulate Canada's nuclear industry. The program provides meaningful work experience and exposes the interns to the general work activities of the Commission. It also provides them with a broad awareness of the regulatory issues in which the CNSC is involved. The intern program is a two-year program focusing on the operational areas and, more specifically, on the generalist functions of project officers. (author)

  18. Managing nuclear wastes: the international connection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handl, G.

    1981-01-01

    The global health and environmental aspects of nuclear waste management transcend national decision making and must be coordinated with the management policies of other nuclear-power countries. Assuming that reprocessing will continue at limited sites, ocean transport of radioactive materials introduces the need for preventive standards that will eliminate transnational pollution. This requires a level of cooperation beyond local and national management that will have to be initiated by individual countries and then replaced by joint international action

  19. International evaluated neutron nuclear data libraries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Tingjin

    2001-01-01

    The current status of five major evaluated neutron nuclear data libraries in the world are introduced. They are ENDF/B-6 (U. S. A.), JENDL-3.2 (Japan), JEF-2.2 (Europe), CENDL-2.1 (China), BROND-2 (Russia). The developing trend of the international neutron evaluated nuclear data library is discussed. How to get and use these data for the domestic users is given

  20. International nuclear markets: Problems and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skjoeldebrand, R.

    1984-01-01

    International nuclear trade is now of considerable importance for the energy balances of a number of countries. From the start, it has been regulated by bilateral or multilateral agreements, ones that always included conditions to obtain non-proliferation assurances with verification requirements, now based on IAEA safeguards. Nuclear trade indeed would have been impossible without the non-proliferation regime that has been developed. Recently, non-proliferation objectives and conditions have come to dominate discussions about international nuclear trade through restrictions introduced in the 1970s as a result of developing national policies. The International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation (INFCE) 1977-1980, and most recently the Committee of Assurances of Supply (CAS) established by the IAEA Board of Governors in 1980, have studied these matters in detail. It sometimes seems, however, that other and possibly more fundamental problems and limitations are given secondary importance. This article discusses some of these factors as regards international trade in nuclear plants and the fuel cycle, and looks at some prospects for the future

  1. Nuclear fuel cycle. International overview. Updating of volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    It is presented the updating of the vol.I of the 'Nuclear fuel cycle - International overview' series which informs about the nuclear fuel cycle in the main countries that supply and /or use nuclear energy. It intends to serve the managerial staff since it gives a global view of the fuel cycle as well as its extent in each of the countries focalized. Information about Japan, Federal Republic of Germany, United Kingdon, France and Canada are presented. At first a summary about the situation of each country is presented and then all data for each country is presented in a tree - graphyic type, using an analysis and synthesis method, developed at the Nuclear Information Center, Brazil. (E.G.) [pt

  2. Status, plans, and capabilities of the Nuclear Criticality Information System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koponen, B.L.

    1984-01-01

    The Nuclear Criticality Information System (NCIS), in preparation since 1981, has substantially evolved and now contains a growing number of resources pertinent to nuclear criticality safety. These resources include bibliographic compilations, experimental data, communications media, and the International Directory of Nuclear Criticality Safety Personnel. These resources are part of the LLNL Technology Information System (TIS) which provides the host computer for NCIS. The TIS provides nationwide access to authorized members of the nuclear criticality community via interactive dial-up from computer terminals that utilize communication facilities such as commercial and federal telephone networks, toll-free WATS lines, TYMNET, and the ARPANET/MILNET computer network

  3. International nuclear service centers: a bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petty, G.M.; Yokota, M.

    1978-03-01

    The literature relating specifically to international nuclear fuel service centers would appear to be relatively scarce, based on the results of searches of the Energy Data Base, the libraries of the University of California at Los Angeles, and The Rand Corporation, and other sources. Works specifically relating to international service centers are annotated in this bibliography. Also listed, without annotation, are studies of various kinds of multinational public enterprises. In addition, there are references to many of the studies of the one-nation nuclear energy center concept. Most of these resulted from the survey of possible sites for these centers mandated by the US Energy Reorganization Act of 1974

  4. Nuclear energy: exit or revival? International aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-11-01

    This colloquium took place less than 1 year after the decision of the US of revival of their nuclear program. Thus the international context has changed, even if nuclear contestation remains as strong as in the past. Among governments, some positions preach the banishment of nuclear energy while others consider the nuclear option as the only solution to meet the growing up energy demand and the future environmental and economical stakes. This report makes a synthesis of the different talks given by the participants during the 3 round tables of the colloquium on the future of nuclear energy: the ecological stake, the democratic stake, and the energy policy stake. Four talks of French government representatives open and conclude the debates of the different round tables. (J.S.)

  5. Transfrontier nuclear civil liability without international conventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dogauchi, M.

    1992-01-01

    Japan is not a contracting party of any international convention in the field of nuclear civil liability, and neither are other east Asian countries who have or will soon have nuclear plants. Therefore, the ordinary rules on private international law will play an important role in dealing with transfrontier nuclear civil liability. Above all, the problems on judicial jurisdiction and governing law are crucial points. With regard to the relations between the above countries and the countries whose legal systems are within the framework of Paris or Vienna Conventions, geographical scopes of these conventions are to be considered. There are two different parts in the international civil liability conventions: uniform civil liability law and mutual funds. As to the first, it is important that, even without the conventions, the basic structure of the nuclear civil liability laws in non-member countries are almost the same with those of members. In any event, considering that the establishment of a single international regime to cover all countries will be hardly possible, legal consequences under the private international law will be explored. (author)

  6. International issue: the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    In this special issue a serie of short articles of informations are presented on the following topics: the EEC's medium term policy regarding the reprocessing and storage of spent fuel, France's natural uranium supply, the Pechiney Group in the nuclear field, zircaloy cladding for nuclear fuel elements, USSI: a major French nuclear engineering firm, gaseous diffusion: the only commercial enrichment process, the transport of nuclear materials in the fuel cycle, Cogema and spent fuel reprocessing, SGN: a leader in the fuel cycle, quality control of mechanical, thermal and termodynamic design in nuclear engineering, Sulzer's new pump testing station in Mantes, the new look of the Ateliers et Chantiers de Bretagne, tubes and piping in nuclear power plants, piping in pressurized water reactor. All these articles are written in English and in French [fr

  7. Information Interaction with IAEA on Nuclear Import and Export

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osokina, A.; Snytnikov, A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers organizational aspects of nuclear import and export interaction between the Russian Federation and the Agency. Requirements of nuclear import and export in Russia, information submission procedure and forms are determined in RF Government Regulation No 973 from December 15th 2000. Particularly, according to these requirements Russian licenced organizations implementing nuclear import and export submit reports about appointed transfers to State Corporation 'Rosatom'. Regulations of State Corporation 'Rosatom' entrusted gathering and processing of reporting information and interaction with IAEA to FSUE 'SCC of Rosatom'. Regulations of reporting information interaction were developed by SCC and approved by State Corporation 'Rosatom'. Russian organizations send notifications to SCC using regulation electron or paper forms. Regulations determine information security measures in reporting process. Automated nuclear import and export accounting system developed by SCC provides data entering, keeping and processing, enables to choose and submit requested information in different formats. This system is integrated with State Nuclear Material Control and Accounting System. Also submitted information is regularly compared with customs declarations data to improve reliability and consistency of information. Generalized nuclear import and export data is using by Departments of State Corporation 'Rosatom' and transmitting to Federal Environmental, Industrial and Nuclear Supervision Service of Russia in agreed forms. Summary information about international nuclear transfers is sending to IAEA according to INFCIRC/207. Reporting information is coordinating. Messaging with IAEA is realized by email using enciphering program. (author)

  8. INES: The International Nuclear Event Scale. User's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-08-01

    The International Nuclear Event Scale (INES) is being introduced for a trial period, the primary purpose being to facilitate communication between the nuclear community, the media and the public on such events. The scale runs from zero, for events with no safety significance, to seven for a major accident. The scale has been circulated to Member States of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development and it is presently anticipated that the trial period will last until late 1991. Provision has been made for the scale to be refined thereafter in the light of experience. It is designed as an important tool in providing prompt, clear and consistent information on nuclear events wherever and whenever they may occur. 2 figs, 2 tabs

  9. International safeguards: Accounting for nuclear materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fishbone, L.G.

    1988-09-28

    Nuclear safeguards applied by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) are one element of the non-proliferation regime'', the collection of measures whose aim is to forestall the spread of nuclear weapons to countries that do not already possess them. Safeguards verifications provide evidence that nuclear materials in peaceful use for nuclear-power production are properly accounted for. Though carried out in cooperation with nuclear facility operators, the verifications can provide assurance because they are designed with the capability to detect diversion, should it occur. Traditional safeguards verification measures conducted by inspectors of the IAEA include book auditing; counting and identifying containers of nuclear material; measuring nuclear material; photographic and video surveillance; and sealing. Novel approaches to achieve greater efficiency and effectiveness in safeguards verifications are under investigation as the number and complexity of nuclear facilities grow. These include the zone approach, which entails carrying out verifications for groups of facilities collectively, and randomization approach, which entails carrying out entire inspection visits some fraction of the time on a random basis. Both approaches show promise in particular situations, but, like traditional measures, must be tested to ensure their practical utility. These approaches are covered on this report. 15 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. International scaling of nuclear and radiological events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yuhui; Wang Haidan

    2014-01-01

    Scales are inherent forms of measurement used in daily life, just like Celsius or Fahrenheit scales for temperature and Richter for scale for earthquakes. Jointly developed by the IAEA and OECD/NEA in 1990, the purpose of International Nuclear and Radiological Event Scale (INES) is to help nuclear and radiation safety authorities and the nuclear industry worldwide to rate nuclear and radiological events and to communicate their safety significance to the general public, the media and the technical community. INES was initially used to classify events at nuclear power plants only. It was subsequently extended to rate events associated with the transport, storage and use of radioactive material and radiation sources, from those occurring at nuclear facilities to those associated with industrial use. Since its inception, it has been adopted in 69 countries. Events are classified on the scale at seven levels: Levels 1-3 are called 'incidents' and Levels 4-7 'accidents'. The scale is designed so that the severity of an event is about ten times greater for each increase in level on the scale. Events without safety significance are called 'deviations' and are classified Below Scale/Level 0. INES classifies nuclear and radiological accidents and incidents by considering three areas of impact: People and the Environment; Radiological Barriers and Control; Defence-in-Depth. By now, two nuclear accidents were on the highest level of the scale: Chernobyl and Fukumashi. (authors)

  11. International Nuclear Science and Technology Conference 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    Conference Nuclear technology has played an important role in many aspects of our lives, including agriculture, medicine and healthcare, materials, environment, forensics, energy, and frontier advancement. The International Nuclear Science and Technology Conference (INST) aims to bring together scientists, engineers, academics and students to share knowledge and experiences about all aspects of nuclear sciences. INST2016 was the second of the INST conference series organized by Thailand Institute of Nuclear Technology. INST has evolved from a national conference series on nuclear science and technology that was held every two years in Bangkok for over a twenty-year period. INST2016 was held from 4 - 6 August 2016 in Bangkok, Thailand, under the central theme “Nuclear for Better Life”. The conference working language was English. The oral and poster research presentations covered seven major topics: • Nuclear physics and engineering (PHY) • Nuclear and radiation safety (SAF) • Medical and nutritional applications (MED) • Environmental applications (ENV) • Radiation processing and industrial applications (IND) • Agriculture and food applications (AGR) • Instrumentation and other related topics (INS) The welcome addresses, committees, program of the conference and the list of presentations can be found in the PDF. (paper)

  12. International safeguards: Accounting for nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fishbone, L.G.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear safeguards applied by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) are one element of the ''non-proliferation regime'', the collection of measures whose aim is to forestall the spread of nuclear weapons to countries that do not already possess them. Safeguards verifications provide evidence that nuclear materials in peaceful use for nuclear-power production are properly accounted for. Though carried out in cooperation with nuclear facility operators, the verifications can provide assurance because they are designed with the capability to detect diversion, should it occur. Traditional safeguards verification measures conducted by inspectors of the IAEA include book auditing; counting and identifying containers of nuclear material; measuring nuclear material; photographic and video surveillance; and sealing. Novel approaches to achieve greater efficiency and effectiveness in safeguards verifications are under investigation as the number and complexity of nuclear facilities grow. These include the zone approach, which entails carrying out verifications for groups of facilities collectively, and randomization approach, which entails carrying out entire inspection visits some fraction of the time on a random basis. Both approaches show promise in particular situations, but, like traditional measures, must be tested to ensure their practical utility. These approaches are covered on this report. 15 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs

  13. International training course on nuclear materials accountability for safeguards purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-12-01

    The two volumes of this report incorporate all lectures and presentations at the International Training Course on Nuclear Materials Accountability and Control for Safeguards Purposes, held May 27-June 6, 1980, at the Bishop's Lodge near Santa Fe, New Mexico. The course, authorized by the US Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act and sponsored by the US Department of Energy in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency, was developed to provide practical training in the design, implementation, and operation of a National system of nuclear materials accountability and control that satisfies both National and IAEA International safeguards objectives. Volume I, covering the first week of the course, presents the background, requirements, and general features of material accounting and control in modern safeguard systems. Volume II, covering the second week of the course, provides more detailed information on measurement methods and instruments, practical experience at power reactor and research reactor facilities, and examples of operating state systems of accountability and control

  14. International training course on nuclear materials accountability for safeguards purposes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-12-01

    The two volumes of this report incorporate all lectures and presentations at the International Training Course on Nuclear Materials Accountability and Control for Safeguards Purposes, held May 27-June 6, 1980, at the Bishop's Lodge near Santa Fe, New Mexico. The course, authorized by the US Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act and sponsored by the US Department of Energy in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency, was developed to provide practical training in the design, implementation, and operation of a National system of nuclear materials accountability and control that satisfies both National and IAEA International safeguards objectives. Volume I, covering the first week of the course, presents the background, requirements, and general features of material accounting and control in modern safeguard systems. Volume II, covering the second week of the course, provides more detailed information on measurement methods and instruments, practical experience at power reactor and research reactor facilities, and examples of operating state systems of accountability and control.

  15. Nuclear information services at the National Nuclear Data Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrows, T.W.; Tuli, J.K.

    1997-01-01

    The National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory has maintained and disseminated data from several numeric and bibliographic data bases for many years. These data bases now cover most of low- and medium-energy nuclear physics and are produced by the NNDC and other groups belonging to various international and national networks. The numeric and bibliographic nuclear data bases maintained by the National Nuclear Data Center and access to these data bases is described. The U.S. Nuclear Data and Reaction Data Networks is also briefly described. (author)

  16. Nuclear civil liability international system. Evolution prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyners, P.

    1996-01-01

    This paper sets out the necessity of a special system of international conventions in the scope of nuclear civil liability. Then the main principles of the conventions in Paris and Vienna are described. Recently, works have been carried out in order to improve and modernize the civil liability system. (TEC). 4 tabs

  17. VIIIth international symposium on nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The conference proceedings contain 92 abstracts of submitted papers dealing with various applications of radioisotopes in diagnosis and therapy. The papers were devoted to scintiscanning, radioimmunoassay, tomography, the applications of nuclear magnetic resonance and electron microscopy in different branches - oncology, cardiology, neurology, histology, gynecology, internal medicine, etc. (M.D.)

  18. Nuclear risks perception and information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenot, J.; Bonnefous, S.; Hubert, P.

    1994-01-01

    In this text we present the studies made by the IPSN (Institute of Protection and Nuclear Safety) on the nuclear risks perception by the public and we compare this perception of risks with other industries

  19. Nuclear data information system for nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Mitsutane; Noda, Tetsuji; Utsumi, Misako

    1996-01-01

    The conceptual system for nuclear material design is considered and some trials on WWW server with functions of the easily accessible simulation of nuclear reactions are introduced. Moreover, as an example of the simulation on the system using nuclear data, transmutation calculation was made for candidate first wall materials such as 9Cr-2W steel, V-5Cr-5Ti and SiC in SUS316/Li 2 O/H 2 O(SUS), 9Cr-2W/Li 2 O/H 2 O(RAF), V alloy/Li/Be(V), and SiC/Li 2 ZrO 3 /He(SiC) blanket/shield systems based on ITER design model. Neutron spectrum varies with different blanket/shield compositions. The flux of low energy neutrons decreases in order of V< SiC< RAF< SUS blanket/shield systems. Fair amounts of W depletion in 9Cr-2W steel and the increase of Cr content in V-5Cr-5Ti were predicted in SUS or RAF systems. Concentration change in W and Cr is estimated to be suppressed if Li coolant is used in place of water. Helium and hydrogen production are not strongly affected by the different blanket/shield compositions. (author)

  20. International nuclear fuel cycle fact book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leigh, I.W.

    1988-01-01

    As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need has developed for a ready source or information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book was compiled to meet that need. The information contained has been obtained from nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECD/NEA activities reports; proceedings of conferences and workshops; and so forth. Sources do not agree completely with each other, and the data listed herein does not reflect any one single source but frequently is consolidation/combination of information. Lack of space as well as the intent and purpose of the Fact Book limit the given information to that pertaining to the Nuclear Fuel Cycle and to data considered of primary interest or most helpful to the majority of users.

  1. International nuclear fuel cycle fact book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leigh, I.W.; Lakey, L.T.; Schneider, K.J.; Silviera, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need has developed for a ready source of information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book was compiled to meet that need. The information contained has been obtained from nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECD/NEA activities reports; proceedings of conferences and workshops; and so forth. Sources do not agree completely with each other, and the data listed herein does not reflect any one single source but frequently is a consolidation/combination of information. Lack of space as well as the intent and purpose of the Fact Book limit the given information to that pertaining to the Nuclear Fuel Cycle and to data considered of primary interest or most helpful to the majority of users

  2. International nuclear fuel cycle fact book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leigh, I.W.

    1988-01-01

    As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need has developed for a ready source or information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book was compiled to meet that need. The information contained has been obtained from nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECD/NEA activities reports; proceedings of conferences and workshops; and so forth. Sources do not agree completely with each other, and the data listed herein does not reflect any one single source but frequently is consolidation/combination of information. Lack of space as well as the intent and purpose of the Fact Book limit the given information to that pertaining to the Nuclear Fuel Cycle and to data considered of primary interest or most helpful to the majority of users

  3. Information about the control of nuclear safety in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerster, D.

    1994-01-01

    The permanent objective of the French Nuclear Safety Authority is the public information about technical controls performed in French nuclear installations. Three publications from the DSIN (Direction of Nuclear Installations Safety) are devoted to this effort: the MAGNUC Minitel magazine, the annual activity report and the CONTROLE magazine. Details about the content of these publications are given. A large part of the information about control of nuclear safety concerns the incidents and accidents and their importance level. A seriousness scale was created in France at the beginning of 1988 and replaced in April 1994 by the very similar International Nuclear Event Scale (INES). Explanation of this scale is given and illustrated with examples of real events and accidents. However, international comparison between incidents and accidents remains delicate because the detailed content of safety reports can change significantly from one country to another. (J.S.). 1 fig

  4. Liability for international nuclear transport: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, O.F.; Horbach, N.

    2000-01-01

    Many elements can bear on liability for nuclear damage during transport. For example, liability may depend upon a number of facts that may be categorized as follows: shipment, origin or destination of the shipment, deviation from the planed route, temporary storage incidental to carriage; content of shipment, type of nuclear material involved, whether its origin is civilian or defence-related; sites of accident, number and type of territories damaged (i.e. potential conventions involved), applicable territorial limits, exclusive economic zone, high seas, etc.; nature of damages, personal injury, property damage, damage to the means of carriage, indirect damage, preventive measures, environmental cleanup or retrieval at seas, res communis, transboundary damages etc.; victims involved, nationality and domiciles of victims; jurisdiction, flag (for ships) or national registration (for aircraft) of the transporting vessel, courts of one or more states may have (or assert) jurisdiction to hear claims, and may have to determine what law to apply to a particular accident; applicable law, the applicability laws and/or international nuclear liability conventions; the extent to which any applicable convention has been implemented or modified by domestic legislation, conflicts with the 1982 Law of the Sea Convention or other applicable international agreements, and finally, also written agreements between installation operators and carriers can define applicable law as well as responsibilities. Harmonizing nuclear liability protection and applying it to additional international shipments would be facilitated by more countries being in treaty relations with each other as soon as possible. Adherence to an international convention by more countries (including China, Russia, the United States, etc.) would promote the open flow of services and advanced technology, and better facilitate international transport. The conventions protect the public, harmonize legislation in the

  5. Therapeutic nuclear medicine (vectorized internal radiotherapy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herain, C.; Machacek, C.; Menechal, P.; Aubert, B.; Celier, D.; Rehel, J.L.; Vidal, J.P.; Lahaye, T.; Gauron, C.; Barret, C.; Biau, A.; Donnarieix, D.; Gambini, D.; Gondran, C.; Pierrat, N.; Guerin, C.; Marande, J.L.; Mercier, J.; Paycha, F.

    2012-09-01

    After having evoked the authorization for possessing and using radionuclides which is required to perform therapeutic nuclear medicine, this document indicates the various personnel involved in this activity, the radionuclide implementation process, the different associated hazards and risks (for sealed and non-sealed sources), how risk is assessed and exposure levels are determined (elements of risk assessment, delimitation of controlled and surveyed areas, personnel classification, selection of dosimetric control type between external passive, operational or internal dosimetry). It proposes a detailed risk management strategy which comprises different components: risk reduction, technical measures regarding the installation, protection measures, information and training, prevention measures, treatment of incident and dysfunction. It describes the medical control to be performed or measures to be taken for the different type of personnel and for pregnant women, indicates the content and management of the medical file and how personnel follow-up must me performed, how anomalies and incidents must be handled. It comments how risk management is to be assessed, and briefly evokes other risks. An example of workstation study is given in appendix

  6. Nuclear emergency preparedness and management the international nuclear emergency exercise Inex 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mundigl, St.

    2003-01-01

    With the initiation of the first international nuclear emergency exercise INEX 1, performed as a table-top exercise in 1993, the international community tested, for the first time, approaches and policies in place to manage a nuclear or radiological emergency. INEX 1 with its related workshops led to a wealth of lessons learned and to an improvement in nuclear emergency management. The INEX 2 exercise series, initiated by the NEA and performed between 1996 and 1999, established an international nuclear emergency 'exercise culture' leading to a clear improvement of the international aspects of nuclear emergency preparedness and management. INEX 2 was a series of four command post exercises based on national nuclear emergency exercises in Switzerland, Finland, Hungary and Canada. Simulated accidents at nuclear power plants were used to test existing procedures in emergency response and management, and to analyse local, regional, national and international emergency plans under realistic conditions. In addition, the exercises allowed the participating countries to gain experience using new concepts and tools. The most significant result of INEX 2 and a major step forward in nuclear emergency management was the development of a new communication and information exchange strategy, which is currently implemented by various NEA member countries as well as by the international community in general. The objective of this new strategy is to assist the decision-maker by improving the selection of the data transmitted, by encouraging the transmission and reception of such data and information using modern communication methods, e.g. secure world wide web technologies, and by defining emergency monitoring and modelling needs. To test the validity and usefulness of the newly-developed strategy, the NEA proposed to organize an international nuclear emergency exercise, INEX 2000, similar in scope to the INEX 2 exercises. In addition, the NEA suggested to include, for the first

  7. Enlightenment on international cooperation for nuclear safety in China in light of Fukushima nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Jie; Feng Yi; Luan Haiyan; Meng Yue; Zhang Ou

    2013-01-01

    This thesis elaborates on the impact of Fukushima nuclear accident on global nuclear power development and subsequent international activities carried out by major countries. It analyses significance of international cooperation in ensuring nuclear safety and promoting nuclear power development and makes some suggestions to further strengthen the international cooperation on nuclear safety in China. (authors)

  8. Managing nuclear knowledge: IAEA activities and international coordination. Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-07-01

    This CD-ROM is attached to the booklet 'Managing nuclear knowledge: IAEA activities and international coordination. Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT)'. It contains the background material with regard to ANENT in full text, including policy level papers, reports, presentation material made by Member States, and meeting summaries during the period 2002-2005. Further information on the current ANENT activities and related IAEA activities is available at 'http://anent-iaea.org' and 'http://iaea.org/inisnkm'

  9. 54 countries and 5 international organizations join in a worldwide exercise in nuclear emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    As part of ongoing international cooperation to deal with possible nuclear emergencies, on 22-23 May 2001, an extensive international nuclear emergency exercise will be carried out at the Gravelines NPP. The main objectives of the exercise are to test existing national and international procedures and arrangements for responding to nuclear emergency, co-ordinate the release of information and assess the effectiveness of advisory and decision making mechanism. The IAEA has specific responsibilities under two international conventions related to emergencies involving ionizing radiation - the Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident and the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency

  10. Information System for Nuclear Materials Assay Techniques. Final Report on Work Performed for the International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, Austria under Contract No. 995/TC (Jan. 1, 1971 - Jan. 1, 1972)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyster, J. R.; Kull, L. A.

    1972-07-01

    During the last several years, Safeguards programs in the U.S. and abroad have generated increasing amounts of information relating to non-destructive measurements and assay techniques for fissionable isotopes. This barrage of data, including ideas for new techniques, prototype design information, operating experience, and critical technical evaluations, has been stimulated by the concerned interest of a number of national and international agencies over the effectiveness of controls for the flow of nuclear materials in the fuel cycle. In anticipation of an international community which will depend increasingly on nuclear energy to satisfy its power requirements, responsible agencies have diverted resources, time, and talent into the development of more accurate measurements techniques - since good measurements are one of the cornerstones of effective materials control. This paper concerns itself with a data management problem which is beginning to appear concomitant with the increase in the production rate of Safeguards information. The problem can be broken down into three parts: 1. The collection of all available data. 2. The condensation and arrangement of the data into a general format to form a data base. 3. The development of a retrieval system which provides convenient access to the data base for users with specific information requirements. This additional effort, is required in order that the information being generated can be readily put to use in the variety of tasks for which it was originally intended. Administrators of government research programs, plant operators' and engineers, technical people working in the measurement field, and national and international inspectors charged with enforcement of existing Safeguards regulations and agreements - all can easily be shown to benefit from a complete but condensed record of Safeguards experience. (author)

  11. DESIGN INFORMATION VERIFICATION FOR NUCLEAR SAFEGUARDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert S. Bean; Richard R. M. Metcalf; Phillip C. Durst

    2009-07-01

    A critical aspect of international safeguards activities performed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is the verification that facility design and construction (including upgrades and modifications) do not create opportunities for nuclear proliferation. These Design Information Verification activities require that IAEA inspectors compare current and past information about the facility to verify the operator’s declaration of proper use. The actual practice of DIV presents challenges to the inspectors due to the large amount of data generated, concerns about sensitive or proprietary data, the overall complexity of the facility, and the effort required to extract just the safeguards relevant information. Planned and anticipated facilities will (especially in the case of reprocessing plants) be ever larger and increasingly complex, thus exacerbating the challenges. This paper reports the results of a workshop held at the Idaho National Laboratory in March 2009, which considered technologies and methods to address these challenges. The use of 3D Laser Range Finding, Outdoor Visualization System, Gamma-LIDAR, and virtual facility modeling, as well as methods to handle the facility data issues (quantity, sensitivity, and accessibility and portability for the inspector) were presented. The workshop attendees drew conclusions about the use of these techniques with respect to successfully employing them in an operating environment, using a Fuel Conditioning Facility walk-through as a baseline for discussion.

  12. Nuclear power proliferation. Problems of international control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, B [International Inst. for Environment and Development, London (UK)

    1977-09-01

    The nuclear industry is experiencing a multiple crisis in which economic, technical and ethical aspects are blended inextricably. Nuclear hardware costs have everywhere soared far beyond inflation in the last five years, largely as a result of delays in programme completion arising from problems of reactor and fuel cycle. Meanwhile, partly as a result of this cost escalation, there is widespread and growing doubt as to whether capital will be available to finance the electricity generating levels projected by the industry and by governments for the 1990s. The nuclear industry is now in trouble at every stage of the fuel cycle. The industry's difficulties have also revealed a lack of overall - but particularly nuclear - energy strategy at either national or international levels, and a lack of will to create regulations and institutional machinery at either of these levels which might reassure both concerned publics and the energy industries themselves. This paper appraises some of the present limitations of international institutions in achieving control and management of nuclear power.

  13. Nuclear power proliferation: problems of international control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, B

    1977-09-01

    Some of the present limitations of international institutions in achieving control and management of nuclear power are reviewed and appraised. The nuclear industry is experiencing a multiple crisis in which economic, technical, and ethical aspects are blended. Nuclear hardware costs have increased faster than inflation in the last five years, largely as a result of delays in program completion arising from reactor and fuel-cycle safety problems. Meanwhile, there is a widespread and growing doubt, partly as a result of this cost escalation, as to whether capital will be available to finance the electricity-generating levels projected by the industry and by governments for the 1990s. The nuclear industry is now in trouble at every stage of the fuel cycle. The industry's difficulties have also revealed a lack of overall--but particularly nuclear--energy strategy at either national or international levels, and a lack of will to create regulations and institutional machinery at either of these levels that could reassure the concerned public and the energy industries.

  14. Nuclear information and knowledge. News from the INIS and Nuclear Knowledge Management Section. No. 3, March 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyck, E.; Gowin, P.J.

    2007-03-01

    This newsletter, a bi-annual publication, is aimed at informing about current developments in Nuclear Knowledge Management (NKM) and the International Nuclear Information System (INIS), in particular about usage of nuclear information and developing nuclear knowledge management programmes. This third issue constitutes a review of the year 2006 in these fields and informs about some planned activities for 2007. In particular summaries are given about the IAEA Conference on Knowledge Management in Nuclear Facilities, the 33rd INIS Liaison Officer Meeting and the 2007 School of Nuclear Knowledge Management

  15. Trends and characteristics observed in nuclear events based on international nuclear event scale reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Norio

    2001-01-01

    The International Nuclear Event Scale (INES) is jointly operated by the IAEA and the OECD-NEA as a means designed for providing prompt, clear and consistent information related to nuclear events, that occurred at nuclear facilities, and facilitating communication between the nuclear community, the media and the public. Nuclear events are reported to the INES with the Scale', a consistent safety significance indicator, which runs from level 0, for events with no safety significance, to level 7 for a major accident with widespread health and environmental effects. Since the operation of INES was initiated in 1990, approximately 500 events have been reported and disseminated. The present paper discusses the trends observed in nuclear events, such as overall trends of the reported events and characteristics of safety significant events with level 2 or higher, based on the INES reports. (author)

  16. International conference on topical issues in nuclear safety. Contributed papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The objective of the Conference was to foster the exchange of information on topical issues in nuclear safety, with the aim of consolidating an international consensus on the present status of these issues, priorities for future work, and needs for strengthening international cooperation, including the IAEA recommendations for future activities. This book contains concise contributed papers submitted on issues falling within the thematic scope of the Conference: risk informed decision making, influence of external factors on safety, safety of fuel cycle facilities, safety of research reactors, and safety performance indicators.

  17. International conference on topical issues in nuclear safety. Contributed papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the Conference was to foster the exchange of information on topical issues in nuclear safety, with the aim of consolidating an international consensus on the present status of these issues, priorities for future work, and needs for strengthening international cooperation, including the IAEA recommendations for future activities. This book contains concise contributed papers submitted on issues falling within the thematic scope of the Conference: risk informed decision making, influence of external factors on safety, safety of fuel cycle facilities, safety of research reactors, and safety performance indicators

  18. Nuclear information and knowledge. News from the INIS and Nuclear Knowledge Management Section. No. 1, April 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-04-01

    This first newsletter, a bi-annual publication, is aimed at informing about current developments in the INIS and Nuclear Knowledge Management Section of the IAEA. The vision for the Section is that knowledge powers the future and that knowledge is the basis of all nuclear activities. The International Nuclear Information System (INIS) is the worlds most authoritative and comprehensive source of reliable nuclear information with the aim that existing nuclear information and knowledge will be available in Member States, whenever and wherever needed, for the peaceful, safe and efficient use of nuclear energy. This first issue of the newspaper constitutes a review of the year 2005 in these fields and informs about some of planned activities for 2006 and 2007. It provides short articles about digitizing documents to preserve knowledge, INIS production statistics, the International Conference on Knowledge Management in Nuclear Facilities, supporting education and training, the School of Nuclear Knowledge Management and Coordinated Research Projects on Knowledge Preservation

  19. Study on information dissemination for effective nuclear risk communication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-08-15

    The aim of this study are to develop an information system and guideline for nuclear risk communication between expert and citizens as well as between both experts in terms of lessons learned from serious disaster such as Fukushima Dai-ich NPP accident. Technical standards for disseminating a result and process of seismic/tsunami PRA (Probabilistic Risk Assessment) of nuclear facility as well as nuclear risk information in an emergency, and risk communication in normal times are needed. Tins study examines the framework, contents, and technical basis for developing an information system for nuclear risk communication. In addition, this study identifies the communication issues of nuclear risk communication concerning the seismic/tsunami PRA through the testing information systems in areas around nuclear facilities and by providing effective implementation guidelines. JNES has developed the information system specified as Protection of Nuclear Power Plants against Tsunamis and Post Earthquake considerations in the External Zone (TiPEEZ) as part of IAEA International Seismic Safety Centre (ISSC) Extra Budgetary Programme (EBP). The EBP is currently preparing technical documents (TECDOC) regarding the implementation of the TiPEEZ. After the Fukushima accident, there has been increasing demand for disaster mitigation systems to share risk information between nuclear organizations and local municipalities. JNES and Niigata Institute of Technology conduct implementation of TiPEEZ for the practical use based on the corroborative works with Kashiwazaki city and citizens. (author)

  20. Study on information dissemination for effective nuclear risk communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study are to develop an information system and guideline for nuclear risk communication between expert and citizens as well as between both experts in terms of lessons learned from serious disaster such as Fukushima Dai-ich NPP accident. Technical standards for disseminating a result and process of seismic/tsunami PRA (Probabilistic Risk Assessment) of nuclear facility as well as nuclear risk information in an emergency, and risk communication in normal times are needed. Tins study examines the framework, contents, and technical basis for developing an information system for nuclear risk communication. In addition, this study identifies the communication issues of nuclear risk communication concerning the seismic/tsunami PRA through the testing information systems in areas around nuclear facilities and by providing effective implementation guidelines. JNES has developed the information system specified as Protection of Nuclear Power Plants against Tsunamis and Post Earthquake considerations in the External Zone (TiPEEZ) as part of IAEA International Seismic Safety Centre (ISSC) Extra Budgetary Programme (EBP). The EBP is currently preparing technical documents (TECDOC) regarding the implementation of the TiPEEZ. After the Fukushima accident, there has been increasing demand for disaster mitigation systems to share risk information between nuclear organizations and local municipalities. JNES and Niigata Institute of Technology conduct implementation of TiPEEZ for the practical use based on the corroborative works with Kashiwazaki city and citizens. (author)

  1. From Nuclear Information to Knowledge: The Role of INIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakopov, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The International Nuclear Information System (INIS) once created to facilitate information exchange in the broad range of scientific and technical fields related to peaceful applications of nuclear power has evolved into a Knowledge Organization System (KOS) consisting of a digital repository and an advanced multi-language thesaurus. This paper gives a general description of the establishment, evolution and features of INIS not only as a digital repository but as one of the key resources of knowledge organization and preservation in the nuclear field. (author

  2. Internal Dosimetry for Nuclear Power Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wo, Y.M.

    2011-01-01

    Internal dosimetry which refers to dosage estimation from internal part of an individual body is an important and compulsory component in order to ensure the safety of the personnel involved in operational of a Nuclear Power Program. Radionuclides particle may deposit in the human being through several pathways and release wave and/or particle radiation to irradiate that person and give dose to body until it been excreted or completely decayed from the body. Type of radionuclides of concerning, monitoring program, equipment's and technique used to measure the concentration level of such radionuclides and dose calculation will be discussed in this article along with the role and capability of Malaysian Nuclear Agency. (author)

  3. International Nuclear Security Situation And China’s Approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Chong

    2016-01-01

    Since 2010,the three Nuclear Security Summits have made a number of achievements,but the international nuclear security situation is still not relaxed.The rapid development of China’s domestic nuclear facilities and a large amount of nuclear and radioactive materials related to nuclear power,active international nuclear black market in China’s surrounding regions,rather serious domestic and international terrorist threats as well as the emerging technology development bring about new challenges to nuclear security.Facing the complicated and long-term nuclear security situation,China from the perspective of monitoring mechanism,laws and regulations system,technical capability-building and nuclear emergency preparedness,takes a series of effective measures to build the national nuclear security capacity,and strictly fulfills its international obligations,actively participates in upgrading the international nuclear non-proliferation regime and relevant international rules,and actively takes part in the Nuclear Security Summit process,strengthens bilateral cooperation on nuclear security with major countries especially the United States of America,and jointly organizes various training with International Atomic Energy Agency,which has made great contributions to upgrading the global nuclear security level.At the end of the Nuclear Security Summit process,China should continue to strengthen its domestic nuclear security capacity building,and promote the international community to treat the root causes and symptoms,adopt a comprehensive strategy,and work together,effectively prevent and dissolve the nuclear terrorist threats.

  4. Nuclear power project management information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Lailong; Zhang Peng; Xiao Ziyan; Chun Zengjun; Huang Futong

    2001-01-01

    Project Management Information System is an important infrastructure facility for the construction and operation of Nuclear Power Station. Based on the practice of Lingao nuclear power project management information system (NPMIS), the author describes the NPMIS design goals, system architecture and software functionality, points out the outline issues during the development and deployment of NPMIS

  5. Safety of nuclear installations. An international comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renner, Andrea; Diwes, Andreas; Reingardt, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Safeguarding of nuclear power plants against disruptive actions or other external hazards is part of the plant design and presumption of an operation license. The general principle is defense in depth involving different security zones with separate barriers. The safeguards for nuclear installations are organized in three areas of responsibility: governmental measures (police, military), technical (detectors, scanners, illuminations, camera tracking, concrete barriers) and personnel measures (access control, security personnel, alarm) of the operating company. International responsibilities results from the treaty on the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons and several IAEA documents. The authors discuss the national regulations in Germany, Switzerland, United Kingdom and USA. Older NPPs that are not in compliance with actual safety standards will be a topic of increasing importance.

  6. International Youth Nuclear Congress 2000. Film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    OST Film Production Studio; YDRNS Information Technology Services, Ltd.

    2001-01-01

    This CD-ROM contains 28 minutes 30 seconds of video-film about programme of International Youth Nuclear Congress 2000 (IYNC 2000). There is documentary video-film about IYNC 2000, also presented are: the Opening panel of the IYNC 2000, every day work of IYNC 2000, Congress people; the fun run; Entertainment excursion in Bratislava, about excursion in Mochovce NPP as well as in IAEA

  7. Problems relating to international transport of nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timm, U.E.

    1985-01-01

    Owing to the tremendous geographic distances between uranium deposits of interest, to the various degrees of sophistication of nuclear industry in industrialized countries and to the close international cooperation in the field of nuclear energy, safe international transports, physical protection and transport handling play an important role. It is suggested to better coordinate the activities of nuclear power plant operators, the nuclear industry and specialized transport companies with respect to all national and international issues of nuclear fuel transports. (DG) [de

  8. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Information Digest 1992 edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olive, K.

    1992-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission Information Digest provides a summary of information about the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), NRC's regulatory responsibilities, the activities NRC licenses, and general information on domestic and worldwide nuclear energy. This digest is a compilation of nuclear- and NRC-related data and is designed to provide a quick reference to major facts about the agency and industry it regulates. In general, the data cover 1975 through 1991, with exceptions noted. Information on generating capacity and average capacity factor for operating US commercial nuclear power reactors is obtained from monthly operating reports that are submitted directly to the NRC by the licensee. This information is reviewed by the NRC for consistency only and no independent validation and/or verification is performed

  9. The international school of nuclear law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kus, S.

    2007-01-01

    The International School of Nuclear Law (ISNL) was established in 2000 by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the University of Montpellier 1. It benefits from the support of the International Nuclear Law Association (INLA) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The school offers a high-quality educational programme acknowledged for its intensive courses, professional lecturers, as well as its academic and practical balance. In the past seven years, the ISNL has been attended by approximately 400 participants from 78 countries around the world. The NEA awards scholarships to enable certain meritorious students from its member countries to benefit from the course. The IAEA also awards a number of fellowships to participants from its member countries. This helps ensure broad representation from different countries and bestows the ISNL with the different views, experience and legal backgrounds of its participants. The applicants are mostly but not necessarily lawyers. Such diversity is welcomed as the interdisciplinary composition of classes contributes to the dialogue and mutual learning between lawyers and scientists or economists for example. (author)

  10. A future vision of nuclear material information systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suski, N.; Wimple, C.

    1999-01-01

    To address the current and future needs for nuclear materials management and safeguards information, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory envisions an integrated nuclear information system that will support several functions. The vision is to link distributed information systems via a common communications infrastructure designed to address the information interdependencies between two major elements: Domestic, with information about specific nuclear materials and their properties, and International, with information pertaining to foreign nuclear materials, facility design and operations. The communication infrastructure will enable data consistency, validation and reconciliation, as well as provide a common access point and user interface for a broad range of nuclear materials information. Information may be transmitted to, from, and within the system by a variety of linkage mechanisms, including the Internet. Strict access control will be employed as well as data encryption and user authentication to provide the necessary information assurance. The system can provide a mechanism not only for data storage and retrieval, but will eventually provide the analytical tools necessary to support the U.S. government's nuclear materials management needs and non-proliferation policy goals

  11. 2. International conference on nuclear technologies of XXI centuries. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakushev, A.P.

    2010-01-01

    The collection contains abstracts of the II International conference 'Nuclear technologies of the XXI century' on energy problems in the world, the prospects for nuclear power plant in Belarus, the various technological, technical and economic aspects of nuclear safety of NPP and nuclear reactions and international cooperation. The materials published in electronic form.

  12. Nuclear public information in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macpherson, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes some of the salient features of the Canadian experience in nuclear communications and examines three key aspects: opinion and attitude research; media relations; and education. It also addresses the challenge of responding to the allegations and tactics of those who are actively hostile to nuclear energy, and recommends that the principles of Total Quality Management and of organizational effectiveness be applied more thoroughly and more consistently to the communications function

  13. Nuclear public information in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macpherson, J A [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.

    1995-10-01

    This paper describes some of the salient features of the Canadian experience in nuclear communications and examines three key aspects: opinion and attitude research; media relations; and education. It also addresses the challenge of responding to the allegations and tactics of those who are actively hostile to nuclear energy, and recommends that the principles of Total Quality Management and of organizational effectiveness be applied more thoroughly and more consistently to the communications function.

  14. The International Nuclear Event Scale (INES) user's manual. 2001 edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-12-01

    The International Nuclear Event Scale (INES) was introduced in March 1990 jointly by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD/NEA). Its primary purpose is to facilitate communication and understanding between the nuclear community, the media and the public on the safety significance of events occurring at nuclear installations. The scale was refined in 1992 in the light of experience gained and extended to be applicable to any event associated with radioactive material and/or radiation, including the transport of radioactive materials.This edition of the INES User's Manual incorporates experience gained from applying the 1992 version of the scale and the document entitled 'Clarification of Issues Raised'. As such, it replaces those earlier publications. It does not amend the technical basis of the INES rating procedure but is expected to facilitate the task of those who are required to rate the safety significance of events using the INES scale. The INES communication network currently receives and disseminates event information to the INES National Officers of 60 Member States on special Event Rating Forms which represent official information on the events, including the rating. The INES communication process has led each participating country to set up an internal network which ensures that all events are promptly communicated and rated whenever they have to be reported outside or inside the country. The IAEA provides training services on the use of INES on request

  15. INES - The International Nuclear Event Scale. User's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The International Nuclear Event Scale (INES) was introduced in March 1990 jointly by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD/NEA). Its primary purpose is to facilitate communication and understanding between the nuclear community, the media and the public on the safety significance of events occurring at nuclear installations. The scale was refined in 1992 in the light of experience gained and extended to be applicable to any event associated with radioactive material and/or radiation, including the transport of radioactive materials. This edition of the INES User's Manual incorporates experience gained from applying the 1992 version of the scale and the document entitled 'Clarification of Issues Raised'. As such, it replaces those earlier publications. It does not amend the technical basis of the INES rating procedure but is expected to facilitate the task of those who are required to rate the safety significance of events using the INES scale. The INES communication network currently receives and disseminates event information to the INES National Officers of 60 Member States on special Event Rating Forms which represent official information on the events, including the rating. The INES communication process has led each participating country to set up an internal network which ensures that all events are promptly communicated and rated whenever they have to be reported outside or inside the country. The IAEA provides training services on the use of INES on request

  16. The International Nuclear Event Scale (INES) user's manual. 2001 edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-02-01

    The International Nuclear Event Scale (INES) was introduced in March 1990 jointly by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD/NEA). Its primary purpose is to facilitate communication and understanding between the nuclear community, the media and the public on the safety significance of events occurring at nuclear installations. The scale was refined in 1992 in the light of experience gained and extended to be applicable to any event associated with radioactive material and/or radiation, including the transport of radioactive materials.This edition of the INES User's Manual incorporates experience gained from applying the 1992 version of the scale and the document entitled ''Clarification of Issues Raised''. As such, it replaces those earlier publications. It does not amend the technical basis of the INES rating procedure but is expected to facilitate the task of those who are required to rate the safety significance of events using the INES scale. The INES communication network currently receives and disseminates event information to the INES National Officers of 60 Member States on special Event Rating Forms which represent official information on the events, including the rating. The INES communication process has led each participating country to set up an internal network which ensures that all events are promptly communicated and rated whenever they have to be reported outside or inside the country. The IAEA provides training services on the use of INES on request

  17. International economic association on production of nuclear instrumentation - ''INTERINSTRUMENT''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twardon, Z.

    1979-01-01

    History of establishment and development of the International economic association ''Interinstrument'' is stated. Structure of the Association is given and directions of its activity, as well as structure of its budget. List is given of organizations, performing works according to the agreements with the Association. Main directions are stated of activity of the Association in the field of specialization of production of items of nuclear equipment; co-ordination of activity in the sphere of foreign trade; information about new instruments. Activity is stated of the branch offices of the Association, engaged in maintenance of instruments and nuclear equipment [ru

  18. Research method of nuclear patent information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mo Dan; Gao An'na; Sun Chenglin; Wang Lei; You Xinfeng

    2010-01-01

    When faced with a huge amount of nuclear patent information, the key to effective research include: (1) Choose convenient way to search, quick access to nuclear technology related patents; (2) To overcome the language barrier, analysis the technical content of patent information; (3) Organize the publication date of retrieved patent documents, analysis the status and trends of nuclear technology development; (4) Research the patented technology of main applicants; (5) Always pay attention to the legal status of patent information, free use the invalid patents, at the same time avoid the patent infringement. Summary, patent information is important to obtain the latest technical information source, and the research work of patent information is a comprehensive understanding and mastery way for advanced nuclear technology. (authors)

  19. Information Management Analyst | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Job Summary The Information Management Analyst is the technical resource person ... Performs systems configuration, testing and quality assurance for all IRO ... IMTD employees, identifying root cause of system issues and solving them or ...

  20. Nuclear Information and Documentation Center (CIDN): in search for excellence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romandia G, M.R.L.

    1994-01-01

    The present situation in the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) implies both the organic reestructuration and the redefinition of objectives: in congruence with this evolution, the nuclear information and documentation center (CIDN) has to be adapted to the information needs that will require the new researching lines and at the same time look for the operating excellence in its services and activities. This paper is made with the purpose to do some considerations and proposals about the internal organization of CIDN through the quality circles and actions intended to reinforce the work perform by the information centers network of energetic sector (IMP, ININ, IIE). (Author)

  1. Nuclear public information in practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesaru, Daniela

    2001-01-01

    This presentation describes the site of Cernavoda-1 NPP, its history, decision making to build it, major public concerns related to NPP operation, fuel fabrication, Interim storage of spent fuel and spent fuel disposal, Transport of radioactive material,Emergency preparedness, Nuclear or radiological accidents. Within this scope the key messages to be communicated to the public are recommended. The public relation groups should communicate all the time with public - trying to send the main message: 'Nobody Wants To Hide Anything. We Are Always Open. Your Good Health Means We Can Still Produce Nuclear Power'

  2. Information for nuclear medicine researchers and practitioners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlett, W.

    1987-01-01

    The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) has a major research program in nuclear medicine; this article describes the information support given to the program by the Lucas Heights Research Laboratories (LHRL) Library. The INIS database is a prime indicator of the information held at LHRL Library, however, other databases also cover nuclear medicine. As part of the Australian library system the ANSTO Library's resources are accessed by subscription. The ANSTO Library staff can also search INIS for a fee for external enquiries but the other databases can presently only be searched for LHRL staff and affiliates. Even so, most major library and information services can provide access to these databases

  3. Security of Nuclear Information. Implementing Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This publication provides guidance on implementing the principle of confidentiality and on the broader aspects of information security (i.e. integrity and availability). It assists States in bridging the gap between existing government and industry standards on information security, the particular concepts and considerations that apply to nuclear security and the special provisions and conditions that exist when dealing with nuclear material and other radioactive material. Specifically it seeks to assist states in the identification, classification, and assignment of appropriate security controls to information that could adversely impact nuclear security if compromised

  4. Nuclear Information and Knowledge, No. 11, June 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-06-01

    This Newsletter contains the following: Interview with Ruth Hahn-Weinert; The 35th Consultative Meeting of INIS Liaison Officers; New INIS collection search capability; The 13th INIS/ETDE Joint Technical Committee Meeting; Regional (AFRA) Training Course on the International Nuclear Information (INIS, Rabat, Morocco, May 2011; INIS Training Seminar in Vienna, Austria in November 2011; INIS 2010 Highlights; Meetings

  5. RWE NUKEM's 'Living' Nuclear Compendium eNICE. An internet-based, multifunctional nuclear information platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwasny, R.; Max, A.

    2002-01-01

    Information has become a commodity particularly important to industry, science, and politics. Information becomes critical because of its rapid change. The basis and the catalyst of this change in information are the information technologies now available, and the Internet with its varied contents. This makes the Internet a new market place which, although it is open, can quickly turn into an information maze because of its sheer volume. Also the nuclear industry must find its way through this maze. eNICE was created in order to build a bridge between the flood of information in the Internet and the information really needed in a specific case. eNICE (e stands for electronic, and NICE stands for Nuclear Information Compendium Europe), a living Internet-based nuclear compendium in the English language, is a unique combination of a broad spectrum of information and data about the use of nuclear power in Europe. The information and data contained in eNICE are interconnected with the World Wide Web in such a way that structured searching for nuclear information is possible quickly and efficiently. This avoids the difficulties sometimes encountered in searches in the Internet as a consequence of the unstructured volume of information. A monthly update of eNICE ensures that the data available are up to date and reliable. eNICE also offers direct access to the library used by RWE NUKEM for internal purposes. (orig.) [de

  6. Report of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section to the International Nuclear Data Committee for the period January 2002 - December 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, Alan L [ed.

    2004-05-01

    This report contains descriptions of the major activities of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section in 2002 and 2003 for review by the International Nuclear Data Committee (INDC). Information is provided on the staff and budget, atomic, molecular and nuclear data activities of the Nuclear Data Centre, coordination of the Nuclear Data Centre Networks, nuclear data development projects, technology transfer, and computer support. This information is complemented by descriptions of other relevant activities in the reporting period, including meetings and publications. The atomic and molecular data programmes are presented to the INDC for information only, since those specific activities are reviewed in depth by the A+M Subcommittee of the International Fusion Research Council. (author)

  7. Report of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section to the International Nuclear Data Committee for the period January 2000 - December 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, A.L.

    2002-05-01

    This report contains descriptions of the major activities of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section in 2000 and 2001 for review by the International Nuclear Data Committee (INDC). Information is provided on the staff and budget, atomic, molecular and nuclear data activities of the Nuclear Data Center, coordination of the Nuclear Data Center Networks, nuclear data development projects, technology transfer, and computer support. This information is complemented by descriptions of other relevant activities in the reporting period, including meetings and publications. The atomic and molecular data programmes are presented to the INDC for information only, since those specific activities are reviewed in depth by the A+M Subcommittee of the International Fusion Research Council. (author)

  8. Experience with Nuclear Medicine Information System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilge Volkan-Salanci

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Radiology information system (RIS is basically evolved for the need of radiologists and ignores the vital steps needed for a proper work flow of Nuclear Medicine Department. Moreover, CT/MRI oriented classical PACS systems are far from satisfying Nuclear Physicians like storing dynamic data for reprocessing and quantitative analysis of colored images. Our purpose was to develop a workflow based Nuclear Medicine Information System (NMIS that fulfills the needs of Nuclear Medicine Department and its integration to hospital PACS system. Material and Methods: Workflow in NMIS uses HL7 (health level seven and steps include, patient scheduling and retrieving information from HIS (hospital information system, radiopharmacy, acquisition, digital reporting and approval of the reports using Nuclear Medicine specific diagnostic codes. Images and dynamic data from cameras of are sent to and retrieved from PACS system (Corttex© for reprocessing and quantitative analysis. Results: NMIS has additional functions to the RIS such as radiopharmaceutical management program which includes stock recording of both radioactive and non-radioactive substances, calculation of the radiopharmaceutical dose for individual patient according to body weight and maximum permissible activity, and calculation of radioactivity left per unit volume for each radionuclide according their half lives. Patient scheduling and gamma camera patient work list settings were arranged according to specific Nuclear Medicine procedures. Nuclear Medicine images and reports can be retrieved and viewed from HIS. Conclusion: NMIS provides functionality to standard RIS and PACS system according to the needs of Nuclear Medicine. (MIRT 2012;21:97-102

  9. Guidelines for patient information in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2010-01-01

    This guide for patients information in nuclear medicine is organised in the following manner: what is a medical examination in nuclear medicine, the preparation and the duration of the examination, the possible risks and the radiation doses, pregnancy, delayed menstruation and nursing and what to do after the examination. (N.C.)

  10. 11-th International conference Nuclear power safety and nuclear education - 2009. Abstracts. Part 1. Session: Safety of nuclear technology; Innovative nuclear systems and fuel cycle; Nuclear knowledge management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The book includes abstracts of the 11-th International conference Nuclear power safety and nuclear education - 2009 (29 Sep - 2 Oct, 2009, Obninsk). Problems of safety of nuclear technology are discussed, innovative nuclear systems and fuel cycles are treated. Abstracts on professional education for nuclear power and industry are presented. Nuclear knowledge management are discussed

  11. Dysnai: Festival of international youth nuclear association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolgarov, A.

    2000-01-01

    Dysnai is a tents camp on the Glade nearby wonderful Lithuanian lake, a kind of interesting and funny show in the forest that takes place for seven summer days each year. Beside the technical reports one can find a lot of causes for self-expression because of spirit of freedom and friendship. Existing for 12 years, the festival provides contacts of youth, which have similar living and work conditions, interests and problems. In July 2000 the XIIl th international festival of young nuclear operators will take place. Any delegation or person can enjoy it. (author)

  12. Current assessment and future potential of the international nuclear market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassidy, P.R.

    1983-01-01

    This is a study of the current and future situation of the international nuclear market. This paper highlights the projections as seen not only by Bechtel Power Corporation, but also by the international nuclear community. It covers in particular the electric power growth projection; the percentage of probable nuclear power generation; operating services for existing nuclear power plants; and the nuclear fuel cycle. (NEA) [fr

  13. Nuclear safety research collaborations between the US and Russian Federation international nuclear safety centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, D.J; Braun, J.C; Klickman, A.E.; Bugaenko, S.E; Kabanov, L.P; Kraev, A.G.

    2000-01-01

    The Russian Federation Ministry for Atomic Energy (MINATOM) and the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) have formed International Nuclear Safety Centers to collaborate on nuclear safety research. USDOE established the U. S. Center at Argonne National Laboratory in October 1995. MINATOM established the Russian Center at the Research and Development Institute of Power Engineering in Moscow in July 1996. In April 1998 the Russian center became an independent, autonomous organization under MINATOM. The goals of the centers are to: cooperate in the development of technologies associated with nuclear safety in nuclear power engineering. be international centers for the collection of information important for safety and technical improvements in nuclear power engineering. maintain a base for fundamental knowledge needed to design nuclear reactors.The strategic approach that is being used to accomplish these goals is for the two centers to work together to use the resources and the talents of the scientists associated with the US Center and the Russian Center to do collaborative research to improve the safety of Russian-designed nuclear reactors

  14. Managing knowledge and information on nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, L.

    2005-01-01

    Described is the management of nuclear safety knowledge through education networks, knowledge pool, sharing, archiving and distributing the knowledge information. Demonstrated is the system used at Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen-und Reaktorsicherheit

  15. Developments in quantum information processing by nuclear ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    qubits, the 2n energy levels of the spin-system can be treated as an n-qubit system. ... Quantum information processing; qubit; nuclear magnetic resonance quantum comput- ing. ..... The equilibrium spectrum has theoretical intensities in the ra-.

  16. International cooperation and guarantee of nuclear safety in the implementation of national nuclear law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Horst

    2011-01-01

    The provisions against damage to be made in accordance with the state of the art as a precondition for licensing under Sec.7, Para.2, No.3 of the German Atomic Energy Act more than ever relate to international findings and practice in science as well as technology. In view of the peaceful use of nuclear power worldwide, together with the manifold institutionalized international and European schemes for cooperation within IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency), OECD/NEA (Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development Nuclear Energy Agency), and within the framework of EURATOM, these can be gleaned only from the global state of the art. In addition, there are informal associations and bilateral cooperation schemes of countries within which knowledge is exchanged and, in part, even specific measures ensuring nuclear safety are agreed upon. Also existing international rules and regulations are important. It is for the national enforcement authorities in the nuclear field to determine and assess the bandwidths of scientific opinions and theoretical as well as practical technical availabilities with regard to all tenable scientific findings and technical developments known on the international horizon. (orig.)

  17. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Information Digest: 1993 edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission Information Digest (digest) provides a summary of information about the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), NRC's regulatory responsibilities, the activities NRC licenses, and general information on domestic and worldwide nuclear energy. The digest, published annually, is a compilation of nuclear- and NRC-related data and is designed to provide a quick reference to major facts about the agency and the industry it regulates. In general, the data cover 1975 through 1992, with exceptions noted. Information on generating capacity and average capacity factor for operating U.S. commercial nuclear power reactors is obtained from monthly operating reports that are submitted directly to the NRC by the licensee. This information is reviewed by the NRC for consistency only and no independent validation and/or verification is performed. Comments and/or suggestions on the data presented are welcomed and should be directed to Karen Olive, United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of the Controller, Division of Budget and Analysis, Washington, D.C. 20555. For detailed and complete information about tables and figures, refer to the source publications

  18. Preservation of information in Fourier theory based deconvolved nuclear spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madan, V.K.; Gopalakrishnan, K.R.; Sharma, R.C.; Rattan, S.S.

    1995-01-01

    Nuclear spectroscopy is extremely useful to the internal radiation dosimetry for the estimation of body burden due to gamma emitters. Analysis of nuclear spectra is concerned with the extraction of qualitative and quantitative information embedded in the spectra. A spectral deconvolution method based on Fourier theory is probably the simplest method of deconvolving nuclear spectra. It is proved mathematically that the deconvolution method preserves the qualitative information. It is shown by using simulated spectra and an observed gamma ray spectrum that the method preserves the quantitative information. This may provide a novel approach of information extraction from a deconvolved spectrum. The paper discusses the methodology, mathematical analysis, and the results obtained by deconvolving spectra. (author). 6 refs., 2 tabs

  19. Tomography in nuclear medicine. Proceedings of an international symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is currently being used universally in clinical practice, while positron emission tomography (PET), originally developed as a technique for research, has also gradually moved from the research laboratory to the clinical environment. However, there are significant differences in nuclear medicine capabilities, especially in tomography, between developed and developing countries. The present status and future prospects of nuclear medicine tomography were the main topics of discussion at this latest international symposium, organized by the IAEA in co-operation with the World Health Organization and held in Vienna from 21 to 25 August 1995. The purpose of the meeting was to share experience and information on new developments and clinical applications of two promising tomographic techniques: SPECT and PET. Eight invited papers and 34 regular papers from 23 countries were presented. In addition, there was a panel discussion on the future and direction of tomography in nuclear medicine for developing countries. Refs, figs, tabs

  20. Ukrainian Nuclear Society International Conference 'Strategy of the nuclear power development: The choice of Ukraine'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vishnevskij, I.N.; Trofimenko, A.P.

    2001-01-01

    Abstracts of the papers presented at the International Conference of the Ukrainian Nuclear Society 'Strategy of the nuclear power development'. The following problems are considered: present situation with the nuclear power and its safety; nuclear fuel cycle development; waste and spent nuclear fuel management; reactors' decommissioning issues; modernization of the NPP with WWER reactors; future reactors; economics of nuclear power; safety culture; legal and regulatory framework, state nuclear regulatory control; PR in nuclear power industry; staff training

  1. The U.S. national nuclear forensics library, nuclear materials information program, and data dictionary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamont, Stephen Philip; Brisson, Marcia; Curry, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear forensics assessments to determine material process history requires careful comparison of sample data to both measured and modeled nuclear material characteristics. Developing centralized databases, or nuclear forensics libraries, to house this information is an important step to ensure all relevant data will be available for comparison during a nuclear forensics analysis and help expedite the assessment of material history. The approach most widely accepted by the international community at this time is the implementation of National Nuclear Forensics libraries, which would be developed and maintained by individual nations. This is an attractive alternative toan international database since it provides an understanding that each country has data on materials produced and stored within their borders, but eliminates the need to reveal any proprietary or sensitive information to other nations. To support the concept of National Nuclear Forensics libraries, the United States Department of Energy has developed a model library, based on a data dictionary, or set of parameters designed to capture all nuclear forensic relevant information about a nuclear material. Specifically, information includes material identification, collection background and current location, analytical laboratories where measurements were made, material packaging and container descriptions, physical characteristics including mass and dimensions, chemical and isotopic characteristics, particle morphology or metallurgical properties, process history including facilities, and measurement quality assurance information. While not necessarily required, it may also be valuable to store modeled data sets including reactor burn-up or enrichment cascade data for comparison. It is fully expected that only a subset of this information is available or relevant to many materials, and much of the data populating a National Nuclear Forensics library would be process analytical or material accountability

  2. Reactor calculations and nuclear information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, D.W.

    1977-12-01

    The relationship of sets of nuclear parameters and the macroscopic reactor quantities that can be calculated from them is examined. The framework of the study is similar to that of Usachev and Bobkov. The analysis is generalised and some properties required by common sense are demonstrated. The form of calculation permits revision of the parameter set. It is argued that any discrepancy between a calculation and measurement of a macroscopic quantity is more useful when applied directly to prediction of other macroscopic quantities than to revision of the parameter set. The mathematical technique outlined is seen to describe common engineering practice. (Author)

  3. Twenty years of an international nuclear laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suschny, O.

    1982-01-01

    The laboratories of the International Atomic Energy Agency were started in 1959 with a physics laboratory, a chemistry laboratory and an electronics workshop. Early work centred on absolute radionuclide calibrations and on assessments of the consequences of radioactive fallout from atomic weapons testing on the health of the people in Member States. Subsequently, work was started on the use of radioactive and stable isotopes in agriculture, in hydrology, in medical applications, in pest and insect control and with the entry into force of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty a Safeguard Analytical Laboratory was established to provide support for the Agency's safeguards inspection responsibilities. Together with WHO a network of 43 Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratories were set up in Member States to improve dosimetric accuracy in medicine and radiation protection worldwide. Throughout their history, the laboratories of the IAEA have lent great importance on their training programmes that have enabled many workers in nuclear or nuclear related research to gain experience. This emphasis on training has been stressed particularly to benefit research workers from developing countries

  4. International group calls for new nuclear 'bargain of confidence'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    A report published by the International Consultative Group on Nuclear Energy on 17 January 1980 concluded that the option of expanding nuclear power supply will not be available for the long term unless its development is carefully sustained during the intervening period. Quotations from the report are given on world energy supplies, establishing nuclear options, nuclear safety and the public interest, and nuclear trade and nuclear proliferation. (UK)

  5. The responsibility of nuclear suppliers in the international market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiessen, C.W.; Cotton, J.D.; Tait, B.I.

    1978-01-01

    As a result of escalating oil prices, the developing countries are more and more turning to nuclear energy. As these countries become a more significant part of the international market, unique issues must be faced by the utility and country concerned and the nuclear supplier. A fundamental prerequisite of a successful supplier/customer relationship is a good relationship between their two governments. The supplier can fulfil an effective liaison function to ensure efficiency of communications in this area. In the preplanning phase the supplier can play a major role in supplying information relative to siting, unit size, system planning and plant economics. Once the nuclear choice is made, the pros and cons of purchasing plants on a turnkey versus non-turnkey basis must be weighed. The customer must balance his available resources and experience against his desires for acquisition of overall plant and systems knowledge. During the planning and procurement phase the subject of training, maintenance and service facilities can be an effective part of a comprehensive nuclear programme. In fact, local training and service centres could logically be the first step of a long-term localization effort. With respect to localization the supplier should be capable and experienced in developing this capability and willing to make a long-term commitment in this area. Through a clearer understanding of the responsibilities of the nuclear supplier and a clear delineation of his role, developing nations can more adequately assess the basis upon which to move forward on a nuclear programme. (author)

  6. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Information Digest, 1991 edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olive, K.L.

    1991-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission Information Digest provides a summary of information about the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), NRC's regulatory responsibilities, and the areas NRC licenses. This digest is a compilation of NRC-related data and is designed to provide a quick reference to major facts about the agency and the industry it regulates. In general, the data cover 1975 through 1990, with exceptions noted. For operating US commercial nuclear power reactors, information on generating capacity and average capacity factor is obtained from Monthly Operating Reports submitted to the NRC directly by the licensee. This information is reviewed for consistency only. No independent validation and/or verification is performed by the NRC. For detailed and complete information about tables and figures, refer to the source publications. This digest is published annually for the general use of the NRC staff and is available to the public. 30 figs., 12 tabs

  7. 15. International symposium on nuclear electronics and International seminar CAMAC-92

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The proceedings of the 25. International symposium on nuclear electronics and the CAMAC-92 seminar are presented. The problems on creation of new effective systems for acquisition and processing the information in the field of high energies, spectroscopy and by radiation control at reactors are considered in the reports. Equipment interfaces, analogue-numerical converters, programmed controllers, etc, accomplished relative to the CAMAC and FASTBUS standards are described

  8. The analysis of the nuclear information resources on the internet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Guoqing; Tu Jinchi; Yao Ruiquan

    2014-01-01

    Information resources have become increasingly prominent role in social and economic development, which has become the focus of international competition in the new open environment such as political, economic, cultural and military. The level of management, development and utilization of network information resources has become an important symbol for the measure of the level of development and degree of informatization of a country or an enterprise. But the exploitation of information resources has greater complexity compared with that of natural resources. Facing of the mass and the uneven quality of the network information, we must sort out the resources through a broader perspective and make a structured framework for the development of network information resources. This article analysed the statistical data of the published content, publishing style, renewal period, data type and so on. It also analysed and evaluated the different types and content of the nuclear information resources on the Internet by its number and characters. Furthermore, it provides a basis for developing and utilizing of nuclear information resources on the Internet of foreign related organizations and sifting the targeted, high qualitied, guaranteed and valued nuclear information resources. It can make the organization and management of the nuclear information resources on the Internet more effective. (authors)

  9. Proceedings of the ANS executive conference on international nuclear commerce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    These proceedings compile papers given at a conference on nuclear commerce. Topice include: global forecasting, foreign policy, nuclear weapons proliferation, trade, non-proliferation policies, non-proliferation treaties, IAEA safeguards, international cooperation, nuclear materials management and safety, the nuclear power industry and energy policy, plutonium storage, and uranium enrichment

  10. 16. international conference on nuclear tracks in solids: abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    16th International Conference on Nuclear Tracks in Solids was held on 7-11 September, 1992 in Beijing. The specialists discussed nuclear tracks formation, development and observation. The applications of nuclear tracks technique in the fields of nuclear physics, life science, geoscience and environment monitoring were discussed at the meeting. More than 300 papers were contributed to the meeting

  11. Nuclear deception: soviet information policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, E.P.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of the accident at the Chernobyl Unit 4 Reactor on information policies in the USSR is examined. The lack of an agreed-upon information policy and intraparty disagreement over domestic and foreign policy help to explain the delay in disclosure of the accident and conflicting statements concerning long-term health effects. A modest change in policy since Chernobyl has been noted: the willingness of Soviet spokespersons to discuss and debate issues with foreign correspondents, to publish sharply critical letters from citizens and a few foreign officials, and to provide many details about the nature and consequences of the accident

  12. Application of IAEA's International Nuclear Event Scale to events at testing/research reactors in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozawa, Masao; Watanabe, Norio

    1999-01-01

    The International Nuclear Event Scale (INES) is a means for providing prompt, clear and consistent information related to nuclear events and facilitating communication between the nuclear community, the media and the public on such events. This paper describes the INES rating process for events at testing/research reactors and nuclear fuel processing facilities and experience on the application of the INES scale in Japan. (author)

  13. The IAEA Nuclear Data Center its role in the International Scientific Community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, A.

    1976-07-01

    The role of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section as an international data information and analysis center for the co-ordination of the world-wide collection, exchange and dissemination of nuclear data is described. Emphasis is put on the recent activities of the center in the assessment of nuclear data needs in various branches of science and technology, and on its projected development as a global referral center for nuclear data. (author)

  14. Informing future societies about nuclear waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, M.

    1994-01-01

    In 1990 a working group of the NKS (the Nordic nuclear safety program) was formed and give the task of established a basis for a common Nordic view of the need for information conservation for nuclear waste repositories. The Group investigated what tipy of information should be conserved; in what form the information should be kept; the quality of the information; and the problems of future retrieval of information, including retrieval after very long periods of time. Topics covered include the following: scientific aspects including social context of scientific solutions; information management; systems for conservation and retrieval of information including the problems of prediction; archives, markers, archives vs. markers, and continuing processes in society; Archive media including paper documents, microfilm, digital media, media lifetimes; and finally conclusions and recommendations

  15. International conference on innovative technologies for nuclear fuel cycles and nuclear power. Unedited proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear power is a significant contributor to the global supply of electricity, and continues to be the major source that can provide electricity on a large scale with a comparatively minimal impact on the environment. But it is evident that, despite decades of experience with this technology, nuclear power today remains mainly in a holding position, with its future somewhat uncertain primarily due to concerns related to waste, safety and security. One of the most important factors that would influence future nuclear growth is the innovation in reactor and fuel cycle technologies to successfully maximize the benefits of nuclear power while minimizing the associated concerns. The main objectives of the Conference were to facilitate exchange of information between senior experts and policy makers from Member States and international organizations on important aspects of the development of innovative technologies for future generations of nuclear power reactors and fuel cycles; to create an understanding of the social, environmental and economic conditions that would facilitate innovative and sustainable nuclear technologies; and to identify opportunities for collaborative work between Member States and international organizations and programmes. All relevant aspects of innovative technologies for nuclear fuel cycles and nuclear power were discussed in an open, frank and objective manner. These proceedings contain a summary of the results of the conference, invited and contributed papers, and summaries of panel discussions. No large increase in the use of nuclear energy is foreseen in the near and medium term, but is likely in the long term if developing country per-capita electricity consumption reaches that of the developed world. The nuclear sector including regulators view an increased use of nuclear energy as the solution for global sustainable energy needs considering that significant reductions in CO 2 emissions would be required. Although the current nuclear

  16. Proceedings of the International Atomic Energy Agency specialists' meeting on advanced information methods and artificial intelligence in nuclear power plant control rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The main objective of the meeting is to provide a forum for exchange of information among the participating experts both at this meeting and later through the publication of the meeting's proceedings. The following topics are considered: experiences from use of information technology in the control room, including operator interfaces, operator support systems and complete control rooms; human aspects of introducing information technology in the control room; design and evaluation of advanced control rooms. 26 papers were presented at the meeting. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  17. NCIS: a nuclear criticality information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koponen, B.L.; Hampel, V.E.

    1984-01-01

    The NCIS is one of the developments carried out to meet the requirements in the field of criticality safety information. Its primary goal is to enhance nuclear criticality safety by dissemination of data, standards, and training material. This paper presents the ''NCIS'' progess since 1950: computer-searching, database management, nuclear critical experiments bibliography. American Nuclear Society transactions criticality safety publications compilation, edition of a personnel directory representing over 140 organizations located in 16 countries and showing a wide range of specialists involved in the field of nuclear criticality safety. The NCIS uses the information management and communication resources of TIS (Technology Information System): automated access procedures; creation of program-dependent information systems; communications. The NCIS is still in a growing, formative stage; it has concentrated first on collecting and organizing the nuclear criticality literature; nuclear critical data, calculational tools, standards, and training materials will follow. Finally the planned and contemplated resources are dealt with: expansion of bibliographic compilations; news database; fundamental criticality safety reference; criticality benchmarck database; user community; training resources; related resources; criticality accident database; dynamic databook; dynamic textbook; expert knowledge system; and, extraction of intelligence

  18. Establishment of nuclear knowledge and information infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Jong Hwa; Yoo, K. J.; Kim, Y. T. and others

    2002-11-01

    An internet portal site which can be a hub web site of information, was developed and disclosed to enhance the information production and dissimination. The representative functions of the portal site are to provide a site map which provide categorized service of domestic and global internet home pages, and a bulletin board, a closed user group. The serviced databases consist of an encyclopedia of nuclear information, which contains detailed description of nuclear relevant topics, a software database for computer program services, a newspaper database for proving up to date news articles, a descriptive database on the incident and accident on the nuclear power plant, and a central search engine on the bibliographic informations. The training lecture texts for the experts on the field of nuclear energy and radiation technology was converted into HTML formatted text and are on service on an internet web site. Six coursewares for the students studying the nuclear engineering are developed and six digital education platforms are introduced for the nuclear engineering departments of domestic universities. The platforms are used in teaching students utilizing the courseware intergrated with engineering simulation programs for substituting experiments which are difficult, dangerous and sometimes impossible in real situation

  19. Process information systems in nuclear reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeschke, A.; Keller, H.; Orth, H.

    1987-01-01

    On a production management level, a process information system in a nuclear reprocessing plant (NRP) has to fulfill conventional operating functions and functions for nuclear material surveillance (safeguards). Based on today's state of the art of on-line process control technology, the progress in hardware and software technology allows to introduce more process-specific intelligence into process information systems. Exemplified by an expert-system-aided laboratory management system as component of a NRP process information system, the paper demonstrates that these technologies can be applied already. (DG) [de

  20. Nuclear safety research collaborations between the U.S. and Russian Federation International Nuclear Safety Centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, D. J.; Braun, J. C.; Klickman, A. E.; Bougaenko, S. E.; Kabonov, L. P.; Kraev, A. G.

    2000-01-01

    The Russian Federation Ministry for Atomic Energy (MINATOM) and the US Department of Energy (USDOE) have formed International Nuclear Safety Centers to collaborate on nuclear safety research. USDOE established the US Center (ISINSC) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in October 1995. MINATOM established the Russian Center (RINSC) at the Research and Development Institute of Power Engineering (RDIPE) in Moscow in July 1996. In April 1998 the Russian center became a semi-independent, autonomous organization under MINATOM. The goals of the center are to: Cooperate in the development of technologies associated with nuclear safety in nuclear power engineering; Be international centers for the collection of information important for safety and technical improvements in nuclear power engineering; and Maintain a base for fundamental knowledge needed to design nuclear reactors. The strategic approach is being used to accomplish these goals is for the two centers to work together to use the resources and the talents of the scientists associated with the US Center and the Russian Center to do collaborative research to improve the safety of Russian-designed nuclear reactors. The two centers started conducting joint research and development projects in January 1997. Since that time the following ten joint projects have been initiated: INSC databases--web server and computing center; Coupled codes--Neutronic and thermal-hydraulic; Severe accident management for Soviet-designed reactors; Transient management and advanced control; Survey of relevant nuclear safety research facilities in the Russian Federation; Computer code validation for transient analysis of VVER and RBMK reactors; Advanced structural analysis; Development of a nuclear safety research and development plan for MINATOM; Properties and applications of heavy liquid metal coolants; and Material properties measurement and assessment. Currently, there is activity in eight of these projects. Details on each of these

  1. Nuclear explosion and internal contamination; Explosion nucleaire et contamination interne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aeberhardt, A [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1956-07-01

    By the study of the conditions of internal contamination due to the radioactive mixture produced by a nuclear explosion, the parts played by the relative weights of the different elements and the mode of expression of the doses are considered. Only the knowledge of the weight composition of the contamination mixture and of its evolution as a function of time can provide the required basis for the study of its metabolism in the organism. The curves which give the composition of the fission product mixture - in number of nuclei - - as a function of time - have been established. These curves are applied to some practical examples, particularly relative to the nature of contamination, radiotoxicity of some elements and assessment of hazards. (author) [French] Etudiant les modalites de la contamination interne par les elements radioactifs apparus lors d'une explosion nucleaire, le role de la 'masse' et le mode d'expression des doses sont envisages. La connaissance de la composition en 'masse' du melange contaminant et de son evolution en fonction du temps peut seule apporter les bases necessaires a l'etude de son comportement dans l'organisme. Les courbes donnant la composition du melange de produits de fission - en nombre de noyaux - - en fonction du temps - ont ete etablies. Quelques applications pratiques, relatives en particulier a la nature de la contamination, a la radiotoxicite de certains elements et a l'evaluation de risque, sont envisagees a titre d'exemple. (auteur)

  2. International safeguards in large scale nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, D.; Heil, J.

    1977-01-01

    The trend in the energy sector in most of the industrialized areas of the world shows rather clearly, that the rate of installation of nuclear plants will be very high and that the largest possible units of nuclear material handling and storage facilities will be built. Various experiments and analyses of measurement methods relevant to safeguards, in typical nuclear facilities like a fuel reprocessing or a fabrication plant, have shown that the associated measurement errors as obtained under normal operating conditions are such that they are mainly dominated by systematic errors and that such systematic errors may lie in the range of percentages of the measured amount so that a material balance in such a plant could not normally be closed with high accuracy. The simplest way of going around the problem would be to increase the frequency of striking a material balance over a given period of time. This could however lead to an anormous increase in the technical and financial burden for the operator of a facility. The present paper analyses this problem in some detail for some facilities and shows that with a properly developed information system in such plants and a combination of containment, surveillance and accountancy measures, safeguards statements for relatively low significant amounts can be made with the attainable range of measurement accuracies

  3. International exchange of safety and licensing information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafleur, J.D. Jr.; Hauber, R.D.; Chenier, D.M.

    1977-01-01

    A network of formal and informal bilateral arrangements for the exchange of nuclear safety information is being established by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. For developing countries such arrangements can provide ready access to the extensive, fully documented safety analyses and safety research results that USNRC has accumulated. USNRC has been receiving foreign visitors at a rate of about 500 per year, largely for discussions of safety and licensing questions related to light water reactors. Exchanges also are taking place on the safety of advanced reactors. A special interest of the USNRC is in providing for reciprocal communication, at the earliest possible time, of important problems, decisions and other actions on nuclear safety matters. For example, it is essential that a newly discovered problem in a nuclear reactor be brought immediately to the attention of other governments that are responsible for the safety of similar reactors. Definite progress has been made in the USA in defining categories of information that USNRC can receive in confidence from foreign countries, and can protect from disclosure under the US Freedom of Information Act. Certain exchanges have taken place on this basis. Experience in the establishment and operation of USNRC's bilateral exchange arrangements is summarized. A typical exchange with the regulatory authority of a country building its first power reactor is described. (author)

  4. Evaluation of excess nuclear materials suitability for international safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, J.W.; White, W.C.; Davis, R.M.; Cherry, R.C.

    1996-01-01

    President Clinton announced in March 1995 the permanent withdrawal of 200 tons of fissile material from the US nuclear stockpile. This action was made possible by the dramatic reduction in nuclear weapons stockpile size and a desire to demonstrate the US'' commitment to nonproliferation goals. To provide further assurance of that commitment, the US is addressing placement of these materials under International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards. An initial step of this overall assessment was evaluation of the nuclear materials'' suitability for international safeguards. US Department of Energy (DOE) field organizations reviewed a detailed listing of all candidate materials with respect to characterization status, security classification, and acceptability for international safeguards compared to specified criteria. These criteria included form, location, environment and safety considerations, measurability, and stability. The evaluation resulted in broad categorizations of all materials with respect to preparing and placing materials under IAEA safeguards and provided essential information for decisions on the timing for offering materials as a function of materials attributes. A plan is being prepared to determine the availability of these materials for IAEA safeguards considering important factors such as costs, processes and facilities required to prepare materials, and impacts on other programs

  5. Nuclear safety: an international approach: the convention on nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper is a general presentation of the IAEA Convention on Nuclear Safety which has already be signed by 50 countries and which is the first legal instrument that directly addresses the safety of nuclear power plants worldwide. The paper gives a review of its development and some key provisions for a better understanding of how this agreement will operate in practice. The Convention consists of an introductory preamble and four chapters consisting of 35 articles dealing with: the principal objectives, definitions and scope of application; the various obligations (general provisions, legislation, responsibility and regulation, general safety considerations taking into account: the financial and human resources, the human factors, the quality assurance, the assessment and verification of safety, the radiation protection and the emergency preparedness; the safety of installations: sitting, design and construction, operation); the periodic meetings of the contracting parties to review national reports on the measures taken to implement each of the obligations, and the final clauses and other judicial provisions common to international agreements. (J.S.). 1 append

  6. Regional cooperation based on multilateral international agreements in nuclear field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valcic, I.

    1996-01-01

    Multilateral international agreements have defined the framework of behavior and cooperation in various fields and aspects of peaceful use of nuclear energy. Thus, obligations have been defined in the following areas: nonproliferation of nuclear weapons, physical protection of nuclear material, liability for nuclear damage, nuclear safety, early notification about a nuclear accident and assistance in case of nuclear accident. Obligations regarding radioactive waste management should be defined soon. This paper gives a review of obligations from particular agreements with a special emphasis on those which are being realized through mutual cooperation of concerned countries and are important for safe use of nuclear energy. (author)

  7. Enhancing nuclear emergency response through international co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugletveit, F.; Aaltonen, H.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: A large number of different national plans and procedures have been established and substantial resources allocated world wide with varying comprehensiveness and quality depending an the national requirements and the possible threat scenarios considered. These national plans are only to a small degree harmonized. It is clear that it is the responsibility of the authorities in the respective countries or utilities under their jurisdiction, to decide upon and implement appropriate response actions to a nuclear emergency. The basic needs for responding properly are: infrastructure in terms of plans, procedures etc.; information regarding the accident, its development and consequences; resources in terms of expertise, man power and tools for acquiring and processing information, making assessments and decisions and carry out the actions. When a large number of countries are making assessments and decisions for their own country and providing the public with information, it is important that assessments, decisions and public information become correct, complete and consistent across boarders. In order to achieve this, they should all have access to the same information as basis for their actions. Lack of information or wrong information could easily lead to wrong assessments, wrong decisions and misleading information to the public. If there is a serious nuclear emergency somewhere that could potentially affect several or many States in one way or another, 'everyone' would like to know 'everything' that happens 'everywhere'. In this case, all States should have the obligation to share with the international community the relevant information they have available themselves and that could be of interest for other States responding to the situation. During a serious nuclear or radiological emergency, the demand for different kinds of resources is huge and could, in many countries, probably exceed national capabilities. Looking at the situation in a global

  8. Impartial information on nuclear waste needed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hautakangas, H.

    1997-01-01

    Biased communication and lack of information on issues that interest the public may make it more difficult for people to absorb information on nuclear waste in the localities that are currently being studied for their suitability as disposal sites of spent nuclear fuel. This was one of the findings made by interviewing residents in these localities. The majority of the 19 interviewers considered that there has not been enough of the kind of information on nuclear waste that would easily attract the residents' interest in the localities concerned. When asked about important sources of information, the interviewers only listed the nuclear power companies and the organisations opposed to the disposal, as well as the general news media. In other words, the need for an impartial source of information was apparent. In general, the interviewers hoped to receive more information about the operations that the disposal will require above the ground, i.e. about transports and conditioning of the waste. It may be that the need for such information has been overlooked, since technical experts do not usually consider transports or conditioning to be a major safety risk. (author)

  9. National and international nuclear material monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waddoups, I.G.

    1996-01-01

    The status of nuclear materials in both the U.S. and Former Soviet Union is changing based upon the execution of agreements relative to weapons materials production and weapon dismantlement. The result of these activities is that a considerably different emphasis is being placed on how nuclear materials are viewed and utilized. Even though much effort is being expended on the final disposition of these materials, the interim need for storage and security of the material is increasing. Both safety and security requirements exist to govern activities when these materials are placed in storage. These requirements are intended to provide confidence that the material is not being misused and that the storage operations are conducted safely. Both of these goals can be significantly enhanced if technological monitoring of the material is performed. This paper will briefly discuss the traditional manual methods of U.S. and international material monitoring and then present approaches and technology that are available to achieve the same goals under the evolving environment

  10. The 26th International Nuclear Physics Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    It was a pleasure to welcome all delegates and accompanying persons to Adelaide for the 26th International Conference in Nuclear Physics, INPC2016. As the major meeting in our field, it was a wonderful opportunity to catch up with colleagues from around the world, learn about the very latest developments and share ideas. We were grateful for the support of the Commission on Nuclear Physics, C12, of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP), which chose Adelaide to host this meeting. We were also honoured that the President of IUPAP, Prof. Bruce McKellar was present at the meeting to welcome delegates and participate in the proceedings. We acknowledge the financial support for the conference which was made available by a number of organisations. We were especially grateful to the major sponsors, the Adelaide Convention Bureau, the University of Adelaide, the Australian National University and ANSTO, as well as IUPAP, the ARC Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Terascale (CoEPP) and several of the world's major nuclear physics laboratories, BNL, GSI, JLab and TRIUMF. As a result of these contributions we were able to offer support to attend the conference to more than 50 international students. Not only did we have a superb scientific program but, consistent with IUPAP guidelines, more than 40% of the invited plenary talks were presented by women. In order to reach out to the local community, Cynthia Keppel (from JLab) presented a public lecture on Hadron Beam Therapy on Tuesday evening, September 13th. As presenting a talk is now often a condition for financial support to attend an international conference, there were 11 simultaneous parallel sessions with more than 350 presentations. We are especially grateful to the International Advisory Committee, the Program Committee and the Conveners whose advice and hard work made it possible for all this to come together. I would also like to acknowledge the work of the Local Organising

  11. Clustering and retrieving information in nuclear science for decision-support techniques[Proceedings of the 2nd International FLINS Workshop (Mol, Belgium, September 25-27, 1996)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dulin, S.K.; Kiselev, I.A

    1996-07-01

    This paper covers the problem of storing and retrieving information from big data bases, where the information does not have an exact structure and different object have very thin (or weak) relations each with other. It is one of the biggest problems in decision-support systems, especially in those environments, where the information is complicated and very changeable. One of the way to solve this problem could be the building a semiotic model of the environment according to our goals. One of the important parts of systems based on semiotic modelling is the active knowledge base supplied with the special concordance mechanism of structural consistency. This paper deals with an active knowledge base condition considered by means of connections structure analysis of knowledge base components. Thereby the dominant attribute of any component is supposed to be the connections structure of knowledge base component (object). A set of objects with connections that have a binary existence estimate is examined. Consonant, dissonant and assonant sets are distinguished, depending on the satisfiability of the consonance criterion. An algorithm is proposed and realised for reducing assonant and dissonant sets to a consonance state with minimum expenditures in the sense of the general number variable estimates of the connections. This way of decision has been applied to arrays of variable information stored on CD-ROM disks.

  12. The innovation and application of the nuclear power construction management information system MISNPC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Kaihua; Tang Zihui; Zhang Baiqi; Sun Guangwei; Zhu Guodong; Qian Fuhua

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on introducing the innovation achievements on the management information system of nuclear power construction (MISNPC). The innovation is achieved through summarizing the practice of nuclear power construction in China and drawing on advanced experience of international nuclear power construction. The innovation, including the management standard for nuclear power construction, the standard of construction process, the standard of nuclear-power basic codes and the standard for nuclear power construction and control, can be rapidly copied for application in various nuclear power construction projects. The application of the innovation may play an essential role in ensuring safe construction and operation of nuclear power plants in China and improving economic benefits. (authors)

  13. International nuclear safety center database on material properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, J.K.

    1996-01-01

    International nuclear safety center database on the following material properties is described: fuel, cladding,absorbers, moderators, structural materials, coolants, concretes, liquid mixtures, uranium dioxide

  14. A study on international nuclear organizations and conventions for the globalization of Korean nuclear community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kwang Seok; Oh, Keun Bae; Lee, Byung Wook; Cho, Il Hoon; Lee, Jae Sung; Choi, Young Rok; Ko, Han Seok; Ham, Chul Hoon; Lee, Byung Woon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze the current status of international nuclear organizations and conventions in systems perspective and suggest national strategies for utilizing them for the globalization of Korean nuclear community. This study analyzes the current status of international nuclear organizations such as IAEA(International Atomic Energy Agency) and international nuclear conventions related to nuclear accidents, nuclear liability, physical protection or nuclear safety. Based on the analysis, this study suggests national strategies, in general and specific terms, to utilize international nuclear organizations and conventions for the globalization of Korean nuclear community. Separately from this report this study publishes `IAEA Handbook`, which contains all about IAEA such as statute, membership, organizational structure, main activities, finance and budget, etc.. 9 tabs., 2 figs., 35 refs. (Author).

  15. A study on international nuclear organizations and conventions for the globalization of Korean nuclear community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kwang Seok; Oh, Keun Bae; Lee, Byung Wook; Cho, Il Hoon; Lee, Jae Sung; Choi, Young Rok; Ko, Han Seok; Ham, Chul Hoon; Lee, Byung Woon

    1995-12-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze the current status of international nuclear organizations and conventions in systems perspective and suggest national strategies for utilizing them for the globalization of Korean nuclear community. This study analyzes the current status of international nuclear organizations such as IAEA(International Atomic Energy Agency) and international nuclear conventions related to nuclear accidents, nuclear liability, physical protection or nuclear safety. Based on the analysis, this study suggests national strategies, in general and specific terms, to utilize international nuclear organizations and conventions for the globalization of Korean nuclear community. Separately from this report this study publishes 'IAEA Handbook', which contains all about IAEA such as statute, membership, organizational structure, main activities, finance and budget, etc.. 9 tabs., 2 figs., 35 refs. (Author)

  16. Nuclear energy, environmental protection and international conflicts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menke-Glueckert, P.

    1975-01-01

    Some general and some critical remarks on: nuclear energy as an image for politics; nuclear energy as a model for research planning; nuclear controversy; the principle of precaution in nuclear and radiation protection law; reactor safety on probation; advantages and economy of nuclear energy; communication difficulties; the special role of nuclear energy; the need for European site planning; supervision of fissionable materials; the world's energy household in danger; global structure politics and nuclear energy; nuclear energy with a capacity for social innovations. (HP/LN) [de

  17. International exchange of safety and licensing information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafleur, J.D. Jr.; Hauber, R.D.; Chenier, D.M.

    1977-01-01

    A network of formal and informal bilateral arrangements for the exchange of nuclear safety information is being established by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. For developing countries, such arrangements can provide ready access to the extensive, fully documented safety analyses and safety research results that NRC has accumulated. NRC has been receiving foreign visitors at a rate of about 500 per year, largely for discussions of safety and licensing questions related to light water reactors. Exchanges also are taking place on the safety of advanced reactors. A special interest of the NRC is in providing for reciprocal communicaion, at the earliest possible time, of important problems, decisions and other actions on nuclear safety matters. For example, it is essential that a newly-discovered problem in a nuclear reactor be brought immediately to the attention of other governments which are responsible for the safety of similar reactors. Definite progress has been made in the U.S. Freedom of Information Act. Certain exchanges have taken place on this basis. Experience in the establishment and operation of NRC's bilateral exchange arrangements is summarized. A typical exchange with the regulatory authority of country building its first power reactor is described

  18. Productivity results of nuclear information systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groves, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    The information necessary to manage a nuclear generation station and multiple stations is greater today than ever before. The management of the processes necessary to develop information from data requires professional management and a programmatic approach. The cost is not insignificant. But the cost of not facing this challenge squarely is greater. The San Onofre Nuclear Generation Plant has developed the Nuclear Information Services function to assist management and professionals at all levels with their information needs. Often, this is merely giving them the tools they need to do it themselves. Herein contains a selection of specific examples that urges officer and senior level management to review the concept of the Nuclear Information Services function in more depth to determine the appropriateness of such an approach within their organizations. The establishment of on line computerized systems for the majority of the work flow processes and administrative process has resulted in an estimate 190 less people needed. The Health Physics Automated Access Control System (AACS) implementation resulted in a savings of $800,000 a year. The implementation of a Site Procedures Information Network (SPIN) has saved $160,000 per year

  19. Nuclear safety. ICFTU proposals for the international control of the nuclear energy industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-07-01

    are strong proponents of its use and others have said that they are only prepared to accept its application if safety controls are substantially improved. All affiliates of the ICFTU are convinced that energy policy options must be widened through increased research and development of new and renewable sources and through extensive energy conservation measures. The environmental impact of all methods of energy generation must be assessed on the basis of the public availability of all relevant information. It is in this context, that whatever their views about the desirability or otherwise of nuclear power, all ICFTU affiliates recognise the immediate need to assure the highest possible level of safety for all nuclear plants and activities everywhere - for example to deal with radioactive wastes created over the last 30 years. Even if some countries opt out of nuclear power it is likely that many others will be committed to it for many years. Given the widespread effects of a catastrophic failure anywhere in the world we must therefore all be concerned to strengthen the international safety regime. Because of their historic role in campaigning for health and safety at work, unions are well placed to exercise an independent watchdog role - making use of the knowledge and skills of their members in the nuclear industry - and are also able to speak on behalf of a large membership which is representative representative of the wide public concern about nuclear safety. Immediately following the Chernobyl disaster, the ICFTU Executive Board adopted a resolution (reproduced as Appendix 2 to this document) calling for immediate steps to tighten up nuclear safety. In the light of subsequent developments, the Confederation has now given further detailed consideration to the whole question of nuclear safety and has decided to publish this report which contains detailed proposals for tighter international control of nuclear energy via the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA

  20. Nuclear safety. ICFTU proposals for the international control of the nuclear energy industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    are strong proponents of its use and others have said that they are only prepared to accept its application if safety controls are substantially improved. All affiliates of the ICFTU are convinced that energy policy options must be widened through increased research and development of new and renewable sources and through extensive energy conservation measures. The environmental impact of all methods of energy generation must be assessed on the basis of the public availability of all relevant information. It is in this context, that whatever their views about the desirability or otherwise of nuclear power, all ICFTU affiliates recognise the immediate need to assure the highest possible level of safety for all nuclear plants and activities everywhere - for example to deal with radioactive wastes created over the last 30 years. Even if some countries opt out of nuclear power it is likely that many others will be committed to it for many years. Given the widespread effects of a catastrophic failure anywhere in the world we must therefore all be concerned to strengthen the international safety regime. Because of their historic role in campaigning for health and safety at work, unions are well placed to exercise an independent watchdog role - making use of the knowledge and skills of their members in the nuclear industry - and are also able to speak on behalf of a large membership which is representative representative of the wide public concern about nuclear safety. Immediately following the Chernobyl disaster, the ICFTU Executive Board adopted a resolution (reproduced as Appendix 2 to this document) calling for immediate steps to tighten up nuclear safety. In the light of subsequent developments, the Confederation has now given further detailed consideration to the whole question of nuclear safety and has decided to publish this report which contains detailed proposals for tighter international control of nuclear energy via the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA

  1. COMMUNICATION AND INFORMATION SYSTEM MANAGEMENT INTERNATIONAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mircea Alexandru Răduţeanu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades international management itself as a separate component of the general science of leadership, is an intercultural management. In this context of globalization, computerization, any business that wants have a modern management should have a structured information system based on communication, overall objective consisting in providing accurate data in real time all parties, increasing the level of communication. Given these considerations, we conducted this work trying to highlight the role of communication in achieving a modern, emphasizing international management features.The paper is divided into 6 parts, prefaced by an introduction of the paper we presented and completed within a set of conclusions on the effectiveness of communication. During the other paragraphs, we present the theoretical concepts of international management, communication, after which I stressed the role of information communication, managerial communication and will then focus on the process, taking stock of its specific stages in international management.

  2. International Convention for the Suppression of Acts of Nuclear Terrorism. United Nations 2005: International Convention for the Suppression of Acts of Nuclear Terrorism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2005-01-01

    The International Convention for the Suppression of Acts of Nuclear Terrorism is a 2005 United Nations treaty designed to criminalize acts of nuclear terrorism and to promote police and judicial cooperation to prevent, investigate and punish those acts. As of September 2016, the convention has 115 signatories and 106 state parties, including the nuclear powers China, France, India, Russia, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The Convention covers a broad range of acts and possible targets, including nuclear power plants and nuclear reactors; covers threats and attempts to commit such crimes or to participate in them, as an accomplice; stipulates that offenders shall be either extradited or prosecuted; encourages States to cooperate in preventing terrorist attacks by sharing information and assisting each other in connection with criminal investigations and extradition proceedings; and, deals with both crisis situations, assisting States to solve the situations and post-crisis situations by rendering nuclear material safe through the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)

  3. Strengthened International Nuclear Safeguards; burdens and Effects on Nuclear Technology Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badawy, I.

    2000-01-01

    The present paper deals with the recent direction of strengthening the international nuclear safeguards and the effects on the development of nuclear technology for peaceful applications. The new basic principles for strengthening the international nuclear control in the direction of undeclared nuclear activities are elaborated, and the national obligations are indicated. The burdens on the development of nuclear technology are discussed. Approaches are proposed in this work for coping with the present and future situations

  4. Report of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section to the International Nuclear Data Committee for the period January 2004 - December 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, A L [International Atomic Energy Agency, Nuclear Data Section, Vienna (Austria)

    2006-05-15

    This report contains details of the main activities of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section (NDS) in 2004 and 2005, as information to the International Nuclear Data Committee (INDC). Work of NDS staff and their consultants has focused on the continued data development and ensuring adequate, trouble-free services to all users in Member States. This information is complemented with descriptions of other related activities in the reporting period, including meetings and publications. The atomic and molecular data programmes are presented to the INDC for their information only, since these specific activities are reviewed in depth by the A+M Subcommittee of the International Fusion Research Council. (author)

  5. Report of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section to the International Nuclear Data Committee for the period January 2004 - December 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, A.L.

    2006-05-01

    This report contains details of the main activities of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section (NDS) in 2004 and 2005, as information to the International Nuclear Data Committee (INDC). Work of NDS staff and their consultants has focused on the continued data development and ensuring adequate, trouble-free services to all users in Member States. This information is complemented with descriptions of other related activities in the reporting period, including meetings and publications. The atomic and molecular data programmes are presented to the INDC for their information only, since these specific activities are reviewed in depth by the A+M Subcommittee of the International Fusion Research Council. (author)

  6. International Technical Working Group Cooperation to Counter Illicit Nuclear Trafficking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D K; Niemeyer, S

    2004-01-01

    The Nuclear Smuggling International Technical Working Group (ITWG) is an international body of nuclear forensic experts that cooperate to deter the illicit trafficking of nuclear materials. The objective of the ITWG is to provide a common approach and effective technical solutions to governments who request assistance in nuclear forensics. The ITWG was chartered in 1996 and since that time more than 28 nations and organizations have participated in 9 international meetings and 2 analytical round-robin trials. Soon after its founding the ITWG adopted a general framework to guide nuclear forensics investigations that includes recommendations for nuclear crime scene security and analysis, the best application of radioanalytical methods, the conduct of traditional forensic analysis of contaminated materials, and effective data analysis to interpret the history of seized nuclear materials. This approach has been adopted by many nations as they respond to incidents of illicit nuclear trafficking

  7. V International Conference of Photonics and Information Optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evtikhiev, NN

    2016-01-01

    Preface This special volume of JPCS contains the “Proceedings of the V International conference on photonics and information optics (PhIO 2016)”. The conference was held in Moscow, Russian Federation in February 3-5, 2016. Organizers of the conference: • The Russian Academy of Sciences • National Research Nuclear University «MEPhI» (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute). The conference included 10 meetings in total: two plenary sessions and eight section meetings, also poster sessions took place. 100 oral and more than 120 poster reports were presented by scientists from 130 organizations of more than 10 countries. The V International conference on photonics and information optics carried on traditions of previous forums held in National Research Nuclear University «MEPhI» (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute): wide range of topics, broad scope of participants and the involvement of young scientists and students. Relevance and importance of researches on photonics and information optics, need of an exchange of new ideas and methods between experts both in the Russian Federation, and at the international level, cause noticeable interest in this conference not only among scientists of the CIS, but also in Europe and Asia. Chairmen of the program committee are members of the Presidium of the Russian Academy of Sciences, president of Kotelnikov Institute of Radio-engineering and Electronics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, academician Yu.V. Gulyaev and head of the Laser Physics Department of National Research Nuclear University «MEPhI» (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), professor N.N. Evtikhiev Conference themes: coherent and nonlinear optics, fiber and integrated optics, optics of crystals and acousto-optics, interaction of radiation with matter and optical materials, optical measurements and biophotonics, holography and digital optics, optical communication and optoelectronic data processing. The articles based on materials, selected by the

  8. Permit processes for nuclear power. International lessons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaahlin, Emil; Nilsson, Isabelle; Pettersson, Maria; Soederholm, Patrik

    2010-01-01

    permitting process in the country as well as important planned (or recently introduced) changes in the relevant legislation. The analysis also presents the role of the regulating authorities as well as other key actors in the process, and outlines the different steps of the permitting processes, including the relationships between the different permits. We also address the responsibility for the radioactive waste and dismantling, and how these issues come into the licensing process. Important differences and similarities across the various countries are highlighted, with special emphasis on parallels to the Swedish legislation. The report then analyzes a number of important legal and political issues of a principal nature in the permitting of nuclear power plants. We compare how the different countries differ on these grounds, and also emphasize some overall lessons and practical experiences of nuclear power development internationally. Three broad issues are discussed. The first of these concerns the notion of nuclear power as a highly political issue, and we analyze the role of the public opinion, the extent to which the regulatory process is independent of policy decisions, as well as the allocation of political power between the national and local levels in the respective countries. Not the least the last issue has been in focus in some of the countries that have reformed their permitting process, and there exist significant inter-country differences. The second issue concerns how a number of countries - most notably the USA and Great Britain - have attempted to streamline their plant permitting processes for new nuclear power. These reforms are characterized by, for instance, a combined construction and operation license, the selection (and exclusion) of geographical locations for new installations, as well as attempts to achieve standardizations of nuclear reactor designs. We pay particular attention to the issues of reactor design standardization, including the scope

  9. INDC correspondents for the exchange of nuclear data information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-05-01

    This list serves as a basis for the distribution of documents originated by or for the International Nuclear Data Committee and includes the names of all recipients of INDC documents. The INDC Secretariat tries to maintain this list up-to-date in order to facilitate an efficient interchange of information on nuclear data topics. In this report, the names are listed in alphabetical order within each state or organization. The main list is followed by four shorter lists, indicating the names of individuals in each distribution category, and the total number of individuals in each category

  10. A new series of international nuclear emergency exercises (INEX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halil-Burcin Okyar; Lazo, Edward; Siemann, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The INEX series of international nuclear emergency exercises, organised under the auspices of the NEA Working Party on Nuclear Emergency Matters (WPNEM), has proven successful in testing, investigating and improving national and international response arrangements for nuclear accidents and radiological emergencies. The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (NPP) accident occurred during INEX-4 and had a direct impact on NEA technical standing committees' work programmes. The WPNEM played an important role during the emergency, following and studying the insights and ideas that drive nuclear emergency management decision making. It collected crucial information on governmental decisions and recommendations with respect to the accident situation, and implemented a framework study to assist in the collection of NEA member country experiences that would facilitate the identification of commonalities in national assessment approaches and results. The findings triggered the INEX-5 exercise, which will build upon the experiences and lessons learnt from past nuclear accidents/incidents, and the success of previous INEX exercises. This exercise is intended to test mechanisms for decision making at the national level, particularly in uncertain circumstances or in the absence of data, to examine arrangements for international co-operation and coordination of data and information exchange among countries and arrangements for practical support and assistance between groups of countries or geographical regions. It will also investigate the long-term issues beyond the early response phase. The WPNEM agreed on a tightly focused scope, which will consist of a tabletop exercise or moderated workshop that is not based on a real time test. The exercise will be a common scenario based on a re-enactment of a nuclear power plant accident, although not the Fukushima accident. It will consider coincident impacts on multiple units and include impacts on other critical national

  11. Nuclear Italy. An International history of Italian Nuclear Policies during the Cold War

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bini, Elisabetta; Londer, Igor

    2017-01-01

    This book examines the history of Italy’s nuclear policies during the Cold War, by placing the Italian case in an international and comparative framework. It highlights the importance the international context had in shaping the country’s specific experience, and analyzes the ways in which international politics and economics, technological and scientific exchanges, as well as social and cultural movements, influenced Italian nuclear policies, both civilian and military. All the essays published in this volume assume that the history of nuclear energy should be written by adopting an international perspective. The spread of nuclear knowledge (scientific, civilian, as well as military), and the implementation of nuclear policies, have a specific international dimension that should be taken into consideration, since no nuclear program has ever had a distinctly national character, and every country pursuing a nuclear policy has been, in one way or another, deeply influenced by the international context.

  12. Public information attitudes towards nuclear energy and the IAEA role in public information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, Hans-Friedrich

    1998-01-01

    It includes information on the relation that exists between the Division of Public Information of the International Atomic Energy Agency, and different journalists, in answering questions on nuclear energy and nuclear applications. Also, questions whenever there was a rumor or a report of a receives a growing number of E-mail letters from all over the world, on the same subjects. Increasingly, international organizations are contacted by journalists and the public, for information on incidents and accidents, in the nuclear or the radiation field. This article states that the interest on nuclear energy, isotopes and radiation is focusing in the public media on following points: the fear for an accident; the fear for radiation escaping; the belief that nuclear power plants are too expensive; the belief that electricity could be saved; the belief that nuclear wastes cannot be properly disposed; the fear for unsafe transport; the fears that the neighbors operate their plants carelessly; and fears that radiation treatment makes food or agricultural products radioactive or poisonous. (S. Grainger)

  13. Managing Nuclear Knowledge: IAEA Activities and International Coordination. Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-07-01

    The important role which the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) plays in assisting Member States in the preservation and enhancement of nuclear knowledge and in facilitating international collaboration in this area has been recognized by the General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency in resolutions GC(46)/RES/11B, GC(47)/RES/10B, GC(48)/RES/13 and GC(50)/RES/13. The IAEA continues to support the enhancement and stabilization of nuclear education and training with the objective of securing the availability of qualified human resources for the nuclear sector. Its most important approaches are networking regional educational institutions and fostering cooperation to develop harmonized curricula, prepare and disseminate teaching materials. The Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT), established by the IAEA in 2004, became operational in 2005. An ANENT website has been set up and is being expanded, such as developing a long-distance learning platform. Also, a reference curriculum for nuclear engineering is being developed with the cooperation of external partners.This booklet summarizes the main activities being carried out by the IAEA with regard to the Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT) and other related activities including those completed during the period 2002–2005. It briefly describes the background information on the events leading to the formation of the ANENT; the terms of reference formulated at the second Coordination Committee meeting held in Vietnam, October 2005; and objectives, strategy and other institutional and managerial policies reaffirmed by the members. CD-ROM attached to the printed booklet containing nearly all of the background material in full text, including policy level papers, reports, presentations made by Member States, and meeting summaries

  14. Stakeholder involvement in nuclear issues. INSAG-20. A report by the International Nuclear Safety Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    Many of the world's nuclear power plants were constructed long ago without much public involvement in the associated decision making. It is anticipated, however, that a variety of stakeholders will seek participation in such decisions now as the nuclear option is being revisited in many places. Accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, among other places, have served to arouse public concern. The development of 'here-and-now' media capabilities has created an awareness that may not have previously existed. Improvements in educational systems and the development of the Internet have made technical information and expertise available to individuals and locations that were previously without them. In addition, consideration of the environmental impacts of various energy strategies has moved to the fore. INSAG has concluded that the expectations of stakeholders of a right to participate in energy decisions are something that the nuclear community must address. Decisions regarding such matters as the siting and construction of a nuclear power plant are no longer largely the domain of a closed community of technical experts and utility executives. Today, the concerns and expectations of all manner of persons and organizations - from the local farmer to the international financial institution - must be considered. This report is intended for use by all stakeholders in the nuclear community - national regulatory authorities, nuclear power plant designers and operators, public interest organizations and individuals, the media and, not to be forgotten, local and national populations. INSAG's fundamental conclusion is that all stakeholders with an interest in nuclear decisions should be provided with an opportunity for full and effective participation in them. With this right, however, come certain obligations on all sides for openness, candour and civility. INSAG is hopeful that this report will help define the interests and roles of the stakeholders in the nuclear

  15. Enhancing international radiation/nuclear detection training opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Thomas L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bersell, Bridget M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Booker, Paul M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Anderson, Gerald E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Leitch, Rosalyn M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Meagher, John B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Siefken, Rob R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Spracklen, James L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-09-23

    The United States has worked domestically to develop and provide radiological and nuclear detection training and education initiatives aimed at interior law enforcement, but the international community has predominantly focused efforts at border and customs officials. The interior law enforcement officials of a State play a critical role in maintaining an effective national-level nuclear detection architecture. To meet this vital need, DNDO was funded by the U.S. Department of State (DOS) to create and deliver a 1-week course at the International Law Enforcement Academy (ILEA) in Budapest, Hungary to inform interior law enforcement personnel of the overall mission, and to provide an understanding of how the participants can combat the threats of radiological and nuclear terrorism through detection efforts. Two courses, with approximately 20 students in each course, were delivered in fiscal year (FY) 2013, two were delivered in FY 2014 and FY 2015, and as of this report’s writing more are planned in FY 2016. However, while the ILEA courses produced measurable success, DNDO requested Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) research potential avenues to further increase the course impact.In a multi-phased approach, PNNL researched and analyzed several possible global training locations and venues, and other possible ways to increase the impact of the course using an agreed-to data-gathering format.

  16. International Nuclear Officials Discuss IAEA Peer Reviews of Nuclear Safety Regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Senior nuclear regulators today concluded a Workshop on the Lessons Learned from the IAEA Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) Missions. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) hosted the workshop, in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency, in Washington, DC, from 26 to 28 October 2011. About 60 senior regulators from 22 IAEA Member States took part in this workshop. The IRRS programme is an international peer review service offered by the IAEA to its Member States to provide an objective evaluation of their nuclear safety regulatory framework. The review is based on the internationally recognized IAEA Safety Standards. ''The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission was pleased to host the IAEA's IRRS meeting this week. The discussions over the past three days have provided an important opportunity for regulators from many countries to come together to strengthen the international peer review process,'' said U.S. NRC Chairman Gregory B. Jaczko. ''Especially after the Fukushima Daiichi accident, the global community recognizes that IRRS missions fill a vital role in strengthening nuclear safety and security programs around the world, and we are proud to be a part of this important effort.'' The IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety includes actions focused towards strengthening the existing IAEA peer reviews, incorporating lessons learned and improving their effectiveness. The workshop provided a platform for the exchange of information, experience and lessons learned from the IRRS missions, as well as expectations for the IRRS programme for the near future. Further improvements in the planning and implementation of the IRRS missions in the longer term were discussed. A strong commitment of all relevant national authorities to the IRRS programme was identified as a key element of an effective regulatory framework. The conclusions of the workshop will be issued in November 2011 and the main results will be reported to the IAEA

  17. Enhancement of international cooperation and experience exchange: international and regional cooperation in nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, R.R.

    1987-01-01

    This paper will explore methods that have been effective in accomplishing broad-based technology transfer relationships between international commercial nuclear organizations, and have enhanced the benefits from such relationships through mutual participation in the development of new technology. The factors involved in accomplishing technology transfer will be examined based on the 25 years of Westinghouse experience in establishing successful nuclear technology relationships with over 20 different associates world-wide. This will include information pertaining to organization, training, consultation, technical information transmission, and other important aspects of technology transfer. Additionally, the methodology of enhancing and increasing the benefits of technology transfer through cooperative development programs as produced and promoted by Weatinghouse with its associates will be examined. This will include reviews of several significant copperative programs, such as the programs for the Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor and the Integrated Protection and Control Systems for future plants. (author)

  18. Enhancement of international cooperation and experience exchange - international and regional cooperation in nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, R.R.

    1988-01-01

    This paper will explore methods that have been effective in accomplishing broad-based technology transfer relationships between international commercial nuclear organizations, and have enhanced the benefits from such relationships through mutual participation in the development of new technology. The factors involved in accomplishing technology transfer will be examined based on the 25 years of Westinghouse experience in establishing successful nuclear technology relationships with over 20 different associates world-wide. This will include information pertaining to organization, training, consultation, technical information transmission, and other important aspects of technology transfer. Additionally, the methodology of enhancing and increasing the benefits of technology transfer through cooperative development programs as produced and promoted by Westinghouse with its associates will be examined. This will include reviews of several significant cooperative programs, such as the programs for the Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor and the Integrated Protection and Control Systems for future plants

  19. Providing public information in the Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fon Jager, Mojca

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Good safety culture is strongly related to transparent and timely information. Experience has shown that radiation and nuclear safety are under continuous surveillance by the public. The provision of open and authentic information to the public is a fundamental policy of the SNSA. The SNSA endeavors to provide substantial and reliable information to the interested institutions, mass media and to the citizens through press conferences, public statements, media discussions, and active participation in domestic and international meetings, symposia and congresses, through publications, the Internet and direct contacts with the interested public. The SNSA regularly provides information on nuclear safety to the Government, the National Assembly and the citizens of the Republic of Slovenia. The Annual Report on Nuclear and Radiation Safety is published in Poroeevalec (Reporter) - the publication of the National Assembly - in autumn, and is available in public libraries throughout Slovenia. Annual Report is available also on the Internet (http://www.sigov.si/ursjv/uvod.html) in Slovene and English. Access to data of the Central Radiation Early Warning System of Slovenia (CROSS), recording the real time (at half-hour intervals) gamma dose rate levels, is also available through Internet. The report in English is sent every year to Slovenian embassies world-wide, to certain foreign embassies in Slovenia and to other organizations participating in the activities in the nuclear and radiological field. Reports on the SNSA activities are also published in the bulletin Okolje in prostor (Environment and Spatial Planning), published by the Ministry of Environment and Spatial Planning. The SNSA regularly contributes articles on courses, seminars and symposia attended at home and abroad. The articles are intended to give basic information on training and the names of contact persons to provide additional information on certain topics to those interested. More than half of

  20. International survey on solid state nuclear track detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azimi-Garakani, D.; Wernli, C.

    1992-04-01

    The results of the 1990 international survey on solid state nuclear track detection are presented. The survey was performed in collaboration with the International Nuclear Track Society (INTS). These results include the data on principal investigator(s), collaborator(s), institution, field of application(s), material(s), and method(s) of track observation from 28 countries. (author)

  1. Chernobyl and the problem of international obligations regarding nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strohl, P.

    1988-01-01

    This paper analyses the way nuclear law was put to the test by the Chernobyl accident - in particular international nuclear law - so as to propose a train of thought which might contribute to adopting and revising the legal system presently in force or even new orientations. It deals only with that part of nuclear law which concerns accidents and their consequences (NEA) [fr

  2. International Nuclear Management Programmes -- INMP-- (VNMU)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Fumio

    2014-01-01

    • INMP is an IAEA-facilitated collaboration for universities to provide master’s degree programs in nuclear management, targeting managers or future managers working in the nuclear sector. • There are currently no full master’s degree programmes specializing in management for the nuclear sector. • Managers at NPP are typically engineers with few chances of formal management education. • In newcomer countries to nuclear energy, working towards the introduction of nuclear power, often lack technical or managerial experience in nuclear energy

  3. The role of international atomic energy agency in maintaining nuclear safety competence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aro, I.; Mazour, T.

    2000-01-01

    This paper provides information how International Atomic Energy Agency can assist Member States in maintaining and developing nuclear safety competence. The topics covered include the development of safety standards, organisation of nuclear safety related conferences, provision of safety reviews, organisation of training courses and topical workshops and publication of training related documents. Usefulness of these activities for competence development is discussed. (author)

  4. Nuclear education in Russia. Status, peculiarities, perspectives and international cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryuchkov, Eduard F.

    2008-01-01

    The paper is devoted to analysis of Russian nuclear education system: its current status, specific features, difficulties and prospects. Russian higher education system in nuclear engineering has been created simultaneously with development of nuclear industry, and the system completely satisfied all industrial demands for the specialists of different qualification level. The specific features of PhD level (doctoral program) of education in Russia are discussed. The paper underlines particularly a special role of international collaboration in the field of nuclear education for further development of nuclear education all over the world. Some examples of international cooperation in the frames of new educational programs development are considered. (author)

  5. International problems connected with the introduction of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckurts, K.H.

    1978-01-01

    In this book, problems of nuclear energy are seen from the international point of view, stress being laid on the role played by the FRG in the international nuclear energy discussion. The FRG is among the non-nuclear-aim-countries, the one with the highest development level of nuclear energy technique, with an essential responsibility and an obligation to support the world-wide thought of not-expanding. The FRG could make an important contribution to finding back to a world-wide solid nuclear order and an atmosphere of confidence. (GL) [de

  6. Provisions relating to Nuclear Energy. II - International Conventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book published by the Portuguese Junta de Energia Nuclear (Nuclear Energy Commission) reproduces in Portuguese and in the original language (English or French), texts of a series of international conventions in the nuclear field and the Statutes of international nuclear organisations and undertakings. The following are among the texts included: the Statutes of the IAEA, NEA, Eurochemic; the Euratom Treaty; the Tlatelolco Treaty; the co-operation agreement between Portugal and the United States on the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. (NEA) [fr

  7. Incentives and Information Exchange in International Taxation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keen, M.; Ligthart, J.E.

    2004-01-01

    The exchange of taxpayer-specific information between national tax authorities has recently emerged as a key and controversial topic in international tax policy discussions, most notably with the OECD s harmful tax practices project and the EU s savings tax initiative.This paper analyses the effects

  8. 13th International Conference on Information Technology

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book collects articles presented at the 13th International Conference on Information Technology- New Generations, April, 2016, in Las Vegas, NV USA. It includes over 100 chapters on critical areas of IT including Web Technology, Communications, Security, and Data Mining.

  9. Toward an international consensus on public information practices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jouve, Andre A. [Autorite de Surete Nucleaire, Fontenay-Aux-Roses (France)

    2006-07-01

    At the 2005 IAEA general conference, several member states have asked the other members to engage in using the International Nuclear Event Scale (Ines) as a key harmonized element in public information practices. Created in 1989 to communicate on nuclear events at nuclear installations, this scale was recently upgraded to include the radiological risk as well as defects in safety provisions for radioactive sources or the transport of radioactive material. Even if communication tools should not be used to compare regulatory performances or enforce regulatory provisions the awareness of the public on the radiation risk is a positive contributor to the improvement of radiation protection. The experience feed back from the trial period of use of the upgraded Ines scale (July 2004- June 2006) demonstrates that a same tool allows an homogenous communication on a wide range of events, from nuclear safety events in nuclear power plants to deterministic effects of radiation among industrial radiographers. The next step for the extension of the Ines scale will be focused on medical events. - A prerequisite to any attempt to rank events in a scale is to define what should be considered as an event. This is not obvious as far as medical events are considered. The French Nuclear Safety Authority is currently working on a list of criteria to be used by licensees to determine the categories of events to be notified to the regulatory Authority. It is intended to organize the widest possible consultation among all stakeholders. The European IRPA conference is a good opportunity to discuss this issue and a way forward finding an international consensus on public information practices. (author)

  10. Toward an international consensus on public information practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jouve, Andre A.

    2006-01-01

    At the 2005 IAEA general conference, several member states have asked the other members to engage in using the International Nuclear Event Scale (Ines) as a key harmonized element in public information practices. Created in 1989 to communicate on nuclear events at nuclear installations, this scale was recently upgraded to include the radiological risk as well as defects in safety provisions for radioactive sources or the transport of radioactive material. Even if communication tools should not be used to compare regulatory performances or enforce regulatory provisions the awareness of the public on the radiation risk is a positive contributor to the improvement of radiation protection. The experience feed back from the trial period of use of the upgraded Ines scale (July 2004- June 2006) demonstrates that a same tool allows an homogenous communication on a wide range of events, from nuclear safety events in nuclear power plants to deterministic effects of radiation among industrial radiographers. The next step for the extension of the Ines scale will be focused on medical events. - A prerequisite to any attempt to rank events in a scale is to define what should be considered as an event. This is not obvious as far as medical events are considered. The French Nuclear Safety Authority is currently working on a list of criteria to be used by licensees to determine the categories of events to be notified to the regulatory Authority. It is intended to organize the widest possible consultation among all stakeholders. The European IRPA conference is a good opportunity to discuss this issue and a way forward finding an international consensus on public information practices. (author)

  11. Nuclear power and international cooperation - perceptions of the third world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    The views of the Third World that need to be given consideration in international nuclear policy-making are presented in the following topical sections: background summary of developing countries energy needs and sources, incentives for nuclear power development in developing countries, the need for nuclear cooperation, the Non-proliferation Treaty, erosion of confidence of the recipient states in the reliability of international cooperation agreements, and perceptions of the Third World regarding energy and proliferation

  12. New nuclear technology; International developments. Review 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devell, L.; Aggeryd, I.; Hultgren, Aa.; Lundell, B.; Pedersen, T.

    1995-09-01

    A summary review of the development of new nuclear rector technology is presented in this report. Fuel cycle strategies and waste handling developments are also commented. Different plans for dismantling nuclear weapons are presented. 18 refs

  13. Relative costs to nuclear plants: international experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Jair Albo Marques de

    1992-03-01

    This work approaches the relative costs to nuclear plants in the Brazil. It also presents the calculation methods and its hypothesis to determinate the costs, and the nacional experience in costs of investment, operating and maintenance of the nuclear plants

  14. Brazilian participation in the International Monitoring System for Nuclear Explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veloso, Jose Alberto Vivas

    1995-01-01

    On January 1, 1995, Brazil was integrated to the world-wide seismic system, through the Seismological Observatory of the University of Brasilia, dedicated to detect and identify underground nuclear explosions. This is an unprecedented global effort program to conduct a seismic test of rapid data collection, distribution and processing evolving the most advanced sensors, global communications and data processing technologies. By the end of February, 49 countries were incorporated and the present test represents a first training step towards the final definition of an International Monitoring System to monitoring a Comprehensive test Band Treaty. Besides accomplishing its main goal, the global monitoring program will be able to supply rapidly, through the International Data Center, important information to the seismological community. (author). 2 figs

  15. International Nuclear Model personal computer (PCINM): Model documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-08-01

    The International Nuclear Model (INM) was developed to assist the Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in producing worldwide projections of electricity generation, fuel cycle requirements, capacities, and spent fuel discharges from commercial nuclear reactors. The original INM was developed, maintained, and operated on a mainframe computer system. In spring 1992, a streamlined version of INM was created for use on a microcomputer utilizing CLIPPER and PCSAS software. This new version is known as PCINM. This documentation is based on the new PCINM version. This document is designed to satisfy the requirements of several categories of users of the PCINM system including technical analysts, theoretical modelers, and industry observers. This document assumes the reader is familiar with the nuclear fuel cycle and each of its components. This model documentation contains four chapters and seven appendices. Chapter Two presents the model overview containing the PCINM structure and process flow, the areas for which projections are made, and input data and output reports. Chapter Three presents the model technical specifications showing all model equations, algorithms, and units of measure. Chapter Four presents an overview of all parameters, variables, and assumptions used in PCINM. The appendices present the following detailed information: variable and parameter listings, variable and equation cross reference tables, source code listings, file layouts, sample report outputs, and model run procedures. 2 figs

  16. Japan's international cooperation programs on seismic safety of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanada, Akira

    1997-01-01

    MITI is promoting many international cooperation programs on nuclear safety area. The seismic safety of nuclear power plants (NPPs) is a one of most important cooperation areas. Experts from MITI and related organization join the multilateral cooperation programs carried out by international organization such as IAEA, OECD/NEA etc. MITI is also promoting bilateral cooperation programs such as information exchange meetings, training programs and seminars on nuclear safety with several countries. Concerning to the cooperation programs on seismic safety of NPPs such as information exchange and training, MITI shall continue and expand these programs. (J.P.N.)

  17. Japan`s international cooperation programs on seismic safety of nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanada, Akira [Agency of Natural Resources and Energy, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    MITI is promoting many international cooperation programs on nuclear safety area. The seismic safety of nuclear power plants (NPPs) is a one of most important cooperation areas. Experts from MITI and related organization join the multilateral cooperation programs carried out by international organization such as IAEA, OECD/NEA etc. MITI is also promoting bilateral cooperation programs such as information exchange meetings, training programs and seminars on nuclear safety with several countries. Concerning to the cooperation programs on seismic safety of NPPs such as information exchange and training, MITI shall continue and expand these programs. (J.P.N.)

  18. International Center for Gas Technology Information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gad, L.H.

    1993-01-01

    Based on an acknowledgement of the growing importance of natural gas, a number of European countries, USA, Japan and the Russian Federation have worked together in order to establish a common center of information on natural gas technology under the auspices of the International Energy Agency. Centers were to be established in Washington and in Denmark. The centers will concern themselves with establishing an international information center for gas technology, effecting natural gas technology transfer between global regions, carrying out analytical studies on the energy market and the development of technology within the field of natural gas. The structure of the decision-making processes that will be employed is explained in addition to the organization and economy. The centers should build up a global information network between the relevant countries, their gas companies, institutions etc. (AB)

  19. Minatom.ru - A nuclear information repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fateyev, Eugene

    2002-01-01

    Developing of the nuclear during the previous 15 years have been mostly restrained by negative public attitude towards the industry. This is not only due to Chernobyl accident, but also due to lack of PR-programs for the nuclear. - Using the mentioned factors the opponents of Minatom ('green', some politicians, several tabloids, competitors in the energy market) conduct anti-nuclear activity. - Nevertheless, the nuclear grows in Russia now. 'The Chernobyl Syndrome' has been overcome. In many regions of the Russian Federation the public demands construction of N-plants. - A 10MW unit will be commissioned in Russia yearly in the coming decade. Up to the year 2020 production of the electricity at the Russian N-plants will grow each year which is twice more than expected growth of productivity at other types of electric power stations (hydro, coal, oil and gas). - Minatom's web-site is visited mostly by nuclear specialists and those who are interested in the nuclear: clerks from other departments, students and Minatom's antagonists. - What we are trying to do is to convert the web-site into a mass media edition of the Russian nuclear. 'Atomic News' agency has been created within the web-site editorial board. 1800 sources of information concerning the nuclear are quoted daily in the 'Digest of Russian and Foreign Press' on the web-site. Opinion of renown persons on different problems related with the nuclear are published on the web-site. Web-site editorial board also organizes interactive press conferences of the industry high officials. Electronic versions of different periodicals issued by Minatom are also placed on the site as well as the videos produced by 'TV-100' studio working within Atominform. - As an example of a successful Minatom and its web-site PR-campaign we may speak about the discussion that took place in the State Duma (Parliament) and was devoted to importing of foreign irradiated fuel. Many politicians used the concern of the broad public presented

  20. Does international nuclear trade law have a specificity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    This study on the specificity of international nuclear trade law covers public international and private international aspects. As regards the first, international organisations and agreements (bilateral and multilateral) are reviewed. In the context of the second, the international organisations with a scientific, legal or commercial vocation are briefly listed. Commercial contracts are then studied in greater detail from the viewpoint of contractual nuclear liability and that outside the contracts. In addition, special aspects are examined, relating to the flexibility of supply contracts, swap agreements in the nuclear field, and other more particular clauses such as the ''Consensus'' framework for export credits. The authors' conclusion is that while there is no specificity properly speaking in international nuclear trade law, it nevertheless has original features (NEA) [fr

  1. New United States policies regarding international nuclear cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, H.R. Jr.

    1981-10-01

    This paper discusses the United States policy on international nuclear power development in the light of the priorities established by President Reagan in the guidelines for his Administration's nuclear co-operation policy. The aim is to establish a framework allowing for co-operation in peaceful nuclear development while remaining committed to the objective of preventing the further spread of nuclear weapons, in particular by supporting the Non-Proliferation Treaty, the IAEA Safeguards System and the Tlatelolco Treaty (NEA) [fr

  2. The text of the amended Protocol to the Agreement between the Kingdom of Swaziland and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in Connection with the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons, is reproduced in this document for the information of all Member States of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The text of the amended Protocol to the Agreement between the Kingdom of Swaziland and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in Connection with the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons, is reproduced in this document for the information of all Member States of the Agency [es

  3. International Conference on Information Science and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Joukov, Nikolai

    2016-01-01

    This book contains selected papers from the 7th International Conference on Information Science and Applications (ICISA 2016) and provides a snapshot of the latest issues encountered in technical convergence and convergences of security technology. It explores how information science is core to most current research, industrial and commercial activities and consists of contributions covering topics including Ubiquitous Computing, Networks and Information Systems, Multimedia and Visualization, Middleware and Operating Systems, Security and Privacy, Data Mining and Artificial Intelligence, Software Engineering, and Web Technology. The contributions describe the most recent developments in information technology and ideas, applications and problems related to technology convergence, illustrated through case studies, and reviews converging existing security techniques. Through this volume, readers will gain an understanding of the current state-of-the-art information strategies and technologies of convergence sec...

  4. International responsibility of using nuclear energy for peaceful purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouenat, N.

    2008-01-01

    Although the stability of the idea of international responsibility in public international law, the international jurisprudence has not settled on a definition. The concept of international responsibility is no longer limited to the legal effects or consequences under international law to violate its provisions. The states recognized that the customary principles governing the international responsibility in public international law does not take into account the specificities of nuclear dangers, this sought to conclude a number of international conventions include a special system of nuclear liability not based on the wrongful act, but on the principle of keeping things, and it requires the existence of an international regime for nuclear liability in order to establish measures and procedures to achieve the implementation of the provisions for compensation unhindered by national legal systems. There is no doubt that the use of nuclear energy in time of peace falls within the scope of internationally prohibited acts. Atomic activities undertaken by the State within its borders for peaceful purposes are considered legitimate activities as long as they have taken necessary measures to avoid damage to neighboring countries. States has tended to conclude international agreements under which disputes that may result from the use of nuclear energy can be solved. The existing international legal framework on Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage consists of three major interrelated agreements: Paris Convention on civil liability in the field of nuclear energy, Vienna Convention on Civil Liability for civil damages and the Brussels Convention on Civil Liability in the Field of Maritime Carriage of Nuclear Materials.

  5. The nuclear power safety programme of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, M.

    1981-01-01

    The expanded role of the IAEA in the field of nuclear power safety will be discussed. Emphasis will be given to the NUSS program (the letters being an acronym for Nuclear Safety Standards) to establish internationally accepted safety codes and guides for nuclear power plants dealing with governmental regulatory organizations, siting, design, operation and quality assurance. Other activities discussed will be advisory services, exchange of information and training, emergency accident assistance, and technical assistance. (orig./RW)

  6. International conference on nuclear physics. Nuclear shells - 50 years. Summaries of reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khazov, Yu.A.

    1999-01-01

    Abstracts of reports made at the 49 meeting on nuclear spectroscopy and nuclear structure are presented. This meeting took place in April 21-24, 1999, at Dubna, Russia. The International Conference Nuclear Shells - 50 years took place in the framework of the 49 meeting. Results of experimental investigations of nuclear properties and nuclear reaction mechanisms are given. Problems of the theoretical description of nuclear structures and nuclear reactions are discussed. The particular attention is given to nuclear spectroscopy technique and its using for applied researches

  7. Health information exchange: national and international approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vest, Joshua R

    2012-01-01

    Health information exchange (HIE), the process of electronically moving patient-level information between different organizations, is viewed as a solution to the fragmentation of data in health care. This review provides a description of the current state of HIE in seven nations, as well was three international HIE efforts, with a particular focus on the relation of exchange efforts to national health care systems, common challenges, and the implications of cross-border information sharing. National and international efforts highlighted in English language informatics journals, professional associations, and government reports are described. Fully functioning HIE is not yet a common phenomenon worldwide. However, multiple nations see the potential benefits of HIE and that has led to national and international efforts of varying scope, scale, and purview. National efforts continue to work to overcome the challenges of interoperability, record linking, insufficient infrastructures, governance, and interorganizational relationships, but have created architectural strategies, oversight agencies, and incentives to foster exchange. The three international HIE efforts reviewed represent very different approaches to the same problem of ensuring the availability of health information across borders. The potential of HIE to address many cost and quality issues will ensure HIE remains on many national agendas. In many instances, health care executives and leaders have opportunities to work within national programs to help shape local exchange governance and decide technology partners. Furthermore, HIE raises policy questions concerning the role of centralized planning, national identifiers, standards, and types of information exchanged, each of which are vital issues to individual health organizations and worthy of their attention.

  8. Managing nuclear knowledge: Strategies and human resource development. Summary of an international conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The nuclear industry is knowledge based, similar to other highly technical industries, and relies heavily on the accumulation of knowledge. Recent trends such as workforce ageing and declining student enrolment numbers, and the risk of losing accumulated knowledge and experience, have drawn attention to the need for better management of nuclear knowledge. In 2002 the IAEA General Conference adopted a resolution on nuclear knowledge, which was reiterated in 2003; the resolution emphasized the importance of nuclear knowledge and information management and urged both the IAEA and Member States to strengthen their activities and efforts in this regard. Consequently, the International Conference on Nuclear Knowledge Management: Strategies, Information Management and Human Resource Development, which was held on 7-10 September 2004 in Saclay, was organized by the IAEA and the Government of France through the Commissariat a l'energie atomique in cooperation with the European Commission, OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, European Atomic Forum, Japan Atomic Industrial Forum, World Council of Nuclear Workers, World Nuclear University and European Association of Information Services. The conference was attended by 250 experts, scientists and officials from 54 Member States and nine international organizations, giving the conference a very broad representation of the nuclear sector. The objective of the conference was to reach a clear and common understanding of the issues related to nuclear knowledge management for sustaining knowledge and expertise in nuclear science and technology and to define a strategic framework for developing IAEA cross-cutting knowledge management activities. The conference provided a forum for professionals and decision makers in the nuclear sector, comprising industry, government and academia, as well as professionals in the knowledge management and information technology sectors. Based on the results of the conference, the key insights, lessons learned

  9. Liability and insurance aspects of international transport of nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Gijn, S.H.

    1985-01-01

    The Paris and Vienna Conventions do not affect the application of any international transport agreement already in force. However, in certain circumstances both the nuclear operator and the carrier may be held liable for nuclear damage which arises during international transports of nuclear materials. The ensuing cumulation of liabilities under the Nuclear and Transport Conventions may cause serious problems in obtaining adequate insurance cover for such transports. The 1971 Brussels Convention seeks to solve this problem by exonerating any person who might be held liable for nuclear damage under an international maritime convention or national law. Similar difficulties are encountered in the case of transports of nuclear materials between states which have and states which have not ratified the Paris and Vienna Conventions. (NEA) [fr

  10. Nuclear Data Unit correspondents for the exchange of nuclear data information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1968-04-15

    This list serves as a basis for the distribution of documents originated by or for the International Nuclear Data Committee, and includes the names of all INDC members, liaison officers and correspondents of the Nuclear Data Unit. The IAEA Nuclear Data Unit tries to maintain this list up-to-date in order to facilitate an efficient interchange of information on nuclear data topics. The recipients of this list are encouraged to inform the Nuclear Data Unit of any corrections, additions and deletions deemed necessary. Because of the variety of document origins and functions, and the number of countries served by this list, each addressee is assigned a seven-letter distribution code, shown to the left of each name, which indicates the categories of documents he receives. The names appear under three categories, member states, international organizations and non-member states, and are listed in alphabetical order within each state or organization. The main list is followed by seven shorter lists, indicating the names of individuals in each distribution category, and the total number of individuals in each category.

  11. Nuclear Data Unit correspondents for the exchange of nuclear data information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1968-04-01

    This list serves as a basis for the distribution of documents originated by or for the International Nuclear Data Committee, and includes the names of all INDC members, liaison officers and correspondents of the Nuclear Data Unit. The IAEA Nuclear Data Unit tries to maintain this list up-to-date in order to facilitate an efficient interchange of information on nuclear data topics. The recipients of this list are encouraged to inform the Nuclear Data Unit of any corrections, additions and deletions deemed necessary. Because of the variety of document origins and functions, and the number of countries served by this list, each addressee is assigned a seven-letter distribution code, shown to the left of each name, which indicates the categories of documents he receives. The names appear under three categories, member states, international organizations and non-member states, and are listed in alphabetical order within each state or organization. The main list is followed by seven shorter lists, indicating the names of individuals in each distribution category, and the total number of individuals in each category

  12. Updating and using the international non-neutron experimental nuclear data base in ''Generalized EXFOR'' format

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuravleva, G.M.; Chukreev, F.E.

    1985-10-01

    A software system for the automatic preparation of non-formalized textual information for the international exchange of nuclear data in the ''Generalized Exchange Format (EXFOR)'' is described. The ''Generalized EXFOR'' format is briefly outlined and data are given on the size of the international non-neutron experimental data base in this format. (author)

  13. Nuclear power needs international solidarity and cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    A report by Dr. Blix, director-general of IAEA, to the General Assembly of the United Nations is summarized. Some 15% of the world's entire power requirements are produced from nuclear energy. Thorough inspections, carried out at regular intervals, have not detected removal of any of this nuclear material for military purposes. Cooperation between governments is essential to prevent accidents and improve the safety of nuclear technology. (J.S.)

  14. Sub-regional Workshop on Illicit Nuclear Trafficking Information Management and Coordination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The workshop was organized to; have a comprehensive set of information which effectively supports implementation of the Nuclear Security Plan; understand nuclear security needs on a global scale to identify areas of cooperation between and among the Agency and Member States; determine illicit global trafficking trends and patterns, including theft and other malicious acts involving radioactive material; fully protect sensitive nuclear security information from disclosure; coordinate the nuclear security support programmes of Member States and international organizations with those of the Agency and have effective mechanisms of interaction with other international organizations

  15. Nuclear physics with internal targets in electron storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Two key experiments in nuclear physics will be discussed in order to illustrate the advantages of the internal target method and demonstrate the power of polarization techniques in electron scattering studies. The progress of internal target experiments will be discussed and the technology of internal polarized target development will be reviewed. 43 refs., 11 figs

  16. Outlook of nuclear power generation and international situation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekulund, S [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    1978-01-01

    Nuclear power generation is advancing at rapid rate over the world, without any major accident. For the base load of electric power, when choice is made between nuclear energy and petroleum, Nuclear energy has larger economic advantages over petroleum as compared with the days before the oil crisis. The costs of its fuel and fuel cycle technology are reasonable. However, nuclear power generation currently has a number of problems. What causes this uncertainty is not technological, but political, i.e. governmental policy changes, and this is based on the apprehension about nuclear proliferation. What is necessary is to strengthen the existing international framework of nuclear nonproliferation. In this respect, IAEA through comprehensive safeguards will make contributions largely to reduction of the political uncertainty. It is important that the new initiatives toward international nuclear cooperation should eliminate the current trends of restraint and denial.

  17. International organisations assure nuclear safety competence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, A.

    2000-01-01

    Irrespective of current views on the future of nuclear power programmes, concerns are arising with respect to the long-term ability to preserve safety competence because student enrollments in nuclear engineering are decreasing rapidly and experienced staff are reaching retirement age. 'Assuring Nuclear Safety Competence into the 21. Century' was discussed in depth by workshop participants. The need for a long-term strategic view was emphasised, and policy recommendations were made. These proceedings will be of particular interest to those playing a policy role in the nuclear industry, regulatory bodies and the education sector

  18. Nuclear power internationally, status and trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laue, H.J.

    1988-01-01

    The recent events have stimulated the discussion concerning the human factor in nuclear engineering. Without a guarantee of the reliability and responsibility of everybody concerned, both directly and indirectly, the future of nuclear power will look bleak in an increasing number of countries. The present status and probable future development of nuclear power are outlined, and general trends are discussed. The future use of nuclear power will be concentrated in countries of high political stability which can assure safety, availability and economic efficiency. (orig.) [de

  19. The International Atomic Energy Agency Nuclear Security Education Strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BRAUNEGGER-GUELICH, A.; RUKHLO, V.; GREGORIC, M.; COLGAN, P.

    2011-01-01

    The threat of nuclear terrorism has not diminished. In response to the concerns of States, an international nuclear security framework has emerged through the establishment of a number of legally binding and non-binding international instruments which obligates or commits States to carry out a number of actions to protect against nuclear terrorism. In this context, the need for human resource development programmes in nuclear security was underscored at several International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) General Conferences and Board of Governors' Meetings. In the pursuit of this need, the IAEA provides a comprehensive nuclear security training programme to States on a regular basis, and has developed a concept that seeks to effectively pass ownership of nuclear security knowledge and skills to States through the establishment of a Nuclear Security Support Centre. In addition, the IAEA has developed a technical guidance titled IAEA Nuclear Security Series No. 12 - Educational Programme in Nuclear Security that consists of a model of a Master of Science (M.Sc.) and assists educational institutions to provide nuclear security education. The article sets out IAEA efforts in the area of nuclear security training and education, including the assistance to States for establishing a Nuclear Security Support Centre. It underlines the objective and content of the IAEA Nuclear Security Series No. 12, discusses different concepts on how to establish nuclear security at universities and, emphasizes on the IAEA efforts to assist educational and research institutions, and other stake holders to enhance global nuclear security by developing, sharing and promoting excellence in nuclear security education. (author)

  20. International conference on the operational safety performance in nuclear installations. Contributed papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    In 2001, the IAEA organized an 'International Conference on Topical Issues in Nuclear Safety'. The issues discussed during the conference were: (1) risk- informed decision-making; (2) influence of external factors on safety; (3) safety of fuel cycle facilities; (4) safety of research reactors; and (5) safety performance indicators. Senior nuclear safety decision makers reviewed the issues and formulated recommendations for future actions by national and international organizations. In 2004, the IAEA organized an 'International Conference on Topical Issues in Nuclear Safety' in Beijing China. The issues discussed during the conference were: (1) changing environment - coping with diversity and globalization; (2) operating experience - managing changes effectively; (3) regulatory management systems - adapting to changes in the environment; and (4) long term operations - maintaining safety margins while extending plant lifetimes. The results of this conference confirmed the importance of operators and regulators of nuclear facilities meeting periodically to share experience and opinion on emerging issues and future challenges of the nuclear industry. Substantial progress has been made, and continues to be made by Member States in enhancing the safety of nuclear installations worldwide. At the same time, more attention is being given to other areas of nuclear safety. The safety standards for research reactors are being updated and new standards are planned on the safety of other facilities in the nuclear fuel cycle. The Agency has taken a lead role in this effort and is receiving much support from its Member States to gain international consensus in these areas. The objective of the conference is to foster the exchange of information on operational safety performance and operating experience in nuclear installations, with the aim of consolidating an international consensus on: - the present status of these issues; - emerging issues with international implications

  1. Report of the International Consultative Group on Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    The International Consultative Groups on Nuclear Energy adopted as its working premise the proposition that nuclear power will play a significant part in meeting future energy needs in an increasing number of countries. The Group's concern has been to examine the international political and economic conditions under which civil nuclear activities may be conducted safely, rationally, and in a manner generally acceptable to the world community. The views are presented in sections entitled: Energy and Nuclear Power; Establishing Nuclear Options; Nuclear Safety and the Public Interest; Nuclear Trade and Nuclear Proliferation; Conditions for the Future in which five conditions are summarized. The Group believes that if nuclear power is to be available to meet an increasing fraction of the world's future energy needs, nuclear power must, despite the difficulty of the sort-term climate, be systematically developed, without interruption or undue delay; earn and retain public acceptance; present technologies for using uranium more efficiently and be developed and tested as soon as possible, with both the coming decades and the 21st century in mind; be less feared; and convince countries depending on nuclear technology, services, or materials of continued international access to them under safeguards, on acceptable terms

  2. The IAEA's role in international information exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brittinger, M.T.M.; Selling, H.A.

    1993-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency strives to foster the exchange of scientific and technical information in the transport safety area through a dual work programme covering the development and maintenance of the Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material, on the one hand, and their implementation, on the other. Under the implementation aspect of its transport safety programme the IAEA takes advantage of the increased availability of mass storage media and the equipment to access them to use databases for information exchange. Information is collected on the identification of national competent authorities, package approval certificates, events in radioactive material transport, research and development, shipments, and exposure data. Data on national competent authorities and the package approval certificates that they issue is updated and disseminated annually to all Member States. Research in progress is described in a document that is published every two years. Databases on events, shipments and radiation exposure are in the development phase. Member States experience difficulty in obtaining the appropriate information and thus, the reporting periods for these subject areas are extended. Information gathered through these activities serve as regulatory aids to the national competent authorities responsible in the Member States for the transport of radioactive material, both internationally and nationally. In addition, it is useful in support of the continuous review and revision process of the transport Regulations and their supporting documents. (J.P.N.)

  3. An analysis of international nuclear fuel supply options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, J'tia Patrice

    . The material movement module is the largest of the three, and the two other modules that assess nonproliferation and economics of the options are dependent on its output. Proliferation resistance measures from literature are modified and incorporated in MEPAT. The module to assess the nonproliferation of the supply options allows the user to specify defining attributes for the fuel cycle processes, and determines significant quantities of materials as well as measures of proliferation resistance. The measure is dependent on user-input and material information. The economics module allows the user to specify costs associated with different processes and other aspects of the fuel cycle. The simulation tool then calculates economic measures that relate the cost of the fuel cycle to electricity production. The second part of this dissertation consists of an examination of four scenarios of fuel supply option using MEPAT. The first is a simple scenario illustrating the modules and basic functions of MEPAT. The second scenario recreates a fuel supply study reported earlier in literature, and compares MEPAT results with those reported earlier for validation. The third, and a rather realistic, scenario includes four nuclear programs with one program entering the nuclear energy market. The fourth scenario assesses the reactor options available to the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan, which is currently assessing available options to introduce nuclear power in the country. The methodology developed and implemented in MEPAT to analyze the material, proliferation and economics of nuclear fuel supply options is expected to help simplify and assess different reactor and fuel options available to utilities, government agencies and international organizations.

  4. Construction of nuclear special information service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Jeong Hoon; Kim, Tae Whan; Lee, Kyu Jeong; Yi, Ji Ho; Chun, Young Choon; Yoo, Jae Bok; Yoo, An Na

    2009-02-01

    Domestic INIS project has carried out various activities on supporting a decision-making for INIS Secretariat, exchanges of the statistical information between INIS and the country,and technical assistance for domestic end-users using INIS database. Based on the construction of INIS database sent by member states, the data published in the country has been gathered, collected, and inputted to INIS database according to the INIS reference series. Using the INIS output data, it has provided domestic users with searching INIS CD-ROM DB, INIS online database, INIS SDI service, and non-conventional literature delivery services. INIS2 DB Host site in Korea has serviced users of domestic and INIS member countries. In order to maintain the same data as Vienna center, the data update process has been performed. Also, publicity information activities were performed by many ways. To construct digital information infrastructure, we changed web server of NUCLIS21 and upgraded information management manager system and constructed full text DB on research and technical reports. Also we collected web DB, digital journals and so on and made an effort on operation of knowledge management system and research documents management. We have inputted over 3,000 records per year since 2002 and the input amount this year has reached 3,738 records. In order to input the comprehensive domestic publication related to nuclear energy, and rise in position of the national center, it is necessary to continue efforts and support budgets. We expect the INIS2 DB Host site will make a contribution to the improvement of productivity in the nuclear energy research as well as the diffusion of information about nuclear energy. We provided users with stable services changing web server of NUCLIS21. Also we contributed to the improvement of librarians' productivity by upgrading information management manager system and provided users with services of web DB, digital journals and so on

  5. Relationship between the international marketing research and the international marketing information system

    OpenAIRE

    Grubor Aleksandar

    2004-01-01

    Real and complete understanding relationship between the international marketing research and the international marketing information system requires recognizing essentials of the both concept. The international marketing research constitutes a process with coherent phases, whereas the international marketing information system is a part of integrated company's information system. Approach to learning relationship between the international marketing research and the international marketing in...

  6. 2002 summit course at the international nuclear law school

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietze, W.

    2003-01-01

    Report by a participant in the International Nuclear Law School. In 2001, this advanced training course was first offered by the OECD-NEA together with the University of Montpellier and other international partners. This effort is intended to provide an overview of nuclear law, a discipline normally playing a subordinate role in curricula. In this way, a contribution is to be made to the important preservation of the existing knowledge base and to increasing know-how in this field. In 2003, the International Nuclear Law School will be continued with a new curriculum addressed to all interested participants. (orig.) [de

  7. The international nuclear liability and compensation regime put to the test of a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyners, P.; Tetley, M.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: It appears that nuclear emergency plans place generally more emphasis on the nuclear safety and radiation protection aspects of the management of an accident, both inside the installation concerned and off-site, than on the particular requirements of local residents who would find themselves suddenly in such an emergency situation and of possible victims of nuclear damage. In a similar vein, studies focusing on the international nuclear third party liability regime usually take a global perspective and leave little room for the treatment of individual cases. The albeit welcome dearth of practical experience in Western countries in providing compensation for accidents of nuclear origin has, however, meant that public and local authorities are not always fully conscious of the importance of this question which should be dealt with in as practical a manner as possible. In order to cover all the legal and practical questions that could arise during the management of the consequences of a nuclear accident with regard to third party liability, insurance and compensation, the OECD/NEA held in co-operation with French authorities a workshop in November 2001. It was decided to organize this workshop according to three main stages: the alert phase, the accident phase and the post-accident phase; and to examine during these three stages the various roles played by local and national authorities, the nuclear operator and his insurer, as well as the nature and form of their respective actions. These questions were addressed both from the angle of applicable domestic legislation and of the relevant international conventions. From the analysis of different national experiences and of the information exchanged during the workshop, a striking diversity may be noted of solutions adopted or envisaged to address various aspects of civil liability, insurance and indemnification of damage in a nuclear emergency situation. This lack of uniformity should not necessarily be

  8. VIIth international symposium on nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The conference proceedings contain abstracts of 100 presented papers, mainly dealing with radioimmunoassays, radiopharmaceuticals, scintiscanning, computer tomography, radionuclide lymphography, ventriculography, angiography, nuclear cardiology, liquid scintillator techniques, radioisotope generators, radiospirometry and various uses of labelled compounds and tracer techniques in nuclear medicine. (M.D.)

  9. INTURGEO: The international uranium geology information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-09-01

    The International Uranium Geology Information System (INTURGEO) is an international compilation of data on uranium deposits and occurrences. The purpose of INTURGEO is to provide a clearinghouse for uranium geological information that can serve for the better understanding of the worldwide distribution of uranium occurrences and deposits. The INTURGEO system is by no means complete for all regions of the world. Data have been available principally from the WOCA countries. INTURGEO currently covers 6,089 occurrences and deposits in 96 countries of which 4,596 occurrences in 92 countries are presented here. The information presented in this publication is a very brief, one line synopsis of deposits and occurrences, and has been collected from literature and through questionnaires sent directly to IAEA Member States. None of the information contained in the INTURGEO database was derived from confidential sources although there are many entries which come from the internal files of Member States and are not directly available in the general literature. The uniformity of the INTURGEO data presented in this report has depended heavily on the data provided by Member States. Basic information includes the deposit or occurrence name, the mining district, the tectonic setting, the geological type, status, size, host-rock type, age of mineralization and bibliographic references. The data contained in the maps of the atlas include all reported occurrences of uranium above the anomaly level. The categories of occurrence and deposit status includes: Anomaly; occurrences of unknown status; occurrences; prospects; developed prospects; subeconomic deposits; economic deposits; mines; inactive mines; depleted mines. A microcomputer version of INTURGEO on 21 Megabyte Bernoulli disks is available. 5 tabs, 102 maps

  10. International Summer School on Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    In cooperation with the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), the Halden Reactor Project organised a Summer School on nuclear fuel in the period August 28 September 1, 2000. The summer school was primarily intended for people who wanted to become acquainted with fuel-related subjects and issues without being experts. It was especially hoped that the summer school would serve to transfer knowledge to the ''young generation'' in the field of nuclear fuel. Experts from Halden Project member organisations gave the following presentations: (1) Overview of the nuclear community, (2) Criteria for safe operation and design of nuclear fuel, (3) Fuel design and fabrication, (4) Cladding Manufacturing, (5) Overview of the Halden Reactor Project, (6) Fuel performance evaluation and modelling, (7) Fission gas release, and (8) Cladding issues. Except for the Overview, which is a written paper, the other contributions are overhead figures from spoken lectures.

  11. AREVA Germany. International competence in nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graeber, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    AREVA NP was created in 2001 by the merger of the French nuclear technology specialist Framatome with the nuclear sector of Siemens. The company is headquartered in Paris and has regional subsidiaries in Germany and the United States. The joint venture's strength lies in its all-round competence in nuclear power plants, from reactor development to power plant services and modernization of operating plants, design and production of fuel assemblies and turn-key construction of nuclear power reactors. Major core competences are located in Germany including the test facilities which are unique in the entire group as well as electrical engineering and instrumentation and control systems. AREVA NP is part of the globally acting AREVA group which pursues a unique integrated business model. The concept covers the entire nuclear fuel cycle from uranium mining to reprocessing used fuel assemblies. At present, AREVA has 48,000 employees worldwide, of which 5,700 are Germany-based. (orig.)

  12. Internal corium catcher of a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anatolii S Vlasov; Vladimir N Mineev; Aleksandr S Sidorov; Yuri A Zeigarnik

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: A corium catcher is one of the main devices of a nuclear reactor that provides corium melt and fission products retention within a containment during severe accidents. Several studies and design developments have shown that corium retention within a reactor vessel can be attained with a moderate capacity of the latter (up to 600 - 650 MW el.). With a higher reactor capacity external corium catchers are applied both at Russian (VVER-1000) and European (EPR) reactors. In the external catcher of a VVER-1000 reactor, most technological problems are solved due to using sacrificial material. They are as follows: (a) endo-thermal interaction of corium and sacrificial material reduces a level of the temperatures in the final melt pool; (b) solution in the melt of a great amount of the sacrificial material reduces the specific heat release density and the heat flux density at the boundaries of a melt; (c) due to changing of the oxide-component density an inverse stratification of the metallic and oxide components of the corium takes place, thus excluding heat-flux focusing in the zone of the metallic layer and making it possible to supply water on the free surface of the corium without a danger of incipience of the vapor explosion; (d) final oxidation of zirconium occurs without hydrogen generation. The above principles have been realized in the external catcher of the VVER- 1000 reactor at Tyanvan NPS that is presently under construction in China. Successfully solving of the problems concerning to the external catcher makes it possible to return on the new conceptual and technological basis to the idea of retention of the corium melt inside the vessel of a nuclear reactor of large capacity, that is, to provide the reactor vessel to play a role of an internal catcher. For this purpose, a reactor vessel is elongated by approximately two meters. In the lower part of the vessel, on elliptical bottom, pieces of sacrificial material are arranged

  13. Straight-Line: A nuclear material storage information management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsen, C.; Mangan, D.

    1995-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is developing Straight-Line -- a pilot system to demonstrate comprehensive monitoring of nuclear material in storage. Straight-Line is an integrated system of sensors providing information that will enhance the safety, security, and international accountability of stored nuclear material. The goals of this effort are to: (1) Provide the right sensor information to the right user immediately. (2) Reduce the expenses, risks, and frequency of human inspection of the material. (3) Provide trustworthy data to international inspectors to minimize their need to make on site inspections. In pursuit of these goals, Straight-Line unites technology from Sandia's Authenticated Item Monitoring System (AIMS) and other programs to communicate the authenticated status of the monitored item back to central magazine receivers. Straight-Line, however, incorporates several important features not found in previous systems: (1) Information Security -- the ability to collect and safely disseminate both classified and unclassified sensor data to users on a need-to-know basis. (2) Integrate into a single system the monitoring needs of safety, security, and international accountability. (3) Incorporate the use of sensors providing analog or digital output. This paper will present the overall architecture and status of the Straight-Line project

  14. Straight-Line -- A nuclear material storage information management system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsen, C. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Mangan, D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Sandia National Laboratories is developing Straight-Line -- a pilot system to demonstrate comprehensive monitoring of nuclear material in storage. Straight-Line is an integrated system of sensors providing information that will enhance the safety, security, and international accountability of stored nuclear material. The goals of this effort are to (1) Provide the right sensor information to the right user in a timely manner. (2) Reduce the expenses, risks, and frequency of human inspection of the material. (3) Provide trustworthy data to international inspectors to minimize their need to make on site inspections. In pursuit of these goals, Straight-Line unites technology from Sandia`s Authenticated Item Monitoring System (AIMS) and other programs to communicate the authenticated status of the monitored item back to central magazine receivers. Straight-Line, however, incorporates several important features not found in previous systems: (1) Information Security -- the ability to collect and safely disseminate both classified and unclassified sensor data to users on a need-to-know basis. (2) Integrate into a single system the monitoring needs of safety, security, and international accountability. (3) Incorporate the use of sensors providing analog or digital output. This paper will present the overall architecture and status of the Straight-Line project.

  15. Straight-Line: A nuclear material storage information management system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsen, C.; Mangan, D.

    1995-07-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is developing Straight-Line -- a pilot system to demonstrate comprehensive monitoring of nuclear material in storage. Straight-Line is an integrated system of sensors providing information that will enhance the safety, security, and international accountability of stored nuclear material. The goals of this effort are to: (1) Provide the right sensor information to the right user immediately. (2) Reduce the expenses, risks, and frequency of human inspection of the material. (3) Provide trustworthy data to international inspectors to minimize their need to make on site inspections. In pursuit of these goals, Straight-Line unites technology from Sandia`s Authenticated Item Monitoring System (AIMS) and other programs to communicate the authenticated status of the monitored item back to central magazine receivers. Straight-Line, however, incorporates several important features not found in previous systems: (1) Information Security -- the ability to collect and safely disseminate both classified and unclassified sensor data to users on a need-to-know basis. (2) Integrate into a single system the monitoring needs of safety, security, and international accountability. (3) Incorporate the use of sensors providing analog or digital output. This paper will present the overall architecture and status of the Straight-Line project.

  16. Straight-Line -- A nuclear material storage information management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsen, C.; Mangan, D.

    1995-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is developing Straight-Line -- a pilot system to demonstrate comprehensive monitoring of nuclear material in storage. Straight-Line is an integrated system of sensors providing information that will enhance the safety, security, and international accountability of stored nuclear material. The goals of this effort are to (1) Provide the right sensor information to the right user in a timely manner. (2) Reduce the expenses, risks, and frequency of human inspection of the material. (3) Provide trustworthy data to international inspectors to minimize their need to make on site inspections. In pursuit of these goals, Straight-Line unites technology from Sandia's Authenticated Item Monitoring System (AIMS) and other programs to communicate the authenticated status of the monitored item back to central magazine receivers. Straight-Line, however, incorporates several important features not found in previous systems: (1) Information Security -- the ability to collect and safely disseminate both classified and unclassified sensor data to users on a need-to-know basis. (2) Integrate into a single system the monitoring needs of safety, security, and international accountability. (3) Incorporate the use of sensors providing analog or digital output. This paper will present the overall architecture and status of the Straight-Line project

  17. The international framework for safeguarding peaceful nuclear energy programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazer, B.M.

    1980-01-01

    International law, in response to the need for safeguard assurances, has provided a framework which can be utilized by supplier and recipient states. Multilateral treaties have created the International Atomic Energy Agency which can serve a vital role in the establishment and supervision of safeguard agreements for nuclear energy programs. The Non-Proliferation Treaty has created definite obligations on nuclear-weapon and non-nuclear weapon states to alleviate some possibilities of proliferation and has rejuvenated the function of the IAEA in providing safeguards, especially to non-nuclear-weapon states which are parties to the Non-Proliferation treaty. States which are not parties to the Non-Proliferation Treaty may receive nuclear energy co-operation subject to IAEA safeguards. States like Canada, have insisted through the bilateral nuclear energy co-operation agreements that either individual or joint agreement be reached with the IAEA for the application of safeguards. Trilateral treaties among Canada, the recipient state and the IAEA have been employed and can provide the necessary assurances against the diversion of peaceful nuclear energy programs to military or non-peaceful uses. The advent of the Nuclear Suppliers Group and its guidlines has definitely advanced the cause of ensuring peaceful uses of nuclear energy. The ultimate objective should be the creation of an international structure incorporating the application of the most comprehensive safeguards which will be applied universally to all nuclear energy programs

  18. INDC list of correspondents for the exchange of nuclear data information and compilation of national nuclear data committees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-09-01

    This list of INDC Correspondents, including information on currently existing National Nuclear Data Committees and their memberships, is compiled and published upon the request of the International Nuclear Data Committee with the objective to promote the interaction and enhance the awareness of nuclear data activities in IAEA Member States. It also serves as a basis for the distribution of documents originated by or for the International Nuclear Data Committee and includes the names of all recipients of INDC documents. The INDC Secretariat tries to maintain this list up-to-date in order to facilitate an efficient interchange of information on nuclear data topics. The report is presented in five sections. The first section contains a detailed description of the INDC distribution categories, distribution codes and document designator codes. The second section describes the aims, organization and objectives of individual national nuclear data committees. The third section lists names and addresses in alphabetical order within each state or international organization together with the assigned INDC document distribution code(s); where applicable committee membership and/or area of specialization are indicated. This is followed by four shorter lists, indicating the names of individuals in each distribution category, sorted by country or international organization, and the total number of individuals in each category. The final section provides the names of nuclear data committee members also listed by country or international organization

  19. Guidelines for the International Observation by the Agency of Nuclear Explosions for Peaceful Purposes under the Provisions of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons or Analogous Provisions in Other International Agreements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1973-01-01

    On 21 June 1972 the Board of Governors approved guidelines for the international observation by the Agency of nuclear explosions for peaceful purposes under the provisions of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons or analogous provisions in other international agreements. These guidelines are now reproduced herein for the information of all Members

  20. Effectiveness of Existing International Nuclear Liability Regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Doais, Salwa; Kessel, Daivd

    2015-01-01

    The first convention was the Paris Convention on Third Party Liability in the Field of Nuclear Energy (the Paris Convention) had been adopted on 29 July 1960 under the auspices of the OECD, and entered into force on 1 April 1968. In 1963,the Brussels Convention - supplementary to the Paris Convention- was adopted in to provide additional funds to compensate damage as a result of a nuclear incident where Paris Convention funds proved to be insufficient. The IAEA's first convention was the Vienna Convention on Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage (the Vienna Convention) which adopted on 21 May 1963,and entered into force in 1977. Both the Paris Convention and the Vienna Convention laid down very similar nuclear liability rules based on the same general principles. The broad principles in these conventions can be summarized as follows: 1- The no-fault liability principle (strict liability) 2- Liability is channeled exclusively to the operator of the nuclear installation (legal channeling) 3- Only courts of the state in which the nuclear accident occurs would have jurisdiction (exclusive jurisdiction) 4- Limitation of the amount of liability and the time frame for claiming damages (limited liability) 5- The operator is required to have adequate insurance or financial guarantees to the extent of its liability amount (liability must be financially secured). 6- Liability is limited in time. Compensation rights are extinguished after specific time. 7- Non-discrimination of victims on the grounds of nationality, domicile or residence. Nuclear liability conventions objective is to provide adequate compensation payments to victims of a nuclear accident. Procedures for receiving these compensation are controlled by some rules such as exclusive jurisdiction, that rule need a further amendment to ensure the effectiveness of the exiting nuclear liability regime . Membership of the Conventions is a critical issue, because the existence of the conventions without being party to

  1. Effectiveness of Existing International Nuclear Liability Regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Doais, Salwa; Kessel, Daivd [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The first convention was the Paris Convention on Third Party Liability in the Field of Nuclear Energy (the Paris Convention) had been adopted on 29 July 1960 under the auspices of the OECD, and entered into force on 1 April 1968. In 1963,the Brussels Convention - supplementary to the Paris Convention- was adopted in to provide additional funds to compensate damage as a result of a nuclear incident where Paris Convention funds proved to be insufficient. The IAEA's first convention was the Vienna Convention on Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage (the Vienna Convention) which adopted on 21 May 1963,and entered into force in 1977. Both the Paris Convention and the Vienna Convention laid down very similar nuclear liability rules based on the same general principles. The broad principles in these conventions can be summarized as follows: 1- The no-fault liability principle (strict liability) 2- Liability is channeled exclusively to the operator of the nuclear installation (legal channeling) 3- Only courts of the state in which the nuclear accident occurs would have jurisdiction (exclusive jurisdiction) 4- Limitation of the amount of liability and the time frame for claiming damages (limited liability) 5- The operator is required to have adequate insurance or financial guarantees to the extent of its liability amount (liability must be financially secured). 6- Liability is limited in time. Compensation rights are extinguished after specific time. 7- Non-discrimination of victims on the grounds of nationality, domicile or residence. Nuclear liability conventions objective is to provide adequate compensation payments to victims of a nuclear accident. Procedures for receiving these compensation are controlled by some rules such as exclusive jurisdiction, that rule need a further amendment to ensure the effectiveness of the exiting nuclear liability regime . Membership of the Conventions is a critical issue, because the existence of the conventions without being party to

  2. German nuclear energy development and international cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt-Kuster, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    The author gives a brief survey on the short, but relatively successful story of nuclear energy in the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG). Like many other countries, FRG had to go through a very difficult period of political indecision and violent opposition from antinuclear groups, supported by large parts of the media. The licensing procedures have been streamlined, nuclear power plants are being built without major interference, and the FRG is making good progress in closing the fuel cycle. This means that nuclear power will play an important role in the energy supply system, although on a lower level than originally anticipated

  3. Nuclear Data Center International Standard Towards TSO Initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raja Murzaferi Raja Moktar; Mohd Fauzi Haris; Siti Nurbahyah Hamdan

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear Data Center is the main facility for Nuclear Malaysia Agency IT infrastructure comprising of main critical servers, research and operational data storage, HPC-clusters system and vital network core equipment. In recent years, international body such as TIA-Telecommunication Industry Association and Up time Institute have came out with proper international data center standards in order to ensure data center operation on achieving maximum operational up time and minimal downtime. The standard are currently being rated as tier level ranging from Data Center tier I up to tier IV, differentiate by facility standard and up time/ downtime percentage ratio. This paper will discuss Nuclear Data Center adopting international standards in supporting Nuclear Malaysia TSO initiative thus ensuring the critical core component of agency IT services availability and further more International standard recognitions. (author)

  4. International development within the spent nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggeryd, I.; Broden, K.; Gelin, R.

    1990-06-01

    The report gives a survey of the newest international development of the fuel processing and the spent nuclear fuel cycle. The transmutation technology of long lived nuclides is discussed in more details. (K.A.E)

  5. Assuaging Nuclear Energy Risks: The Angarsk International Uranium Enrichment Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, Astasia

    2011-01-01

    The recent nuclear renaissance has motivated many countries, especially developing nations, to plan and build nuclear power reactors. However, domestic low enriched uranium demands may trigger nations to construct indigenous enrichment facilities, which could be redirected to fabricate high enriched uranium for nuclear weapons. The potential advantages of establishing multinational uranium enrichment sites are numerous including increased low enrichment uranium access with decreased nuclear proliferation risks. While multinational nuclear initiatives have been discussed, Russia is the first nation to actualize this concept with their Angarsk International Uranium Enrichment Center (IUEC). This paper provides an overview of the historical and modern context of the multinational nuclear fuel cycle as well as the evolution of Russia's IUEC, which exemplifies how international fuel cycle cooperation is an alternative to domestic facilities.

  6. Nuclear decommissioning planning, execution and international experience

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    A title that critically reviews the decommissioning and decontamination processes and technologies available for rehabilitating sites used for nuclear power generation and civilian nuclear facilities, from fundamental issues and best practices, to procedures and technology, and onto decommissioning and decontamination case studies.$bOnce a nuclear installation has reached the end of its safe and economical operational lifetime, the need for its decommissioning arises. Different strategies can be employed for nuclear decommissioning, based on the evaluation of particular hazards and their attendant risks, as well as on the analysis of costs of clean-up and waste management. This allows for decommissioning either soon after permanent shutdown, or perhaps a long time later, the latter course allowing for radioactivity levels to drop in any activated or contaminated components. It is crucial for clear processes and best practices to be applied in decommissioning such installations and sites, particular where any ...

  7. Internal dosimetry in nuclear medicine procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrera Magarino, F.; Salgado Garcia, C.; Ruiz Manzano, P.; Rivas Ballarin, M. A.; Jimenez Hefernan, A.; Sanchez Segovia, J.

    2011-01-01

    The Department of Radio Physics and Radiation Protection, University Hospital Lozano Blesa Zaragoza presented a calculus textbook to estimate patient doses in diagnostic nuclear medicine. In this paper present an updated referred Book of calculation.

  8. Nuclear data standards - International Evaluation Co-operation volume 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, A.D.; Shibata, K.; Vonach, H.; Hambsch, F.J.; Chen, Z.; Hofmann, H.M.; Oh, S.Y.; Badikov, S.A.; Gai, E.V.; Pronyaev, V.G.; Smith, D.L.; Hale, G.M.; Kawano, T.; Larson, N.M.

    2006-01-01

    A Working Party on International Evaluation Co-operation was established under the sponsorship of the OECD/NEA Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) to promote the exchange of information on nuclear data evaluations, validation and related topics. Its aim is also to provide a framework for co-operative activities between members of the major nuclear data evaluation projects. This includes the possible exchange of scientists in order to encourage co-operation. Requirements for experimental data resulting from this activity are compiled. The working party determines common criteria for evaluated nuclear data files with a view to assessing and improving the quality and completeness of evaluated data. The parties to the project are: ENDF (United States), JEFF/EFF (NEA Data Bank member countries) and JENDL (Japan). Co-operation with evaluation projects of non-OECD countries is organised through the Nuclear Data Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This report was issued by Subgroup 7, which was in charge of producing new evaluated neutron cross-section standards. When starting the project, there was a general consensus on the need to update these standards, as significant improvements had been made to the experimental database since 1991 when the last evaluation of these standards was performed. The present work was accomplished through efficient collaboration between a task force of the US Cross-section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG), a Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and Subgroup 7 of the Working Party on International Evaluation Co-operation (WPEC) of the NEA Nuclear Science Committee. Work is reported on the results of an international effort to evaluate the neutron cross-section standards. The evaluations include the H(n,n), 6 Li(n,t), 10 B(n,α), 10 B(n,α1γ), 197 Au(n,γ), 235 U(n,f) and 238 U(n,f) standard reactions. Evaluations were also produced for the non-standard 238 U(n,γ) and 239 Pu

  9. Construction of nuclear special information service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Jeong Hoon; Kim, Tae Whan; Yi, Ji Ho; Chun, Young Choon; Yoo, Jae Bok; Yoo, An Na; Choi, Heon Soo

    2012-01-01

    Domestic INIS project has carried out various activities on supporting a decision-making for INIS Secretariat, exchanges of the statistical information between INIS and the country, and technical assistance for domestic end-users using INIS database. Based on the construction of INIS database sent by member states, the data published in the country has been gathered, collected, and inputted to INIS database according to the INIS reference series. Using the INIS output data, it has provided domestic users with searching INIS CD-ROM DB, INIS online database, INIS SDI service, and non-conventional literature delivery services. INIS2 DB Host site in Korea has serviced users of domestic and INIS member countries. In order to maintain the same data as Vienna center, the data update process has been performed. Also, publicity information activities were performed by many ways. To construct digital information infrastructure, we changed web server of KORNIS21 and we reconstruct digital library system as separation of KAERI network system. We constructed patent trend analysis system and new SDI service system. Also we collected Web DB, digital journals and so on and made an effort on operation of knowledge management system and research documents management. We have inputted over 4,000 records per year since 2009 and the input amount this year has reached 4,284 records. In order to input the comprehensive domestic publication related to nuclear energy, and rise in position of the national center, it is necessary to continue efforts and support budgets. We expect the INIS2 DB Host site will make a contribution to the improvement of productivity in the nuclear energy research as well as the diffusion of information about nuclear energy. We provided users with stable services changing web server of KORNIS21. Also we contributed to the improvement of researcher's productivity by constructing patent trend analysis system, new SDI service system and provided users with services

  10. Iranian nuclear power and international law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aivo, G.

    2006-01-01

    Does the Iranian programme violate the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT)? Iran is a signatory to the NPT and whilst certainly within its rights in developing civil nuclear energy, this is not so for the development of nuclear weapons in order to become a regional power which Iran is already not far from becoming. In the face of diverging opinions among the major interested parties (including the UN, United States, EU, Russia and China), how might this crisis be resolved? (author)

  11. The eight paradoxes of nuclear information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timbal-Duclaux, Louis

    1977-01-01

    As it now develops, the nuclear debate is essentially characterized by its technical, mythical and polemical fields. Due to the interrelation between these three characteristics, paradox tends to multiply, either on the requesters for information side or from those who answer it. As many problems the people or organizations, such as E.D.F. for example, have to cope with as there are parties in this debate. These different paradoxes are analyzed together with some means which permits a suitable answer to be found. To conclude it is noted that if the nuclear fear is mostly imaginary passional, irrational, the problem is not to ignore these characteristics but to 'give them a statute' [fr

  12. Recent international trends on nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Tetsuya

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear power generation is now sluggish from economical reason or sometimes together from political reason, except some exceptions in Western Europe, and U.S.A. It tends now to keep its present state or to decrease gradually as cannot say to be out of nuclear power generation. At these areas, anxiety on energy security becomes lower at present, and economics under liberation of market is preceded to everything because of without anxiety on environmental theory at a viewpoint of the global warming protection, either. However, when considering on finiteness of fossil fuel and long-term countermeasure of the global warming protection, no longer that any break-through on energy technology will form in future, it seems to occur that nuclear power would be re-recognized. For the Renaissance of the nuclear power, it is essential to correspond to some problems shown as follows: processing and disposal of high level radioactive wastes, upgrading of economics containing its initial cost, safe operation, maintenance of scientific technology standard on nuclear power, and nuclear non-scattering. And, on the energy problem, it is essential to recognize that Japan is a nation with a number of differences in its circumstance from those in U.S.A. and European nations. (G.K.)

  13. Ranking French nuclear industry on international market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labbe, B.

    1987-01-01

    Based on the success of its own ambitious nuclear power station program, France has been able to export its technology to many parts of the world, providing everything from individual components to complete power stations on a turnkey basis. Industrial partners who regurarly work together have set up the necessary structures to ensure the dovetailing of their activities during joint operations on the foreign market. These structures are matched to the needs of individual clients, and can be dispensed with completely in cases where a sole supplier is involved. Not one single unit under construction has been halted and no contract cancelled after the Chernobyl accident. France, like Japan and the USSR, is pressing on with its nuclear power program. China has ordered two PWR units for Daya Bay, while Britain has decided to construct its first PWR at Sizewell. Although a number of countries have deferred decisions in this field, this has been mainly on financial grounds. The French nuclear power industry has demonstrated its mastery of the technology, which can now be placed at the disposal of countries wishing to build nuclear power units, to improve their existing nuclear capacity, to develop parts of this future-oriented industry, or to supply their power stations with advanced nuclear fuel

  14. Inauguration of the international Institute of the nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2011-01-01

    On June 27, 2011 was inaugurated in Saclay (France) the I2EN (international Institute of the nuclear energy) and the Jannus platform. The I2EN has to particularly centralize and relay, at the international scale, the French formations offer in the field of nuclear energy. On the other hand, the Jannus platform is an example of cooperation between research organisms and universities. (O.M.)

  15. A Project in Support of International Nuclear Cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Myung Ro; Kim, Kyoung Pyo; Lee, Jeong Kong; Jung, Sung Hyon; Shim, Jae Sun

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study is to establish the strategies of international cooperation in order to promote our nation's leading role in international community, to lay the foundation for the effective transfer of nuclear technology to developing countries, and to cope with the rapidly changing in the international nuclear communities. This study contains the work undertaken to promote multilateral cooperation within the framework of international nuclear related organizations and regional cooperative agreements and the relevant forums, to enhance bilateral cooperation with foreign nuclear related research institutes as well as to promote cooperation through the exchange of foreign scientists. As for multilateral cooperation, activities for promoting cooperation within the IAEA and regional cooperative frameworks are introduced. Regarding bilateral cooperation, activities for concluding arrangements and MOUs with foreign research institutes and for participation in joint nuclear coordinating committee meetings between Korea and other countries are presented. For promoting personnel exchanges, activities for inviting and utilizing foreign scientists and mutual discussions with foreign experts, who have visited KAERI, are also described. Continuous efforts to contributing towards the international community through utilizing Korea's experience gained in the process of technical self-reliance and development of human resources are needed. Also efforts to establish the foundation of international cooperation and to make inroad into overseas nuclear markets for export of our nuclear technologies should be made. Meanwhile in the bilateral cooperation, we need to beef up cooperation with U.S.A. and Canada through the joint committee for the joint export to third countries. It is expected that this study would be utilized as a basic material for the international cooperation of nuclear energy, especially for the KAERI's international cooperation in an effective way

  16. A Project in Support of International Nuclear Cooperation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myung Ro; Kim, Kyoung Pyo; Lee, Jeong Kong; Jung, Sung Hyon; Shim, Jae Sun

    2008-12-15

    The objective of this study is to establish the strategies of international cooperation in order to promote our nation's leading role in international community, to lay the foundation for the effective transfer of nuclear technology to developing countries, and to cope with the rapidly changing in the international nuclear communities. This study contains the work undertaken to promote multilateral cooperation within the framework of international nuclear related organizations and regional cooperative agreements and the relevant forums, to enhance bilateral cooperation with foreign nuclear related research institutes as well as to promote cooperation through the exchange of foreign scientists. As for multilateral cooperation, activities for promoting cooperation within the IAEA and regional cooperative frameworks are introduced. Regarding bilateral cooperation, activities for concluding arrangements and MOUs with foreign research institutes and for participation in joint nuclear coordinating committee meetings between Korea and other countries are presented. For promoting personnel exchanges, activities for inviting and utilizing foreign scientists and mutual discussions with foreign experts, who have visited KAERI, are also described. Continuous efforts to contributing towards the international community through utilizing Korea's experience gained in the process of technical self-reliance and development of human resources are needed. Also efforts to establish the foundation of international cooperation and to make inroad into overseas nuclear markets for export of our nuclear technologies should be made. Meanwhile in the bilateral cooperation, we need to beef up cooperation with U.S.A. and Canada through the joint committee for the joint export to third countries. It is expected that this study would be utilized as a basic material for the international cooperation of nuclear energy, especially for the KAERI's international cooperation in an

  17. A Project in Support of International Nuclear Cooperation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myung Ro; Kim, Kyoung Pyo; Lee, Jeong Kong; Jung, Sung Hyon; Shim, Jae Sun

    2009-01-15

    The objective of this study is to establish the strategies of international cooperation in order to promote our nation's leading role in international community, to lay the foundation for the effective transfer of nuclear technology to developing countries, and to cope with the rapidly changing in the international nuclear communities. This study contains the work undertaken to promote multilateral cooperation within the framework of international nuclear related organizations and regional cooperative agreements and the relevant forums, to enhance bilateral cooperation with foreign nuclear related research institutes as well as to promote cooperation through the exchange of foreign scientists. As for multilateral cooperation, activities for promoting cooperation within the IAEA and regional cooperative frameworks are introduced. Regarding bilateral cooperation, activities for concluding arrangements and MOUs with foreign research institutes and for participation in joint nuclear coordinating committee meetings between Korea and other countries are presented. For promoting personnel exchanges, activities for inviting and utilizing foreign scientists and mutual discussions with foreign experts, who have visited KAERI, are also described. Continuous efforts to contributing towards the international community through utilizing Korea's experience gained in the process of technical self-reliance and development of human resources are needed. Also efforts to establish the foundation of international cooperation and to make inroad into overseas nuclear markets for export of our nuclear technologies should be made. Meanwhile in the bilateral cooperation, we need to beef up cooperation with U.S.A. and Canada through the joint committee for the joint export to third countries. It is expected that this study would be utilized as a basic material for the international cooperation of nuclear energy, especially for the KAERI's international cooperation in an

  18. Nuclear Criticality Information System. Database examples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foret, C.A.

    1984-06-01

    The purpose of this publication is to provide our users with a guide to using the Nuclear Criticality Information System (NCIS). It is comprised of an introduction, an information and resources section, a how-to-use section, and several useful appendices. The main objective of this report is to present a clear picture of the NCIS project and its available resources as well as assisting our users in accessing the database and using the TIS computer to process data. The introduction gives a brief description of the NCIS project, the Technology Information System (TIS), online user information, future plans and lists individuals to contact for additional information about the NCIS project. The information and resources section outlines the NCIS database and describes the resources that are available. The how-to-use section illustrates access to the NCIS database as well as searching datafiles for general or specific data. It also shows how to access and read the NCIS news section as well as connecting to other information centers through the TIS computer.

  19. Nuclear Criticality Information System. Database examples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foret, C.A.

    1984-06-01

    The purpose of this publication is to provide our users with a guide to using the Nuclear Criticality Information System (NCIS). It is comprised of an introduction, an information and resources section, a how-to-use section, and several useful appendices. The main objective of this report is to present a clear picture of the NCIS project and its available resources as well as assisting our users in accessing the database and using the TIS computer to process data. The introduction gives a brief description of the NCIS project, the Technology Information System (TIS), online user information, future plans and lists individuals to contact for additional information about the NCIS project. The information and resources section outlines the NCIS database and describes the resources that are available. The how-to-use section illustrates access to the NCIS database as well as searching datafiles for general or specific data. It also shows how to access and read the NCIS news section as well as connecting to other information centers through the TIS computer

  20. Nuclear information services at the National Nuclear Data Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrows, T.W.; Tuli, J.K.

    1996-01-01

    The numeric and bibliographic nuclear data bases maintained by the National Nuclear Data Center and access to these data bases will be described. The U.S. Nuclear Data and Reaction Data Networks will also be briefly described

  1. Enhancing R&D in Nuclear Malaysia Through International Cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Muin Abdul Rahman

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear Malaysia is mandated by the Government of Malaysia, inter alia, to spearhead Research and Development (R&D) in nuclear and related technology. Technically, nuclear technology is a highly specialised subject in which expertise are thinly spread over the globe with concentration in mainly developed countries. Nuclear technology also tends to be politically sensitive and handling of radioactive materials and equipment needs high level of skills and knowledge for the safe and secured uses of this technology and needs to be regulated. Hence international cooperation and multilateral approach is of vital importance for the development and sustainability of peaceful uses of nuclear technology and to provide assurance that the interests of all parties are safeguarded and remains in check. In this context, the International Atomic Energy Agency or the IAEA, a UN agency, plays a vital role where international cooperation in nuclear technologies is centred. Malaysia also contributed a fair amount of financial resources to the IAEA as part of its international obligations to keep the Agency afloat. This paper provides an insight into various services and facilities offered or available at the IAEA in which researchers in Nuclear Malaysia could utilize in order to expand and enhance their R&D activities in nuclear and related technologies, as mandated by the Government of Malaysia, as well as ensuring that the investments will provide good returns in terms of socio-economic benefits, both tangible and intangible. (author)

  2. A fresh start of nuclear safety regulation and international perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshima, Kenzo

    2013-01-01

    It should be explained more to the outside modestly the Fukushima nuclear accident would be a man-made complex disaster, which might be reluctant to do but not be neglected. Utmost efforts to change inward-looking attitude and reform safety culture should be done so as to prevent superficial reflection of the Fukushima nuclear accident. Since all nuclear regulatory functions ('3S': safety, security, safeguards) were integrated in Nuclear Regulation Authority (NRA), NRA and secretariat of NRA became more responsible for international response, and strengthening of organization system and human resources development would be an urgent necessity. This article described present stage of NRA focusing on international dimension including personal views. Overseas strong concern over the Fukushima nuclear accident and international communications were reviewed. The Fukushima nuclear accident started from natural disaster and enlarged as a man-made complex disaster with many human factors (mainly inaction, wilful negligence) overlapping and safety culture flawed. Examples of overseas and Japanese action plan to learn and absorb lessons from the Fukushima accident were introduced. NRA's started activities on inviting IAEA's IRRS and OPPAS as soon as ready, strengthening nuclear security measures, safeguards to prevent nuclear proliferation, bilateral cooperation and international advisors were also presented. (T. Tanaka)

  3. Evaluating training and information to teachers on nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Bail, H.

    1994-01-01

    Teachers in Physics Sciences in French secondary level schools have received, during their formation, little information on radioactivity and nuclear energy; nevertheless, they have a serious knowledge of energy topics and are able to receive any nuclear-related information. INSTN (National Institute for Nuclear technology) provides teachers with annual sessions (two weeks) at Saclay research centre for complementary information on nuclear science with practical works. Information materials are also supplied

  4. Review of international forum on peaceful use of nuclear energy and nuclear non-proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Ryo; Suzuki, Mitsutoshi; Sakurai, Satoshi; Tamai, Hiroshi; Yamamura, Tsukasa; Kuno, Yusuke

    2012-02-01

    International forum on peaceful use of nuclear energy and nuclear non-proliferation was held at Gakushi-kaikan, Tokyo on February 2-3, 2011 in cooperation with The Japan Institute of International Affairs (JIIA) and The University of Tokyo Global COE. In our International Forum, we would like to encourage active discussion of international challenges to and solutions for compatibility between peaceful use of nuclear energy and nuclear non-proliferation, and international cooperation for emerging nuclear energy states. It was successfully carried out with as many as 310 participants and a lot of discussions. This report includes abstracts of keynote speeches, summary of panel discussions and materials of the presentations in the forum. (author)

  5. Consequence Management and International Nuclear Emergency Exercises: Lessons from INEX 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wim Molhoek; Vince McClelland; Amanda Stegen; Brian Ahier; Ted Lazo

    2006-01-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (Nea) has a long tradition of expertise in the area of nuclear emergency policy, preparedness, and management. The 1986 Chernobyl accident demonstrated that nuclear accidents may have consequences over wide areas, highlighting the need for international cooperation, coordination and communication. From the beginning, the Nea focus of work, as carried out by the Working Party on Nuclear Emergency Matters, has been on improving the effectiveness of international nuclear emergency preparedness and management. A major pillar of this work has been the preparation and organisation of the International Nuclear Emergency Exercise (I.N.E.X.) series. Beginning in 1993, the Nea I.N.E.X. series has proved successful in testing and developing arrangements for nuclear emergency response. The I.N.E.X.-1,-2 and -2000 series, which focussed on the early-phase of an emergency, provided a unique forum for testing existing as well as new arrangements and concepts for international nuclear emergency management, and succeeded in establishing a recognised international nuclear emergency exercise culture. In response to international interest in the longer term consequence management issues that will arise after an emergency, the Nea developed a third generation of exercises, I.N.E.X. 3. The I.N.E.X. 3 series of national level table-top exercises focused on the response to widespread radiological contamination of the environment and the issues likely to be raised in the medium to longer term period after such an event. Exercise objectives included an investigation of decisions on agricultural countermeasures and food restrictions, countermeasures such as travel and trade, recovery management and public information. The evaluation aimed to identify aspects of national decision-making which would benefit from international co-ordination, compare national approaches and identify 'best' practices in these circumstances. An International Evaluation Workshop will

  6. Reflections on the development of international nuclear law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamm, Vanda

    2017-01-01

    Over the course of more than seven decades, treaty norms on the production and utilisation of nuclear energy have been developed, which together form a special section within international law. These norms are the consequence of the unique nature of the field, namely that on the one hand some aspects of the uses of nuclear energy should be covered by totally new and special norms (e.g. in the field of disarmament, seeking to eliminate or at least to control the spread of nuclear weapons, and nuclear weapons tests) and on the other hand that several traditional legal solutions were not suitable for the problems that emerged in connection with other uses of nuclear energy (like liability). In this article, three aspects of the development of that special section of international law will be explored, namely: the close connections between the regulation of peaceful and military uses of nuclear energy; the effects of nuclear catastrophes on the development of international nuclear legislation; and the interaction between soft law norms and binding norms in the area of nuclear law

  7. International technical working group cooperation to counter illicit nuclear trafficking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.K.; Niemeyer, S.

    2004-01-01

    The Nuclear Smuggling International Technical Working Group (ITWG) is an international group of nuclear forensic experts that cooperate to deter the illicit trafficking of nuclear materials. The objective of the ITWG is to provide a common approach and effective technical solutions to governments who request assistance in nuclear forensics. The ITWG was chartered in 1996 and since that time more than 28 nations and organizations have participated in 9 international meetings and 2 analytical round-robin trials. Soon after its founding the ITWG adopted a general framework to guide nuclear forensics investigations that includes recommendations for nuclear crime scene security and analysis, the best application of radioanalytical methods, the conduct of traditional forensic analysis of contaminated materials, and effective data analysis to interpret the history of seized nuclear materials. This approach has been adopted by many nations as they respond to incidents of illicit nuclear trafficking. ITWG members include policy and decision makers, law enforcement personnel, and scientists with expertise in, and responsibility for, nuclear forensics. (author)

  8. International Congress on Information and Communication Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Bhatt, Yogesh; Joshi, Amit; Mishra, Durgesh

    2016-01-01

    This volume contains 69 papers presented at ICICT 2015: International Congress on Information and Communication Technology. The conference was held during 9th and 10th October, 2015, Udaipur, India and organized by CSI Udaipur Chapter, Division IV, SIG-WNS, SIG-e-Agriculture in association with ACM Udaipur Professional Chapter, The Institution of Engineers (India), Udaipur Local Centre and Mining Engineers Association of India, Rajasthan Udaipur Chapter. This volume contains papers mainly focused on ICT for Managerial Applications, E-governance, IOT and e-Mining.

  9. The international nuclear non-proliferation system: Challenges and choices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, J.; McGrew, A.G.

    1984-01-01

    When a topic has been under discussion for almost 40 years there is a danger that the literature will become excessively esoteric and that, as Philip Grummett suggests, '...a new scholasticism will arise' (p.79). Originating in a November l982 seminar co-sponsored by the British International Studies Association and the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, this volume is a refreshing, well conceived, and well written antidote to that trend. It is also well timed for the 1985 NPT Review Conference. The eight chapters of the volume are divided into three sections. Following an introduction by Anthony McGrew that touches on all the major themes of the volume, the first section deals with the existing non-proliferation system. In three chapters the historical, institutional and policy-making elements of the present system are outlined. There is a vignette on the Nuclear Suppliers Group in Wilmshurst's chapter one (pp. 28-33). Fischer's informative chapter on the IAEA is followed by Gummett's examination of policy options, including, for example, the linking of conventional weapons transfer to non-proliferation policies. The second section, also of three chapters, examines current issues: the state of the international nuclear industry, and the non-proliferation policies of the United States and Britain. Walker's chapter focuses chiefly on change in the industry-from monopoly to pluralism in suppliers, the effect of the economic recession, and the combined effect of these two factors on international politics. Devine's American non-proliferation chapter is a statement of the State Department view, whilst Keohane's chapter on Britain attempts to put the Trident procurement into a proliferation context. The British chapter is present because of ethnocentric considerations

  10. The international nuclear non-proliferation system: Challenges and choices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, J.; McGrew, A.G.

    1984-01-01

    When a topic has been under discussion for almost 40 years there is a danger that the literature will become excessively esoteric and that, as Philip Grummett suggests, '...a new scholasticism will arise' (p.79). Originating in a November l982 seminar co-sponsored by the British International Studies Association and the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, this volume is a refreshing, well conceived, and well written antidote to that trend. It is also well timed for the 1985 NPT Review Conference. The eight chapters of the volume are divided into three sections. Following an introduction by Anthony McGrew that touches on all the major themes of the volume, the first section deals with the existing non-proliferation system. In three chapters the historical, institutional and policy-making elements of the present system are outlined. There is a vignette on the Nuclear Suppliers Group in Wilmshurst's chapter one (pp. 28-33). Fischer's informative chapter on the IAEA is followed by Gummett's examination of policy options, including, for example, the linking of conventional weapons transfer to non-proliferation policies. The second section, also of three chapters, examines current issues: the state of the international nuclear industry, and the non-proliferation policies of the United States and Britain. Walker's chapter focuses chiefly on change in the industry-from monopoly to pluralism in suppliers, the effect of the economic recession, and the combined effect of these two factors on international politics. Devine's American non-proliferation chapter is a statement of the State Department view, whilst Keohane's chapter on Britain attempts to put the Trident procurement into a proliferation context. The British chapter is present because of ethnocentric considerations.

  11. Prospects for nuclear power international after Fukushima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kidd, Steve

    2012-01-01

    Full-text: The Fukushima accident in March 2011 has imposed a number of significant challenges for the world nuclear industry, in terms of enhancing safety at both existing and prospective reactor sites and in regaining public trust for its operations. Yet despite setbacks in a number of countries (notably Germany in addition to Japan itself) the overall outlook for nuclear power around the world is little changed from before the accident. The front end of the nuclear fuel cycle is fully internationalised and operates as a series of competitive markets, guaranteeing economic supply to the operating reactors around the world. Although new reactor types with potentially different fuelling modes are on the horizon, nothing much is likely to change before 2030. The back end is, however, comparatively less developed and there remain substantial uncertainties how it will develop in the future. Technical solutions exist, but governments have failed to grasp realities in used fuel management and waste disposal. Although many commentators argue that low levels of public acceptance are the prime reason for nuclear power failing to take a more substantial part of the energy mix, the root cause is relatively poor economics (at least in much of the Western world). Plants cost too much to build, essentially taking too long to complete, by comparison with rival generating technologies. Additionally, cheap natural gas has become a barrier in certain markets. The risk profile of nuclear projects therefore makes it difficult to attract financing but there are some possible solutions to these issues. (author)

  12. Implementation of a geographical information system in nuclear emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadaniowski, I.; Telleria, D.; Jordan, O.; Bruno, H.; Boutet, L.; Hernandez, D.

    2006-01-01

    From 2003, the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (RNA) has worked in the implementation of a Geographical Information System (SIG) for the planning and the intervention in emergencies, with special emphasis in the nuclear emergencies. The main objective of the SIG developed in the ARN is to give the necessary support for the planning, training and application of the actions of radiological protection necessary in front of a nuclear emergency, offering the geo referenced cartographic base, the readiness of logistical resources in the whole country, incorporating results of models of forecast of consequences and environmental measurements during the emergency, facilitating the analysis of this information in real time and facilitating the presentation of results for the decision making. The cartographic base is constituted of demographic, social, economic data identification of main actors interveners in the emergency, vial infrastructure and natural characteristics of the area in question. In this work the main characteristics of the implemented SIG are presented including the conceptual standards of design that contemplate the international requirements for the planning and answer in the event of nuclear emergencies, the current state of the system and the foreseen evolution. A description of the opposing problems during its implementation that can be common to many countries of the region is also presented, as well as the obtained experience of its use in preparation tasks for emergencies and in mocks. (Author)

  13. Thirty years of international nuclear standards in ISO and IEC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, K.

    1991-01-01

    Of over 4700 nuclear and radiation protection standards, laws, regulations, recommendations, etc., which have been issued by 52 countries and several governmental international organizations such as IAEA, or non-government organizations such as ICRP, ICRU, ISO and IEC, more than 90% are national, and more than half of those of a non-regulatory nature. Both number and importance of international standards are, however, increasing. The two most important non-governmental international standards organizations are the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), which founded a Technical Committee (TC) 85 'Nuclear Energy' with several Sub-Committees in 1957, and the closely associated International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) with its TC 45 'Nuclear Instrumentation' formed in 1960. There are over 20 member countries actively participating in the work in each of them, with additional observer countries and liaison to the relevant other international organizations. A brief review is given on some of the experience which has been gained by ISO/TC 85 and IEC/TC 45, and its work program and accomplishments, considering in particular recent developments. It covers nuclear safety and instrumentation, radiation protection, and the nuclear fuel cycle, as well as interface issues including definitions and terminology, interaction of the activities with the work of other national and international bodies, etc. Some problem areas are also briefly discussed. (orig.)

  14. International conference on innovative technologies for nuclear fuel cycles and nuclear power. Book of extended synopses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    A wide range of issues relevant to the innovative technologies for nuclear power cycle and nuclear power were addressed. The 7 sessions of the conference were entitled: (1) no title; (2) needs, prospects and challenges for innovation; (3) evolution of technical, social, economic and political conditions; (4) panel on challenges for the deployment of innovative technologies; (5) international programmes on innovative nuclear systems; (6) innovative nuclear systems and related R and D programmes; (7) concluding panel.

  15. International status and prospects of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-12-01

    Nuclear power plants are primarily used for electricity production. Currently, 439 reactors are operating in 30 countries and are contributing approximately 14% to global electricity generation. The share of nuclear in global electricity generation has declined slightly in recent years. However, the total amount of nuclear electricity generation is increasing as plant availability, power uprating, and new plants offset the loss from older plants that are being shut down. Due to the economic benefits of continuing operation of a plant after the capital cost has been repaid, and with careful plant life management assessments, a number of reactors have had their operating licences extended for an additional 20 years. Light water reactors (LWRs) are by far the most prevalent reactors in use today, followed by pressurized heavy water reactors, gas cooled reactors and, currently, two fast reactors. The safety and reliability of nuclear facilities have been steadily improving. Strong networks among countries with operating nuclear power plants have enabled operators to learn from each other and to address common issues. Ongoing efforts have continuously strengthened safety culture and regulatory oversight. The current available supply of uranium meets the demand. Current enrichment and fuel fabrication capacities are adequate to meet the expected demand for the next decade. There is also substantial experience in the storage and reprocessing of spent fuel and the treatment of high level waste. Existing reprocessing capacity is adequate to meet present demand. Most spent fuel continues, however, to be stored awaiting a decision on future policy, i.e. whether to reprocess and recycle it or to dispose of it as waste. To date, no ultimate disposal facilities are available. Only a few countries currently use civil nuclear energy for purposes other than electricity production - mainly for seawater desalination and district heating - and even then only to a limited extent

  16. Internal radiation dosimetry using nuclear medicine imaging in radionuclide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyeong Min; Byun, Byun Hyun; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Lim, Sang Moo

    2007-01-01

    Radionuclide therapy has been an important field in nuclear medicine. In radionuclide therapy, relevant evaluation of internally absorbed dose is essential for the achievement of efficient and sufficient treatment of incurable disease, and can be accomplished by means of accurate measurement of radioactivity in body and its changes with time. Recently, the advances of nuclear medicine imaging and multi modality imaging processing techniques can provide chance of more accurate and easier measurement of the measures commented above, in cooperation of conventional imaging based approaches. In this review, basic concept for internal dosimetry using nuclear medicine imaging is summarized with several check points which should be considered in real practice

  17. Organization of the internal dosimetry in the Spanish nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manchena, P.; Soliet, E.

    1998-01-01

    From the beginning of the exploitation of the nuclear energy of Espanna, the nuclear facilities have had Services of Personal Dosimetry with the appropriate means to determine the dose. so much internal as external, of the personnel that mentioned facilities works. All the nuclear power stations use advanced systems of teams with object of detecting the radionuclides incorporation in the organism and calculation programs based on the recent recommendations of the International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP) for the determination of the derived doses

  18. Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission dosimetric information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrero Vallejos, Patricia Andrea

    1997-01-01

    This thesis discusses the nuclear radiation that people who work with radioactive material is exposed to and its control by the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission. A full analysis of the System is presented with information about the Commission and the Department of Nuclear and Radiological Safety which runs the System. Ana analysis of the System is presented in order to obtain requirements. Management flow diagrams, the processes involved and current problems experienced by the users are described. A design logic is modeled producing Data Flow Diagrams (DFD). based on this physical design, or, Model of Physical Data, is prepared including tables, attributes, types of data, primary and foreign keys. A description is presented of how the System is implemented, the tools that are used and how the testing phase is carried out. The Dosimetry System meets the criteria for a Software Engineering project, where the basic cycle was used as a working methodology. The System developed supports the dosimetric control of people exposed to radioactive material. (author)

  19. Nuclear plants gain integrated information systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villavicencio-Ramirez, A.; Rodriquez-Alvarez, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    With the objective of simplifying the complex mesh of computing devices employed within nuclear power plants, modern technology and integration techniques are being used to form centralized (but backed up) databases and distributed processing and display networks. Benefits are immediate as a result of the integration and the use of standards. The use of a unique data acquisition and database subsystem optimizes the high costs of engineering, as this task is done only once for the life span of the system. This also contributes towards a uniform user interface and allows for graceful expansion and maintenance. This article features an integrated information system, Sistema Integral de Informacion de Proceso (SIIP). The development of this system enabled the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power plant to fully use the already existing universe of signals and its related engineering during all plant conditions, namely, start up, normal operation, transient analysis, and emergency operation. Integrated systems offer many advantages over segregated systems, and this experience should benefit similar development efforts in other electric power utilities, not only for nuclear but also for other types of generating plants

  20. XVI International symposium on nuclear electronics and VI International school on automation and computing in nuclear physics and astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Churin, I.N.

    1995-01-01

    Reports and papers of the 16- International Symposium on nuclear electronics and the 6- International school on automation and computing in nuclear physics and astrophysics are presented. The latest achievements in the field of development of fact - response electronic circuits designed for detecting and spectrometric facilities are studied. The peculiar attention is paid to the systems for acquisition, processing and storage of experimental data. The modern equipment designed for data communication in the computer networks is studied